Science.gov

Sample records for murine tumor necrosis

  1. Lovastatin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha exhibit potentiated antitumor effects against Ha-ras-transformed murine tumor via inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feleszko, W; Bałkowiec, E Z; Sieberth, E; Marczak, M; Dabrowska, A; Giermasz, A; Czajka, A; Jakóbisiak, M

    1999-05-17

    Lovastatin, a drug commonly used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, has previously been reported to exert potentiated antitumor activity when combined with either tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), cisplatin or doxorubicin in a melanoma model in mice. Since lovastatin interferes with the function of ras oncogene-encoded (Ras) proteins, we have investigated the antitumor activity of lovastatin and TNF-alpha using a Ha-ras-transformed murine tumor model. In in vitro studies, lovastatin inhibited the growth of cells transformed with Ha-ras oncogene (Ras-3T3 and HBL100-ras cells) more effectively than control NIH-3T3 and HBL100-neo cells. In in vivo experiments, the Ras-3T3 tumor demonstrated significantly increased sensitivity to combined treatment with both lovastatin (50 mg/kg) and TNF-alpha (1 microg/day) compared with either agent alone. Combined treatment with both agents also resulted in greater inhibition of blood-vessel formation. Ras-3T3 tumor cells produced increased amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and lovastatin effectively suppressed VEGF production by these cells. Our results suggest that lovastatin increases antitumor activity of TNF-alpha against tumor cells transformed with v-Ha-ras oncogene via inhibition of tumor-induced blood-vessel formation. PMID:10225445

  2. Multiorgan chronic inflammatory hepatobiliary pancreatic murine model deficient in tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provoke persistent/chronic multiorgan inflammatory response and to contribute to stones formation followed by fibrosis in hepatobiliary and pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1/R2) deficient mice reared in-house were given dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) twice within 10 d by oral gavage delivery. Sham control animals received vehicle treatment and naïve animals remained untreated throughout the study. Animals were monitored daily for symptoms of pain and discomfort. The abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity were assessed with von Frey microfilaments. Exploratory behaviors were recorded at the baseline, after initiation of treatment, and before study termination. Histopathological changes were examined postmortem in tissues. Collagen accumulation and fibrosis were confirmed with Sirius Red staining. RESULTS: Animals lost weight after oral administration of DBTC and developed persistent inflammatory abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity compared to sham-treated controls (P < 0.0001). These pain related secondary mechanical hypersensitivity responses increased more than 2-fold in DBTC-treated animals. The drastically diminished rearing and grooming rates persisted after DBTC administration throughout the study. Gross as well as micropathology at one month confirmed that animals treated with DBTC developed chronic hepatobiliary injuries evidenced with activation of stellate cells, multifocal necrosis, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, periportal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and prominent biliary ductal dilation. The severity of hepatitis was scored 3.7 ± 0.2 (severe) in DBTC-treated animals vs score 0 (normal) in sham-treated animals. Fibrotic thickening was extensive around portal ducts, in hepatic parenchyma as well as in lobular pancreatic structures and confirmed with Sirius Red histopathology. In addition, pancreatic microarchitecture was presented with distortion of islets, and parenchyma, infiltration of

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits albumin gene expression in a murine model of cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Buck, M; Feitelberg, S P; Chojkier, M

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for decreased serum albumin levels in patients with cachexia-associated infection, inflammation, and cancer are unknown. Since tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) is elevated in cachexia-associated diseases, and chronic administration of TNF alpha induces cachexia in animal models, we assessed the regulation of albumin gene expression by TNF alpha in vivo. In this animal model of cachexia, Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the functional gene for human TNF alpha were inoculated into nude mice (TNF alpha mice). TNF alpha mice became cachectic and manifested decreased serum albumin levels, albumin synthesis, and albumin mRNA levels. However, even before the TNF alpha mice lost weight, their albumin mRNA steady-state levels were decreased approximately 90%, and in situ hybridization revealed a low level of albumin gene expression throughout the hepatic lobule. The mRNA levels of several other genes were unchanged. Hepatic nuclei from TNF alpha mice before the onset of weight loss were markedly less active in transcribing the albumin gene than hepatic nuclei from control mice. Therefore, TNF alpha selectively inhibits the genetic expression of albumin in this model before weight loss. Images PMID:2295699

  4. IFN-gamma reduces specific binding of tumor necrosis factor on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Drapier, J.C.; Wietzerbin, J. )

    1991-02-15

    Because IFN-gamma is the main cytokine activating macrophages and TNF cooperates in this activation, we assessed TNF binding capacity during the course of murine macrophage activation by IFN-gamma. TNF binding to elicited macrophages increased with time, was maximal by 8 h of culture, and required de novo protein synthesis. {sup 125}I-TNF bound to about 40,000 sites/cell with a Kd of 1 x 10(-9) M. Cross-linking experiments performed with a bifunctional cross-linking agent revealed a specific band with a m.w. of 94,000. Preincubation of macrophages with IFN-gamma prevented the binding of TNF to receptors. This effect was dose-dependent and maximal at 100 U/ml. IFN-gamma also reduced specific TNF binding to preexisting receptors (50% inhibition in 3 h), but IFN-gamma did not change the internalization rate of TNF. These studies showed that the number of TNF receptors increased on macrophages vs maturation in culture and was negatively controlled by IFN-gamma.

  5. Fructose Protects Murine Hepatocytes from Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis by Modulating JNK Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Tobias; Köhler, Ulrike A.; Choukèr, Alexander; Werner, Sabine; Weiland, Timo; Wendel, Albrecht

    2012-01-01

    Fructose-induced hepatic ATP depletion prevents TNF-induced apoptosis, whereas it contrarily enhances CD95-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. By contrast, transformed liver cells are not protected against TNF due to metabolic alterations, allowing selective tumor targeting. We analyzed the molecular mechanisms by which fructose modulates cytokine-induced apoptosis. A release of adenosine after fructose-induced ATP depletion, followed by a cAMP response, was demonstrated. Likewise, cAMP and adenosine mimicked per se the modulation by fructose of CD95- and TNF-induced apoptosis. The effects of fructose on cytokine-induced apoptosis were sensitive to inhibition of protein kinase A. Fructose prevented the pro-apoptotic, sustained phase of TNF-induced JNK signaling and thereby blocked bid-mediated activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in a PKA-dependent manner. We explain the dichotomal effects of fructose on CD95- and TNF-induced cell death by the selective requirement of JNK signaling for the latter. These findings provide a mechanistic rationale for the protection of hepatocytes from TNF-induced cell death by pharmacological doses of fructose. PMID:22086922

  6. Local induction of a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like cytotoxic factor in murine tissues with tumorous and nontumorous inflammation after systemic administration of antitumor polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Yamazaki, M; Abe, S

    1988-07-01

    Local induction of a cytotoxic factor (CF), which was reported by us to be a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like molecule, in murine tumor tissues by i.v. administration of antitumor polysaccharides was studied. The CF was measured by cytolysis assay against L929 fibroblasts in vitro. The antitumor polysaccharides mannoglucan polyalcohol (MGA), lentinan, carboxymethyl-(1----3)-beta-D-linear glucan DP540 (CM-TAK) and yeast mannan induced the CF in MH134 hepatoma tissues inoculated intradermally, with MGA inducing the highest level of the CF. MGA induced the CF in MM46 mammary carcinoma, Ehrlich carcinoma, and MH134 hepatoma, the growth of which were all inhibited by MGA, but not in Lewis lung carcinoma and EL-4 lymphoma, which are therapeutically resistant to MGA. MGA induced the CF in solid MH134 hepatoma tissues inoculated subcutaneously or intramuscularly as well as intradermally, but not in ascitic fluids with intraperitoneal MH134 hepatoma on which MGA is ineffective. These findings suggest that CF induction is correlated with the antitumor activity of polysaccharides. CF induction in tumor tissues was detectable 6 h after i.d. inoculation of MH134 hepatoma. Even in nontumorous inflammatory skin tissues produced by injection of TAK, the CF was induced by MGA. Thus, the early inflammatory reaction with accumulation of host cells and MGA treatment act cooperatively in local induction of the CF. PMID:3183925

  7. The 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor and CD95 independently signal murine hepatocyte apoptosis and subsequent liver failure.

    PubMed Central

    Leist, M.; Gantner, F.; Künstle, G.; Bohlinger, I.; Tiegs, G.; Bluethmann, H.; Wendel, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation of either the 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R1) or CD95 (Fas/Apo-1) causes apoptosis of cells and liver failure in mice, and has been associated with human liver disorders. The aim of this study was first to clarify the association between CD95 activation, hepatocyte apoptosis, and fulminant liver failure. Next, we investigated whether TNF-R1 and CD95 operate independently of each other in the induction of hepatocyte apoptosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using both mice and primary liver cell cultures deficient in either TNF-R1 or functional CD95, the induction of apoptosis and hepatocyte death following activation of TNF-R1 or CD95 were studied in vitro and in various in vivo models of acute liver failure. RESULTS: In vivo or in vitro stimulation of CD95 caused apoptosis of wild-type (wt) murine hepatocytes which had not been sensitized by blocking transcription. Time course studies showed that DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation preceded, respectively, membrane lysis in vitro and necrosis in vivo. Similar results were obtained after CD95 activation in hepatocytes or livers lacking TNF-R1. Conversely, hepatocytotoxicity due to endogenous or exogenous TNF was not affected in animals or liver cell cultures lacking the expression of functional CD95. CONCLUSIONS: TNF-R1 and CD95 are independent and differentially regulated triggers of murine apoptotic liver failure. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 9 PMID:8900539

  8. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion. PMID:25366263

  9. Targeted Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Suppresses Tumor Necrosis Factor–α and Ameliorates Murine Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Colm B.; Strassheim, Derek; Aherne, Carol M.; Yeckes, Alyson R.; Jedlicka, Paul; de Zoeten, Edwin F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases thought to reflect a dysregulated immune response. Although antibody-based inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has provided relief to many inflammatory bowel diseases patients, these therapies are either ineffective in a patient subset or lose their efficacy over time, leaving an unmet need for alternatives. Given the critical role of the heat shock response in regulating inflammation, this study proposed to define the impact of selective inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) on intestinal inflammation. Using multiple preclinical mouse models of inflammatory bowel diseases, we demonstrate a potent anti-inflammatory effect of selective inhibition of the HSP90 C-terminal ATPase using the compound novobiocin. Novobiocin-attenuated dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and CD45RBhigh adoptive-transfer colitis through the suppression of inflammatory cytokine secretion, including TNF-α. In vitro assays demonstrate that CD4+ T cells treated with novobiocin produced significantly less TNF-α measured by intracellular cytokine staining and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This corresponded to significantly decreased nuclear p65 translocation by Western blot and a decrease in nuclear factor-κB luciferase activity in Jurkat T cells. Finally, to verify the anti-TNF action of novobiocin, 20-week-old TNFΔARE mice were treated for 2 weeks with subcutaneous administration of novobiocin. This model has high levels of circulating TNF-α and exhibits spontaneous transmural segmental ileitis. Novobiocin treatment significantly reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate in the ileal lamina propria. HSP90 inhibition with novobiocin offers a novel method of inflammatory cytokine suppression without potential for the development of tolerance that limits current antibody-based methods. PMID:24552830

  10. Lon Mutant of Brucella abortus Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Murine J774.A1 Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungdo; Choi, Young-Sill; Park, Sang-Hee; Kim, Young-Rok; Chu, Hyuk; Hwang, Kyu-Jam; Park, Mi-Yeoun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to isolate a Brucella lon mutant and to analyze the cytokine response of B. lon mutant during macrophage infection. Methods A wild-type Brucella abortus strain was mutagenized by Tn5 transposition. From the mouse macrophage J774.A1 cells, total RNA was isolated at 0 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after infection with Brucella. Using mouse cytokine microarrays, we measured transcriptional levels of the cytokine response, and validated our results with a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay to confirm the induction of cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA). Results In host J774.A1 macrophages, mRNA levels of T helper 1 (Th1)-type cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and IL-3, were significantly higher in the lon mutant compared to wild-type Brucella and the negative control. TNF-α levels in cell culture media were induced as high as 2 μg/mL after infection with the lon mutant, a greater than sixfold change. Conclusion In order to understand the role of the lon protein in virulence, we identified and characterized a novel B. lon mutant. We compared the immune response it generates to the wild-type Brucella response in a mouse macrophage cell line. We demonstrated that the B. lon mutants induce TNF-α expression from the host J774.A1 macrophage. PMID:24524018

  11. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  12. Silica-induced apoptosis in murine macrophage: involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Gozal, Evelyne; Ortiz, Luis A; Zou, Xiaoyan; Burow, Matthew E; Lasky, Joseph A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2002-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in silica-induced lung fibrosis. Silica exposure induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation, and apoptotic mechanisms have been implicated in silica-induced pathogenesis. To characterize potential relationships between these signaling events, we studied their induction in two murine macrophage cell lines. The RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line was more sensitive, and the IC-21 macrophage cell line more tolerant to silica exposure (0.2 or 1 mg/ml for 6 h) as evidenced by significantly higher apoptotic responses in RAW 264.7 (P < 0.05). RAW 264.7 macrophages exhibited enhanced TNF-alpha production and NF-kappaB activation in response to silica, whereas IC-21 macrophages did not produce TNF-alpha in response to silica and did not induce NF-kappaB nuclear binding. Inhibition of NF-kappaB in RAW 264.7 cells with BAY11-7082 significantly increased apoptosis while inhibiting TNF-alpha release. In addition, TNF-alpha and NF-kappaB activation, but not apoptosis, were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in both cell lines, and NF-kappaB inhibition reduced LPS-induced TNF-alpha release. These data suggest that TNF-alpha induction is dependent on NF-kappaB activation in both cell lines. However, silica can induce apoptosis in murine macrophages, independently of TNF-alpha stimulation, as in IC-21 macrophages. Furthermore, NF-kappaB activation in macrophages may play dual roles, both pro- and antiapoptotic during silica injury. PMID:12091251

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor and Its Receptors Are Crucial to Control Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Pleural Infection in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Vesin, Dominique; Segueni, Noria; Prasad, Pritha; Buser-Llinares, Raphaële; Blaser, Guillaume; Pache, Jean-Claude; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Garcia, Irene

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial to control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, which remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. TNF blockade compromises host immunity and may cause reactivation of latent infection, resulting in overt pulmonary, pleural, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Herein, we investigate the roles of TNF and TNF receptors in the control of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) pleural infection in a murine model. As controls, wild-type mice and those with a defective CCR5, a receptor that is crucial for control of viral infection but not for tuberculosis, were used. BCG-induced pleural infection was uncontrolled and progressive in absence of TNF or TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1)/TNFR2 (TNFR1R2) with increased inflammatory cell recruitment and bacterial load in the pleural cavity, and heightened levels of pleural and serum proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, compared to wild-type control mice. The visceral pleura was thickened with chronic inflammation, which was prominent in TNF(-/-) and TNFR1R2(-/-) mice. The parietal pleural of TNF(-/-) and TNFR1R2(-/-) mice exhibited abundant inflammatory nodules containing mycobacteria, and these mice developed nonresolving inflammation and succumbed from disseminated BCG infection. By contrast, CCR5(-/-) mice survived and controlled pleural BCG infection as wild-type control mice. In conclusion, BCG-induced pleurisy was uncontrolled in the absence of TNF or TNF receptors with exacerbated inflammatory response, impaired bacterial clearance, and defective mesothelium repair, suggesting a critical role of TNF to control mycobacterial pleurisy. PMID:27456129

  14. Mechanisms for virus-induced liver disease: tumor necrosis factor-mediated pathology independent of natural killer and T cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Salazar-Mather, T P; Opal, S M; Biron, C A

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of endogenous NK cells and cytokines to virus-induced liver pathology was evaluated during murine cytomegalovirus infections of mice. In immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, the virus induced a self-limited liver disease characterized by hepatitis, with focal inflammation, and large grossly visible subcapsular necrotic foci. The inflammatory foci were most numerous and contained the greatest number of cells 3 days after infection; they colocalized with areas of viral antigen expression. The largest number of necrotic foci was found 2 days after infection. Overall hepatic damage, assessed as increased expression of liver enzymes in serum, accompanied the development of inflammatory and necrotic foci. Experiments with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that although virus-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can have antiviral effects, it also mediated significant liver pathology. TNF was required for development of hepatic necrotic foci and increased levels of liver enzymes in serum but not for increased numbers of inflammatory foci. The necrotic foci and liver enzyme indications of pathology occurred independently of NK and T cells, because mice rendered NK-cell deficient by treatment with antibodies, T- and B-cell-deficient Rag-/- mice, and NK- and T-cell-deficient E26 mice all manifested both parameters of disease. Development of necrotic foci and maximally increased levels of liver enzymes in serum also were TNF dependent in NK-cell-deficient mice. Moreover, in the immunodeficient E26 mice, virus-induced liver disease was progressive, with eventual death of the host, and neutralization of TNF significantly increased longevity. These results establish conditions separating hepatitis from significant liver damage and demonstrate a cytokine-mediated component to viral pathogenesis. PMID:9371583

  15. Down-regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and lipopolysaccharide in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Gharavi, Negar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2005-03-01

    Although much is known concerning the effects of inflammation and oxidative stress on the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), little is known about the modulation of other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-regulated genes such as glutathione-S-transferase Ya (GST Ya) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QOR) by inflammation. In the present study, the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the constitutive and inducible expression of the AHR-regulated genes cyp1a1, GST Ya, and QOR was determined in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 (WT), AHR-deficient (C12), and AHR nuclear translocator protein (ARNT)-deficient (C4) cells. We found that both TNF-alpha and LPS strongly repressed the constitutive expression and the beta-naphthoflavone-mediated induction of cyp1a1, GST Ya, and QOR in WT but not in C12 and C4 cells. The induction of GST Ya and QOR activities and mRNA levels by phenolic antioxidant, tert-butylhydroquinone, through the antioxidant response element was not significantly affected by TNF-alpha or LPS. In addition, a significant increase in reactive oxygen species was observed in WT, C12, and C4 cells treated with TNF-alpha or LPS which was completely prevented by tert-butylhydroquinone. These results show that the down-regulation of AHR-regulated genes by TNF-alpha and LPS is dependent on the presence of both heterodimeric transcription factors, AHR and ARNT. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species may be involved in the down-regulation of AHR-regulated genes. PMID:15627257

  16. Anti-tumor necrosis factor VNAR single domains reduce lethality and regulate underlying inflammatory response in a murine model of endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sepsis, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is the key factor triggering respiratory burst, tissue injury and disseminated coagulation. Anti-TNF strategies based on monoclonal antibodies or F(ab’)2 fragments have been used in sepsis with contradictory results. Immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNAR) are a unique subset of antibodies consisting of five constant (CNAR) and one variable domains (VNAR). VNAR domains are the smallest, naturally occurring, antibody-based immune recognition units, having potential use as therapy. Our aim was to explore the impact of an anti-TNF VNAR on survival in an experimental model of endotoxic shock. Also, mRNA expression and serum protein of several inflammatory molecules were measured. Results Endotoxic shock was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in male Balb/c mice. Animals were treated with anti-TNF VNAR domains, F(ab’)2 antibody fragments, or saline solution 15 minutes before, 2 h and 24 h after lethal dose100 (LD100) LPS administration. TNF blockade with either VNAR domains or F(ab’)2 fragments were associated with lower mortality (60% and 75%, respectively) compared to LD100. Challenge with LPS induced significant production of serum TNF and interleukins -10 and -6 at 3 h. After that, significant reduction of IL-6 at 24 h (vs 3 h) was shown only in the VNAR group. Nitrites level also increased in response to LPS. In liver, TNF and IL-10 mRNA expression showed a pro-inflammatory imbalance in response to LPS. Blocking TNF was associated with a shift towards an anti-inflammatory status; however, polarization was more pronounced in animals receiving F(ab’)2 fragments than in those with VNAR therapy. With regard to IL-6, gene expression was increased at 3 h in all groups. TNF blockade was associated with rapid and sustained suppression of IL-6 expression, even more evident in the VNAR group. Finally, expression of inducible-nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) increased in response to LPS at 3 h, but this

  17. Intratumoral application of standardized mistletoe extracts down regulates tumor weight via decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and necrosis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Beuth, J; Ko, H L; Schneider, H; Tawadros, S; Kasper, H U; Zimst, H; Schierholz, J M

    2006-01-01

    The cytotoxic in vitro activity of standardized mistletoe extracts (ME) was examined by established assays towards the human ductal breast carcinoma cell line BT474. A dose-dependent (optimum 25 mg/mL medium) and significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced cytotoxic activity towards the BT474 cells was demonstrated. In vivo experiments on the antitumor activity of ME-A and ME-M were performed in a BALB/c-mouse / BT474 ductal breast carcinoma model. ME-A and ME-M were intratumorally administered according to an application schedule which was found to be optimal concerning dosage and time of administration. Standardized intratumoral application of ME-A and ME-M induced a significantly (p < 0.05) decreased tumor weight in experimental mice. Histological investigations were performed comprising analysis of mitosis and proliferation rates (Ki67 expression), as well as necrosis and apoptosis induction (ssDNA detection). As compared to tumors of control mice with intratumoral phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) injections, tumors of the ME-A and ME-M treated groups showed a decreased cell proliferation rate, as well as an increased cell necrosis and apoptosis rate. Standardized mistletoe extracts, interfering with defined tumor cell functions, e.g., proliferation, necrosis and apoptosis, may have an impact on local cancer treatment. PMID:17201168

  18. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol

    PubMed Central

    Aghighi, Maryam; Golovko, Daniel; Ansari, Celina; Marina, Neyssa M.; Pisani, Laura; Kurlander, Lonnie; Klenk, Christopher; Bhaumik, Srabani; Wendland, Michael; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2015-01-01

    showed similar findings with high T1 signal in areas of tumor necrosis and low signal in areas of intracellularly compartmentalized iron. Conclusion Differential T1- and T2-enhancement patterns of USPIO in tumors enable conclusions about their intracellular and extracellular location. This information can be used to characterize the composition of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26569397

  19. Disruption of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 5 Exacerbates Murine Experimental Colitis via Regulating T Helper Cell-Mediated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jian; Li, Lixia; Wang, Xiaobing; Pan, Huaqin; Liu, Shi; He, Ruohang; Li, Jin; Zhao, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 5 (TRAF5) is a key mediator of TNF receptor superfamily members and is important in both T helper (Th) cell immunity and the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To clarify TRAF5's influence on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), we investigated TRAF5 deficiency's effect on dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced colitis. Colitis was induced in TRAF5 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates by administering 3% DSS orally for 7 days. The mice were then sacrificed, and their colons were removed. Our data suggested that KO mice were more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis. TRAF5 deficiency significantly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17a mRNA and protein levels in the colons of DSS-fed mice, and the mRNA expression of T-bet and GATA-3 was also markedly elevated. However, ROR-α and ROR-γt mRNA levels did not differ between DSS-induced KO and WT mice. Flow cytometry showed increased frequencies of Th2 and IFN-γ/IL-17a-coproducing CD4+ T cells in the colons of DSS-induced KO mice. Additionally, TRAF5 deficiency significantly enhanced the activation of NF-κB in CD4+ T cells after DSS administration. These results indicated that TRAF5 deficiency significantly aggravated DSS-induced colitis, most likely by regulating Th cell-mediated inflammation. PMID:27110068

  20. Induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene expression in murine liver by lipopolysaccharide. Cellular localization and role of endogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Fearns, C.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) gene expression primarily in endothelial cells in most organs of the mouse, with maximal induction by 3 hours. Here we show that induction in the liver occurs in a distinctly different pattern. For example, the increase in PAI-1 mRNA in liver was biphasic with an initial peak at 1 to 2 hours and a second peak at 6 to 8 hours. Moreover, in situ hybridization experiments revealed that PAI-1 mRNA was induced in both endothelial cells and hepatocytes. The endothelial cell response was monophasic and maximal between 1 and 4 hours, whereas the hepatocyte response was biphasic, peaking at 2 hours and again at 6 to 8 hours. To determine possible mechanisms involved in the induction of PAI-1 by LPS, we analyzed the tissues for changes in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha LPS caused a rapid induction of TNF-alpha mRNA in Kupffer cells, detectable within 15 minutes. Pretreatment of mice with anti-TNF antiserum before challenge with LPS reduced the subsequent increase in plasma levels of PAI-1 by 50 to 70% and significantly reduced the level of induction of PAI-1 mRNA in the liver at both early and late times. Pretreatment appeared to inhibit induction primarily within hepatocytes. These results suggest that LPS may induce PAI-1 in endothelial cells and hepatocytes by different mechanisms. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9033272

  1. Blockade of Glucocorticoid-Induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-Receptor-Related Protein Signaling Ameliorates Murine Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Modulating Follicular Helper T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Feng, Dingqi; Wei, Yancai; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Rui, Ke; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-receptor-related protein (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) are critically involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, but the role of GITRL/GITR signaling in modulating CD4(+) follicular helper T (Tfh) cell response during autoimmune arthritis remains largely unclear. We showed that splenic Tfh cells from mice with collagen-induced arthritis expressed higher levels of GITR compared with non-Tfh cells. In vitro, GITRL treatment markedly enhanced the percentage and number of Tfh cells. The administration of GITR fused to fragment crystallizable of IgG protein in mice with collagen-induced arthritis suppressed the Tfh cell response, resulting in ameliorated disease severity, and reduced production of autoantibody and the number of autoantibody-secreting cells in both the spleen and bone marrow. Together, these results indicate that blockade of GITR signaling can ameliorate arthritis progression mainly by modulating the Tfh cell response. PMID:27106763

  2. Mechanistic links between oxidative/nitrosative stress and tumor necrosis factor alpha in letrozole-induced murine polycystic ovary: biochemical and pathological evidences for beneficial effect of pioglitazone.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, M A; Rezvanfar, M A; Ahmadi, A; Saadi, H A Shojaei; Baeeri, M; Abdollahi, M

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible relationship between ovarian functionality and the oxidative response during cystogenesis induced by hyperandrogenization with letrozole and examine protective effect of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist, pioglitazone (PIO), in polycystic ovary (PCO). Ovarian cysts were induced by oral administration of letrozol (1 mg/kg/day) for 21 consecutive days in the female rats. Effective dose of PIO (20 mg/kg/day) was administrated orally for 21 days. Serum estradiol (E), progesterone (P), testosterone (T), and the ovarian immunomodulator prostaglandin E (PGE) were analyzed as biomarkers of ovarian function. To determine the role of oxidative stress in PCO, the level of cellular lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and peroxynitrite (ONOO), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as a marker of inflammation and apoptosis were measured in serum and the ovaries. Letrozole-induced PCO in rats exhibited a significant increase in LPO and ONOO in serum and ovary while significantly decreased serum and ovarian SOD, CAT, and GPx. Serum T and TNF-α, and ovarian PGE were increased in animals with cysts compared with healthy controls, while E and P diminished. When compared to control group, letrozole-treated group showed irregular sexual cycles, polycystic ovaries characterized by high incidence of sub-capsular ovarian cyst with diminished or scant granulosa cell layer, increased number of atretic pre-antral and antral follicles and absence of corpus luteum. There were almost no primary, secondary, and tertiary follicles observed in PCO rats. All measured parameters were improved by PIO and reached close to normal levels. The present study further supports the role of oxidative/nitrosative stress and infiammatory responses in the pathogenesis of letrozole-induced hyperandrogenic PCO rats. Results indicate that PIO is able to exert direct

  3. COMPARISON OF TOPICAL INTERLEUKIN-1 VS TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA BLOCKADE WITH CORTICOSTEROID THERAPY ON MURINE CORNEAL INFLAMMATION, NEOVASCULARIZATION, AND TRANSPLANT SURVIVAL (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) play critical roles in mediating corneal inflammation. In this study, topical blockade of IL-1 and TNF-α, alone or in combination, was compared to conventional corticosteroid anti-inflammatory therapy in suppressing infiltration of the cornea by antigen-presenting Langerhans cells (LCs) and in promoting corneal transplant survival in a mouse model of keratoplasty. Methods: Study drugs included topical 2% IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), 1.5% soluble TNF-α receptor (sTNFR), and 1% prednisolone phosphate (Pred), all formulated in hyaluronic acid vehicle. Fifty eyes of BALB/c mice were used for LC studies where the numbers of LCs were determined 1 week after electrocautery to the corneal surface or transplantation of C57BL/6 corneas. Additionally, 65 BALB/c mice received corneal allografts and were randomized to receive one of the following for 8 weeks: (1) IL-1Ra, (2) sTNFR, (3) Pred, (4) combined IL-1Ra and Pred, or (5) vehicle alone. Results: Mean suppression of LC infiltration after electrocautery or transplantation was 67% and 71%, respectively, for IL-1Ra, 40% and 62% for sTNFR, 70% and 72% for sTNFR+IL-1Ra, and 77% and 78% for Pred alone. Rejection rates were 15% for IL-1Ra (P = .01), 38% for sTNFR (P = .1), 17% for Pred (P = .02), and 7% for combined IL-1Ra+Pred (P = .002) as compared to 69% for the vehicle-treated group. IL-1Ra and Pred, but not sTNFR, significantly inhibited post-transplantation neovascularization. Conclusions: Topical IL-1Ra and prednisolone are comparable in their capacity to promote graft survival. sTNFR therapy, though effective, has much lower efficacy as compared to IL-1Ra or Pred. Combination IL-1Ra and steroid therapy offers only minimal added efficacy over either agent used alone. PMID:18427620

  4. Treatment of an infected murine macrophage cell line (J774A.1) with interferon-gamma but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha or live Mycobacterium intracellulare alone modulates the expression of adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Pourshafie, M R; Sonnenfeld, G

    1997-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluated whether the activation of a murine macrophage cell line (J774.1A) by treatment with recombinant murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) or recombinant murine interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) before or simultaneous with infection with Mycobacterium intracellulare would affect their ability to express lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and to restrict growth and kill the ingested M. intracellulare. The data showed that the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in increasing the level of LFA-1 was the same in the presence or absence of M. intracellulare. The inability of M. intracellulare to affect the level of expression of LFA-1 was irrespective of the M. intracellulare to J774A.1 ratio. A significant increase in the expression of LFA-1 was observed when J774A.1 cells were prestimulated with IFN-gamma 1 day before the addition of the bacteria. The addition of IFN-gamma with M. intracellulare simultaneously, however, did not affect the expression of the adhesion molecules as compared with the IFN-gamma alone. Our results indicated no change in the level of LFA-1 on J774A.1 following exposure with TNF-alpha. We observed that preexposure with 10-10(4) IU/ml of TNF-alpha can significantly decrease the number of ingested M. intracellulare. Simultaneous addition of 10(3) and 10(4) IU/ml of TNF-alpha, however, did not have any mycobactericidal effect. This indicates that the TNF-alpha-induced killing by J774A.1 cells was relatively selective, depending on the concentration and the time of presence of TNF-alpha. The data may suggest that the uptake of M. intracellulare is carried out via other adhesion receptors when M. intracellulare and IFN-alpha are present simultaneously and that in the presence of TNF-alpha other surface receptors are involved in the uptake of M. intracellulare. Flow cytometry analysis of the spleen cells removed at various times from M. intracellulare-infected mice also indicated no change in the

  5. Cyclophilin D regulates necrosis, but not apoptosis, of murine eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang; Hogan, Simon P; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Zimmermann, Nives

    2016-04-15

    Eosinophil degranulation and clusters of free extracellular granules are frequently observed in diverse diseases, including atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Whether these intact granules are released by necrosis or a biochemically mediated cytolysis remains unknown. Recently, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase located within the mitochondrial matrix, cyclophilin D (PPIF), was shown to regulate necrotic, but not apoptotic, cell death in vitro in fibroblasts, hepatocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Whether cyclophilin D regulates necrosis in hematopoietic cells such as eosinophils remains unknown. We used PPIF-deficient (Ppif(-/-)) mice to test whether cyclophilin D is required for regulating eosinophil necrosis. PPIF deficiency did not affect eosinophil development or maturation at baseline. After in vitro ionomycin or H2O2 treatment, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils were significantly protected from Ca(2+) overload- or oxidative stress-induced necrosis. Additionally, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils demonstrated significantly decreased necrosis, but not apoptosis, in response to Siglec-F cross-linking, a stimulus associated with eosinophil-mediated processes in vitro and in vivo. When treated with apoptosis inducers, Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) eosinophils exhibited no significant difference in apoptosis or secondary necrosis. Finally, in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model, although levels of colitogenic cytokines and eosinophil-selective chemokines were comparable between Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) mice, the latter exhibited decreased clinical outcomes. This correlated with significantly reduced eosinophil cytolysis in the colon. Collectively, our present studies demonstrate that murine eosinophil necrosis is regulated in vitro and in vivo by cyclophilin D, at least in part, thus providing new insight into the mechanism of eosinophil necrosis and release of free extracellular granules in eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:26893161

  6. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization Using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, subtotal cranial irradiation; and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in 10 equal fractions. Magnetic resonance images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2-, and diffusion sequences at selected time points after irradiation. After imaging, animals were killed and their brains fixed for correlative histologic analysis. Results: Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms) (p < 0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions: This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that diffusion-weighted imaging may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings.

  7. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance (MR) images following external beam radiotherapy for brain tumors often display signal changes characteristic of either tumor progression and/or radiation injury. No non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers have been identified that clearly distinguish between these two disease processes. This study’s objective was to develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, sub-total cranial irradiation and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced MR imaging techniques. Methods Twenty four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in ten equal fractions. MR images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2- and diffusion-sequences at selected time points following irradiation or implantation. Following imaging, animals were euthanized and their brains were fixed for correlative histology. Results Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted MR images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 μm2/ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 μm2/ms) (p<0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that DWI may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings. PMID:19735877

  8. Ketoconazole attenuates radiation-induction of tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D.E.; Virudachalam, S.; Kufe, D.W.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1994-07-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that inhibitors of phospholipase A2 attenuate ionizing radiation-induced arachidonic acid production, protein kinase C activation, and prevent subsequent induction of the tumor necrosis factor gene. Because arachidonic acid contributes to radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor expression, the authors analyzed the effects of agents which alter arachidonate metabolism on the regulation of this gene. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors quinicrine, bromphenyl bromide, and pentoxyfylline or the inhibitor of lipoxygenase (ketoconazole) or the inhibitor of cycloxygenase (indomethacine) were added to cell culture 1 h prior to irradiation. Radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by each of the phospholipase A2 inhibitors (quinicrine, bromphenylbromide, and pentoxyfylline). Furthermore, ketoconazole attenuated X ray induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression. Conversely, indomethacin enhanced tumor necrosis factor expression following irradiation. The finding that radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by ketoconazole suggests that the lipoxygenase pathway participates in signal transduction preceding tumor necrosis factor induction. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor expression by indomethacin following irradiation suggests that prostaglandins produced by cyclooxygenase act as negative regulators of tumor necrosis factor expression. Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor induction ameliorate acute and subacute sequelae of radiotherapy. The authors propose therefore, that ketoconazole may reduce acute radiation sequelae such as mucositis and esophagitis through a reduction in tumor necrosis factor induction or inhibition of phospholipase A2 in addition to its antifungal activity. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Colchicine prevents tumor necrosis factor-induced toxicity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Tiegs, G; Freudenberg, M A; Galanos, C; Wendel, A

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) toxicity was induced in vivo by intravenous administration of 15 micrograms of recombinant murine TNF-alpha per kg to galactosamine-sensitized mice. Within 8 h, the animals developed a fulminant hepatitis. Intravenous administration of 0.5 mg of colchicine per kg at 19 and 4 h prior to TNF challenge protected the animals against hepatitis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated, bone marrow-derived macrophages from C3H/HeN mice released significant amounts of TNF in vitro. When such macrophages were intravenously given to LPS-resistant galactosamine-sensitized C3H/HeJ mice, these animals died within 24 h. Preincubation of these transferred macrophages with colchicine did not suppress the LPS-inducible TNF release from these cells. Concordantly, administration of macrophages exposed to colchicine in vitro resulted in full lethality. However, in vivo pretreatment of C3H/HeJ mice with colchicine 19 and 4 h prior to the transfer of LPS-stimulated macrophages prevented lethality. In LPS-responsive NMRI mice which had been protected against galactosamine-LPS-induced hepatitis by pretreatment with colchicine, TNF was still released into the blood. We conclude from our findings that the in vivo protection by colchicine is mediated by blocking TNF action on target cells while the effector cells of LPS toxicity, i.e., the macrophages, remain responsive. PMID:1563785

  10. Constitutive synthesis of tumor necrosis factor in the thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Giroir, B P; Brown, T; Beutler, B

    1992-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a major mediator of endotoxic shock, the normal function of TNF that has preserved this protein throughout mammalian evolution remains unknown. If the protein serves a role in normal development or homeostasis, it must be produced under physiologic conditions. To determine whether TNF secretion occurs in normal animals, and to define the tissue sources of the protein, we prepared a reporter construct in which the TNF coding sequence and introns are replaced by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) coding sequence. This construct was inserted into the murine genome, yielding 13 transgenic founders. Macrophages harvested from 4 of the transgenic lines expressed CAT activity after stimulation with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in vitro. Each of these 4 transgenic lines also constitutively expressed CAT activity in the thymus but in no other tissue examined. Cultured thymocytes secrete TNF, as demonstrated both by cytotoxicity assays and by immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled thymic culture medium. CAT activity was associated with the thymic lymphocyte population and not with thymic macrophages or dendritic cells. CAT activity was present in thymic lymphocytes irrespective of CD4 or CD8 expression; T cells from the spleen, however, had no detectable CAT activity. The biosynthesis of TNF in the thymus of normal animals implies a role for this protein in the development or regulation of the immune response. Images PMID:1594585

  11. Effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on macrophage enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Measurements of changes in acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase levels were made as an indication of activation by cytokine treatment. IFN-gamma or TNF-gamma treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both enzymes measured in the cell lysates. This increase was observable after 6 h of incubation, but reached its maximum level after 24 h of incubation. The effect of the treatment of the cell with both cytokines together was additive. No synergistic effect of addition of both cytokines on the enzyme levels was observed.

  12. Correlation of MRI Biomarkers with Tumor Necrosis in Hras5 Tumor Xenograft in Athymic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Daniel P; Tessier, Jean J; Ashton, Susan E; Waterton, John C; Wilson, Zena; Worthington, Philip L; Ryan, Anderson J

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of therapies targeting the tumor vasculature and has demonstrated that vascular-damaging agents (VDA) induce acute vascular shutdown in tumors in human and animal models. However, at subtherapeutic doses, blood flow may recover before the induction of significant levels of necrosis. We present the relationship between changes in MRI biomarkers and tumor necrosis. Multiple MRI measurements were taken at 4.7 T in athymic rats (n = 24) bearing 1.94 ± 0.2-cm3 subcutaneous Hras5 tumors (ATCC 41000) before and 24 hours after clinically relevant doses of the VDA, ZD6126 (0–10 mg/kg, i.v.). We measured effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*), initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve (IAUGC60/150), equivalent enhancing fractions (EHF60/150), time constant (Ktrans), proportion of hypoperfused voxels as estimated from fit failures in Ktrans analysis, and signal intensity (SI) in T2-weighted MRI (T2W). ZD6126 treatment induced > 90% dose-dependent tumor necrosis at 10 mg/kg; correspondingly, SI changes were evident from T2W MRI. Although R2* did not correlate, other MRI biomarkers significantly correlated with necrosis at doses of ≥ 5 mg/kg ZD6126. These data on Hras5 tumors suggest that the quantification of hypoperfused voxels might provide a useful biomarker of tumor necrosis. PMID:17534443

  13. β-Glucan from Lentinus edodes Inhibits Nitric Oxide and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production and Phosphorylation of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases in Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated Murine RAW 264.7 Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojuan; Yasuda, Michiko; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Mizuno, Masashi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Lentinan (LNT), a β-glucan from the fruiting bodies of Lentinus edodes, is well known to have immunomodulatory activity. NO and TNF-α are associated with many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of LNT extracted by sonication (LNT-S) on the NO and TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results suggested that treatment with LNT-S not only resulted in the striking inhibition of TNF-α and NO production in LPS-activated macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, but also the protein expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) and the gene expression of iNOS mRNA and TNF-α mRNA. It is surprising that LNT-S enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and NF-κB luciferase activity, but severely inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2. The neutralizing antibodies of anti-Dectin-1 and anti-TLR2 hardly affected the inhibition of NO production. All of these results suggested that the suppression of LPS-induced NO and TNF-α production was at least partially attributable to the inhibition of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation. This work discovered a promising molecule to control the diseases associated with overproduction of NO and TNF-α. PMID:22102286

  14. Ionizing radiation potentiates the induction of nitric oxide synthase by interferon-gamma and/or lipopolysaccharide in murine macrophage cell lines. Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    McKinney, L C; Aquilla, E M; Coffin, D; Wink, D A; Vodovotz, Y

    2000-01-01

    Macrophages respond to infection or injury by changing from a "resting" cellular phenotype to an "activated" state defined by the expression of various cytotoxic effector functions. Regulation of the transition from a resting to an activated state is effected by cytokine and/or pathogenic signals. Some signals do not directly induce activation, but instead "prime" the macrophage to respond more vigorously to a second signal. One example of this priming phenomenon involves induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). Our experiments indicate that low doses (1-5 Gy) of ionizing radiation can enhance the induction of enzymatically active NOS2 by IFN-gamma or LPS in J774.1 and RAW264.7 murine macrophage cell lines. Radiation alone did not produce this induction, rather, it was effective as a priming signal; cells exposed to radiation produced more NO when a second signal, either IFN-gamma or LPS, was applied 24 h later. PMID:10863529

  15. Purification and characterization of an inhibitor (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor) for tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin obtained from the serum ultrafiltrates of human cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gatanaga, Tetsuya; Whang, Chenduen; Cappuccini, F.; Lucci, J.A. III; Jeffes, E.W.B. ); Kohr, W. ); Lentz, R. ); Tomich, J. ); Yamamoto, R.S. ); Granger, G.A. Memorial Cancer Inst., Long Beach, CA )

    1990-11-01

    Serum ultrafiltrates (SUF) from human patients with different types of cancer contain a blocking factor (BF) that inhibits the cytolytic activity of human tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) in vitro. BF is a protein with a molecular mass of 28kDa on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE). The active material was purified to homogeneity by a combination of affinity chromatography, PAGE, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that BF is derived from the membrane TNF receptor. Purified BF blocks the lytic activity of recombinant human and mouse TNF-{alpha} and recombinant human lymphotoxin activity of TNF-{alpha} and recombinant human lymphotoxin on murine L929 cells in vitro. However, BF inhibits the lytic activity of TNF-{alpha} more effectively than it does that of lymphotoxin. The BF also inhibits the necrotizing activity of recombinant human TNF-{alpha} when coinjected into established cutaneous Meth A tumors in BALB/c mice. The BF may have an important role in (i) the regulation and control of TNF-{alpha} and lymphotoxin activity in cancer patients, (ii) interaction between the tumor and the host antitumor mechanisms, and (iii) use of systemically administered TNF-{alpha} in clinical trials with human cancer patients.

  16. Growth promoting effect of recombinant interleukin I and tumor necrosis factor for human astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Giulian, D.; Dinarello, C.A.; Brown, D.C.; Lachman, L.B.

    1986-03-01

    Human IL I has been demonstrated to stimulate the growth of rat astrocytes in vitro. To determine if IL I has a similar growth promoting effect upon human brain cells, two astrocytoma cell lines were tested for their ability to incorporate /sup 3/H-thymidine in response to various types of IL I and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The U373 astrocytoma was found to respond mitogenically to human native IL I, human recombinant IL I, rat IL I and murine recombinant IL I. The cell line failed to respond to recombinant IL 2 and recombinant ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. interferon. The sensitivity of the U373 cells paralleled the murine thymocyte assay for IL I. Interestingly, the U373 responded mitogenically to recombinant TNF prepared by two different companies, thus indicating that TNF stimulates proliferation of this cell line and does not lead to cell death. In the murine thymocyte assay for IL I, TNF was not active. The results indicate that 1) both IL I and TNF are mitogenic for a human astrocytoma cell line and 2) the U373 cells may be used to assay both IL I and TNF in a highly sensitive mitogenic assay.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors – state of knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Krzysztof; Kuzawińska, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is considered a major proinflammatory cytokine, affecting various aspects of the immune reaction. All five TNF inhibitors currently available on the market (i.e., etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab and golimumab) are top sellers, although indicated only in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and psoriasis. This article briefly discusses the background and place for TNF inhibitors in modern therapy. The main safety aspects of TNF inhibitor administration are described in particular, with special consideration of the available meta-analyses. Finally, perspectives on the next-generation TNF inhibitors and their use in the clinic are given. PMID:25624856

  18. Evaluation of antitumor effects following tumor necrosis factor-α gene delivery using nanobubbles and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Horie, Sachiko; Watanabe, Yukiko; Ono, Masao; Mori, Shiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2011-11-01

    The antitumor effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) were evaluated following transfection of TNF-α plasmid DNA into solid mouse tumors using the nanobubbles (NBs) and ultrasound (US) gene delivery system. Murine breast carcinoma (EMT6) cells expressing luciferase (1 × 10(6) cells) were injected intradermally into the flanks of 6-7-week-old male SCID mice on day 0. Ten microliters of TNF-α (5 μg/μL) or TNF-α mock plasmid DNA (5 μg/μL) with/without NBs (15 μL) and saline was injected intratumorally in a total volume of 30 μL, and tumors were exposed to US (frequency, 1 MHz; intensity, 3.0 W/cm(2); duty cycle, 20%; number of pulses, 200; and exposure time, 60 s) on days 2, 4, 7, and 9. Changes in tumor size were measured with an in vivo bioluminescent imaging system and a mechanical caliper. Changes in tumor vessel area were quantified using contrast-enhanced US imaging with Sonazoid and a high frequency US imaging system (40 MHz) and immunohistochemistry (CD31). At the mRNA level, expression of TNF-α, caspase-3, and p53 were quantified using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. At the protein level, expression of caspase-3 and p53 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. We show that repeated TNF-α gene delivery using NBs and US can lead to the local production of TNF-α. This results in antitumor effects, including activation of p53-dependent apoptosis, decrease in tumor vessel density, and suppression of tumor size. In this study, we showed the effectiveness of using NBs and US for TNF-α gene delivery into tumor cells. PMID:21824220

  19. Lithium chloride potentiates tumor necrosis factor-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Beyaert, R; Vanhaesebroeck, B; Suffys, P; Van Roy, F; Fiers, W

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is cytotoxic for several transformed cell lines in vitro. In the presence of LiCl, the murine fibrosarcoma cell lines L929 and WEHI 164 clone 13 became greater than 10 times more sensitive to TNF-mediated cytotoxicity. The human tumor cell lines BT20 and HeLa D98/AH2 were also responsive to the cytotoxicity-enhancing effect of LiCl. Other monovalent or divalent cations did not affect TNF-mediated cytotoxicity. The potentiating effect of LiCl on TNF cytotoxicity was largely independent of transcription, and LiCl could be added to the cells as early as 2 hr before or as late as 4 hr after TNF without loss of effectiveness. The mechanism by which LiCl increases the cytotoxic response seems to differ from the sensitizing effect of actinomycin D or interferon gamma, since the latter treatments overcame TNF resistance of several cell lines, whereas LiCl did not. Evidence is presented that LiCl acts, either directly or indirectly, via the TNF-activated phospholipase A2 pathway. In nude mice, a combination of TNF and LiCl led to hemorrhagic necrosis and growth inhibition of L929 tumors, whereas little effect was observed when TNF was administered alone. HeLa D98/AH2 tumors also were sensitive to the potentiating effect of LiCl in vivo. We conclude that LiCl enhances the effectiveness of TNF in vitro and in vivo, results that may have therapeutic implications. PMID:2556714

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mediates changes in tissue protein turnover in a rat cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed Central

    Costelli, P; Carbó, N; Tessitore, L; Bagby, G J; Lopez-Soriano, F J; Argilés, J M; Baccino, F M

    1993-01-01

    Rats bearing the Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma showed enhanced fractional rates of protein degradation in gastrocnemius muscle, heart, and liver, while fractional synthesis rates were similar to those in non-tumor bearing rats. This hypercatabolic pattern was associated with marked perturbations of the hormonal homeostasis and presence of tumor necrosis factor in the circulation. The daily administration of a goat anti-murine TNF IgG to tumor-bearing rats decreased protein degradation rates in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver as compared with tumor-bearing rats receiving a nonimmune goat IgG. The anti-TNF treatment was also effective in attenuating early perturbations in insulin and corticosterone homeostasis. Although these results suggest that tumor necrosis factor plays a significant role in mediating the changes in protein turnover and hormone levels elicited by tumor growth, the inability of such treatment to prevent a reduction in body weight implies that other mediators or tumor-related events were also involved. PMID:8254032

  1. Structure-activity relationships of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and induction of macrophage cell death in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX) in a murine macrophage-like cell line, J774.1.

    PubMed

    Karahashi, H; Amano, F

    1998-10-01

    The structure-activity relationships of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and induction of macrophage cell death in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX) were examined in a murine macrophage-like cell line, J774.1. TNF-alpha production is one of the characteristic phenotypes of LPS-activated macrophages, and is observed upon incubation with LPS. On the contrary, macrophage cell death, which had been found in our laboratory (Amano F., Karahashi H., J. Endotoxin Res., 3, 415423 (1996)) and was examined as the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from cells into the culture supernatant, was observed 2.5 h after the addition of LPS in the presence of CHX. However, both TNF-alpha production and macrophage cell death were similarly dependent on the structures of LPS and lipid A. At more than 10 ng/ml, wild-type LPS from E.coli and S. minnesota exhibited the highest activity, and LPS as well as diphosphoryl lipid A from S. minnesota rough mutants also exhibited activity, but E. coli LPS detoxified by alkaline treatment or monophosphoryl lipid A from S. minnesota exhibited no activity even at 100 ng/ml. These results suggest that LPS-induced macrophage cell death in the presence of CHX shows similar requirements for LPS and/or lipid A structures as for the macrophage activation at higher doses than 10 ng/ml, although the former was not observed at 1 ng/ml LPS, while the latter was. However, TNF-alpha does not seem to be involved in the induction of macrophage cell death, because a neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha antibody failed to block the macrophage cell death and because recombinant TNF-alpha had little effect on the extent of LDH release in the presence or absence of LPS and/or CHX, and also because TNF-alpha production by LPS was abolished in the presence of CHX. PMID:9821819

  2. Tumor necrosis factor and cancer, buddies or foes?*

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Xia; LIN, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a multifunctional cytokine that plays important roles in diverse cellular events such as cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and death. As a pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF is secreted by inflammatory cells, which may be involved in inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. TNF exerts its biological functions through activating distinct signaling pathways such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). NF-κB is a major cell survival signal that is anti-apoptotic while sustained JNK activation contributes to cell death. The crosstalk between the NF-κB and JNK is involved in determining cellular outcomes in response to TNF. In regard to cancer, TNF is a double-dealer. On one hand, TNF could be an endogenous tumor promoter, because TNF stimulates cancer cells’ growth, proliferation, invasion and metastasis, and tumor angiogenesis. On the other hand, TNF could be a cancer killer. The property of TNF in inducing cancer cell death renders it a potential cancer therapeutic, although much work is needed to reduce its toxicity for systematic TNF administration. Recent studies have focused on sensitizing cancer cells to TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting survival signals such as NF-κB, by combined therapy. In this article we provide an overview of the roles of TNF-induced signaling pathways in cancer biology with specific emphasis on carcinogenesis and cancer therapy. PMID:18954521

  3. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy in uveitis.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Coma, Miguel; Sobrin, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Since the first reported use in 2001 of an anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) agent, infliximab, for the treatment of uveitis, several new anti-TNF-α agents have emerged for the treatment of refractory noninfectious uveitides, although their use remains off-label in the US. These agents have demonstrated remarkable clinical antiinflammatory efficacy and a potential immunoregulatory role in selected uveitis patients, but it is currently unclear whether they can modify the natural history of disease. We review the rationale and clinical indications for this therapy, the differences between agents, how to manage dosing and intervals, and how to screen for and identify potential side effects. We also present a summary of the science behind the use of anti-TNF-α agents in ocular inflammation and the evidence for their efficacy. PMID:26164735

  4. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor–ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor–ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  5. Tumor necrosis factor alpha polymorphism in heart failure/cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, Lou; Iyengar, Srinivas

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is produced by activated macrophages. It has been shown to stimulate the release of endothelial cytokines and NO, increase vascular permeability, decrease contractility, and induce a prothrombotic state. The most studied TNF-a gene mutation in heart disease is a gamma to alpha substitution, which occurs when 308 nucleotides move upstream from the transcription initiation site in the TNF promoter and has been associated with elevated levels of TNF-alpha. The TNF1 allele (wild type) contains gamma at this site, while the TNF2 allele has an alpha substitution at the site. The TNF2 allele is a more powerful transcriptional activator, therefore leading to higher TNF-alpha levels. Most of the studies to date have failed to conclusively show any link between the polymorphism and heart disease, both coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathy/heart failure. PMID:15591843

  6. Impact of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma on tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis in murine fibroblasts and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, E R; Werner-Felmayer, G; Fuchs, D; Hausen, A; Reibnegger, G; Yim, J J; Wachter, H

    1991-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha causes an up to 30-fold induction of GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) activity in murine dermal fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. Owing to the high constitutive activities of 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase and sepiapterin reductase (EC 1.1.1.153), this potentiates biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. Murine macrophages already contain high activities of GTP cyclohydrolase I when unstimulated, and this is further augmented up to 4-fold by tumour necrosis factor-alpha/interferon-gamma. In Western blots an antiserum to murine liver GTP cyclohydrolase I does not stain cell extracts with high enzyme activities, suggesting that the cytokine induced peripheral form of GTP cyclohydrolase I might differ from the liver form. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1764035

  7. Targeted Cancer Therapy with Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Kerner, Zachary J.; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a member of the TNF superfamily, was the first cytokine to be evaluated for cancer biotherapy. However, the clinical use of TNF-α is severely limited by its toxicity. Currently, TNF-α is administered only through locoregional drug delivery systems such as isolated limb perfusion and isolated hepatic perfusion. To reduce the systemic toxicity of TNF-α, various strategies have been explored over the last several decades. This review summarizes current state-of-the-art targeted cancer therapy using TNF-α. Passive targeting, cell-based therapy, gene therapy with inducible or tissue-specific promoters, targeted polymer-DNA complexes, tumor pre-targeting, antibody-TNF-α conjugate, scFv/TNF-α fusion proteins, and peptide/TNF-α fusion proteins have all been investigated to combat cancer. Many of these agents are already in advanced clinical trials. Molecular imaging, which can significantly speed up the drug development process, and nanomedicine, which can integrate both imaging and therapeutic components, has the potential to revolutionize future cancer patient management. Cooperative efforts from scientists within multiple disciplines, as well as close partnerships among many organizations/entities, are needed to quickly translate novel TNF-α-based therapeutics into clinical investigation. PMID:24115841

  8. Accuracy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinction between radiation necrosis and recurrence of brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Anbarloui, Mousa Reza; Ghodsi, Seyed Mohammad; Khoshnevisan, Alireza; Khadivi, Masoud; Abdollahzadeh, Sina; Aoude, Ahmad; Naderi, Soheil; Najafi, Zeynab; Faghih-Jouibari, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Distinction between radiation necrosis and recurrence of intraparenchymal tumors is necessary to select the appropriate treatment, but it is often difficult based on imaging features alone. We developed an algorithm for analyzing magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings and studied its accuracy in differentiation between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. Methods: Thirty-three patients with a history of intraparenchymal brain tumor resection and radiotherapy, which had developed new enhancing lesion were evaluated by MRS and subsequently underwent reoperation. Lesions with Choline (Cho)/N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) > 1.8 or Cho/Lipid > 1 were considered as tumor recurrence and the remaining as radiation necrosis. Finally, pre-perative MRS diagnoses were compared with histopathological report. Results: The histological diagnosis was recurrence in 25 patients and necrosis in 8 patients. Mean Cho/NAA in recurrent tumors was 2.72, but it was 1.46 in radiation necrosis (P < 0.01). Furthermore, Cho/Lipid was significantly higher in recurrent tumors (P < 0.01) with the mean of 2.78 in recurrent tumors and 0.6 in radiation necrosis. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the algorithm for detecting tumor recurrence were 84%, 75% and 81%, respectively. Conclusion: MRS is a safe and informative tool for differentiating between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis. PMID:25874054

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Stübgen, Joerg-Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha plays an important role in many aspects of immune system development, immune-response regulation, and T-cell-mediated tissue injury. The evidence that TNF-alpha, released by autoreactive T cells and macrophages, may contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathies is reviewed. TNF-alpha antagonists (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab) are indicated for the treatment of advanced inflammatory rheumatic and bowel disease, but these drugs can induce a range of autoimmune diseases that also attack the central and peripheral nervous systems. Case histories and series report on the association between anti-TNF-alpha treatment and various disorders of peripheral nerve such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block, mononeuropathy multiplex, and axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathies. The proposed pathogeneses of TNF-alpha-associated neuropathies include both a T-cell and humoral immune attack against peripheral nerve myelin, vasculitis-induced nerve ischemia, and inhibition of signaling support for axons. Most neuropathies improve over a period of months by withdrawal of the TNF-alpha antagonist, with or without additional immune-modulating treatment. Preliminary observations suggest that TNF-alpha antagonists may be useful as an antigen-nonspecific treatment approach to immune-mediated neuropathies in patients with a poor response to, or intolerance of, standard therapies, but further studies are required. PMID:18041052

  10. Tumor necrosis factor induced stimulation of granulopoiesis and radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Urbaschek, R; Männel, D N; Urbaschek, B

    1987-01-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor, TNF, was used to assess its ability to stimulate granulopoiesis and to protect mice against lethal irradiation, effects known to be inducable with TNF-rich postendotoxin serum from BCG infected mice (BCG/ET serum). Although the endotoxin contamination of this TNF preparation is extremely low its effects were compared in endotoxin low responder C3H/HeJ mice and susceptible NMRI mice. TNF is a potent inducer of serum colony stimulating activity, CSA, in both mouse strains. In peripheral blood a marked granulocytosis with a concomitant decrease in lymphocytes and monocytopenia occurs at 2 hours after injection of TNF. Moreover, TNF induces an increase in the number of splenic myelopoietic committed stem cells (GM-CFC, granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells) determined five days after injection. The lethality rate, registered over 30 days after exposure to 660 cGy whole body X-irradiation is reduced to 40% in C3H/HeJ mice as compared to 75% in control animals. The reduction in lethality is observed both, when TNF was injected 24 hours before or after irradiation. In vitro, TNF significantly increases the number of colonies in the presence of CSA in bone marrow cultures. TNF per se does not effect colony growth. The studies reported here demonstrate that TNF is a myelopoiesis stimulating factor in mice which may be related to the reduction in lethality following whole body irradiation. PMID:3306175

  11. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor in Human Acute Cardiac Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Grasso, Maurizia; Diegoli, Marta; Bramerio, Manuela; Foglieni, Andrea Scotti; Albertario, Marco; Martinelli, Luigi; Gavazzi, Antonello; Goggi, Claudio; Campana, Carlo; Vigano, Mario

    1991-01-01

    The authors performed an immunohistochemical study on expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in endomyocardial biopsies from human cardiac allografts. TNFα immunoreactivity was found in 45% biopsies with mild acute rejection, in 83% biopsies with focal moderate rejection, in 80% biopsies with diffuse moderate rejection. Biopsies with absent rejection did not show immunoreactive cells. In mild rejection, positive cells were few and scanty monocytes and macrophages (MAC-387 and LN5 positive cells) and T lymphocytes (UCHL-1/CD45 RO positive cells) (up to 20% of all infiltrating cells). Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens on infiltrating and endothelial cells occurred earlier and independent of TNFα reactivity. Number of immunoreactive cells increased in moderate rejection (up to 50%). Immunoreactivity was also present in nonpigmented macrophages in part of the biopsies with resolving rejection (45%). The authors conclude that TNFα is expressed in acute cardiac rejection by immunologically activated inflammatory cells. Immunoreactive cells increase in number with increasing severity of the reaction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1928295

  12. Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Innate Immunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Šedý, John; Bekiaris, Vasileios; Ware, Carl F.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and its corresponding receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) form communication pathways required for developmental, homeostatic, and stimulus-responsive processes in vivo. Although this receptor–ligand system operates between many different cell types and organ systems, many of these proteins play specific roles in immune system function. The TNFSF and TNFRSF proteins lymphotoxins, LIGHT (homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator [HVEM], a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes), lymphotoxin-β receptor (LT-βR), and HVEM are used by embryonic and adult innate lymphocytes to promote the development and homeostasis of lymphoid organs. Lymphotoxin-expressing innate-acting B cells construct microenvironments in lymphoid organs that restrict pathogen spread and initiate interferon defenses. Recent results illustrate how the communication networks formed among these cytokines and the coreceptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 both inhibit and activate innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), innate γδ T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Understanding the role of TNFSF/TNFRSF and interacting proteins in innate cells will likely reveal avenues for future therapeutics for human disease. PMID:25524549

  13. Tumor necrosis factor superfamily in innate immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Šedý, John; Bekiaris, Vasileios; Ware, Carl F

    2015-04-01

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and its corresponding receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) form communication pathways required for developmental, homeostatic, and stimulus-responsive processes in vivo. Although this receptor-ligand system operates between many different cell types and organ systems, many of these proteins play specific roles in immune system function. The TNFSF and TNFRSF proteins lymphotoxins, LIGHT (homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator [HVEM], a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes), lymphotoxin-β receptor (LT-βR), and HVEM are used by embryonic and adult innate lymphocytes to promote the development and homeostasis of lymphoid organs. Lymphotoxin-expressing innate-acting B cells construct microenvironments in lymphoid organs that restrict pathogen spread and initiate interferon defenses. Recent results illustrate how the communication networks formed among these cytokines and the coreceptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 both inhibit and activate innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), innate γδ T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Understanding the role of TNFSF/TNFRSF and interacting proteins in innate cells will likely reveal avenues for future therapeutics for human disease. PMID:25524549

  14. Tumor necrosis factor drives increased splenic monopoiesis in old mice.

    PubMed

    Loukov, Dessi; Naidoo, Avee; Puchta, Alicja; Marin, Jorge L Arredondo; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2016-07-01

    Aging is accompanied by changes in hematopoiesis and consequently in leukocyte phenotype and function. Although age-related changes in bone marrow hematopoiesis are fairly well documented, changes in extramedullary hematopoiesis are less well described. We observed that 18-22-mo-old mice had larger spleens than young controls and found that the enlargement was caused by increased monopoiesis. Because extramedullary hematopoiesis is often driven by inflammation, we hypothesized that the chronic, low-level inflammation that occurs with age is a causal agent in splenomegaly. To test this theory, we compared the number of monocytes in 18-mo-old tumor necrosis factor-knockout mice, which are protected from age-associated inflammation, and found that they did not have increased extramedullary monopoiesis. To determine whether increased splenic monopoiesis is caused by intrinsic changes in the myeloid precursors that occur with age or by the aging microenvironment, we created heterochronic bone marrow chimeras. Increased splenic monopoiesis occurred in old recipient mice, regardless of the age of the donor mouse, but not in young recipient mice, demonstrating that these cells respond to signals from the microenvironment. These data suggest that decreasing the inflammatory microenvironment with age would be an effective strategy for reducing inflammatory diseases propagated by cells of myeloid lineage, which increase in number with age. PMID:27037197

  15. Murine Tumor Models for Oncolytic Rhabdo-Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Falls, Theresa; Roy, Dominic Guy; Bell, John Cameron; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical optimization and validation of novel treatments for cancer therapy requires the use of laboratory animals. Although in vitro experiments using tumor cell lines and ex vivo treatment of patient tumor samples provide a remarkable first-line tool for the initial study of tumoricidal potential, tumor-bearing animals remain the primary option to study delivery, efficacy, and safety of therapies in the context of a complete tumor microenvironment and functional immune system. In this review, we will describe the use of murine tumor models for oncolytic virotherapy using vesicular stomatitis virus. We will discuss studies using immunocompetent and immunodeficient models with respect to toxicity and therapeutic treatments, as well as the various techniques and tools available to study cancer therapy with Rhabdoviruses. PMID:27034397

  16. Resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carletto, Bruna; Berton, Juliana; Ferreira, Tamara Nascimento; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2016-08-01

    In this study, resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were developed and its antitumor activity tested on a melanoma mice model. These nanocapsules were spherically-shaped and presented suitable size, negative charge and high encapsulation efficiency for their use as a modified-release system of resveratrol. Nanoencapsulation leads to the drug amorphization. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles reduced cell viability of murine melanoma cells. There was a decrease in tumor volume, an increase in the necrotic area and inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma when resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were compared to free resveratrol in treated mice. Nanoencapsulation of resveratrol also prevented metastasis and pulmonary hemorrhage. This modified-release technology containing resveratrol can be used as a feasible approach in order to inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth. PMID:27070053

  17. Percentage tumor necrosis following chemotherapy in neuroblastoma correlates with MYCN status but not survival.

    PubMed

    Bomken, Simon; Davies, Beverley; Chong, Leeai; Cole, Michael; Wood, Katrina M; McDermott, Michael; Tweddle, Deborah A

    2011-03-01

    The percentage of chemotherapy-induced necrosis in primary tumors corresponds with outcome in several childhood malignancies, including high-risk metastatic diseases. In this retrospective pilot study, the authors assessed the importance of postchemotherapy necrosis in high-risk neuroblastoma with a histological and case notes review of surgically resected specimens. The authors reviewed all available histology of 31 high-risk neuroblastoma cases treated with COJEC (dose intensive etoposide and vincristine with either cyclophosphamide, cisplatin or carboplatin) or OPEC/OJEC (etoposide, vincristine and cyclophosphamide with alternating cisplatin [OPEC] or carboplatin [OJEC]) induction chemotherapy in 2 Children's Cancer & Leukaemia Group (CCLG) pediatric oncology centers. The percentage of postchemotherapy necrosis was assessed and compared with MYCN amplification status and overall survival. The median percentage of postchemotherapy tumor necrosis was 60%. MYCN status was available for 28 cases, of which 12 were amplified (43%). Survival in cases with ≥ 60% necrosis or ≥ 90% necrosis was not better than those with less necrosis, nor was percentage necrosis associated with survival using Cox regression. However, MYCN-amplified tumors showed a higher percentage of necrosis than non-MYCN-amplified tumors, 71.3% versus 37.2% (P = .006). This effect was not related to prechemotherapy necrosis and did not confer improved overall survival. Postchemotherapy tumor necrosis is higher in patients with MYCN amplification. In this study, postchemotherapy necrosis did not correlate with overall survival and should not lead to modification of postoperative treatment. However, these findings need to be confirmed in a larger prospective study of children with high-risk neuroblastoma. PMID:21214410

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma: IVIM diffusion quantification for prediction of tumor necrosis compared to enhancement ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kakite, Suguru; Dyvorne, Hadrien A.; Lee, Karen M.; Jajamovich, Guido H.; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To correlate intra voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion parameters of liver parenchyma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with degree of liver/tumor enhancement and necrosis; and to assess the diagnostic performance of diffusion parameters vs. enhancement ratios (ER) for prediction of complete tumor necrosis. Patients and methods In this IRB approved HIPAA compliant study, we included 46 patients with HCC who underwent IVIM diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI in addition to routine sequences at 3.0 T. True diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), perfusion fraction (PF) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were quantified in tumors and liver parenchyma. Tumor ER were calculated using contrast-enhanced imaging, and degree of tumor necrosis was assessed using post-contrast image subtraction. IVIM parameters and ER were compared between HCC and background liver and between necrotic and viable tumor components. ROC analysis for prediction of complete tumor necrosis was performed. Results 79 HCCs were assessed (mean size 2.5 cm). D, PF and ADC were significantly higher in HCC vs. liver (p < 0.0001). There were weak significant negative/positive correlations between D/PF and ER, and significant correlations between D/PF/ADC and tumor necrosis (for D, r 0.452, p < 0.001). Among diffusion parameters, D had the highest area under the curve (AUC 0.811) for predicting complete tumor necrosis. ER outperformed diffusion parameters for prediction of complete tumor necrosis (AUC > 0.95, p < 0.002). Conclusion D has a reasonable diagnostic performance for predicting complete tumor necrosis, however lower than that of contrast-enhanced imaging. PMID:27069971

  19. Effects of tumor necrosis factor α-857C/T polymorphism on the expression of tumor necrosis factor α.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Koji; Takayanagi, Risa; Yokoyama, Haruko; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2016-08-01

    It was reported that homozygosity for a lymphotoxin α (LTA) 1-1-1-1 haplotype (LTA NcoI-TNFc-aa13L-aa26) may identify subgroups with a poor response to infliximab in Crohn's disease patients. Previously, we found a genetic polymorphism that linked with the LTA 1-1-1-1 haplotype and noted that it was a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α-857 T allele. To investigate the effects of the -857C/T (rs1799724) polymorphism on the expression of TNFα, we compared levels of transcriptional activity of the gene, mRNA, and protein of the TNFα. The change in transcriptional activity of the -857T allele was higher than that of the -857C allele. Furthermore, the accumulated transcriptional activity of the -857T allele was 1.3-fold higher than that of the -857C allele up to 48 h. The levels of mRNA and protein of the TNFα after stimulation were also shown to be significantly higher in -857C/T as compared to the -857C/C genotype. Our results suggested that TNFα promoter -857T is higher than -857C in the levels of transcriptional activity of the gene, mRNA, and protein of the TNFα. The differences in therapeutic effect of TNF inhibitors among individuals can be explained in part by the induction ability of TNFα via the -857C/T polymorphism. PMID:27307133

  20. Early embryonic and endometrial regulation of tumor necrosis factor and tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 in the cattle uterus.

    PubMed

    Correia-Álvarez, E; Gómez, E; Martín, D; Carrocera, S; Pérez, S; Peynot, N; Giraud-Delville, C; Caamaño, J N; Balseiro, A; Sandra, O; Duranthon, V; Muñoz, M

    2015-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha likely mediates embryomaternal communication in mammals. In bovine, we have previously found that the uterine fluid of heifers that carried early embryos shows downregulation in the TNF and nuclear factor κB system. In this work, we assessed the expression of TNF and its receptor TNFR2 in the bovine endometrium and embryos during blastocyst development. Moreover, to explore the endometrial immune response to early embryos, we analyzed the number of CD45 leukocytes in the bovine endometrium. Day 8 endometrium and blastocyst recovered from animals after transfer of Day 5 embryos showed TNF and TNFR2 mRNA transcription and protein colocalization. The presence of embryos increased endometrial TNF and TNFR2 protein, whereas endometrial leukocytes decreased. Blastocysts exposed to the uterine tract had undetectable levels of TNF and lower levels of TNFR2 mRNA. These results suggest that the endometrium might lower the TNF concentration in the blastocyst by (1) regulating TNF secretion into the uterine fluid and (2) inducing decreased TNF and TNFR2 mRNA transcription in the embryo. Thus, TNF and TNFR2 might participate in early embryomaternal communication. PMID:25589228

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene is not associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Zai, Gwyneth; Arnold, Paul D; Burroughs, Eliza; Richter, Margaret A; Kennedy, James L

    2006-02-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system has been suggested to play a role in the complex etiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder. In this context, tumor necrosis factor-alpha is considered an interesting candidate for genetic studies as overproduction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which may be genetically modulated, can exert neurotoxic effects and influence neural cell growth and proliferation. Moreover, the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene is located on chromosome 6p21.3, a region that has been found to be weakly associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder in linkage studies. One functional polymorphism, G-308A, has been found within the gene. PMID:16395130

  2. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25911043

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-beta in human pregnancy and labor.

    PubMed

    Laham, N; Van Dunné, F; Abraham, L J; Farrugia, W; Bendtzen, K; Brennecke, S P; Rice, G E

    1997-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine tumor necrosis factor-beta (TNF-beta) concentration profiles in peripheral venous plasma and amniotic fluid during pregnancy and at the time of labor and to characterise TNF-beta mRNA expression and TNF-beta release from human gestational tissues. In addition, we investigated the expression of TNF-beta binding protein, lymphotoxin-beta (LT-beta), in human gestational tissues. The mean (+/-S.E.M.) TNF-beta concentrations in maternal plasma (TIL, 78 +/- 12 pg/ml, n = 7 vs. TNIL, 304 +/- 88 pg/ml, n = 7) and amniotic fluid (TIL, 8 +/- 5 pg/ml, n = 6 vs. TNIL, 73 +/- 20 pg/ml, n = 20) were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in association with term labor-onset (TIL) compared to term not-in-labor (TNIL). TNF-beta concentration in maternal plasma and amniotic fluid did not change significantly either with preterm labor (PIL), or during pregnancy. Group-matched comparison of maternal plasma and amniotic fluid TNF-beta concentrations demonstrated that amniotic fluid TNF-beta concentrations were 6-8 fold lower than maternal plasma TNF-beta concentrations. Furthermore, no detectable TNF-beta was secreted from cultured human amniotic, choriodecidual and placental explants. Although, TNF-beta mRNA was detected in amnion, choriodecidual and placenta, LT-beta was similarly expressed in these tissues, suggesting that TNF-beta may be cell membrane bound. These data demonstrate that TNF-beta is present at low levels within the intrauterine environment and may suggest that TNF-beta is specifically inhibited at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:9185077

  4. A third distinct tumor necrosis factor receptor of orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Loparev, V N; Parsons, J M; Knight, J C; Panus, J F; Ray, C A; Buller, R M; Pickup, D J; Esposito, J J

    1998-03-31

    Cowpox virus Brighton red strain (CPV) contains a gene, crmD, which encodes a 320-aa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) of 44% and 22% identity, respectively, to the CPV TNFR-like proteins, cytokine response modifiers (crm) CrmB and CrmC. The crmD gene was interrupted in three other cowpox strains examined and absent in various other orthopoxviruses; however, four strains of ectromelia virus (ECT) examined contained an intact crmD (97% identity to CPV crmD) and lacked cognates of crmB and crmC. The protein, CrmD, contains a transport signal; a 151-aa cysteine-rich region with 21 cysteines that align with human TNFRII ligand-binding region cysteines; and C-terminal region sequences that are highly diverged from cellular TNFR C-terminal region sequences involved in signal transduction. Bacterial maltose-binding proteins containing the CPV or ECT CrmD cysteine-rich region bound TNF and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTalpha) and blocked their in vitro cytolytic activity. Secreted viral CrmD bound TNF and LTalpha and was detectable after the early stage of replication, using nonreducing conditions, as 60- to 70-kDa predominant and 90- to 250-kDa minor disulfide-linked complexes that were able to be reduced to a 46-kDa form and deglycosylated to a 38-kDa protein. Cells infected with CPV produced extremely low amounts of CrmD compared with ECT. Possessing up to three TNFRs, including CrmD, which is secreted as disulfide-linked complexes in varied amounts by CPV and ECT, likely enhances the dynamics of the immune modulating mechanisms of orthopoxviruses. PMID:9520445

  5. Critical role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Masaki; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Although tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has a critical role in the development of COPD, the role of different TNF receptors (TNFRs) in pulmonary emphysema has not been resolved. We aimed to clarify the role of TNFRs in the development of pulmonary emphysema. TNF-α transgenic mice, a murine model of COPD in which the mice spontaneously develop emphysema with a large increase in lung volume and pulmonary hypertension, were crossed with either TNFR1-deficient mice or TNFR2-deficient mice. After 6 months, the gross appearance of the lung, lung histology, and pulmonary and cardiac physiology were determined. In addition, the relationship between apoptosis and emphysema was investigated. Pulmonary emphysema-like changes disappeared with deletion of TNFR1. However, slight improvements were attained with deletion of TNFR2. Apoptotic cells in the interstitium of the lung were observed in TNF-α transgenic mice. The apoptotic signals through TNFR1 appear critical for the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In contrast, the inflammatory process has a less important role for the development of emphysema. PMID:27555760

  6. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha deficiency impairs host defense against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Dong-Gu; Seo, Jin-Hee; Heo, Seung-Ho; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen that is involved in community-acquired pneumonia. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that activates immune responses against infection, invasion, injury, or inflammation. To study the role of TNF-α during S. pneumoniae infection, a murine pneumococcal pneumonia model was used. We intranasally infected C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) and TNF-α knockout (KO) mice with S. pneumoniae D39 serotype 2. In TNF-α KO mice, continuous and distinct loss of body weight, and low survival rates were observed. Bacterial counts in the lungs and blood of TNF-α KO mice were significantly higher than those in WT mice. Histopathological lesions in the spleen of TNF-α KO mice were more severe than those in WT mice. In TNF-α KO mice, severe depletion of white pulp was observed and the number of apoptotic cells was significantly increased. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), IL-12p70 and IL-10 levels in serum were significantly increased in TNF-α KO mice. TNF-α is clearly involved in the regulation of S. pneumoniae infections. Early death and low survival rates of TNF-α KO mice were likely caused by a combination of impaired bacterial clearance and damage to the spleen. Our findings suggest that TNF-α plays a critical role in protecting the host from systemic S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:26155202

  8. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  9. EARLY DIVERSIFICATION OF THE TUMOR NECROSIS SUPERFAMILY IN TELEOSTS: GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION AND EXPRESSION ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) are cytokines involved in diverse immunological and developmental pathways. Little is known about their evolution or expression in lower vertebrate species. Bioinformatic searches of available teleost databases including Zebrafish, Tetroadon...

  10. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  11. Tumor necrosis factor induces glomerular damage in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, T.; Abbate, M.; Zoja, C.; Corna, D.; Perico, N.; Ghezzi, P.; Remuzzi, G.

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a polypeptide hormone produced by activated macrophages detectable in the circulation of experimental animals given endotoxin. Recent evidence strongly suggests that many of the deleterious effects of endotoxin in experimental animals are mediated by TNF. Because endotoxemia in experimental animals and humans is associated with glomerular damage the present investigation was designed to establish whether TNF directly induces glomerular functional and structural changes. Twenty-three rabbits were given human recombinant TNF at the doses of 0.08, 0.8, and 8.0 micrograms/kg/h as a continuous 5-hour intravenous infusion. Animals were killed at the end of the infusion. All rabbits given 0.8 and 8.0 micrograms/kg/h TNF developed anemia (Ht value decrease at 5 hours: 0.8 microgram/kg/h, 15%; 8.0 micrograms/kg/h, 16%); leukopenia (leukocyte count decrease at 5 hours: 0.8 micrograms/kg/h, 47%; 8.0 micrograms/kg/h, 59%); thrombocytopenia (platelet count decrease at 5 hours; 0.8 micrograms/kg/h, 45%; 8.0 micrograms/kg/h, 57%). Rabbits given 8.0 micrograms/kg/h also had renal failure (serum creatinine from 1.02 +/- 0.15 to 1.64 +/- 0.34 mg/dl). By light microscopy only occasional polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the glomerular capillaries were detectable in rabbits infused with 0.08 micrograms/kg/h TNF, whereas with 0.8 micrograms/kg/h TNF the presence of inflammatory cells in the glomerular capillaries was the prominent finding. With 8.0 micrograms/kg/h TNF beside leukocyte accumulation, fibrin was detected in the glomerular capillary lumens of two of eight animals. Electron microscopy found dose-dependent glomerular endothelial cell damage in animals given TNF with fibrinlike material in the capillary lumens. Glomerular changes induced by TNF were remarkably similar to those previously found in animals given endotoxin. Thus, TNF is likely to be the mediator of endotoxin-induced glomerular damage and can be regarded as a new mediator of

  12. Correlation of Doxorubicin Delivery and Tumor Necrosis after Drug-eluting Bead Transarterial Chemoembolization of Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gaba, Ron C; Emmadi, Rajyasree; Parvinian, Ahmad; Casadaban, Leigh C

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To quantify the correlation between doxorubicin (DOX) delivery and tumor necrosis after drug-eluting bead (DEB) transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Materials and Methods In this animal care committee-approved study, New Zealand white rabbit VX2 liver tumors were treated transarterially with DOX-loaded 70-150-μm DEBs in five treatment groups with varying drug doses: sham (saline), 0 mg, 12.5 mg, 25 mg, and 37.5 mg. DEB TACE was followed by 3- and 7-day sacrifice, tumor harvest, and sectioning. Drug delivery was assessed by using fluorescence imaging, and tumor necrosis was quantified by means of histologic analysis. Statistical correlation of DOX delivery and tumor necrosis was performed by using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (ρ). Results Thirty-six VX2 tumors (median diameter, 1.3 cm) in 20 rabbits (median weight, 2.8 kg) underwent successful DEB TACE. Treatment groups included eight, seven, eight, five, and eight tumors of similar size (P > .05). Tumors showed progressively greater DOX extent (sham, 0%; 0 mg, 0%; 12.5 mg, 3%; 25 mg, 20%; and 37.5 mg, 27%) and intensity (sham, 0.4; 0 mg, 1.9; 12.5 mg, 8.5; 25 mg, 9.6; and 37.5 mg, 18.3) and higher median percentage necrosis (sham, 68%; 0 mg, 64%; 12.5 mg, 76%; 25 mg, 78%; and 37.5 mg, 83%) across DOX treatment groups. Correlation of DOX extent (ρ = 0.975, P = .005) and intensity (ρ = 0.900, P = .037) with percentage tumor necrosis was statistically significant. Conclusion Incremental increases in DOX correlate with greater necrosis in rabbit VX2 liver tumors after DEB TACE. This result indicates an essential role for chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity in TACE effectiveness and supports the use of chemotherapeutic drugs in transarterial therapy. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26967144

  13. Testicular Seminoma With Pseudocyst and Coagulation Necrosis Like Burned-out Tumor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hoshii, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Go; Ikeda, Yohei; Nishiyama, Tsutomu

    2016-07-01

    Testicular seminoma is a relatively common testicular cancer; however, testicular seminoma with pseudocyst is an extremely rare. The 'burned-out' phenomenon in germ cell tumors refers to a germ cell tumor in extra-gonadal tissues with spontaneous regression of an intra-gonadal tumor. We present a case of the testicular seminoma with pseudocyst and coagulation necrosis like burned-out tumor without metastasis. PMID:27335779

  14. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  15. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediation of tumor targeting human recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Shao, Xin; Zeng, Liang; Wang, Fa; Huang, Di-Nan; Hou, Gan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to use genetic engineering in order to establish an efficient tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α fusion protein with low toxicity, which may be used to target tumors. Four types of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated tumor targeting human recombinant TNF-α (rhTNF-α) fusion protein vectors were constructed. These were subsequently introduced into Escherichia coli. rhTNF-α fusion protein with a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tag was purified using GST resin affinity chromatography, and GST-tags were digested using factor Xa. The cytotoxic effects of the fusion protein on L929 cells were determined using MTT assays. At a concentration of 1 pM, the GST-tagged fusion protein exerted no cytotoxic effects on the cells, compared with the negative control cells (P=0.975>0.05). However, at a concentration of 1000 pM, the deblocking fusion protein exerted greater cytotoxic effects on L929 cells, compared with positive control cells (P<0.05). Treatment with the fusion protein also induced cell apoptosis in the nasopharyngeal cancer cell line, CNE-2Z, which secretes high levels of MMP-1. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that MMP-mediated rhTNF-α fusion protein induces CNE-2Z cells apoptosis. rhTNF-α exhibits high efficacy and tumor cell targeting capability, with low toxicity effects on healthy cells. PMID:25891416

  17. A Novel Small-molecule Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Attenuates Inflammation in a Hepatitis Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Gong, Haiyan; Zhu, Haiyan; Ji, Qing; Su, Pei; Liu, Peng; Cao, Shannan; Yao, Jianfeng; Jiang, Linlin; Han, Mingzhe; Ma, Xiaotong; Xiong, Dongsheng; Luo, Hongbo R.; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Yuanfu

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a hallmark of many inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and septic shock and hepatitis, making it a potential therapeutic target for clinical interventions. To explore chemical inhibitors against TNFα activity, we applied computer-aided drug design combined with in vitro and cell-based assays and identified a lead chemical compound, (E)-4-(2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl) (named as C87 thereafter), which directly binds to TNFα, potently inhibits TNFα-induced cytotoxicity (IC50 = 8.73 μm) and effectively blocks TNFα-triggered signaling activities. Furthermore, by using a murine acute hepatitis model, we showed that C87 attenuates TNFα-induced inflammation, thereby markedly reducing injuries to the liver and improving animal survival. Thus, our results lead to a novel and highly specific small-molecule TNFα inhibitor, which can be potentially used to treat TNFα-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24634219

  18. Release of tumor necrosis factor alpha by human peritoneal macrophages in response to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1.

    PubMed

    Buyalos, R P; Rutanen, E M; Tsui, E; Halme, J

    1991-08-01

    We examined the release in vitro of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood monocytes following incubation with toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). We obtained peritoneal macrophages from 22 women at laparoscopy and peripheral blood monocytes from four healthy women during both the midfollicular and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle. The samples were incubated for 24 hours at 37 C with 10(-2)-10(4) ng/mL of TSST-1 or 10(4) ng/mL of bacterial endotoxin. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha activity was determined with a bioassay using an actinomycin D-sensitized WEHI-164 murine fibrosarcoma cell line. Twenty-four-hour incubation with TSST-1 resulted in a dose-dependent release of TNF-alpha by both peritoneal macrophages (maximal response 554 +/- 97 U of activity) and peripheral blood monocytes (maximal response 478 +/- 81 U of activity). We observed enhanced TNF-alpha release by peritoneal macrophages from women with endometriosis, compared with those without endometriosis, at a concentration of 10(4) ng/mL of TSST-1 (704 +/- 134 versus 354 +/- 103 U of activity; P less than .05). These data support the theory that the metabolic and physiologic derangements of perimenstrual toxic shock syndrome may be partially mediated by TNF-alpha released by peritoneal macrophages as a result of exposure to TSST-1. PMID:2067760

  19. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis as a novel approach to eliminate tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The cytokine TRAIL represents one of the most promising candidates for the apoptotic elimination of tumor cells, either alone or in combination therapies. However, its efficacy is often limited by intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to apoptosis. Programmed necrosis is an alternative, molecularly distinct mode of programmed cell death that is elicited by TRAIL under conditions when the classical apoptosis machinery fails or is actively inhibited. The potential of TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis in tumor therapy is, however, almost completely uncharacterized. We therefore investigated its impact on a panel of tumor cell lines of wide-ranging origin. Methods Cell death/viability was measured by flow cytometry/determination of intracellular ATP levels/crystal violet staining. Cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors was detected by flow cytometry, expression of proteins by Western blot. Ceramide levels were quantified by high-performance thin layer chromatography and densitometric analysis, clonogenic survival of cells was determined by crystal violet staining or by soft agarose cloning. Results TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis killed eight out of 14 tumor cell lines. Clonogenic survival was reduced in all sensitive and even one resistant cell lines tested. TRAIL synergized with chemotherapeutics in killing tumor cell lines by programmed necrosis, enhancing their effect in eight out of 10 tested tumor cell lines and in 41 out of 80 chemotherapeutic/TRAIL combinations. Susceptibility/resistance of the investigated tumor cell lines to programmed necrosis seems to primarily depend on expression of the pro-necrotic kinase RIPK3 rather than the related kinase RIPK1 or cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors. Furthermore, interference with production of the lipid ceramide protected all tested tumor cell lines. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis represents a feasible approach for the elimination of

  20. Pulsed focused ultrasound exposures enhance locally administered gene therapy in a murine solid tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Ziadloo, Ali; Xie, Jianwu; Frenkel, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy by intratumoral injection is a promising approach for treating solid tumors. However, this approach has limited success due to insufficient distribution of gene vectors used for gene delivery. Previous studies have shown that pulsed-focused ultrasound (pFUS) can enhance both systemic and local delivery of therapeutic agents in solid tumors and other disease models. Here, murine squamous cell carcinoma flank tumors were treated with single intratumoral injection of naked tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plasmid, either with or without a preceding pFUS exposure. The exposures were given at 1 MHz, at a spatial average, temporal peak intensity of 2660 W cm–2, using 50 ms pulses, given at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz. One hundred pulses were given at individual raster points, spaced evenly over the projected surface of the tumor at a distance of 2 mm. Exposures alone had no effect on tumor growth. Significant growth inhibition was observed with injection of TNF-α plasmid, and tumor growth was further inhibited with pFUS. Improved results with pFUS correlated with larger necrotic regions in histological sections and improved distribution and penetration of fluorescent surrogate nanoparticles. Electron microscopy demonstrated enlarged gaps between cells in exposed tissue, and remote acoustic palpation showed decreases in tissue stiffness after pFUS. Combined, these results suggest pFUS effects may be reducing barriers for tissue transport and additionally lowering interstitial fluid pressure to further improve delivery and distribution of injected plasmid for greater therapeutic effects. This suggests that pFUS could potentially be beneficial for improving local gene therapy treatment of human malignancies. PMID:23464051

  1. CCL11-induced eosinophils inhibit the formation of blood vessels and cause tumor necrosis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yanjiang; Tian, Yijun; Kurosawa, Takamasa; Matsui, Sayaka; Touma, Maki; Yanai, Takanori; Wu, Qiong; Sugimoto, Kenkichi

    2016-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that IL-18 and CCL11 were highly expressed in an NFSA tumor cell line that showed limited angiogenesis and severe necrosis. However, IL-18 was not responsible for the immune cell accumulation and necrosis. Here, we attempted to clarify the relevance of CCL11 in angiogenesis and tumor formation. We established CCL11-overexpressing MS-K cell clones (MS-K-CCL11) to assess the role of CCL11 in immune cell accumulation and angiogenesis. The MS-K-CCL11 cells did not form tumors in mice. MS-K-CCL11-conditioned medium (CM) and recombinant CCL11 induced macrophage and eosinophil differentiation from bone marrow cells. The MS-K-CCL11-CM effectively recruited the differentiated eosinophils. Furthermore, the eosinophils damaged the MS-K, NFSA and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of an antagonist of CCR3, a CCL11 receptor, to NFSA tumor-bearing mice restored the blood vessel formation and blocked the eosinophil infiltration into the NFSA tumors. Furthermore, other CCL11-overexpressing LM8 clones were established, and their tumor formation ability was reduced compared to the parental LM8 cells, accompanied by increased eosinophil infiltration, blockade of angiogenesis and necrosis. These results indicate that CCL11 was responsible for the limited angiogenesis and necrosis by inducing and attracting eosinophils in the tumors. PMID:27169545

  2. [Brain MR perfusion and MR spectroscopy in differentiation of radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence (case report)].

    PubMed

    Tekşam, Mehmet; Kayahan, Esra Meltem; Yerli, Hasan; Ağildere, A Muhteşem

    2004-12-01

    It is not always possible to differentiate tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis using conventional MR images. In this report we present a case of pathologically proven radiation necrosis which appeared as nodular contrast enhancement on conventional MR images in a patient who was surgically treated for grade II astrocytoma 5 years ago. There were decreased choline, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate peaks and significantly increased lipid peak on multivoxel H1-MR spectroscopy while there was no significant perfusion increase on MR perfusion. These findings suggested changes secondary to radiation necrosis. PMID:15611913

  3. Use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gallitano, Stephanie M; McDermott, Laura; Brar, Kanwaljit; Lowenstein, Eve

    2016-05-01

    Patients with HIV and AIDS are living longer because of advancements in antiretroviral therapy. These patients are often susceptible to debilitating inflammatory disorders that are refractory to standard treatment. We discuss the relationship of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and HIV and then review 27 published cases of patients with HIV being treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. This review is limited because no randomized controlled trials have been performed with this patient population. Regardless, we propose that reliable seropositive patients, who are adherent to medication regimens and frequent monitoring and have failed other treatment modalities, should be considered for treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. PMID:26774690

  4. F3-targeted cisplatin-hydrogel nanoparticles as an effective therapeutic that targets both murine and human ovarian tumor endothelial cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Winer, I.; Wang, S.; Lee, Y-E K.; Fan, W.; Gong, Y.; Burgos-Ojeda, D.; Spahlinger, G.; Kopelman, R.; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that ovarian cancer may be highly responsive to anti-vascular therapeutics. We have developed an anti-vascular tumor therapeutic using the F3 peptide to target cisplatin loaded nanoparticles (F3-Cis-Np) to tumor vessels. We demonstrate that while F3-Cis-Np bind with high specificity to both human ovarian tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells in vitro, they only demonstrate cytotoxic activity against the tumor endothelial cells. In vivo these nanoparticles bind primarily to tumor endothelial cells. Therapeutic studies in both flank and orthotopic intraperitoneal murine ovarian tumor models, as well as human tumor xenograft models, demonstrate rapid tumor regression with treatment. Treatment was associated with significant vascular necrosis consistent with an anti-vascular effect. Furthermore treatment was active in both platinum sensitive and platinum resistant cell lines. Importantly we demonstrate that F3-Cis-Np bind to human tumor endothelial cells in vitro and to human tumor vessels in vivo. Therapy targeting human vasculature in vivo with F3-Cis-Np led to near complete loss of all human tumor vessels in a murine model of human tumor vasculature. Our studies indicate that F3-targeted vascular therapeutics may be an effective treatment modality in human ovarian cancer. PMID:20959470

  5. Enhancement of glioblastoma radioresponse by a selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib: Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Khong Bee . E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg; Wang, Ting Ting; Woon, Chow Thai; Cheah, Elizabeth S.; Moore, Xiao Lei; Zhu Congju; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Toward improved glioblastoma multiforme treatment, we determined whether celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, could enhance glioblastoma radiosensitivity by inducing tumor necrosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Methods and Materials: U-87MG cells treated with celecoxib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival and angiogenic factor protein analysis (angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]). In vivo, survival of mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells and treated with celecoxib and/or irradiation was monitored. Isolated tumors were assessed for tumor necrosis and tumor microvascular density by von Williebrand's factor (vWF) immunohistochemical staining. Results: Celecoxib (4 and 30 {mu}M; 24, 48, and 72 h) enhanced U-87MG cell radiosensitivity by significantly reducing clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Angiopoietin-1 and VEGF proteins were decreased, whereas angiopoietin-2 expression increased after 72 h of celecoxib alone and when combined with irradiation. In vivo, median survival of control mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells was 18 days. Celecoxib (100 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks) significantly extended median survival of irradiated mice (24 Gy total) from 34 to 41 days, with extensive tumor necrosis [24.5 {+-} 8.6% of tumor region, compared with irradiation alone (2.7 {+-} 1.8%)]. Tumor microvascular density was significantly reduced in combined celecoxib and irradiated tumors (52.5 {+-} 2.9 microvessels per mm{sup 2} tumor region), compared with irradiated tumors alone (65.4 {+-} 4.0 microvessels per mm{sup 2}). Conclusion: Celecoxib significantly enhanced glioblastoma radiosensitivity, reduced clonogenic survival, and prolonged survival of glioblastoma-implanted mice by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necr0010os.

  6. Unilamellar liposomes modulate secretion of tumor necrosis factor by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brisseau, G F; Kresta, A; Schouten, D; Bohnen, J M; Shek, P N; Fok, E; Rotstein, O D

    1994-01-01

    Liposomal encapsulation of antimicrobial agents has been used to improve drug delivery, particularly against intracellular pathogens. The effect of unilamellar liposomes on macrophage activation in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide was examined. Liposomes caused a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of tumor necrosis factor release by lipopolysaccharide-treated cells. The accumulation of tumor necrosis factor mRNA transcripts was unaffected, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism for this effect. However, induction of macrophage procoagulant activity was unaffected by liposomes, indicating a selective rather than a global inhibition. These data suggest that liposomes used for drug delivery may modulate the host response to infection. Images PMID:7872768

  7. Dissecting Cellulitis of the Scalp Responding to Intravenous Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Gemmeke, Astrid; Koch, André

    2012-04-01

    The authors present the case of a 30-year-old male patient with a severe and long-standing dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. The disease did not respond to conventional treatment, including oral antibiotics, isotretinoin, and prednisolone. Quality of life was significantly impaired. After introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment (infliximab), the malodorous discharge stopped, inflammation was reduced significantly, nodules became flat, and pain decreased. The treatment was well tolerated although he developed a temporary psoriasiform rash after the second intravenous infusion. In conclusion, anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment is a new therapeutic option in this severe and recalcitrant disorder. PMID:22708007

  8. Mieap suppresses murine intestinal tumor via its mitochondrial quality control

    PubMed Central

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Kinjo, Takao; Nakanishi, Ruri; Arakawa, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Mieap, a novel p53-inducible protein, plays a key role in maintaining healthy mitochondria in various pathophysiological states. Here, we show that Mieap deficiency in ApcMin/+ mice is strikingly associated with the malignant progression of murine intestinal tumors. To understand the role that Mieap plays in in vivo tumorigenesis, we generated Mieap heterozygous (ApcMin/+ Mieap+/−) and homozygous (ApcMin/+ Mieap−/−) ApcMin/+ mice. Interestingly, the ApcMin/+ mice with the Mieap+/− and Mieap−/− genetic background revealed remarkable shortening of the lifetime compared to ApcMin/+ mice because of severe anemia. A substantial increase in the number and size of intestinal polyps was associated with Mieap gene deficiency. Histopathologically, intestinal tumors in the Mieap-deficient ApcMin/+ mice clearly demonstrated advanced grades of adenomas and adenocarcinomas. We demonstrated that the significant increase in morphologically unhealthy mitochondria and trace accumulations of reactive oxygen species may be mechanisms underlying the increased malignant progression of the intestinal tumors of Mieap-deficient ApcMin/+ mice. These findings suggest that the Mieap-regulated mitochondrial quality control plays a critical role in preventing mouse intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:26216032

  9. Beta-1,2-linked oligomannosides from Candida albicans act as signals for tumor necrosis factor alpha production.

    PubMed Central

    Jouault, T; Lepage, G; Bernigaud, A; Trinel, P A; Fradin, C; Wieruszeski, J M; Strecker, G; Poulain, D

    1995-01-01

    Different cell wall components from Candida albicans have been shown to stimulate murine macrophages for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion. All of these molecules contain beta-1,2-oligomannosides. In order to examine their role in TNF-alpha production, acid-labile oligosaccharides, released from C. albicans VW32 cell wall phosphopeptidomannan by mild acid hydrolysis, and previously shown to correspond to homopolymers of beta-1,2-linked mannopyranosyl units, were separated by gel filtration chromatography according to their degree of polymerization. Murine macrophages incubated with purified oligomannosides (M2 to M8) released TNF-alpha to an extent which was dependent on, although not directly correlated with, the length of the mannosyl chain. Slight activity was observed with M4 and M5; M6 and M7 had virtually no effect, whereas M8 was associated with strong TNF-alpha release. This effect of M8 was dose dependent and was not altered by polymyxin B, known to interfere with lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production. These results suggest that stimulation of TNF-alpha release by C. albicans glycoconjugates containing beta-1,2-linked oligomannosides may be due, at least in part, to the presence of these components. PMID:7768626

  10. Until Death Do Us Part: Necrosis and Oxidation Promote the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Ramin; Kaltenmeier, Christof; Lotze, Michael T.; Bergmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor proliferation is concomitant with autophagy, limited apoptosis, and resultant necrosis. Necrosis is associated with the release of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), which act as ‘danger signals’, recruiting inflammatory cells, inducing immune responses, and promoting wound healing. Most of the current treatment strategies for cancer (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy) promote DAMP release following therapy-induced tumor death by necroptosis and necrosis. Myeloid cells (monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and granulocytes), as well as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) belong to the early immigrants in response to unscheduled cell death, initiating and modulating the subsequent inflammatory response. Responding to DAMPs, MSCs, and DCs promote an immunosuppressive milieu, while eosinophils induce oxidative conditions limiting the biologic activity of DAMPs over time and distance. Regulatory T cells are strongly affected by pattern recognition receptor signaling in the tumor microenvironment and limit immune reactivity coordinately with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Means to ‘aerobically’ oxidize DAMPs provide a novel strategy for limiting tumor progression. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the impact of necrosis on the tumor microenvironment and the influence of oxidative conditions found within this setting. PMID:27226794

  11. Photodynamic therapy with aluminum-chloro-phthalocyanine induces necrosis and vascular damage in mice tongue tumors.

    PubMed

    Longo, João Paulo Figueiró; Lozzi, Silene Paulino; Simioni, Andreza Ribeiro; Morais, Paulo César; Tedesco, Antônio Cláudio; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we describe the efficacy of the liposomal-AlClPc (aluminum-chloro-phthalocyanine) formulation in PDT study against Ehrlich tumor cells proliferation in immunocompetent swiss mice tongue. Experiments were conduced in sixteen tumor induced mice that were divided in three control groups: (1) tumor without treatment; (2) tumor with 100J/cm(2) laser (670nm) irradiation; and (3) tumor with AlClPc peritumoral injection; and a PDT experimental group when tumors received AlClPc injection followed by tumor irradiation. Control groups present similar macroscopically and histological patterns after treatments, while PDT treatment induced 90% of Ehrlich tumor necrosis after 24h of one single application, showing the efficacy of liposome-AlClPc (aluminum-chloro-phthalocyanine) mediated PDT on the treatment of oral cancer. PMID:19097802

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced enhancement of cryosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Raghav; Paciotti, Guilio F.; Bischof, John C.

    2008-02-01

    Local recurrence of cancer after cryosurgery is related to the inability to monitor and predict destruction of cancer (temperatures > -40°C) within an iceball. We previously reported that a cytokine adjuvant TNF-α could be used to achieve complete cancer destruction at the periphery of an iceball (0 to -40°C). This study is a further development of that work in which cryosurgery was performed using cryoprobes operating at temperatures > -40°C. LNCaP Pro 5 tumor grown in a dorsal skin fold chamber (DSFC) was frozen at -6°C after TNF-α incubation for 4 or 24 hours. Tumors grown in the hind limb were frozen with a probe tip temperature of -40°C, 4 or 24 hours after systemic injection with TNF-α. Both cryosurgery alone or TNF-α treatment alone caused only a minimal damage to the tumor tissue at the conditions used in the study. The combination of TNF-α and cryosurgery produced a significant damage to the tumor tissue in both the DSFC and the hind limb model system. This augmentation in cryoinjury was found to be time-dependent with 4-hour time period between the two treatments being more effective than 24-hour. These results suggests the possibility of cryotreatment at temperatures > -40°C with the administration of TNF-α.

  13. VEGFR-2 Targeted Chemoprevention of Murine Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Karoor, Vijaya; Le, Mysan; Merrick, Daniel; Dempsey, Edward C.; Miller, York E.

    2010-01-01

    No clinically effective chemoprevention for lung cancer has been found. Angiogenesis is an early feature of both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell lung cancer. We investigated the effects of VEGFR-2 inhibition on lung carcinogenesis in a murine model of adenocarcinoma. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, was administered to FVB/N mice in chow for 7 days at varying doses in order to demonstrate pharmacologic activity by inhibition of VEGF mediated VEFGR-2 and ERK phosphorylation. Plasma levels corroborated adequate dosage. For chemoprevention experiments, mice were injected i.p. with 1 mg/gm urethane, a carcinogen found in tobacco smoke. Chow containing vandetanib, 75 mg/kg/d, or control chow was given to mice, starting 7 days after urethane administration. Sixteen weeks after urethane injection, mice were sacrificed, tumors enumerated and measured. Vandetanib resulted in reductions in tumor multiplicity (6.5 +/− 0.86 vs 1.0 +/− 0.30, p = 0.001) and average tumor volume (0.85 +/− 0.10 mm3 vs. 0.15 +/− 0.09 mm3, p = 0.001), but not incidence (71% vs. 100%, p = ns), compared to control. As vandetanib has other activities besides VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibition, we administered the anti-VEGFR-2 monoclonal antibody, DC101, for weeks 11–15 of a urethane carcinogenesis protocol with an arrest in tumor volume increase, but no change in multiplicity or incidence. Further investigation of the chemopreventive effect of vandetanib and other VEGF signaling inhibitors is needed. PMID:20647338

  14. Bone necrosis and tumor induction following experimental intraoperative irradiation.

    PubMed

    Powers, B E; Gillette, E L; McChesney, S L; LeCouteur, R A; Withrow, S J

    1989-09-01

    The bone of the lumbar vertebrae of 153 dogs was examined 2 and 5 years after intraoperative irradiation (IORT), fractionated external beam irradiation (EBRT), or the combination. Groups of dogs received 15 to 55 Gy IORT only, 10 to 47.5 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions or 60 to 80 Gy EBRT in 30 fractions. Six MeV electrons were used for IORT, and EBRT was done using photons from a 6 MV linear accelerator. The paraaortic region was irradiated and the ventral part of the lumbar vertebrae was in the 90% isodose level. Two years after irradiation, the dose causing significant bone necrosis as determined by at least 50% empty lacunae in the vertebral cortex was 38.2 Gy IORT alone and 32.5 Gy IORT combined with EBRT. Five years after irradiation, the dose causing 50% empty lacunae was 28.5 Gy IORT only and 14.4 Gy IORT combined with EBRT. The ED50 for lesions of the ventral vertebral artery was 21.7 Gy IORT only and 20.1 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT 2 years after irradiation and 27.0 Gy IORT only and 20.0 Gy IORT combined with 50 Gy EBRT 5 years after irradiation. All lesions after EBRT only were mild. Eight dogs developed osteosarcomas 4 to 5 years after irradiation, one at 47.5 Gy IORT only and the remainder at 25.0 Gy IORT and above combined with 50 Gy EBRT. In conclusion, the extent of empty lacunae, indicating bone necrosis, was more severe 5 years after irradiation than after 2 years. The effect of 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions was equivalent to about 6 Gy IORT 2 years after irradiation and to about 14 Gy 5 years after irradiation. Based on these estimates, IORT doses of 10 to 15 Gy have an effect 5 times or greater than the amount given in 2 Gy fractions. Osteosarcomas occurred in 21% of dogs which received doses greater than 25 Gy IORT. Doses of 15 to 20 Gy IORT in combination with 50 Gy EBRT in 2 Gy fractions may be near the tolerance level for late developing bone injury. PMID:2506159

  15. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  16. Tumor necrosis a regulation of adipokine gene expression in neonatal adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neonatal period is also a time of significant stress and susceptibility to infection, conditions which favor the secretion of tumor necrosis a. The present study was designed to determine if TNFa can alter adipokine gene expression within the adipose tissue of neonatal swine. Primary stromal v...

  17. Vertical Transmission of Histoplasmosis Associated With Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, James G; Halasa, Natasha; Creech, C Buddy; Dulek, Daniel E; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G; Nelson, George E; Talbot, H Keipp; Scalise, Melissa L; Scott, Patricia L; Mahadevan, Uma; Beaulieu, Dawn B

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutics blocking the activity of tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) are a risk factor for invasive fungal infections; however, infectious risks to infants born to mothers receiving anti-TNF therapy are not well defined. We report a case of vertical transmission of disseminated histoplasmosis in a mother-infant pair exposed to anti-TNF therapy. PMID:27012275

  18. Genetics Home Reference: tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): definition, semiology, prognosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and place relative to other periodic joint diseases. Joint Bone Spine. 2004 Jul;71(4):284-90. Review. Citation on PubMed Pettersson T, Kantonen J, Matikainen S, ...

  19. Genes encoding tumor necrosis factor alpha and granzyme A are expressed during development of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Held, W; MacDonald, H R; Weissman, I L; Hess, M W; Mueller, C

    1990-01-01

    Progressive destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in nonobese diabetic mice is observed after infiltration of the pancreas with lymphocytes [Makino, S., Kunimoto, K., Muraoka, Y., Mizushima, Y., Katagiri, K. & Tochino, Y. (1980) Exp. Anim. (Tokyo) 29, 1-13]. We show that the genes for tumor necrosis factor alpha and granzyme A, a serine protease associated with cytoplasmic granules of cytotoxic cells, are expressed during the development of spontaneous diabetes mellitus in the nonobese diabetic mouse. Granzyme A-positive cells are found both in and surrounding the islets, implying induction prior to islet infiltration. Tumor necrosis factor alpha expression is exclusively observed in the intra-islet infiltrate, predominantly in lymphocytes adjacent to insulin-producing beta cells, the targets of the autoimmune destruction, implying that tumor necrosis factor alpha expression is induced locally--i.e., in the islet. A considerable portion of cells expressing tumor necrosis factor alpha appear to be CD4+ T cells. This T-cell subset was previously shown to be necessary for development of the disease. Thus, these findings may be important for understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes mellitus and potentially also for that of other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:2179951

  20. Functional Characterization of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 15(TNFSF15) Induced by Lipopolysaccharides and Eimeria Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A full-length cDNA encoding chicken tumor necrosis factor superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) was isolated and its functional role was investigated. TNFSF15 transcripts were primarily expressed in spleen, liver, intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), peripheral blood lymphocytes and bursa. In vitro inf...

  1. Structural Biology of Tumor Necrosis Factor Demonstrated for Undergraduates Instruction by Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Urmi

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional (3D) modeling exercise for undergraduate students in chemistry and health sciences disciplines, focusing on a protein-group linked to immune system regulation. Specifically, the exercise involves molecular modeling and structural analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) proteins, both wild type and mutant. The…

  2. A drug carrier targeting murine uPAR for photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolei; Zheng, Ke; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhuo; Yuan, Cai; Hu, Ping; Chen, Jincan; Xue, Jinping; Huang, Mingdong

    2015-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an effective therapeutical modality for tumors. In PDT, a photosensitizer was used to capture the light of specific wavelength, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species and cytotoxicity surrounding the photosensitizer. Modifications of photosensitizers to enhance tumor specificity are common approaches to increase the efficacy and reduce the side effects of PDT. Previously, we developed a human serum albumin (HSA)-based drug carrier fused with the human amino-terminal fragment (hATF), which binds to a tumor surface marker (urokinase receptor, uPAR). However, hATF-HSA binds to murine uPAR much weaker (79-fold) than to human uPAR, and is not optimal for applications on murine tumor models. In this study, we developed a murine version of the drug carrier (mATF-HSA). A photosensitizer (mono-substituted β-carboxy phthalocyanine zinc, CPZ) was loaded into this carrier, giving a rather stable macromolecule (mATF-HSA:CPZ) that was shown to bind to murine uPAR in vitro. In addition, we evaluated both the photodynamic therapy efficacy and tumor retention capability of the macromolecule (at a dose of 0.05mg CPZ/kg mouse body weight) on murine hepatoma-22 (H22) tumor bearing mouse model. mATF-HSA:CPZ showed more accumulation in tumors compared to its human counterpart (hATF-HSA:CPZ) measured by quantitative fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). Besides, mATF-HSA:CPZ exhibited a higher tumor killing efficacy than hATF-HSA:CPZ. Together, the macromolecule mATF-HSA is a promising tumor-specific drug carrier on murine tumor models and is an useful tool to study tumor biology on murine tumor models. PMID:26004218

  3. Monocyte Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–Converting Enzyme Catalytic Activity and Substrate Shedding in Sepsis and Noninfectious Systemic Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, David J. P.; O’Dea, Kieran P.; Scott, Alasdair J.; Takata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of severe sepsis on monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme baseline and inducible activity profiles. Design: Observational clinical study. Setting: Mixed surgical/medical teaching hospital ICU. Patients: Sixteen patients with severe sepsis, 15 healthy volunteers, and eight critically ill patients with noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Monocyte expression of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide, sol-tumor necrosis factor production, tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme expression and catalytic activity, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 expression, and shedding at 48-hour intervals from day 0 to day 4, as well as p38-mitogen activated protein kinase expression. Compared with healthy volunteers, both sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients’ monocytes expressed reduced levels of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide and released less sol-tumor necrosis factor on in vitro lipopolysaccharide stimulation, consistent with the term monocyte deactivation. However, patients with sepsis had substantially elevated levels of basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity that were refractory to lipopolysaccharide stimulation and this was accompanied by similar changes in p38-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. In patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, monocyte basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme, and its induction by lipopolysaccharide, appeared similar to healthy controls. Changes in basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity at day 0 for sepsis patients correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and the attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme response to lipopolysaccharide was associated with increased mortality. Similar changes in monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity could

  4. Adjuvant Cationic Liposomes Presenting MPL and IL-12 Induce Cell Death, Suppress Tumor Growth, and Alter the Cellular Phenotype of Tumors in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) process and present antigens to T lymphocytes, inducing potent immune responses when encountered in association with activating signals, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Using the 4T1 murine model of breast cancer, cationic liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and interleukin (IL)-12 were administered by intratumoral injection. Combination multivalent presentation of the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand MPL and cytotoxic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trmethylammonium-propane lipids induced cell death, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased serum levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The addition of recombinant IL-12 further suppressed tumor growth and increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and interferon-γ. IL-12 also increased the percentage of cytolytic T cells, DC, and F4/80+ macrophages in the tumor. While single agent therapy elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase 3-fold above basal levels in the tumor, combination therapy with MPL cationic liposomes and IL-12 stimulated a 7-fold increase, supporting the observed cell cycle arrest (loss of Ki-67 expression) and apoptosis (TUNEL positive). In mice bearing dual tumors, the growth of distal, untreated tumors mirrored that of liposome-treated tumors, supporting the presence of a systemic immune response. PMID:25179345

  5. Capsid is an important determinant for functional complementation of murine leukemia virus and spleen necrosis virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Boyko, Vitaly; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2007-04-10

    In this report, we examined the abilities and requirements of heterologous Gag proteins to functionally complement each other to support viral replication. Two distantly related gammaretroviruses, murine leukemia virus (MLV) and spleen necrosis virus (SNV), were used as a model system because SNV proteins can support MLV vector replication. Using chimeric or mutant Gag proteins that could not efficiently support MLV vector replication, we determined that a homologous capsid (CA) domain was necessary for the functional complementation of MLV and SNV Gag proteins. Findings from the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay revealed that MLV and SNV Gag proteins were capable of colocalizing and interacting in cells. Taken together, our results indicated that MLV and SNV Gag proteins can interact in cells; however, a homologous CA domain is needed for functional complementation of MLV and SNV Gag proteins to complete virus replication. This requirement of homologous Gag most likely occurs at a postassembly step(s) of the viral replication. PMID:17156810

  6. Murine leukemia virus envelope gp70 is a shared biomarker for the high-sensitivity quantification of murine tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Scrimieri, Francesca; Askew, David; Corn, David J; Eid, Saada; Bobanga, Iuliana D; Bjelac, Jaclyn A; Tsao, Matthew L; Allen, Frederick; Othman, Youmna S; Wang, Shih-Chung G; Huang, Alex Y

    2013-01-01

    The preclinical development of anticancer drugs including immunotherapeutics and targeted agents relies on the ability to detect minimal residual tumor burden as a measure of therapeutic efficacy. Real-time quantitative (qPCR) represents an exquisitely sensitive method to perform such an assessment. However, qPCR-based applications are limited by the availability of a genetic defect associated with each tumor model under investigation. Here, we describe an off-the-shelf qPCR-based approach to detect a broad array of commonly used preclinical murine tumor models. In particular, we report that the mRNA coding for the envelope glycoprotein 70 (gp70) encoded by the endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is universally expressed in 22 murine cancer cell lines of disparate histological origin but is silent in 20 out of 22 normal mouse tissues. Further, we detected the presence of as few as 100 tumor cells in whole lung extracts using qPCR specific for gp70, supporting the notion that this detection approach has a higher sensitivity as compared with traditional tissue histology methods. Although gp70 is expressed in a wide variety of tumor cell lines, it was absent in inflamed tissues, non-transformed cell lines, or pre-cancerous lesions. Having a high-sensitivity biomarker for the detection of a wide range of murine tumor cells that does not require additional genetic manipulations or the knowledge of specific genetic alterations present in a given neoplasm represents a unique experimental tool for investigating metastasis, assessing antitumor therapeutic interventions, and further determining tumor recurrence or minimal residual disease. PMID:24482753

  7. Iron-independent induction of ferritin H chain by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L L; Miller, S C; Torti, S V; Tsuji, Y; Torti, F M

    1991-01-01

    Iron increases the synthesis of the iron-storage protein, ferritin, largely by promoting translation of preexisting mRNAs for both the H and L ferritin isoforms (H, heavy, heart, acidic; L, light, liver, basic). We have recently cloned and sequenced a full-length cDNA to murine ferritin H and identified ferritin H as a gene induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, cachectin). Using primary human myoblasts, we have now examined the relationship between TNF-alpha and iron in regulating ferritin. Four lines of evidence suggest that TNF-alpha regulates ferritin independently of iron. First, evaluation of mRNA showed that TNF-alpha increased ferritin H chain specifically, provoking no change in steady-state levels of ferritin L mRNA; iron, in contrast, increased the mRNA of both isoforms. Second, the increase in ferritin H protein synthesis observed during TNF-alpha treatment was dependent on an increase in ferritin H mRNA: actinomycin D blocked the TNF-alpha-induced changes in ferritin H but did not inhibit the translational induction of ferritin seen with iron treatment. Third, equal ferritin mRNA induction was observed in iron-loaded cells and in cells depleted of iron by a permeant chelator, 2,2'-dipyridyl. Fourth, ferritin H induction by TNF-alpha and iron was additive over the entire range of iron concentrations, even at TNF-alpha doses known to maximally stimulate ferritin H mRNA levels. Nonetheless, the role of iron in translational regulation of ferritin was retained in TNF-alpha-treated cells; effective biosynthesis of TNF-alpha-induced, H-subunit-predominant ferritin protein required iron and could be enhanced by treatment of the cells with additional iron or blocked by 2,2'-dipyridyl. Finally, we observed that the TNF-alpha-mediated increase in ferritin synthesis peaked at 8 hr and was followed by a decrease in both H and L isoferritin synthesis; the addition of iron, however, reversed the late-occurring depression in ferritin synthesis. This

  8. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro. PMID:8629860

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2: Its Contribution to Acute Cellular Rejection and Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and one of the two receptors that orchestrate the complex biological functions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, also designed TNF-α). Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that TNFR2 plays an important role in renal disorders associated with acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma but its exact role in these settings is still not completely understood. This papers reviews the factors that may mediate TNFR2 induction in acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma and its contribution to these conditions and discusses its therapeutic implications. A greater understanding of the function of TNFR2 may lead to the development of new anti-TNF drugs. PMID:24350291

  10. Key facts and hot spots on tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Vitale, Antonio; Lucherini, Orso Maria; De Clemente, Caterina; Caso, Francesco; Emmi, Giacomo; Costa, Luisa; Silvestri, Elena; Andreozzi, Laura; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2014-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), formerly known as familial Hibernian fever, is the most common autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disease, resulting from mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene, encoding the 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor. The pathophysiologic mechanism of TRAPS remains ambiguous and only partially explained. The onset age of the syndrome is variable and the clinical scenery is characterized by recurrent episodes of high-grade fever that typically lasts 1-3 weeks, associated with migrating myalgia, pseudocellulitis, diffuse abdominal pain, appendicitis-like findings, ocular inflammatory signs, and risk of long-term amyloidosis. Fever episodes are responsive to high-dose corticosteroids, but different classes of drugs have been reported to be ineffective. The use of etanercept is unable to control systemic inflammation, while interleukin-1 blockade has been shown as effective in the control of disease activity in many patients reported so far. PMID:24935411

  11. Structural biology of tumor necrosis factor demonstrated for undergraduates instruction by computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Urmi

    2016-05-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional (3D) modeling exercise for undergraduate students in chemistry and health sciences disciplines, focusing on a protein-group linked to immune system regulation. Specifically, the exercise involves molecular modeling and structural analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) proteins, both wild type and mutant. The structure of the tumor necrosis factor type 1 receptor (TNF-R1) is also briefly explored. TNF and TNF-R1 play major roles in maintaining human immune-system homeostasis. Upon binding with TNFR-1, the TNF can activate the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), eventually resulting in apoptosis or cell death. These essential features of the clinically relevant TNF family is explored within the frame work of a readily adaptable tutorial. © 2015 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:246-255, 2016. PMID:26638199

  12. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aguado-Gil, L; Irarrazaval-Armendáriz, I; Pretel-Irazabal, M

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease included in the group of autoinflammatory syndromes. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation in different regions of the body. The main clinical manifestations are myalgia, migratory erythematous rash, periorbital edema, and abdominal pain. The diagnosis is reached using gene analysis and prognosis depends on the appearance of amyloidosis secondary to the recurrent episodes of inflammation. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and corticosteroids are the most widely used treatments. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of TRAPS, thanks to a better understanding of its pathogenesis. Dermatologists must be aware that the skin manifestations of TRAPS are particularly important, as they are often diagnostic. PMID:23891452

  13. Gemella morbillorum Bacteremia after Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha as Acne Inversa Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Matthias G.; Gattringer, Klaus B.; Khalifeh, Neda; Koreny, Maria; Spertini, Verena; Mallouhi, Ammar; Willeit, Markus; Volc-Platzer, Beatrix; Asboth, Friederike; Graninger, Wolfgang; Thalhammer, Florian

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of fever, brain abscesses, and Gemella morbillorum bacteremia after anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) therapy in a 21-year-old acne inversa patient currently taking long-term dapsone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing such a case. During antimicrobial therapy, the patient developed systemic varicella infection with severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:22189120

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-induced contraction of cultured rat mesangial cells: interaction with angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Medina, J; Baud, L; Garcia Escribano, C; Gila, J A; Rodriguez Puyol, D; Rodriguez Puyol, M

    1993-08-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha in the regulation of renal function, particularly glomerular filtration rate, has not been completely defined. This study was designed to assess the intrinsic role of this cytokine on glomerular filtration rate by analyzing its short-term effect on the degree of contraction in cultured rat mesangial cells, not only directly but also in the presence of angiotensin II. Contraction was evaluated both morphologically--by measuring planar cell surface area of cultured rat mesangial cells and glomerular cross-sectional area of isolated rat glomeruli--and biochemically--by analyzing myosin light-chain phosphorylation in cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha significantly decreased planar cell surface area in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner, an effect completely abolished by preincubation of the cells with platelet-activating factor receptor antagonists BN 52021 and alprazolam. This effect was also observed in the presence of angiotensin II, whether tumor necrosis factor alpha was added before or after angiotensin II, increasing the reduction in planar cell surface area induced by angiotensin II in both cases. Changes in planar cell surface area were evident not only when the absolute values of this parameter were considered but also when the percentage of contracted cells (cells with a planar cell surface area reduction > 10%) was analyzed. Tumor necrosis factor alpha also induced a significant reduction of glomerular cross-sectional area in isolated rat glomeruli. The results of the morphologic studies were supported by myosin light-chain phosphorylation experiments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8340701

  15. Model-Based Radiation Dose Correction for Yttrium-90 Microsphere Treatment of Liver Tumors With Central Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ching-Sheng; Lin, Ko-Han; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Tseng, Hsiou-Shan; Wang, Ling-Wei; Huang, Pin-I; Chao, Liung-Sheau; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Yen, Sang-Hue; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Wang, Syh-Jen; Oliver Wong, Ching-yee

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to model and calculate the absorbed fraction {phi} of energy emitted from yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microsphere treatment of necrotic liver tumors. Methods and Materials: The tumor necrosis model was proposed for the calculation of {phi} over the spherical shell region. Two approaches, the semianalytic method and the probabilistic method, were adopted. In the former method, the range--energy relationship and the sampling of electron paths were applied to calculate the energy deposition within the target region, using the straight-ahead and continuous-slowing-down approximation (CSDA) method. In the latter method, the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code was used to verify results from the first method. Results: The fraction of energy, {phi}, absorbed from {sup 90}Y by 1-cm thickness of tumor shell from microsphere distribution by CSDA with complete beta spectrum was 0.832 {+-} 0.001 and 0.833 {+-} 0.001 for smaller (r{sub T} = 5 cm) and larger (r{sub T} = 10 cm) tumors (where r is the radii of the tumor [T] and necrosis [N]). The fraction absorbed depended mainly on the thickness of the tumor necrosis configuration, rather than on tumor necrosis size. The maximal absorbed fraction {phi} that occurred in tumors without central necrosis for each size of tumor was different: 0.950 {+-} 0.000, and 0.975 {+-} 0.000 for smaller (r{sub T} = 5 cm) and larger (r{sub T} = 10 cm) tumors, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The tumor necrosis model was developed for dose calculation of {sup 90}Y microsphere treatment of hepatic tumors with central necrosis. With this model, important information is provided regarding the absorbed fraction applicable to clinical {sup 90}Y microsphere treatment.

  16. Does the Degree of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tumor Necrosis following Transarterial Chemoembolization Impact Patient Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Nathan; Gennaro, Kyle; Obert, John; Sauer, Paul F.; Redden, David T.; Zarzour, Jessica; Smith, J. Kevin; Bolus, David; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Gray, Stephen; White, Jared; Eckhoff, Devin E.; DuBay, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The association between transarterial chemoembolization- (TACE-) induced HCC tumor necrosis measured by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (mRECIST) and patient survival is poorly defined. We hypothesize that survival will be superior in HCC patients with increased TACE-induced tumor necrosis. Materials and Methods. TACE interventions were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor response was quantified via dichotomized (responders and nonresponders) and the four defined mRECIST categories. Results. Median survival following TACE was significantly greater in responders compared to nonresponders (20.8 months versus 14.9 months, p = 0.011). Survival outcomes also significantly varied among the four mRECIST categories (p = 0.0003): complete, 21.4 months; partial, 20.8; stable, 16.8; and progressive, 7.73. Only progressive disease demonstrated significantly worse survival when compared to complete response. Multivariable analysis showed that progressive disease, increasing total tumor diameter, and non-Child-Pugh class A were independent predictors of post-TACE mortality. Conclusions. Both dichotomized (responders and nonresponders) and the four defined mRECIST responses to TACE in patients with HCC were predictive of survival. The main driver of the survival analysis was poor survival in the progressive disease group. Surprisingly, there was small nonsignificant survival benefit between complete, partial, and stable disease groups. These findings may inform HCC treatment decisions following first TACE. PMID:26949394

  17. Local Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor Encoded by Recombinant Vaccinia Virus is Effective in Controlling Viral Replication in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambhi, Sharan K.; Kohonen-Corish, Maija R. J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.

    1991-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has pleiotropic effects on a wide variety of cell types. In vitro studies have demonstrated that TNF has antiviral properties and is induced in response to viral infections. However, a role for TNF in the antiviral immune response of the host has yet to be demonstrated. Here we describe the construction of and studies using a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the gene for murine TNF-α. By comparing the replication of and immune responses elicited by the TNF-encoding virus to a similarly constructed control virus, we hoped to observe immunobiological effects of TNF in the host. The in vivo experiments with this recombinant virus demonstrate that the localized production of TNF-α during a viral infection leads to the rapid and efficient clearance of the virus in normal mice and attenuates the otherwise lethal pathogenicity of the virus in immunodeficient animals. This attenuation occurs early in the infection (by postinfection hour 24) and is not due to the enhancement of cellular or antibody responses by the vaccinia virus-encoded TNF. This evidence suggests that attenuation of the recombinant virus is due to a direct antiviral effect of TNF on cells at the site of infection. Therefore, these results support the suggestion that TNF produced by immune cells may be an important effector mechanism of viral clearance in vivo.

  18. Mitochondrial bax translocation accelerates DNA fragmentation and cell necrosis in a murine model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Farhood, Anwar; Lemasters, John J; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen and peroxynitrite and release endonucleases during acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Because mitochondrial translocation of Bax can initiate these events, we investigated the potential role of Bax in the pathophysiology of hepatic necrosis after 300 mg/kg APAP in fasted C57BL/6 mice. APAP overdose induced Bax translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria as early as 1 h after APAP injection. At 6 h, there was extensive centrilobular nitrotyrosine staining (indicator for peroxynitrite formation) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. In addition, mitochondrial intermembrane proteins were released into the cytosol. Plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities of 5610 +/- 600 U/l indicated extensive necrotic cell death. Conversely, Bax gene knockout (Bax(-/-)) mice had 80% lower ALT activities, less DNA fragmentation, and less intermembrane protein release at 6 h. However, immunohistochemical staining for nitrotyrosine or APAP protein adducts did not show differences between wild-type and Bax(-/-) mice. In contrast to the early hepatoprotection in Bax(-/-) mice, plasma ALT activities (7605 +/- 480 U/l) and area of necrosis (53 +/- 6% hepatocytes) in wild-type animals was similar to values in Bax(-/-) mice at 12 h. In addition, there was no difference in DNA fragmentation or nitrotyrosine immunostaining. We concluded that the rapid mitochondrial Bax translocation after APAP overdose has no effect on peroxynitrite formation but that it contributes to the mitochondrial release of proteins, which cause nuclear DNA fragmentation. However, the persistent oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation in mitochondria may eventually trigger the permeability transition pore opening and release intermembrane proteins independently of Bax. PMID:17906064

  19. Tumor necrosis is associated with increased alphavbeta3 integrin expression and poor prognosis in nodular cutaneous melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Ingeborg M; Ladstein, Rita G; Straume, Oddbjørn; Naumov, George N; Akslen, Lars A

    2008-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis and apoptotic activity are considered important in cancer progression, but these features have not been much studied in melanomas. Our hypothesis was that rapid growth in cutaneous melanomas of the vertical growth phase might lead to tissue hypoxia, alterations in apoptotic activity and tumor necrosis. We proposed that these tumor characteristics might be associated with changes in expression of cell adhesion proteins leading to increased invasive capacity and reduced patient survival. Methods A well characterized series of nodular melanoma (originally 202 cases) and other benign and malignant melanocytic tumors (109 cases) were examined for the presence of necrosis, apoptotic activity (TUNEL assay), immunohistochemical expression of hypoxia markers (HIF-1 α, CAIX, TNF-α, Apaf-1) and cell adhesion proteins (αvβ3 integrin, CD44/HCAM and osteopontin). We hypothesized that tumor hypoxia and necrosis might be associated with increased invasiveness in melanoma through alterations of tumor cell adhesion proteins. Results Necrosis was present in 29% of nodular melanomas and was associated with increased tumor thickness, tumor ulceration, vascular invasion, higher tumor proliferation and apoptotic index, increased expression of αvβ3 integrin and poor patient outcome by multivariate analysis. Tumor cell apoptosis did also correlate with reduced patient survival. Expression of TNF-α and Apaf-1 was significantly associated with tumor thickness, and osteopontin expression correlated with increased tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67). Conclusion Tumor necrosis and apoptotic activity are important features of melanoma progression and prognosis, at least partly through alterations in cell adhesion molecules such as increased αvβ3 integrin expression, revealing potentially important targets for new therapeutic approaches to be further explored. PMID:19061491

  20. Radiocurability by Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} Using a Bispecific Antibody in Carcinoembryonic Antigen Transgenic Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Larbouret, Christel; Robert, Bruno; Linard, Christine; Teulon, Isabelle; Gourgou, Sophie M.Sc.; Bibeau, Frederic; Martineau, Pierre; Santoro, Lore; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Pelegrin, Andre; Azria, David

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) enhances radiotherapy (RT) killing of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. To overcome systemic side effects, we used a bispecific antibody (BsAb) directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and TNF-{alpha} to target this cytokine in a CEA-expressing colon carcinoma. We report the evaluation of this strategy in immunocompetent CEA-transgenic mice. Methods and Materials: The murine CEA-transfected colon carcinoma MC-38 was used for all experiments. In vitro, clonogenic assays were performed after RT alone, TNF-{alpha} alone, and RT plus TNF-{alpha}. In vivo, the mice were randomly assigned to treatment groups: control, TNF-{alpha}, BsAb, BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}, RT, RT plus TNF-{alpha}, and RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}. Measurements of endogenous TNF-{alpha} mRNA levels and evaluation of necrosis (histologic evaluation) were assessed per treatment group. Results: In vitro, combined RT plus TNF-{alpha} resulted in a significant decrease in the survival fraction at 2 Gy compared with RT alone (p < 0.00001). In vivo, we observed a complete response in 5 (50%) of 10, 2 (20%) of 10, 2 (18.2%) of 11, and 0 (0%) of 12 treated mice in the RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}, RT plus TNF-{alpha}, RT alone, and control groups, respectively. This difference was statistically significant when TNF-{alpha} was targeted with the BsAb (p = 0.03). The addition of exogenous TNF-{alpha} to RT significantly increased the endogenous TNF-{alpha} mRNA level, particularly when TNF-{alpha} was targeted with BsAb (p < 0.01). The percentages of necrotic area were significantly augmented in the RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha} group. Conclusion: These results suggest that targeting TNF-{alpha} with the BsAb provokes RT curability in a CEA-expressing digestive tumor syngenic model and could be considered as a solid rationale for clinical trials.

  1. Inhibition of Eyes Absent Homolog 4 expression induces malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor necrosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, S J; Lan, Z D; Hardiman, A; Wu, J; Kordich, J J; Patmore, D M; Hegde, R S; Cripe, T P; Cancelas, J A; Collins, M H; Ratner, N

    2010-01-21

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive sarcomas without effective therapeutics. Bioinformatics was used to identify potential therapeutic targets. Paired Box (PAX), Eyes Absent (EYA), Dachsund (DACH) and Sine Oculis (SIX) genes, which form a regulatory interactive network in Drosophila, were found to be dysregulated in human MPNST cell lines and solid tumors. We identified a decrease in DACH1 expression, and increases in the expressions of PAX6, EYA1, EYA2, EYA4, and SIX1-4 genes. Consistent with the observation that half of MPNSTs develop in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients, subsequent to NF1 mutation, we found that exogenous expression of the NF1-GTPase activating protein-related domain normalized DACH1 expression. EYA4 mRNA was elevated more than 100-fold as estimated by quantitative real-time PCR in most MPNST cell lines. In vitro, suppression of EYA4 expression using short hairpin RNA reduced cell adhesion and migration and caused cellular necrosis without affecting cell proliferation or apoptotic cell death. MPNST cells expressing shEYA4 either failed to form tumors in nude mice or formed very small tumors, with extensive necrosis but similar levels of proliferation and apoptosis as control cells. Our findings identify a role of EYA4 and possibly interacting SIX and DACH proteins in MPNSTs and suggest the EYA4 pathway as a rational therapeutic target. PMID:19901965

  2. Impedance-Based Monitoring of Ongoing Cardiomyocyte Death Induced by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiling; Liao, Ronglih; Zhang, Xin

    2009-01-01

    Deregulated cardiomyocyte death is a critical risk factor in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Although various assays have been developed to detect cell responses during cell death, the capability of monitoring cell detachment will enhance the understanding of death processes by providing instant information at its early phase. In this work, we developed an impedance-sensing assay for real-time monitoring of cardiomyocyte death induced by tumor necrosis factor-α based on recording the change in cardiomyocyte adhesion to extracellular matrix. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed in impedance data processing, followed by calibration with the electrical cell-substrate impedance-sensing technique. The adhesion profile of cardiomyocytes undergoing cell death processes was recorded as the time course of equivalent cell-substrate distance. The cell detachment was detected with our assay and proved related to cell death in the following experiments, indicating its advantage against the conventional assays, such as Trypan blue exclusion. An optimal concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (20 ng/mL) was determined to induce cardiomyocyte apoptosis rather than the combinative cell death of necrosis and apoptosis by comparing the concentration-related adhesion profiles. The cardiomyocytes undergoing apoptosis experienced an increase of cell-substrate distance from 59.1 to 89.2 nm within 24 h. The early change of cell adhesion was proved related to cardiomyocyte apoptosis in the following TUNEL test at t = 24 h, which suggested the possibility of early and noninvasive detection of cardiomyocyte apoptosis. PMID:19254558

  3. Targeted gene transfer to lymphocytes using murine leukaemia virus vectors pseudotyped with spleen necrosis virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Engelstädter, M; Buchholz, C J; Bobkova, M; Steidl, S; Merget-Millitzer, H; Willemsen, R A; Stitz, J; Cichutek, K

    2001-08-01

    In contrast to murine leukaemia virus (MLV)-derived vector systems, vector particles derived from the avian spleen necrosis virus (SNV) have been successfully targeted to subsets of human cells by envelope modification with antibody fragments (scFv). However, an in vivo application of the SNV vector system in gene transfer protocols is hampered by its lack of resistance against human complement. To overcome this limitation we established pseudotyping of MLV vector particles produced in human packaging cell lines with the SNV envelope (Env) protein. Three variants of SNV Env proteins differing in the length of their cytoplasmic domains were all efficiently incorporated into MLV core particles. These pseudotype particles infected the SNV permissive cell line D17 at titers of up to 10(5) IU/ml. A stable packaging cell line (MS4) of human origin released MLV(SNV) pseudotype vectors that were resistant against human complement inactivation. To redirect their tropism to human T cells, MS4 cells were transfected with the expression gene encoding the scFv 7A5 in fusion with the transmembrane domain (TM) of the SNV Env protein, previously shown to retarget SNV vector particles to human lymphocytes. MLV(SNV-7A5)-vector particles released from these cells were selectively infectious for human T cell lines. The data provide a proof of principle for targeting MLV-derived vectors to subpopulations of human cells through pseudotyping with SNV targeting envelopes. PMID:11509952

  4. Effect of intratumoral heterogeneity in oxygenation status on FMISO PET, autoradiography, and electrode PO {sub 2} measurements in murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Michael . E-mail: michael@pet.auh.dk; Horsman, Michael R.; Cumming, Paul; Munk, Ole Lajord; Keiding, Susanne

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To explore conflicting results obtained when tumor hypoxia is assessed with Eppendorf electrode PO {sub 2} measurements and with positron emission tomography (PET) by use of [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Methods and Materials: We compared the 2 methods in conjunction with 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET, dual-tracer ex vivo autoradiography (FMISO and 2-deoxy-D-[1-{sup 14}C]glucose (2DG)), and histology in 2 murine tumor models, the C3H mammary carcinoma and the SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma. Results: 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET showed tumor-to-reference tissue ratios of 3.5 in both tumor models after 2 hours. C3H mammary carcinoma reached an FMISO PET ratio of 11 after 3.5 hours. Autoradiography showed large confluent areas of FMISO and 2DG uptake. Median PO {sub 2} was 7 mm Hg and necrotic fraction was 10% to 30%. SCCVII squamous-cell carcinoma reached an FMISO PET tumor-to-reference tissue ratio of 2 after 2.5 hours. Autoradiography showed homogeneous 2DG uptake and scattered foci of high FMISO uptake. Median PO {sub 2} was 1 mm Hg and necrotic fraction was below 5%. Conclusions: Ex vivo dual-tracer autoradiography documented the ability of in vivo FMISO PET to distinguish between confluent areas of either viable tissue or necrosis. Electrode PO {sub 2} measurements could not be ascribed to specific areas in the tumors. Less uptake of FMISO in SCCVII squamous-cell carcinoma than in C3H mammary carcinoma could be caused by scattered foci versus confluent areas of viable hypoxic tissue in the 2 tumors, respectively.

  5. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  6. Multiple roles of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jonathan M; Daffner, Scott D; Watkins, Colleen M

    2015-09-01

    This review presents a summary of basic science evidence examining the influence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) on secondary fracture healing. Multiple studies suggest that TNF-α, in combination with the host reservoir of peri-fracture mesenchymal stem cells, is a main determinant in the success of bone healing. Disease states associated with poor bone healing commonly have inappropriate TNF-α responses, which likely contributes to the higher incidence of delayed and nonunions in these patient populations. Appreciation of TNF-α in fracture healing may lead to new therapies to augment recovery and reduce the incidence of complications. PMID:25959413

  7. Synthesis of tumor necrosis factor α for use as a mirror-image phage display target.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Mark E; Jacobsen, Michael T; Kay, Michael S

    2016-06-21

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease. Here we describe the chemical synthesis of l-TNFα along with the mirror-image d-protein for use as a phage display target. The synthetic strategy utilized native chemical ligation and desulfurization to unite three peptide segments, followed by oxidative folding to assemble the 52 kDa homotrimeric protein. This synthesis represents the foundational step for discovering an inhibitory d-peptide with the potential to improve current anti-TNFα therapeutic strategies. PMID:27211891

  8. Coexistent tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingping; Zhou, Lan; Tomecki, Kenneth J

    2012-07-01

    A 32-year-old Caucasian woman had periodic fevers, skin disease, polyarthralgia and hypermobile joints that were consistent with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome confirmed with a finding of R92Q missense mutation of the TNFRSFA1 gene with Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility type syndrome. They are both autosomal dominant disorders, and their coexistence suggests that they could share some phenotypic features that may require special consideration in management. Conceivably, they could share common gene mutations although no such data are available. PMID:21785959

  9. Selective cytotoxicity of transformed cells but not normal cells by a sialoglycopeptide growth regulator in the presence of tumor necrosis factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, K. M.; Fattaey, H.; Johnson, T. C.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-resistant, SV40-transformed, murine fibroblast cell lines, F5b and F5m, became sensitive to TNF-mediated cytolysis after treatment with a biologically active 18 kDa peptide fragment (SGP) derived from a 66-kDa parental cell surface sialoglycoprotein. Neither TNF nor the SGP alone exhibited cytotoxicity to the two SV40-transformed cell lines. However, Balb/c 3T3 cells, incubated with SGP alone or with SGP and TNF, were not killed. Therefore, SGP can selectively sensitize cells for TNF alpha-mediated cytotoxicity. This selective sensitization may be due to the previously documented ability of the SGP to selectively mediate cell cycle arrest.

  10. [Viral transfer of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Wędrowska, Ewelina; Wandtke, Tomasz; Dyczek, Andrzej; Woźniak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces carcinoma cell death through the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Preclinical trials of gene therapy have been conducted using viral transfer of the TRAIL transgene into prostate, bladder, breast, kidney, liver, non-small cell lung cancer and also glioblastoma cells. Experiments in vitro demonstrated the extensive apoptosis of target cells as well as frequent disease regression or remission. TRAIL transfer did not show any side effects, opposite to chemotherapy. Encouraging results of TRAIL-related gene therapy were observed in rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes. Adenoviral vectors (AdV) encoding TRAIL are the most promising tool in anti-tumor therapy. They have undergone numerous modifications by increasing transfection efficiency and transgene expression in target cells. However, only one clinical phase I trial has been performed. AdV encoding the TRAIL transgene caused local inflammation and apoptosis in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27259213

  11. Phase I study of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H H; Nagel, G A; Mull, R; Flener, R; Pfizenmaier, K

    1988-01-01

    A clinical phase I trial with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) was performed in 30 patients with advanced malignancies. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) by 3 times weekly intramuscular (i.m.) application was 150 micrograms m-2. Main subjective toxicities including chills, fever, hypotension, fatigue, and anorexia were dose-related. In addition, transient changes in hematologic parameters and lipid metabolism were noted. Two out of 25 evaluated patients showed a minor tumor response after eight weeks of therapy. There was evidence for an improvement of in vivo immuneresponsiveness as revealed from positive delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin tests of 3 out of 6 pretherapeutically anergic patients. We conclude from this phase I trial that rTNF-alpha can be safely administered at doses up to 150 micrograms m-2 i.m., 3 times weekly, without evidence of cumulative toxicity in long-term treatment. PMID:3267369

  12. Risk of open angle glaucoma due to tumor necrosis factor alpha gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Mona Abdel; Moemen, Leqaa; Labib, Hany; Helmy, Hazem; Elsergany, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Axonal degeneration and retinal ganglion cell apoptosis in glaucoma is associated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the risk of open angle glaucoma (OAG) in the Egyptian population and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene polymorphisms. Methods Sixty OAG patients and 26 healthy unrelated controls were used to analyze TNF-α polymorphism G-308A using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Results the GG genotype was found at a higher frequency in the controls than in the patients, and the AA and GA genotypes were associated strongly with OAG. Conclusion In this study, we found that the TNF-α polymorphism G-308A was associated significantly with OAG in the Egyptian population. However, there is a need for population-based studies with large numbers of subjects. Also, long-term follow up is required to verify the association between TNF-α polymorphism G-308A and glaucoma susceptibility. PMID:27054008

  13. Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibit Cardiac Myocyte β -adrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Tod; Chung, Mina K.; Pieper, Stephen J.; Lange, Louis G.; Schreiner, George F.

    1989-09-01

    Reversible congestive heart failure can accompany cardiac allograft rejection and inflammatory myocarditis, conditions associated with an immune cell infiltrate of the myocardium. To determine whether immune cell secretory products alter cardiac muscle metabolism without cytotoxicity, we cultured cardiac myocytes in the presence of culture supernatants from activated immune cells. We observed that these culture supernatants inhibit β -adrenergic agonist-mediated increases in cultured cardiac myocyte contractility and intracellular cAMP accumulation. The myocyte contractile response to increased extracellular Ca2+ concentration is unaltered by prior exposure to these culture supernatants, as is the increase in myocyte intracellular cAMP concentration in response to stimulation with forskolin, a direct adenyl cyclase activator. Inhibition occurs in the absence of alteration in β -adrenergic receptor density or ligand binding affinity. Suppressive activity is attributable to the macrophage-derived cytokines interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor. Thus, these observations describe a role for defined cytokines in regulating the hormonal responsiveness and function of contractile cells. The effects of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on intracellular cAMP accumulation may be a model for immune modulation of other cellular functions dependent upon cyclic nucleotide metabolism. The uncoupling of agonist-occupied receptors from adenyl cyclase suggests that β -receptor or guanine nucleotide binding protein function is altered by the direct or indirect action of cytokines on cardiac muscle cells.

  14. Polymer-conjugated inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α for local control of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Newell R; Prata, Joseph E; Friedrich, Emily E; Ramadan, Mohamed H; Elder, Allison N; Sun, Liang Tso

    2013-01-01

    Burns, chronic wounds, osteoarthritis, and uveitis are examples of conditions characterized by local, intense inflammatory responses that can impede healing or even further tissue degradation. The most powerful anti-inflammatory drugs available are often administered systemically, but these carry significant side effects and are not compatible for patients that have underlying complications associated with their condition. Conjugation of monoclonal antibodies that neutralize pro-inflammatory cytokines to high molecular weight hydrophilic polymers has been shown to be an effective strategy for local control of inflammation. Lead formulations are based on antibody inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α conjugated to hyaluronic acid having molecular weight greater than 1 MDa. This review will discuss fundamental aspects of medical conditions that could be treated with these conjugates and design principles for preparing these cytokine-neutralizing polymer conjugates. Results demonstrating that infliximab, an approved inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-α, can be incorporated into the conjugates using a broad range of water-soluble polymers are also presented, along with a prospectus for clinical translation. PMID:23903893

  15. Tumors in murine brains studied by grating-based phase contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Dominietto, Marco; Kovacs, Zsofia; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Hieber, Simone E.; Thalmann, Peter; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of vessels, is one of the key processes during tumor development. The newly formed vessels transport oxygen and nutrients from the healthy tissue to the tumor and gives tumor cells the possibility to replicate. The principle of anti-angiogenic therapy is to block angiogenic process in order to stop tumor growth. The aim of the present study is the investigation of murine glioma vascular architecture at early (7 days), intermediate (10 and 15 days) and late (23 days) stage of growth by means of grating-based phase contrast microtomography. We demonstrate that this technique yields premium contrast between healthy and cancerous parts of murine brain tissues.

  16. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS
    M S Miller, J E Moore, M Xu, G B Nelson, S T Dance, N D Kock, J A Ross Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Previously, our laboratory demonstrated...

  17. Release of tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to Vibrio vulnificus capsular polysaccharide in in vivo and in vitro models.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J L; Wright, A C; Wasserman, S S; Hone, D M; Morris, J G

    1997-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus produces a severe septic shock syndrome in susceptible individuals. Virulence of the bacterium has been closely linked to the presence of a surface-exposed acidic capsular polysaccharide (CPS). To investigate whether CPS plays an additional role in pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory-associated cytokine production, studies were initiated in a mouse model and followed by investigations of cytokine release from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) could be detected in serum up to 12 h postinoculation in animals challenged with the encapsulated parent strain MO6-24/O. The unencapsulated strain CVD752 was quickly eliminated by the animals, thus preventing a direct association between serum TNF-alpha levels and the presence or absence of the CPS. Purified CPS from MO6-24/O when injected into D-galactosamine-sensitized mice was a more immediate inducer of TNF-alpha than an equivalent quantity of MO6-24/O lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Both V. vulnificus CPS and V. vulnificus LPS induced inflammation-associated cytokine responses from primary human PBMCs in vitro. CPS elicited TNF-alpha from PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal induction at 6 to 10 h, and was not inhibited by polymyxin B. Expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNAs was also induced in the presence of CPS. Interestingly, while adherent PBMCs secreted high levels of TNF-alpha after stimulation with LPS, they secreted little TNF-alpha in response to CPS. These studies provide evidence that V. vulnificus CPS directly stimulates the expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by murine and human cells and suggest that CPS activation of PBMCs operates through a cellular mechanism distinct from that of LPS. PMID:9284142

  18. Identification of tumor necrosis factor as a transcriptional regulator of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene following endotoxin treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M R; McCallum, R E

    1992-01-01

    The decreased synthesis of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, that occurs during endotoxemia was shown previously in rats to occur at the transcriptional level. In the current study, the exogenous administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a proximal mediator of endotoxic shock, reduced the PEPCK transcription rate, mRNAPEPCK levels, and PEPCK enzyme activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner in CD-1 mice. Comparable amounts of circulating TNF were measured in mice 2 h after injection of human recombinant TNF (10(5) U) or a 50% lethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg). Direct action of TNF to decrease the PEPCK transcription rate was confirmed in vitro with H-4-II-E Reuber hepatoma cells, in which a dose-dependent inhibition of PEPCK transcription was observed with 1 to 100 U of TNF per ml. A role for TNF-elicited changes in PEPCK gene expression during endotoxemia was confirmed by the protective effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies to recombinant murine TNF. C57BL/6 mice passively immunized with anti-TNF 4 h prior to endotoxin challenge exhibited normal PEPCK enzyme activity. Neutralization of circulating TNF with anti-TNF failed, however, to prevent the hypoglycemia commonly observed during endotoxemia, suggesting the participation of other mediators. Anti-TNF treatment reduced circulating interleukins 1 and 6 at 3 and 6 h after endotoxin treatment, respectively. These results suggest that during endotoxemia, the development of hypoglycemia is multifaceted and that several cytokines are most likely involved. The findings from the Reuber hepatoma cell model afford an opportunity in future work to map putative cytokine response elements in the PEPCK promoter responsible for perturbed hormonal regulation of the gene during endotoxemia. PMID:1398916

  19. Toll-like receptor 9 regulates tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression by different mechanisms. Implications for osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amcheslavsky, Alla; Zou, Wei; Bar-Shavit, Zvi

    2004-12-24

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODNs), mimicking bacterial DNA, stimulate osteoclastogenesis via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL)-primed osteoclast precursors. This activity is mediated via tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha induction by CpG-ODN. To further reveal the role of the cytokine in TLR9-mediated osteoclastogenesis, we compared the ability of CpG-ODN to induce osteoclastogenesis in two murine strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, expressing different TNF-alpha alleles. The induction of osteoclastogenesis and TNF-alpha release by CpG-ODN was by far more noticeable in BALB/c-derived than in C57BL/6-derived osteoclast precursors. Unexpectedly, as revealed by Northern analysis, CpG-ODN induction of TNF-alpha mRNA increase was more efficient in C57BL/6-derived cells. The cytokine transcript abundance was increased due to both increased message stability and rate of transcription. The difference between the two cell types was the result of a higher transcription rate in CpG-ODN-induced C57BL/6-derived cells caused by a single nucleotide polymorphism in kappa B2a site within the TNF-alpha promoter sequence. CpG-ODN enhanced the rate of the cytokine translation in BALB/c-derived cells. Thus, CpG-ODN modulated both transcription and translation of TNF-alpha. The induction of transcription was more evident in C57BL/6-derived cells, while the induction of translation took place only in BALB/c-derived osteoclast precursors. Altogether the cytokine was induced to a larger extent in BALB/c-derived osteoclast precursors, consistent with the increased CpG-ODN osteoclastogenic effect in these cells. PMID:15485822

  20. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8105469

  1. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime; Ohtake, Makoto; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sonoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 201}Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with {sup 201}Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Conclusions: Semiquantitative analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most

  2. Use of the tumor necrosis factor-blockers for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Gupta, Milli; Freeman, Hugh J

    2012-01-01

    The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy for inflammatory bowel disease represents the most important advance in the care of these patients since the publication of the National Co-operative Crohn’s disease study thirty years ago. The recommendations of numerous consensus groups worldwide are now supported by a wealth of clinical trials and several meta-analyses. In general, it is suggested that tumor necrosis factor-α blockers (TNFBs) are indicated (1) for persons with moderately-severe Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC) who have failed two or more causes of glucocorticosteroids and an acceptably long cause (8 wk to 12 wk) of an immune modulator such as azathioprine or methotrexate; (2) non-responsive perianal disease; and (3) severe UC not responding to a 3-d to 5-d course of steroids. Once TNFBs have been introduced and the patient is responsive, therapy given by the IV and SC rate must be continued. It remains open to definitive evidence if concomitant immune modulators are required with TNFB maintenance therapy, and when or if TNFB may be weaned and discontinued. The supportive evidence from a single study on the role of early versus later introduction of TNFB in the course of a patient’s illness needs to be confirmed. The risk/benefit profile of TNFB appears to be acceptable as long as the patient is immunized and tested for tuberculosis and viral hepatitis before the initiation of TNFB, and as long as the long-term adverse effects on the development of lymphoma and other tumors do not prone to be problematic. Because the rates of benefits to TNFB are modest from a population perspective and the cost of therapy is very high, the ultimate application of use of TNFBs will likely be established by cost/benefit studies. PMID:23002356

  3. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M; Messenheimer, David J; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B; Fox, Bernard A

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  4. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M.; Messenheimer, David J.; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of systemic anti-tumour necrosis factor α treatment in human/murine SCID arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schadlich, H.; Ermann, J.; Biskop, M.; Falk, W.; Sperling, F.; Jungel, A.; Lehmann, J.; Emmrich, F.; Sack, U.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate in vivo the contribution of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) to the chimeric transfer model of human rheumatoid arthritis synovial membrane into SCID mice (hu/mu SCID arthritis), systemic anti-TNFα treatment was performed and the clinical, serological, and histopathological effects of this treatment assessed.
METHODS—Animals were treated with the rat-antimouse TNFα monoclonal antibody V1q, starting on day 1 after hu/mu engraftment, twice weekly for 12 weeks. Joint swelling, serum concentrations of human and murine interleukin 6 (IL6), and serum amyloid P (SAP) were measured. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the joints were also performed at the end of treatment.
RESULTS—Neutralisation of murine TNFα induced the following effects: (a) reduction of extent and duration of the acute arthritis phase, with significant reduction of joint swelling at two weeks; (b) decrease of murine SAP concentrations after the first antibody administration; and (c) increase of murine IL6 in the serum. At the end of treatment, there was a significant reduction of the inflammatory infiltration in the engrafted joints. Because of the mild degree of joint erosion, no treatment effects could be demonstrated on the destructive process.
CONCLUSION—In the lymphocyte independent hu/mu SCID arthritis, anti-TNFα treatment reduces local and systemic signs of inflammation.

 PMID:10381487

  6. [Systemic versus local therapy with recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (r-TNF-alpha) in patients with advanced tumors].

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H H; Pfizenmaier, K; Schröder, M; Nagel, G A

    1989-06-01

    44 patients with different advanced malignant tumors were treated with recombinant Tumor-necrosis factor alpha (rTNF-alpha) in two Phase-I trials. 30 patients received rTNF-alpha 3 x/week intramuscular in doses between 25-300 mcg. 14 patients were treated intra/peritumoral with rTNF-alpha in the same dose range. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) was 150 mcg/m2 for both ways of application. The duration of therapy was 1-26 weeks for systemic application and 2-20 weeks for local treatment. 25 patients treated systemically were evaluable for response. In 2 patients a minor response (MR) and in 9 patients stable disease was observed. 5/14 patients receiving rTNF-alpha locally showed a significant tumor regression (3 PR, 2 MR). Main side effects were dose dependent fever, chills, anorexia and nausea. In doses greater than 50mcg/m2 a decrease of blood pressure according to WHO III was noted. Hematologic toxicity included a transient decrease of leucocytes and platelets without indicating a cumulative hematologic toxicity. There were no further organ toxicities. The experience from both phase-I trials indicate a definite antitumoral activity of rTNF-alpha suggesting that locoregional treatment might be superior to systemic application. The side effects observed might be a limitation for larger clinical trials. PMID:2668836

  7. Metabolic effects of cachectin/tumor necrosis factor are modified by site of production. Cachectin/tumor necrosis factor-secreting tumor in skeletal muscle induces chronic cachexia, while implantation in brain induces predominantly acute anorexia.

    PubMed

    Tracey, K J; Morgello, S; Koplin, B; Fahey, T J; Fox, J; Aledo, A; Manogue, K R; Cerami, A

    1990-12-01

    We have developed a murine model of wasting by injecting intracerebrally cells which continuously secrete h-cachectin/TNF (CHO-TNF) to: (a) determine the effects of cachectin/TNF produced continuously in the central nervous system (CNS), and (b) compare the metabolic effects of cachectin/TNF-secreting tumor in the brain to the cachexia caused by CHO-TNF tumor in peripheral tissue (IM). Intracerebral CHO-TNF tumors produced increased serum h-cachectin/TNF levels with lethal hypophagia and weight loss (mean survival time of 11 d); these changes were not observed in association with nonsecretory control brain tumors. The metabolic consequences of intracerebral cachectin/TNF production were indistinguishable from acute, lethal starvation: whole-body lipid content was decreased significantly but protein was conserved. Although intramuscular cachectin/TNF-secreting tumors caused similar increases of serum h-cachectin/TNF levels, profound anorexia did not develop; wasting developed after a longer period of tumor burden (50 d) with classical signs of cachexia (i.e., anemia and depletion of both protein and lipid). These studies provide a reproducible animal model of site-specific cytokine production and suggest that, regardless of serum levels, cachectin/TNF produced locally in brain influences both the rate of development of wasting and its net metabolic effects. PMID:2254457

  8. Unusual location of tuberculosis in the course of tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brzezicki, Jan; Rymko, Marcin; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mycobacteria. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis usually develops more than two years after infection or many years later. Factors favoring onset of the disease are malnutrition, older age, renal failure, diabetes, cancer, immunosuppression and biological treatment, e.g. tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitors. The paper presents a case of a 56-year-old patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with infliximab, diagnosed with tuberculosis of the spleen. The unusual location and uncharacteristic symptoms created a lot of diagnostic difficulties, particularly as during qualification for biological treatment tests are performed to exclude infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Pharmacological treatment of tuberculosis is typical, but in the case of tuberculosis of the spleen, splenectomy also is a method of treatment. The decision was made to implement pharmacological treatment, which proved to be effective, so the patient avoided surgery.

  9. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis associated with the use of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor adalimumab

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alan William; Rosenblatt, Randall Lee

    2014-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman was referred for evaluation of progressive dyspnea of 3 months— duration. She had received 3 doses of adalimumab for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis prior to the onset of her dyspnea. Her chest examination revealed absent diaphragmatic movement with inspiration. Spirometry showed a severe restrictive defect. Radiologic studies confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. Laboratory and radiologic workup excluded other possible causes of the diagnosis. Adalimumab was discontinued, and she was treated with bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation and intravenous immunoglobulin. Three months later, the diaphragmatic paralysis persisted. This is the second reported case of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis occurring in a patient who had received adalimumab. Acute neuropathies are rare side effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. PMID:24688191

  10. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome managed with the couple canakinumab-alendronate.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Rigante, Donato; Vitale, Antonio; Frediani, Bruno; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Management of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is puzzling, and therapeutic choices can be complicated, due to both wide genetic heterogeneity and protean clinical phenotype. We report on a 35-year-old female who was diagnosed with TRAPS, after finding the V95M mutation on the TNFRSF1A gene; who was treated in order with etanercept, anakinra, and canakinumab (150 mg/every 8 weeks by subcutaneous injection, then increased to 150 mg every 4 weeks); and who started therapy with oral alendronate (70 mg/weekly) to control her osteoporosis. Alendronate combined with canakinumab led to the optimal clinical control of all TRAPS manifestations and normalization of inflammatory markers. Further studies should be performed to clarify bisphosphonates' role in the scenery of autoinflammatory disorders. PMID:24609716

  11. Bilirubin release induced by tumor necrosis factor in combination with galactosamine is toxic to mice.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, W; Libert, C

    2003-08-01

    Application of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in combination with galactosamine (GalN) in mice causes severe apoptosis of hepatocytes, resulting in complete destruction of the liver. Administration of high levels of unconjugated bilirubin and abnormally high production of unconjugated bilirubin have been reported to cause liver damage and are associated with several human pathologies. Serum alanine aminotransferase as well as total and direct bilirubin levels in mice were determined. Bilirubin levels are shown to significantly increase after a challenge with TNF/GalN in mice. Pretreatment with a heme oxygenase-1 inhibitor significantly prevents this release in bilirubin and offers significant protection against TNF/GalN-induced lethality. A correlation between the release of unconjugated bilirubin and the toxicity accompanied with this release is provided. PMID:12906872

  12. Tumor necrosis factor antagonists in the treatment of multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: Current clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjun; Wu, Chunmei; Wu, Mengyun; Zhou, Yaou; Zhu, Honglin; Li, Yisha; You, Yunhui; Luo, Hui; Wang, Lijing; Zuo, Xiaoxia

    2016-07-01

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a rare and debilitating systemic disorder characterized by cutaneous nodules and destructive polyarthritis. Due to its unknown etiology, the treatment of MRH varies with different rates of success, which causes treatment options to be rather independent and empirical. In the present study, a case of a 48‑year‑old woman with a 12‑month history of polyarthralgia and skin nodules was reported. Biopsy samples, which were obtained from her skin eruption exhibited dermal infiltration with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells. Immunohistochemical staining indicated positivity for CD68. The patient was diagnosed with MRH and treated with a combination therapy of infliximab, prednisolone and methotrexate. Her symptoms improved markedly within 2 weeks. Following the results of this case study, a systematic review of 17 cases of MRH treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists was performed, and the efficacy of anti‑TNF treatment in MRH was analyzed. PMID:27175854

  13. Progress with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carlos; Allocca, Mariangela; Danese, Silvio; Fiorino, Gionata

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is a valid, effective and increasingly used option in inflammatory bowel disease management. Nevertheless, further knowledge and therapeutic indications regarding these drugs are still evolving. Anti-TNF therapy may be essential to achieve recently proposed end points, namely mucosal healing, prevention of bowel damage and prevention of patient's disability. Anti-TNF drugs are also suggested to be more effective in early disease, particularly in early Crohn's disease. Moreover, its efficacy for prevention of postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease is still debated. Costs and adverse effects, the relevance of drug monitoring and the possibility of anti-TNF therapy withdrawal in selected patients are still debated issues. This review aimed to describe and discuss the most relevant data about the progress with anti-TNF therapy for the management of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25713992

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-α impairs oligodendroglial differentiation through a mitochondria-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, M; De Marchi, E; Patergnani, S; Suski, J M; Celsi, F; Bononi, A; Giorgi, C; Marchi, S; Rimessi, A; Duszyński, J; Pozzan, T; Wieckowski, M R; Pinton, P

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects, affecting parameters such as mitochondrial number and shape, levels of respiratory chain complex components and markers of oxidative stress, have been associated with the appearance and progression of multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, mitochondrial physiology has never been monitored during oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) differentiation, especially in OPCs challenged with proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we show that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibits OPC differentiation, accompanied by altered mitochondrial calcium uptake, mitochondrial membrane potential, and respiratory complex I activity as well as increased reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with a mitochondrial uncoupler (FCCP) to mimic mitochondrial impairment also causes cells to accumulate at the progenitor stage. Interestingly, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) levels increase during TNF-α exposure and inhibit OPC differentiation. Overall, our data indicate that TNF-α induces metabolic changes, driven by mitochondrial impairment and AMPK activation, leading to the inhibition of OPC differentiation. PMID:24658399

  15. Tumor necrosis factor antagonists in the treatment of multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: Current clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, HONGJUN; WU, CHUNMEI; WU, MENGYUN; ZHOU, YAOU; ZHU, HONGLIN; LI, YISHA; YOU, YUNHUI; LUO, HUI; WANG, LIJING; ZUO, XIAOXIA

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a rare and debilitating systemic disorder characterized by cutaneous nodules and destructive polyarthritis. Due to its unknown etiology, the treatment of MRH varies with different rates of success, which causes treatment options to be rather independent and empirical. In the present study, a case of a 48-year-old woman with a 12-month history of polyarthralgia and skin nodules was reported. Biopsy samples, which were obtained from her skin eruption exhibited dermal infiltration with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells. Immunohistochemical staining indicated positivity for CD68. The patient was diagnosed with MRH and treated with a combination therapy of infliximab, prednisolone and methotrexate. Her symptoms improved markedly within 2 weeks. Following the results of this case study, a systematic review of 17 cases of MRH treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists was performed, and the efficacy of anti-TNF treatment in MRH was analyzed. PMID:27175854

  16. SLE - Complex cytokine effects in a complex autoimmune disease: tumor necrosis factor in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aringer, Martin; Smolen, Josef S

    2003-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine and a B-cell growth factor. It has numerous possible effects on T lymphocytes and dendritic cells, and it influences apoptosis. These differential effects may in part explain why patients under TNF-blocker therapy can develop autoantibodies to nuclear antigens, and may shed some light on the finding that low TNF fosters autoimmune disease in some mouse strains. On the contrary, TNF is increased in the blood and in the inflamed kidneys of systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Several studies in lupus-prone mice other than the F1 generation of New Zealand Black mice crossed with New Zealand White mice suggest that TNF is highly proinflammatory in the efferent limb and is potentially detrimental in lupus organ disease. Therefore, TNF blockade probably constitutes an efficacious therapeutic option. PMID:12823847

  17. Alopecia secondary to anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lara Beatriz Prata; Rego, Juliana Carlos Gonçalves; Estrada, Bruna Duque; Bastos, Paula Raso; Piñeiro Maceira, Juan Manuel; Sodré, Celso Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Biologic drugs represent a substantial progress in the treatment of chronic inflammatory immunologic diseases. However, its crescent use has revealed seldom reported or unknown adverse reactions, mainly associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Psoriasiform cutaneous reactions and few cases of alopecia can occur in some patients while taking these drugs. Two cases of alopecia were reported after anti-TNF therapy. Both also developed psoriasiform lesions on the body. This is the second report about a new entity described as 'anti-TNF therapy-related alopecia', which combines clinical and histopathological features of both alopecia areata and psoriatic alopecia. The recognition of these effects by specialists is essential for the proper management and guidance of these patients. PMID:25830994

  18. Fatigue mechanisms in patients with cancer: effects of tumor necrosis factor and exercise on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St Pierre, B. A.; Kasper, C. E.; Lindsey, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue is a common adverse effect of cancer and its therapy. However, the specific mechanisms underlying cancer fatigue are unclear. One physiologic mechanism may involve changes in skeletal muscle protein stores or metabolite concentration. A reduction in skeletal muscle protein stores may result from endogenous tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or from TNF administered as antineoplastic therapy. This muscle wasting would require patients to exert an unusually high amount of effort to generate adequate contractile force during exercise performance or during extended periods of sitting or standing. This additional effort could result in the onset of fatigue. Additionally, cancer fatigue may develop or become exacerbated during exercise as a consequence of changes in the concentration of skeletal muscle metabolites. These biochemical alterations may interfere with force that is produced by the muscle contractile proteins. These physiologic changes may play a role in the decision to include exercise in the rehabilitation plans of patients with cancer. They also may affect ideas about fatigue.

  19. Regulatory roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced proteins (TNFAIPs) 3 and 9 in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Isao; Inoue, Asuka; Takai, Chinatsu; Umeda, Naoto; Tanaka, Yuki; Kurashima, Yuko; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) have proved to be important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because the outcome of RA has greatly improved with the recent availability of biologics targeting them. It is well accepted that these cytokines are involved in the activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, but our understanding of the dependency of these pro-inflammatory cytokines and the link between them in RA is currently limited. Recently, we and others proved the importance of TNFα-induced protein (TNFAIP), due to the spontaneous development of arthritis in deficient animals that are dependent on IL-6. To date, nine TNFAIPs have been identified, and TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP9 were found to be clearly associated with mouse and human arthritis. In this review, we compare and discuss recent TNFAIP topics, especially focusing on TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP9 in autoimmune arthritis in mice and humans. PMID:24704577

  20. Tumor necrosis factor and stroke: role of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihong; Kastin, Abba J.

    2008-01-01

    The progression and outcome of stroke is affected by the intricate relationship between the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). TNFα crosses the intact BBB by a receptor-mediated transport system that is upregulated by CNS trauma and inflammation. In this review, we discuss intracellular trafficking and transcytosis of TNFα, regulation of TNFα transport after stroke, and the effects of TNFα on stroke preconditioning. TNFα can activate cytoprotective pathways by pretreatment or persistent exposure to low doses. This explains the paradoxical observation that transport of this proinflammatory cytokine improves the survival and function of hypoxic cells and of mice with stroke. The dual effects of TNFα may be related to differential regulation of TNFα trafficking downstream to TNFR1 and TNFR2 receptors. As we better understand how peripheral TNFα affects its own transport and modulates neuroregeneration, we may be in a better position to pharmacologically manipulate its regulatory transport system to treat stroke. PMID:17913328

  1. The effect of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha on ovarian function

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Erin J.; Sibley, Kelly; Miller, Aleisha N.; Lane, Elizabeth A.; Fishwick, John; Nash, Deborah M.; Herath, Shan; England, Gary CW; Dobson, Hilary; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2009-01-01

    Problem Pelvic inflammatory disease and metritis are important causes of infertility in humans and domestic animals. Uterine infection with Escherichia coli in cattle is associated with reduced ovarian follicle growth and decreased estradiol secretion. We hypothesized that this effect could be mediated by the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Method of study In vitro, bovine ovarian theca and granulosa cells were treated with LPS or TNFα and steroid secretion measured. In vivo, the effect of LPS or TNFα intrauterine infusion was determined by ovarian ultrasonography and measurement of hormones in cattle. Results LPS reduced granulosa cell estradiol secretion, whilst TNFα decreased theca and granulosa cell androstenedione and estradiol production, respectively. In vivo, fewer animals ovulated following intrauterine infusion with LPS or TNFα. Conclusion LPS and TNFα suppress ovarian cell function, supporting the concept that pelvic inflammatory disease and metritis are detrimental for bovine ovarian health. PMID:19238751

  2. Extensive genetic polymorphism in the human tumor necrosis factor region and relation to extended HLA haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Jongeneel, C V; Briant, L; Udalova, I A; Sevin, A; Nedospasov, S A; Cambon-Thomsen, A

    1991-01-01

    We have identified three polymorphic microsatellites (which we call TNFa, TNFb, and TNFc) within a 12-kilobase region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that includes the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) locus. TNFc is located within the first intron of the TNF-beta gene and has only 2 alleles. TNFa and TNFb are 3.5 kilobases upstream (telomeric) of the TNF-beta gene and have at least 13 and 7 alleles, respectively. TNFa, -b, and -c alleles are in linkage disequilibrium with alleles at other loci within the MHC, including class I, class II, and class III. TNFa, -b, and -c alleles are also associated with extended HLA haplotypes. These TNF polymorphisms will allow a thorough genetic analysis of the involvement of TNF in MHC-linked pathologies. Images PMID:1946393

  3. ATAR, a novel tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, signals through TRAF2 and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H; Solovyev, I; Colombero, A; Elliott, R; Kelley, M; Boyle, W J

    1997-05-23

    Members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family signal largely through interactions with death domain proteins and TRAF proteins. Here we report the identification of a novel TNFR family member ATAR. Human and mouse ATAR contain 283 and 276 amino acids, respectively, making them the shortest known members of the TNFR superfamily. The receptor is expressed mainly in spleen, thymus, bone marrow, lung, and small intestine. The intracellular domains of human and mouse ATAR share only 25% identity, yet both interact with TRAF5 and TRAF2. This TRAF interaction domain resides at the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Like most other TRAF-interacting receptors, overexpression of ATAR activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Co-expression of ATAR with TRAF5, but not TRAF2, results in synergistic activation of NF-kappaB, suggesting potentially different roles for TRAF2 and TRAF5 in post-receptor signaling. PMID:9153189

  4. Modulation of Endogenous Hormone Action by Recombinant Human Tumor Necrosis Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Robert S.; Donner, David B.; Fletcher Starnes, H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1987-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated in the toxic manifestations of overwhelming bacterial infection and in the tissue wasting that often accompanies prolonged infections and malignancy. We have examined a possible role of TNF in the early metabolic alterations following acute tissue injury or sepsis. Recombinant human TNF stimulated rat liver amino acid uptake up to 5-fold in vivo and there was a concomitant increase in plasma glucagon. In vitro TNF had no direct effect on hepatocyte amino acid uptake, but it markedly enhanced the stimulation of amino acid transport by glucagon, without an alteration in binding of glucagon to hepatocytes. This permissive effect of TNF on glucagon action represents an interrelationship between the immune and endocrine systems, and it may help to explain the mechanism of hormonal regulation of both the anabolic and catabolic responses to acute injury.

  5. Targeting of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand and cognate TNF receptor superfamilies constitute an important regulatory axis that is pivotal for immune homeostasis and correct execution of immune responses. TNF ligands and receptors are involved in diverse biological processes ranging from the selective induction of cell death in potentially dangerous and superfluous cells to providing costimulatory signals that help mount an effective immune response. This diverse and important regulatory role in immunity has sparked great interest in the development of TNFL/TNFR-targeted cancer immunotherapeutics. In this review, I will discuss the biology of the most prominent proapoptotic and co-stimulatory TNF ligands and review their current status in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23840967

  6. Tumor necrosis factor alpha negatively regulates hepatitis B virus gene expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, P N; Fey, G; Chisari, F V

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that several inflammatory cytokines can modulate hepatocellular gene expression in a complex physiological process known as the hepatic acute-phase response. Since hepatitis B virus (HBV) characteristically induces a vigorous lymphomononuclear inflammatory response in the liver during acute and chronic hepatitis, it is possible that hepatocellular HBV gene expression may also be modulated by one or more of the cytokines produced by these cells. Using bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a surrogate inducer of inflammatory cytokines in vivo, we have tested this hypothesis in a transgenic mouse model system. In experiments with two independent transgenic mouse lineages that express the HBV envelope region under the control of either HBV or cellular promoters, we observed a 50 to 80% reduction in the hepatic steady-state content of a 2.1-kb HBV mRNA following administration of a single intraperitoneal dose of LPS. The regulatory influence of several inflammatory cytokines known to be induced by LPS was also examined in this system. The negative regulatory effect of LPS was consistently reproduced by the administration of a single nontoxic dose of tumor necrosis factor alpha, and it was occasionally observed following the administration of high doses of alpha interferon and interleukin-6, while no effect was detectable in response to high-dose interleukin-1 alpha or to gamma interferon. These observations suggest that tumor necrosis factor alpha and perhaps other cytokines may activate a heretofore unsuspected intracellular pathway that negatively regulates HBV gene expression. The intracellular mechanism(s) responsible for this effect and its pathophysiologic relevance remain to be elucidated. Images PMID:1583737

  7. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Shen, Guobo; Ye, Tinghong; Guo, Fuchun; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti‑tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p‑STAT3 and p‑p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL‑positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti‑tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re‑evaluated and investigated in clinical settings. PMID:26095429

  8. Female temperament, tumor development and life span: relation to glucocorticoid and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Cavigelli, Sonia A; Bennett, Jeanette M; Michael, Kerry C; Klein, Laura Cousino

    2008-07-01

    Behavioral characteristics closely associated with specific physiological profiles present an important area of research in understanding health disparities. In particular, glucocorticoid overproduction may be an important factor moderating disease progression; natural variance in production of this steroid has been proposed as one mechanism underlying individual differences in health and disease. In the current paper, we examined immune parameters in female rats of two different behavioral types previously shown to have differential glucocorticoid production and life spans. We categorized young female rats according to their behavioral response to novelty (high- or low-locomotion), and compared their glucocorticoid production, adrenal size, thymus size, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production, tumor development and life span. As expected, high-locomotion females produced more glucocorticoids and had larger adrenal glands during young adulthood than did low-locomotion females. High-locomotion females had significantly smaller thymuses and reduced TNF-alpha levels compared to low-locomotion, suggesting altered immune function in young adulthood. Finally, high-locomotion females had shorter life spans than did low-locomotion females, and this was particularly true in females that developed pituitary tumors, but not in those that developed mammary tumors. These results, along with other published findings, suggest that high-locomotion rodent females experience life-long elevations in glucocorticoid responses to novelty, and that these elevated levels may be comparable to chronic stress. This naturally occurring endocrine profile may influence immune responses which in turn could affect disease susceptibility. Variance in immune function across personality types may be partially moderated by natural variance in glucocorticoid production. PMID:18155400

  9. Dietary linoleate-enhanced metastasis of 4526 murine mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of quantitative differences in dietary linoleic acid (18:2) and of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (IM), on the metastasis of line 4526 mammary tumors was investigated. All mice were fed high fat (20%, w/w), semipurified diets that were prepared using different mixtures of coconut (primarily saturated) and safflower (mostly 18:2) oil and thus contained either 1, 2, 4, 8, or 12% 18:2 (w/w). The spontaneous metastasis of 4526 tumor cells from primary sites, was increased 2-4 fold in mice that were fed diets containing higher levels of 18:2 (8 and 12%). Chronic treatment of mice with a relatively low dosage of IM reduced the growth rate of primary 4526 tumors, slightly reduced metastasis in mice fed 1 and 4% 18:2, and completely inhibited the increased metastasis observed in mice fed 12% 18:2. Treatment with a higher dosage of IM reduced metastasis even further compared to controls, but did not decrease growth rate compared to the low dosage of IM. The level of 18:2 in the diet did not appear to affect the incorporation of {sup 3}H-thymidine into tumor cells of metastatic lung nodules. The effect of 18:2 may be through a modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. This modulation, in turn, may affect particular steps in the metastatic cascade such as lodgement and survival of tumor cells.

  10. Involvement of specific matrix metalloproteinases during tumor necrosis factor/IFNgamma-based cancer therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Maarten; Van Lint, Philippe; Van Laere, Ineke; Wielockx, Ben; Wilson, Carole; López-Otin, Carlos; Shapiro, Stephen; Libert, Claude

    2007-09-01

    The potent antitumor activity of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in combination with IFN-gamma can only be applied in local regimens due to their strong proinflammatory properties. It has been shown that the broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor BB-94 protects against TNF/IFNgamma-induced toxicity without blocking the antitumor effect. Here, we tried to explain this protective role of BB-94 and sought to assign roles to specific MMPs in TNF/IFNgamma-induced toxicity. By studying the expression of MMP genes in different organs and in the tumor, we observed that the expression levels of MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-12 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-4 are clearly up-regulated in the liver during therapy. MMP-8 and MMP-9 are also up-regulated in the lung and kidney, respectively. In the tumor, most MMP genes are expressed, but only MMP-3 is up-regulated during TNF/IFNgamma treatment. Using MMP-deficient or double-deficient mice, we have shown a mediating role for MMP-3 during TNF/IFNgamma treatment in tumor-free and B16BL6 melanoma-bearing mice. By contrast, MMP-12 seemed to have some protective role in both models. However, because most phenotypes were not extremely outspoken, we have to conclude, based on the set of MMP-deficient mice we have studied, that inhibition of a single MMP will probably not increase the therapeutic value of TNF/IFNgamma, but that rather, broad-spectrum MMP inhibitors will be required. PMID:17876053

  11. Taci Is a Traf-Interacting Receptor for Tall-1, a Tumor Necrosis Factor Family Member Involved in B Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xing-Zhong; Treanor, James; Senaldi, Giorgio; Khare, Sanjay D.; Boone, Tom; Kelley, Michael; Theill, Lars E.; Colombero, Anne; Solovyev, Irina; Lee, Frances; McCabe, Susan; Elliott, Robin; Miner, Kent; Hawkins, Nessa; Guo, Jane; Stolina, Marina; Yu, Gang; Wang, Judy; Delaney, John; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Boyle, William J.; Hsu, Hailing

    2000-01-01

    We and others recently reported tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and apoptosis ligand–related leukocyte-expressed ligand 1 (TALL-1) as a novel member of the TNF ligand family that is functionally involved in B cell proliferation. Transgenic mice overexpressing TALL-1 have severe B cell hyperplasia and lupus-like autoimmune disease. Here, we describe expression cloning of a cell surface receptor for TALL-1 from a human Burkitt's lymphoma RAJI cell library. The cloned receptor is identical to the previously reported TNF receptor (TNFR) homologue transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand (CAML) interactor (TACI). Murine TACI was subsequently isolated from the mouse B lymphoma A20 cells. Human and murine TACI share 54% identity overall. Human TACI exhibits high binding affinities to both human and murine TALL-1. Soluble TACI extracellular domain protein specifically blocks TALL-1–mediated B cell proliferation without affecting CD40- or lipopolysaccharide-mediated B cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, when injected into mice, soluble TACI inhibits antibody production to both T cell–dependent and –independent antigens. By yeast two-hybrid screening of a B cell library with TACI intracellular domain, we identified that, like many other TNFR family members, TACI intracellular domain interacts with TNFR-associated factor (TRAF)2, 5, and 6. Correspondingly, TACI activation in a B cell line results in nuclear factor κB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation. The identification and characterization of the receptor for TALL-1 provides useful information for the development of a treatment for B cell–mediated autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:10880535

  12. RXFP1 is Targeted by Complement C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Factor 8 in Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Glogowska, Aleksandra; Burg, Maxwell; Wong, G. William; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The relaxin-like RXFP1 ligand–receptor system has important functions in tumor growth and tissue invasion. Recently, we have identified the secreted protein, CTRP8, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) family, as a novel ligand of the relaxin receptor, RXFP1, with functions in brain cancer. Here, we review the role of CTRP members in cancers cells with particular emphasis on CTRP8 in glioblastoma. PMID:26322020

  13. RXFP1 is Targeted by Complement C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Factor 8 in Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Glogowska, Aleksandra; Burg, Maxwell; Wong, G William; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The relaxin-like RXFP1 ligand-receptor system has important functions in tumor growth and tissue invasion. Recently, we have identified the secreted protein, CTRP8, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) family, as a novel ligand of the relaxin receptor, RXFP1, with functions in brain cancer. Here, we review the role of CTRP members in cancers cells with particular emphasis on CTRP8 in glioblastoma. PMID:26322020

  14. Tumor-specific immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer with butanol-extracted antigens and ethylchlorformate polymerized tumor protein.

    PubMed

    Rochester, M G; Sarosdy, M F; Pickett, S H; Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L

    1988-09-01

    Successful treatment of superficial bladder cancer using nonspecific immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been well documented. Investigation of two potential tumor-specific immunotherapeutic agents using a murine transitional-cell carcinoma model (MBT-2) is reported. The survival of mice immunized with tumor proteins obtained by treating tumor cells with either 1-butanol or ethylchlorformate was compared to the survival of animals immunized with BCG. Long-term immunity conferred by each of these agents was also assessed. Significant protection by both agents was noted in all treatment groups compared to controls. Long-term immunity was also found to result from treatment with both investigational agents as well as with BCG. Butanol-extracted antigens and ethylchlorformate polymerized tumor protein may be useful as immunotherapeutic alternatives to BCG. PMID:3411695

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Stimulates the Overproduction of Intestinal Apolipoprotein B48-containing Very Low Density Lipoproproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha(a)(TNFa), a proinflammatory cytokine, is involved in obesity-associated pathologies including type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. TNFa enhanced postprandial apoB48-VLDL1 overproduction by about 89% compared with the control after 90 min olive oil loading; TNFa did not si...

  16. Automated ensemble segmentation of epithelial proliferation, necrosis, and fibrosis using scatter tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Allende, P. Beatriz; Conde, Olga M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pogue, Brian W.; Mirapeix, Jesus; Lopez-Higuera, Jose M.

    2010-04-01

    Conventional imaging systems used today in surgical settings rely on contrast enhancement based on color and intensity and they are not sensitive to morphology changes at the microscopic level. Elastic light scattering spectroscopy has been shown to distinguish ultra-structural changes in tissue. Therefore, it could provide this intrinsic contrast being enormously useful in guiding complex surgical interventions. Scatter parameters associated with epithelial proliferation, necrosis and fibrosis in pancreatic tumors were previously estimated in a quantitative manner. Subtle variations were encountered across the distinct diagnostic categories. This work proposes an automated methodology to correlate these variations with their corresponding tumor morphologies. A new approach based on the aggregation of the predictions of K-nearest neighbors (kNN) algorithm and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) has been developed. The major benefit obtained from the combination of the distinct classifiers is a significant increase in the number of pixel localizations whose corresponding tissue type is reliably assured. Pseudo-color diagnosis images are provided showing a strong correlation with sample segmentations performed by a veterinary pathologist.

  17. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell injury by cycloheximide

    SciTech Connect

    Nolop, K.B.; Ryan, U.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent polypeptide mediator released by activated monocytes and macrophages, has a number of proinflammatory effects on endothelial cells. TNF is cytotoxic to tumor cells in vivo and in vitro, but TNF-induced toxicity to endothelial cells is less well established. We now report that cycloheximide (CHX), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, renders endothelial cells highly susceptible to TNF-induced lysis. TNF alone did not change the overall rate of protein synthesis by endothelial cells, whereas the addition of CHX completely abolished protein synthesis. Endothelial cells incubated in TNF alone in high concentrations (up to 1,000 U/ml) showed minimal rounding up and release of 51Cr. Likewise, CHX alone (5 micrograms/ml) had no significant effect on endothelial cell morphology and release of 51Cr. However, incubation of endothelial cells in both CHX and TNF caused injury in a dose-dependent manner. Morphological evidence of cell retraction, rounding, and detachment began within 2 h, but specific 51Cr release did not begin to rise until after 4 h. These changes were not observed when endothelial cells were incubated with TNF/CHX at 4 degrees C. The combination of TNF/CHX was lethal to all endothelial cells tested (bovine pulmonary artery, human umbilical vein, and human aorta), with human aortic cells showing the most pronounced changes. We conclude that healthy endothelial cells are resistant to TNF-induced lysis, but inhibition of their ability to make protein renders them highly susceptible.

  18. Phase I trial of intramuscularly administered tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, A A; Casper, E S; Gabrilove, J L; Templeton, M A; Sherwin, S A; Oettgen, H F

    1989-03-01

    A phase I trial of intramuscularly administered recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) was conducted in 19 adult patients with advanced solid tumors. The agent was administered daily for up to five consecutive days every other week for two to four courses. Doses of rTNF ranged from 5 to 200 micrograms/m2/d. Dose-limiting toxicities were encountered at doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d. Toxicities included tenderness, erythema and induration at the site of injection, fatigue, fever, chills, headache, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Moderate to marked reductions in WBC and platelet counts were observed regularly at the highest dose levels, but none were clinically significant. Hepatic enzyme elevation was seen frequently, and two patients developed hyperbilirubinemia. Only one of seven patients treated with doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d completed the planned course of therapy. Even at the highest dose levels, serum concentrations of rTNF could only rarely be detected in the serum. No therapeutic responses were observed. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of rTNF in this trial was 150 micrograms/m2/d, administered for two courses. PMID:2918329

  19. A comparison of the intoxication pathways of tumor necrosis factor and diphtheria toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) initiates tumor cell destruction is unknown. We have approached this problem by comparing the biological properties of TNF with diphtheria toxin (DTx), a well-characterized cytotoxin. Initial studies with human U937 cells revealed that a transient exposure to low pH enhances the cytotoxic activity of TNF. Detailed studies on the interaction of TNF with pure lipid vesicles revealed that the acid-enhanced cytolytic activity of this cytokine is correlated with the acquisition of membrane binding and insertion properties. Significantly, an increase in target membrane stabilization was observed in the presence of TNF; hence, TNF is not directly lytic for membranes. In susceptible target cells, DTx induces the release of {sup 51}Cr- and {sup 75}Se-labeled proteins within 7 h. Although DTx-triggered cell death has generally been accepted as a straightforward effect of translation inhibition, little or no cell lysis was observed over a 20-30 h period when target cells were exposed to cycloheximide, amino acid deficient medium or metabolic poisons even though protein synthesis was inhibited to levels observed with DTx. The protein synthesis inhibition and cytolytic activities of DTx showed similar dose-dependencies, target cell specificities, and sensitivities to NH{sub 4}Cl inhibition. DTx-induced DNA fragmentation preceded cells lysis and did not occur in cells that were treated with the other protein synthesis inhibitors.

  20. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  1. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  2. Necrosis targeted radiotherapy with iodine-131-labeled hypericin to improve anticancer efficacy of vascular disrupting treatment in rabbit VX2 tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Haibo; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Ziping; Chen, Feng; Dai, Xu; Li, Yaming; Ni, Yicheng; Xu, Ke

    2015-01-01

    A viable rim of tumor cells surrounding central necrosis always exists and leads to tumor recurrence after vascular disrupting treatment (VDT). A novel necrosis targeted radiotherapy (NTRT) using iodine-131-labeled hypericin (131I-Hyp) was specifically designed to treat viable tumor rim and improve tumor control after VDT in rabbit models of multifocal VX2 tumors. NTRT was administered 24 hours after VDT. Tumor growth was significantly slowed down by NTRT with a smaller tumor volume and a prolonged tumor doubling time (14.4 vs. 5.7 days), as followed by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging over 12 days. The viable tumor rims were well inhibited in NTRT group compared with single VDT control group, as showed on tumor cross sections at day 12 (1 vs. 3.7 in area). High targetability of 131I-Hyp to tumor necrosis was demonstrated by in vivo SPECT as high uptake in tumor regions lasting over 9 days with 4.26 to 98 times higher radioactivity for necrosis versus the viable tumor and other organs by gamma counting, and with ratios of 7.7–11.7 and 10.5–13.7 for necrosis over peri-tumor tissue by autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. In conclusion, NTRT improved the anticancer efficacy of VDT in rabbits with VX2 tumors. PMID:26036625

  3. A longitudinal magnetic resonance elastography study of murine brain tumors following radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y; Clayton, E H; Okamoto, R J; Engelbach, J; Bayly, P V; Garbow, J R

    2016-08-21

    An accurate and noninvasive method for assessing treatment response following radiotherapy is needed for both treatment monitoring and planning. Measurement of solid tumor volume alone is not sufficient for reliable early detection of therapeutic response, since changes in physiological and/or biomechanical properties can precede tumor volume change following therapy. In this study, we use magnetic resonance elastography to evaluate the treatment effect after radiotherapy in a murine brain tumor model. Shear modulus was calculated and compared between the delineated tumor region of interest (ROI) and its contralateral, mirrored counterpart. We also compared the shear modulus from both the irradiated and non-irradiated tumor and mirror ROIs longitudinally, sampling four time points spanning 9-19 d post tumor implant. Results showed that the tumor ROI had a lower shear modulus than that of the mirror ROI, independent of radiation. The shear modulus of the tumor ROI decreased over time for both the treated and untreated groups. By contrast, the shear modulus of the mirror ROI appeared to be relatively constant for the treated group, while an increasing trend was observed for the untreated group. The results provide insights into the tumor properties after radiation treatment and demonstrate the potential of using the mechanical properties of the tumor as a biomarker. In future studies, more closely spaced time points will be employed for detailed analysis of the radiation effect. PMID:27461395

  4. A longitudinal magnetic resonance elastography study of murine brain tumors following radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Clayton, E. H.; Okamoto, R. J.; Engelbach, J.; Bayly, P. V.; Garbow, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate and noninvasive method for assessing treatment response following radiotherapy is needed for both treatment monitoring and planning. Measurement of solid tumor volume alone is not sufficient for reliable early detection of therapeutic response, since changes in physiological and/or biomechanical properties can precede tumor volume change following therapy. In this study, we use magnetic resonance elastography to evaluate the treatment effect after radiotherapy in a murine brain tumor model. Shear modulus was calculated and compared between the delineated tumor region of interest (ROI) and its contralateral, mirrored counterpart. We also compared the shear modulus from both the irradiated and non-irradiated tumor and mirror ROIs longitudinally, sampling four time points spanning 9–19 d post tumor implant. Results showed that the tumor ROI had a lower shear modulus than that of the mirror ROI, independent of radiation. The shear modulus of the tumor ROI decreased over time for both the treated and untreated groups. By contrast, the shear modulus of the mirror ROI appeared to be relatively constant for the treated group, while an increasing trend was observed for the untreated group. The results provide insights into the tumor properties after radiation treatment and demonstrate the potential of using the mechanical properties of the tumor as a biomarker. In future studies, more closely spaced time points will be employed for detailed analysis of the radiation effect.

  5. Ultrasonic enhancement of gene transfection in murine melanoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Bao, S; Gies, R A; Thrall, B D

    1999-11-01

    The enhancement of gene transfection by ultrasound (US) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using the B16 mouse melanoma model. Cultured cells were either exposed in suspensions in vitro or implanted subcutaneously in female C57BL/6 mice for 10-14 days and, subsequently exposed, in vivo. For comparison to results with a luciferase plasmid, a reporter plasmid for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to evaluate transfection efficiency. US was supplied by a system, similar to a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter, that produced shock waves (SW) of 24.4 MPa peak positive and 5.2 MPa peak negative pressure amplitudes at the focus. The plasmids were mixed with the suspensions to achieve 20 ,microL mL(-1), or were injected intratumorally to provide 0.2 mg DNA per mL of tumor. Acoustic cavitation was promoted by retaining 0.2 mL of air in the 1.2-mL exposure chambers in vitro and by injecting air at 10% of tumor volume in vivo. In vitro, cell counts declined to 5.3% of shams after 800 SW exposure, with 1.4% of the cells expressing GFP after 2 days of culture. In vivo, 2 days after 400 SW exposure, viable-cell recovery from excised tumors was reduced to 4.2% of shams and cell transfection was enhanced by a factor of about 8, reaching 2.5% of cell counts (p < 0.005 in t-test). These results show that strong tumor ablation induced by US shock wave treatment can be coupled with simultaneous enhancement of gene transfection. PMID:10626630

  6. Quantification of Murine Pancreatic Tumors by High Resolution Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Sastra, Stephen A.; Olive, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ultrasonography is a powerful imaging modality that enables non-invasive, real time visualization of abdominal organs and tissues. This technology may be adapted for use in mice through the utilization of higher frequency transducers, allowing for extremely high resolution imaging of the mouse pancreas. This technique is particularly well-suited to pancreas imaging due to the ultrasonographic properties of the normal mouse pancreas, easily accessible imaging planes for the head and tail of the mouse pancreas, and the comparative difficulty in imaging the mouse pancreas with other technologies. A suite of measurements tools is available to characterize the normal and diseased states of tissues. Of particular utility for cancer applications is the ability to use tomography to construct a 3D tumor volume, enabling longitudinal imaging studies to track tumor development, or response to therapies. Here, we describe a detailed method for performing high resolution ultrasound to detect and measure pancreatic lesions in a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal using the VisualSonics Vevo2100 High Resolution Ultrasound System. The method includes preparation of the animal for imaging, 2D and 3D image acquisition, and post-acquisition analysis of tumors volumes. The combined procedure has been utilized extensively by our group and others for the preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (1–4). PMID:23359158

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α/CD40 Ligand-Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Greatly Enhanced the Antitumor Immune Response and Lifespan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmandi, Saeed; Menaa, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The interaction between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dendritic cells (DCs) affects T cell development and function. Further, the chemotactic capacity of MSCs, their interaction with the tumor microenvironment, and the intervention of immune-stimulatory molecules suggest possible exploitation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and CD40 ligand (CD40L) to genetically modify MSCs for enhanced cancer therapy. Both DCs and MSCs were isolated from BALB/c mice. DCs were then cocultured with MSCs transduced with TNF-α and/or CD40L [(TNF-α/CD40L)-MSCs]. Major DCs' maturation markers, DC and T cell cytokines such as interleukin-4, -6, -10, -12, TNF-α, tumor growth factor-β, as well as T cell proliferation, were assessed. Meantime, a BALB/c mouse breast tumor model was inducted by injecting 4T1 cells subcutaneously. Mice (n=10) in each well-defined test groups (n=13) were cotreated with DCs and/or (TNF-α/CD40L)-MSCs. The controls included untreated, empty vector-MSC, DC-lipopolysaccharide, and immature DC mouse groups. Eventually, cytokine levels from murine splenocytes, as well as tumor volume and survival of mice, were assessed. Compared with the corresponding controls, both in vitro and in vivo analyses showed induction of T helper 1 (Th1) as well as suppression of Th2 and Treg responses in test groups, which led to a valuable antitumor immune response. Further, the longest mouse survival was observed in mouse groups that were administered with DCs plus (TNF-α/CD40L)-MSCs. In our experimental setting, the present pioneered study demonstrates that concomitant genetic modification of MSCs with TNF-α and CD40L optimized the antitumor immunity response in the presence of DCs, meantime increasing the mouse lifespan. PMID:24372569

  8. Analysis of Tumor Necrosis Factor Function Using the Resonant Recognition Model.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Irena; Cosic, Drasko; Lazar, Katarina

    2016-06-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a complex protein that plays a very important role in a number of biological functions including apoptotic cell death, tumor regression, cachexia, inflammation inhibition of tumorigenesis and viral replication. Its most interesting function is that it is an inhibitor of tumorigenesis and inductor of apoptosis. Thus, the TNF could be a good candidate for cancer therapy. However, the TNF has also inflammatory and toxic effects. Therefore, it would be very important to understand complex functions of the TNF and consequently be able to predict mutations or even design the new TNF-related proteins that will have only a tumor inhibition function, but not other side effects. This can be achieved by applying the resonant recognition model (RRM), a unique computational model of analysing macromolecular sequences of proteins, DNA and RNA. The RRM is based on finding that certain periodicities in distribution of free electron energies along protein, DNA and RNA are strongly correlated to the biological function of these macromolecules. Thus, based on these findings, the RRM has capabilities of protein function identification, prediction of bioactive amino acids and protein design with desired biological function. Using the RRM, we separate different functions of TNF as different periodicities (frequencies) within the distribution of free energy electrons along TNF protein. Interestingly, these characteristic TNF frequencies are related to previously identified characteristics of proto-oncogene and oncogene proteins describing TNF involvement in oncogenesis. Consequently, we identify the key amino acids related to the crucial TNF function, i.e. receptor recognition. We have also designed the peptide which will have the ability to recognise the receptor without side effects. PMID:27286856

  9. Fiber-mutant technique can augment gene transduction efficacy and anti-tumor effects against established murine melanoma by cytokine-gene therapy using adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yuka; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kanehira, Makiko; Nishino, Naoko; Takahashi, Koichi; Mizuno, Nobuyasu; Hayakawa, Takao; Mayumi, Tadanori

    2002-03-01

    Melanoma cells are relatively resistant to adenovirus vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer due to the low expression of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), which acts as a primitive Ad-receptor. Therefore, extremely high doses of Ad are required for effective gene therapy against melanoma. In the present study, we investigated whether fiber-mutant Ad containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence in the fiber knob could promote gene delivery and anti-tumor effects in the murine B16 BL6 tumor model. B16 BL6 cells (in vitro) and tumors (in vivo) infected with RGD fiber-mutant Ad containing a tumor necrosis factor alpha gene (Ad-RGD-TNFalpha) produced more TNFalpha than those infected with conventional Ad-TNFalpha. In addition, Ad-RGD-TNFalpha required about one-tenth the dosage of Ad-TNFalpha for induction of equal therapeutic effects upon intratumoral injection into established B16 BL6 tumors. Furthermore, the combination of both TNFalpha- and interleukin 12-expressing RGD fiber-mutant Ads exhibited more effective tumor regression than the Ad expressing each alone. These results suggested that the fiber-mutant for altering Ad-tropism is a very potent technology for advancing gene therapy for melanoma. PMID:11809531

  10. Dynamic Tumor Growth Patterns in a Novel Murine Model of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Terrah J. Paul; Hadac, Jamie N.; Sievers, Chelsie K.; Leystra, Alyssa A.; Deming, Dustin A.; Zahm, Christopher D.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Nomura, Alice; Nettekoven, Laura A.; Plesh, Lauren K.; Clipson, Linda; Sullivan, Ruth; Newton, Michael A.; Schelman, William R.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) often arises from adenomatous colonic polyps. Polyps can grow and progress to cancer, but may also remain static in size, regress, or resolve. Predicting which progress and which remain benign is difficult. We developed a novel long-lived murine model of CRC with tumors that can be followed by colonoscopy. Our aim was to assess whether these tumors have similar growth patterns and histologic fates to human colorectal polyps to identify features to aid in risk-stratification of colonic tumors. Long-lived ApcMin/+ mice were treated with dextran sodium sulfate to promote colonic tumorigenesis. Tumor growth patterns were characterized by serial colonoscopy with biopsies obtained for immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling. Tumors grew, remained static, regressed, or resolved over time with different relative frequencies. Newly developed tumors demonstrated higher rates of growth and resolution than more established tumors that tended to remain static in size. Colonic tumors were hyperplastic lesions (3%), adenomas (73%), intramucosal carcinomas (20%), or adenocarcinomas (3%). Interestingly, the level of β-catenin was higher in adenomas that became intratumoral carcinomas as compared to those that failed to progress. In addition, differentially expressed genes between adenomas and intramucosal carcinomas were identified. This novel murine model of intestinal tumorigenesis develops colonic tumors that can be monitored by serial colonoscopy, mirror growth patterns seen in human colorectal polyps, and progress to CRC. Further characterization of cellular and molecular features are needed to determine which features can be used to risk-stratify polyps for progression to CRC and potentially guide prevention strategies. PMID:24196829

  11. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yash N.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Perou, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs)’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways. PMID:27149990

  12. Anti-tumor angiogenesis effect of genetic fusion vaccine encoding murine beta-defensin 2 and tumor endothelial marker-8 in a CT-26 murine colorectal carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Xie, Ganfeng; Geng, Peiliang; Zheng, Chenhong; Li, Jianjun; Pan, Feng; Ruan, Zhihua; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) is an endothelial-specific marker that is upregulated during tumor angiogenesis. We previously demonstrated that DNA-based vaccine encoding xenogeneic TEM8 can potentiate anti-angiogenesis immunotherapy of malignancy; nevertheless, it remains to be improved in minimizing immune tolerance. Recently, it has been reported that murine beta-defensin 2 (MBD2) is chemotactic for immature dendritic cells and plays a pivotal role in breaking immune tolerance. Herein, we constructed a genetic fusion vaccine encoding murine TEM8 and MBD2 to investigate whether the novel vaccine preferentially elicits therapeutic antitumor immune responses and suppresses cancerous angiogenesis in mouse models. The anti-angiogenesis effect was determined by microvessel density (MVD) using immunohistochemical staining. The efficacy of the fusion vaccine was primarily assessed by detecting cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity (51Cr-release assay). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay was used to detect TEM8-specific INF-γ production, and the activity of CTL was further verified by a depletion of CD8+ T cells via anti-CD8 monoclonal antibody. Our results showed that the DNA fusion vaccine possessed an enhanced therapeutic antitumor immunity through anti-angiogenesis in BALB/c mice inoculated with CT26 cells, and this effect was generally attributed to stimulation of an antigen specific CD8+ T-cell response against mTEM8. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that the fusion vaccine based on mTEM8 and MBD2 induced autoimmunity against endothelial cells, resulting in deceleration of tumor growth, and could be potential therapeutical application in clinic. PMID:26064415

  13. Initial description of a tumor enhancing activity produced by murine splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, W H; Stebler, B; Ershler, W B

    1991-08-30

    We have shown that certain murine tumors grow more slowly and spread less readily in immune deficient animals. We have also demonstrated that immunologic factors explain certain aspects of this difference. In the work presented we demonstrate that a subpopulation of splenocytes produce a factor(s) that enhances tumor cell proliferation in vitro. We also describe an in vitro model to determine the level of tumor stimulatory activity. We found that the tumor cell growth-enhancing activity (TEA) is heat stable but sensitive to trypsin digestion, low pH and beta-mercaptoethanol. TEA production is found to be insensitive to mitogen stimulation such as concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, and phytohemagglutinin. Among the known growth factors and interleukins we have tested (interleukin 1-7, basic FGF, EGF, TGF-beta PDGF, GM-CSF, and MCSF), none appear to account for TEA activity. PMID:1883389

  14. Treatment of murine tumors using acoustic droplet vaporization-enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meili; Jiang, Lixing; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Zhang, Aili; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Lisa X.

    2013-09-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be applied focally and noninvasively to thermally ablate solid tumors. Long treatment times are typically required for large tumors, which can expose patients to certain risks while potentially decreasing the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a promising modality that can enhance the efficacy of tumor treatment using HIFU. In this study, the therapeutic effects of combined HIFU and ADV was evaluated in mice bearing subcutaneously-implanted 4T1 tumors. Histological examination showed that the combination of HIFU and ADV generated a mean necrotic area in the tumor that was 2.9-fold larger than with HIFU alone. A significant enhancement of necrosis was found in the periphery of the tumor, where the blood supply was abundant. Seven days after treatment, the tumors treated with combined HIFU and ADV were 30-fold smaller in volume than tumors treated with HIFU alone. The study demonstrates the potential advantage of combining HIFU and ADV in tumor treatment.

  15. Historical perspectives on tumor necrosis factor and its superfamily: 25 years later, a golden journey

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Kim, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    Although activity that induced tumor regression was observed and termed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as early as the 1960s, the true identity of TNF was not clear until 1984, when Aggarwal and coworkers reported, for the first time, the isolation of 2 cytotoxic factors: one, derived from macrophages (molecular mass 17 kDa), was named TNF, and the second, derived from lymphocytes (20 kDa), was named lymphotoxin. Because the 2 cytotoxic factors exhibited 50% amino acid sequence homology and bound to the same receptor, they came to be called TNF-α and TNF-β. Identification of the protein sequences led to cloning of their cDNA. Based on sequence homology to TNF-α, now a total of 19 members of the TNF superfamily have been identified, along with 29 interacting receptors, and several molecules that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of these receptors. The roles of the TNF superfamily in inflammation, apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and morphogenesis have been documented. Their roles in immunologic, cardiovascular, neurologic, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases are becoming apparent. TNF superfamily members are active targets for drug development, as indicated by the recent approval and expanding market of TNF blockers used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohns disease, and osteoporosis, with a total market of more than US $20 billion. As we learn more about this family, more therapeutics will probably emerge. In this review, we summarize the initial discovery of TNF-α, and the insights gained regarding the roles of this molecule and its related family members in normal physiology and disease. PMID:22053109

  16. Disturbance of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Mediated Beta Interferon Signaling in Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Hanke, Brigitte; Zawatzky, Rainer; Soto, Ubaldo; van Riggelen, Jan; zur Hausen, Harald; Rösl, Frank

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we show that malignant human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cells lost their ability to synthesize endogenous beta interferon (IFN-β) upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) treatment. IFN-β transcription, however, was reinducible in nonmalignant HPV-positive cells, which was confirmed in functional protection assays against encephalomyocarditis virus or vesicular stomatitis virus infections. Addition of neutralizing antibodies against IFN-β blocked the antiviral effect, excluding the possibility that other IFN types were involved. Conversely, both malignant and immortalized cells could be protected against viral cytolysis when either IFN-β, IFN-α, or IFN-γ was added exogenously. This indicates that only the cross talk between TNF-α and the IFN-β pathways, and not IFN-α/β and IFN-γ signaling in general, is perturbed in cervical carcinoma cells. Notably, full virus protection was restricted exclusively to nonmalignant cells, indicating that the antiviral effect correlates with the growth-inhibitory and virus-suppressive properties of TNF-α. The IFN-regulatory factors IRF-1 and p48 (ISGF3γ) emerged as key regulatory molecules in the differential IFN-β response, since their transcription was either absent or only inefficiently enhanced in tumorigenic cells upon treatment with TNF-α. Inducibility of both genes, however, became reestablished in cervical carcinoma cells, which were complemented to nontumorigenicity after somatic cell hybridization. Complementation was paralleled by the entire reconstitution of cytokine-mediated IFN-β expression and the ability of TNF-α to exert an antiviral state. In contrast, under conditions where tumor suppression was not accomplished upon somatic cell hybridization, neither expression of IRF-1, p48, and IFN-β nor antiviral activity could be restored. PMID:11739693

  17. A phase II trial of recombinant tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, N; Childs, B; Larchian, W; Rosado, K; Kelsen, D

    1990-08-15

    Sixteen previously treated (with only one prior regimen) patients with histologically proven metastatic or locally recurrent colorectal carcinoma were treated with recombinant tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) administered by 30-minute i.v. infusions twice daily for 5 consecutive days every other week for 8 weeks. Patients received 100 micrograms/m2 twice daily on day 1 of cycle 1 with escalation to 150 micrograms/m2 twice daily thereafter. Patients were concomitantly treated with indomethacin 25 mg every 6 hours and acetaminophen 650 mg every 4 hours to obviate fever and chills. Toxicities included: nausea/vomiting (69%), headache (25%), chills (69%), pain at tumor sites (63%), hypotension (31%), and hypertension (38%). Hematologic toxicity included leukopenia less than 2000 cells/mm3 (38%) and thrombocytopenia less than 100,000 cells/mm3 (13%). Liver function abnormalities occurred independently of the site or extent of metastatic disease and inconsistently in each treatment cycle. Four patients developed bilirubinemia greater than 2.5 x baseline values (range, 2.5 to 10.3 U/L); five patients had greater than 2.5 x elevations in alkaline phosphatase (range, 624 to 1663 U/L). Two patients developed retinal vein thrombosis in the absence of hemostatic abnormalities. In both instances, this complication occurred several weeks after completion of therapy. No objective responses were noted in 14 evaluable patients (95% confidence interval: 0 to 0.23). Three patients had stable disease for a median duration of 4.5 months. In conclusion, i.v. rTNF at this dose and schedule has no demonstrable antitumor efficacy. Twice-daily i.v. administration of this agent is associated with more hepatotoxicity than previously reported in trials using subcutaneous or once daily i.v. administration. Retinal vein thrombosis may be a late complication of i.v. rTNF at this dose and schedule. PMID:2386895

  18. Phase I evaluation of recombinant tumor necrosis factor given in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W; Urba, W J; Clark, J W; Longo, D L; Farrell, M; Creekmore, S P; Conlon, K C; Jaffe, H; Steis, R G

    1991-10-01

    In light of in vitro and preclinical animal model data suggesting potential additive or synergistic antitumor effects from the combined use of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), we conducted a phase I study employing escalating doses of each agent in 36 patients with solid tumors to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Patients were given an intramuscular (i.m.) injection of IFN-gamma, followed 5 min later by an i.m. injection of TNF-alpha, each agent in different sites, every other day for ten doses over 20 days. Patients received 10, 50, or 100 micrograms/m2 of each agent throughout the treatment course. No dose modifications were made. Patients suffering serious toxicity had therapy stopped and were considered to be off-study. All patients experienced fatigue, and 36% spent over half their time in bed on treatment days. Fever and chills were nearly universal. Mild to moderate elevations in serum transaminase levels were noted in 44% of patients, and 44% developed transient microscopic hematuria. Although 81% of patients had anorexia, only 17% of patients lost more than 3 kg of body wt during the 3 weeks of therapy. Because two of three patients receiving 100 micrograms/m2 of both agents developed serious toxicity (one fever greater than 105 degrees F, one thrombocytopenia 43,000/mm3), the MTD was established to be 100 micrograms/m2 of IFN-gamma plus 50 micrograms/m2 of TNF-alpha. The use of aspirin did not significantly alter the toxic effects of the agents. One patient with melanoma had a mixed response and one patient with mesothelioma transiently cleared his ascites of malignant cells. PMID:1790143

  19. Targeting the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand path in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezhong; Thiele, Carol J

    2003-07-18

    The identification of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) a few years ago generated considerable enthusiasm for it as a potential cancer therapeutic agent. This is because TRAIL shows potent apoptosis inducing activity in a wide spectrum of transformed cell lines but not in cell lines derived from normal tissue origin. As the details in the signal transduction pathway of TRAIL-induced apoptosis are clarified, various defects of TRAIL pathway have been identified in TRAIL resistant cancer cells. Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children and those with a poor prognosis require more sensitive therapies. Unlike other cancer cells, most neuroblastoma cell lines are resistant to TRAIL induced apoptosis and the resistance correlates with caspase 8 deficiency, which is attributed to the methylation of the gene. Interferon (IFN)-gamma induces caspase 8 expression in most neuroblastoma cell lines regardless of the methylation status but fails to sensitize most NB to TRAIL. Further analysis indicates a TRAIL receptor deficiency contributes to TRAIL resistance in NB. Multiple lesions suggest that this path may play an important role in tumorigenesis and/ or evasion from therapies. Furthermore it indicates that the clinical application of TRAIL in NB will require a multi-modality approach. Important questions remain unanswered: How does IFN-gamma induce caspase 8 and why is the induction heterogeneous? How to stimulate the caspase 8 induction in cells that fail to respond to IFN-gamma? How to target other TRAIL pathway lesions with the clinically feasible approaches? PMID:12880973

  20. Interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha values in elk neonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, S. M.; Johnson, C.R.; Murtaugh, M.P.; Mech, L.D.; White, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Serological indicators of general condition would be helpful for monitoring or assessing ungulate wildlife. Toward that end, we report the 1st reference values for 2 cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-??), in neonatal elk (Cervus elaphus). We obtained blood samples from 140 calves ??? 6 days old in Yellowstone National Park during summer 2003-2005. TL-6 values ranged from 0 to 1.21 pg/ml with a median of 0.03 pg/ml. TNF-?? values ranged from 0 to 225.43 pg/ml with a median of 1.85 pg/ml. IL-6 and TNF-?? concentrations were not significant predictors of elk calf survival through 21 days. Development of ungulate-based IL-6 and TNF-?? assays that provide greater sensitivity than cross-reacting human-based assays could be helpful in monitoring ungulate condition and health status comparisons among herds. Such information could provide indirect assessments of range quality or environmental influences among herds. ?? 2007 American Society of Mammalogists.

  1. Induction of release of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes by staphylococci and staphylococcal peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, C P; Mattsson, E; Martinez-Martinez, L; De Graaf, L; Van Strijp, J A; Verbrugh, H A; Verhoef, J; Fleer, A

    1993-01-01

    The role of cytokines in gram-positive infections is still relatively poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to establish whether or not intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans and peptidoglycan components derived from staphylococci are capable of stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by human monocytes. We show here that intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans, isolated from three Staphylococcus epidermidis and three S. aureus strains, were indeed able to induce secretion of TNF by human monocytes in a concentration-dependent fashion. TNF release was detected by both enzyme immunoassay and the L929 fibroblast bioassay. In the enzyme immunoassay, a minimal concentration of peptidoglycan of 1 micrograms/ml was required to detect TNF release by monocytes, whereas in the bioassay a peptidoglycan concentration of 10 micrograms/ml was needed to detect a similar amount of TNF release. Peptidoglycan components such as the stem peptide, tetra- and pentaglycine, and muramyl dipeptide were unable to induce TNF release from human monocytes. PMID:8406805

  2. Genetic variability in the tumor necrosis factor-lymphotoxin region influences susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, B.; Waldron-Lynch, F.; McDermott, M. F.; Adams, C.; Amos, C. I.; Zhu, D. K.; Ward, R. H.; Clegg, D. O.; Shanahan, F.; Molloy, M. G.; O'Gara, F.

    1996-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class III tumor necrosis factor-lymphotoxin (TNF-LT) region (6p21.3) was investigated as a possible susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inheritance of five TNF microsatellite markers was determined in 50 multiplex families. Overall, 47 different haplotypes were observed. One of these, the TNF a6, b5, c1, d3, e3 (H1) haplotype, was present in 35.3% of affected, but in only 20.5% of unaffected, individuals (P < .005). This haplotype accounted for 21.5% of the parental haplotypes transmitted to affected offspring and only 7.3% not transmitted to affected offspring (P = .0003). The TNF a6 and TNF c1 alleles were individually associated with RA (P = .0005 and .0008, respectively), as were the HLA-DRB1 "shared epitope" (SE) (P = .0001) and HLA-DRB1*0401 (P = .0018). Both univariate and bivariate conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant effects of TNF c1 and SE in increasing risk to RA (P < .001). Stratification by the presence of SE indicated an independent effect of the TNFc1 allele (P = .0003) and the HLA A1, B8, DR3 extended haplotype (always TNFa2, b3, c1, d1, e3) (P = .0027) in SE heterozygotes, while the H1 haplotype was associated with RA in SE homozygotes (P = .0018). The TNF-LT region appears to influence susceptibility to RA, distinct from HLA-DR. PMID:8751869

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-α modifies the effects of Shiga toxin on glial cells.

    PubMed

    Leu, Hue; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Shimizu, Masaki; Toma, Tomoko; Wada, Taizo; Ohta, Kunio; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-09-01

    Shiga toxin (STX) is one of the main factors inducing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in infections with STX-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Approximately 62% of patients with HUS showed symptoms of encephalopathy in the 2011 Japanese outbreak of STEC infections. At that time, we reported elevated serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in patients with acute encephalopathy during the HUS phase. In the current study, we investigated whether TNF-α augments the effects of STX in glial cell lines and primary glial cells. We found that TNF-α alone or STX in combination with TNF-α activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling and inhibits growth of glial cells. The magnitude of the NF-κB activation and the inhibition of cell growth by the STX and TNF-α combination was greater than that obtained with TNF-α alone or STX alone. Thus, this in vitro study reveals the role of TNF-α in glial cells during STEC infections. PMID:27268285

  4. Tumor necrosis factor inhibition increases the revascularization of ischemic hind-limbs in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Assiri, Adel M A; El-Baz, Hatim A; Amin, Ali H

    2015-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is first identified as a mediator of lethal endotoxin poisoning. The anti-TNF therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is based on the recognition of the role of TNF as the master regulator. Type II diabetes is characterized with altered stem cells and reduced vasculogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to determine if TNF inhibitor would improve vasculogenesis in ischemic hind-limbs of diabetic mice. Fifty male type 2 diabetic and their control (8-10 weeks old mice) were used, and ischemia was induced in the hind-limbs of all mice for 28 days. Vessel density was assessed by high-definition microangiography at the end of the treatment period. After 4 weeks, vessel density displayed no difference between the ischemic and the non-ischemic legs in control mice. However, in diabetic mice, the ischemic hind-limb vessel density was significantly decreased. Interestingly, diabetic mice displayed a significant improved vasculogenesis when treated with TNF inhibitor. Moreover, this data was confirmed by capillary density determined by immunostaining. TNF inhibitors are able to improve the formation of microvessels in response to ischemia in type 2 diabetes. PMID:26026701

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Peripical Tissue Exudates of Teeth with Apical Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezelj-Ribarić, Sonja; Magašić, Karolina; Prpić, Jelena; Miletić, Ivana; Karlović, Zoran

    2007-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to determine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels in periapical exudates and to evaluate their relationship with radiological findings. Methodology. Periapical exudates were collected from root canals of 60 single-rooted teeth using absorbent paper points. TNF-α levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The samples were divided into three groups according to the periapical radiolucent area. Results. Nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test revealed significant differences between TNF-α concentrations in control group (40, 57±28, 15 pg/mL) and group with larger radiolucent areas (2365, 79±582, 95 pg/mL), as well as between control and canals with small radiolucent areas (507, 66±278, 97) (P<.05). Conclusions. The levels of TNF-α increase significantly in teeth with periapical pathosis, from smaller to bigger lesions. This research and its results have shown that objective analysis of the TNF-α levels enables establishment of a relationship between different concentrations of TNF-α and different radiological changes. PMID:18320014

  6. Association between serum soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors and early childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Shengrong; Li, Wei; Liu, Zhuo; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Sen; Wu, Jianxin

    2016-06-30

    This study aimed to characterize the inflammatory cytokine profiles and further validate the significantly different cytokines in the serum obtained from obese children aged 36-48 months. Four obese children and four lean controls were randomly selected for inflammatory cytokine array assay, in which two cytokines [soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors (sTNFRs) 1 and 2] were found to be significantly different. Both cytokines (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) were then further validated through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 61 obese children and 52 lean children. ELISA results revealed that serum sTNFR1 level in obese children significantly increased (p = 0.003), whereas sTNFR2 did not change significantly (p = 0.069). Stratified analysis by gender showed that only obese girls presented increased sTNFR1 (p = 0.005) and sTNFR2 (p = 0.049) levels. We conclude that serum sTNFR1 is elevated in early childhood obesity. Moreover, serum sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with obese girls but not obese boys, thereby suggesting that serum sTNFRs in early childhood obesity may be sex related. PMID:27040725

  7. Imbalance of tumor necrosis factor receptors during progression in bovine leukemia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Konnai, Satoru . E-mail: konnai@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ikeda, Manabu; Kohara, Junko; Hirata, Toh-ichi; Okada, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2005-09-01

    Previously, we found an up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-{alpha} and an imbalance of TNF receptors in sheep experimentally infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). In order to investigate the different TNF-{alpha}-induced responses, in this study we examined the TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferative response and the expression levels of two distinct TNF receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from BLV-uninfected cattle and BLV-infected cattle that were aleukemic (AL) or had persistent lymphocytosis (PL). The proliferative response of PBMC isolated from those cattle with PL in the presence of recombinant bovine TNF-{alpha} (rTNF-{alpha}) was significantly higher than those from AL cattle and uninfected cattle and the cells from PL cattle expressed significantly higher mRNA levels of TNF receptor type II (TNF-RII) than those from AL and BLV-uninfected cattle. No difference was found in TNF-RI mRNA levels. Most cells expressing TNF-RII in PL cattle were CD5{sup +} or sIgM{sup +} cells and these cells showed resistance to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations between the changes in provirus load and TNF-RII mRNA levels, and TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferation and TNF-RII mRNA levels. These data suggest that imbalance in the expression of TNF receptors could at least in part contribute to the progression of lymphocytosis in BLV infection.

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes in long-term culture.

    PubMed Central

    Bour, E. S.; Ward, L. K.; Cornman, G. A.; Isom, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    Apoptosis occurs naturally in the liver and increases in specific pathogenic processes. We previously described the use of a chemically defined medium supplemented with epidermal growth factor and dimethylsulfoxide to maintain rat hepatocytes in a highly differentiated state for more than 30 days (long-term culture). In this study, we showed that hepatocytes in long-term dimethylsulfoxide culture have definite advantages over using cells in short-term culture (cells in culture for 2 to 4 days) to study apoptosis. We demonstrated that treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha induced apoptosis (detected morphologically and by formation of an oligonucleosomal DNA ladder) only in hepatocytes that had been subjected to dimethylsulfoxide removal. Neither treatment with TNF-alpha alone or dimethylsulfoxide removal alone induced apoptosis. Apoptosis could be induced by concentrations as low as 500 U of TNF-alpha/ml. Although a DNA ladder was not detected by 12 hours after TNF-alpha treatment, it was easily identified by 24 hours. We conclude that this system can be used 1) to examine the underlying mechanism by which TNF-alpha causes apoptosis in hepatocytes and 2) to study induction of apoptosis in hepatocytes by other agents. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8579111

  9. Production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 by macrophages from human atheromatous plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Tipping, P. G.; Hancock, W. W.

    1993-01-01

    The production of cytokines by atheromatous plaque macrophages from human endarterectomy tissue was assessed in vitro by short-term cell culture and in situ by immunohistology. Macrophages were isolated from plaques of 14 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy and 7 patients undergoing reconstructive procedures on atheromatous distal aortic and femoral arteries. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) production by plaque macrophages and blood monocytes isolated concurrently from these patients was assessed. TNF release by macrophages from carotid plaques (0.39 +/- 0.12 ng/10(6) cells/24 hours) was significantly augmented compared to the release by corresponding blood monocytes (0.014 +/- 0.011 ng/10(6) cells/24 hours, P = 0.03), and by macrophages from noncarotid lesions (0.038 +/- 0.036 ng/10(6) cells/24 hours, P < 0.04). Cellular TNF expression by macrophages within carotid plaques was also more prominent than in noncarotid lesions. By contrast, IL-1 production by plaque macrophages from both carotid and noncarotid plaques was not augmented compared to blood monocytes, and only infrequent and low-intensity labeling for IL-1 was present on macrophages within plaques from either group. These results provide functional and immunohistological evidence for increased production of TNF but not IL-1 by activated macrophages, indicating local and selective augmentation of cytokine production within carotid plaques. This suggests that macrophages play an active role in the inflammatory response within atheromatous carotid plaques. Images Figure 3 PMID:8506944

  10. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) reverses experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdul G; Arnold, Nadine D; Chamberlain, Janet; Pickworth, Josephine A; Paiva, Claudia; Dawson, Sarah; Cross, Simon; Long, Lu; Zhao, Lan; Morrell, Nicholas W; Crossman, David C; Newman, Christopher M H; Kiely, David G; Francis, Sheila E; Lawrie, Allan

    2012-10-22

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by the progressive narrowing and occlusion of small pulmonary arteries. Current therapies fail to fully reverse this vascular remodeling. Identifying key pathways in disease pathogenesis is therefore required for the development of new-targeted therapeutics. We have previously reported tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) immunoreactivity within pulmonary vascular lesions from patients with idiopathic PAH and animal models. Because TRAIL can induce both endothelial cell apoptosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation in the systemic circulation, we hypothesized that TRAIL is an important mediator in the pathogenesis of PAH. We demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL is a potent stimulus for pulmonary vascular remodeling in human cells and rodent models. Furthermore, antibody blockade or genetic deletion of TRAIL prevents the development of PAH in three independent rodent models. Finally, anti-TRAIL antibody treatment of rodents with established PAH reverses pulmonary vascular remodeling by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis, improves hemodynamic indices, and significantly increases survival. These preclinical investigations are the first to demonstrate the importance of TRAIL in PAH pathogenesis and highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target to direct future translational therapies. PMID:23071256

  11. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) reverses experimental pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Abdul G.; Arnold, Nadine D.; Chamberlain, Janet; Pickworth, Josephine A.; Paiva, Claudia; Dawson, Sarah; Cross, Simon; Long, Lu; Zhao, Lan; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Crossman, David C.; Newman, Christopher M.H.; Kiely, David G.; Francis, Sheila E.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by the progressive narrowing and occlusion of small pulmonary arteries. Current therapies fail to fully reverse this vascular remodeling. Identifying key pathways in disease pathogenesis is therefore required for the development of new-targeted therapeutics. We have previously reported tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) immunoreactivity within pulmonary vascular lesions from patients with idiopathic PAH and animal models. Because TRAIL can induce both endothelial cell apoptosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation in the systemic circulation, we hypothesized that TRAIL is an important mediator in the pathogenesis of PAH. We demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL is a potent stimulus for pulmonary vascular remodeling in human cells and rodent models. Furthermore, antibody blockade or genetic deletion of TRAIL prevents the development of PAH in three independent rodent models. Finally, anti-TRAIL antibody treatment of rodents with established PAH reverses pulmonary vascular remodeling by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis, improves hemodynamic indices, and significantly increases survival. These preclinical investigations are the first to demonstrate the importance of TRAIL in PAH pathogenesis and highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target to direct future translational therapies. PMID:23071256

  12. Mitochondria mediate tumor necrosis factor-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle myotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y. P.; Atkins, C. M.; Sweatt, J. D.; Reid, M. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is implicated in muscle atrophy and weakness associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Recently, we reported that TNF-alpha directly induces muscle protein degradation in differentiated skeletal muscle myotubes, where it rapidly activates nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). We also have found that protein loss induced by TNF-alpha is NF-kappaB dependent. In the present study, we analyzed the signaling pathway by which TNF-alpha activates NF-kappaB in myotubes differentiated from C2C12 and rat primary myoblasts. We found that activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha was blocked by rotenone or amytal, inhibitors of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. On the other hand, antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III, enhanced TNF-alpha activation of NK-kappaB. These results suggest a key role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating NF-kappaB activation in muscle. In addition, we found that TNF-alpha stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) activity. However, other signal transduction mediators including ceramide, Ca2+, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and nitric oxide (NO) do not appear to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB.

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Converting Enzyme: Implications for Ocular Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, Kota V

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) –converting enzyme (TACE), a member of the family of metalloproteinase disintegrin proteins, is responsible for the conversion of inactive TNF-α precursor from to active mature form. TNF-α is a pleiotropic cytokine that contributes to cellular immunity and inflammatory response in wide range of inflammatory pathologies. Although a large number of studies indicate the use of TACE inhibitors, which prevents processing of TNF-α as potential therapeutic drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and cancer, very few studies indicate its use in ocular pathologies. It is still not clearly understood how the TACE-mediated shedding of cytokines and growth factors in various ocular tissues plays a critical role in the cytotoxic signals causing tissue dysfunction and damage leading to blindness. Regulation of TACE activity is likely to have wide implications for ocular immunology and inflammatory diseases. Specifically, since anti-TNF-α therapies have been used to prevent ocular inflammatory complications, the use of TACE inhibitors could be a novel therapeutic approach for ocular inflammatory diseases especially uveitis. PMID:20303413

  14. Genetically engineered bacteriophage delivers a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist coating on neural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Jin, Young-Hyun; Salieb-Beugelaar, Georgette B; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports a novel approach for the formation of anti-inflammatory surface coating on a neural electrode. The surface coating is realized using a recombinant f88 filamentous bacteriophage, which displays a short platinum binding motif and a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist (TNF-α antagonist) on p3 and p8 proteins, respectively. The recombinant bacteriophages are immobilized on the platinum surface by a simple dip coating process. The selective and stable immobilization of bacteriophages on a platinum electrode is confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, atomic force microscope and fluorescence microscope. From the in vitro cell viability test, the inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) induced cell death was prevented by presenting recombinant bacteriophage coating, albeit with no significant cytotoxic effect. It is also observed that the bacteriophage coating does not have critical effects on the electrochemical properties such as impedance and charge storage capacities. Thus, this approach demonstrates a promising anti-apoptotic as well as anti-inflammatory surface coating for neural implant applications. PMID:24448635

  15. Cytokine expression in mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles by inhalation. Role of tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Bornholdt, Jette; Kjær, Sanna L; Dybdahl, Marianne; Risom, Lotte; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2006-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution has been associated with lung and cardiovascular disease, for which lung inflammation may be a driving mechanism. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been suggested to have a key-role in particle-induced inflammation. We studied the time course of gene expression of inflammatory markers in the lungs of wild type mice and Tnf-/- mice after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). Mice were exposed to either a single or multiple doses of DEP by inhalation. We measured the mRNA level of the cytokines Tnf and interleukin-6 (Il-6) and the chemokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein (Mcp-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (Mip-2) and keratinocyte derived chemokine (Kc) in the lung tissue at different time points after exposure. Results Tnf mRNA expression levels increased late after DEP-inhalation, whereas the expression levels of Il-6, Mcp-1 and Kc increased early. The expression of Mip-2 was independent of TNF if the dose was above a certain level. The expression levels of the cytokines Kc, Mcp-1 and Il-6, were increased in the absence of TNF. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that Tnf is not important in early DEP induced inflammation and rather exerts negative influence on Mcp-1 and Kc mRNA levels. This suggests that other signalling pathways are important, a candidate being one involving Mcp-1. PMID:16504008

  16. Retrospective cohort study of anti-tumor necrosis factor agent use in a veteran population

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Nermeen; Kazerooni, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are effective for several immunologic conditions (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn’s disease (CD), and psoriasis). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents via chart review. Methods. Single-site, retrospective cohort study that evaluated the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents in veterans initiated between 2010 and 2011. Primary aim evaluated response at 12 months post-index date. Secondary aims evaluated initial response prior to 12 months post-index date and infection events. Results. A majority of patients were prescribed anti-TNF agents for CD (27%) and RA (24%). Patients were initiated on etanercept (41%), adalimumab (40%), and infliximab (18%) between 2010 and 2011. No differences in patient demographics were reported. Response rates were high overall. Sixty-five percent of etanercept patients, 82% of adalimumab patients, and 59% of infliximab patients were either partial or full responders, respectively. Approximately 16%, 11%, and 12% of etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab were non-responders, respectively. Infections between the groups were non-significant. Etanercept and adalimumab patients had higher but non-significant odds of being a responder relative to infliximab. Conclusions. Most patients initiated with anti-TNF agent were responders at 12 months follow-up for all indications in a veteran population. PMID:24883246

  17. Orthodontic forces increase tumor necrosis factor alpha in the human gingival sulcus.

    PubMed

    Lowney, J J; Norton, L A; Shafer, D M; Rossomando, E F

    1995-11-01

    The production of cytokines has been associated with the biology of tooth movement in animal populations. The purpose of this study was to measure tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) directly in the human gingival sulcus before and after the application of an orthodontic force. To recover TNF from the sulcus, paramagnetic beads, coated with monoclonal antibodies for TNF, were introduced into the gingival sulcus of 50 teeth undergoing orthodontic tooth movement (by two force systems) in 20 patients. Retrieval was performed by a permanent magnetic device designed to fit the periodontal sulcus. The samples were taken before force application (controls), and at a fixed time after force application. The amount of immunoabsorbed TNF was quantified with an immunochemical assay. There was a greater than twofold increase in TNF recoverable from the gingival sulcus after application of orthodontic forces (mean of 12.9 ng vs 30.5 ng). A Student's t test for paired samples demonstrated statistical significance at p < 0.01. We conclude that the quantity of paradental TNF, found in human gingival sulcus, is elevated during tooth movement. The source may be from the adjacent gingiva, but more likely the compressed periodontal ligament and the resorbing bone adjacent to the root surface. PMID:7484971

  18. Downregulation of tumor necrosis factor and other proinflammatory biomarkers by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Deshmukh-Taskar, Priya; Hinojosa, Myriam; Prasad, Sahdeo; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2014-10-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor (TNF), first isolated by our group as an anticancer agent, has been now shown to be a primary mediator of inflammation. Till today 19 different members of the TNF superfamily which interact with 29 different receptors, have been identified. Most members of this family exhibit pro-inflammatory activities, in part through the activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Thus TNF and the related pro-inflammatory cytokines have been shown to play a key role in most chronic diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, psoriasis, neurologic diseases, Crohn's disease, and metabolic diseases. Therefore, agents that can modulate the TNF-mediated inflammatory pathways may have potential against these pro-inflammatory diseases. Although blockers of TNF-α, such as infliximab (antibody against TNF-α), adalimumab (humanized antibody against TNF-α), and etanercept (soluble form of TNFR2) have been approved for human use, these blockers exhibit numerous side effects. In this review, we describe various plant-derived polyphenols that can suppress TNF-α activated inflammatory pathways both in vitro and in vivo. These polyphenols include curcumin, resveratrol, genistein, epigallocatechin gallate, flavopiridol, silymarin, emodin, morin isoliquiritigenin, naringenin, ellagic acid, apigenin, kaempferol, catechins, myricetin, xanthohumol, fisetin, vitexin, escin, mangostin and others. Thus these polyphenols are likely to have potential against various pro-inflammatory diseases. PMID:24946050

  19. Glucocorticoids Regulate Tristetraprolin Synthesis and Posttranscriptionally Regulate Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inflammatory Signaling▿

    PubMed Central

    Smoak, Kathleen; Cidlowski, John A.

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are used to treat various inflammatory disorders, but the mechanisms underlying these actions are incompletely understood. The zinc finger protein tristetraprolin (TTP) destabilizes several proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs by binding to AU-rich elements within their 3′ untranslated regions, targeting them for degradation. Here we report that glucocorticoids induce the synthesis of TTP mRNA and protein in A549 lung epithelial cells and in rat tissues. Dexamethasone treatment leads to a sustained induction of TTP mRNA expression that is abrogated by RU486. Glucocorticoid induction of TTP mRNA is also blocked by actinomycin D but not by cycloheximide, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism which has been confirmed by transcription run-on experiments. The most widely characterized TTP-regulated gene is the AU-rich tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene. Dexamethasone represses TNF-α mRNA in A549 cells and decreases luciferase expression of a TNF-α 3′ untranslated region reporter plasmid in an orientation-dependent manner. Small interfering RNAs to TTP significantly prevent this effect, and a cell line stably expressing a short-hairpin RNA to TTP conclusively establishes that TTP is critical for dexamethasone inhibition of TNF-α mRNA expression. These studies provide the molecular evidence for glucocorticoid regulation of human TTP and reflect a novel inductive anti-inflammatory signaling pathway for glucocorticoids that acts via posttranscriptional mechanisms. PMID:16982682

  20. Perirenal fat promotes renal arterial endothelial dysfunction in obese swine through tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuangtao; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Eirin, Alfonso; Woollard, John R.; Jordan, Kyra L.; Tang, Hui; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Perirenal fat is associated with poor blood pressure control and chronic kidney disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that perirenal fat impairs renal arterial endothelial function in pigs with obesity-metabolic derangements (ObM). Material and Methods Fourteen domestic pigs were studied after 16 weeks of a high-fat/high-fructose diet (ObM) or standard chow (Lean). Renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and visceral fat volumes were studied in-vivo with CT. Renal arterial endothelial function was also studied ex-vivo in the organ bath. Results ObM pigs demonstrated increased body weight, blood pressure, cholesterol, and intra-abdominal fat compared to lean pigs, and perirenal fat volume was significantly larger. RBF and GFR were markedly elevated, while urinary protein level was preserved. Ex-vivo acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation of renal artery rings was substantially impaired in ObM compared to Lean. Endothelial function was further blunted in both ObM and Lean arterial rings by incubation with perirenal fat harvested from ObM, but not from Lean pigs, and was restored by inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. ObM perirenal fat also showed increased pro-inflammatory macrophage infiltration and TNF-α expression. Conclusions ObM perirenal fat directly causes renal artery endothelial dysfunction, partly mediated by TNF-α. PMID:26417644

  1. Safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy during pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Androulakis, Ioannis; Zavos, Christos; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Mastorakos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2015-12-21

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease has significantly improved since the introduction of biological agents, such as infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, and golimumab. The Food and Drug Administration has classified these factors in category B, which means that they do not demonstrate a fetal risk. However, during pregnancy fetuses are exposed to high anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels that are measurable in their plasma after birth. Since antibodies can transfer through the placenta at the end of the second and during the third trimesters, it is important to know the safety profile of these drugs, particularly for the fetus, and whether maintaining relapse of the disease compensates for the potential risks of fetal exposure. The limited data available for the anti-TNF drugs to date have not demonstrated any significant adverse outcomes in the pregnant women who continued their therapy from conception to the first trimester of gestation. However, data suggest that anti-TNFs should be discontinued during the third trimester, as they may affect the immunological system of the newborn baby. Each decision should be individualized, based on the distinct characteristics of the patient and her disease. Considering all the above, there is a need for more clinical studies regarding the effect of anti-TNF therapeutic agents on pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26715803

  2. Curcumin half analog modulates interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kondamudi, Phani Krishna; Kovelamudi, Hemalatha; Nayak, Pawan G.; Rao, Mallikarjuna Chamallamudi; Shenoy, Rekha Raghuveer

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed at examining the effect of dehydrozingerone (DHZ), half analogue of curcumin which is the active constituent of turmeric (Curcuma longa) in the di-nitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) induced model for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats (200–220 g) were divided into four groups (n = 6). Chemical induction of IBD was done by sensitizing with 300 µL of 20 g/L of DNCB (in acetone) onto the nape of rats for 14 days followed by intra-colonic instillation of 250 µL of DNCB (0.1% DNCB in 50% alcohol) solution on day 15. Rats in Group 1 (normal control) and Group 2 (DNCB control) were treated with vehicle. Rats in Group 3 were treated with DHZ (100 mg/kg, p.o.; 8 days) and Group 4 animals were treated with sulfasalazine (SS) (100 mg/kg, p.o.; 8 days). On 24th day, the rats were killed, colon removed and the macroscopic, biochemical, and histopathological evaluations were performed. Results: The levels of myeloperoxidase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substrate, and nitrite increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the DNCB group whereas reduced significantly in the DHZ and SS treated groups. Serum nitrite levels were found to be insignificant between the different groups. Interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha level was significantly high in the DNCB group. Conclusion: These findings show that DHZ can be a promising molecule for the treatment of IBD. PMID:26664018

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Ototoxicity in Mouse Cochlear Organotypic Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Guo-Peng; Xie, Jing; Guo, Jing-Ying; Gong, Shu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a cytokine involved in acute inflammatory phase reactions, and is the primary upstream mediator in the cochlear inflammatory response. Treatment of the organ of Corti with TNF-α can induce hair cell damage. However, the resulting morphological changes have not been systematically examined. In the present study, cochlear organotypic cultures from neonatal mice were treated with various concentrations and durations of TNF-α to induce inflammatory responses. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the condition of hair cells and supporting cells following immunohistochemical staining. In addition, the ultrastructure of the stereocilia bundle, hair cells, and supporting cells were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. TNF-α treatment resulted in a fusion and loss of stereocilia bundles in hair cells, swelling of mitochondria, and vacuolation and degranulation of the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of tight junctions between hair cells and supporting cells was also observed at high concentrations. Hair cell loss was preceded by apoptosis of Deiters’ and pillar cells. Taken together, these findings detail the morphological changes in the organ of Corti after TNF-α treatment, and provide an in vitro model of inflammatory-induced ototoxicity. PMID:26000970

  4. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha in human leukocytes stimulated by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A; Kornfeld, H; Reardon, C C; Golenbock, D T

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a key mediator of inflammation and may promote human immunodeficiency virus replication in latently infected cells. Since cryptococcosis often is associated with aberrations in the host inflammatory response and occurs preferentially in persons with AIDS, we defined the conditions under which human leukocytes produce TNF-alpha when stimulated by Cryptococcus neoformans. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) produced comparable amounts of TNF-alpha following stimulation with C. neoformans and lipopolysaccharide. Detectable TNF-alpha release in response to C. neoformans occurred only when fungi with small-sized capsules were used and complement-sufficient serum was added. Fractionation of PBMC established that monocytes were the predominant source of TNF-alpha. TNF-alpha gene expression and release occurred significantly later in PBMC stimulated with C. neoformans than in PBMC stimulated with LPS. C. neoformans was also a potent inducer of TNF-alpha from freshly isolated bronchoalveolar macrophages (BAM). Upon in vitro culture, BAM and monocytes bound greater numbers of fungal cells, yet their capacity to produce TNF-alpha following cryptococcal stimulation declined by 74 to 100%. However, this decline was reversed if the BAM and monocytes were cultured with gamma interferon. These data establish that C. neoformans can potently stimulate TNF-alpha release from human leukocytes. However, several variables profoundly affected the amount of TNF-alpha released, including the type of leukocyte and its state of activation, the size of the cryptococcal capsule, and the availability of opsonins. PMID:8168965

  5. Molecular Basis for Defining the Pineal Gland and Pinealocytes as Targets for Tumor Necrosis Factor

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia Emanuele; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Tamura, Eduardo Koji; Fernandes, Pedro A. C. M.; Pinato, Luciana; Muxel, Sandra M.; Cecon, Erika; Markus, Regina P.

    2011-01-01

    The pineal gland, the gland that translates darkness into an endocrine signal by releasing melatonin at night, is now considered a key player in the mounting of an innate immune response. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), the first pro-inflammatory cytokine to be released by an inflammatory response, suppresses the translation of the key enzyme of melatonin synthesis (arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase, Aanat). Here, we show that TNF receptors of the subtype 1 (TNF-R1) are expressed by astrocytes, microglia, and pinealocytes. We also show that the TNF signaling reduces the level of inhibitory nuclear factor kappa B protein subtype A (NFKBIA), leading to the nuclear translocation of two NFKB dimers, p50/p50, and p50/RelA. The lack of a transactivating domain in the p50/p50 dimer suggests that this dimer is responsible for the repression of Aanat transcription. Meanwhile, p50/RelA promotes the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the production of nitric oxide, which inhibits adrenergically induced melatonin production. Together, these data provide a mechanistic basis for considering pinealocytes a target of TNF and reinforce the idea that the suppression of pineal melatonin is one of the mechanisms involved in mounting an innate immune response. PMID:22654792

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhances IL-15-induced natural killer cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Suk Hyung; Shin, Nara; Jeong, Mira; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ran; Chung, Jin Woong; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2009-09-04

    The differentiation of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by various factors including soluble growth factors and transcription factors. Here, we have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) is a positive regulator of NK cell differentiation. TNF-{alpha} augmented the IL-15-induced expression of NK1.1 and CD122 in mature NK cells, and TNF-{alpha} alone also induced NK cell maturation as well as IL-15. TNF-{alpha} also increased IFN-{gamma} production in NK cells in the presence of IL-15. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of several transcription factors, including T-bet and GATA-3, was increased by the addition of TNF-{alpha} and IL-15. In addition, TNF-{alpha} increased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in NK cells and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B impeded TNF-{alpha}-enhanced NK cell maturation. Overall, these data suggest that TNF-{alpha} significantly increased IL-15-driven NK cell differentiation by increasing the expression of transcription factors that play crucial roles in NK cell maturation and inducing the NF-{kappa}B activity.

  7. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-06-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy. PMID:23745038

  8. Demyelinizing Neurological Disease after Treatment with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Bruè, Claudia; Mariotti, Cesare; Rossiello, Ilaria; Saitta, Andrea; Giovannini, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Demyelinizing neurological disease is a rare complication after treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α antagonists. We report on a case of multiple sclerosis after TNFα antagonist treatment and discuss its differential diagnosis. Methods This is an observational case study. Results A 48-year-old male was referred to Ophthalmology in January 2015 for an absolute scotoma in the superior quadrant of the visual field in his right eye. Visual acuity was 20/50 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left. Fundus examination was unremarkable bilaterally. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed a normal macular retina structure. Visual field examination revealed a superior hemianopsia in the right eye. Head magnetic resonance imaging showed findings compatible with optic neuritis. The visual evoked potentials confirmed the presence of optic neuritis. The patient had been under therapy with adalimumab since January 2014, for Crohn's disease. Suspension of adalimumab was recommended, and it was substituted with tapered deltacortene, from 1 mg/kg/day. After 1 month, the scotoma was resolved completely. Conclusions TNFα antagonists can provide benefit to patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, they can also be associated with severe adverse effects. Therefore, adequate attention should be paid to neurological abnormalities in patients treated with TNFα antagonists. PMID:27504093

  9. Are circulating cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha involved in chlorpyrifos-induced fever?

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Rowsey, P J

    1999-05-01

    Oral exposure to chlorpyrifos (CHP) in the rat results in an initial hypothermic response followed by a delayed fever. Fever from infection is mediated by the release of cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha). This study determined if the CHP-induced fever involves cytokine-mediated mechanisms similar to that of infectious fevers. Long-Evans rats were gavaged with the corn oil vehicle or CHP (10-50 mg/kg). The rats were euthanized and blood collected at various times that corresponded with the hypothermic and febrile effects of CHP. Plasma IL-6, TNF alpha, cholinesterase activity (ChE), total iron, unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC), and zinc were measured. ChE activity was reduced by approximately 50% 4 h after CHP. There was no effect of CHP on IL-6 when measured during the period of CHP-induced hypothermia or fever. TNF alpha levels nearly doubled in female rats 48 h after 25 mg/kg CHP. The changes in plasma cytokine levels following CHP were relatively small when compared to > 1000-fold increase in IL-6 and > 10-fold rise in TNF alpha following lipopolysaccharide (E. coli; 50 microg/kg; i.p.)-induced fever. This does not preclude a role of cytokines in CHP-induced fever. Nonetheless, the data suggest that the delayed fever from CHP is unique, involving mechanisms other than TNF alpha and IL-6 release into the circulation characteristic of infectious fevers. PMID:10413184

  10. Endothelial cells undergo morphological, biomechanical, and dynamic changes in response to tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Vaitkus, Janina A; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-11-01

    The immune response triggers a complicated sequence of events, one of which is release of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from stromal cells, for example monocytes and macrophages. In this work we investigated the biophysical effects of TNF-α on endothelial cells (ECs), including changes in cell morphology, biomechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that TNF-α induces a wide distribution of cell area and aspect ratio, with these properties increasing on average during treatment. Interestingly, aspect ratio peaks after approximately 10 h of exposure to TNF-α, corresponding also to a peak in exerted traction forces. Meanwhile, ECs treated with TNF-α soften, and we associate this with significant increases in estimated cellular volume. In addition, our evaluation of migratory dynamics revealed an inverse correlation between cell aspect ratio and migration speed after TNF-α treatment, suggesting that cell shape may be an important functional regulator of EC migration during an inflammatory response. Finally, we addressed the basic mechanics of how the reorganization of F-actin filaments occurs during TNF-α treatment, and observed a dynamic shift of existing actin filaments. Together, our results suggest a functional link between EC morphology, biomechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics during an inflammatory response. PMID:22940754

  11. Endothelial cells undergo morphological, biomechanical, and dynamic changes in response to tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Stroka, Kimberly M.; Vaitkus, Janina A.; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-01-01

    The immune response triggers a complicated sequence of events, one of which is release of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from stromal cells such as monocytes and macrophages. In this work we explored the biophysical effects of TNF-α on endothelial cells (ECs), including changes in cell morphology, biomechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that TNF-α induces a wide distribution of cell area and aspect ratio, with these properties increasing on average during treatment. Interestingly, aspect ratio peaks around 10 hours of exposure to TNF-α, corresponding also to a peak in exerted traction forces. Meanwhile, ECs treated with TNF-α soften, and we associate this with significant increases in estimated cellular volume. In addition, our evaluation of migratory dynamics demonstrates an inverse correlation between cell aspect ratio and migration speed after TNF-α treatment, suggesting that cell shape may be an important functional regulator of EC migration during an inflammatory response. Finally, we address the basic mechanics of how the reorganization of F-actin filaments occurs during TNF-α treatment, and we demonstrate a dynamic shift of existing actin filaments. Together, our results suggest a functional link between EC morphology, biomechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics during an inflammatory response. PMID:22940754

  12. Drug Survival Rates of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the compliance of Korean patients using tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and identified potential predictors associated with treatment discontinuation. The study population comprised 114 RA and 310 AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors at a single tertiary center for at least 1 yr from December 2002 to November 2011. Of the 114 RA patients, 64 (56.1%) discontinued their first TNF inhibitors with a mean duration of 18.1 months. By contrast, 65 of 310 patients (21.0%) with AS discontinued their first TNF inhibitors, with a mean duration of 84 months. Although the survival rate did not differ among the three TNF inhibitors in the AS patients, the etanercept group had a lower discontinuation rate than the infliximab group in the RA patients. In addition, RA patients who received corticosteroids in combination with TNF inhibitors were more likely to discontinue their TNF inhibitors. The independent predictors of drug discontinuation in AS patients were male gender and complete ankylosis on radiographs of the sacroiliac joint. Our results provide further evidence that real-life treatment outcomes of RA and AS patients may be different from those observed in randomized clinical trials. Graphical Abstract PMID:25246737

  13. [Mechanism of production and release of tumor necrosis factor implicated in inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Hide, Izumi

    2003-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine involved in many pathophysiological conditions including rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Despite recent evidence regarding signal transduction via TNF receptor and its biological actions, the mechanism of TNF release remains poorly understood. To clarify how production and release of TNF are regulated, we focused on mast cells and microglia which are involved in allergic inflammation and brain damage or recovery, respectively. In RBL-2H3 mast cells, anti-allergic drugs including azelastine inhibited the release of TNF more potently than degranulation in response to antigen or ionomycin. It was also demonstrated that TNF releasing steps are regulated via the PKC alpha-dependent pathway. Furthermore, Rho GTPases, possibly Rac, were shown to be involved in antigen-induced TNF transcription through activating PKC beta I. In cultured rat brain microglia, we found that extracellular ATP triggers the release of TNF via the P2X7 receptor. ERK and JNK are also involved in ATP-induced TNF transcription, while p38 regulates the transport of TNF mRNA from the nucleus to the cytosol. Additionally, JNK and p38, but not ERK, are activated via the P2X7 receptor. A better understanding of the specific pathways that regulate TNF release for each effector cell may offer further possible therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases. PMID:12673950

  14. Erythropoietin protects myocardin-expressing cardiac stem cells against cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Shelat, Harnath; Xue, Qun; Willerson, James T.; De Caterina, Raffaele; Geng, Yong-Jian

    2009-10-15

    Cardiac stem cells are vulnerable to inflammation caused by infarction or ischemic injury. The growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), ameliorates the inflammatory response of the myocardium to ischemic injury. This study was designed to assess the role of Epo in regulation of expression and activation of the cell death-associated intracellular signaling components in cardiac myoblasts stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. Cardiac myoblasts isolated from canine embryonic hearts characterized by expression of myocardin A, a promyogenic transcription factor for cardiovascular muscle development were pretreated with Epo and then exposed to TNF-{alpha}. Compared to untreated cells, the Epo-treated cardiac myoblasts exhibited better morphology and viability. Immunoblotting revealed lower levels of active caspase-3 and reductions in iNOS expression and NO production in Epo-treated cells. Furthermore, Epo pretreatment reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and inhibited phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B) in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cardiac myoblasts. Thus, Epo protects cardiac myocyte progenitors or myoblasts against the cytotoxic effects of TNF-{alpha} by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated iNOS expression and NO production and by preventing caspase-3 activation.

  15. Fullerenes and their derivatives as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α with highly promoted affinities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaoyin; Gao, Xuejiao J; Jang, Joonkyung; Gao, Xingfa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cell signalling protein involved in systemic inflammation in infectious and other malignant diseases. Physiologically, it plays an important role in regulating host defence, but its overexpression can lead to serious illnesses including cancer, autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease. Gadolinium-based metallofullerenols, e.g., Gd@C82(OH) x (x ≈ 22), are well known for their abundant biological activities with low toxicity experimentally and theoretically; however, their activity in direct TNF-α inhibition has not been explored. In this work, we investigated the inhibiting effects of four types of fullerene-based ligands: fullerenes, fullerenols, metallofullerenes, and metallofullerenols. We reported previously that fullerenes, metallofullerenes and their hydroxylated derivatives (fullerenols) can reside in the same pocket of the TNF-α dimer as that of SPD304-a known inhibitor of TNF-α [He et al. (2005) Science 310:1022, 18]. Ligand docking and binding free energy calculations suggest that, with a similar nonpolar interaction dominated binding pattern, the fullerene-based ligands, C60, C60(OH)12, Gd@C60, C82, C82(OH)12, Gd@C82, Gd@C82(OH)13 and Gd@C82(OH)21, have larger affinity than currently known inhibitors, and could be used to design novel inhibitors of TNF-α in the future. Graphical Abstract Fullerene-material/TNF-α. PMID:27316702

  16. African Swine Fever Virus Infection Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production: Implications in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez del Moral, M.; Ortuño, E.; Fernández-Zapatero, P.; Alonso, F.; Alonso, C.; Ezquerra, A.; Domínguez, J.

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced by in vitro infection with African swine fever (ASF) virus (ASFV) and the systemic and local release of this inflammatory cytokine upon in vivo infection. An early increase in TNF-α mRNA expression was detected in ASFV-infected alveolar macrophages, and high levels of TNF-α protein were detected by ELISA in culture supernatants from these cells. When animals were experimentally infected with a virulent isolate (E-75), enhanced TNF-α expression in mainly affected organs correlated with viral protein expression. Finally, elevated levels of TNF-α were detected in serum, corresponding to the onset of clinical signs. TNF-α has been reported to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of major clinical events in ASF, such as intravascular coagulation, tissue injury, apoptosis, and shock. In the present study, TNF-α containing supernatants from ASFV-infected cultures induced apoptosis in uninfected lymphocytes; this effect was partially abrogated by preincubation with an anti-TNF-α specific antibody. These results suggest a relevant role for TNF-α in the pathogenesis of ASF. PMID:9971800

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by glomerular visceral epithelial cells in human membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T. J.; Rüger, B. M.; Macaulay, H.; Dunbar, P. R.; Hasan, Q.; Bourke, A.; Murray-McIntosh, R. P.; Kitching, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was examined in biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunogold electron microscopy, immunoassay in serum and urine, and urinary immunoblot. Striking glomerular capillary wall and visceral glomerular epithelial cell TNF-alpha protein staining was observed in all cases of membranous nephropathy and membranous lupus nephropathy. Staining was less frequently observed in crescentic glomerulonephritis and in isolated cases of other histological subtypes of glomerulonephritis, usually in association with glomerular macrophages. By immunogold electron microscopy TNF-alpha was localized in membranous nephropathy within the visceral glomerular epithelial cells, and also in the glomerular basement membrane, especially in relation to immune deposits. In situ hybridization localized TNF-alpha mRNA exclusively to glomerular epithelial cells in all biopsies with membranous morphology but not in other histological subtypes. Concentrations of TNF-alpha were significantly increased compared with normal controls in the urine of patients with membranous nephropathy and with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The expression of TNF-alpha by glomerular epithelial cells exclusively and universally in biopsies showing a membranous morphology strongly suggests this cytokine has a role in the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7778683

  18. Efficacy of monoclonal antibody against human recombinant tumor necrosis factor in E. coli-challenged swine.

    PubMed Central

    Jesmok, G.; Lindsey, C.; Duerr, M.; Fournel, M.; Emerson, T.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody against human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF MAb) prevents death induced by intravenous gram-negative bacteria or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in primates. Although these studies have demonstrated that TNF plays a prominent role in the development of lethal septic shock, exploration of dose-response relationships and possible mechanisms of protection have been limited. We addressed these questions in a series of experiments conducted in E. coli-challenged pigs. First, we determined that TNF MAb neutralized the cytotoxic activity found in septic pig plasma and in culture media from pig monocytes incubated with LPS. Second, we demonstrated that pretreatment with TNF MAb promotes survival, in a dose-dependent fashion, in an otherwise lethal E. coli bacteremic pig model. The results of the survival study highly correlate (r = 0.96, P < 0.01) the presence of TNF in the circulation with mortality. In an additional series of physiologic monitoring experiments designed to delineate possible mechanisms of protection, the authors demonstrate that TNF MAb pretreatment abrogates the prolonged leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and microvascular leakiness resulting from intravenous bacterial challenge and maintains arterial blood pressure while diminishing pulmonary edema. These findings may provide a mechanism whereby neutralization of TNF systemically affords protection against the lethal sequelae of bacteremia. PMID:1443053

  19. LARP4 Is Regulated by Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in a Tristetraprolin-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Mattijssen, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    LARP4 is a protein with unknown function that independently binds to poly(A) RNA, RACK1, and the poly(A)-binding protein (PABPC1). Here, we report on its regulation. We found a conserved AU-rich element (ARE) in the human LARP4 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (UTR). This ARE, but not its antisense version or a point-mutated version, significantly decreased the stability of β-globin reporter mRNA. We found that overexpression of tristetraprolin (TTP), but not its RNA binding mutant or the other ARE-binding proteins tested, decreased cellular LARP4 levels. RNA coimmunoprecipitation showed that TTP specifically associated with LARP4 mRNA in vivo. Consistent with this, mouse LARP4 accumulated to higher levels in TTP gene knockout (KO) cells than in control cells. Stimulation of WT cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which rapidly induces TTP, robustly decreased LARP4 with a coincident time course but had no such effect on LARP4B or La protein or on LARP4 in the TTP KO cells. The TNF-α-induced TTP pulse was followed by a transient decrease in LARP4 mRNA that was quickly followed by a subsequent transient decrease in LARP4 protein. Involvement of LARP4 as a target of TNF-α–TTP regulation provides a clue as to how its functional activity may be used in a physiologic pathway. PMID:26644407

  20. Protective effects of tanshinone IIA on endothelial progenitor cells injured by tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XING-XIANG; YANG, JIN-XIU; PAN, YAN-YUN; ZHANG, YE-FEI

    2015-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is a Traditional Chinese Medicine commonly used in Asian and Western countries for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders, such as atherosclerosis. Endothelial dysfunction and associated inflammatory processes have a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been demonstrated to be involved in certain aspects of the endothelial repair process. The present study aimed to investigate the putative protective effects of Tan IIA on EPCs injured by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The potential effects of Tan IIA on TNF-α-stimulated EPC proliferation, migration, adhesion, in vitro tube formation ability and paracrine activity were investigated in the current study. The results indicated that TNF-α impaired EPC proliferation, migration, adhesion capacity and vasculogenesis ability in vitro as well as promoted EPC secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L). However, Tan IIA was able to reverse these effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that Tan IIA may have the potential to protect EPCs against damage induced by TNF-α. Therefore, these results may provide evidence for the pharmacological basis of Tan IIA and its potential use in the prevention and treatment of early atherosclerosis associated with EPC and endothelial damage. PMID:26095681

  1. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiuping; Andresen1, Bradley T.; Hill, Michael; Zhang, Jing; Booth, Frank; Zhang, Cuihua

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cell injury and dysfunction are the major triggers of pathophysiological processes leading to cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) has been implicated in atherosclerosis, hypertension, coronary artery disease, vascular complications of diabetes, chronic renal failure, insulin resistance and hypercholesterolemia. Although now recognized as a class of physiological second messengers, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators in cellular injury, specifically, as a factor in endothelial cell damage. Uncontrolled ROS production and/or decreased antioxidant activity results in a deleterious state referred to as ‘oxidative stress’. A candidate factor in causing ROS production in endothelial cells is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), a pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine. TNF-α has been shown to both be secreted by endothelial cells and to induce intracellular ROS formation. These observations provide a potential mechanism by which TNF-α may activate and injure endothelial cells resulting in ED. In this review, we focus on the relationship between intracellular ROS formation and ED in endothelial cells or blood vessels exposed to TNF-α to provide insight into the role of this important cytokine in cardiovascular disease. PMID:20559453

  2. The Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Stalk Regions Define Responsiveness to Soluble versus Membrane-Bound Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Christine; Messerschmidt, Sylvia; Holeiter, Gerlinde; Tepperink, Jessica; Osswald, Sylvia; Zappe, Andrea; Branschädel, Marcus; Boschert, Verena; Mann, Derek A.; Scheurich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The family of tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFRs) and their ligands form a regulatory signaling network that controls immune responses. Various members of this receptor family respond differently to the soluble and membrane-bound forms of their respective ligands. However, the determining factors and underlying molecular mechanisms of this diversity are not yet understood. Using an established system of chimeric TNFRs and novel ligand variants mimicking the bioactivity of membrane-bound TNF (mTNF), we demonstrate that the membrane-proximal extracellular stalk regions of TNFR1 and TNFR2 are crucial in controlling responsiveness to soluble TNF (sTNF). We show that the stalk region of TNFR2, in contrast to the corresponding part of TNFR1, efficiently inhibits both the receptor's enrichment/clustering in particular cell membrane regions and ligand-independent homotypic receptor preassembly, thereby preventing sTNF-induced, but not mTNF-induced, signaling. Thus, the stalk regions of the two TNFRs not only have implications for additional TNFR family members, but also provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22547679

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy and fetal risk: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Marchioni, Renée M; Lichtenstein, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (anti-TNFs) are effective in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) recalcitrant to conventional medical therapy. As the peak incidence of IBD overlaps with the prime reproductive years, it is crucial to establish pharmacologic regimens for women of childbearing age that achieve effective disease control without posing significant fetal harm. A systematic literature review was performed to identify all human studies with birth outcomes data after maternal exposure to infliximab, adalimumab, or certolizumab pegol within 3 mo of conception or during any trimester of pregnancy. Live births, spontaneous abortions or stillbirths, preterm or premature births, low birth weight or small for gestational age infants, and congenital abnormalities were recorded. Fifty selected references identified 472 pregnancy exposures. The subsequent review includes general information regarding anti-TNF therapy in pregnancy followed by a summary of our findings. The benefits of biologic modalities in optimizing disease control during pregnancy must be weighed against the potential toxicity of drug exposure on the developing fetus. Although promising overall, there is insufficient evidence to prove absolute safety for use of anti-TNFs during pregnancy given the limitations of available data and lack of controlled trials. PMID:23674866

  4. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Augments Resistance Artery Myogenic Tone in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Meghan; Hui, Sonya K; Dinh, Danny D; Foltz, Warren D; Momen, Abdul; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Offermanns, Stefan; Husain, Mansoor; Kroetsch, Jeffrey T; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes strongly associates with microvascular complications that ultimately promote multiorgan failure. Altered myogenic responsiveness compromises tissue perfusion, aggravates hypertension, and sets the stage for later permanent structural changes to the microcirculation. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle resistance arteries isolated from patients with diabetes have augmented myogenic tone, despite reasonable blood glucose control. To understand the mechanisms, we titrated a standard diabetes mouse model (high-fat diet plus streptozotocin [HFD/STZ]) to induce a mild increase in blood glucose levels. HFD/STZ treatment induced a progressive myogenic tone augmentation in mesenteric and olfactory cerebral arteries; neither HFD nor STZ alone had an effect on blood glucose or resistance artery myogenic tone. Using gene deletion models that eliminate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or sphingosine kinase 1, we demonstrate that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF drives the elevation of myogenic tone via enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. Therapeutically antagonizing TNF (etanercept) or S1P (JTE013) signaling corrects this defect. Our investigation concludes that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF augments resistance artery myogenic vasoconstriction in a diabetes model that induces a small elevation of blood glucose. Our data demonstrate that microvascular reactivity is an early disease marker and advocate establishing therapies that strategically target the microcirculation. PMID:27207546

  6. Inositol lipid metabolism in vasopressin stimulated hepatocytes from rats infused with tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzer, J.A.; Rodriguez de Turco, E.B. )

    1989-05-30

    We studied the effect of i.v. infusion of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha (rHuTNF alpha, Cetus, 15 micrograms/100 g bw over 3 h) on vasopressin (VP)-stimulated {sup 32}P-inositol lipid turnover and the release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates in isolated rat hepatocytes. The early VP-induced decrease (within 30 s) in {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate labeling was significantly reduced (-40%) and at the same time the uptake of {sup 32}P into phosphatidic acid was 50% lower than in saline-infused (matched control) rats. Within 5 min of VP-stimulation, lower {sup 32}P phosphatidylinositol (-40%) and higher {sup 32}P-phosphatidic acid (+30%) labeling were observed in rHuTNF alpha-infused rats. Infusion of rHuTNF alpha also affected the VP-induced release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates. The accumulation of {sup 3}H-inositol-labeled water soluble products was decreased by 25% and 17% at 30 s and 10 min, respectively. These data show that rHuTNF alpha mimics early perturbations induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin infusion in VP-stimulated inositol lipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes.

  7. Response of early active rheumatoid arthritis to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Wataru; Nishikawa, Kenichiro; Hirose, Masuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory changes (synovitis and bone marrow edema) and destructive changes (bone erosion) were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and their relations with disease activity were assessed during treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Ten patients with early active RA underwent MRI at 0 and 16 weeks of TNF-inhibitor treatment. The carpal bones of the dominant hand were evaluated by the outcome measures in rheumatology clinical trials MRI score for RA. After 16 weeks, the mean disease activity score (DAS 28) decreased significantly from 5.54 to 2.70, while the number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, and inflammatory parameters were also significantly improved. The mean synovitis and marrow edema scores determined by MRI showed a significant decrease from 6.1 to 2.2 and 12.8 to 6.2, respectively, while the annual bone-erosion progression score decreased from 12.6 to 2.0. Although synovitis persisted in some patients, imaging remission was achieved in two patients. In conclusion, TNF-inhibitor therapy achieved an early decrease of disease activity and MRI revealed amelioration of joint destruction. The MRI score for RA is useful for assessing the early response to TNF inhibitors. PMID:18762862

  8. Tuberculosis infection versus anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy: screening challenges in psoriatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Solovan, Caius; Chiticariu, Elena; Timofte, Adelina; Stoia-Djeska, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to analyze the performance of the tuberculin skin test (TST) for screening and monitoring patients treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, in a high-incidence area. Methods A 3-year retrospective study was carried out on 268 subjects. The study included 68 patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, screened for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and subjects without psoriasis (100 adults and 100 children) with close contact with infected individuals. Results Positive tuberculin skin test (TST) results (induration >5 mm) were observed in 70.5% (48/68) of patients with psoriasis, higher than those observed in subjects with suspicion of tuberculosis or with close contact with infected individuals: 51% (51/100) in the adult group and 30% (30/100) in the children group. Conclusions These results show that the prevalence of LTBI evaluated with the TST in the psoriatic group is higher than in subjects without psoriasis. Limitation The positive reactions were not confirmed by other verification methods.

  9. Protective effects of Tougu Xiaotong capsule on tumor necrosis factor-α-injured UMR-106 cells

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, NAISHUN; HUANG, YUNMEI; YE, JINXIA; CHEN, WENLIE; LI, ZUAN FANG; LIN, RUHUI; LI, XIHAI; ZHENG, LIANGPU; LIU, XIANXIANG

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in the abnormal metabolism of osteoblasts (OBs), which leads to subchondral bone (SB) alterations in osteoarthritis. In the present study, Tougu Xiaotong capsule (TXC), a traditional Chinese medicine, was used to treat TNF-α-injured OB-like cells. The cellular viability, mortality and ultramicroscopic morphology were evaluated. Thereafter, the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), secretion of osteocalcin (OCN) and mineralization of nodules were analyzed. The results showed that TXC treatment significantly promoted cell proliferation, reduced cellular mortality and improved cellular ultrastructure, particularly that of the endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. These data indicate that TXC is able to promote cell growth, as well as prevent inflammation in OB-like cells. Furthermore, the activity of ALP, secretion of OCN and mineralization of nodules were accelerated, and the calcium content of the TNF-α-injured OB-like cells was promoted by TXC treatment. These results indicate that TXC protected the OB-like cells from TNF-α-induced injuries. This may be a potential mechanism through which TXC regulates SB remodeling in the clinical treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26640571

  10. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene regulation by virus and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeld, A E; Doyle, C; Maniatis, T

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a region of the human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene promoter that is necessary for maximal constitutive, virus-induced, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription. This region contains three sites that match an NF-kappa B binding-site consensus sequence. We show that these three sites specifically bind NF-kappa B in vitro, yet each of these sites can be deleted from the TNF-alpha promoter with little effect on the induction of the gene by virus or LPS. Moreover, when multimers of these three sites are placed upstream from a truncated TNF-alpha promoter, or a heterologous promoter, an increase in the basal level of transcription is observed that is influenced by sequence context and cell type. However, these multimers are not sufficient for virus or LPS induction of either promoter. Thus, unlike other virus- and LPS-inducible promoters that contain NF-kappa B binding sites, these sites from the TNF-alpha promoter are neither required nor sufficient for virus or LPS induction. Comparison of the sequence requirements of virus induction of the human TNF-alpha gene in mouse L929 and P388D1 cells reveals significant differences, indicating that the sequence requirements for virus induction of the gene are cell type-specific. However, the sequences required for virus and LPS induction of the gene in a single cell type, P388D1, overlap. Images PMID:2263628

  11. Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in lipopolysaccharide-induced pathologic alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Remick, D. G.; Strieter, R. M.; Eskandari, M. K.; Nguyen, D. T.; Genord, M. A.; Raiford, C. L.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) has been implicated strongly as a principal mediator in the pathogenesis of septic shock. The authors investigated the in vivo production of TNF in CBA/J and CD-1 mice that had been primed by an intraperitoneal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant followed 2 weeks later by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TNF bioactivity peaked in both the ascites and plasma one hour after challenge, and TNF mRNA expression in the ascites cells peaked 30 minutes after LPS. After the induction of bioactivity, an interstitial pulmonary neutrophilic infiltrate occurred that was quantitated both morphometrically and by a myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. Peripheral blood neutrophilia and lymphopenia developed after the LPS injection (PMNs: control, 46 +/- 2%; LPS, 65 +/- 3%; Lymphs control, 53 +/- 2%; LPS, 37 +/- 3%). Treatment with dexamethasone (Dex) completely inhibited the pulmonary neutrophilic infiltrate as measured by the (MPO) assay. Because Dex will inhibit the production of several cytokines, anti-TNF antiserum was given to mice at the same time as the LPS challenge to assess specifically the role of TNF in inducing these changes. This antiserum partially blocked the pulmonary neutrophil infiltrate, and completely blocked the peripheral blood changes at one hour after LPS. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in the early pathophysiologic alterations that occur after systemic exposure to LPS. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 11 PMID:2297050

  12. Wound healing potential of pterospermum acerifolium wild. With induction of tumor necrosis factor - α

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Aswini Kumar; Giri, Ranjan Kumar; Panda, Dibya Sundar; Satyanarayan, Sremantula

    2011-01-01

    Pterospermum acerifolium, a well-known plant in Indian medicine possesses various therapeutic properties including healing properties and cytokine induction. Wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of P. acerifolium flower along with its effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was assessed using excision model of wound repair in Wistar albino rats. After application of the P. acerifolium extract, rate of epithelization with an increase in wound contraction was observed. Animals tropically treated with 10% P. acerifolium extract in petroleum jelly, the wound healing process was observed faster as compared to control group which were treated with petroleum jelly alone. A significant accelerated healing was noticed in animals which were additionally prefed with 250mg/kg body weight of ethanolic P. acerifolium extract daily for 20 consecutive days along with the topical application 10% P. acerifolium extract. During wound healing phase TNF-α level was found to be up regulated by P. acerifolium treatment. Early wound healing may be pronounced due to P. acerifolium extract elevating TNF−α production PMID:24826024

  13. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the maxillary sinus related with pulp necrosis of maxillary teeth: case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sin-Young; Yang, Sung-Eun

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a benign lesion composed of myofibroblasts accompanied by varying numbers of inflammatory cells. Various pathogenetic factors have been proposed, but the etiology of most IMTs remains unknown. This article presents a case of IMT occurring in the left maxillary sinus. A 24-year-old man complained of throbbing pain in the maxillary left molars and swelling of the left cheek. His maxillary left second molar was diagnosed as pulp necrosis and root canal treatment performed. After that, his symptoms continued and he was referred to the Department of Otolaryngology. Computerized tomography disclosed compact soft tissue masses in the left maxillary sinus with obstruction of maxillary ostium. Under general anesthesia, the lesions were fully excised. Histopathologically, the lesions were composed of plump or spindled myofibroblasts. Cells were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin and β-catenin, and were negative for ALK1, CD34, and EMA. The diagnosis was IMT of left maxillary sinus. Although it is very rare, IMT should be included as a differential diagnosis in patients with compact masses in maxillary sinus. PMID:21868269

  14. Renal Tumor Necrosis Factor α Contributes to Hypertension in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Baorui; Cheng, Yuan; Usa, Kristie; Liu, Yong; Baker, Maria Angeles; Mattson, David L.; He, Yongcheng; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a major proinflammatory cytokine and its level is elevated in hypertensive states. Inflammation occurs in the kidneys during the development of hypertension. We hypothesized that TNFα specifically in the kidney contributes to the development of hypertension and renal injury in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, a widely used model of human salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury. SS rats were chronically instrumented for renal interstitial infusion and blood pressure measurement in conscious, freely moving state. Gene expression was measured using real-time PCR and renal injury assessed with histological analysis. The abundance of TNFα in the renal medulla of SS rats, but not the salt-insensitive congenic SS.13BN26 rats, was significantly increased when rats had been fed a high-salt diet for 7 days (n = 6 or 9, p < 0.01). The abundance of TNFα receptors in the renal medulla was significantly higher in SS rats than SS.13BN26 rats. Renal interstitial administration of Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNFα, significantly attenuated the development of hypertension in SS rats on a high-salt diet (n = 7–8, p < 0.05). Glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis were also significantly ameliorated. These findings indicate intrarenal TNFα contributes to the development of hypertension and renal injury in SS rats. PMID:26916681

  15. Renal Tumor Necrosis Factor α Contributes to Hypertension in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Baorui; Cheng, Yuan; Usa, Kristie; Liu, Yong; Baker, Maria Angeles; Mattson, David L; He, Yongcheng; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a major proinflammatory cytokine and its level is elevated in hypertensive states. Inflammation occurs in the kidneys during the development of hypertension. We hypothesized that TNFα specifically in the kidney contributes to the development of hypertension and renal injury in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, a widely used model of human salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury. SS rats were chronically instrumented for renal interstitial infusion and blood pressure measurement in conscious, freely moving state. Gene expression was measured using real-time PCR and renal injury assessed with histological analysis. The abundance of TNFα in the renal medulla of SS rats, but not the salt-insensitive congenic SS.13(BN26) rats, was significantly increased when rats had been fed a high-salt diet for 7 days (n = 6 or 9, p < 0.01). The abundance of TNFα receptors in the renal medulla was significantly higher in SS rats than SS.13(BN26) rats. Renal interstitial administration of Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNFα, significantly attenuated the development of hypertension in SS rats on a high-salt diet (n = 7-8, p < 0.05). Glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis were also significantly ameliorated. These findings indicate intrarenal TNFα contributes to the development of hypertension and renal injury in SS rats. PMID:26916681

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha genetic predisposing factors can influence clinical severity in nephropathia epidemica.

    PubMed

    Maes, Piet; Clement, Jan; Groeneveld, Paul H P; Colson, Paul; Huizinga, Tom W J; Van Ranst, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Severe human infection with Hantavirus is characterized by high fever, cold chills, thrombocytopenia, arterial hypotension, acute renal failure, and/or adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like pulmonary involvement, but the clinical course varies greatly between individuals. We investigated whether genetically determined differences in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production can influence the severity of Hantavirus disease. We studied a TNF-alpha single-nucleotide promoter polymorphism (SNP) at position -238 (a guanine [G]-to-adenine [A] transition) and ex vivo TNF-alpha production in a recall study of 36 Belgian patients who had a serologically proven form of Puumala virus-induced Hantavirus infection with the kidney as main target organ. In our study, the highest creatinine levels were found in patients with the lowest ex vivo TNF-alpha production. Creatinine levels correlated inversely with TNF-alpha production (R = -0.35, p < 0.05). The number of thrombocytes was significantly lower in patients with the GA-238 genotype (low TNF-alpha producers) compared with patients with the GG-238 genotype. In our study, genetically determined low production of TNF-alpha was associated with some parameters indicating a more severe clinical course of Puumala Hantavirus infection in humans, possibly by impaired activation of TNF-alpha-dependent antiviral mechanisms, which could in turn result in decreased clearance of Hantavirus. PMID:16987073

  17. Effect of mycobacteria on sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Filley, E A; Rook, G A

    1991-01-01

    Unlike Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not found inside cells other than macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells in vivo, yet previous work has revealed that in vitro it readily enters all cell lines tested. Moreover, these cells are not killed by the intracellular mycobacteria. We report here that when fibroblasts take up live (but not killed) M. tuberculosis H37Rv, they develop greatly increased sensitivity to the toxic effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) whether the cell line is inherently sensitive to TNF or not. Ultrasonically disrupted M. tuberculosis also has this property. The increased sensitivity is seen in the absence of metabolic inhibitors, although addition of emetine, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, causes the effect to manifest itself earlier and at a lower concentration of TNF. In contrast, infection with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin induces little or no increased sensitivity to TNF, whereas Mycobacterium avium and M. tuberculosis H37Ra have intermediate sensitivities. We discuss the possibility that virulent tuberculosis strains produce a factor which distorts the normal protective function of TNF, rendering it toxic to host tissues and leading to the classical immunopathology of tuberculous lesions. PMID:1906841

  18. Tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates in vivo intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1.

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, M. S.; Vaporciyan, A. A.; Miyasaka, M.; Tamatani, T.; Ward, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Lung injury following deposition of IgG immune complexes is neutrophil-dependent and requires both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and CD18. In the current studies, we have evaluated the relationship between TNF alpha and expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in vitro and in vivo. In both rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, TNF alpha induced an early (within 60 minutes) increase in ICAM-1 expression, followed by a peak at 6 to 8 hours, with relatively stable expression at 24 hours. Expression of E-selectin did not show the early phase (within 60 minutes) of up-regulation, peaked at 4 hours, and then declined thereafter. Using a radioimmunochemical assay in vivo, it was demonstrated that intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes caused a progressive increase in ICAM-1 expression in lung over an 8-hour period. In animals pretreated with antibody to TNF alpha, the intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1 was significantly reduced. These results were confirmed by immunoperoxidase analysis of lung tissue. It was also shown that airway instillation of TNF alpha caused up-regulation of ICAM-1 in lung. These data support the concept that deposition of IgG immune complexes in lung induces intrapulmonary up-regulation of ICAM-1 in a manner that is TNF alpha-dependent. Images Figure 2 Figure 7 PMID:7685152

  19. Systemic miRNA-7 delivery inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth in murine xenograft glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Van Beijnum, Judy R.; Cerisoli, Francesco; Scaria, Puthupparampil V.; Verheul, Mark; Van Berkel, Maaike P.; Pieters, Ebel H. E.; Van Haastert, Rick J.; Yousefi, Afrouz; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Storm, Gert; Berezikov, Eugene; Cuppen, Edwin; Woodle, Martin; Schaapveld, Roel Q. J.; Prevost, Gregoire P.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Van Noort, Paula I.; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-angiogenesis is the multi-factorial process of sprouting of endothelial cells (EC) into micro-vessels to provide tumor cells with nutrients and oxygen. To explore miRNAs as therapeutic angiogenesis-inhibitors, we performed a functional screen to identify miRNAs that are able to decrease EC viability. We identified miRNA-7 (miR-7) as a potent negative regulator of angiogenesis. Introduction of miR-7 in EC resulted in strongly reduced cell viability, tube formation, sprouting and migration. Application of miR-7 in the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay led to a profound reduction of vascularization, similar to anti-angiogenic drug sunitinib. Local administration of miR-7 in an in vivo murine neuroblastoma tumor model significantly inhibited angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, systemic administration of miR-7 using a novel integrin-targeted biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles that targets both EC and tumor cells, strongly reduced angiogenesis and tumor proliferation in mice with human glioblastoma xenografts. Transcriptome analysis of miR-7 transfected EC in combination with in silico target prediction resulted in the identification of OGT as novel target gene of miR-7. Our study provides a comprehensive validation of miR-7 as novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic miRNA that can be systemically delivered to both EC and tumor cells and offers promise for miR-7 as novel anti-tumor therapeutic. PMID:25149532

  20. Combination of gold nanoparticle-conjugated TNF-α and radiation therapy results in a synergistic anti-tumor response in murine carcinoma models

    PubMed Central

    Koonce, Nathan A.; Quick, Matthew C.; Hardee, Matthew E.; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Dent, Judith A.; Paciotti, Giulio F.; Nedosekin, Dmitry; Dings, Ruud P.M.; Griffin, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although remarkable preclinical antitumor effects have been shown for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) alone and in combination with radiation, clinical use is hindered by systemic dose-limiting toxicities. Here, we investigated the physiological and anti-tumor effects of radiotherapy combined with the novel nanomedicine CYT-6091, a 27-nm average diameter polyethylene glycol-TNF coated gold nanoparticle which passed through Phase I trials recently. Methods Physiological and anti-tumor effects of single and fractionated radiation in combination with CYT-6091 were studied in the murine 4T1 breast carcinoma and SCCVII head and neck tumor squamous cell carcinoma models. Results In the 4T1 murine breast tumor model we observed a significant reduction in tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) 24h after CYT-6091 alone and combined with a radiation dose of 12 Gy (p<0.05 vs control), whereas radiation alone (12Gy) had negligible effect on IFP. In the SCCVII head and neck tumor model, the baseline IFP was not markedly elevated and there was little additional change in IFP post single dose radiation or combined therapy (p>0.05 vs control) despite extensive observed vascular damage. The IFP reduction in the 4T1 model was also associated with marked vascular damage and extravasation of red blood cells into the tumor interstitium. A sustained reduction in tumor cell density was observed in the combined therapy group compared to all other groups (p<0.05). Finally, we observed a >2-fold delay in tumor growth when CYT-6091 was combined with a single 20 Gy irradiation- notably irrespective of treatment sequence. Moreover, when hypofractionated radiation (12 Gy × 3) was applied in combination with CYT-6091 treatment, a >5-fold growth delay was observed in the combined treatment group of both tumor models and determined to be synergistic. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that gold-labeled TNF nanoparticles in combination with single or fractionated high-dose radiation

  1. Potentiation of radiation-induced regrowth delay in murine tumors by fludarabine.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, V; Hunter, N; Milas, L; Brock, W A; Plunkett, W; Hittelman, W N

    1994-01-15

    Fludarabine (9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-2-fluoroadenine-5'-monophosphate), an adenine nucleoside analogue, has previously been shown to inhibit the repair of radiation-induced chromosome damage. Thus fludarabine may have therapeutic utility in combination with photon irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fludarabine could enhance radiation-induced murine tumor regrowth delay and to determine the most effective dose and schedule of the combination. A significant (P < 0.05) absolute regrowth delay enhancement was observed in three murine tumor models (SA-NH, a sarcoma; and MCA-K and MCA-4, mammary carcinomas) when fludarabine (800 mg/kg) was given 1 h prior to 25 Gy gamma-irradiation. While fludarabine enhanced radiation-induced tumor regrowth delay when given between -36 h and +6 h of radiation (SA-NH tumor), the greatest enhancement was observed when fludarabine was given at -24 h prior to irradiation (radiation dose modification factor of 1.82 at -24 h compared to 1.57 at -3 h prior to radiation). The degree of fludarabine enhancement (at -3 or -24 h) was dose dependent at doses above 200 mg/kg. When fludarabine and radiation were administered on a fractionated schedule (fludarabine given 3 h prior to radiation each day for 4 days), the dose modification factor increased to 2.14 (1.63 if the effect of fludarabine alone is subtracted). These results suggest that fludarabine enhances radiation-induced tumor regrowth delay in a more than additive fashion after both single and fractionated treatments, and the degree of enhancement is dependent on the sequence and timing of administration, the fludarabine dose, and the tumor type. Thus, fludarabine may have clinical potential as a radiation enhancer in the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:8275483

  2. Necrosis After Craniospinal Irradiation: Results From a Prospective Series of Children With Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping; Lukose, Renin; Wright, Karen D.; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Broniscer, Alberto; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is a known complication of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in children with medulloblastoma and similar tumors. We reviewed the incidence of necrosis in our prospective treatment series. Patients and Methods: Between 1996 and 2009, 236 children with medulloblastoma (n = 185) or other CNS embryonal tumors (n = 51) received postoperative CSI followed by dose-intense cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and cisplatin. Average risk cases (n = 148) received 23.4 Gy CSI, 36 Gy to the posterior fossa, and 55.8 Gy to the primary; after 2003, the treatment was 23.4 Gy CSI and 55.8 Gy to the primary. All high-risk cases (n = 88) received 36-39.6 Gy CSI and 55.8 Gy primary. The primary site clinical target volume margin was 2 cm (pre-2003) or 1 cm (post-2003). With competing risk of death by any cause, we determined the cumulative incidence of necrosis. Results: With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 4-163 months), eight cases of necrosis were documented. One death was attributed. The median time to the imaging evidence was 4.8 months and to symptoms 6.0 months. The cumulative incidence at 5 years was 3.7% {+-} 1.3% (n = 236) for the entire cohort and 4.4% {+-} 1.5% (n = 196) for infratentorial tumor location. The mean relative volume of infratentorial brain receiving high-dose irradiation was significantly greater for patients with necrosis than for those without: {>=}50 Gy (92.12% {+-} 4.58% vs 72.89% {+-} 1.96%; P=.0337), {>=}52 Gy (88.95% {+-} 5.50% vs 69.16% {+-} 1.97%; P=.0275), and {>=}54 Gy (82.28% {+-} 7.06% vs 63.37% {+-} 1.96%; P=.0488), respectively. Conclusions: Necrosis in patients with CNS embryonal tumors is uncommon. When competing risks are considered, the incidence is 3.7% at 5 years. The volume of infratentorial brain receiving greater than 50, 52, and 54 Gy, respectively, is predictive for necrosis.

  3. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  4. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model.

    PubMed

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO2 in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10Gy×2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:23831468

  5. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha exert their antirickettsial effect via induction of synthesis of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, H. M.; Walker, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    How the host defenses control rickettsiae in the cytosol of nonphagocytic host cells, where they are not exposed to antibodies or phagocytes, has posed a difficult question. Rickettsia conorii infection of a mouse fibroblast cell line was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by nitrogen oxide synthesized by eukaryotic host cells stimulated by interferon-gamma or tumor necrosis factor-alpha. L-arginine was the source of the nitric oxide as demonstrated by competitive inhibition by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Nitric oxide synthesis required host cell protein synthesis and had an approximately 48-hour lag phase following cytokine stimulation. At low doses of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which had no detectable response as single agents, dramatic synergistic nitric oxide synthesis and antirickettsial effects were observed. PMID:8213997

  6. The development of novel inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production based on substituted [5,5]-bicyclic pyrozolones

    SciTech Connect

    Laufersweiler, Matthew; Brugel, Todd; Clark, Michael; Golebiowski, Adam; Bookland, Roger; Laughlin, Steven; Sabat, Mark; Townes, Jennifer; VanRens, John; De, Biswanath; Hsieh, Lily; Heitmeyer, Sandra; Juergens, Karen; Brown, Kimberly; Mekel, Marlene; Walter, Richard; Janusz, Michael

    2010-11-16

    Novel substituted [5,5]-bicyclic pyrzazolones are presented as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) production. Many of these compounds show low nanomolar activity against lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced TNF-{alpha} production in THP-1 cells. This class of molecules was co-crystallized with mutated p38, and several analogs showed good oral bioavailability in the rat. Oral activity of these compounds in the rat iodoacetate model for osteoarthritis is discussed.

  7. Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection during Pregnancy Increases Maternal Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha, Suppresses Maternal Interleukin-10, and Enhances Fetal Growth Restriction and Resorption in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dongming; Smith, Mary Alice; Champagne, Catherine; Elter, John; Beck, James; Offenbacher, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a potential association between maternal periodontitis and pregnancy complications. We used a pregnant murine model to study the effect of infection with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis on pregnancy outcomes. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with heat-killed P. gingivalis (109 CFU) in a subcutaneous chamber and mated 2 weeks later. At gestation day (GD) 7.5, mice were challenged with live P. gingivalis (107 CFU) (n = 20) or broth (control; n = 8) and sacrificed at GD 16.5. Fetal growth restriction (FGR, <0.46 g) was defined as fetuses with weights 2 standard deviations (SD) smaller than controls (0.56 ± 0.05 g [mean ± SD]). Among the 20 challenged mice, 8 had both normal-weight (0.51 ± 0.11 g) and FGR (0.34 ± 0.1 g) fetuses within the same litter. All other challenged dams had normal-weight fetuses (0.57 ± 0.04 g). Maternal liver, uterus, and spleen samples were examined for P. gingivalis DNA using a PCR technique. Of the eight challenged mice with FGR fetuses, three had PCR signals for P. gingivalis in liver and uterus, but not in the spleen. Liver, uterus, and spleen were negative for P. gingivalis DNA among all other challenged and control mice. In serum of dams with FGR fetuses, tumor necrosis factor alpha levels were elevated significantly, while interluekin-10 levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in dams with normal fetuses. P. gingivalis-specific serum immunoglobulin G levels were significantly elevated in dams with FGR fetuses compared to dams without any FGR fetuses. These data demonstrate that P. gingivalis-induced murine FGR is associated with systemic dissemination of the organism and activated maternal immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:12933859

  8. Involvement of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin-1β in Enhancement of Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures Caused by Shigella dysenteriae

    PubMed Central

    Yuhas, Yael; Shulman, Lester; Weizman, Abraham; Kaminsky, Elizabeth; Vanichkin, Alexey; Ashkenazi, Shai

    1999-01-01

    Neurologic manifestations, mainly convulsions, are the most frequent extraintestinal complications of shigellosis. We used an animal model to study the roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) in Shigella-related seizures. Administration of Shigella dysenteriae 60R sonicate enhanced the sensitivity of mice to the proconvulsant pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) within 7 h. This was indicated by a significantly higher mean convulsion score and an increased number of mice responding with clonic-tonic seizures in the Shigella-pretreated group. Preinjection of mice with anti-murine TNF-α (anti-mTNF-α) or anti-murine IL-1β (anti-mIL-1β) 30 min prior to administration of Shigella sonicate abolished their enhanced response to PTZ at 7 h. Mean convulsion scores were reduced by anti-mTNF-α from 1.2 to 0.8 (P = 0.017) and by anti-mIL-1β from 1.3 to 0.7 (P = 0.008). Preinjection of anti-mTNF-α also reduced the percentage of mice responding with clonic-tonic seizures, from 48 to 29% (P = 0.002), and preinjection of anti-mIL-1β reduced it from 53 to 21% (P = 0.012). Neutralization of TNF-α or IL-1β did not protect the mice from death due to S. dysenteriae 60R. These findings indicate that TNF-α and IL-1β play a role in the very early sensitization of the central nervous system to convulsive activity after S. dysenteriae administration. Similar mechanisms may trigger neurologic disturbances in other infectious diseases. PMID:10024595

  9. Stromal CCR6 drives tumor growth in a murine transplantable colon cancer through recruitment of tumor-promoting macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Bisweswar; Shapiro, Mia; Samur, Mehmet K; Pai, Christine; Frank, Natasha Y; Yoon, Charles; Prabhala, Rao H; Munshi, Nikhil C; Gold, Jason S

    2016-08-01

    Interactions between the inflammatory chemokine CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 have been implicated in promoting colon cancer; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that deficiency of CCR6 is associated with decreased tumor macrophage accumulation in a model of sporadic intestinal tumorigenesis. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of stromal CCR6 expression in a murine syngeneic transplantable colon cancer model. We show that deficiency of host CCR6 is associated with decreased growth of syngeneic CCR6-expressing colon cancers. Colon cancers adoptively transplanted into CCR6-deficient mice have decreased tumor-associated macrophages without alterations in the number of monocytes in blood or bone marrow. CCL20, the unique ligand for CCR6, promotes migration of monocytes in vitro and promotes accumulation of macrophages in vivo. Depletion of tumor-associated macrophages decreases the growth of tumors in the transplantable tumor model. Macrophages infiltrating the colon cancers in this model secrete the inflammatory mediators CCL2, IL-1α, IL-6 and TNFα. Ccl2, Il1α and Il6 are consequently downregulated in tumors from CCR6-deficient mice. CCL2, IL-1α and IL-6 also promote proliferation of colon cancer cells, linking the decreased macrophage migration into tumors mediated by CCL20-CCR6 interactions to the delay in tumor growth in CCR6-deficient hosts. The relevance of these findings in human colon cancer is demonstrated through correlation of CCR6 expression with that of the macrophage marker CD163 as well as that of CCL2, IL1α and TNFα. Our findings support the exploration of targeting the CCL20-CCR6 pathway for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27622061

  10. Natural history of tumor growth and immune modulation in common spontaneous murine mammary tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren; Slota, Meredith; Koehnlein, Marlese; Treuting, Piper M.; Dang, Yushe; Stanton, Sasha; Disis, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies in patients with breast cancer suggest the immune microenvironment influences response to therapy. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between growth rates of tumors in common spontaneous mammary tumor models and immune biomarkers evaluated in the tumor and blood. Methods TgMMTV-neu and C3(1)-Tag transgenic mice were followed longitudinally from birth, and MPA-DMBA treated mice from the time of carcinogen administration, for the development of mammary tumors. Tumor infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Serum cytokines were evaluated in subsets of mice. Fine needle aspirates of tumors were collected and RNA isolated to determine levels of immune and proliferation markers. Results Age of tumor onset and kinetics of tumor growth were significantly different among the models. Mammary tumors from TgMMTV-neu contained a lower CD8/CD4 ratio than other models (p<0.05). MPA-DMBA induced tumors contained a higher percentage of FOXP3+ CD4+ T-cells (p<0.01) and MDSC (p<0.001) as compared to the other models. Individuals with significantly slower tumor growth demonstrated higher levels of Type I serum cytokines prior to the development of lesions as compared to those with rapid tumor growth. Moreover, the tumors of animals with more rapid tumor growth demonstrated a significant increase in expression of genes associated with Type II immunity than those with slower progressing tumors. Conclusions These data provide a foundation for the development of in vivo models to explore the relationship between endogenous immunity and response to standard therapies for breast cancer. PMID:25395320

  11. Texture Descriptors to distinguish Radiation Necrosis from Recurrent Brain Tumors on multi-parametric MRI.

    PubMed

    Pallavi, Tiwari; Prateek, Prasanna; Lisa, Rogers; Leo, Wolansky; Chaitra, Badve; Andrew, Sloan; Mark, Cohen; Anant, Madabhushi

    2014-01-01

    Differentiating radiation necrosis (a radiation induced treatment effect) from recurrent brain tumors (rBT) is currently one of the most clinically challenging problems in care and management of brain tumor (BT) patients. Both radiation necrosis (RN), and rBT exhibit similar morphological appearance on standard MRI making non-invasive diagnosis extremely challenging for clinicians, with surgical intervention being the only course for obtaining definitive "ground truth". Recent studies have reported that the underlying biological pathways defining RN and rBT are fundamentally different. This strongly suggests that there might be phenotypic differences and hence cues on multi-parametric MRI, that can distinguish between the two pathologies. One challenge is that these differences, if they exist, might be too subtle to distinguish by the human observer. In this work, we explore the utility of computer extracted texture descriptors on multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) to provide alternate representations of MRI that may be capable of accentuating subtle micro-architectural differences between RN and rBT for primary and metastatic (MET) BT patients. We further explore the utility of texture descriptors in identifying the MRI protocol (from amongst T1-w, T2-w and FLAIR) that best distinguishes RN and rBT across two independent cohorts of primary and MET patients. A set of 119 texture descriptors (co-occurrence matrix homogeneity, neighboring gray-level dependence matrix, multi-scale Gaussian derivatives, Law features, and histogram of gradient orientations (HoG)) for modeling different macro and micro-scale morphologic changes within the treated lesion area for each MRI protocol were extracted. Principal component analysis based variable importance projection (PCA-VIP), a feature selection method previously developed in our group, was employed to identify the importance of every texture descriptor in distinguishing RN and rBT on MP-MRI. PCA-VIP employs regression analysis to

  12. Texture descriptors to distinguish radiation necrosis from recurrent brain tumors on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Prasanna, Prateek; Rogers, Lisa; Wolansky, Leo; Badve, Chaitra; Sloan, Andrew; Cohen, Mark; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Di erentiating radiation necrosis (a radiation induced treatment e ect) from recurrent brain tumors (rBT) is currently one of the most clinically challenging problems in care and management of brain tumor (BT) patients. Both radiation necrosis (RN), and rBT exhibit similar morphological appearance on standard MRI making non-invasive diagnosis extremely challenging for clinicians, with surgical intervention being the only course for obtaining de nitive ground truth". Recent studies have reported that the underlying biological pathways de n- ing RN and rBT are fundamentally di erent. This strongly suggests that there might be phenotypic di erences and hence cues on multi-parametric MRI, that can distinguish between the two pathologies. One challenge is that these di erences, if they exist, might be too subtle to distinguish by the human observer. In this work, we explore the utility of computer extracted texture descriptors on multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) to provide alternate representations of MRI that may be capable of accentuating subtle micro-architectural di erences between RN and rBT for primary and metastatic (MET) BT patients. We further explore the utility of texture descriptors in identifying the MRI protocol (from amongst T1-w, T2-w and FLAIR) that best distinguishes RN and rBT across two independent cohorts of primary and MET patients. A set of 119 texture descriptors (co-occurrence matrix homogeneity, neighboring gray-level dependence matrix, multi-scale Gaussian derivatives, Law features, and histogram of gradient orientations (HoG)) for modeling di erent macro and micro-scale morphologic changes within the treated lesion area for each MRI protocol were extracted. Principal component analysis based variable importance projection (PCA-VIP), a feature selection method previously developed in our group, was employed to identify the importance of every texture descriptor in distinguishing RN and rBT on MP-MRI. PCA-VIP employs regression analysis to provide

  13. Phosphorylation of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (p55) protects macrophages from silica-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Federica; Di, Peter; Niu, Xiaomei; Friedman, Mitchell; Hammond, Timothy; Riches, David W H; Ortiz, Luis A

    2004-01-16

    Macrophages play a fundamental role in silicosis in part by removing silica particles and producing inflammatory mediators in response to silica. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is a prominent mediator in silicosis. Silica induction of apoptosis in macrophages might be mediated by TNFalpha. However, TNFalpha also activates signal transduction pathways (NF-kappaB and AP-1) that rescue cells from apoptosis. Therefore, we studied the TNFalpha-mediated mechanisms that confer macrophage protection against the pro-apoptotic effects of silica. We will show that exposure to silica induced TNFalpha production by RAW 264.7 cells, but not by IC-21. Silica-induced activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages. ERK activation in response to silica exposure was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages, whereas activation of p38 phosphorylation was predominantly observed in IC-21 macrophages. No changes in JNK activity were observed in either cell line in response to silica exposure. Silica induced apoptosis in both macrophage cell lines, but the induction of apoptosis was significantly larger in IC-21 cells. Protection against apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells in response to silica was mediated by enhanced NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNFalpha receptor. Inhibition of these two protective mechanisms by specific pharmacological inhibitors or transfection of dominant negative mutants that inhibit IkappaBalpha or ERK phosphorylation significantly increased silica-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These data suggest that NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNF receptor are important cell survival mechanisms in the macrophage response to silica exposure. PMID:14570868

  14. Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in zebrafish retinal neurogenesis and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xu-Dan; Sun, Yan; Cai, Shi-Jiao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Cui, Jian-Lin; Li, Yu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in zebrafish retinal development and myelination. METHODS Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO), which are complementary to the translation start site of the wild-type embryonic zebrafish TNF-α mRNA sequence, were synthesized and injected into one- to four-cell embryos. The translation blocking specificity was verified by Western blotting using an anti-TNF-α antibody, whole-mount in situ hybridization using a hepatocyte-specific mRNA probe ceruloplasmin (cp), and co-injection of TNF-α MO and TNF-α mRNA. An atonal homolog 7 (atoh7) mRNA probe was used to detect neurogenesis onset. The retinal neurodifferentiation was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies Zn12, Zpr1, and Zpr3 to label ganglion cells, cones, and rods, respectively. Myelin basic protein (mbp) was used as a marker to track and observe the myelination using whole-mount in situ hybridization. RESULTS Targeted knockdown of TNF-α resulted in specific suppression of TNF-α expression and a severely underdeveloped liver. The co-injection of TNF-α MO and mRNA rescued the liver development. Retinal neurogenesis in TNF-α morphants was initiated on time. The retina was fully laminated, while ganglion cells, cones, and rods were well differentiated at 72 hours post-fertilization (hpf). mbp was expressed in Schwann cells in the lateral line nerves and cranial nerves from 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) as well as in oligodendrocytes linearly along the hindbrain bundles and the spinal cord from 4 dpf, which closely resembled its endogenous profile. CONCLUSION TNF-α is not an essential regulator for retinal neurogenesis and optic myelination. PMID:27366683

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  16. Genetic variability in the tumor necrosis factor-lymphotoxin region influences susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, B.; Waldron-Lynch, F.; Adams, C.; O`Gara, F.

    1996-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class H1 tumor necrosis factor-tymphotoxin (TNF-LT) region (6p21.3) was investigated as a possible susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inheritance of five TNF microsatellite markers was determined in 50 multiplex families. Overall, 47 different haplotypes were observed. One of these, the TNF a6, b5, c1, d3, e3 (H1) haplotype, was present in 35.3% of affected, but in only 20.5% of unaffected, individuals (P < .005). This haplotype accounted for 21.5% of the parental haplotypes transmitted to affected offspring and only 7.3 % not transmitted to affected offspring (P = .0003). The TNF a6 and TNF c1 alleles were individually associated with RA (P = .0005 and .0008, respectively), as were the HLA-DRB1 {open_quotes}shared epitope{close_quotes} (SE) (P = .0001) and HLA-DRB1*0401 (P = .0018). Both univariate and bivariate conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant effects of TNF c1 and SE in increasing risk to RA (P < .001). Stratification by the presence of SE indicated an independent effect of the TNFc1 allele (P = .0003) and the HLA A1, BS, DR3 extended haplotype (always TNFa2, b3, c1, d1, e3) (P = .0027) in SE heterozygotes, while the H1 haplotype was associated with RA in SE homozygotes (P = .0018). The TNF-LT region appears to influence susceptibility to RA, distinct from HLA-DR. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Complicated Whipple’s disease and endocarditis following tumor necrosis factor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test whether treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFI) is associated with complications of Tropheryma whipplei (T. whipplei) infection. METHODS: Because unexplained arthritis is often the first Whipple’s disease (WD) symptom, patients may undergo treatment with TNFI before diagnosis. This may influence the course of infection with T. whipplei, which causes WD, because host immune defects contribute to the pathogenesis of WD. A literature search and cross referencing identified 19 reports of TNFI treatment prior to WD diagnosis. This case-control study compared clinical data in patients receiving TNFI therapy (group I, n = 41) with patients not receiving TNFI therapy (group II, n = 61). Patients from large reviews served as controls (group III, n = 1059). RESULTS: The rate of endocarditis in patient group I was significantly higher than in patient group II (12.2% in group I vs 1.6% in group II, P < 0.05), and group III (12.2% in group I vs 0.16% in group III, P < 0.01). Other, severe systemic or local WD complications such as pericarditis, fever or specific organ manifestations were increased also in group I as compared to the other patient groups. However, diarrhea and weight loss were somewhat less frequent in patient group I. WD is typically diagnosed with duodenal biopsy and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. PAS-stain as standard diagnostic test had a very high percentage of false negative results (diagnostic failure in 63.6% of cases) in group I. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for T. whipplei was more accurate than PAS-stainings (diagnostic accuracy, rate of true positive tests 90.9% for PCR vs 36.4% for PAS, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: TNFI trigger severe WD complications, particularly endocarditis, and lead to false-negative PAS-tests. In case of TNFI treatment failure, infection with T. whipplei should be considered. PMID:25548618

  18. Predictors of Switching Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Won; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Park, Dong-Jin; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Shin-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential predictors of switching tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The patients who had been treated with TNF-α inhibitors were divided into two groups depending on whether they had switched TNF-α inhibitors. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and treatment data at the time of initiation of TNF-α inhibitor treatment were compared between switchers and non-switchers, and within switchers according to the reasons for switching. Of the 269 patients, 70 (23%) had switched TNF-α inhibitors once; of these, 11 switched again. The median follow-up time was 52.7 months. Three- and five-year drug survival rates were 52%/48% for infliximab, 62%/42% for etanercept, and 71%/51% for adalimumab, respectively. Switchers were more likely to be prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs than non-switchers. A history of joint surgery and complete ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint was more frequent in switchers. Multivariate Cox’s proportional hazard analysis showed that the use of adalimumab as the first TNF-α inhibitor was less likely to lead to switching and complete ankylosis of the sacroiliac joints was more likely to lead to switching. The principal reasons for switching were drug inefficacy and adverse events, but the differences in the clinical data of these two groups of switchers were not significant. In AS patients who are candidates for TNF-α inhibitor therapy, switching may improve the therapeutic outcome based on clinical information. PMID:26176701

  19. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  20. Estimation of salivary tumor necrosis factor-alpha in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Sheeja S.; Thomas, Hima; Jayakumar, N. D.; Sankari, M.; Lakshmanan, Reema

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Periodontitis is a chronic bacterial infection characterized by persistent inflammation, connective tissue breakdown and alveolar bone destruction mediated by pro-inflammatory mediators. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is an important pro-inflammatory mediator that produced causes destruction of periodontal tissues. Objective: The aim of the study is to estimate the salivary TNF-α in chronic and aggressive periodontitis and control participants and further correlate the levels with clinical parameter such as gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment loss. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 75 subjects age ranging from 25 to 55 years attending the outpatient section of Department of Periodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospital. The study groups included Groups 1, 2, and 3 with participants with healthy periodontium (n = 25), generalized chronic periodontitis (n = 25) and generalized aggressive periodontitis (n = 25), respectively. Salivary samples from the participants were used to assess the TNF-α levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: GI and PI were found to be significantly higher in chronic and aggressive periodontitis compared to the controls. The mean TNF-α value in chronic periodontitis patients (12.92 ± 17.21 pg/ml) was significantly higher than in control subjects (2.15 ± 3.60 pg/ml). Whereas, in aggressive periodontitis patients the mean TNF-α (7.23 ± 7.67) were not significantly different from chronic periodontitis or healthy subjects. Among periodontitis participants, aggressive periodontitis subjects exhibited a significant positive correlation between the salivary TNF-α and PPD. Conclusion: Salivary TNF-α levels are significantly higher in chronic periodontitis than in healthy subjects, but there was no significant correlation with the clinical parameters. PMID:26604566

  1. Role of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on energy metabolism in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Tredget, E.E.; Yu, Y.M.; Zhong, S.; Burini, R.; Okusawa, S.; Gelfand, J.A.; Dinarello, C.A.; Young, V.R.; Burke, J.F.

    1988-12-01

    A study of the combined effects of intravenous infusion of the recombinant cytokines beta-interleukin 1 (IL-1) and alpha-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on energy substrate metabolism in awake, conditioned, adult rabbits was performed. After a 2-h basal or control period, 48-h fasted rabbits were administered TNF and IL-1 as a bolus (5 micrograms/kg) followed by a continuous intravenous infusion (25 ng.kg-1.min-1) for 3 h. Significant increases in plasma lactate (P less than 0.01), glucose (P less than 0.01), and triglycerides (P less than 0.05) occurred during the combined infusion of IL-1 and TNF, whereas neither cytokine alone had no effect. There was a 33% increase in the rate of glucose appearance (P less than 0.05), but glucose clearance was not altered compared with the control period. Glucose oxidation increased during the combined cytokine infusion period and glucose recycling increased by 600% (P less than 0.002). Lactic acidosis and decreased oxygen consumption, as a result of the cytokine infusions, indicated development of anaerobic glycolytic metabolism. A reduction in the activity state of hepatic mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (65 vs. 82% in control animals, P less than 0.05) was consistent with the observed increase in anaerobic glycolysis. Thus the combined infusion of IL-1 and TNF in rabbits produces metabolic manifestations seen in severe injury and sepsis in human patients and, as such, may account for the profound alterations of energy metabolism seen in these conditions.

  2. Attenuation of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell cytotoxicity and neutrophil chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Crowley, J.J.; Chan, J.C.; Hoffmann, H.; Hatherill, J.R.; Ishizaka, A.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Our laboratory has previously shown that the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a cytokine produced by activated mononuclear cells, to guinea pigs produces a syndrome similar to gram-negative sepsis or ARDS. Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine, protects against TNF-induced and sepsis-induced acute lung injury in vivo. We now report on in vitro cellular studies of PMN-mediated cellular injury and its attenuation. We studied TNF-induced bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell (EC) cytotoxicity both with and without PMN. A 51Cr release assay was used to measure EC damage. Further, we investigated PMN function in response to TNF by measuring chemiluminescence. Agents that attenuate EC damage and PMN activation were evaluated in the above assays. Results revealed that TNF causes EC injury (p less than 0.05) and PMN increase TNF-induced EC injury. Furthermore, PTX, aminophylline (AMPH), caffeine, and forskolin attenuate TNF-induced EC cytotoxicity only in the presence of PMN (p less than 0.05). Of interest, dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) protects EC from TNF-induced injury both with and without PMN. Agents that may increase cAMP levels in PMN (PTX, DBcAMP, forskolin, isobutyl methylxanthine, and terbutaline) significantly attenuate TNF-induced PMN chemiluminescence (p less than 0.05). We conclude that TNF causes EC damage and PMN increase this damage. Furthermore, PTX, AMPH, caffeine, and forskolin can attenuate TNF-induced EC injury in the presence of PMN, whereas DBcAMP attenuates TNF-induced EC injury with and without PMN. In addition, agents that may increase intracellular cAMP levels in PMN can attenuate TNF-induced PMN chemiluminescence. Thus, these agents likely attenuate TNF-induced PMN-mediated EC injury through their inhibitory effects on PMN.

  3. Synergistic activation of NF-kappaB by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Jono, Hirofumi; Han, Jiahuai; Lim, David J; Li, Jian-Dong

    2004-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important human pathogen causing otitis media in children and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. Like most other bacterial infections, NTHi infections are also characterized by inflammation, which is mainly mediated by cytokines and chemokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Among a variety of transcription regulators, NF-kappaB has been shown to play a critical role in regulating the expression of large numbers of genes encoding inflammatory mediators. In review of the current studies on NF-kappaB regulation, most of them have focused on investigating how NF-kappaB is activated by a single inducer at a time. However, in bacteria-induced inflammation in vivo, multiple inducers including both exogenous and endogenous mediators are present simultaneously. A key issue that has yet to be addressed is whether the exogenous inducers such as NTHi and the endogenous factors such as TNF-alpha activate NF-kappaB in a synergistic manner. We show that NTHi and TNF-alpha, when present together, synergistically induce NF-kappaB activation via two distinct signaling pathways: NF-kappaB translocation-dependent and -independent pathways. The NF-kappaB translocation-dependent pathway involves NF-kappaB-inducing kinase-IkappaB kinase beta/gamma-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, whereas the NF-kappaB translocation-independent pathway involves mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase kinase 1-dependent activation of MAPK kinase 3/6-p38 MAPK pathway. In addition, the same signaling pathways are also involved in synergistic induction of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-8. These studies should deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the combinatorial regulation of inflammation and lead to development of therapeutic strategies for NTHi-induced infections. PMID:14993593

  4. Adrenomedullin mediates tumor necrosis factor-α-induced responses in dorsal root ganglia in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yajuan; Zhang, Yan; Huo, Yuanhui; Wang, Dongmei; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a member of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, has been demonstrated to be a pain peptide. This study investigated the possible involvement of AM in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced responses contributing to neuronal plasticity in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Exposure of the DRG explant cultures to TNF-α (5nM) for 48h upregulated the expression of AM mRNA. The treatment with TNF-α also increased the level of CGRP, CCL-2 and MMP-9 mRNA in the cultured DRG. This increase was attenuated by the co-treatment with the selective AM receptor antagonist AM22-52 (2μM). The blockade of AM receptors inhibited TNF-α-induced increase of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) and nuclear factor kappa B (pNF-κB) proteins. On the other hand, the treatment with the AM receptor agonist AM1-50 (10nM) for 96h induced an increase in the level of GFAP, IL-1β, pCREB and pNF-κB proteins. The inhibition of AM activity did not change TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (pERK) while the treatment with AM1-50 still increased the level of pERK in the cultured DRG. Immunofluorescence assay showed the colocalization of AM-like immunoreactivity (IR) with TNF-α-IR in DRG neurons. The present study suggests that the increased AM receptor signaling mediated the many, but not all, TNF-α-induced activities, contributing to peripheral sensitization in neuropathic pain. PMID:27184601

  5. Tumor necrosis factor primes hepatocytes for DNA replication in the rat.

    PubMed

    Webber, E M; Bruix, J; Pierce, R H; Fausto, N

    1998-11-01

    Signaling through tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1 (TNFR-1) using a pathway that involves nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and STAT3 is required for the initiation of liver regeneration. We have proposed that TNF primes hepatocytes to respond to the mitogenic effect of growth factors, but so far, there has been no experimental demonstration that TNF enhances growth factor responses of hepatocytes. To test this hypothesis, we infused hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF-) (40 microgram/24 h) directly into the portal vein of rats for 24 hours using osmotic pumps and determined whether TNF injection (5 microgram per rat) would significantly increase hepatocyte DNA labeling in these animals. All rats received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) by intraperitoneal delivery during a 48-hour period (i.e., BrdU infusion continued for 24 hours after the end of growth factor administration). BrdU labeling in the liver was measured by both immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, and the results obtained by these methods showed excellent concordance. The results demonstrate that TNF transiently activates NF-kappaB and STAT3 and increases the proliferative response of hepatocytes to HGF or TGF- by fourfold. Priming effects on hepatocyte DNA replication were also obtained with injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), agents that release TNF in the liver. Similarly to TNF, GdCl3 injection caused the activation of NF-kappaB and STAT3, reaching a maximum 8 to 12 hours after the injection. The results show that TNF acts as a primer to sensitize hepatocytes to the proliferative effects of growth factors and offers a mechanism to explain the initiation and progression phases of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH). PMID:9794905

  6. Association of the tumor necrosis factor -308 A/G promoter polymorphism with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keszler, G; Kruk, E; Kenezloi, E; Tarnok, Z; Sasvari-Szekely, M; Nemoda, Z

    2014-12-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that certain subtypes of obsessive-compulsive and tic disorders might be paediatric manifestations of post-streptococcal autoimmunity caused by cross-reactive autoantibodies. As tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is known to play a seminal role in coordinating the humoral immune response, TNF gene polymorphisms have been proposed as genetic risk factors both in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). The aim of this study was to investigate two TNF promoter polymorphisms (-238 A/G: rs361525 and -308 A/G: rs1800629) on the genetic susceptibility to OCD and TS in a child psychiatric sample (102 patients with OCD and 117 patients with TS). In the case-control set-up, the genotype and allele frequencies were compared to a control group from the general population (n = 405). As a control child psychiatric sample, 194 children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were also genotyped. Our results revealed that the TNF -308 G-allele was more frequent in children with TS compared to controls (90.2% vs 84.8%, P = 0.037). For confirmation of this genetic association, a family-based analysis, the transmission disequilibrium test was used, which showed preferential transmission of the G-allele to patients with TS (nominal P-value 0.011). Moreover, this allele was also transmitted more frequently to children with tic symptoms (nominal P-value 0.039). No association was found between OCD or obsessive-compulsive symptoms and the studied TNF polymorphisms. Based on these findings, the TNF -308 G-allele can be associated with Tourette syndrome, highlighting the potential pathophysiological role of TNF dysregulation. PMID:25256363

  7. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-II nt587 polymorphism in Chinese Han patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Wang, M; Ma, R; Zhang, T; Liu, J; Chen, J W; Peng, W

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to explore the association between the onset of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and nt587 polymorphisms of the tumor necrosis factor receptor II (TNFRII) gene in the Han population of Hunan Province, China. Correlation analysis was performed in a case-control study involving 100 AS cases and 100 healthy controls. The nt587 single nucleotide polymorphism of the TNFRII gene was examined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The relationship between AS and the frequencies of genotypes and alleles in TNFRII nt587 were analyzed using the SPSS software. There were 43 cases with the TNFRII nt587 T/T genotype, 32 cases with the TNFRII nt587 T/G genotype, and 25 cases with the TNFRII nt587 G/G genotype. In the 100 healthy controls, 56 subjects had the TNFRII nt587 T/T genotype, 34 had the TNFRII nt587 T/G genotype, and 10 had the TNFRII nt587 G/G genotype. The G allele frequency of the AS group was significantly higher (χ(2) = 8.734, P = 0.003) than that in the control group (41.0 vs 27.0%). The odds ratio (OR) in AS cases with the TNFRII nt587 G/G genotype was 3.256, which was obviously higher than in those with T/G (OR = 1.226) and T/T (OR = 1.0) genotype. The polymorphism at position nt587 of the TNFRII gene was found to be associated with AS, and the TNFRII nt587 G allele may play an important role in AS susceptibility. The TNFRII nt587 G/G genotype may increase the risk of developing AS in the Hunan population. PMID:25061744

  8. No impact of tumor necrosis-factor antagonists on the joint manifestations of sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Banse, Christopher; Bisson-Vaivre, Aurélia; Kozyreff-Meurice, Marie; Vittecoq, Olivier; Goëb, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents to treat joint manifestations of sarcoidosis has not been described. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of three such biologics in patients with these symptoms refractory to conventional therapy (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and/or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs). Methods This retrospective study, covering January 2001 to September 2011, examined clinical–biological parameters collected before anti-TNF treatment (age, sex, duration of disease evolution, drugs taken), and at introduction and under anti-TNF therapy (number of painful and swollen joints, visual analog scale score of global disease activity, disease-activity score of 28 joints with erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, TNF-antagonist duration). At 3, 6, and 12 months, anti-TNF impact on joints and the therapeutic response according to European League Against Rheumatism criteria used for rheumatoid arthritis were assessed. Results Ten patients’ data were evaluated; some of them had received several anti-TNF agents (median [range] duration on each biotherapy was 10 [4–30] months), which enabled analysis of 19 prescriptions. The total duration of anti-TNF exposure was 17.6 patient-years, which was started a median of 3 (0.33–17) years after sarcoidosis diagnosis. The median numbers of painful and swollen joints were 1 (0–28) and 0 (0–9), respectively. Despite rapid efficacy, after 1 year of treatment, clinical (especially joint) and biological parameters were comparable to pretreatment, and only the corticosteroid dose was significantly lower (P=0.03). One case of mild skin toxicity was noted. Conclusion TNF antagonists allowed significant steroid sparing and were well tolerated, but do not seem to be effective against sarcoidosis joint involvement. PMID:23901289

  9. Different changes in cortical tumor necrosis factor-α-related pathways in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Dean, B; Gibbons, A S; Tawadros, N; Brooks, L; Everall, I P; Scarr, E

    2013-07-01

    The growing body of evidence implicating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders led us to measure levels of that protein in the cortex of subjects with major depressive disorders (MDD). Having reported an increase (458%) in the levels of the transmembrane (tmTNFα), but not the soluble (sTNFα), form of the protein in Brodmann's area (BA) 46, but not 24, in people with the disorder, we decided to examine additional components of TNFα-related pathways in the same regions in people with MDD and extend our studies to the same cortical regions of people with schizophrenia (Sz) and bipolar disorders (BD). Using postmortem tissue, western blots and quantitative PCR, we have now shown there is a significant increase (305%) in tmTNFα in Brodmann's area 24, but not 46, from subjects with BD, and that levels of the protein were not altered in Sz. Levels of sTNFα were not altered in BD or Sz. In addition, we have shown that levels of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) mRNA are increased in BA 24 (53%) and BA 46 (82%) in people with Sz, whereas levels of TNFR2 mRNA was decreased in BA 46 in people with mood disorders (MDD=-51%; BD=-67%). Levels of proteins frequently used as surrogate markers of neuronal, astrocytic and microglia numbers, as well as levels of the pro-inflammatory marker (interleukin 1β), were not changed in the cortex of people with mood disorders. Our data suggest there are differential changes in TNFα-related markers in the cortex of people with MDD, BD and Sz that may not be related to classical inflammation and may cause changes in different TNFα-related signaling pathways. PMID:22801413

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Promoter Polymorphism and Severity of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Susantitaphong, Paweena; Perianayagam, Mary C.; Tighiouart, Hocine; Liangos, Orfeas; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Jaber, Bertrand L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in the pathobiology of acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods We explored the association of a functional polymorphism in the promoter region (rs1800629) of the TNFA gene with severity of AKI, as defined by level of glomerular filtration (serum cystatin C and creatinine) and tubular injury (urinary NAG, KIM-1, α-GST, and π-GST) markers, in 262 hospitalized adults. Results In unadjusted analyses, compared with the GG genotype, the TNFA GA and AA genotype groups tended to have higher enrollment (p = 0.08), peak (p = 0.004), and discharge (p = 0.004) serum creatinine levels, and the AA genotype tended to have a higher enrollment serum cystatin C level (p = 0.04). Compared with the GG genotype, the TNFA GA and AA genotype groups tended to have a higher urinary KIM-1 level (p = 0.03), and the AA genotype group tended to have a higher urinary π-GST level (p = 0.03). After adjustment for sex, race, age, baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, sepsis, and dialysis requirement, compared with the GG genotype, the TNFA minor A-allele group had a higher peak serum creatinine of 1.03 mg/dl (0.43, 1.63; p = 0.001) and a higher urinary KIM-1 (relative ratio: 1.73; 95% CI: 1.16, 2.59; p = 0.008). The TNFA minor A-allele group also had a higher Multiple Organ Failure score of 0.26 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.49; p = 0.024) after adjustment for sex, race, age, and sepsis. Conclusions The TNFA rs1800629 gene polymorphism is associated with markers of kidney disease severity and distant organ dysfunction among patients with AKI. Larger studies are needed to confirm these relationships. PMID:23796916

  11. Comparative Biochemical and Functional Analysis of Viral and Human Secreted Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Decoy Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pontejo, Sergio M; Alejo, Ali; Alcami, Antonio

    2015-06-26

    The blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by etanercept, a soluble version of the human TNF receptor 2 (hTNFR2), is a well established strategy to inhibit adverse TNF-mediated inflammatory responses in the clinic. A similar strategy is employed by poxviruses, encoding four viral TNF decoy receptor homologues (vTNFRs) named cytokine response modifier B (CrmB), CrmC, CrmD, and CrmE. These vTNFRs are differentially expressed by poxviral species, suggesting distinct immunomodulatory properties. Whereas the human variola virus and mouse ectromelia virus encode one vTNFR, the broad host range cowpox virus encodes all vTNFRs. We report the first comprehensive study of the functional and binding properties of these four vTNFRs, providing an explanation for their expression profile among different poxviruses. In addition, the vTNFRs activities were compared with the hTNFR2 used in the clinic. Interestingly, CrmB from variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, is the most potent TNFR of those tested here including hTNFR2. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new immunomodulatory activity of vTNFRs, showing that CrmB and CrmD also inhibit the activity of lymphotoxin β. Similarly, we report for the first time that the hTNFR2 blocks the biological activity of lymphotoxin β. The characterization of vTNFRs optimized during virus-host evolution to modulate the host immune response provides relevant information about their potential role in pathogenesis and may be used to improve anti-inflammatory therapies based on soluble decoy TNFRs. PMID:25940088

  12. Regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor-α genetic variations

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANGZHOU; HAN, NING; LI, QINCHUAN; LI, ZENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genetic variations. The GSE5760 expression profile data, which was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, contained 30 wild-type (WT) and 28 mutation (MUT) samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two types of samples were identified using the Student's t-test, and the corresponding microRNAs (miRNAs) were screened using WebGestalt software. An integrated miRNA-DEG network was constructed using the Cytoscape software, based on the interactions between the DEGs, as identified using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, and the correlation between miRNAs and their target genes. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and the KEGG Orthology Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 390 DEGS between the WT and MUT samples, along with 11 -associated miRNAs, were identified. The integrated miRNA-DEG network consisted of 38 DEGs and 11 miRNAs. Within this network, COPS2 was found to be associated with transcriptional functions, while FUS was found to be involved in mRNA metabolic processes. Other DEGs, including FBXW7 and CUL3, were enriched in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway. In addition, miR-15 was predicted to target COPS2 and CUL3. The results of the present study suggested that COPS2, FUS, FBXW7 and CUL3 may be associated with sepsis in patients with TNF-α genetic variations. In the progression of sepsis, FBXW7 and CUL3 may participate in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway, whereas COPS2 may regulate the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of the FUS protein. Furthermore, COPS2 and CUL3 may be novel targets of miR-15. PMID:27347057

  13. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection.

  14. Ultrasound-targeted antisense oligonucleotide attenuates ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Erikson, John M; Freeman, Gregory L; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are now emerging as effective vehicles for delivering therapeutic agents to target tissues. In the present study, we used ultrasound-targeted, contrast-bound antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine with negative inotropic effects. We compared the efficacy of left ventricular vs. intravenous administration and determined the optimal time for delivery. WKY rats were treated with perfluorocarbon-exposed sonicated dextrose albumin (PESDA) microspheres incubated with 100 microg of antisense oligonucleotide directed against TNF-alpha. Contrast was infused into either the superior vena cava or the left ventricular cavity along with simultaneous application of ultrasound. Twenty-four hours later, the animals underwent 15 min of ischemia and 2 h reperfusion. Control animals underwent sham operation only, ischemia/reperfusion only, or received PESDA only. A second group received treatment just prior to, or immediately after the onset of ischemia. At the end of the experimental period, hearts were removed and analyzed for TNF-alpha by northern and western blotting. While no TNF-alpha expression was detected in sham-operated animals, robust expression of TNF-alpha mRNA and protein was seen in controls treated with ultrasound and PESDA alone. In contrast, intravenous or left ventricular administration of antisense oligonucleotides significantly inhibited ischemia/reperfusion-induced TNF-alpha expression. Direct delivery into the left ventricular cavity was more effective than intravenous administration, and delivery just prior to ischemia was most effective in attenuating TNF-alpha expression. Furthermore, attenuation of TNF-alpha expression also significantly inhibited other post-ischemic inflammatory mediators including IL-1beta and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Thus, ultrasound-targeted antisense oligonucleotides can effectively attenuate post

  15. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  16. Claudin 1 mediates tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced cell migration in human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroki; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Konishi, Hirotaka; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kubota, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Iitaka, Daisuke; Nakashima, Shingo; Nako, Yoshito; Liu, Mingyao; Otsuji, Eigo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of claudin 1 in the regulation of genes involved in cell migration and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-induced gene expression in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. METHODS: Knockdown experiments were conducted with claudin 1 small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the effects on the cell cycle, apoptosis, migration and invasion were analyzed in human gastric adenocarcinoma MKN28 cells. The gene expression profiles of cells were analyzed by microarray and bioinformatics. RESULTS: The knockdown of claudin 1 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and increased apoptosis. Microarray analysis identified 245 genes whose expression levels were altered by the knockdown of claudin 1. Pathway analysis showed that the top-ranked molecular and cellular function was the cellular movement related pathway, which involved MMP7, TNF-SF10, TGFBR1, and CCL2. Furthermore, TNF- and nuclear frctor-κB were the top-ranked upstream regulators related to claudin 1. TNF-α treatment increased claudin 1 expression and cell migration in MKN28 cells. Microarray analysis indicated that the depletion of claudin 1 inhibited 80% of the TNF-α-induced mRNA expression changes. Further, TNF-α did not enhance cell migration in the claudin 1 siRNA transfected cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that claudin 1 is an important messenger that regulates TNF-α-induced gene expression and migration in gastric cancer cells. A deeper understanding of these cellular processes may be helpful in establishing new therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:25548484

  17. The toxic effects of tumor necrosis factor in vivo and their prevention by cyclooxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Kettelhut, I C; Fiers, W; Goldberg, A L

    1987-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a macrophage product under active study as an anticancer drug. However, this agent can be very toxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endotoxic shock. After intravenous injection of human recombinant TNF (4 micrograms/g), growing rats showed an unusual constellation of physiological responses, and all died within 2-4 hr. In 1 hr, TNF caused a sharp fall (2.5 degrees C) in body temperature and a large increase in plasma prostaglandin E2 levels. Blood glucose initially increased, but then a profound hypoglycemia developed by 2 hr. The TNF-treated animals also showed diarrhea, cyanosis, and a severe metabolic acidosis. A single injection of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin or ibuprofen before the TNF treatment completely prevented the rapid killing and reduced eventual lethality by 70%. These agents blocked prostaglandin E2 production and prevented the hypothermia, changes in blood glucose, acidosis, and other symptoms. Since similar physiological changes have been reported after endotoxin injection, our data support the suggestion that TNF production is a critical factor in the development of septic shock. These findings also indicate that increased production of prostaglandins or thromboxanes is important in endotoxic shock and argue that cyclooxygenase inhibitors should be useful in its therapy. Indomethacin did not block the cytotoxic effects of TNF in vitro on several transformed cell lines (HeLa, Me 180, or L929). Therefore, combined use of TNF with a cyclooxygenase inhibitor may allow safer administration of high doses of this polypeptide to cancer patients. PMID:3108890

  18. Oxidative Stress Promotes Ligand-independent and Enhanced Ligand-dependent Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Ozsoy, Hatice Z.; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Wieder, Eric D.; Pedersen, Steen; Mann, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1, p55) and 2 (TNFR2, p75) are characterized by several cysteine-rich modules in the extracellular domain, raising the possibility that redox-induced modifications of these cysteine residues might alter TNFR function. To test this possibility, we examined fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in 293T cells transfected with CFP- and YFP-tagged TNFRs exposed to the thiol oxidant diamide. Treatment with high concentrations of diamide (1 mm) resulted in an increase in the FRET signal that was sensitive to inhibition with the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that oxidative stress resulted in TNFR self-association. Treatment of cells with low concentrations of diamide (1 μm) that was not sufficient to provoke TNFR self-association resulted in increased TNF-induced FRET signals relative to the untreated cells, suggesting that oxidative stress enhanced ligand-dependent TNFR signaling. Similar findings were obtained when the TNFR1- and TNFR2-transfected cells were pretreated with a cell-impermeable oxidase, DsbA, that catalyzes disulfide bond formation between thiol groups on cysteine residues. The changes in TNFR self-association were functionally significant, because pretreating the HeLa cells and 293T cells resulted in increased TNF-induced NF-κB activation and TNF-induced expression of IκB and syndecan-4 mRNA levels. Although pretreatment with DsbA did not result in an increase in TNF binding to TNFRs, it resulted in increased TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, consistent with an allosteric modification of the TNFRs. Taken together, these results suggest that oxidative stress promotes TNFR receptor self-interaction and ligand-independent and enhanced ligand-dependent TNF signaling. PMID:18544535

  19. Vpr Enhances Tumor Necrosis Factor Production by HIV-1-Infected T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Richard, Léa; Rua, Réjane; Porrot, Françoise; Casartelli, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr displays different activities potentially impacting viral replication, including the arrest of the cell cycle in the G2 phase and the stimulation of apoptosis and DNA damage response pathways. Vpr also modulates cytokine production by infected cells, but this property remains partly characterized. Here, we investigated the effect of Vpr on the production of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We report that Vpr significantly increases TNF secretion by infected lymphocytes. De novo production of Vpr is required for this effect. Vpr mutants known to be defective for G2 cell cycle arrest induce lower levels of TNF secretion, suggesting a link between these two functions. Silencing experiments and the use of chemical inhibitors further implicated the cellular proteins DDB1 and TAK1 in this activity of Vpr. TNF secreted by HIV-1-infected cells triggers NF-κB activity in bystander cells and allows viral reactivation in a model of latently infected cells. Thus, the stimulation of the proinflammatory pathway by Vpr may impact HIV-1 replication in vivo. IMPORTANCE The role of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr remains only partially characterized. This protein is important for viral pathogenesis in infected individuals but is dispensable for viral replication in most cell culture systems. Some of the functions described for Vpr remain controversial. In particular, it remains unclear whether Vpr promotes or instead prevents proinflammatory and antiviral immune responses. In this report, we show that Vpr promotes the release of TNF, a proinflammatory cytokine associated with rapid disease progression. Using Vpr mutants or inhibiting selected cellular genes, we show that the cellular proteins DDB1 and TAK1 are involved in the release of TNF by HIV-infected cells. This report provides novel insights into how Vpr manipulates TNF production and helps clarify the role of Vpr in innate immune responses and inflammation

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  1. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Downregulating Genes for the Development of Antituberculous Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Aaron; Chen, Yong; Ji, Qingzhou; Zhu, Guofeng; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Vilchèze, Catherine; Weisbrod, Torin; Li, Weimin; Xu, Jiayong; Larsen, Michelle; Zhang, Jinghang; Porcelli, Steven A.; Jacobs, William R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) plays a critical role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in part by augmenting T cell responses through promoting macrophage phagolysosomal fusion (thereby optimizing CD4+ T cell immunity by enhancing antigen presentation) and apoptosis (a process that can lead to cross-priming of CD8+ T cells). M. tuberculosis can evade antituberculosis (anti-TB) immunity by inhibiting host cell TNF production via expression of specific mycobacterial components. We hypothesized that M. tuberculosis mutants with an increased capacity to induce host cell TNF production (TNF-enhancing mutants) and thus with enhanced immunogenicity can be useful for vaccine development. To identify mycobacterial genes that regulate host cell TNF production, we used a TNF reporter macrophage clone to screen an H37Rv M. tuberculosis cosmid library constructed in M. smegmatis. The screen has identified a set of TNF-downregulating mycobacterial genes that, when deleted in H37Rv, generate TNF-enhancing mutants. Analysis of mutants disrupted for a subset of TNF-downregulating genes, annotated to code for triacylglycerol synthases and fatty acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetase, enzymes that concern lipid biosynthesis and metabolism, has revealed that these strains can promote macrophage phagolysosomal fusion and apoptosis better than wild-type (WT) bacilli. Immunization of mice with the TNF-enhancing M. tuberculosis mutants elicits CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that are superior to those engendered by WT H37Rv. The results suggest that TNF-upregulating M. tuberculosis genes can be targeted to enhance the immunogenicity of mycobacterial strains that can serve as the substrates for the development of novel anti-TB vaccines. PMID:27247233

  2. Tumor necrosis factor α is a risk factor for infection in peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Kim, Seihran; Lee, Hwa Jung; Park, Inhwee; Kim, Heungsoo; Shin, Gyu-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: It has been shown that circulating tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is elevated in end stage renal disease patients; however, the relationship between TNF-α and the development of infection in these patients is unknown. In this study, we investigated the association of plasma TNF-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6) with infection in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We also evaluated the association of their plasma levels with the production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and with various clinical parameters. Methods: We enrolled 32 patients on maintenance PD and 10 healthy controls. Plasma and PBMC were isolated from blood. PBMC were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in vitro. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 775 days. Six patients developed organ infections (five pneumonia and one liver abscess), and six patients developed PD peritonitis and eight developed exit site infection. Plasma TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly elevated in organ infections but not in peritonitis or in exit site infection. Plasma TNF-α was the only significant risk factor for organ infections and pneumonia in multivariate regression analysis. Patients with high plasma TNF-α levels showed a significantly greater cumulative hazard rate for organ infections compared to those with low TNF-α levels. Plasma TNF-α levels correlated with TNF-α production by PBMC and showed an inverse association with Kt/V. Conclusions: This is the first study showing that plasma TNF-α is a significant risk factor for infection in PD patients. PMID:27000486

  3. Dendritic cell-derived tumor necrosis factor α modifies airway epithelial cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lutfi, R; Ledford, J R; Zhou, P; Lewkowich, I P; Page, K

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal dendritic cells (DC) are intimately associated with the airway epithelium and thus are ideally situated to be first responders to pathogens. We hypothesize that DC drive innate immune responses through early release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, which drives airway epithelial cell responses. In a mouse model, TNFα release was significantly increased following a single exposure to German cockroach (GC) frass, an event independent of neutrophil recruitment into the airways. While lung epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages failed to release TNFα following GC frass exposure, bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) produced substantial amounts of TNFα suggesting their importance as early responding cells. This was confirmed by flow cytometry of pulmonary myeloid DC. Addition of GC frass-pulsed BMDC or conditioned media from GC frass-pulsed BMDC to primary mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTEC) or MLE-15 cells induced chemokine (C-C) motif ligand (CCL) 20 and granulocyte macrophage (GM) colony-stimulating factor (CSF), both of which are important for DC recruitment, survival and differentiation. Importantly, DC do not produce CCL20 or GM-CSF following allergen exposure. Blocking TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) completely abolished chemokine production, suggesting that BMDC-derived TNFα induced airway epithelial cell activation and enhancement of the innate immune response. Lastly, blocking TNFR1 in vivo resulted in significantly decreased CCL20 and GM-CSF production in the lungs of mice. Together, our data strongly suggest that DC-derived TNFα plays a crucial role in the initiation of innate immune responses through the modification of airway epithelial cell responses. PMID:22517116

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor p55-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castaños-Velez, Esmeralda; Maerlan, Stephanie; Osorio, Lyda M.; Åberg, Frederik; Biberfeld, Peter; Örn, Anders; Rottenberg, Martín E.

    1998-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (TNFRp55) mediates host resistance to several pathogens by allowing microbicidal activities of phagocytes. In the studies reported here, TNFRp55−/− mice infected with the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi showed clearly higher parasitemia and cumulative mortality than wild-type (WT) controls did. However, gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-activated macrophages from TNFRp55−/− mice produced control levels of nitric oxide and killed the parasite efficiently in vitro. Trypanocidal mechanisms of nonphagocytic cells (myocardial fibroblasts) from both TNFRp55−/− and WT mice were also activated by IFN-γ in a dose-dependent way. However, IFN-γ-activated TNFRp55−/− nonphagocytes showed less effective killing of T. cruzi than WT control nonphagocytes, even when interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was added as a costimulator. In vivo, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice and WT mice released similar levels of NO and showed similar levels of IFN-γ mRNA and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in their tissues. Instead, increased susceptibility to T. cruzi of TNFRp55−/− mice was associated with reduced levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) (but not IgM) antibodies during infection, which is probably linked to abnormal B-cell differentiation in secondary lymphoid tissues of the mutant mice. Surprisingly, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice showed increased inflammatory and necrotic lesions in several tissues, especially in skeletal muscles, indicating that TNFRp55 plays an important role in controlling the inflammatory process. Accordingly, levels of Mn2+ superoxide dismutase mRNA, a TNF-induced enzyme which protects the cell from the toxic effects of superoxide, were lower in mutant than in WT infected mice. PMID:9596773

  5. Effects of botulinum toxin type D on secretion of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, K.; Spriggs, D.; Ohno, T.; Kufe, D.

    1989-05-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins which block the release of neurotransmitters. The effects of these toxins on hematopoietic cells, however, are unknown. Monocytes secrete a variety of polypeptide growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In the study reported here, the effects of botulinum toxin type D on the secretion of TNF from human monocytes were examined. The results demonstrate that biotulinum toxin type D inhibits the release of TNF from monocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Botulinum toxin type D had no detectable effect on intracellular TNF levels in LPS-treated monocytes, indicating that the effects of this toxin involve the secretory process. This inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type D on TNF secretion from LPS-treated monocytes was partially reversed by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or introduction of guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)t-riphosphate into these cells. The results demonstrate that TNF secretion is regulated by at least two distinct guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, one responsible for the activation of phospholiphase C and another which acts as a substrate for botulinum toxin type D. ADP-ribosylation of monocyte membranes by botulinum toxin type D demonstrated the presence of three substrates with M/sub r/s of 45,000, 21,000, and 17,000. While the role of these substrates in exocytosis is unknown, the results suggest that the M/sub r/ 21,000 substrate is involved in a process other than TNF secretion.

  6. Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor-α with Adalimumab: Effects on Endothelial Activation and Monocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Raghav; Schuett, Jutta; Schuett, Harald; Koch, Ann-Kathrin; Luchtefeld, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is well known that atherosclerotic inflammatory vascular disease is critically driven by oxidized lipids and cytokines. In this regard, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is known as a crucial mediator of early pro-atherosclerotic events. Epidemiologic data suggest that blockade of TNF-α has beneficial effects on vascular outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, however, detailed mechanistic studies are still lacking. This study aims to elucidate effects of TNF-α blockade by adalimumab–which is approved for several inflammatory disorders–on endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion under pro-atherosclerotic conditions. Methods and Results Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 macrophages were stimulated with oxidized low density lipoprotein and subsequent analysis of this conditioned media (oxLDL CM) revealed a strong release of TNF-α. The TNF-α rich supernatant led to activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as shown by enhanced expression of major adhesion molecules, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin which was suppressed by the TNF-α inhibitor adalimumab. Accordingly, adalimumab effectively prevented THP-1 monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under static as well as under flow conditions. Furthermore, adalimumab suppressed endothelial leakage as shown by Evan's blue diffusion across a confluent endothelial monolayer. Of note, after intraperitoneal injection we detected abundant deposition of fluorophore-labelled adalimumab in atherosclerotic plaques of hypercholesterolemic mice. Conclusion Our results show that adalimumab prevents major inflammatory effects of TNF-α on endothelial activation, endothelial monocyte adhesion, endothelial leakage and therefore extends the therapeutic options of adalimumab to limit vascular inflammation. PMID:27467817

  7. Histamine receptor antagonists, cyclooxygenase blockade, and tumor necrosis factor during acute septic insult.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Carey, D; Byrne, K; Walsh, C; Fisher, B; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1998-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be a major endogenous mediator of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. We proposed that treatment of septic pigs with the combined agents ibuprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, and histamine receptor antagonists, cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) would result in lower circulating levels of TNF and decreased parameters of sepsis-induced injury in these animals. To test this, plasma TNF activity, cardiac index, systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, arterial PO2 and bronchoalveolar lavage protein content were monitored for 300 min in four groups of anesthetized pigs: saline-infused control pigs (n = 4); pigs infused for 60 min with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(8) organisms/mL, .3 mL/20 kg/min) (n = 5) and pigs infused for 60 min with P. aeruginosa plus ibuprofen (12.5 mg/kg) alone (n = 4) or ibuprofen plus cimetidine (150 mg) and diphenhydramine (30 mg/kg) at 0 and 120 min (CID, n = 4). Within 60 min, pigs infused with P. aeruginosa exhibited increased plasma TNF activity (>8-fold increase in ng/mL TNF; L929 cytolysis assay) and showed alterations in all hemodynamic and pulmonary parameters. Ibuprofen or CID administration in the septic pigs decreased peak TNF activity by 4.6 and 10.2 ng/mL, respectively, and CID treatment was correlated with better attenuation of certain sepsis-induced alterations. These results show that CID treatment attenuates sepsis-induced injury and that this is correlated with reduced plasma TNF activity in a porcine model of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. PMID:9488252

  8. Pharmacologic reduction in tumor necrosis factor activity of pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Fisher, B J; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1993-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), an inflammatory cytokine released by macrophages, may be a mediator of lung injury during septicemia. We previously reported that the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen and histamine receptor antagonists cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) attenuate lung injury and reduce circulating TNF surges during porcine sepsis. Since pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) may participate in early sepsis by producing TNF, we hypothesized that the TNF activity of PAM is reduced by ibuprofen, cimetidine, and diphenhydramine. To test this, we examined changes in PAM-derived TNF bioactivity and cell viability of freshly isolated porcine PAM during exposure to bacterial endotoxin (LPS), ibuprofen, cimetidine, and diphenhydramine. The TNF activity (% L929 cytotoxicity of PAM conditioned medium) was elevated in LPS-stimulated PAM cultures (15 to 25% increase at 1 to 6 h and 40 to 43% increase at 6 to 48 h, compared with non-LPS-stimulated cultures), and ibuprofen (150 micrograms/ml) added with LPS decreased the TNF activity for 24 h (20 to 28% reduction at 1 to 24 h). Ibuprofen added 1 h after LPS was less effective in reducing the PAM-derived TNF activity (20 to 22% reduction at 2 to 6 h). Cimetidine (112 micrograms/ml) reduced the TNF activity of LPS-stimulated PAM cultures during the first 4 h of LPS exposure (15 to 24% decrease at 1 to 4 h). Diphenhydramine (150 micrograms/ml) attenuated the PAM-derived TNF activity but also decreased viability of PAM, indicating a toxic effect of this agent on PAM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8093999

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhanced fusions between oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and endothelial cells via VCAM-1/VLA-4 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Zhu, Fei; Zhang, Han-zhong; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2012-08-15

    Fusion between cancer cells and host cells, including endothelial cells, may strongly modulate the biological behavior of tumors. However, no one is sure about the driving factors and underlying mechanism involved in such fusion. We hypothesized in this study that inflammation, one of the main characteristics in tumor microenvironment, serves as a prominent catalyst for fusion events. Our results showed that oral cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with endothelial cells in co-culture and inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) increased fusion of human umbilical vein endothelium cells and oral cancer cells by up to 3-fold in vitro. Additionally, human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and 35 out of 50 (70%) oral squamous carcinoma specimens express VLA-4, an integrin, previously implicated in fusions between human peripheral blood CD34-positive cells and murine cardiomyocytes. Expression of VCAM-1, a ligand for VLA-4, was evident on vascular endothelium of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis revealed that expression of VCAM-1 increased obviously in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. Anti-VLA-4 or anti-VCAM-1 treatment can decrease significantly cancer-endothelial adhesion and block such fusion. Collectively, our results suggested that TNF-{alpha} could enhance cancer-endothelial cell adhesion and fusion through VCAM-1/VLA-4 pathway. This study provides insights into regulatory mechanism of cancer-endothelial cell fusion, and has important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for prevention of metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous oral cancer-endothelial cell fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} enhanced cell fusions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCAM-1/VLA-4 expressed in oral cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} increased expression of VCAM-1 on endothelial cells. Black

  10. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Berridge, Jon Casey; Mallon, Zachary; Kreis, Mark; Athos, Brian; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT) to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth. PMID:26231031

  11. Combination of poly-gamma-glutamate and cyclophosphamide enhanced antitumor efficacy against tumor growth and metastasis in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Jin; Lee, Tae-Young; Won, Ji-Na; Sung, Moon-Hee; Poo, Haryoung

    2013-09-28

    Conventional chemotherapeutic regimens often accompany severe side effects and fail to induce complete regression of chemoresistant or relapsing metastatic cancers. The need for establishing more efficacious anticancer strategies led to the development of a combined modality treatment of chemotherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy or radiotherapy. It has been reported that poly-gamma-glutamate (γ-PGA), a natural polymer composed of glutamic acids, increases antitumor activity by activating antigen-presenting cells and natural killer (NK) cells. Here, we investigated the antitumor effect of γ-PGA in combination with cyclophosphamide in a murine melanoma model. Whereas cyclophosphamide alone directly triggered apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro, γ-PGA did not show cytotoxicity in tumor cells. Instead, it activated macrophages, as reflected by the upregulation of surface activation markers and the secretion of proinflammatory factors, such as nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor α. When the antitumor effects were examined in a mouse model, combined treatment with cyclophosphamide and γ-PGA markedly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. Notably, γ-PGA treatment dramatically increased the NK cell population in lung tissues, coinciding with decreased metastasis and increased survival. These data collectively suggest that γ-PGA can act as an immunotherapeutic agent that exhibits a synergistic antitumor effect in combination with conventional chemotherapy. PMID:23867701

  12. Tumor necrosis factor alpha is reparative via TNFR2 [corrected] in the hippocampus and via TNFR1 [corrected] in the striatum after virus-induced encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Moses; Zoecklein, Laurie; Papke, Louisa; Gamez, Jeff; Denic, Aleksandar; Macura, Slobodan; Howe, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Differentiating between injurious and reparative factors facilitates appropriate therapeutic intervention. We evaluated the role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) in parenchymal brain pathology resolution following virus-induced encephalitis from a picornavirus, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). We infected the following animals with TMEV for 7 to 270 days: B6/129 TNF(-/-) mice (without TNFalpha expression), B6/129 TNFR1(-/-) mice (without TNFalpha receptor 1 expression), and B6/129 TNFR2(-/-) mice (without TNFalpha receptor 2 expression). Normal TNFalpha-expressing controls were TMEV-infected B6, 129/J, B6/129F1 and B6/129F2 mice. Whereas all strains developed inflammation and neuronal injury in the hippocampus and striatum 7 to 21 days postinfection (dpi), the control mice resolved the pathology by 45 to 90 dpi. However, parenchymal hippocampal and striatal injury persisted in B6/129 TNF(-/-) mice following infection. Treating virus-infected mice with active recombinant mouse TNFalpha resulted in less hippocampal and striatal pathology, whereas TNFalpha-neutralizing treatment worsened pathology. T1 "black holes" appeared on MRI during early infection in the hippocampus and striatum in all mice but persisted only in TNF(-/-) mice. TNFR2 [corrected] mediated hippocampal pathology resolution whereas TNFR1 [corrected] mediated striatal healing. These findings indicate the role of TNFalpha in resolution of sublethal hippocampal and striatal injury. PMID:18422761

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 antagonists alleviate inflammatory skin changes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Surguladze, David; Deevi, Dhanvanthri; Claros, Nidia; Corcoran, Erik; Wang, Su; Plym, Mary Jane; Wu, Yan; Doody, Jacqueline; Mauro, David J; Witte, Larry; Busam, Klaus J; Pytowski, Bronek; Rodeck, Ulrich; Tonra, James R

    2009-07-15

    Cancer patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody therapy often experience an acneiform rash of uncertain etiology in skin regions rich in pilosebaceous units. Currently, this condition is treated symptomatically with very limited, often anecdotal success. Here, we show that a monoclonal antibody targeting murine EGFR, ME1, caused a neutrophil-rich hair follicle inflammation in mice, similar to that reported in patients. This effect was preceded by the appearance of lipid-filled hair follicle distensions adjacent to enlarged sebaceous glands. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), localized immunohistochemically to this affected region of the pilosebaceous unit, was specifically up-regulated by ME1 in skin but not in other tissues examined. Moreover, skin inflammation was reduced by cotreatment with the TNFalpha signaling inhibitor, etanercept, indicating the involvement of TNFalpha in this inflammatory process. Interleukin-1, a cytokine that frequently acts in concert with TNFalpha, is also involved in this process given the efficacy of the interleukin-1 antagonist Kineret. Our results provide a mechanistic framework to develop evidence-based trials for EGFR antibody-induced skin rash in patients with cancer. PMID:19584274

  14. 12 Gy gamma knife radiosurgical volume is a predictor for radiation necrosis in non-AVM intracranial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Korytko, Timothy; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Colussi, Valdir; Wessels, Barry W.; Pillai, Kunjan; Maciunas, Robert J.; Einstein, Douglas B. . E-mail: Douglas.Einstein@uhhs.com

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the 12-Gy radiosurgical volume (12-GyV) correlates with the development of postradiosurgical imaging changes suggestive of radiation necrosis in patients treated for non-arteriovenous malformation (non-AVM) intracranial tumors with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). Methods and Materials: A retrospective single-institution review of 129 patients with 198 separate non-AVM tumors was performed. Patients were followed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and physical examinations at 3- to 6-month intervals. Patients who developed postradiosurgical MRI changes suggestive of radiation necrosis were labeled as having either symptomatic radiation necrosis (S-NEC) if they experienced any decline in neurologic examination associated with the imaging changes, or asymptomatic radiation necrosis (A-NEC) if they had a stable or improving neurologic examination. Results: 12-GyV correlated with risk of S-NEC, which was 23% (for 12-GyV of 0-5 cc), 20% (5-10 cc), 54% (10-15 cc), and 57% (>15 cc). The risk of A-NEC did not significantly change with 12-GyV. Logistic regression analyses showed that the following factors were associated with the development of S-NEC: 12-GyV (p < 0.01), occipital and temporal lesions (p < 0.01), previous whole-brain radiotherapy (p = 0.03), and male sex (p 0.03). Radiosurgical plan conformality did not correlate with the development of S-NEC. Conclusion: The risk of S-NEC, but not A-NEC after GKSRS for non-AVM tumors correlates with 12-GyV, and increases significantly for 12-GyV >10 cc.

  15. Investigation of HIFU-induced anti-tumor immunity in a murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenlin; Yang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Yunbo; Morse, Michael A.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Clay, Timothy M.; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    To determine whether HIFU treatment can elicit a systemic, anti-tumor immune response in vivo, MC-38 solid tumors grown subcutaneously at the right hindlimbs of C57BL/6 mice were treated in an experimental HIFU system. Three different treatment strategies that produce thermal, mechanical, or thermal combined with mechanical damage to the tumor tissue were evaluated. To detect anti-tumor immune response, a tumor challenge was performed on the left hindlimbs of the mice one day following the HIFU treatment, and subsequently, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was evaluated on day 14. All three HIFU treatment strategies were found to cause significant regression of the primary tumor, with the best suppressive effect produced by the thermal HIFU. In contrast, the most significant regression of the challenged tumor with concomitantly elevated CTL response were detected in mice treated by the mechanical HIFU, followed by the thermal combined with mechanical HIFU, but not in mice treated by the thermal HIFU alone. These findings suggest that alternative treatment strategies that promote mechanical lysis of the tumor cells (in contrast to purely thermal ablation) may enhance HIFU-induced anti-tumor immune response.

  16. Role of curcumin-dependent modulation of tumor microenvironment of a murine T cell lymphoma in altered regulation of tumor cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-05-01

    Using a murine model of a T cell lymphoma, in the present study, we report that tumor growth retarding action of curcumin involves modulation of some crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment regulating tumor progression. Curcumin-administration to tumor-bearing host caused an altered pH regulation in tumor cells associated with alteration in expression of cell survival and apoptosis regulatory proteins and genes. Nevertheless, an alteration was also observed in biophysical parameters of tumor microenvironment responsible for modulation of tumor growth pertaining to hypoxia, tumor acidosis, and glucose metabolism. The study thus sheds new light with respect to the antineoplastic action of curcumin against a tumor-bearing host with progressively growing tumor of hematological origin. This will help in optimizing application of the drug and anticancer research and therapy. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  17. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibit Interferon Signaling in Hepatocytes by Increasing Ubiquitin-Like Protease 18 (USP18) Expression

    PubMed Central

    MacParland, Sonya A.; Ma, Xue-Zhong; Chen, Limin; Khattar, Ramzi; Cherepanov, Vera; Selzner, Markus; Feld, Jordan J.; Selzner, Nazia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammation may be maladaptive to the control of viral infection when it impairs interferon (IFN) responses, enhancing viral replication and spread. Dysregulated immunity as a result of inappropriate innate inflammatory responses is a hallmark of chronic viral infections such as, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that expression of an IFN-stimulated gene (ISG), ubiquitin-like protease (USP)18 is upregulated in chronic HCV infection, leading to impaired hepatocyte responses to IFN-α. We examined the ability of inflammatory stimuli, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10 to upregulate hepatocyte USP18 expression and blunt the IFN-α response. Human hepatoma cells and primary murine hepatocytes were treated with TNF-α/LPS/IL-6/IL-10 and USP18, phosphorylated (p)-STAT1 and myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (Mx1) expression was determined. Treatment of Huh7.5 cells and primary murine hepatocytes with LPS and TNF-α, but not IL-6 or IL-10, led to upregulated USP18 expression and induced an IFN-α refractory state, which was reversed by USP18 knockdown. Liver inflammation was induced in vivo using a murine model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury led to an induction of USP18 expression in liver tissue and promotion of lymphocytic choriomeningitis replication. These data demonstrate that certain inflammatory stimuli (TNF-α and LPS) but not others (IL-6 and IL-10) target USP18 expression and thus inhibit IFN signaling. These findings represent a new paradigm for how inflammation alters hepatic innate immune responses, with USP18 representing a potential target for intervention in various inflammatory states. IMPORTANCE Inflammation may prevent the control of viral infection when it impairs the innate immune response, enhancing viral replication and spread. Blunted immunity as a result of

  19. Association of tumor necrosis factor-α and -β gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Meghaiseeb, Ebtissam Saleh; Al-Robayan, Abdulrahman A; Al-Otaibi, Mulfi Mubarak; Arfin, Misbahul; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract in which immune dysregulation caused by genetic and/or environmental factors plays an important role. The aim of this case–control study was to evaluate the association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (308) and -β (+252) polymorphisms with susceptibility of IBD. A total of 379 Saudi subjects including 179 IBD patients (ulcerative colitis (UC) =84 and Crohn’s disease (CD) =95) and 200 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. TNF-α and TNF-β genes were amplified using an amplification refractory mutation systems polymerase chain reaction methodology to detect TNF-α (−308) and -β (+252) polymorphisms. The frequency of the GA genotype of TNF-α (−308G/A) was higher, and the frequencies of the GG and AA genotypes were significantly lower in IBD patients compared with those in controls, indicating that genotype GA-positive individuals are susceptible to IBD and that the GG and AA genotypes exert a protective effect. The frequency of allele A of TNF-α (−308G/A) was significantly higher and that of allele G was lower in IBD patients compared with those in controls, indicating an association of allele A with IBD risk in Saudi patients. On stratification of IBD patients into UC and CD, an almost similar pattern was noticed in both the groups. The results of TNF-β (+252A/G) polymorphisms showed a significant increase in the frequency of the GG genotype in IBD patients, suggesting a positive association of GG genotype with IBD risk. On stratification of IBD patients into UC and CD, the genotype GG of TNF-β was associated with susceptibility risk to UC but not CD. The frequencies of alleles and genotypes of both TNF-α and-β polymorphisms are not affected by sex or type of IBD (familial or sporadic). TNF-α (−308G/A) and TNF-β (+252A/G) polymorphisms are associated with risk of developing IBD in Saudi population

  20. Serum and colostral antibody production in cows immunized with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Burton, Randall; Kim, Skaison; Patel, Rutvij; Scola, Michele; Hartman, Deborah; Tracey, Daniel; Fox, Barbara S

    2016-06-01

    The use of hyper-immune bovine colostrum as a human therapeutic platform is an emerging technology with potential to deliver the efficacy of antibody therapeutics with the convenience and safety of oral or topical application. It is necessary to understand how the bovine immune system responds to immunization with foreign proteins, both in terms of the serum antibody response and the transfer of antigen-specific antibodies into the colostrum to enable efficient large-scale production of therapeutic antibodies. We have immunized 25 cows with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF) and measured the levels of rhTNF-specific antibodies in the serum and colostrum of these animals. We observed a decline of 84±9% in serum IgG1 concentrations in the final weeks of pregnancy that presumably reflects rapid transport of IgG1 into colostrum. The serum IgG2 levels remained constant, such that the serum IgG1 to IgG2 ratio was 1:20 at parturition. We observed substantial animal-to-animal variability in the levels of anti-rhTNF antibodies in both serum and colostrum samples. In particular, a subset of 4 cows had extraordinarily high colostral anti-rhTNF antibody production. Only a weak correlation was found between the peak serum anti-rhTNF activity and the colostral anti-rhTNF activity in these animals. The 4 cows with high colostral anti-rhTNF activities trended toward higher serum IgG1 loss relative to average colostral anti-rhTNF producers, but this difference was not statistically significant in this small sample. The high-anti-rhTNF-producing cows also exhibited a greater proportion of rhTNF-specific antibodies that bound to bovine IgG1- and IgG2-specific detection antibodies relative to the total anti-rhTNF immunoglobulin population. This finding suggests that the isotype distribution of the anti-rhTNF response is varied between individuals and genetic or environmental factors may increase the yield of antigen-specific colostral antibodies. PMID:27040787

  1. Effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha on sexual activity of male patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xin; Zheng, Yi; Shi, Tian-Yan; Liu, Hong-Yan

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of a tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) antagonist on the sexual quality of life of male patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In this open-label study, 42 AS patients were grouped into the TNF-α antagonist treatment group and the non-TNF-α antagonist treatment group for 3 months. Clinical and laboratory indices and changes in the sexual quality of life were compared to assess the efficacy of TNF-α antagonists on sexual activity. The relationship between sexual quality and disease activity was analyzed. There were no significant differences in baseline data between the two groups. After treatment, disease activity and quality of life were improved in these two groups. The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) score (1.9 ± 1.6 vs. 3.0 ± 1.3, p = 0.020), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (9 ± 7 mm/1 h vs. 18 ± 17 mm/1 h, p = 0.031), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (1.8 ± 2.1 mg/dl vs. 6.2 ± 8.5 mg/dl, p = 0.035) were significantly lower in the TNF-α antagonist treatment group than in the non-TNF-α antagonist treatment group. The extent of improvement in the quality of life was more evident in the TNF-α antagonist treatment group. The average degree of improvement in the quality of life was negatively related to the BASDAI score and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index score in the TNF-α antagonist treatment group (r = -0.497, p = 0.018; r = -0.558, p = 0.007, respectively). Sexual quality of life and disease activity are improved after treatment with TNF-α antagonists in male patients with AS. The extent of improvement in sexual quality and disease activity are positively related. PMID:25064131

  2. Adverse Events of Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor α Therapy in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Qiang; Cai, Qing; de Mooij, Tristan; Xu, Xia; Dai, Shengming; Qu, Wenchun; Zhao, Dongbao

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to investigate the prevalence of short-term and long-term adverse events associated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) blocker treatment in Chinese Han patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods The study included 402 Chinese Han AS patients treated with TNF-α blockers. Baseline data was collected. All patients were monitored for adverse events 2 hours following administration. Long-term treatment was evaluated at 8, 12, 52 and 104 weeks follow-up for 172 patients treated with TNF-α blockers. Results Short-term adverse events occurred in 20.15% (81/402), including rash (3.5%; 14/402), pruritus (1.2%; 5/402), nausea (2.2%; 9/402), headache (0.7%; 3/402), skin allergies (4.0%; 16/402), fever (0.5%; 2/402), palpitations (3.0%; 12/402), dyspnea (0.5%; 2/402), chest pain (0.2%; 2/402), abdominal pain (1.0%; 4/402), hypertension (2.2%; 9/402), papilledema (0.5%; 2/402), laryngeal edema (0.2%; 1/402) and premature ventricular contraction (0.2%; 1/402). Long-term adverse events occurred in 59 (34.3%; 59/172) patients, including pneumonia (7.6%; 13/172), urinary tract infections (9.9%; 17/172), otitis media (4.7%; 8/172), tuberculosis (3.5%; 17/172), abscess (1.2%; 2/172), oral candidiasis (0.6%; 1/172), elevation of transaminase (1.7%; 3/172), anemia (1.2%; 2/172), hematuresis (0.6%; 1/172), constipation (2.3%; 4/172), weight loss (0.6%; 1/172), exfoliative dermatitis (0.6%; 1/172). CRP, ESR and disease duration were found to be associated with an increased risk of immediate and long-term adverse events (P<0.05). Long-term treatment with Infliximab was associated with more adverse events than rhTNFR-Fc (P<0.01). Conclusion This study reports on the prevalence of adverse events in short-term and long-term treatment with TNF-α blocker monotherapy in Chinese Han AS patients. Duration of disease, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and c-reactive protein serum levels were found to be associated with increased adverse events with

  3. Association of tumor necrosis factor-α and -β gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Meghaiseeb, Ebtissam Saleh; Al-Robayan, Abdulrahman A; Al-Otaibi, Mulfi Mubarak; Arfin, Misbahul; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract in which immune dysregulation caused by genetic and/or environmental factors plays an important role. The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate the association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (308) and -β (+252) polymorphisms with susceptibility of IBD. A total of 379 Saudi subjects including 179 IBD patients (ulcerative colitis (UC) =84 and Crohn's disease (CD) =95) and 200 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. TNF-α and TNF-β genes were amplified using an amplification refractory mutation systems polymerase chain reaction methodology to detect TNF-α (-308) and -β (+252) polymorphisms. The frequency of the GA genotype of TNF-α (-308G/A) was higher, and the frequencies of the GG and AA genotypes were significantly lower in IBD patients compared with those in controls, indicating that genotype GA-positive individuals are susceptible to IBD and that the GG and AA genotypes exert a protective effect. The frequency of allele A of TNF-α (-308G/A) was significantly higher and that of allele G was lower in IBD patients compared with those in controls, indicating an association of allele A with IBD risk in Saudi patients. On stratification of IBD patients into UC and CD, an almost similar pattern was noticed in both the groups. The results of TNF-β (+252A/G) polymorphisms showed a significant increase in the frequency of the GG genotype in IBD patients, suggesting a positive association of GG genotype with IBD risk. On stratification of IBD patients into UC and CD, the genotype GG of TNF-β was associated with susceptibility risk to UC but not CD. The frequencies of alleles and genotypes of both TNF-α and-β polymorphisms are not affected by sex or type of IBD (familial or sporadic). TNF-α (-308G/A) and TNF-β (+252A/G) polymorphisms are associated with risk of developing IBD in Saudi population. PMID:27382325

  4. Interindividual concordance of methylation profiles in human genes for tumor necrosis factors alpha and beta.

    PubMed Central

    Kochanek, S; Toth, M; Dehmel, A; Renz, D; Doerfler, W

    1990-01-01

    The DNA in mammalian genomes is characterized by complex patterns of DNA methylation that reflect the states of all genetic activities of that genome. The modified nucleotide 5-methyldeoxycytidine (5mdC) can affect the interactions of specific proteins with DNA sequence motifs. The most extensively studied effect of sequence-specific methylations is that of the long-term silencing of eukaryotic (mammalian) promoters. We have initiated studies on the methylation status of parts of the human genome to view patterns of DNA methylation as indicators for genetic activities. In this report, analyses using both restriction enzyme--Southern blotting and the very precise genomic sequencing technique have been done. The genes for tumor necrosis factors (TNF) alpha and beta--in particular, their 5'-upstream and promoter regions--have been investigated in DNA isolated from human lymphocytes, granulocytes, and sperm. The results are characterized by a remarkable interindividual concordance of DNA methylation in specific human cell types. The patterns are identical in the DNA from one cell type for different individuals even of different genetic origins but different in the DNA from different cell types. As an example, in the DNA from human granulocytes of 15 different individuals (ages 20-48 yr, both sexes), 5mdC residues have been localized by the genomic sequencing technique in three identical sequence positions in the 5'-upstream region and in one downstream position of the gene encoding TNF-alpha. The promoter of this gene is free of 5mdC, and TNF-alpha is expressed in human granulocytes. The TNF-beta promoter is methylated in granulocytes from 9 different individuals, and TNF-beta is not expressed. In human lymphocytes, the main source of TNF-beta, the TNF-beta promoter is free of 5mdC residues. All 5'-CG-3' sites studied in the TNF-alpha and -beta genes are methylated in DNA from human sperm. In human cell lines HL-60, Jurkat, and RPMI 1788, the extent of DNA methylation

  5. Arsenite enhances tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, T.-C. . E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw; Yeh, Szu Ching; Tsai, E.-M.; Tsai, F.-Y.; Chao, H.-R.; Chang, Louis W.

    2005-11-15

    Epidemiological studies demonstrated a high association of vascular diseases with arsenite exposure. We hypothesize that arsenite potentiates the effect of proinflammatory cytokines on vascular endothelial cells, and hence contributes to atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of arsenite and its induction of glutathione (GSH) on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) protein expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in response to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a typical proinflammatory cytokine. Our study demonstrated that arsenite pretreatment potentiated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with up-regulations of both activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). To elucidate the role of GSH in regulation of AP-1, NF-{kappa}B, and VCAM-1 expression, we employed L-buthionine (S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) inhibitor, to block intracellular GSH synthesis. Our investigation revealed that, by depleting GSH, arsenite attenuated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression as well as a potentiation of AP-1 and an attenuation of NF-{kappa}B activations by TNF-{alpha}. Moreover, we found that depletion of GSH would also attenuate the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with a down-regulation of the TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation and without significant effect on AP-1. On the other hand, the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression could be completely abolished by inhibition of AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B was necessary for VCAM-1 expression. In summary, we demonstrate that arsenite enhances the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs via regulation of AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B activities in a GSH-sensitive manner. Our present study suggested a potential mechanism for arsenite in the induction of vascular inflammation and vascular diseases via modulating the actions

  6. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibition and Head and Neck Cancer Recurrence and Death in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christopher; Zeringue, Angelique L.; McDonald, Jay R.; Eisen, Seth A.; Ranganathan, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy on the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) recurrence or HNC-attributable death in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA patients with HNC were assembled from the US national Veterans’ Affairs (VA) administrative databases, and diagnoses confirmed and data collected by electronic medical record review. The cohort was divided into those treated with non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs) versus TNF inhibitors (TNFi) after a diagnosis of HNC. Likelihood of a composite endpoint of recurrence or HNC-attributable death was determined by Cox proportional hazards regression. Of 180 patients with RA and HNC, 31 were treated with TNFi and 149 with nbDMARDs after the diagnosis of HNC. Recurrence or HNC-attributable death occurred in 5/31 (16.1%) patients in the TNFi group and 44/149 (29.5%) patients in the nbDMARD group (p = 0.17); it occurred in 2/16 (13%) patients who received TNFi in the year prior to HNC diagnosis but not after. Overall stage at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and stage 4 HNC (HR 2.49 [CI 1.06–5.89]; p = 0.04) were risk factors for recurrence or HNC-attributable death; treatment with radiation or surgery was associated with a lower risk (HR 0.35 [CI 0.17–0.74]; p = 0.01 and HR 0.39 [CI 0.20–0.76]; p = 0.01 respectively). Treatment with TNFi was not a risk factor for recurrence or HNC-attributable death (HR 0.75; CI 0.31–1.85; p = 0.54). We conclude that treatment with TNFi may be safe in patients with RA and HNC, especially as the time interval between HNC treatment and non-recurrence increases. In this study, TNF inhibition was not associated with an increase in recurrence or HNC-attributable death. PMID:26599370

  8. Systematic Review of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Discontinuation Studies in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Millán, Iris; Sattui, Sebastian E.; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-tumor necrosis factor agents (anti-TNFs) have changed the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for more than a decade. Use of these medications often results in remission, or at least low disease activity (LDA), but at substantial cost. It has been postulated that discontinuation of these medications among RA patients in remission or LDA may be possible without an associated increase in RA disease activity. Objective The goal of this systematic literature review is to summarize published articles regarding discontinuation of anti-TNFs in patients with RA. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify English-language articles indexed in Pubmed from July 1999 through June 2013 reporting results regarding anti-TNF discontinuation in patients with RA. Study designs included observational longitudinal studies and clinical trials. Outcomes had to include one of the following: time to flare after anti-TNF discontinuation, failure to remain in remission, or LDA at the end of the study. Results Ten studies examined discontinuation of anti-TNF therapies in RA. Inclusion criteria varied significantly across studies in terms of disease activity status (remission or LDA) and duration of this disease status (1 year or 1 month) prior to discontinuation being attempted. Results from larger studies (e.g. > 100 patients) suggest that the proportion of patients who discontinued and did not have an increase in disease activity ranged between 24%-81%. In 2 studies that evaluated durability of LDA or remission after anti-TNF discontinuation, the mean time to relapse varied from 15 weeks to 14 months. In studies that analyzed radiographic data, once therapies were reinitiated after an increase in disease activity was detected, patients generally did not experience progression in structural damage. Conclusion Discontinuation of anti-TNF therapy is achievable for many RA patients who start in clinical remission or LDA. However, heterogeneous inclusion

  9. Regulation of human lung fibroblast glycosaminoglycan production by recombinant interferons, tumor necrosis factor, and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Elias, J A; Krol, R C; Freundlich, B; Sampson, P M

    1988-01-01

    Mononuclear cells may be important regulators of fibroblast glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis. However, the soluble factors mediating these effects, the importance of intercytokine interactions in this regulation and the mechanisms of these alterations remain poorly understood. We analyzed the effect of recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lymphotoxin (LT), and gamma, alpha, and beta 1 interferons (INF-gamma, -alpha and -beta 1), alone and in combination, on GAG production by normal human lung fibroblasts. rTNF, rLT, and rINF-gamma each stimulated fibroblast GAG production. In addition, rIFN-gamma synergized with rTNF and rLT to further augment GAG biosynthesis. In contrast, IFN-alpha A, -alpha D, and -beta 1 neither stimulated fibroblast GAG production nor interacted with rTNF or rLT to regulate GAG biosynthesis. The effects of the stimulatory cytokines and cytokine combinations were dose dependent and were abrogated by the respective monoclonal antibodies. In addition, these cytokines did not cause an alteration in the distribution of GAG between the fibroblast cell layer and supernatant. However, the stimulation was at least partially specific for particular GAG moieties with hyaluronic acid biosynthesis being markedly augmented without a comparable increase in the production of sulfated GAGs. Fibroblast prostaglandin production did not mediate these alterations since indomethacin did not decrease the stimulatory effects of the cytokines. In contrast, protein and mRNA synthesis appeared to play a role since the stimulatory effects of the cytokines were abrogated by cyclohexamide and actinomycin D, respectively. In addition, the cytokines and cytokine combinations increased cellular hyaluronate synthetase activity in proportion to their effects on hyaluronic acid suggesting that induction of this enzyme(s) is important in this stimulatory process. These studies demonstrate that IFN-gamma, TNF, and LT are important stimulators of fibroblast GAG

  10. Binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha to activated forms of human plasma alpha 2 macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg, G. K.; LaMarre, J.; Rosendal, S.; Gonias, S. L.; Hayes, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that human plasma alpha 2 macroglobulin (alpha 2M) is a latent binding glycoprotein for human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Human recombinant 125I-TNF-alpha was incubated for 2 hours (37 degrees C) with purified native alpha 2M and with alpha 2M that was modified by reaction with methylamine or various proteinases. 125I-TNF-alpha/alpha 2M complexes were detected by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after autoradiography or by liquid chromatography on Superose-6. 125I-TNF-alpha bound strongly but noncovalently to alpha 2M-plasmin and alpha 2M-methylamine. There was minimal binding of 125I-TNF-alpha to native alpha 2M, alpha 2M-trypsin, or alpha 2M-thrombin. A 10(6) molar excess of porcine heparin did not reduce the binding of 125I-TNF-alpha to alpha 2M-methylamine or alpha 2M-plasmin. alpha 2M-plasmin or alpha 2M-methylamine added to human plasma or serum preferentially bound 125I-TNF-alpha in the presence of native alpha 2M. 125I-TNF-alpha also bound to 'fast' alpha-macroglobulins in methylamine-reacted human, rat, mouse, swine, equine, and bovine plasma. However, TNF-alpha, preincubated with either alpha 2M-plasmin or alpha 2M-methylamine, remained a potent necrogen for cultured L929 cells. Purified 125I-TNF-alpha/alpha 2M-plasmin complex injected intravenously in CD-1 mice rapidly cleared from the circulation, unless the alpha 2M-receptor pathway was blocked by coinjection of excess alpha 2M-trypsin. These findings demonstrate that alpha 2M is a latent plasmin-activated binding glycoprotein for TNF-alpha and that TNF-alpha/alpha 2M-plasmin complexes can be removed from the circulation by the alpha 2M-receptor pathway. This suggests that alpha 2M may be an important regulator of the activity and distribution of TNF-alpha in vivo. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:1704186

  11. Predisposing Factors of Liver Necrosis after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization in Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Joskin, Julien Baere, Thierry de; Auperin, Anne; Tselikas, Lambros Guiu, Boris Farouil, Geoffroy; Boige, Valérie Malka, David; Leboulleux, Sophie; Ducreux, Michel; Baudin, Eric; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo investigate predictive factors for liver necrosis after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) of neuroendocrine liver metastases.MethodsA total of 164 patients receiving 374 TACE were reviewed retrospectively to analyze predictive factors of liver necrosis. We analyzed patient age and sex; metastasis number and location; percentage of liver involvement; baseline liver function test; and pretreatment imaging abnormalities such as bile duct dilatation (BDD), portal vein narrowing (PVN), and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We analyzed TACE technique such as Lipiodol or drug-eluting beads (DEB) as the drug’s vector; dose of chemotherapy; diameter of DEB; and number, frequency, and selectivity of TACE.ResultsLiver necrosis developed after 23 (6.1 %) of 374 TACE. In multivariate analysis, DEB > 300 μm in size induced more liver necrosis compared to Lipiodol (odds ratio [OR] 35.20; p < 0.0001) or with DEB < 300 μm in size (OR 19.95; p < 0.010). Pretreatment BDD (OR 119.64; p < 0.0001) and PVT (OR 9.83; p = 0.030) were predictive of liver necrosis. BDD or PVT responsible for liver necrosis were present before TACE in 59 % (13 of 22) and were induced by a previous TACE in 41 % (9 of 22) of cases.ConclusionDEB > 300 μm in size, BDD, and PVT are responsible for increased rate of liver necrosis after TACE. Careful analysis of BDD or PVT on pretreatment images as well as images taken between two courses can help avoid TACE complications.

  12. Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous Topic Granular cell tumors Next Topic Mastitis Fat necrosis and oil cysts Fat necrosis happens when ... lumpy area if it becomes bothersome. How do fat necrosis and oil cysts affect your risk for ...

  13. Keratinocyte growth factor enhances DNA plasmid tumor vaccine responses after murine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jenq, Robert R.; King, Christopher G.; Volk, Christine; Suh, David; Smith, Odette M.; Rao, Uttam K.; Yim, Nury L.; Holland, Amanda M.; Lu, Sydney X.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Diab, Adi; Alpdogan, Onder; Penack, Olaf; Na, Il-Kang; Kappel, Lucy W.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Houghton, Alan N.; Perales, Miguel-Angel

    2009-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), which is given exogenously to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) recipients, supports thymic epithelial cells and increases thymic output of naive T cells. Here, we demonstrate that this improved T-cell reconstitution leads to enhanced responses to DNA plasmid tumor vaccination. Tumor-bearing mice treated with KGF and DNA vaccination have improved long-term survival and decreased tumor burden after allo-BMT. When assayed before vaccination, KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients have increased numbers of peripheral T cells, including CD8+ T cells with vaccine-recognition potential. In response to vaccination, KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients, compared with control subjects, generate increased numbers of tumor-specific CD8+ cells, as well as increased numbers of CD8+ cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We also found unanticipated benefits to antitumor immunity with the administration of KGF. KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients have an improved ratio of T effector cells to regulatory T cells, a larger fraction of effector cells that display a central memory phenotype, and effector cells that are derived from a broader T-cell–receptor repertoire. In conclusion, our data suggest that KGF can function as a potent vaccine adjuvant after allo-BMT through its effects on posttransplantation T-cell reconstitution. PMID:19011222

  14. Tumor Necrosis Adds Prognostically Significant Information to Grade in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Study of 842 Consecutive Cases From a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Khor, Li-Yan; Dhakal, Hari P; Jia, Xuefei; Reynolds, Jordan P; McKenney, Jesse K; Rini, Brian I; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Przybycin, Christopher G

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis has been shown to be an independent predictor of adverse outcome in renal cell carcinoma. A modification of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system for renal cell carcinomas has recently been proposed, which incorporates the presence of tumor necrosis into grade. The investigators proposing this system found that necrosis added significant prognostic information to ISUP grade. We attempted to describe our experience with the effect of tumor necrosis in relationship to nuclear grade by reviewing the slides from a large consecutive series of localized clear cell renal cell carcinomas from our institution and obtaining long-term clinical follow-up information (overall survival). Of the 842 clear cell renal cell carcinomas reviewed, 265 (31.5%) were ISUP grade 1 or 2, 437 (51.9%) were ISUP grade 3, and 140 (16.6%) were ISUP grade 4. Tumor necrosis was present in 177 (21%) cases. Five hundred and forty-seven (64.9%) cases were stage pT1, 83 (9.9%) were stage pT2, 193 (22.9%) were stage pT3a, and 19 (2.3%) were pT3b or higher. Median follow-up was 73.2 months (range 0.12 to 273.6), and 310 (36.8%) patients died. On univariable analysis, there was no significant difference in outcome for tumors of ISUP grades 1 to 3. After adjustment for age, tumor stage, and tumor size, ISUP grade 4 and necrosis were significant predictors of overall survival on multivariable analysis. When the recently proposed modified grading system incorporating tumor necrosis was applied to our data, there was no significant difference in overall survival between patients with modified grade 1 tumors and those with modified grade 2 tumors (P=0.31); however, there was a statistically significant difference between patients with modified grade 1 or 2 tumors and those with modified grade 3 tumors (P=0.04),and a substantial difference in outcome between those with modified grade 3 and modified grade 4 tumors (P<0.001). When a recursive partitioning approach

  15. Development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors as a function of time and dose.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Hunter, N R; Ang, K K; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1993-07-01

    In a previous paper (Radiat. Res. 127, 308-316, 1991), we reported that a moderately radiosensitive, transplantable murine ovarian carcinoma (OCaI) displayed apoptosis after irradiation whereas a radioresistant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCaI) did not. These initial observations have been followed up in this detailed analysis of the development of apoptosis in these two tumors as a function of time and dose. Histological sections of OCaI and HCaI carcinomas were scored at various times between 0.5 and 24 h after single doses of 2.5 or 25 Gy gamma radiation for the incidence of apoptosis. The percentage of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in untreated tumors was 5% in OCaI and 0.6% in HCaI. The peak in the number of apoptotic bodies occurred in the OCaI tumors 3-5 h after either dose. After 2.5 Gy, the peak incidence was about 20% and after 25 Gy it was about 30%. Irrespective of dose, HCaI tumors had an incidence of apoptosis of less than 3%. Based on the results of this time course, 4 h after irradiation was chosen for the determination of the dose response, over doses ranging from 2.5 to 25 Gy. The dose response for the OCaI tumors reached a plateau at 25-30% apoptotic nuclei after doses of about 7.5 Gy and above. Autoradiographic analysis of histological sections from mice injected with [3H]thymidine showed that some apoptotic bodies in the OCaI tumors arose from cycling cells. These results confirm that the apoptotic mode of cell death may represent an important response in some irradiated tumors. PMID:8327664

  16. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  17. Primary polyoma virus-induced murine thymic epithelial tumors. A tumor model of thymus physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, G. P.; Kettman, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Thymic tumors were induced in C3'/Bittner mice by neonatal inoculation with polyoma virus. The objective of this study was to identify the phenotypes of the cells within the tumors and to attempt to determine the origin of the neoplastic cell population(s). At the ultrastructural level, the neoplastic cells resembled normal thymic epithelium with tonofilaments and desmosomes. Immunoperoxidase staining demonstrated the presence of cytokeratin, Iak, -beta 2-microglobulin, -asialo-GM1, the thymic cortical epithelial marker ER-TR4, and the medullary epithelial marker ER-TR5. Islands of normal cortical thymocytes supported by residual normal cortical epithelium and acid phosphatase-positive cortical macrophages were interspersed in the tumors. Residual islands of normal medullary architecture with nonspecific esterase-positive IDCs were rarely identified in tumors. Most lymphocytes in the tumors were normal immature cortical thymocytes with the phenotype Tdt+, PNA+, Thy 1.2bright, Ly-1dull, H-2Kkdull, ThB+, J11d+, and Lyt-2+L3T4+. Lymphocytes in the tumors were steroid-sensitive like normal thymocytes. The proportions of Lyt-2+L3T4- and Lyt-2-L3T4+ cells were generally larger in the tumors than in normal thymus and reflected the higher frequency of lymphocytes in the tumors capable of proliferating in vitro in response to Con A plus IL-2. The data were consistent with the hypothesis that the neoplasia originates from thymic epithelium that is interspersed with normal, developing thymic lymphocytes. Images Figure 4 p[688]-a Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 p687-a Figure 7 PMID:2552813

  18. SWIFT-MRI imaging and quantitative assessment of IONPs in murine tumors following intra-tumor and systemic delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Russell; Petryk, Alicia A.; Kastner, Elliot J.; Zhang, Jinjin; Ring, Hattie; Garwood, Michael; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Although preliminary clinical trials are ongoing, successful the use of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles (IONP) for heatbased cancer treatments will depend on advancements in: 1) nanoparticle platforms, 2) delivery of a safe and effective alternating magnetic field (AMF) to the tumor, and 3) development of non-invasive, spatially accurate IONP imaging and quantification technique. This imaging technique must be able to assess tumor and normal tissue anatomy as well as IONP levels and biodistribution. Conventional CT imaging is capable of detecting and quantifying IONPs at tissue levels above 10 mg/gram; unfortunately this level is not clinically achievable in most situations. Conventional MRI is capable of imaging IONPs at tissue levels of 0.05 mg/gm or less, however this level is considered to be below the therapeutic threshold. We present here preliminary in vivo data demonstrating the ability of a novel MRI technique, Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT), to accurately image and quantify IONPs in tumor tissue in the therapeutic concentration range (0.1-1.0 mg/gm tissue). This ultra-short, T2 MRI method provides a positive Fe contrast enhancement with a reduced signal to noise ratio. Additional IONP signal enhancement techniques such as inversion recovery spectroscopy and variable flip angle (VFA) are also being studied for potential optimization of SWIFT IONP imaging. Our study demonstrates the use of SWIFT to assess IONP levels and biodistribution, in murine flank tumors, following intra-tumoral and systemic IONP administration. ICP-MS and quantitative histological techniques are used to validate the accuracy and sensitivity of SWIFT-based IONP imaging and quantification.

  19. Berberine inhibits human tongue squamous carcinoma cancer tumor growth in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-09-01

    Our primary studies showed that berberine induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. But there is no report to show berberine inhibited SCC-4 cancer cells in vivo on a murine xenograft animal model. SCC-4 tumor cells were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, berberine (10mg/kg of body weight) and doxorubicin (4mg/kg of body weight). The tested agents were injected once per four days intraperitoneally (i.p.), with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cells inoculation. Treatment with 4mg/kg of doxorubicin or with 10mg/kg of berberine resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 10mg/kg berberine was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Our findings indicated that berbeirne inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model. Therefore, berberine may represent a tongue cancer preventive agent and can be used in clinic. PMID:19303753

  20. Necrosis avid near infrared fluorescent cyanines for imaging cell death and their use to monitor therapeutic efficacy in mouse tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bangwen; Stammes, Marieke A.; van Driel, Pieter B.A.A.; Cruz, Luis J.; Knol-Blankevoort, Vicky T.; Löwik, Martijn A.M.; Mezzanotte, Laura; Que, Ivo; Chan, Alan; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P.H.M.; Siebes, Maria; Gottschalk, Sven; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Keereweer, Stijn; Horobin, Richard W.; Hoehn, Mathias; Kaijzel, Eric L.; van Beek, Ermond R.; Snoeks, Thomas J.A.; Löwik, Clemens W.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of tumor necrosis in cancer patients is of diagnostic value as the amount of necrosis is correlated with disease prognosis and it could also be used to predict early efficacy of anti-cancer treatments. In the present study, we identified two near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) carboxylated cyanines, HQ5 and IRDye 800CW (800CW), which possess strong necrosis avidity. In vitro studies showed that both dyes selectively bind to cytoplasmic proteins of dead cells that have lost membrane integrity. Affinity for cytoplasmic proteins was confirmed using quantitative structure activity relations modeling. In vivo results, using NIRF and optoacoustic imaging, confirmed the necrosis avid properties of HQ5 and 800CW in a mouse 4T1 breast cancer tumor model of spontaneous necrosis. Finally, in a mouse EL4 lymphoma tumor model, already 24 h post chemotherapy, a significant increase in 800CW fluorescence intensity was observed in treated compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, that the NIRF carboxylated cyanines HQ5 and 800CW possess strong necrosis avid properties in vitro and in vivo. When translated to the clinic, these dyes may be used for diagnostic or prognostic purposes and for monitoring in vivo tumor response early after the start of treatment. PMID:26472022

  1. Regulation of tumor necrosis factor gene expression in colorectal adenocarcinoma: in vivo analysis by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Beissert, S; Bergholz, M; Waase, I; Lepsien, G; Schauer, A; Pfizenmaier, K; Krönke, M

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced by macrophages is thought to contribute to the host defense against development of cancer. However, since tumor cells themselves are able to produce TNF, it is conceivable that TNF may also play an adverse pathological role in carcinogenesis. To better understand the functional significance of TNF in neoplastic disease, we have determined the cellular source of TNF activity produced in 10 patients with colorectal cancer. Northern blot analysis of RNAs extracted from fresh biopsy specimens revealed detectable TNF mRNA levels in all instances. By using in situ hybridization of frozen sections, scattered cells expressing TNF mRNA could be discerned. Based on morphological criteria, these TNF-positive cells most likely belong to the macrophage lineage. Macrophages in normal tissue surrounding the tumor did not express TNF mRNA, suggesting that macrophage activation occurs locally at the site of neoplastic transformation. Immunohistochemistry using anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies revealed that less than 1% of tumor-infiltrating macrophages synthesize TNF protein. Thus we present evidence that in colorectal cancer only a small proportion of tumor-infiltrating macrophages produces TNF, indicating that the microenvironment of the tumor provides adequate, yet suboptimal, conditions for macrophage activation. Images PMID:2662193

  2. Primary Tumor Necrosis Predicts Distant Control in Locally Advanced Soft-Tissue Sarcomas After Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    MacDermed, Dhara M.; Miller, Luke L.; Peabody, Terrance D.; Simon, Michael A.; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Montag, Anthony G.; Undevia, Samir D.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Various neoadjuvant approaches have been evaluated for the treatment of locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas. This retrospective study describes a uniquely modified version of the Eilber regimen developed at the University of Chicago. Methods and Materials: We treated 34 patients (28 Stage III and 6 Stage IV) with locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas of an extremity between 1995 and 2008. All patients received preoperative therapy including ifosfamide (2.5 g/m2 per day for 5 days) with concurrent radiation (28 Gy in 3.5-Gy daily fractions), sandwiched between various chemotherapy regimens. Postoperatively, 47% received further adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Most tumors (94%) were Grade 3, and all were T2b, with a median size of 10.3 cm. Wide excision was performed in 29 patients (85%), and 5 required amputation. Of the resected tumor specimens, 50% exhibited high (>=90%) treatment-induced necrosis and 11.8% had a complete pathologic response. Surgical margins were negative in all patients. The 5-year survival rate was 42.3% for all patients and 45.2% for Stage III patients. For limb-preservation patients, the 5-year local control rate was 89.0% and reoperation was required for wound complications in 17.2%. The 5-year freedom-from-distant metastasis rate was 53.4% (Stage IV patients excluded), and freedom from distant metastasis was superior if treatment-induced tumor necrosis was 90% or greater (84.6% vs. 19.9%, p = 0.02). Conclusions: This well-tolerated concurrent chemoradiotherapy approach yields excellent rates of limb preservation and local control. The resulting treatment-induced necrosis rates are predictive of subsequent metastatic risk, and this information may provide an opportunity to guide postoperative systemic therapies.

  3. The first scintigraphic detection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Bernateck, Michael; Karst, Matthias; Gratz, Klaus F; Meyer, Geerd J; Fischer, Michael J; Knapp, Wolfram H; Koppert, Wolfgang; Brunkhorst, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha has been identified as a pathogenic factor in many immunologically based diseases and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In this case series, we used radiolabeled technetium anti-TNF-alpha antibody to scintigraphically image TNF-alpha in 3 patients with type 1 CRPS. The results show that TNF-alpha was localized only in affected hands of patients with early-stage CRPS. No uptake was seen in clinically unaffected hands and late-stage CRPS. Our findings support the growing evidence for neuroimmune disturbance in patients with CRPS and may have important further implications for specific anticytokine treatment in patients with CRPS. PMID:19910617

  4. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS AND DNA ADDUCTS OF 3-METHYLCHOLANTHRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Strain-dependent susceptibility to transplacentally-induced murine lung tumors and DNA adducts of 3methylcholanthrene G B Nelson, J A Ross, J E Moore, M Xu, N D Kock, M S Miller Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    It has been de...

  5. In vivo measurement of epidermal thickness changes associated with tumor promotion in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Gladish, James C.; Thuillier, Philippe; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of tissue morphology in murine models of pathogenesis has traditionally been carried out by excision of affected tissues with subsequent immunohistological examination. Excision-based histology provides a limited two-dimensional presentation of tissue morphology at the cost of halting disease progression at a single time point and sacrifice of the animal. We investigate the use of noninvasive reflectance mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) as an alternative tool to biopsy in documenting epidermal hyperplasia in murine models exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An automated technique utilizing average axial rCSLM reflectance profiles is used to extract epidermal thickness values from rCSLM data cubes. In comparisons to epidermal thicknesses determined from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, we find no significant correlation to rCSLM-derived thickness values. This results from method-specific artifacts: physical alterations of tissue during H&E preparation in standard histology and specimen-induced abberations in rCSLM imaging. Despite their disagreement, both histology and rCSLM methods reliably measure statistically significant thickness changes in response to TPA exposure. Our results demonstrate that in vivo rCSLM imaging provides epithelial biologists an accurate noninvasive means to monitor cutaneous pathogenesis. PMID:20799792

  6. Treatment of murine tumors using dual-frequency ultrasound in an experimental in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Barati, Amir H; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Mozdarani, Hossein; Bathaie, S Zahra; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic inertia cavitation is the primary mechanism underlying sonochemical reactions and has potential for use in tumor treatment. In in vitro experiments that were performed previously and are thus not included in this paper, we found that the ultrasonically-induced chemical reactions are greatly accelerated when ultrasound is simultaneously applied at frequencies of 1 MHz and 150 kHz.. In this study, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of the simultaneous dual-frequency ultrasound at low level intensity (I(SPTA) <6 W/cm(2)) was investigated in a murine model of breast adenocarcinoma in Balb/c mice. The tumor-bearing mice were divided into five groups: those treated with combined dual-frequency ultrasound in continuous mode (1 MHz(con)+150 kH(zcon)) for 30 and 15 min (C and D), those treated with dual-frequency ultrasound in which the source of 1 MHz was in pulse mode (duty cycle of 80%) and that of 150 kHz was in continuous mode for 30 min (E), and untreated control and sham groups (A and B). The tumor growth parameters evaluated to assess delay include tumor volume, relative tumor volume, and T(5) and T(2), which are the time needed for each tumor to reach 5 and 2 times its initial volume, respectively. The survival period and percent of tumor growth inhibition ratio and were measured at various times after treatment. The results show that treatment with a combined continuous mode of 1 MHz(con)+150 kHz(con) and a pulse mode of 1 MHz(pl,80%)+150 kHz(con) effectively delayed tumor growth and increased the tumor growth inhibitory ratio compared to the sham group. When the tumor volume growth and relative volume of tumors in treated groups C, D and E were examined, an anti-tumor effect was observed in groups E and C. There is a significant difference between groups E and C and the sham group 12 d after treatment for tumor volume growth and 18 d after treatment for relative tumor volume (p < 0.05). The mean survival periods for animals in groups C and E were 16% and 17

  7. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with variably sized polyethylene glycol in murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Thomas; Wittenborn, Thomas; Rydtoft, Louise Munk; Lokanathan, Arcot R; Hansen, Line; Østergaard, Leif; Kingshott, Peter; Howard, Kenneth A; Besenbacher, Flemming; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have found widespread applications in different areas including cell separation, drug delivery and as contrast agents. Due to water insolubility and stability issues, nanoparticles utilized for biological applications require coatings such as the commonly employed polyethylene glycol (PEG). Despite its frequent use, the influence of PEG coatings on the physicochemical and biological properties of iron nanoparticles has hitherto not been studied in detail. To address this, we studied the effect of 333-20,000 Da PEG coatings that resulted in larger hydrodynamic size, lower surface charge, longer circulation half-life, and lower uptake in macrophage cells when the particles were coated with high molecular weight (M(w)) PEG molecules. By use of magnetic resonance imaging, we show coating-dependent in vivo uptake in murine tumors with an optimal coating M(w) of 10,000 Da. PMID:22395568

  8. Interferon-γ and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Polarize Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Uniformly to a Th1 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ping; Zhao, Yuanlong; Liu, Hui; Chen, Jinguo; Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Jianjian; Bedognetti, Davide; Liu, Shutong; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David

    2016-01-01

    Activated T cells polarize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype which likely has an important role in amplifying the immune response in the tumor microenvironment. We investigated the role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), two factors produced by activated T cells, in MSC polarization. Gene expression and culture supernatant analysis showed that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulated MSCs expressed distinct sets of proinflammatory factors. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α was synergistic and induced a transcriptome most similar to that found in MSCs stimulated with activated T cells and similar to that found in the inflamed tumor microenvironment; a Th1 phenotype with the expression of the immunosuppressive factors IL-4, IL-10, CD274/PD-L1 and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Single cell qRT-PCR analysis showed that the combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α polarized uniformly to this phenotype. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α results in the synergist uniform polarization of MSCs toward a primarily Th1 phenotype. The stimulation of MSCs by IFN-γ and TNF-α released from activated tumor infiltrating T cells is likely responsible for the production of many factors that characterize the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27211104

  9. Re-expression of CXCL14, a common target for epigenetic silencing in lung cancer, induces tumor necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Mathewos; Klinge, Donna M.; Yingling, Christin M.; Do, Kieu; Van Neste, Leander; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines are important regulators of directional cell migration and tumor metastasis. A genome-wide transcriptome array designed to uncover novel genes silenced by methylation in lung cancer identified the CXC-subfamily of chemokines. Expression of eleven of the sixteen known human CXC-chemokines was increased in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines after treatment with 5-aza-2deoxycytidine (DAC). Tumor-specific methylation leading to silencing of CXCL5, 12 and 14 was found in over 75% of primary lung adenocarcinomas and DAC treatment restored expression of each silenced gene. Forced expression of CXCL14 in H23 cells where this gene is silenced by methylation increased cell death in vitro and dramatically reduced in vivo growth of lung tumor xenografts through necrosis of up to 90% of the tumor mass. CXCL14 re-expression had a profound effect on the genome altering the transcription of over 1,000 genes, including increased expression of 30 cell cycle inhibitor and pro-apoptosis genes. In addition, CXCL14 methylation in sputum from asymptomatic early stage lung cancer cases was associated with a 2.9-fold elevated risk for this disease compared to controls, substantiating its potential as a biomarker for early detection of lung cancer. Together these findings identify CXCL14 as an important tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced during lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20562917

  10. Interferon-γ and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Polarize Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Uniformly to a Th1 Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ping; Zhao, Yuanlong; Liu, Hui; Chen, Jinguo; Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Jianjian; Bedognetti, Davide; Liu, Shutong; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David

    2016-01-01

    Activated T cells polarize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype which likely has an important role in amplifying the immune response in the tumor microenvironment. We investigated the role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), two factors produced by activated T cells, in MSC polarization. Gene expression and culture supernatant analysis showed that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulated MSCs expressed distinct sets of proinflammatory factors. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α was synergistic and induced a transcriptome most similar to that found in MSCs stimulated with activated T cells and similar to that found in the inflamed tumor microenvironment; a Th1 phenotype with the expression of the immunosuppressive factors IL-4, IL-10, CD274/PD-L1 and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Single cell qRT-PCR analysis showed that the combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α polarized uniformly to this phenotype. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α results in the synergist uniform polarization of MSCs toward a primarily Th1 phenotype. The stimulation of MSCs by IFN-γ and TNF-α released from activated tumor infiltrating T cells is likely responsible for the production of many factors that characterize the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27211104

  11. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 2. Induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) on human leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulesu, L.; Luzzi, E.; Bocci, V. )

    1991-10-01

    The effect of ozone as a probable inducer of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) has been investigated on human blood and on Ficoll-purified blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Samples were exposed at different ozone concentrations ranging from 2.2 to 108 micrograms/ml and incubated at 37 degrees C in an 95% air-5% CO2 atmosphere. At predetermined times, all cell supernatants were tested for TNF activity and some PBMC cultures were examined for DNA synthesis. The authors have shown that ozone concentration is critical in terms of TNF production and of cell mitogenesis and that, owing to the presence of erythrocytes, higher ozone concentrations are required to be effective in blood than in PBMC. Because ozonization of blood is a procedure followed in several European countries for the treatment of viral diseases and tumors, the release of factors with antiviral and immunomodulatory activities by leukocytes may explain the mechanism of action of ozone and of autohemotherapy.

  12. Automated segmentation of murine lung tumors in x-ray micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swee, Joshua K. Y.; Sheridan, Clare; de Bruin, Elza; Downward, Julian; Lassailly, Francois; Pizarro, Luis

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen micro-CT emerge as a means of providing imaging analysis in pre-clinical study, with in-vivo micro-CT having been shown to be particularly applicable to the examination of murine lung tumors. Despite this, existing studies have involved substantial human intervention during the image analysis process, with the use of fully-automated aids found to be almost non-existent. We present a new approach to automate the segmentation of murine lung tumors designed specifically for in-vivo micro-CT-based pre-clinical lung cancer studies that addresses the specific requirements of such study, as well as the limitations human-centric segmentation approaches experience when applied to such micro-CT data. Our approach consists of three distinct stages, and begins by utilizing edge enhancing and vessel enhancing non-linear anisotropic diffusion filters to extract anatomy masks (lung/vessel structure) in a pre-processing stage. Initial candidate detection is then performed through ROI reduction utilizing obtained masks and a two-step automated segmentation approach that aims to extract all disconnected objects within the ROI, and consists of Otsu thresholding, mathematical morphology and marker-driven watershed. False positive reduction is finally performed on initial candidates through random-forest-driven classification using the shape, intensity, and spatial features of candidates. We provide validation of our approach using data from an associated lung cancer study, showing favorable results both in terms of detection (sensitivity=86%, specificity=89%) and structural recovery (Dice Similarity=0.88) when compared against manual specialist annotation.

  13. Silencing of Foxp3 delays the growth of murine melanomas and modifies the tumor immunosuppressive environment

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Molina, Moisés A; Miranda-Hernández, Diana F; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Coronado-Cerda, Erika E; Sierra-Rivera, Crystel A; Saavedra-Alonso, Santiago; Taméz-Guerra, Reyes S; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression was believed to be specific for T-regulatory cells but has recently been described in non-hematopoietic cells from different tissue origins and in tumor cells from both epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Foxp3 in murine melanoma. The B16F10 cell line Foxp3 silenced with small interference Foxp3 plasmid transfection was established and named B16F10.1. These cells had lower levels of Foxp3 mRNA (quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [0.235-fold]), protein (flow cytometry [0.02%]), CD25+ expression (0.06%), cellular proliferation (trypan blue staining), and interleukin (IL)-2 production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [72.35 pg/mL]) than those in B16F10 wild-type (WT) cells (P<0.05). Subcutaneous inoculation of the B16F10.1 cell line into C57BL/6 mice delayed the time of visible tumor appearance, increased the time of survival, and affected the weight of tumors, and also decreased the production of IL-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor beta compared with mice inoculated with the B16F10 WT cell line. The B16F10.1 cells derived from tumors and free of T-cells (isolated by Dynabeads and plastic attachment) expressed relatively lower levels of Foxp3 and CD25+ than B16F10 WT cells (P<0.05) in a time-dependent manner. The population of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of T CD4+ cells (CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) increased in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05) in tumors derived from B16F10 WT cells and decreased in tumors derived from B16F10.1 cells. Similar data were obtained from spleen cells. These results suggest that, in melanomas, Foxp3 partly induces tumor growth by modifying the immune system at the local and peripheral level, shifting the environment toward an immunosuppressive profile. Therapies incorporating this transcription factor could be strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:26834483

  14. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  15. Cloning of the murine counterpart of the tumor-associated antigen H-L6: Epitope mapping of the human and murine L6 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.P.; Farr, A.G.; Marken, J.S. |

    1995-10-03

    The murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) L6 was raised against human lung carcinoma cells and found to recognize an antigen which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas. Promising results in phase 1 clinical studies with this antibody or its chimerized counterpart suggest the antigen recognized by mAb L6 (H-L6) is an attractive target for monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy. Further development of L6 as an anti-tumor-targeting agent would benefit from the development of a murine model. However, initial attempts to develop such a model were hampered by our inability to generate antibodies against the murine homologue of the L6 antigen, M-L6. Here we describe the preparation of the mAb 12A8, which was raised against murine thymic epithelial cells, the tissue distribution of the murine antigen recognized by 12A8, the cloning of a cDNA encoding the 12A8 target antigen, and the demonstration that this antigen is M-L6. Using H-L6/M-L6 chimeric proteins, we show that the region of the M-L6 protein recognized by mAb 12A8 corresponds to the region of H-L6 recognized by mAb L6. There are five amino acid differences in the regions of the H-L6 and M-L6 proteins recognized by L6 and 12A8, respectively. We further mapped the protein epitope recognized by L6 by individually exchanging each of these residues in H-L6 with the corresponding residue found in M-L6. Substitution of the single H-L6 residue Leu122 with Ser resulted in the H-L6 mutant HL6-L122S which failed to bind L6. The HL6-L122S mutant also failed to bind 12A8. Substituting residue Ser122 in M-L6 with Leu did not prevent 12A8 binding and did not result in L6 binding. The availability of mAb 12A8 and the finding that it recognizes the same region of M-L6 that is recognized by L6 on H-L6 might allow the development of a murine tumor model in which the L6 antigen can be further evaluated as a therapeutic target. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Characterization of lymphoid tumors induced by a recombinant murine retrovirus carrying the avian v-myc oncogene. Identification of novel (B-lymphoid) tumors in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Brightman, B K; Chandy, K G; Spencer, R H; Gupta, S; Pattengale, P K; Fan, H

    1988-10-15

    Lymphoid tumors induced by a recombinant murine retrovirus carrying the v-myc oncogene of avian MC29 virus were characterized. The Moloney murine leukemia virus myc oncogene (M-MuLV (myc], carried by an amphotropic MuLV helper, induced tumors in NIH Swiss and NFS/N mice after a relatively long latency (8 to 24 wk). Tumor masses appeared in the thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes. Flow cytometry of the tumor cells indicated that approximately 50% were positive for Thy 1.2. Most of these tumors also expressed one or more other cell surface markers of thymocytes and mature T cells (CD4, CD8). Southern blot hybridization revealed genomic rearrangements for the TCR beta genes. The TCR beta analysis suggested that the M-MuLV(myc)-induced Thy 1.2+ tumors were derived from somewhat less mature cells than tumors induced by M-MuLV, which is a classical non-acute retrovirus lacking an oncogene. The remainder of the M-MuLV(myc)-induced tumors were Thy 1.2-, but they were positive for Ly-5 (B220) and also for MAC-2. The Thy 1.2- tumors were characteristically located in the thymus. However, they were negative for TCR beta gene rearrangements. Some, but not all, of the Thy 1.2- tumors contained rearrangements for Ig genes. Additionally, they typically expressed mRNA specific for B but not for T cells. Thus, these thymic tumors had characteristics of the B cell lineage. Tumor transplantation experiments demonstrated that the Thy 1.2- tumor cells could reestablish in the thymus and spleen of irradiated hosts, and low level expression of the Thy 1 molecule was observed in the thymus but not the spleen on the first passage. After serial passage, one Thy 1- tumor altered its cell surface phenotype to Thy 1low B220-. PMID:2902139

  17. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Valentina E; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, J T; Rudin, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors. PMID:27611664

  18. Rat sequences of the Kirsten and Harvey murine sarcoma virus genomes: nature, origin, and expression in rat tumor RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G R; Robbins, K C

    1976-01-01

    Two murine sarcoma viruses, the Kirsten and the Harvey, were isolated by passage of mouse type C leukemia viruses through rats. These sarcoma viruses have genomes containing portions of their parental type C mouse leukemia virus genomes, in stable association with specific rat cellular sequences that we find to be quite likely not those of a rat type C leukemia virus. To determine if these murine sarcoma viruses provide a model relevant to the events occurring in spontaneous tumors, we have hybridized DNA and RNA prepared from rat tumors and normal rat tissues to [3H]DNA prepared from the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. We have also hybridized these rat tissue nucleic acids to [3H]DNA prepared from a respresentative endogenous rat type C leukemia virus, the WFU (Wistar-Furth). Sarcoma-viral rat cellular sequences and endogenous rat leukemia viral sequences were detected in the DNA of both tumor and normal tissues, with no evidence of either gene amplification or additional sequences being present in tumor DNA. Sarcoma-viral rat cellular sequences and endogenous rat leukemia viral sequences were detected at elevated concentrations in the RNA of many rat tumors and in specific groups of normal tissues. PMID:176419

  19. Identification of the galactose-adherence lectin epitopes of Entamoeba histolytica that stimulate tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Séguin, R; Mann, B J; Keller, K; Chadee, K

    1995-01-01

    The 170-kDa subunit of the galactose-adherence lectin (Gal-lectin) of Entamoeba histolytica mediates adherence to human colonic mucins and intestinal epithelium as a prerequisite to amebic invasion. The Gal-lectin is an immunodominant molecule and a protective antigen in the gerbil model of amebiasis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) produced by activated macrophages enhances nitric oxide-dependent cytotoxicity in host defense against E. histolytica. The purpose of this study was to identify the Gal-lectin epitopes which stimulate TNF-alpha production by macrophages. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) exposed to Gal-lectin (100-500 ng/ml) stimulated stable expression of TNF-alpha mRNA (8-fold increase) and TNF-alpha production similar to that of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cells (100 ng/ml). Polyclonal anti-lectin serum specifically inhibited TNF-alpha mRNA induction in response to the Gal-lectin but not to lipopolysaccharide. Anti-lectin monoclonal antibodies 8C12, H85 and 1G7, which recognize nonoverlapping epitopes of the cysteine-rich region of the 170-kDa heavy subunit, inhibited both amebic adherence to mammalian cells and Gal-lectin-stimulated TNF-alpha mRNA expression by BMMs,but monoclonal antibody 7F4 did neither. As these inhibitory antibodies map to amino acids 596-1082 of the 170-kDa Gal-lectin, our results have identified the functional region that mediates amebic adherence and TNF-alpha mRNA induction in BMMMs; thus, this region of the Gal-lectin is a subunit vaccine candidate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8618866

  20. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding proteins by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Char, D; Bagby, G J; Gelato, M C; Lang, C H

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine 1) whether exogenous administration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) alters insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding proteins (BPs) and 2) whether the enhanced endogenous production of TNF mediates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in the IGF system. The overnight infusion of murine TNF-alpha reduced circulating concentrations of both growth hormone (GH) and IGF-I in fasted rats. Furthermore, TNF-alpha decreased IGF-I content in liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and pituitary. In contrast, TNF-alpha increased IGF-I content in kidney and brain. IGFBP-1 was increased in plasma, liver, and muscle in response to TNF-alpha. In a second study, rats were injected with LPS after treatment with a neutralizing anti-TNF antibody (Ab), and blood and tissues were collected 4 h later. In LPS-treated rats, plasma concentrations of GH and IGF-I were reduced. LPS also decreased the IGF-I content in liver and skeletal muscle and increased plasma, liver, and muscle concentrations of IGFBP-1. Pretreatment with anti-TNF Ab attenuated the LPS-induced reduction in IGF-I and the increased IGFBP-1 in plasma and liver and completely prevented the decrease in IGF-I observed in muscle. In contrast, the LPS-induced decrease in plasma GH and the increased IGFBP-1 observed in muscle were unaltered by the anti-TNF Ab.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7503312

  1. Rap1 GTPase Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Choroidal Endothelial Migration via NADPH Oxidase- and NF-κB-Dependent Activation of Rac1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Fotheringham, Lori; Wittchen, Erika S; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Macrophage-derived tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been found in choroidal neovascularization (CNV) surgically removed from patients with age-related macular degeneration. However, the role of TNF-α in CNV development remains unclear. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, compared with un-lasered controls, TNF-α mRNA was increased in retinal pigment epithelial and choroidal tissue, and TNF-α colocalized with lectin-stained migrating choroidal endothelial cells (CECs). Inhibition of TNF-α with a neutralizing antibody reduced CNV volume and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level around CNV. In CECs, pretreatment with the antioxidant apocynin or knockdown of p22phox, a subunit of NADPH oxidase, inhibited TNF-α-induced ROS generation. Apocynin reduced TNF-α-induced NF-κB and Rac1 activation, and inhibited TNF-α-induced CEC migration. TNF-α-induced Rac1 activation and CEC migration were inhibited by NF-κB inhibitor Bay11-7082. Overexpression of Rap1a prevented TNF-α-induced ROS generation and reduced NF-κB and Rac1 activation. Activation of Rap1 by 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine-2'-O-Me-cAMP prevented TNF-α-induced CEC migration and reduced laser-induced CNV volume, ROS generation, and activation of NF-κB and Rac1. These findings provide evidence that active Rap1a inhibits TNF-α-induced CEC migration by inhibiting NADPH oxidase-dependent NF-κB and Rac1 activation and suggests that Rap1a de-escalates CNV development by interfering with ROS-dependent signaling in several steps of the pathogenic process. PMID:26476350

  2. Inhibition of Rho-Associated Kinase 1/2 Attenuates Tumor Growth in Murine Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hinsenkamp, Isabel; Schulz, Sandra; Roscher, Mareike; Suhr, Anne-Maria; Meyer, Björn; Munteanu, Bogdan; Fuchser, Jens; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Ebert, Matthias P A; Wängler, Björn; Hopf, Carsten; Burgermeister, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a malignant disease with high mortality. Patients are frequently diagnosed in advanced stages where survival prognosis is poor. Thus, there is high medical need to find novel drug targets and treatment strategies. Recently, the comprehensive molecular characterization of GC subtypes revealed mutations in the small GTPase RHOA as a hallmark of diffuse-type GC. RHOA activates RHO-associated protein kinases (ROCK1/2) which regulate cell contractility, migration and growth and thus may play a role in cancer. However, therapeutic benefit of RHO-pathway inhibition in GC has not been shown so far. The ROCK1/2 inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-homopiperazine (HA-1077, fasudil) is approved for cerebrovascular bleeding in patients. We therefore investigated whether fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg per day, 4 times per week, 4 weeks) inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical model of GC. Fasudil evoked cell death in human GC cells and reduced the tumor size in the stomach of CEA424-SV40 TAg transgenic mice. Small animal PET/CT confirmed preclinical efficacy. Mass spectrometry imaging identified a translatable biomarker for mouse GC and suggested rapid but incomplete in situ distribution of the drug to gastric tumor tissue. RHOA expression was increased in the neoplastic murine stomach compared with normal non-malignant gastric tissue, and fasudil reduced (auto) phosphorylation of ROCK2 at THR249 in vivo and in human GC cells in vitro. In sum, our data suggest that RHO-pathway inhibition may constitute a novel strategy for treatment of GC and that enhanced distribution of future ROCK inhibitors into tumor tissue may further improve efficacy. PMID:27566106

  3. Exercise modulation of the host-tumor interaction in an orthotopic model of murine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Antonelli, Jodi; Masko, Elizabeth M; Broadwater, Gloria; Lascola, Christopher D; Fels, Diane; Dewhirst, Mark W; Dyck, Jason R B; Nagendran, Jeevan; Flores, Catherine T; Betof, Allison S; Nelson, Erik R; Pollak, Michael; Dash, Rajesh C; Young, Martin E; Freedland, Stephen J

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of exercise on cancer progression, metastasis, and underlying mechanisms in an orthotopic model of murine prostate cancer. C57BL/6 male mice (6-8 wk of age) were orthotopically injected with transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate C-1 cells (5 × 10(5)) and randomly assigned to exercise (n = 28) or a non-intervention control (n = 31) groups. The exercise group was given voluntary access to a wheel 24 h/day for the duration of the study. Four mice per group were serially killed on days 14, 31, and 36; the remaining 38 mice (exercise, n = 18; control, n = 20) were killed on day 53. Before death, MRI was performed to assess tumor blood perfusion. Primary tumor growth rate was comparable between groups, but expression of prometastatic genes was significantly modulated in exercising animals with a shift toward reduced metastasis. Exercise was associated with increased activity of protein kinases within the MEK/MAPK and PI3K/mTOR signaling cascades with subsequent increased intratumoral protein levels of HIF-1α and VEGF. This was associated with improved tumor vascularization. Multiplex ELISAs revealed distinct reductions in plasma concentrations of several angiogenic cytokines in the exercise group, which was associated with increased expression of angiogenic and metabolic genes in the skeletal muscle. Exercise-induced stabilization of HIF-1α and subsequent upregulation of VEGF was associated with "productive" tumor vascularization with a shift toward suppressed metastasis in an orthotopic model of prostate cancer. PMID:22604887

  4. Pretreatment serum interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels predict the progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Hung; Pan, Yi-Ping; Fan, Chung-Wei; Tseng, Wen-Ko; Huang, Jen-Seng; Wu, Tsung-Han; Chou, Wen-Chi; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Yeh, Kun-Yun

    2016-03-01

    The correlations of pretreatment serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) with the clinicopathologic features and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) were investigated. The pretreatment serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα were measured in 164 CRC patients before treatment. The relationships between changes in proinflammatory cytokine and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and both clinicopathologic variables and disease progression were examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Advanced tumor stage was associated with a poorer histologic differentiation, higher CRP level, lower albumin level, and inferior progression-free survival rate (PFSR). Furthermore, high levels of CRP (>5 mg/L) were associated with proinflammatory cytokine intensity, defined according to the number of proinflammatory cytokines with levels above the median level (IL-1β ≥10 pg/mL; IL-6 ≥ 10 pg/mL; and TNFα ≥55 pg/mL). Under different inflammation states, proinflammatory cytokine intensity, in addition to tumor stage, independently predicted PFSR in patients with CRP <5 mg/L, whereas tumor stage was the only independent predictor of PFSR in patients with CRP ≥5 mg/L. Proinflammatory cytokine intensity and the CRP level are clinically relevant for CRC progression. Measurement of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα serum levels may help identify early cancer progression among patients with CRP <5 mg/L in routine practice. PMID:26799163

  5. Glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein co-stimulation facilitates tumor regression by inducing IL-9-producing helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Kyu; Kim, Byung-Seok; Koh, Choong-Hyun; Seok, Jae-Won; Park, Jun-Seok; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Bae, Eun-Ah; Lee, Ga-Eun; Jeon, Hyewon; Cho, Jaebeom; Jung, Yujin; Han, Daehee; Kwon, Byoung S; Lee, Ho-Young; Chung, Yeonseok; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2015-09-01

    T cell stimulation via glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-related protein (GITR) elicits antitumor activity in various tumor models; however, the underlying mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we demonstrate a crucial role for interleukin (IL)-9 in antitumor immunity generated by the GITR agonistic antibody DTA-1. IL-4 receptor knockout (Il4ra(-/-)) mice, which have reduced expression of IL-9, were resistant to tumor growth inhibition by DTA-1. Notably, neutralization of IL-9 considerably impaired tumor rejection induced by DTA-1. In particular, DTA-1-induced IL-9 promoted tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses by enhancing the function of dendritic cells in vivo. Furthermore, GITR signaling enhanced the differentiation of IL-9-producing CD4(+) T-helper (TH9) cells in a TNFR-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)- and NF-κB-dependent manner and inhibited the generation of induced regulatory T cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate that GITR co-stimulation mediates antitumor immunity by promoting TH9 cell differentiation and enhancing CTL responses and thus provide a mechanism of action for GITR agonist-mediated cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26280119

  6. Tumor necrosis treatment of ME-180 human cervical carcinoma model with sup 131 I-labeled TNT-1 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.M.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1989-08-15

    In contrast to normal tissues, many malignant tumors contain a high proportion of dead and dying cells. The loss of membrane integrity that accompanies cellular degeneration permits macromolecules, including antibodies, to freely enter the cell cytoplasm. Based upon these observations, it was hypothesized that monoclonal antibodies to intracellular antigens, which are integral structural components and are retained by degenerating cells, may be used to target a wide range of human malignancies. Previous studies by our laboratory utilizing these principles have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging four different histological types of human cancer in a nude mouse model, using monoclonal antibodies directed against insoluble intranuclear antigens. The present study describes the application of this approach, designated tumor necrosis treatment, for the radioimmunotherapy of transplantable ME-180 human cervical carcinomas in the nude mouse. Groups of tumor-bearing nude mice received three weekly treatments of 150 or 300 microCi of 131I-labeled experimental (TNT-1) or control (Lym-1) monoclonal antibodies. Detailed biodistribution data, dosimetric evaluations, and therapeutic results are presented to demonstrate the effective and preferential targeting of 131I-labeled TNT-1 monoclonal antibody within the tumor. In the experimental groups, the dose delivered to the tumor was sufficient to induce clinical regressions in 88% of treated animals, without evidence of toxicity to normal tissues. Complete regressions were obtained in 25% of the mice treated with high dose TNT-1. Microscopic examination of the implantation sites of these mice demonstrated the presence of acute radiation damage and residual keratin-positive tumor cells showing marked evidence of degeneration.

  7. Marine Drugs Regulating Apoptosis Induced by Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Elmallah, Mohammed I. Y.; Micheau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine biomass diversity is a tremendous source of potential anticancer compounds. Several natural marine products have been described to restore tumor cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell death. TRAIL is involved during tumor immune surveillance. Its selectivity for cancer cells has attracted much attention in oncology. This review aims at discussing the main mechanisms by which TRAIL signaling is regulated and presenting how marine bioactive compounds have been found, so far, to overcome TRAIL resistance in tumor cells. PMID:26580630

  8. Gene Electrotransfer of Plasmid with Tissue Specific Promoter Encoding shRNA against Endoglin Exerts Antitumor Efficacy against Murine TS/A Tumors by Vascular Targeted Effects

    PubMed Central

    Stimac, Monika; Dolinsek, Tanja; Lampreht, Ursa; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Vascular targeted therapies, targeting specific endothelial cell markers, are promising approaches for the treatment of cancer. One of the targets is endoglin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) co-receptor, which mediates proliferation, differentiation and migration of endothelial cells forming neovasculature. However, its specific, safe and long-lasting targeting remains the challenge. Therefore, in our study we evaluated the transfection efficacy, vascular targeted effects and therapeutic potential of the plasmid silencing endoglin with the tissue specific promoter, specific for endothelial cells marker endothelin-1 (ET) (TS plasmid), in comparison to the plasmid with constitutive promoter (CON plasmid), in vitro and in vivo. Tissue specificity of TS plasmid was demonstrated in vitro on several cell lines, and its antiangiogenic efficacy was demonstrated by reducing tube formation of 2H11 endothelial cells. In vivo, on a murine mammary TS/A tumor model, we demonstrated good antitumor effect of gene electrotransfer (GET) of either of both plasmids in treatment of smaller tumors still in avascular phase of growth, as well as on bigger tumors, already well vascularized. In support to the observations on predominantly vascular targeted effects of endoglin, histological analysis has demonstrated an increase in necrosis and a decrease in the number of blood vessels in therapeutic groups. A significant antitumor effect was observed in tumors in avascular and vascular phase of growth, possibly due to both, the antiangiogenic and the vascular disrupting effect. Furthermore, the study indicates on the potential use of TS plasmid in cancer gene therapy since the same efficacy as of CON plasmid was determined. PMID:25909447

  9. Chronic Tumor Necrosis Factor Alters T Cell Responses by Attenuating T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Andrew P.; Liblau, Roland S.; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Congia, Mauro; Laudanna, Carlo; Schreiber, Robert D.; Probert, Lesley; Kollias, George; McDevitt, Hugh O.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated injections of adult mice with recombinant murine TNF prolong the survival of NZB/W F1 mice, and suppress type I insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. To determine whether repeated TNF injections suppress T cell function in adult mice, we studied the responses of influenza hemagglutinin-specific T cells derived from T cell receptor (HNT-TCR) transgenic mice. Treatment of adult mice with murine TNF for 3 wk suppressed a broad range of T cell responses, including proliferation and cytokine production. Furthermore, T cell responses of HNT-TCR transgenic mice also expressing the human TNF-globin transgene were markedly reduced compared to HNT-TCR single transgenic littermates, indicating that sustained p55 TNF-R signaling is sufficient to suppress T cell function in vivo. Using a model of chronic TNF exposure in vitro, we demonstrate that (a) chronic TNF effects are dose and time dependent, (b) TNF suppresses the responses of both Th1 and Th2 T helper subsets, (c) the suppressive effects of endogenous TNF produced in T cell cultures could be reversed with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to TNF, and (d) prolonged TNF exposure attenuates T cell receptor signaling. The finding that anti-TNF treatment in vivo enhances T cell proliferative responses and cytokine production provides evidence for a novel regulatory effect of TNF on T cells in healthy laboratory mice. These effects are more pronounced in chronic inflammatory disease. In addition, our data provide a mechanism through which prolonged TNF exposure suppresses disease in animal models of autoimmunity. PMID:9151895

  10. Glioma-secreted soluble factors stimulate microglial activation: The role of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Jung, Eun-Hye; Kwon, Mi-Youn; Han, Inn-Oc

    2016-09-15

    We aimed to elucidate the effect of soluble factors secreted by glioma on microglial activation. Conditioned medium (CM) from glioma cells, CRT-MG and C6, significantly induced nitric oxide (NO) production and stimulated the mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in BV2 cells. Glioma CM stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, and a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, suppressed CM-induced NO production in BV2 cells. In addition, CM stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) DNA binding and transcriptional activity, which was repressed by SB203580. Gliomas displayed higher mRNA expression and release of TNF-α and IL-1β than primary astrocyte cells. Neutralization of TNF-α and IL-1β in C6-CM using a neutralizing antibody inhibited NO/iNOS expression in BV-2 cells. These results indicate potential contribution of diffusible tumor-derived factors to regulate microglial activation and subsequent tumor microenvironment. PMID:27609291

  11. Combined effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha and radiation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma grown as radia spheroids.

    PubMed

    Van Moorselaar, R J; Schwachöfer, J H; Crooijmans, R P; Van Stratum, P; Debruyne, F M; Schalken, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the antiproliferative effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF) and radiation on a recently described rat renal cell tumor line grown as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS). Treatment commenced when the spheroids had reached a diameter of 250 microns. TNF was diluted in the tissue culture medium in different concentrations, ranging from 250-1000 ng/ml. TNF monotherapy had a dose-dependent inhibiting effect on spheroid growth. Single-dose irradiation with 2, 4 or 6 Gy also retarded spheroids significantly in their growth. In the combination treatment the highest dose of TNF (1000 ng/ml) was added 4 hours prior to radiation. TNF could not induce a potentiation of the radiation injury at 2 Gy. The combination with 4 Gy, however, had additive and the combination with 6 Gy synergistic antiproliferative effects; in these treatment regimens respectively 2 and 5 out of 24 spheroids were controlled, i.e. cured. These experiments suggest that TNF in combination with radiotherapy may be beneficial for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma or cancer in general. PMID:2285257

  12. Benefits and risks of combining anti-tumor necrosis factor with immunomodulator therapy in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Cozijnsen, Martinus A; Escher, Johanna C; Griffiths, Anne; Turner, Dan; de Ridder, Lissy

    2015-04-01

    Since the introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy as treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), care of pediatric and adult patients with IBD has significantly improved. To further improve treatment efficacy and durability, multiple trials have compared the efficacy of combination therapy, using anti-TNF therapy combined with an immunomodulator (a thiopurine or methotrexate), with that of anti-TNF monotherapy with contradicting results. The safety of combined therapy has been questioned after several reported cases of hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma in young patients with IBD so treated. Physicians prescribing anti-TNF therapy to patients with IBD are required to weigh the benefits of combined therapy with its risks. To inform physicians treating children with IBD of these benefits and risks, we reviewed studies in pediatric and adult patients with IBD comparing efficacy, durability, and/or safety of combined therapy with anti-TNF monotherapy. PMID:25723615

  13. Characterization of a Canine Tetranucleotide Microsatellite Marker Located in the First Intron of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Gene

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Masashi; TANAKA, Kazuaki; TAKIZAWA, Tatsuya; SEGAWA, Kazuhito; NEO, Sakurako; TSUCHIYA, Ryo; MURATA, Michiko; MURAKAMI, Masaru; HISASUE, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A polymorphic tetranucleotide (GAAT)n microsatellite in the first intron of the canine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA) gene was characterized in this study; 139 dogs were analyzed: 22 Beagles, 26 Chihuahuas, 20 Miniature Dachshunds, 24 Miniature Poodles, 22 Pembroke Welsh Corgis and 25 Shiba Inus. We detected the presence of the 4 alleles (GAAT)5, (GAAT)6, (GAAT)7 and (GAAT)8, including 9 of the 10 expected genotypes. The expected heterozygosity (He) and the polymorphic information content (PIC) value of this microsatellite locus varied from 0.389 to 0.749 and from 0.333 to 0.682, respectively, among the 6 breeds. The allelic frequency differed greatly among breeds, but this microsatellite marker was highly polymorphic and could be a useful marker for the canine TNFA gene. PMID:24042337

  14. Media effects in modulating the conformational equilibrium of a model compound for tumor necrosis factor converting enzyme inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchelli, Martina; Guardiani, Carlo; Sandberg, Robert B.; Menichetti, Stefano; Procacci, Piero; Caminati, Gabriella

    2015-07-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Tumor Necrosis Factor α Converting Enzyme (TACE) are a promising therapeutic tool for Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. Here we report on an extensive chemical-physical analysis of the media effects in modulating the conformational landscape of MBET306, the common scaffold and a synthetic precursor of a family of recently discovered tartrate-based TACE inhibitors. The structural features of this molecule with potential pharmaceutical applications have been disclosed by interpreting extensive photophysical measurements in various solvents with the aid of enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations and time dependent density functional calculations. Using a combination of experimental and computational techniques, the paper provides a general protocol for studying the structure in solution of molecular systems characterized by the existence of conformational metastable states.

  15. Inhibitory effects of Turkish folk remedies on inflammatory cytokines: interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Yeşilada, E; Ustün, O; Sezik, E; Takaishi, Y; Ono, Y; Honda, G

    1997-09-01

    In this study, in vitro inhibitory effects of 55 extracts or fractions obtained from 10 plant species on interleukin-1 (IL-1alpha, IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) biosynthesis were studied. The following plant materials from Turkish folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases which are thought to be inflammatory in nature e.g. rheumatism, fever, infections, edemas or related inflammatory diseases were selected as the subject of this study: Cistus laurifolius leaves, Clematis flammna flowering herbs, Crataegus orientalis roots, Daphne oleoides ssp. oleoides whole plant, Ecbalium elaterium roots, Rosa canina roots, Rubus discolor roots, Rubus hirtus roots, Sambucus ebulus flowers and leaves, Sambucus nigra flowers and leaves. All plants showed inhibitory activity against at least one of these models in various percentages depending upon the concentration, thus supporting the folkloric utilization. Daphne oleoides was found to be the most active plant against the test models. PMID:9324006

  16. Tumor-necrosis factor impairs CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological control in chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Marc; Abdullah, Zeinab; Chemnitz, Jens M; Maisel, Daniela; Sander, Jil; Lehmann, Clara; Thabet, Yasser; Shinde, Prashant V; Schmidleithner, Lisa; Köhne, Maren; Trebicka, Jonel; Schierwagen, Robert; Hofmann, Andrea; Popov, Alexey; Lang, Karl S; Oxenius, Annette; Buch, Thorsten; Kurts, Christian; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Lang, Philipp A; Hartmann, Pia; Knolle, Percy A; Schultze, Joachim L

    2016-05-01

    Persistent viral infections are characterized by the simultaneous presence of chronic inflammation and T cell dysfunction. In prototypic models of chronicity-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-we used transcriptome-based modeling to reveal that CD4(+) T cells were co-exposed not only to multiple inhibitory signals but also to tumor-necrosis factor (TNF). Blockade of TNF during chronic infection with LCMV abrogated the inhibitory gene-expression signature in CD4(+) T cells, including reduced expression of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and reconstituted virus-specific immunity, which led to control of infection. Preventing signaling via the TNF receptor selectively in T cells sufficed to induce these effects. Targeted immunological interventions to disrupt the TNF-mediated link between chronic inflammation and T cell dysfunction might therefore lead to therapies to overcome persistent viral infection. PMID:26950238

  17. Screening Bicyclic Peptide Libraries for Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors: Discovery of a Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Curran A.; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23865589

  18. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  19. Perioperative management of tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocker-treated psoriatic patients: Case reports and review.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Yuka; Abe, Namiko; Katori, Youich; Takahashi, Kousuke; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Okubo, Yukari

    2016-02-01

    Regarding appropriate timings of discontinuation and resumption of biologics for psoriasis patients before and after elective surgeries, an international consensus has yet to be reached. The Japanese Dermatological Association of Guideline and Safety Manual for the use of Biologic Agents in Psoriasis 2013 states that infliximab (IFX) and adalimumab (ADA) should be withheld at least 4 and 2 weeks, respectively, before surgery and can be restarted as neither postoperative infection nor delayed wound healing is recognized. We experienced three generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) patients and one plaque-type psoriasis patient undergoing surgeries during tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blocker therapy. Three GPP cases experienced uneventful post-surgical course. One psoriasis vulgaris patient on IFX had a wound healing delay with deterioration of psoriatic plaques which was restored by restarting IFX. The timing of suspension and resumption of TNF-α blockers in all cases were determined following the Japanese guideline. PMID:26346621

  20. A Nonpolar Blueberry Fraction Blunts NADPH Oxidase Activation in Neuronal Cells Exposed to Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Sally J.; Dunlap, Kriya L.; McGill, Colin M.; Kuhn, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are key to the progressive neuronal degeneration common to chronic pathologies, traumatic injuries, and aging processes in the CNS. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) orchestrates cellular stress by stimulating the production and release of neurotoxic mediators including reactive oxygen species (ROS). NADPH oxidases (NOX), ubiquitously expressed in all cells, have recently emerged as pivotal ROS sources in aging and disease. We demonstrated the presence of potent NOX inhibitors in wild Alaska bog blueberries partitioning discretely into a nonpolar fraction with minimal antioxidant capacity and largely devoid of polyphenols. Incubation of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with nonpolar blueberry fractions obstructed the coalescing of lipid rafts into large domains disrupting NOX assembly therein and abolishing ROS production characteristic for TNF-α exposure. These findings illuminate nutrition-derived lipid raft modulation as a novel therapeutic approach to blunt inflammatory and oxidative stress in the aging or diseased CNS. PMID:22530077

  1. Human dermal mast cells contain and release tumor necrosis factor alpha, which induces endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, L J; Trinchieri, G; Waldorf, H A; Whitaker, D; Murphy, G F

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates endothelial leukocyte interactions by inducing expression of adhesion molecules. In this report, we demonstrate that human dermal mast cells contain sizeable stores of immunoreactive and biologically active TNF-alpha within granules, which can be released rapidly into the extracellular space upon degranulation. Among normal human dermal cells, mast cells are the predominant cell type that expresses both TNF-alpha protein and TNF-alpha mRNA. Moreover, induction of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 expression is a direct consequence of release of mast cell-derived TNF-alpha. These findings establish a role for human mast cells as "gatekeepers" of the dermal microvasculature and indicate that mast cell products other than vasoactive amines influence endothelium in a proinflammatory fashion. Images PMID:1709737

  2. Tumor necrosis factor alpha induces expression of human immunodeficiency virus in a chronically infected T-cell clone.

    PubMed Central

    Folks, T M; Clouse, K A; Justement, J; Rabson, A; Duh, E; Kehrl, J H; Fauci, A S

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), also known as cachectin, was demonstrated to induce the expression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in a chronically infected T-cell clone (ACH-2). Concentrations of recombinant TNF-alpha as low as 50 pg/ml induced a significant increase over background of HIV expression in the ACH-2 cells as determined by supernatant reverse transcriptase activity. The HIV-inducing effects of TNF-alpha could not be explained by toxic effects on the cells. In addition, both the uninfected parental cell line (A3.01) and the infected ACH-2 cells were shown to have high-affinity receptors for TNF-alpha. Transient-transfection experiments demonstrated that the inductive effects of TNF-alpha were due to specific activation of the HIV long terminal repeat. These studies provide evidence that TNF-alpha may play a role in the mechanisms of pathogenesis of HIV infection. Images PMID:2784570

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (Trail) in endothelial response to biomechanical and biochemical stresses in arteries.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, F; Centurione, L; Centurione, M A; Angelini, A; Di Pietro, R

    2015-11-01

    Shear stress is determined by three physical components described in a famous triad: blood flow, blood viscosity and vessel geometry. Through the direct action on endothelium, shear stress is able to radically interfere with endothelial properties and the physiology of the vascular wall. Endothelial cells (ECs) have also to sustain biochemical stresses represented by chemokines, growth factors, cytokines, complement, hormones, nitric oxide (NO), oxygen and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, hormones, and chemical substances, like NO, act and regulate endothelium functions and homeostasis. Among these cytokines Tumor Necrosis Factor Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) has been assigned a regulatory role in ECs physiology and physiopathology. Thus, the aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the endothelial response pathways after different types of biomechanical and biochemical stress in in vitro models and to analyze the crucial role of TRAIL under pathological conditions of the cardiocirculatory system like atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and diabetes. PMID:25974396

  4. Pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and axial spondyloarthritis: efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2012-12-01

    We report the case of a patient with a simultaneous presence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and axial spondyloarthritis. This condition differs from both the PASH (pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis) syndrome, in which arthritis is absent, and the PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome, in which suppurative hidradenitis is lacking. Our patient failed to respond to etanercept therapy, whereas all dermatologic and rheumatic manifestations completely regressed following infliximab infusion. We therefore propose that simultaneous presence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and seronegative spondyloarthritis might represent a distinct syndrome that could be termed the PASS syndrome. Tumor necrosis factor α therapies seem to play selective roles. PMID:23188209

  5. Hepatitis B and C reactivation with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: synopsis and interpretation of screening and prophylaxis recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Inbal; Abu-Shakra, Mahmoud; Sikuler, Emanuel

    2013-06-01

    Information on reactivation of chronic viral hepatitis infection in patients who are candidates for tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFi) is in a constant state of flux. We retrieved the most updated guidelines (in English) of prominent rheumatological and gastroenterological professional socienties for the mangement of chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the context of treatment with TNFi. Subsequently, the major areas of uncertainty and absence of consensus in the guidelines were located and a secondary search for additional studies addressing those areas was performed. Based on our search we formulated a personal interpretation applicable to health care settings with virological laboratories capable of performing viral load measurements, and health systems that can support use of potent nucleoside/tide analogues in well-defined patient populations. PMID:23882898

  6. Synergistic effects of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha: central monoamine, corticosterone, and behavioral variations.

    PubMed

    Brebner, K; Hayley, S; Zacharko, R; Merali, Z; Anisman, H

    2000-06-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) influence neuroendocrine activity, promote central neurotransmitter alterations, and induce a constellation of symptoms collectively referred to as sickness behaviors. These cytokines may also elicit anxiety and anhedonia, and have been associated with psychological disturbances in humans. In the present investigation, systemic IL-1beta and TNF-alpha dose-dependently and synergistically disrupted consumption of a highly palatable food source (chocolate milk), possibly reflecting anorexia or anhedonia engendered by the treatments. As well, these cytokines synergistically increased plasma corticosterone levels. Although IL-1beta and TNF-alpha provoked variations of amine turnover in the hypothalamus, locus coeruleus, and central amygdala, synergistic effects were not evident in this respect. Nevertheless, in view of the central amine variations induced by the cytokines, it is suggested that immune activation may come to influence complex behavioral processes, as well as affective state. PMID:10788757

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-α driven inflammation in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a new model of pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Killian; Reeves, Emer P; Carroll, Tomás P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) has traditionally been thought of as a genetic disorder characterized by lung destruction and early emphysema in a low AAT, and high neutrophil elastase (NE) environment in the lungs of affected individuals. Recently, a growing body of evidence has emerged to support the hypothesis that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is essential in the pathogenesis of both genetic AATD and non-genetic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Reports have highlighted the importance of TNF-α driven immune cell dysfunction in the development of lung disease in AATD. The authors discuss the role of AAT as a key modulator of TNF-α signaling firstly in the setting of AATD and secondly in other conditions where AAT augmentation therapy has potential utility as a novel therapy. PMID:26634397

  8. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography of Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Chemoembolisation Using Drug-Eluting Beads: A Pilot Study Focused on Sustained Tumor Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moschouris, Hippocrates; Malagari, Katerina; Papadaki, Marina Georgiou; Kornezos, Ioannis Matsaidonis, Dimitrios

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and the sustained antitumor effect of drug-eluting beads used for transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Ten patients with solitary, unresectable HCC underwent CEUS before, 2 days after, and 35 to 40 days after TACE using a standard dose (4 ml) of drug-eluting beads (DC Beads; Biocompatibles, Surrey, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (25 mg doxorubicin/ml hydrated beads). For CEUS, a second-generation contrast agent (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) and a low mechanical-index technique were used. A part of the tumor was characterized as necrotic if it showed complete lack of enhancement. The percentage of necrosis was calculated at the sonographic section that depicted the largest diameter of the tumor. Differences in the extent of early (2 days after TACE) and delayed (35 to 40 days after TACE) necrosis were quantitatively and subjectively assessed. Early post-TACE tumor necrosis ranged from 21% to 70% (mean 43.5% {+-} 19%). There was a statistically significant (p = 0.0012, paired Student t test) higher percentage of delayed tumor necrosis, which ranged from 24% to 88% (mean 52.3% {+-} 20.3%). Subjective evaluation showed a delayed obvious increase of the necrotic areas in 5 patients. In 2 patients, tumor vessels that initially remained patent disappeared on the delayed follow-up. A part of tumor necrosis after chemoembolisation of HCC with DEB seems to take place later than 2 days after TACE. CEUS may provide evidence for the sustained antitumor effect of DEB-TACE. Nevertheless, the ideal time for the imaging evaluation of tumor response remains to be defined.

  9. Lysosomal serine protease CLN2 regulates tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated apoptosis in a Bid-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Autefage, Hélène; Albinet, Virginie; Garcia, Virginie; Berges, Hortense; Nicolau, Marie-Laure; Therville, Nicole; Altié, Marie-Françoise; Caillaud, Catherine; Levade, Thierry; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie

    2009-04-24

    Apoptosis is a highly organized, energy-dependent program by which multicellular organisms eliminate damaged, superfluous, and potentially harmful cells. Although caspases are the most prominent group of proteases involved in the apoptotic process, the role of lysosomes has only recently been unmasked. This study investigated the role of the lysosomal serine protease CLN2 in apoptosis. We report that cells isolated from patients affected with late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL) having a deficient activity of CLN2 are resistant to the toxic effect of death ligands such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), CD95 ligand, or tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but not to receptor-independent stress agents. CLN2-deficient cells exhibited a defect in TNF-induced Bid cleavage, release of cytochrome c, and caspase-9 and -3 activation. Moreover, extracts from CLN2-overexpressing cells or a CLN2 recombinant protein were able to catalyze the in vitro cleavage of Bid. Noteworthy, correction of the lysosomal enzyme defect of LINCL fibroblasts using a medium enriched in CLN2 protein enabled restoration of TNF-induced Bid and caspase-3 processing and toxicity. Conversely, transfection of CLN2-corrected cells with small interfering RNA targeting Bid abrogated TNF-induced cell death. Altogether, our study demonstrates that genetic deletion of the lysosomal serine protease CLN2 and the subsequent loss of its catalytic function confer resistance to TNF in non-neuronal somatic cells, indicating that CLN2 plays a yet unsuspected role in TNF-induced cell death. PMID:19246452

  10. Targeting of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 to Low Density Plasma Membrane Domains in Human Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessio, Alessio; Kluger, Martin S.; Li, Jie H.; Al-Lamki, Rafia; Bradley, John R.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2010-01-01

    TNFR1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1) localizes to caveolae of human endothelial-derived EA.hy926 cells. Transduced TNFR1 molecules lacking amino acid residues 229–244 (spanning the transmembrane/intercellular boundary) are expressed on the cell surface equivalently to full-length TNFR1 molecules but incompletely localize to caveolae. A peptide containing this sequence pulls down CAV-1 (caveolin-1) and TNFR1 from cell lysates but fails to do so following disruption of caveolae with methyl-β-cyclodextrin. We previously reported that methyl-β-cyclodextrin eliminates caveolae and blocks tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced internalization of TNFR1 but not TNF-induced activation of NF-κB in EA.hy926 cells. Both CAV-1 and FLOT-2 (flotillin-2), organizing proteins of caveolae and lipid rafts, respectively, associate with caveolae in EA.hy926 cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CAV-1 but not FLOT-2 strikingly reduces caveolae number. Both knockdowns reduce total TNFR1 protein expression, but neither prevents TNFR1 localization to low density membrane domains, TNF-induced internalization of TNFR1, or NF-κB activation by TNF. Both CAV-1 and FLOT-2 knockdowns reduce TNF-mediated activation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK). However, both knockdowns reduce expression of TRAF2 (TNF receptor-associated factor-2) protein, and small interfering RNA targeting of TRAF2 also selectively inhibits SAPK activation. We conclude that TNFR1 contains a membrane-proximal sequence that targets the receptor to caveolae/lipid rafts. Neither TNFR1 targeting to nor internalization from these low density membrane domains depends upon CAV-1 or FLOT-2. Furthermore, both NF-κB and SAPK activation appear independent of both TNFR1 localization to low density membrane domains and to TNF-induced receptor internalization. PMID:20511226

  11. Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein-3 protects zinc transporter 8 against proinflammatory cytokine-induced downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liqing; Zhang, Dongmei; Chen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) is exclusively expressed in the pancreatic islet and is essential for insulin crystallization, hexamerization and secretion. Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein-3 (TNFAIP3) is a zinc finger protein that serves a major role in the negative feedback regulation of NF-κB signaling in response to multiple stimuli, and is a central regulator of immunopathology. Although the role of TNFAIP3 in diabetes has been extensively studied, its effect on ZnT8 has not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to verify whether proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), are able to affect ZnT8 expression in islet cells. In addition, the study aimed to determine the effect of TNFAIP3 overexpression on cytokine-altered ZnT8 activity, considering its effect on NF-κB signaling. Cell-based studies using NIT-1 cells overexpressing TNFAIP3 were used to assess the effect of cytokines on ZnT8 and NF-κB activation, as well as the effect of TNFAIP3 on ZnT8 expression. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were employed to determine the protein expression and NF-κB activation, respectively. The results indicated that cytokine stimulation led to TNFAIP3 upregulation, ZnT8 downregulation and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, TNFAIP3 overexpression protected ZnT8 from cytokine-induced downregulation. In conclusion, the current results suggest that inflammation or TNFAIP3 dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes via ZnT8 expression, besides from islet cell apoptosis. In addition, restricting inflammation and enhancing TNFAIP3 expression may exert a positive effect in diabetes prevention, treatment and pancreatic cell transplantation. PMID:27588072

  12. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yin; Pfeifer, Andreas Klaus; Myschetzky, Rebecca; Garbyal, Rajendra Singh; Rasmussen, Palle; Knigge, Ulrich; Bzorek, Michael; Kristensen, Michael Holmsgaard; Kjaer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy. PMID:26824927

  13. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27622331

  14. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha-Mediated Genes Predicts Recurrence-Free Survival in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lianya; Zhang, Helin; Duan, Lin; He, Wenshu; Zhu, Yihua; Bai, Yunfei; Zhu, Miao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis on high-throughput gene expression data to identify TNF-α-mediated genes implicated in lung cancer. We first investigated the gene expression profiles of two independent TNF-α/TNFR KO murine models. The EGF receptor signaling pathway was the top pathway associated with genes mediated by TNF-α. After matching the TNF-α-mediated mouse genes to their human orthologs, we compared the expression patterns of the TNF-α-mediated genes in normal and tumor lung tissues obtained from humans. Based on the TNF-α-mediated genes that were dysregulated in lung tumors, we developed a prognostic gene signature that effectively predicted recurrence-free survival in lung cancer in two validation cohorts. Resampling tests suggested that the prognostic power of the gene signature was not by chance, and multivariate analysis suggested that this gene signature was independent of the traditional clinical factors and enhanced the identification of lung cancer patients at greater risk for recurrence. PMID:25548907

  15. Demethylation and expression of murine mammary tumor proviruses in mouse thymoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Mermod, J J; Bourgeois, S; Defer, N; Crépin, M

    1983-01-01

    Murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV) expression is analyzed in a T-lymphoid cell line (T1M1) sensitive to the killing effect of glucocorticoids and in two of its variants, one resistant (T1M1r) and one supersensitive (T1M1ss) to glucocorticoid-induced lymphocytolysis. In the T1M1 line, MMTV is expressed and induced approximately 10-fold by short treatment with dexamethasone. Southern blot analyses of restriction enzyme digests of DNA from T1M1 cells reveal three proviruses similar to those of normal C57BL mouse tissue. In the T1M1ss line, which has retained functional glucocorticoid receptors, MMTV mRNA is inducible by glucocorticoids, while induction is reduced in the T1M1r line defective in glucocorticoid receptors. Moreover, the T1M1r line expresses a strikingly elevated basal level of MMTV mRNA in the absence of hormone. No rearrangements or superinfection have occurred in the variants, but all the regions containing 5'-long terminal repeats are demethylated in the T1M1r variant although other sites of the provirus remain methylated. Because this variant was selected by prolonged treatment with dexamethasone, these observations raise the possibility that the continuous transcription of MMTV that occurred during this selection can result in glucocorticoid-induced demethylation of long-terminal-repeat sequences. Images PMID:6296860

  16. XFM demonstrates preferential accumulation of a vanadyl-based MRI contrast agent in murine colonic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Ward, Jesse; Dougherty, Urszula; Bissonnette, Marc; Hart, John; Vogt, Stefan; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast agents that specifically enhance cancers on MRI would allow earlier detection. Vanadyl-based chelates (VCs) selectively enhance rodent cancers on MRI, suggesting selective uptake of VCs by cancers. Here we report X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) of VC uptake by murine colon cancer. Colonic tumors in mice treated with azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium were identified by MRI. Then a gadolinium-based contrast agent and a VC were injected I.V.; mice were sacrificed and colons sectioned. VC distribution was sampled at 120 minutes after injection to evaluate the long term accumulation. Gadolinium distribution was sampled at 10 minutes after injection due to its rapid washout. XFM was performed on 72 regions of normal and cancerous colon from 5 normal mice and 4 cancer-bearing mice. XFM showed that all gadolinium was extracellular with similar concentrations in colon cancers and normal colon. In contrast, the average VC concentration was 2-fold higher in cancers vs. normal tissue (p<0.002). Cancers also contained numerous ‘hot spots’ with intracellular VC concentrations 6-fold higher than the concentration in normal colon (p<0.0001). No ‘hot spots’ were detected in normal colon. This is the first direct demonstration that VCs selectively accumulate in cancer cells, and thus may improve cancer detection. PMID:25813904

  17. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  18. Murine Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Whole Tumor Lysates Mediate Potent Antitumor Immune Responses in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, R. C.; Shimizu, K.; Mule, J. J.

    1998-08-01

    The highly efficient nature of dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells raises the possibility of uncovering in tumor-bearing hosts very low levels of T cell reactivity to poorly immunogenic tumors that are virtually undetectable by other means. Here, we demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo capacities of murine bone marrow-derived, cytokine-driven DC to elicit potent and specific anti-tumor responses when pulsed with whole tumor lysates. Stimulation of naive spleen-derived T cells by tumor lysate-pulsed DC generated tumor-specific proliferative cytokine release and cytolytic reactivities in vitro. In addition, in two separate strains of mice with histologically distinct tumors, s.c. injections of DC pulsed with whole tumor lysates effectively primed these animals to reject subsequent lethal challenges with viable parental tumor cells and, important to note, also mediated significant reductions in the number of metastases established in the lungs. Tumor rejection depended on host-derived CD8+ T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD4+ T cells. Spleens from mice that had rejected their tumors contained specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The use of whole tumor lysates as a source of tumor-associated antigen(s) for pulsing of DC circumvents several limitations encountered with other methods as well as provides certain distinct advantages, which are discussed. These data serve as rationale for our recent initiation of a phase I clinical trial of immunization with autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC in adult and pediatric cancer patients.

  19. PLASMA TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA CONCENTRATIONS DURING THE TRANSITION PERIOD OF COWS FED EITHER AD LIBITUM OR RESTRICTED DIETS DURING THE DRY PERIOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-') is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that upregulates mRNA expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) and induces nitric oxide (NO) production. Both SOCS and NO inhibit intracellular growth hormone (GH) signaling and uncouple the somatotropic axis. Expressio...

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha directly stimulates the overproduction of hepatic apolipoprotein B100-containing VLDL via impairment of hepatic insulin signaling.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin resistant states are commonly associated with both increased circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a) and hepatic overproduction of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). In the present study, we examined the potential mechanistic link between TNF-a and hepatic overproduction of ap...

  1. CD8+ T Cells Specific to Apoptosis-Associated Antigens Predict the Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Citro, Alessandra; Scrivo, Rossana; Martini, Helene; Martire, Carmela; De Marzio, Paolo; Vestri, Anna Rita; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Valesini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells (apoptotic epitopes) represent a principal player in chronic immune activation, which is known to amplify immunopathology in various inflammatory diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship involving these autoreactive T cells, the rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology, and the response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy. The frequency of autoreactive CD8+ T cells specific to various apoptotic epitopes, as detected by both enzyme-linked immunospot assay and dextramers of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules complexed with relevant apoptotic epitopes, was longitudinally analyzed in the peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients who were submitted to etanercept treatment (or other tumor necrosis factor inhibitors as a control). The percentage of apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells was significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients than in healthy donors, and correlated with the disease activity. More important, it was significantly more elevated in responders to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy than in non-responders before the start of therapy; it significantly dropped only in the former following therapy. These data indicate that apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells may be involved in rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology through the production of inflammatory cytokines and that they may potentially represent a predictive biomarker of response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy to validate in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26061065

  2. Interleukin-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Are Associated with Quality of Life–Related Symptoms in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Palevsky, Harold I.; Lederer, David J.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Mathai, Stephen C.; Pinder, Diane; Archer-Chicko, Christine; Bagiella, Emilia; Roberts, Kari E.; Tracy, Russell P.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Girgis, Reda E.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Inflammation is associated with symptoms in many chronic illnesses; however, this link has not been established in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between inflammatory markers and quality of life–related symptoms in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. We hypothesized that higher circulating IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α levels would be associated with worse quality of life–related symptoms. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis using baseline and 3-month assessments of 62 subjects in a clinical trial of aspirin and simvastatin to determine the association between plasma IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α levels and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 subscales (pain, vitality, mental health). Measurements and Main Results: The mean age was 49.7 ± 13.4 years; 87% were female. Higher IL-6 levels were significantly associated with lower Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 subscale scores, indicating worse bodily pain, vitality, and mental health (all P < 0.01). Higher tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly associated with increased bodily pain, but better mental health scores. Conclusions: IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α levels are associated with certain quality of life domains in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00384865). PMID:25615959

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis: a protector or culprit?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen; Zhao, Yuxia; Wang, Shuangxi; Jiang, Fan

    2014-12-01

    In addition to inducing tumor cell apoptosis, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) shows broad biological functions both in vitro and in vivo. TRAIL gene deletion enhanced atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, supporting that endogenous TRAIL has protective actions in maintaining blood vessel homeostasis and repressing atherosclerosis. The mechanisms of this beneficial effect are not understood. It remains to be determined whether the athero-protective action of TRAIL is via direct impacts on residential vascular cells or indirectly by modulating systemic immune functions. However, in vitro experiments indicate that excessive TRAIL may stimulate endothelial cell apoptosis, smooth muscle proliferation and migration, and inflammatory responses. Moreover, TRAIL can stimulate lipid uptake and foam cell formation in cultured macrophages. Here we provide a critical review on the potential relationships between TRAIL and atherosclerosis. We propose that increased TRAIL production may also have potential detrimental effects on vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Further in vivo experiments are warranted to elucidate the effects of exogenous TRAIL on atherogenesis. PMID:25451562

  4. Tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) regulation of development, function, and homeostasis of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew C.; Lee, JangEun; Choi, Yongwon

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an adaptor protein that mediates a wide array of protein-protein interactions via its TRAF domain and a RING finger domain that possesses non-conventional E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. First identified nearly two decades ago as a mediator of IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-mediated activation of NFκB, TRAF6 has since been identified as an actor downstream of multiple receptor families with immunoregulatory functions, including members of the TNFR superfamily, the toll-like receptor (TLR) family, tumor growth factor-β receptors (TGFβR), and T cell receptor (TCR). In addition to NFκB, TRAF6 may also direct activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathways. In the context of the immune system, TRAF6-mediated signals have proven critical for the development, homeostasis, and/or activation of B cells, T cells, and myeloid cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, and osteoclasts, as well as for organogenesis of thymic and secondary lymphoid tissues. In multiple cellular contexts, TRAF6 function is essential not only for proper activation of the immune system, but also for maintaining immune tolerance, and more recent works have begun to identify mechanisms of contextual specificity for TRAF6, involving both regulatory protein interactions, and messenger RNA regulation by microRNAs. PMID:26085208

  5. PD-1 Blockade and OX40 Triggering Synergistically Protects against Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xin; Cheng, Dali; Xia, Zhijun; Luan, Meng; Zhang, Shulan

    2014-01-01

    The co-inhibitory receptor Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) curtails immune responses and prevent autoimmunity, however, tumors exploit this pathway to escape from immune destruction. The co-stimulatory receptor OX40 is upregulated on T cells following activation and increases their clonal expansion, survival and cytokine production when engaged. Although antagonistic anti-PD-1 or agonistic anti-OX40 antibodies can promote the rejection of several murine tumors, some poorly immunogenic tumors were refractory to this treatment. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumor effects and mechanisms of combinatorial PD-1 blockade and OX40 triggering in a murine ID8 ovarian cancer model. Although individual anti-PD-1 or OX40 mAb treatment was ineffective in tumor protection against 10-day established ID8 tumor, combined anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment markedly inhibited tumor outgrowth with 60% of mice tumor free 90 days after tumor inoculation. Tumor protection was associated with a systemic immune response with memory and antigen specificity and required CD4+ cells and CD8+ T cells. The anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment increased CD4+ and CD8+ cells and decreased immunosuppressive CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid suppressor cells (MDSC), giving rise to significantly higher ratios of both effector CD4+ and CD8+ cells to Treg and MDSC in peritoneal cavity; Quantitative RT-PCR data further demonstrated the induction of a local immunostimulatory milieu by anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb treatment. The splenic CD8+ T cells from combined mAb treated mice produced high levels of IFN-γ upon tumor antigen stimulation and exhibited antigen-specific cytolytic activity. To our knowledge, this is the first study testing the antitumor effects of combined anti-PD-1/OX40 mAb in a murine ovarian cancer model, and our results provide a rationale for clinical trials evaluating ovarian cancer immunotherapy using this combination of mAb. PMID:24586709

  6. Regulation of Adipose Tissue Stem Cells Angiogenic Potential by Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha.

    PubMed

    Zubkova, Ekaterina S; Beloglazova, Irina B; Makarevich, Pavel I; Boldyreva, Maria A; Sukhareva, Olga Yu; Shestakova, Marina V; Dergilev, Konstantin V; Parfyonova, Yelena V; Menshikov, Mikhail Yu

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration requires coordinated "teamwork" of growth factors, proteases, progenitor and immune cells producing inflammatory cytokines. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) might play a pivotal role by substituting cells or by secretion of growth factors or cytokines, and attraction of progenitor and inflammatory cells, which participate in initial stages of tissue repair. Due to obvious impact of inflammation on regeneration it seems promising to explore whether inflammatory factors could influence proangiogenic abilities of MSC. In this study we investigated effects of TNF-α on activity of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). We found that treatment with TNF-α enhances ADSC proliferation, F-actin microfilament assembly, increases cell motility and migration through extracellular matrix. Exposure of ADSC to TNF-α led to increased mRNA expression of proangiogenic factors (FGF-2, VEGF, IL-8, and MCP-1), inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6), proteases (MMPs, uPA) and adhesion molecule ICAM-1. At the protein level, VEGF, IL-8, MCP-1, and ICAM-1 production was also up-regulated. Pre-incubation of ADSC with TNF-α-enhanced adhesion of monocytes to ADSC but suppressed adherence of ADSC to endothelial cells (HUVEC). Stimulation with TNF-α triggers ROS generation and activates a number of key intracellular signaling mediators known to positively regulate angiogenesis (Akt, small GTPase Rac1, ERK1/2, and p38 MAP-kinases). Pre-treatment with TNF-α-enhanced ADSC ability to promote growth of microvessels in a fibrin gel assay and accelerate blood flow recovery, which was accompanied by increased arteriole density and reduction of necrosis in mouse hind limb ischemia model. These findings indicate that TNF-α plays a role in activation of ADSC angiogenic and regenerative potential. PMID:26096299

  7. Thalidomide treatment reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha production and enhances weight gain in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Tramontana, J. M.; Utaipat, U.; Molloy, A.; Akarasewi, P.; Burroughs, M.; Makonkawkeyoon, S.; Johnson, B.; Klausner, J. D.; Rom, W.; Kaplan, G.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The monocyte-derived cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), is essential for host immunity, but overproduction of this cytokine may have serious pathologic consequences. Excess TNF alpha produced in pulmonary tuberculosis may cause fevers, weakness, night sweats, necrosis, and progressive weight loss. Thalidomide (alpha-N-phthalimidoglutarimide) has recently been shown to suppress TNF alpha production by human monocytes in vitro and to reduce serum TNF alpha in leprosy patients. We have therefore conducted a two-part placebo-controlled pilot study of thalidomide in patients with active tuberculosis to determine its effects on clinical response, immune reactivity, TNF alpha levels, and weight. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 30 male patients with active tuberculosis, either human immunodeficiency virus type 1 positive (HIV-1+) or HIV-1-, received thalidomide or placebo for single or multiple 14 day cycles. Toxicity of the study drug, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), cytokine production, and weight gain were evaluated. RESULTS: Thalidomide treatment was well tolerated, without serious adverse events. The drug did not adversely affect the DTH response to purified protein derivative (PPD), total leukocyte, or differential cell counts. TNF alpha production was significantly reduced during thalidomide treatment while interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) production was enhanced. Daily administration of thalidomide resulted in a significant enhancement of weight gain. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that thalidomide is well tolerated by patients receiving anti-tuberculosis therapy. Thalidomide treatment reduces TNF alpha production both in vivo and in vitro and is associated with an accelerated weight gain during the study period. PMID:8521296

  8. Aminoguanidine and curcumin attenuated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced oxidative stress, colitis and hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Mouzaoui, Souad; Rahim, Ibtissem; Djerdjouri, Bahia

    2012-01-01

    The up regulation of gut mucosal cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and oxidative stress have been related to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). This study investigated an immune-mediated model of colitis. TNF-α injected intraperitonally to mice induced a dose-dependent recruitment of neutrophils into abdominal mesentery. The leukocytes influx induced by TNF-α (10 μg kg(-1) body weight) increased by 3 fold liver and colon damage scores. TNF-α-colitis was characterized by hemorrhagic edemas and crypt abscesses massively infiltrated by inflammatory cells, namely neutrophils. Moreover, TNF-α-toxicity resulted in liver steatosis and foci of necrosis infiltrated by Kupffer cells and neutrophils in parenchyma and around the centrilobular veins. The involvement of oxidative stress was evaluated using aminoguanidine (AG) as selective inhibitor of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and curcumin (Cur), the polyphenolic antioxidant of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.). TNF-α-toxicity led to significant increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO, an index of neutrophils infiltration), nitrites (stable nitric oxide metabolites) and malondialdehyde (MDA, a marker of lipid peroxides) levels and cell apoptosis in liver and colon. AG and Cur treatments significantly attenuated the hallmarks of oxidative stress, neutrophils influx and ROS-related cellular and histological damages, in TNF-α-treated mice. Taken together, our results provide insights into the role of phagocytes-derived oxidants in TNF-α-colitis in mice. Cur and AG, by inhibiting neutrophils priming and iNOsynthase could be effective against oxidative bowel damages induced in IBD by imbalanced gut immune response. PMID:22036766

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene affects inflammatory bowel diseases risk

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Huebner, Claudia; Petermann, Ivonne; Gearry, Richard B; Barclay, Murray L; Demmers, Pieter; McCulloch, Alan; Han, Dug Yeo

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter of the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) gene play in the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) in a New Zealand population, in the context of international studies. METHODS: DNA samples from 388 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), 405 ulcerative colitis (UC), 27 indeterminate colitis (IC) and 201 randomly selected controls, from Canterbury, New Zealand were screened for 3 common polymorphisms in the TNF-α receptor: -238 G→A, -308 G→A and -857C→T, using a TaqmanR assay. A meta-analysis was performed on the data obtained on these polymorphisms combined with that from other published studies. RESULTS: Individuals carrying the -308 G/A allele had a significantly (OR = 1.91, χ2 = 17.36, P < 0.0001) increased risk of pancolitis, and a 1.57-fold increased risk (OR = 1.57, χ2 = 4.34, P = 0.037) of requiring a bowel resection in UC. Carrying the -857 C/T variant decreased the risk of ileocolonic CD (OR = 0.56, χ2 = 4.32, P = 0.037), and the need for a bowel resection (OR = 0.59, χ2 = 4.85, P = 0.028). The risk of UC was reduced in individuals who were smokers at diagnosis, (OR = 0.48, χ2 = 4.86, P = 0.028). CONCLUSION: TNF-α is a key cytokine known to play a role in inflammatory response, and the locus for the gene is found in the IBD3 region on chromosome 6p21, known to be associated with an increased risk for IBD. The -308 G/A SNP in the TNF-α promoter is functional, and may account in part for the increased UC risk associated with the IBD3 genomic region. The -857 C/T SNP may decrease IBD risk in certain groups. Pharmaco- or nutrigenomic approaches may be desirable for individuals with such affected genotypes. PMID:18698679

  10. Immunogenicity of murine solid tumor models as a defining feature of in vivo behavior and response to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Karimi, Saman S; Barry-Holson, Keegan; Angell, Trevor E; Murphy, Katherine A; Church, Connor H; Ohlfest, John R; Hu, Peisheng; Epstein, Alan L

    2013-01-01

    Immune profiling has been widely used to probe mechanisms of immune escape in cancer and identify novel targets for therapy. Two emerging uses of immune signatures are to identify likely responders to immunotherapy regimens among individuals with cancer and to understand the variable responses seen among subjects with cancer in immunotherapy trials. Here, the immune profiles of 6 murine solid tumor models (CT26, 4T1, MAD109, RENCA, LLC, and B16) were correlated to tumor regression and survival in response to 2 immunotherapy regimens. Comprehensive profiles for each model were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry techniques, as well as functional studies of suppressor cell populations (regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells), to analyze intratumoral and draining lymphoid tissues. Tumors were stratified as highly or poorly immunogenic, with highly immunogenic tumors showing a significantly greater presence of T-cell costimulatory molecules and immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. An absence of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was seen across all models. Delayed tumor growth and increased survival with suppressor cell inhibition and tumor-targeted chemokine+/-dendritic cells vaccine immunotherapy were associated with high tumor immunogenicity in these models. Tumor MHC class I expression correlated with the overall tumor immunogenicity level and was a singular marker to predict immunotherapy response with these regimens. By using experimental tumor models as surrogates for human cancers, these studies demonstrate how select features of an immune profile may be utilized to identify patients most likely to respond to immunotherapy regimens. PMID:24145359

  11. Ultrasound Targeted Apoptosis Imaging in Monitoring Early Tumor Response of Trastuzumab in a Murine Tumor Xenograft Model of Her-2–Positive Breast Cancer11

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xi; Li, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Gao, Xiujun; Luo, Yi; Gao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to monitor the trastuzumab therapy response of murine tumor xenograft model with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her-2)–positive breast cancer using ultrasound targeted apoptosis imaging. METHODS: We prepared targeted apoptosis ultrasound probes by nanobubble (NB) binding with Annexin V. In vitro, we investigated the binding rate of NB–Annexin V with breast cancer apoptotic cells after the trastuzumab treatment. In vivo, tumor-bearing mice underwent ultrasound targeted imaging over 7 days. After imaging was completed, the tumors were excised to determine Her-2 and caspase-3 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The correlation between parameters of imaging and histologic results was then analyzed. RESULTS: For seeking the ability of targeted NB binding with apoptotic tumor cells (Her-2 positive), we found that binding rate in the treatment group was higher than that of the control group in vitro (P = .001). There were no differences of tumor sizes in all groups over the treatment process in vivo (P = .98). However, when using ultrasound imaging to visualize tumors by targeted NB in vivo, we observed that the mean and peak intensities from NBs gradually increased in the treatment group after trastuzumab therapy (P = .001). Furthermore, these two parameters were significantly associated with caspase-3 expression of tumor excised samples (P = .0001). CONCLUSION: Ultrasound targeted apoptosis imaging can be a non-invasive technique to evaluate the early breast tumor response to trastuzumab therapy. PMID:24685547

  12. Evaluation of serum level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in patients with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Noor Mohammad; Moghaddam, Maryam Nakhaee; Teimouri, Alireza; Shahramian, Iraj; Keyvani, Behrooz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study is to assess the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in patients with congenital heart diseases (CHDs) and control. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study, sixty patients with CHD with ages of 1 month to 15 years and thirty healthy subjects were assessed. All objects measured in height, weight, age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Patients diagnosed by echocardiography and patients’ blood samples were 3 ml and taken in the catheterization laboratory through catheter and kept for 60 min at a room with normal temperature and separated serum has been held. All samples in compliance with the cold chain carried out to biochemistry laboratory and finally the levels of serum TNF-α and IL-6 were measured by Elisa Kit. Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20. Nonparametric tests by considering 95% confidence interval were applied. Results: The mean of age in cyanotic patients was 4.28 ΁ 3.44 years, a cyanotic was 3.12 ΁ 3.87 years and for the control group was 3.30 ΁ 3.61 years. Comparison of TNF-α (Mann-Whitney U-test = 56.62, P < 0.001), IL-6 (Mann-Whitney U-test = 313.5, P < 0.001), right ventricular (RV) pressure (Mann-Whitney U-test = 27, P < 0.001), pulmonary artery (PA) pressure (Mann-Whitney U-test = 618, P = 0.015), and BMI (Mann-Whitney U-test = 214.5, P < 0.001) in the case and control groups resulted in significant differences. To compare TNF-α (Chi-square = 57.82, P < 0.001), IL-6 (Chi-square = 54.70, P < 0.001), RV pressure (Chi-square = 71.35, P < 0.001), PA pressure (Chi-square = 5.92, P = 00.052), oxygen saturation (Chi-square = 74.70, P < 0.001), and BMI (Chi-square = 34.90, P < 0.001) in cyanotic, acyanotic, and control groups resulted that there were significant differences between these three groups except PA pressure. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that in patients with CHD, serum levels of TNF-α increased

  13. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  14. Suppression of tumor cell proliferation by quinine via the inhibition of the tumor necrosis factor receptor‑associated factor 6‑AKT interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjuan; Qi, Yonghao; Liu, Lingyu; Tang, Yu; Wei, Jing; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-09-01

    Protein kinase B (AKT), is a pivotal component of pathways associated with cell survival, metabolism, invasion and metastasis. AKT mediates anti‑apoptotic and proliferative signaling in response to essential cytokines. Tumor necrosis factor receptor‑associated factor (TRAF)6, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been shown to ubiquitylate, as well as activate AKT. The present study used computational methods to determine the relevant amino acid residues at the binding site of TRAF6 and selected small molecules, which may bind to TRAF6. An ex vivo assay was performed to determine their antitumor activities and the possible mechanism of action. Quinine, a natural alkaloid that is well‑known for its therapeutic treatment of malaria, exhibited a distinct antiproliferative and pro‑apoptotic effect in HeLa and A549 tumor cell lines via the inhibition of the antiapoptotic protein, B‑cell lymphoma (BCL)‑2, and activation of the pro‑apoptotic factor, BCL‑2‑associated X protein. Quinine inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced activation of AKT by inhibiting its phosphorylation at Thr‑308 and Ser‑473, and reversing LPS‑induced proliferation. These results suggested that the inhibition of AKT activation via targeting of TRAF6 with quinine may be a viable anticancer therapeutic approach and a successful example of the alternative use of the original therapeutic properties of this well‑known natural product. PMID:27430155

  15. Triterpenoids Amplify Anti-Tumoral Effects of Mistletoe Extracts on Murine B16.F10 Melanoma In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Strüh, Christian M.; Jäger, Sebastian; Kersten, Astrid; Schempp, Christoph M.; Scheffler, Armin; Martin, Stefan F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mistletoe extracts are often used in complementary cancer therapy although the efficacy of that therapy is controversially discussed. Approved mistletoe extracts contain mainly water soluble compounds of the mistletoe plant, i.e. mistletoe lectins. However, mistletoe also contains water-insoluble triterpenoids (mainly oleanolic acid) that have anti-tumorigenic effects. To overcome their loss in watery extracts we have solubilized mistletoe triterpenoids with cyclodextrins, thus making them available for in vivo cancer experiments. Experimental design B16.F10 subcutaneous melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice were treated with new mistletoe extracts containing both water soluble compounds and solubilized triterpenoids. Tumor growth and survival was monitored. In addition, histological examinations of the tumor material and tumor surrounding tissue were performed. Results Addition of solubilized triterpenoids increased the anti-tumor effects of the mistletoe extracts, resulting in reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival of the mice. Histological examination of the treated tumors showed mainly tumor necrosis and some apoptotic cells with active caspase-3 and TUNEL staining. A significant decrease of CD31-positive tumor blood vessels was observed after treatment with solubilized triterpenoids and different mistletoe extracts. Conclusion We conclude that the addition of solubilized mistletoe triterpenoids to conventional mistletoe extracts improves the efficacy of mistletoe treatment and may represent a novel treatment option for malignant melanoma. PMID:23614029

  16. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  17. DMXAA causes tumor site-specific vascular disruption in murine non-small cell lung cancer, and like the endogenous non-canonical cyclic dinucleotide STING agonist, 2'3'-cGAMP, induces M2 macrophage repolarization.

    PubMed

    Downey, Charlene M; Aghaei, Mehrnoosh; Schwendener, Reto A; Jirik, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), a murine agonist of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), appears to target the tumor vasculature primarily as a result of stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Since there were relatively few reports of DMXAA effects in genetically-engineered mutant mice (GEMM), and models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in particular, we examined both the effectiveness and macrophage dependence of DMXAA in various NSCLC models. The DMXAA responses of primary adenocarcinomas in K-rasLA1/+ transgenic mice, as well as syngeneic subcutaneous and metastatic tumors, generated by a p53R172HΔg/+; K-rasLA1/+ NSCLC line (344SQ-ELuc), were assessed both by in vivo bioluminescence imaging as well as by histopathology. Macrophage-dependence of DMXAA effects was explored by clodronate liposome-mediated TAM depletion. Furthermore, a comparison of the vascular structure between subcutaneous tumors and metastases was carried out using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Interestingly, in contrast to the characteristic hemorrhagic necrosis produced by DMXAA in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors, this agent failed to cause hemorrhagic necrosis of either 344SQ-ELuc-derived metastases or autochthonous K-rasLA1/+ NSCLCs. In addition, we found that clodronate liposome-mediated depletion of TAMs in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors led to non-hemorrhagic necrosis due to tumor feeding-vessel occlusion. Since NSCLC were comprised exclusively of TAMs with anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype, the ability of DMXAA to re-educate M2-polarized macrophages was examined. Using various macrophage phenotypic markers, we found that the STING agonists, DMXAA and the non-canonical endogenous cyclic dinucleotide, 2'3'-cGAMP, were both capable of re-educating M2 cells towards an M1 phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that the choice of preclinical model and the anatomical site of a

  18. DMXAA Causes Tumor Site-Specific Vascular Disruption in Murine Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and like the Endogenous Non-Canonical Cyclic Dinucleotide STING Agonist, 2′3′-cGAMP, Induces M2 Macrophage Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Charlene M.; Aghaei, Mehrnoosh; Schwendener, Reto A.; Jirik, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), a murine agonist of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), appears to target the tumor vasculature primarily as a result of stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Since there were relatively few reports of DMXAA effects in genetically-engineered mutant mice (GEMM), and models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in particular, we examined both the effectiveness and macrophage dependence of DMXAA in various NSCLC models. The DMXAA responses of primary adenocarcinomas in K-rasLA1/+ transgenic mice, as well as syngeneic subcutaneous and metastatic tumors, generated by a p53R172HΔg/+; K-rasLA1/+ NSCLC line (344SQ-ELuc), were assessed both by in vivo bioluminescence imaging as well as by histopathology. Macrophage-dependence of DMXAA effects was explored by clodronate liposome-mediated TAM depletion. Furthermore, a comparison of the vascular structure between subcutaneous tumors and metastases was carried out using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Interestingly, in contrast to the characteristic hemorrhagic necrosis produced by DMXAA in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors, this agent failed to cause hemorrhagic necrosis of either 344SQ-ELuc-derived metastases or autochthonous K-rasLA1/+ NSCLCs. In addition, we found that clodronate liposome-mediated depletion of TAMs in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors led to non-hemorrhagic necrosis due to tumor feeding-vessel occlusion. Since NSCLC were comprised exclusively of TAMs with anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype, the ability of DMXAA to re-educate M2-polarized macrophages was examined. Using various macrophage phenotypic markers, we found that the STING agonists, DMXAA and the non-canonical endogenous cyclic dinucleotide, 2′3′-cGAMP, were both capable of re-educating M2 cells towards an M1 phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that the choice of preclinical model and the anatomical site of a

  19. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice. PMID:26978528

  20. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice. PMID:26978528

  1. Tissue oxygenation in a murine SCC VII tumor after X-ray irradiation as determined by EPR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hirotada; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Katsumata, Yoshihiro; Sato, Rikiya; Kinouchi, Makoto; Someya, Masanori; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Hareyama, Masato; Swartz, Harold M.; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to clarify the dynamics of tumor oxygen (partial pressure of oxygen, pO2) in SCC VII murine tumors in mice after X-ray irradiation. Materials and methods Changes in pO2 in tumors were measured by 1.2-GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy after they were exposed to various doses of irradiation. The pO2 in tumors was followed for up to six days after irradiation at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy. Paramagnetic crystals were used as an oximetry probe and implanted into normal or tumor tissues in mice for prolonged periods. Results The pattern of tumor oxygen after a single dose of radiation with the 5-Gy dose was different from those with other doses (10, 15, and 20 Gy). After 5 Gy, pO2 increased rapidly (P < 0.01, Student’s t test) and then returned to the level observed before irradiation by 12 hours (P < 0.01). In contrast, after 10, 15, or 20 Gy, pO2 increased rapidly by 6 h after irradiation, continued to increase until at least 24 h (P < 0.01), and then gradually decreased. Conclusion In tumors that received 5 Gy, post-irradiation increases in pO2 at 4 h after irradiation were detected by EPR oximetry (P < 0.01) noninvasively. PMID:18077029

  2. Effect of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α gene silencing on mouse gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    SUN, ZHONGWEI; MENG, YAN; LIU, GUOQIN; JIANG, YONGSHENG; MENG, QINGHUA; HU, SANYUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) gene co-silencing in mouse gastric cancer (GC) cells. Respectively, three pairs of liposome-encapsulated IL-1β and TNFα small interfering RNA (siRNA) were transfected into the mouse GC cell line MFC. The most effective siRNA, as identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, was used for co-suppression of IL-1β and TNFα genes. The activities of cell proliferation, colony formation and migration were determined by the Cell Counting Kit 8 method, colony formation assay and Transwell assay, respectively. Protein array analysis was performed to identify the differentially expressed factors. The possible signaling pathways of the various factors targeting the genes were identified by pathway enrichment analysis using KOBAS 2.0. siRNA1 and siRNAc were the most effective interference sequences for IL-1β and TNFα, respectively. Following co-transfection of siRNA1 and siRNAc, the expression of IL-1β and TNFα was inhibited at the mRNA and protein levels, and the cell proliferation, colony forming and migration abilities were reduced (P<0.05). The expression of inflammatory factors, including chemokine ligand 5, cyclooxygenase-2, IL-6, transforming growth factor β, IL-17A, matrix metallopeptidase 9 and stromal cell-derived factor 1α were also inhibited (P<0.05). These factors are mainly involved in the rheumatoid arthritis pathway, the intestinal immune network for IgA production, the TNF signaling pathway and the inflammatory bowel disease pathway. IL-1β and TNFα gene silencing inhibits the proliferation and migration of MFC. The mechanisms may involve multiple inflammatory factors that participate in the signaling pathways of tumor tissue inflammation, the immune network and TNF. PMID:27073517

  3. Antibodies against amino acids 1-15 of tumor necrosis factor block its binding to cell-surface receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Socher, S H; Riemen, M W; Martinez, D; Friedman, A; Tai, J; Quintero, J C; Garsky, V; Oliff, A

    1987-01-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor (hTNF) mediates a variety of biologic activities, which are dependent on the attachment of hTNF to cell-surface receptors. To identify regions of the hTNF protein involved in binding hTNF to its receptor, we prepared five synthetic peptides [hTNF-(1-15), hTNF-(1-31), hTNF-(65-79), hTNF-(98-111), and hTNF-(124-141)] and two hydroxylamine cleavage fragments [hTNF-(1-39) and hTNF-(40-157)] of hTNF. The hTNF-synthetic peptides and hTNF fragments were tested in hTNF receptor binding assays and in two biologic assays: cytolysis of tumor cells and suppression of lipoprotein lipase in adipocytes. Neither the synthetic peptides nor hTNF fragments were active agonists or antagonists in these assays. The synthetic peptides were also conjugated to thyroglobulin, and peptide-specific antisera were raised. All five peptide-thyroglobulin conjugates induced antibody responses to the immunizing peptide and to hTNF. Each antiserum was tested for antagonist activity in hTNF binding assays. Only antisera raised against hTNF-(1-15) or hTNF-(1-31) and antisera against whole hTNF blocked binding. IgGs purified from these three antisera also block hTNF-induced cytolysis and lipoprotein lipase suppression. We conclude that antibodies that recognize the N-terminus of hTNF block the attachment of hTNF to its cellular receptor and inhibit the biologic effects of hTNF. PMID:2827156

  4. A pathogenic role for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Haw, T J; Starkey, M R; Nair, P M; Pavlidis, S; Liu, G; Nguyen, D H; Hsu, A C; Hanish, I; Kim, R Y; Collison, A M; Inman, M D; Wark, P A; Foster, P S; Knight, D A; Mattes, J; Yagita, H; Adcock, I M; Horvat, J C; Hansbro, P M

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a life-threatening inflammatory respiratory disorder, often induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. The development of effective therapies is impaired by a lack of understanding of the underlining mechanisms. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a cytokine with inflammatory and apoptotic properties. We interrogated a mouse model of CS-induced experimental COPD and human tissues to identify a novel role for TRAIL in COPD pathogenesis. CS exposure of wild-type mice increased TRAIL and its receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and protein levels, as well as the number of TRAIL(+)CD11b(+) monocytes in the lung. TRAIL and its receptor mRNA were also increased in human COPD. CS-exposed TRAIL-deficient mice had decreased pulmonary inflammation, pro-inflammatory mediators, emphysema-like alveolar enlargement, and improved lung function. TRAIL-deficient mice also developed spontaneous small airway changes with increased epithelial cell thickness and collagen deposition, independent of CS exposure. Importantly, therapeutic neutralization of TRAIL, after the establishment of early-stage experimental COPD, reduced pulmonary inflammation, emphysema-like alveolar enlargement, and small airway changes. These data provide further evidence for TRAIL being a pivotal inflammatory factor in respiratory diseases, and the first preclinical evidence to suggest that therapeutic agents that target TRAIL may be effective in COPD therapy. PMID:26555706

  5. Pathogenetic and Therapeutic Applications of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) in Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Zhang, Hongxiu; Baloch, Zulqarnain

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by mood, vegetative, cognitive, and even psychotic symptoms and signs that can cause substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. Up to now, the exact pathogenesis of MDD remains poorly understood. Recent research has begun to reveal that the pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), play an integral role in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and the mechanism of antidepressant treatment. On the base of several observations: it is found that subsets of MDD patients have enhanced plasma levels TNF-α; antidepressant treatments had linked with the decline of TNF-α; central administration of TNF-α gives rise to sickness behavior which shares features with depression; and a blockade of it can ameliorate depressive symptomatology in animal models and clinical trials. In this review article, we focus on recent evidence linking TNF-α and MDD looking at data from animal and clinical studies, illustrating the pathophysiological role, susceptibility and its therapeutic application in depression. We conclude by discussing future directions for research, in particular the opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics that target TNF-α. This will be very important for designing preventative strategies and for the identification of new drug targets and preventative strategies. PMID:27187381

  6. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  7. Ferulic acid enhances the vasorelaxant effect of epigallocatechin gallate in tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced inflammatory rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Suyama, Aki; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2014-07-01

    Previously, we demonstrated synergistic enhancement of vasorelaxation by combination treatment with Trp-His and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) in intact rat aorta. The aim of the present study was to determine whether this vasorelaxant synergy could be recapitulated in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced inflammatory rat aorta, and to determine the extent of its modulation by anti-inflammatory phenolic acids. Synergistic enhancement of vasorelaxation in rat aorta by Trp-His and EGCg was significantly attenuated in the presence of TNF-α, an effect that was reversed by the addition of ferulic acid (FA, 250 μM). Moreover, FA markedly enhanced EGCg-induced vasorelaxation, but not Trp-His-induced vasorelaxation, in TNF-α-treated aorta. Structure-activity analysis showed that the unsaturated 2-propenoic moiety and the methoxy group of FA were important for the enhancement of vasorelaxation by EGCg. The stimulation of EGCg-induced vasorelaxation by FA was antagonized by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine acetate, while FA enhanced vasorelaxant properties of the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase activator acetylcholine in TNF-α-treated inflammatory aorta. Moreover, the EGCg-stimulated NO production was also enhanced by FA in TNF-α-treated aorta. These data indicate that stimulation of NO production by FA enhances the vasorelaxant properties of EGCg in TNF-α-induced inflammatory aorta. PMID:24794014

  8. Canarypox Virus-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells Is Mediated by Apoptotic Cell Death and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ignatius, Ralf; Marovich, Mary; Mehlhop, Erin; Villamide, Loreley; Mahnke, Karsten; Cox, William I.; Isdell, Frank; Frankel, Sarah S.; Mascola, John R.; Steinman, Ralph M.; Pope, Melissa

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant avipox viruses are being widely evaluated as vaccines. To address how these viruses, which replicate poorly in mammalian cells, might be immunogenic, we studied how canarypox virus (ALVAC) interacts with primate antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). When human and rhesus macaque monocyte-derived DCs were exposed to recombinant ALVAC, immature DCs were most susceptible to infection. However, many of the infected cells underwent apoptotic cell death, and dying infected cells were engulfed by uninfected DCs. Furthermore, a subset of DCs matured in the ALVAC-exposed DC cultures. DC maturation coincided with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secretion and was significantly blocked in the presence of anti-TNF-α antibodies. Interestingly, inhibition of apoptosis with a caspase 3 inhibitor also reduced some of the maturation induced by exposure to ALVAC. This indicates that both TNF-α and the presence of primarily apoptotic cells contributed to DC maturation. Therefore, infection of immature primate DCs with ALVAC results in apoptotic death of infected cells, which can be internalized by noninfected DCs driving DC maturation in the presence of the TNF-α secreted concomitantly by exposed cells. This suggests an important mechanism that may influence the immunogenicity of avipox virus vectors. PMID:11070033

  9. Uncoupling the Proinflammatory from the Immunosuppressive Properties of Tumor Necrosis Factor (Tnf) at the P55 TNF Receptor Level

    PubMed Central

    Kassiotis, George; Kollias, George

    2001-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disabling inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, considered to result from self-reactivity to myelin antigens. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the p55 TNF receptor (TNFR) have been strongly implicated in MS pathogenesis. We reveal in this study a dual role for TNF in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model for MS. In addition to its well-established proinflammatory effects, TNF exhibits potent immunosuppressive properties, providing one possible explanation for the immune and disease activating effect of anti-TNF treatment of MS. We show that in TNF-deficient mice, myelin-specific T cell reactivity fails to regress and expansion of activated/memory T cells is abnormally prolonged, leading to exacerbated EAE. Strikingly, immnosuppression by TNF and protection against EAE does not require the p55 TNFR, whereas the same receptor is necessary for the detrimental effects of TNF during the acute phase of the disease. Thus, blocking the function of the p55 TNFR in autoimmune demyelination may inhibit the noxious proinflammatory activities of TNF without compromising its immunosuppressive properties. PMID:11181695

  10. Prevention of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice by tumor necrosis factor (TNF): similarities between TNF-alpha and interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, C O; Aiso, S; Michie, S A; McDevitt, H O; Acha-Orbea, H

    1990-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes mellitus was tested in the nonobese mouse (NOD) model system. The effects of TNF-alpha were assessed on three levels: (i) insulitis development, (ii) development of overt diabetes, (iii) adoptive transfer of diabetes by splenic lymphocytes. Spontaneous diabetes mellitus was blocked in NOD mice by long-term treatment with recombinant TNF-alpha. Treatment with TNF-alpha caused a significant reduction in the lymphocytic infiltration associated with the destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Class II major histocompatibility complex Ia expression by islet cells was not up-regulated by TNF-alpha. Moreover, TNF-alpha was able to suppress the induction of diabetes in adoptive transfer of lymphocytes from diabetic female mice to young nondiabetic male NOD mice. These activities of TNF-alpha were shared by interleukin 1 alpha in this system. These studies have implications for the pathogenesis and therapy of autoimmune diabetes mellitus. Images PMID:2405400

  11. In Autoimmune Diabetes the Transition from Benign to Pernicious Insulitis Requires an Islet Cell Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor α

    PubMed Central

    Pakala, Syamasundar V.; Chivetta, Marylee; Kelly, Colleen B.; Katz, Jonathan D.

    1999-01-01

    The islet-infiltrating and disease-causing leukocytes that are a hallmark of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus produce and respond to a set of cytokine molecules. Of these, interleukin 1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon (IFN)-γ are perhaps the most important. However, as pleiotropic molecules, they can impact the path leading to β cell apoptosis and diabetes at multiple points. To understand how these cytokines influence both the formative and effector phases of insulitis, it is critical to determine their effects on the assorted cell types comprising the lesion: the effector T cells, antigen-presenting cells, vascular endothelium, and target islet tissue. Here, we report using nonobese diabetic chimeric mice harboring islets deficient in specific cytokine receptors or cytokine-induced effector molecules to assess how these compartmentalized loss-of-function mutations alter the events leading to diabetes. We found that islets deficient in Fas, IFN-γ receptor, or inducible nitric oxide synthase had normal diabetes development; however, the specific lack of TNF- α receptor 1 (p55) afforded islets a profound protection from disease by altering the ability of islet-reactive, CD4+ T cells to establish insulitis and subsequently destroy islet β cells. These results argue that islet cells play a TNF-α–dependent role in their own demise. PMID:10190896

  12. Mycobacterium marinum SecA2 Promotes Stable Granulomas and Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Brigitte Y.; Joshi, Shilpa A.; Ball, David A.; Leggett, Hadley; Park, Summer; Kim, Janice; Austin, Cary D.; Paler-Martinez, Andres; Xu, Min; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    SecA2 is an ATPase present in some pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, is required for translocation of a limited set of proteins across the cytosolic membrane, and plays an important role in virulence in several bacteria, including mycobacteria that cause diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. However, the mechanisms by which SecA2 affects virulence are incompletely understood. To investigate whether SecA2 modulates host immune responses in vivo, we studied Mycobacterium marinum infection in two different hosts: an established zebrafish model and a recently described mouse model. Here we show that M. marinum ΔsecA2 was attenuated for virulence in both host species and SecA2 was needed for normal granuloma numbers and for optimal tumor necrosis factor alpha response in both zebrafish and mice. M. marinum ΔsecA2 was more sensitive to SDS and had unique protrusions from its cell envelope when examined by cryo-electron tomography, suggesting that SecA2 is important for bacterial cell wall integrity. These results provide evidence that SecA2 induces granulomas and is required for bacterial modulation of the host response because it affects the mycobacterial cell envelope. PMID:22851747

  13. Spontaneous and stimulated release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) from blood monocytes of miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Borm, P J; Palmen, N; Engelen, J J; Buurman, W A

    1988-12-01

    It is generally accepted that fibrotic lung diseases are mediated by macrophage-derived cytokines. We investigated the release of the monokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) from blood monocytes in a group of 66 coal miners and 12 non-dust-exposed individuals. Twenty-seven miners had simple Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis (CWP). Control miners (n = 39) were matched with respect to age, years underground, and smoking. Monocytes were assayed for TNF release, spontaneously or in response to soluble (endotoxin) or particulate (coal mine dust, silica) stimulation. TNF was measured with a TNF-specific ELISA. Monocytes of all subjects responded to stimulants by the release of TNF. Dust-exposed controls' monocytes revealed higher TNF release as compared to normal controls. The greatest discriminator between control miners and cases (CWP) was coal mine dust-induced TNF release. Interestingly, the largest difference was observed between controls and those cases with a small number of opacities (0/1, 1/0, 1/1, and 1/2), giving an odds ratio of 6.3 to find an individual with a "high" dust-induced TNF release in the patient group. PMID:2849351

  14. Effects of nasal CPAP on exhaled SIRT1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Chi; Liaw, Shwu-Fang; Chiu, Chung-Hsin; Chen, Wei-Ji; Lin, Mei-Wei; Chang, Feng-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been used to examine airway inflammation and oxidative stress. This study aimed to evaluate if there were abnormal Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in EBC and to determine if these levels could be improved after nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Thirty-five patients with moderately severe to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) who wanted nasal CPAP treatment and 20 healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. The EBC SIRT1 protein levels and EBC TNF-α protein levels were assessed by ELISA. All patients underwent sleep studies that were repeated 3 months after nasal CPAP treatment in patients with OSAS. Results showed that in OSAS before nasal CPAP treatment, the EBC SIRT1 protein levels were lower than that in normal subjects, whereas the EBC TNF-α protein levels were higher. After nasal CPAP treatment, the EBC SIRT1 levels increased and EBC TNF-α levels decreased. In conclusion, successful treatment of OSAS by nasal CPAP can normalize the levels of EBC SIRT1 and EBC TNF-α. PMID:26976689

  15. Tissue Destruction Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection in a Mouse Chamber Model Is Associated with Host Tumor Necrosis Factor Generation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuh-Yih; Huang, Jan-Hung; Lai, Yo-Yin; Huang, Han-Ching; Hu, Suh-Woan

    2005-01-01

    Intrachamber challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis strain 381 in a mouse subcutaneous chamber model results in a local infection that progresses to exfoliation of the chambers within 15 days. This study was designed to elucidate the contribution of host reactions to tissue destruction manifested by chamber exfoliation in animals infected with P. gingivalis. Chamber fluids showed increasing levels of prostaglandin E2 with infection, and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in chamber fluids peaked just before chamber exfoliation. Intraperitoneal injection of a TNF inhibitor, thalidomide (TH), reduced the number of exfoliated chambers, while indomethacin had no effect. Exogenous TNF in chambers without bacterial infection did not cause chamber exfoliation but induced neutrophil infiltration. In a dual-chamber model, two chambers were implanted in the same mouse. One chamber was infected with P. gingivalis, and 9 days later exogenous TNF was added to the other chamber. Altogether, 66.67% of uninfected chambers were exfoliated between day 11 and day 16, although no bacteria were recovered from uninfected chambers. TH treatment alleviated both infected and uninfected chamber exfoliation. In this study, tissue destruction caused by P. gingivalis 381 infection was due to the elevation of the TNF levels and not due to local bacterial activities. Our results further indicate that local infection by P. gingivalis 381, a nondisseminating strain, actually has systemic effects on the host pathological outcome. PMID:16299286

  16. Significance of Tumor necrosis factor α-308 (G/A) gene polymorphism in the development of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Nega; Sobti, Rabinder Chandera; Melesse, Shiferaw; Mahdi, Salih Abdul; Kassu, Afework

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer among men, accounting for 10 % of male cancer-related deaths worldwide. The etiology of PCa is largely unknown, although multiple environmental and lifestyle factors such as ultraviolet irradiation, smoking, and diet might increase the risk of the disease. Risk of disease varies most prominently with age, ethnicity, family history, and diet. The multifunctional cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) has an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory, autoimmune and malignant diseases. In this case control study 150 Prostate cancer patients and 150 age matched benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and equal number of healthy control groups were involved. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of TNF-α-308 (G/A) polymorphism on risk of prostate cancer on north Indian prostate cancer patients. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was utilized to genotype TNF-α-308 (G/A) polymorphism. The present study showed statistically significant increased risk of prostate cancer among individuals that carried the A allele of TNF-α-308 gene (OR = 1.81, 95 % CI 1.00-3.481, p = 0.03). PMID:23065208

  17. Elevated CO2 selectively inhibits interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor expression and decreases phagocytosis in the macrophage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Naizhen; Gates, Khalilah L; Trejo, Humberto; Favoreto, Silvio; Schleimer, Robert P; Sznajder, Jacob I; Beitel, Greg J; Sporn, Peter H S

    2010-07-01

    Elevated blood and tissue CO(2), or hypercapnia, is common in severe lung disease. Patients with hypercapnia often develop lung infections and have an increased risk of death following pneumonia. To explore whether hypercapnia interferes with host defense, we studied the effects of elevated P(CO2) on macrophage innate immune responses. In differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human and mouse alveolar macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and other Toll-like receptor ligands, hypercapnia inhibited expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-6, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB-dependent cytokines critical for antimicrobial host defense. Inhibition of IL-6 expression by hypercapnia was concentration dependent, rapid, reversible, and independent of extracellular and intracellular acidosis. In contrast, hypercapnia did not down-regulate IL-10 or interferon-beta, which do not require NF-kappaB. Notably, hypercapnia did not affect LPS-induced degradation of IkappaB alpha, nuclear translocation of RelA/p65, or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, but it did block IL-6 promoter-driven luciferase activity in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. Elevated P(CO2) also decreased phagocytosis of opsonized polystyrene beads and heat-killed bacteria in THP-1 and human alveolar macrophages. By interfering with essential innate immune functions in the macrophage, hypercapnia may cause a previously unrecognized defect in resistance to pulmonary infection in patients with advanced lung disease. PMID:20181940

  18. The functional tumor necrosis factor-α (308A/G) polymorphism modulates attentional selection in elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Patrick D; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus; Falkenstein, Michael; Beste, Christian

    2013-11-01

    There has been increasing interest in understanding the role of inflammatory processes for cognitive functions in aging using molecular genetic approaches. Though this has mostly been evaluated in pathological aging, little is known about the relevance for cognitive functions in healthy aging in humans. On the basis of behavioral data and neurophysiological data (event-related potentials and time-frequency decomposition) we show that the A-allele of the functional tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α -308 A/G polymorphism confers dysfunction in a number of cognitive processes: prolonged attentional selection indexed by a delayed P1/N1 complex, an increased P3a, which is interpreted as an enhanced distractibility by nonrelevant stimuli and compromised response selection mechanisms, as indexed by a reduced frontocentral N2. Time-frequency analyses show that allelic variations further exert their effects by modulating alpha and beta frequency oscillations. On a neurobiological level, these effects might be because of the interaction of TNF-α with glutamatergic neural transmission by which TNF-α is known to boost apoptotic mechanisms in elderly individuals. PMID:23673311

  19. Variation in the Lymphotoxin-α/Tumor Necrosis Factor Locus Modifies Risk of Erythema Nodosum in Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Kathryn E.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Moller, David R.; Song, Zhimin; Cutler, David J.; Steiner, Lori L.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2010-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system inflammatory disease with organ involvement that varies by race and sex. Family studies indicate that genes play a role in the etiology and extent of organ involvement in sarcoidosis. In this study, we evaluated whether 25 variants distributed in 19 genes with a known role in inflammation were associated with erythema nodosum status in 659 sarcoidosis patients and 658 controls from A Case–Control Etiologic Study of Sarcoidosis (ACCESS). We found no association with affectation status; however, a variant in the promoter of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) at position −308 was found to be associated with erythema nodosum in Caucasian sarcoidosis patients (study-wide P = 0.027). When separated by sex, a variant in intron 1 of lymphotoxin-α (LTA), a gene adjacent to TNF, was associated with erythema nodosum in female Caucasian sarcoidosis patients (study-wide P = 0.027). These DNA variants frequently occur together in Caucasians, and each variant has individually been associated with erythema nodosum in sarcoidosis patients. These results confirm that variation in the LTA/TNF gene cluster modifies a major skin manifestation of sarcoidosis and may explain the higher rate of erythema nodosum in females with sarcoidosis. PMID:19225544

  20. Pathophysiological roles of microvascular alterations in pulmonary inflammatory diseases: possible implications of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Orihara, Kanami; Matsuda, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma are common respiratory diseases that are caused by chronic inflammation of the airways. Although these diseases are mediated by substantially distinct immunological reactions, especially in mild cases, they both show increased numbers of neutrophils, increased production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and poor responses to corticosteroids, particularly in patients with severe diseases. These immunological alterations may contribute strongly to airway structural changes, commonly referred to as airway remodeling. Microvascular alterations, a component of airway remodeling and caused by chronic inflammation, are observed and appear to be clinically involved in both diseases. It has been well established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays important roles in the airway microvascular alterations in mild and moderate cases of both diseases, but any role that VEGF might play in severe cases of these diseases remains unclear. Here, we review recent research findings, including our own data, and discuss the possibility that TNF-α and its associated CXC chemokines play roles in microvascular alterations that are even more crucial than those of VEGF in patients with severe COPD or asthma. PMID:19281078

  1. Targeting the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α to alleviate cardiopulmonary bypass-induced lung injury (review).

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingxin; Xie, Baodong; Gu, Chengxiong; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Fan; Yu, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary dysfunction is one of the most frequent complications associated with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Multiple factors, including the contact of blood with the artificial surface of the CPB circuit, ischemia‑reperfusion and lung ventilator arrest elicit inflammatory reactions, consequently resulting in CPB‑induced lung injury. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) has been demonstrated to have a critical role in mediating CPB‑induced pulmonary inflammation. The present review evaluated previous studies and summarized the effects of CPB on TNF‑α level in the serum and lung tissue of patients and animal models of CPB, the underlying mechanism of TNF‑α‑mediated lung injury and the therapeutic strategies for the inhibition of TNF‑α activity and production to attenuate CPB‑induced lung injury. TNF‑α level in the serum and lung tissue is significantly increased during and following CPB. TNF‑α mediates CPB‑induced lung damage by directly inducing apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells and lung endothelial cells and by indirectly modulating the function of immune cells, including monocytes and macrophages. A functional neutralizing antibody to TNF‑α can reduce pulmonary TNF‑α production and attenuate CPB‑induced lung injury in a rabbit model of CPB. Inhibition of TNF‑α function and production using a neutralizing antibody to TNF‑α appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy to alleviate CPB‑induced lung injury. PMID:25483004

  2. Transgenerational Glucose Intolerance of Tumor Necrosis Factor with Epigenetic Alteration in Rat Perirenal Adipose Tissue Induced by Intrauterine Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Su, Rina; Yan, Jie; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Changes in DNA methylation may play a role in the genetic mechanism underlying glucose intolerance in the offspring of mothers with diabetes. Here, we established a rat model of moderate intrauterine hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin to detect glucose and lipid metabolism of first-generation (F1) and second-generation (F2) offspring. Moderate intrauterine hyperglycemia induced high body weight in F1 and F2 offspring of diabetic mothers. F1 offspring had impaired glucose tolerance and abnormal insulin level. Additionally, F1 and F2 offspring that were exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia had impaired insulin secretion from the islets. The tumor necrosis factor (Tnf) gene was upregulated in perirenal adipose tissue from F1 offspring and relatively increased in F2 offspring. Both F1 and F2 offspring showed similar hypomethylation level at the −1952 site of Tnf. We confirmed that DNA methylation occurs in offspring exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia and that the DNA methylation is intergenerational and inherited. PMID:26881249

  3. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on body fat, tumor necrosis factor alpha and resistin secretion in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Díaz, Guillermo; Alexander-Aguilera, Alfonso; Arzaba-Villalba, Agustin; Soto-Rodríguez, Ida; García, Hugo S

    2010-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a naturally occurring group of dienoic derivaties of linoleic acid found mainly in beef and dairy products. CLA has been reported to reduce body fat, as well as to possess anticarcinogenic, antiatherogenic and procatabolic activities in animals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of CLA supplementation to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) on body fat, biochemical parameters of serum related tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and resistin secretion. Thirty rats were divided in three groups, the first group of spontaneously hypertensive rats received a standard diet (V-SHR group, n=10), a second group of SHR was fed 1.5% of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA-SHR group, n=10) and the third was the control, non-hypertensive group (KW, n=10) also on a standard diet including 7.5% of sunflower oil during eight weeks. After CLA diet administration, spontaneously hypertensive rats showed a significant reduction in blood pressure, serum glucose, cholesterol and triacylglycerols, together with reduction of index of body fat, pericardic, abdominal and epididymal adipose tissue. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in the secretion of TNF-alpha and resistin. PMID:20074923

  4. Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin (TNF alpha) in sera from patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Malavé, I; Perdomo, Y; Escalona, E; Rodriguez, E; Anchustegui, M; Malavé, H; Arends, T

    1993-01-01

    Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin (TNF alpha) were studied in a group of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), which include 31 patients with homozygous SS hemoglobinopathy and 10 patients bearing double heterozygous SC hemoglobinopathy and in their matched normal controls. All patients tested did not show any form of crisis for at least 4 weeks prior to the extraction of the sample. The amount of TNF alpha in serum was quantitated by means of an immunoenzymatic assay with a lower limit of detection of 25 pg/ml. The percentage of sera with detectable levels of TNF alpha was significantly increased in SCD patients as compared with the normal controls. Mean TNF alpha values in individuals with detectable levels of the cytokine were also significantly higher in the whole group of SCD patients and in patients bearing either SS or SC hemoglobinopathies than in the control group. An inverse correlation was observed between the percentages of Hb F and the levels of TNF alpha found in the sera from the patients. PMID:8140855

  5. Canakinumab efficacy and long-term tocilizumab administration in tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    La Torre, Francesco; Muratore, Maurizio; Vitale, Antonio; Moramarco, Fulvio; Quarta, Laura; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disease caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene. Treatment is aimed at preventing acute disease attacks, improving quality of life, and preventing long-term complications such as systemic reactive amyloidosis. Biologic agents have significantly improved TRAPS management. In particular, interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition either with the recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra or with the human IgG1 anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody canakinumab has recently shown to induce a prompt and stable disease remission. Conversely, the successful experience with IL-6 inhibition is nowadays limited to a single patient. Anyway, introduction of new treatment options for patients requiring a lifelong therapy is desirable. We describe two TRAPS patients (son and father) successfully treated with canakinumab and tocilizumab, respectively. In particular, we highlight the clinical and laboratory efficacy as well as the good safety profile of tocilizumab during a 42-month follow-up period. PMID:26048626

  6. Relationship of endotoxin to tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta in children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Willett, D N; Rezaee, R P; Billy, J M; Tighe, M B; DeMaria, T F

    1998-01-01

    Sixty-five middle ear effusions and paired sera from 41 children with chronic otitis media with effusion were assayed for endotoxin and for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) in order to establish whether a correlation exists between the concentrations of endotoxin and of these cytokines. Endotoxin concentration was determined by means of a chromogenic limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and the cytokine concentration by means of a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Forty percent of the effusions had detectable levels of endotoxin, with a mean concentration of 2.9 +/- 7.8 endotoxin units per milligram of total protein. The mean concentration of TNF-alpha was 1.24 +/- 3.1 pg/mg total protein, and that of IL-1 beta was 18.79 pg/mg total protein. A strong, statistically significant correlation exists between the concentrations of endotoxin and TNF-alpha (r = .89) and IL-1 beta (r = .72). The data indicate that endotoxin may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media with effusion by stimulating the sustained production of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta in the middle ear. PMID:9439385

  7. Structural Insights into mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhubing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yanyan; Li, Chuanchuan; Wang, Xin; He, Feng; Sun, Lina; Jiao, Shi; Shi, Weiyang; Zhou, Zhaocai

    2015-10-30

    In response to viral infection, cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors sense viral RNA and promote oligomerization of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), which then recruits tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family proteins, including TRAF6, to activate an antiviral response. Currently, the interaction between MAVS and TRAF6 is only partially understood, and atomic details are lacking. Here, we demonstrated that MAVS directly interacts with TRAF6 through its potential TRAF6-binding motif 2 (T6BM2; amino acids 455-460). Further, we solved the crystal structure of MAVS T6BM2 in complex with the TRAF6 TRAF_C domain at 2.95 Å resolution. T6BM2 of MAVS binds to the canonical adaptor-binding groove of the TRAF_C domain. Structure-directed mutational analyses in vitro and in cells revealed that MAVS binding to TRAF6 via T6BM2 instead of T6BM1 is essential but not sufficient for an optimal antiviral response. Particularly, a MAVS mutant Y460E retained its TRAF6-binding ability as predicted but showed significantly impaired signaling activity, highlighting the functional importance of this tyrosine. Moreover, these observations were further confirmed in MAVS(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Collectively, our work provides a structural basis for understanding the MAVS-TRAF6 antiviral response. PMID:26385923

  8. Legionella pneumophila EnhC is required for efficient replication in tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyu; Conover, Gloria M.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2008-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila enhC− mutants were originally identified as being defective for uptake into host cells. In this work, we found that the absence of EnhC resulted in defective intracellular growth when dissemination of intracellular bacteria to neighboring cells was expected to occur. No such defect was observed during growth within the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum Culture supernatants containing the secreted products of infected macrophages added to host cells restricted the growth of the ΔenhC strain, while tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), at concentrations similar to those found in macrophage culture supernatants, could reproduce the growth restriction exerted by culture supernatants on L. pneumophila ΔenhC. The absence of EnhC also caused defective trafficking of the Legionella-containing vacuole in TNF-α treated macrophages. EnhC was shown to be an envelope-associated protein largely localized to the periplasm, with its expression induced in post-exponential phase, as is true for many virulence-associated proteins. Furthermore, the absence of EnhC appeared to affect survival under stress conditions, as the ΔenhC mutant was more susceptible to H2O2 treatment than the wild type strain. EnhC, therefore, is a unique virulence factor that is required for growth specifically when macrophages have heightened potential to restrict microbial replication. PMID:18549456

  9. Structural insights of homotypic interaction domains in the ligand-receptor signal transduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-01-01

    Several members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily that these members activate caspase-8 from death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in TNF ligand-receptor signal transduction have been identified. In the extrinsic pathway, apoptotic signal transduction is induced in death domain (DD) superfamily; it consists of a hexahelical bundle that contains 80 amino acids. The DD superfamily includes about 100 members that belong to four subfamilies: death domain (DD), caspase recruitment domain (CARD), pyrin domain (PYD), and death effector domain (DED). This superfamily contains key building blocks: with these blocks, multimeric complexes are formed through homotypic interactions. Furthermore, each DD-binding event occurs exclusively. The DD superfamily regulates the balance between death and survival of cells. In this study, the structures, functions, and unique features of DD superfamily members are compared with their complexes. By elucidating structural insights of DD superfamily members, we investigate the interaction mechanisms of DD domains; these domains are involved in TNF ligand-receptor signaling. These DD superfamily members play a pivotal role in the development of more specific treatments of cancer. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 159-166] PMID:26615973

  10. [Expression and analysis of the extracellular domain of human glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor ligand in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yanli; Zheng, Fang; Li, Xiaoxia; Wang, Baoli; Guo, Shanyi

    2009-05-01

    GITRL (Glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor ligand) has been recently identified as a novel inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis and hence called Osteostat. In this study, we expressed recombinant extracellular domain of GITRL protein in Escherichia coli and analyzed its bioactivity. Using an Eco31I enzyme-based restriction and ligation method, we obtained an E. coli-preferred DNA sequence coding for the extracellular domain of human GITRL. The DNA was cloned into expression vector pQE-30Xa that encodes a fusion tag of 6xHis before the insert. The resultant recombinant expression vector pQE/GITRL was subsequently transformed into E. coli strain M15[pREP4]. After induction with Isopropyl beta-D-Thiogalactoside (IPTG), the cells produced the fusion protein mainly in the form of inclusion bodies as identified by SDS-PAGE. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography through Ni-NTA column and recognized by anti-His polyclonal antibody using Western blotting analysis. Moreover, we established a simple, efficient and sensitive reporter gene-based method to detect the activity of the recombinant protein. The results showed that the target protein was biologically active. PMID:19670639

  11. Okadaic acid mimics multiple changes in early protein phosphorylation and gene expression induced by tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1.

    PubMed

    Guy, G R; Cao, X; Chua, S P; Tan, Y H

    1992-01-25

    Okadaic acid, a phosphatase inhibitor from a marine organism, mimics tumor necrosis factor/interleukin-1 (TNF/IL-1) in inducing changes in early cellular protein phosphorylation. A total of approximately 116 proteins exhibit significant and concordant changes in phosphorylation or dephosphorylation within 15 min in human fibroblasts activated by either okadaic acid, TNF, or IL-1. The fidelity of this mimicry by okadaic acid extends to the phosphorylation of the 27 hsp complex, stathmin, eIF-4E, myosin light chain, nucleolin, epidermal growth factor receptor, and other cdc2-kinase substrates (c-abl, RB, and p53). The okadaic acid-induced pattern of protein phosphorylation is distinct from that observed in cells treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or with ligands like epidermal growth factor, cyclic AMP agonists, bradykinin, or interferons. Like TNF, okadaic acid also induces the transcription of immediate early response genes like c-jun and Egr-1 as well as the interleukin-6 genes. The overall early effects of okadaic acid uniquely parallel those of TNF/IL-1 and not those of other cytokines or ligands. Regulation of protein phosphatase inhibition is discussed as a mechanism for TNF/IL-1 signal transduction. PMID:1370482

  12. Tumor necrosis factor alpha -308 gene locus promoter polymorphism: an analysis of association with health and disease.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Asotra, Kamlesh; Matata, Bashir M; Mastana, Sarabjit S

    2009-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a potent immunomediator and proinflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a large number of human diseases. The location of its gene within major histocompatibility complex and biological activities has raised the possibility that polymorphisms within this locus may contribute to the pathogenesis of wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. For example, a bi-allelic single nucleotide substitution of G (TNFA1 allele) with A (TNFA2 allele) polymorphism at -308 nucleotides upstream from the transcription initiation site in the TNF-alpha promoter is associated with elevated TNF-alpha levels and disease susceptibilities. However, it is still unclear whether TNF-alpha -308 polymorphism plays a part in the disease process, in particular whether it could affect transcription factor binding and in turn influence TNF-alpha transcription and synthesis. Several studies have suggested that TNFA2 allele is significantly linked with the high TNF-alpha-producing autoimmune MHC haplotype HLA-A1, B8, DR3, with elevated serum TNF-alpha levels and a more severe outcome in diseases. This review discusses the genetics of the TNF-alpha -308 polymorphism in selected major diseases and evaluates its common role in health and disease. PMID:19708125

  13. Microglial Derived Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Drives Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Neuronal Cell Cycle Events

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Kiran; Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Varvel, Nicholas H.; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Weick, Jason P.; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Lamb, Bruce T.

    2013-01-01

    Massive neuronal loss is a key pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the mechanisms are still unclear. Here we demonstrate that neuroinflammation, cell autonomous to microglia, is capable of inducing neuronal cell cycle events (CCEs), which are toxic for terminally differentiated neurons. First, oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide (ApO)-mediated microglial activation induced neuronal CCEs via the tumor-necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and the c-Jun Kinase (JNK) signaling pathway. Second, adoptive transfer of CD11b+ microglia from AD transgenic mice (R1.40) induced neuronal cyclin D1 expression via TNFα signaling pathway. Third, genetic deficiency of TNFα in R1.40 mice (R1 .40-Tnfα−/−) iled to induce neuronal CCEs. Finally, the mitotically active neurons spatially co-exist with F4/80+ activated microglia in the human AD brain and that a portion of these neurons are apoptotic. Together our data suggest a cell-autonomous role of microglia, and identify TNFα as the responsible cytokine, in promoting neuronal CCEs in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24141019

  14. In Silico Analysis of Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Protein 8-Like-1 (TIPE1) Protein.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei; Zhang, Hong; Su, Zhaoliang; Wang, Shengjun; Xu, Huaxi

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8)-like protein 1 (TIPE1) was a member of TNFAIP8 family. Previous studies have shown that TIPE1 could induce apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we attempted to predict its potential structure. Bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 was performed to predict its potential structure using the bioinfomatic web services or softwares. The results showed that the amino acid sequences of TIPE1 were well conserved in mammals. No signal peptide and no transmembrane domain existed in human TIPE1. The aliphatic index of TIPE1 was 100.75 and the theoretical pI was 9.57. TIPE1 was a kind of stable protein and its grand average of hydropathicity was -0.108. Various post-translational modifications were also speculated to exist in TIPE1. In addition, the results of Swiss-Model Server and Swiss-Pdb Viewer program revealed that the predicted three-dimensional structure of TIPE1 protein was stable and it may accord with the rule of stereochemistry. TIPE1 was predicted to interact with FBXW5, caspase8 and so on. In conclusion, TIPE1 may be a stable protein with no signal peptide and no transmembrane domain. The bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 will provide the basis for the further study on the function of TIPE1. PMID:26207809

  15. Interleukin-8 down-regulates the oxidative burst induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha in neutrophils adherent to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Lindley, I J; Pastorino, G; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1994-01-01

    Human neutrophils (5 x 10(4) incubated on fibronectin precoated wells released 2.83 +/- .25 nmoles of superoxide (0(2)-) (x +/- 1 SEM, n = 15) in response to 5.9 nM (100 ng/ml) Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF). On the contrary, the 0(2)- production induced by interleukin-8 (IL-8) (doses ranging from 0.1 nM to 1 microM) was comparable to that of "resting" cells (< .6 nmoles/5 x 10(4) cells). IL-8 (100 nM) did not affect the TNF-dependent 0(2)- production when added with TNF at the beginning of the assay, but reduced it by approximately 80% when added with TNF on neutrophils previously incubated for 1 hour on fibronectin. As compared with IL-8, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP, 100 nM) failed to suppress the TNF-triggering of the oxidative burst in neutrophils plated on fibronectin. The data suggest that the interaction of neutrophils with fibronectin uncovers the capacity of IL-8 to limit the cell response to TNF, without affecting the response to the combination of FMLP and TNF. Thus, although the chemotactic factors IL-8 and FMLP share the capacity of triggering the oxidative burst of neutrophils incubated in suspension, only IL-8 has the potential to down-regulate the responsiveness of fibronectin-adherent cells to TNF. PMID:8049357

  16. Sensitivity enhancement of capacitive tumor necrosis factor-α detection by deposition of nanoparticles on interdigitated electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Park, Jinsoo; Kim, Jungsuk; Ju, Heongkyu; Chang, Keun-A.; Cho, Sungbo

    2016-06-01

    An interdigitated electrodes (IDE) modified with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was fabricated to enhance the capacitive detection of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and compared with a bare IDE. A TNF-α immunosensor was developed by covalently conjugating TNF-α antibodies with 3-mercaptopropionic acid by a carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide reaction on the AuNP/IDE. After the application of human serum samples containing various concentrations of TNF-α to the sensing electrode, changes in both the impedance spectrum and the electrode interfacial capacitance were measured. The capacitance changes were dependent on the TNF-α concentration in the range of 1 pg ml‑1 to 10 ng ml‑1, and the device had the calculated detection limit of 0.83 pg ml‑1. The developed AuNP/IDE-based immunosensor was successfully used for the capacitive detection of the binding of TNF-α to its antibody, and was found to be feasible for the analysis of TNF-α in human blood serum.

  17. Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNF RII) in sera of children and traffic-derived particulate air pollution.

    PubMed

    Cox, F A; Stiller-Winkler, R; Hadnagy, W; Ranft, U; Idel, H

    1999-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNF RII) was determined in sera of 160 healthy schoolchildren of the city of Düsseldorf, Germany, living in areas with different traffic density. According to the frequency distribution a higher prevalence of children with increased sTNF RII values (> 3000 pg/ml) were found for a high traffic area as compared to a low traffic area. Based on sTNF RII values above the 75% percentile of children from the low traffic area, the group of children from the high traffic area revealed a significant increased odds ratio of 2.5. Concerning traffic-derived particulate air pollution an association between the concentration of fine particles (PM2.5) and sTNF RII serum levels could be observed for both areas. Furthermore, sTNF RII values gave a significant positive correlation with C3c, an activation product of the complement component C3. C3c has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of the non-specific humoral defence in response to air pollution. Therefore, the results suggest that traffic-derived fine particles may upon inhalation trigger immune modulation via the activation of macrophages and enhanced cytokine production. PMID:10631790

  18. Inhibitory effects of somatostatin on tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-6 secretion in human pancreatic periacinar myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Akira; Hata, Kazunori; Shimada, Mitsue; Fujino, Sanae; Tasaki, Kazuhito; Bamba, Shigeki; Araki, Yoshio; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Bamba, Tadao

    2002-07-01

    Pancreatic periacinar myofibroblasts are considered to be therapeutic targets for the suppression of acute pancreatitis. To elucidate the mechanisms mediating the therapeutic actions of somatostatin on acute pancreatitis, we investigated how somatostatin affects the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion from pancreatic myofibroblasts. Cytokine secretion was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Northern blotting. Nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB DNA-binding activity was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSAs). The expression of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) mRNA was evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Somatostatin dose-dependently inhibited the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 secretion. In comparison, the effects on IL-8 secretion were modest. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that somatostatin decreased the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 mRNA expression, and that this effect was completely blocked by the somatostatin antagonist cyclo-somatostatin. Furthermore, somatostatin suppressed TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activation. These cells bear SSTR subtypes 1 and 2. Somatostatin down-regulated the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 secretion in human pancreatic periacinar myofibroblasts. These findings suggest that some of the therapeutic actions of somatostatin on acute pancreatitis might be mediated by reducing local IL-6 secretion in the pancreas. PMID:12060857

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) interleukin-1beta and tumor necro