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Sample records for muscle cell line

  1. Establishment and cryopreservation of a giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Jian; Zeng, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Cheng-Dong; Xiong, Tie-Yi; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Zhang, He-Min

    2015-06-01

    The giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca is an endangered species and is a symbol for wildlife conservation. Although efforts have been made to protect this rare and endangered species through breeding and conservative biology, the long-term preservation of giant panda genome resources (gametes, tissues, organs, genomic libraries, etc.) is still a practical option. In this study, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line was successfully established via primary explants culture and cryopreservation techniques. The population doubling time of giant panda skeletal cells was approximately 33.8 h, and this population maintained a high cell viability before and after cryopreservation (95.6% and 90.7%, respectively). The two skeletal muscle-specific genes SMYD1 and MYF6 were expressed and detected by RT-PCR in the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line. Karyotyping analysis revealed that the frequencies of giant panda skeletal muscle cells showing a chromosome number of 2n=42 ranged from 90.6∼94.2%. Thus, the giant panda skeletal muscle-derived cell line provides a vital resource and material platform for further studies and is likely to be useful for the protection of this rare and endangered species. PMID:26035009

  2. Cultured C2C12 cell lines as a model for assessment of bacterial attachment to bovine primary muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zulfakar, Siti Shahara; White, Jason D; Ross, Tom; Tamplin, Mark L

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms of bacterial attachment to meat tissues need to be understood to enhance meat safety interventions. However, little is known about attachment of foodborne pathogens to meat muscle cells. In this study, attachment of six Escherichia coli and two Salmonella strains to primary bovine muscle cells and a cultured muscle cell line, C2C12, was measured, including the effect of temperature. At 37°C, all but one strain (EC623) attached to C2C12 cells, whereas only five of eight strains (M23Sr, H10407, EC473, Sal1729a and Sal691) attached to primary cells. At 10 °C, two strains (H10407 and EC473) attached to C2C12 cells, compared to four strains (M23Sr, EC614, H10407 and Sal1729a) of primary cells. Comparing all strains at both temperatures, EC614 displayed the highest CFU per C2C12 cell (4.60±2.02CFU/muscle cell at 37 °C), whereas greater numbers of M23Sr attached per primary cell (51.88±39.43CFU/muscle cell at 37 °C). This study indicates that primary bovine muscle cells may provide a more relevant model system to study bacterial attachment to beef carcasses compared to cell lines such as C2C12. PMID:23501253

  3. OUABAIN- AND MARINOBUFAGENIN-INDUCED PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS AND A RAT VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL LINE, A7R5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the growth-promoting effects of 2 sodium pump-selective cardiotonic steroids, ouabain and marinobufagenin, on cultured cells from vascular smooth muscle (VSMCs) from human umbilical vein and a rat VSMC line, A7r5. Both ouabain and marinobufagenin activated proliferation of these cells in...

  4. Vasopressin induced production of inositol trisphosphate and calcium efflux in a smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, V.M.; Rueegg, U.T.

    1985-08-30

    Phosphatidylinositol metabolism and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were examined in a vascular smooth muscle cell line (A7r5). (Arg 8)Vasopressin stimulated the rapid formation (measurable at 1 sec) of inositol phosphates in a concentration-dependent manner. The time course for formation of inositol phosphates was similar to that for /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from preloaded cells. The efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in response to (Arg8)vasopressin could be inhibited by a vasopressin antagonist. This supports the hypothesis that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate plays a role in vasopressin stimulated calcium mobilization from an intracellular source in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

  5. Comparison of growth characteristics between skeletal muscle satellite cell lines from diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-hao; Tan, Xungang; Jiao, Shuang; Zhang, Pei-jun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. According to myosatellite cell lines (MSCs) established in vitro from diploid and triploid flounder, we compared the characters of growth and differentiation of their MSCs. The results would be useful for learning the muscle development mechanism in teleosts. Materials and Methods. The skeletal muscle cells from the diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus were isolated and cultured in vitro, respectively, and the cells were characterized at the morphology and molecular level; meanwhile, the performance of these cells’ proliferation and differentiation were analyzed. Results. Two new skeletal muscle cell lines (POMSCS(2n) and POMSCS(3n)) from diploid and triploid flounder have been respectively subcultured for 67 times and 66 times. The cultured cells were mostly spindle-like mononuclear cells. They have normal flounder diploid karyotype (2n=48t) and triploid karyotype (3n=72t), respectively. Muscle satellite cell gene marker (pax7b) and myogenic cell protein marker (Desmin) were all expressed in cells of two cell lines. Both of the cells could differentiate into the large polynucleated muscle fibre cells, and immunofluorescence reactions of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were positive. There were more cells of POMSCS(3n) to differentiate into the muscle fibre cells than that of POMSCS(2n). However, POMSCS(2n) cells proliferated more rapidly than those of POMSCS(3n) (P < 0.05). The significant fluorescent signals were observed in both POMSCS(2n) and POMSCS(3n) cells after transfected with pEGFP-N3 reporter plasmid. Conclusions. The two cell lines have been established and characterized as MSCs. We suppose that it might be the differentiation capacity, rather than the proliferation activity of MSCs to play a key role in the better growth of triploid ones than diploid. Both cell lines will become the ideal tools to learn the mechanism of fish MSCs proliferation, differentiation and regeneration during muscle development in the future. PMID

  6. Modulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a skeletal muscle cell line model of mitochondrial toxicity☆

    PubMed Central

    Dott, William; Mistry, Pratibha; Wright, Jayne; Cain, Kelvin; Herbert, Karl E

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is increasingly being implicated as a contributing factor to many xenobiotic-induced organ toxicities, including skeletal muscle toxicity. This has necessitated the need for predictive in vitro models that are able to sensitively detect mitochondrial toxicity of chemical entities early in the research and development process. One such cell model involves substituting galactose for glucose in the culture media. Since cells cultured in galactose are unable to generate sufficient ATP from glycolysis they are forced to rely on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for ATP generation and consequently are more sensitive to mitochondrial perturbation than cells grown in glucose. The aim of this study was to characterise cellular growth, bioenergetics and mitochondrial toxicity of the L6 rat skeletal muscle cell line cultured in either high glucose or galactose media. L6 myoblasts proliferated more slowly when cultured in galactose media, although they maintained similar levels of ATP. Galactose cultured L6 cells were significantly more sensitive to classical mitochondrial toxicants than glucose-cultured cells, confirming the cells had adapted to galactose media. Analysis of bioenergetic function with the XF Seahorse extracellular flux analyser demonstrated that oxygen consumption rate (OCR) was significantly increased whereas extracellular acidification rate (ECAR), a measure of glycolysis, was decreased in cells grown in galactose. Mitochondria operated closer to state 3 respiration and had a lower mitochondrial membrane potential and basal mitochondrial O2•– level compared to cells in the glucose model. An antimycin A (AA) dose response revealed that there was no difference in the sensitivity of OCR to AA inhibition between glucose and galactose cells. Importantly, cells in glucose were able to up-regulate glycolysis, while galactose cells were not. These results confirm that L6 cells are able to adapt to growth in a galactose media model

  7. Atrazine exposure causes mitochondrial toxicity in liver and muscle cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sagarkar, Sneha; Gandhi, Deepa; Devi, S. Saravana; Sakharkar, Amul; Kapley, Atya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic exposure to atrazine and other pesticides is reported to cause metabolic disorders, yet information on effects of atrazine on expression of genes relevant to mitochondrial function is largely missing. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the expression of a battery of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in human liver (HepG2) and rat muscle (L6) cell lines due to short-term atrazine exposure. Materials and Methods: We have determined the EC50 values of atrazine for cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity (mitotoxicity) in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in HepG2 and L6 cells. Further, the mRNA expression of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: The EC50 value of atrazine for mitotoxicity in HepG2 and L6 cells was found to be about 0.162 and 0.089 mM, respectively. Mitochondrial toxicity was indicated by reduction in ATP content following atrazine exposure. Atrazine exposure resulted in down-regulation of many OXPHOS subunits expression and affected biogenesis factors’ expression. Most prominently, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) expressions were up-regulated in HepG2 cells, whereas SIRT3 expression was alleviated in L6 cells, without significant changes in SOD levels. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and SIRT1 expression were significantly down-regulated in both cell lines. Conclusion: Results suggest that TFAM and SIRT1 could be involved in atrazine-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and further studies can be taken up to understand the mechanism of mitochondrial toxicity. Further study can also be taken up to explore the possibility of target genes as biomarkers of pesticide toxicity. PMID:27114639

  8. Establishment of clonal myogenic cell lines from severely affected dystrophic muscles - CDK4 maintains the myogenic population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A hallmark of muscular dystrophies is the replacement of muscle by connective tissue. Muscle biopsies from patients severely affected with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) may contain few myogenic cells. Because the chromosomal contraction at 4q35 linked to FSHD is thought to cause a defect within myogenic cells, it is important to study this particular cell type, rather than the fibroblasts and adipocytes of the endomysial fibrosis, to understand the mechanism leading to myopathy. Results We present a protocol to establish clonal myogenic cell lines from even severely dystrophic muscle that has been replaced mostly by fat, using overexpression of CDK4 and the catalytic component of telomerase (human telomerase reverse transcriptase; hTERT), and a subsequent cloning step. hTERT is necessary to compensate for telomere loss during in vitro cultivation, while CDK4 prevents a telomere-independent growth arrest affecting CD56+ myogenic cells, but not their CD56- counterpart, in vitro. Conclusions These immortal cell lines are valuable tools to reproducibly study the effect of the FSHD mutation within myoblasts isolated from muscles that have been severely affected by the disease, without the confounding influence of variable amounts of contaminating connective-tissue cells. PMID:21798090

  9. Inhibition of prenyltransferase activity by statins in both liver and muscle cell lines is not causative of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gee, Rowena H; Spinks, Jenny N; Malia, Jason M; Johnston, Jonathan D; Plant, Nick J; Plant, Kathryn E

    2015-03-01

    As inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, statins are an important first-line treatment for hypercholesterolemia. However, a recognized side-effect of statin therapy is myopathy, which in severe cases can present as potentially fatal rhabdomyolysis. This represents an important impediment to successful statin therapy, and despite decades of research the molecular mechanisms underlying this side-effect remain unclear. Current evidence supports a role for reduced levels of mevalonate pathway intermediates, with the most accepted hypothesis being a reduction in isoprenoids formation, leading to faulty post-translational modifications of membrane-associated proteins. We have undertaken a comprehensive analysis of the impact of nine statins on two human cell lines; Huh7 hepatoma and RD rhabdomyosarcoma. In both cell lines, concentration-dependent inhibition of prenylation was observed for cerivastatin and simvastatin, which could be rescued with the pathway intermediate mevalonate; in general, muscle cells were more sensitive to this effect, as measured by the levels of unprenylated Rap1A, a marker for prenylation by geranylgeranyl transferase I. Concentration-dependent toxicity was observed in both cell lines, with muscle cells again being more sensitive. Importantly, there was no correlation between inhibition of prenylation and cell toxicity, suggesting they are not causally linked. The lack of a causal relationship was confirmed by the absence of cytotoxicity in all cell lines following exposure to specific inhibitors of geranylgeranyl transferases I and II, and farnesyl transferase. As such, we provide strong evidence against the commonly accepted hypothesis linking inhibition of prenylation and statin-mediated toxicity, with the two processes likely to be simultaneous but independent. PMID:25578243

  10. Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cherbas, Lucy; Gong, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We review the properties and uses of cell lines in Drosophila research, emphasizing the variety of lines, the large body of genomic and transcriptional data available for many of the lines, and the variety of ways the lines have been used to provide tools for and insights into the developmental, molecular, and cell biology of Drosophila and mammals. PMID:24434506

  11. Generation and Characterization of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Lines Derived from a Patient with a Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Lazar-Karsten, Pamela; Belge, Gazanfer; Schult-Badusche, Detlev; Focken, Tim; Radtke, Arlo; Yan, Junfeng; Renhabat, Pramod; Mohamed, Salah A.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dilation is the most common malformation of the proximal aorta and is responsible for 1%–2% of all deaths in industrialized countries. In approximately 50% of patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), dilation of any or all segments of the aorta occurs. BAV patients with aortic dilation show an increased incidence of cultured vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) loss. In this study, VSMC, isolated from the ascending aorta of BAV, was treated with Simian virus 40 to generate a BAV-originated VSMC cell line. To exclude any genomic DNA or cross-contamination, highly polymorphic short tandem repeats of the cells were profiled. The cells were then characterized using flow cytometry and karyotyping. The WG-59 cell line created is the first reported VSMC cell line isolated from a BAV patient. Using an RT2 Profiler PCR Array, genes within the TGFβ/BMP family that are dependent on losartan treatment were identified. Endoglin was found to be among the regulated genes and was downregulated in WG-59 cells following treatment with different losartan concentrations, when compared to untreated WG-59 cells. PMID:27110824

  12. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  13. Ghrelin stimulates myogenic differentiation in a mouse muscle satellite cell line and in primary cultures of bovine myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Flores, D; Mora, O; Tamariz, E; González-Dávalos, L; González-Gallardo, A; Antaramian, A; Shimada, A; Varela-Echavarría, A; Romano-Muñoz, J L

    2012-08-01

    Ghrelin is an acylated hormone that influences food intake, energy metabolism and reproduction, among others. Ghrelin may also stimulate proliferating myoblast cell differentiation and multinucleated myotube fusion. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of human ghrelin (hGHRL) and human ghrelin fragment 1-18 (hGHRL1-18) on myoblast differentiation by means of mRNA expression and protein level. Two types of cells were tested, the cell line i28 obtained from mouse skeletal muscle and primary cultures of bovine myoblasts. Both ghrelin and its N-terminal fragment hGHRL1-18 were used at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nm. Treatments were applied to pre-confluent cultures and were maintained for 4 days. We determined that between 0.1 and 100 nm, hGHRL and hGRHL1-18 had similar effects on myogenic differentiation of i28 cells (p < 0.01). On the other hand, only the higher concentrations (10 and 100 nm) of hGHRL stimulated bovine myoblast differentiation. These results could be attributed to the presence, in both i28 cells and in bovine myoblasts, of the mRNA for GHS-R1a and CD36 receptors. The use of ghrelin in livestock production is still questionable because of the limited effects shown in this study, and additional research is needed in this field. PMID:21777295

  14. Establishment and Characterization of a New Muscle Cell Line of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an In Vitro Model for Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Neha; Goswami, Mukunda; Srivastava, J K; Mishra, Akhilesh K; Lakra, W S

    2016-07-01

    A new continuous fibroblast cell line was established from the muscle tissue of healthy juvenile Danio rerio (Zebrafish) through explant method. Fish cell lines serve as useful tool for investigating basic fish biology, as a model for bioassay of environmental toxicant, toxicity ranking, and for developing molecular biomarkers. The cell line was continuously subcultured for a period of 12 months (61 passages) and maintained at 28 °C in L-15 medium supplemented with 10% FBS and 10 ng/mL of basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) without use of antibiotics. Its growth rate was proportional to the FBS concentration, with optimum growth at 15% FBS. DNA barcoding (16SrRNA and COX1) was used to authenticate the cell line. Cells were incubated with propidium iodide and sorted via flow cytometry to calculate the DNA content to confirm the genetic stability. Significant green fluorescent protein (GFP) signals confirmed the utility of cell line in transgenic and genetic manipulation studies. In vitro assay was performed with MTT to examine the growth potential of the cell line. The muscle cell line would provide a novel invaluable in vitro model to identify important genes to understand regulatory mechanisms that govern the molecular regulation of myogenesis and should be useful in biomedical research. PMID:26985868

  15. Role of guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) in vasopressin-induced responses of a vascular smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nambi, P.; Aiyar, N.; Whitman, M.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A-10) carry vascular V1 vasopressin receptors. In these cells, vasopressin inhibits isoproterenol-induced cAMP accumulation and stimulates phosphatidylinositol turnover and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Pretreatment of the cells with phorbol esters resulted in inhibition of the vasopressin-induced responses. The inactive phorbol ester aPDD was ineffective. These data suggested that phorbol ester might cause phosphorylation of the vasopressin receptor and/or coupling protein(s). Here, they studied the role of guanine nucleotide binding proteins by employing the novel radiolabeled vasopressin antagonist (/sup 3/H)-SKF 101926. In competition experiments with cell membranes, Gpp(NH)p shifted the vasopressin curve to the right indicating decreased agonist affinity. Phorbol ester pretreatment abolished the Gpp(NH)p effect. Pretreatment of the cells with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of vasopressin-induced phosphatidyinositol turnover. NEM also abolished the decrease in agonist affinity caused by Gpp(NH)p. These data showed that NEM and phorbol ester pretreatment of smooth muscle cells functionally uncoupled the vasopressin receptors and suggested that vasopressin V1 receptor responses are mediated through guanine nucleotide binding protein(s).

  16. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  17. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  18. Electrical stimulation induces calcium-dependent up-regulation of neuregulin-1β in dystrophic skeletal muscle cell lines.

    PubMed

    Juretić, Nevenka; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Caviedes, Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Riveros, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a neuromuscular disease originated by reduced or no expression of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that provides structural integrity to muscle fibres. A promising pharmacological treatment for DMD aims to increase the level of a structural dystrophin homolog called utrophin. Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1), a growth factor that potentiates myogenesis, induces utrophin expression in skeletal muscle cells. Microarray analysis of total gene expression allowed us to determine that neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) is one of 150 differentially expressed genes in electrically stimulated (400 pulses, 1 ms, 45 Hz) dystrophic human skeletal muscle cells (RCDMD). We investigated the effect of depolarization, and the involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) and PKC isoforms on NRG-1β expression in dystrophic myotubes. Electrical stimulation of RCDMD increased NRG-1β mRNA and protein levels, and mRNA enhancement was abolished by actinomycin D. NRG-1β transcription was inhibited by BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, and by inhibitors of IP(3)-dependent slow Ca(2+) transients, like 2-APB, Ly 294002 and Xestospongin B. Ryanodine, a fast Ca(2+) signal inhibitor, had no effect on electrical stimulation-induced expression. BIM VI (general inhibitor of PKC isoforms) and Gö 6976 (specific inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC isoforms) abolished NRG-1β mRNA induction. Our results suggest that depolarization induced slow Ca(2+) signals stimulate NRG-1β transcription in RCDMD cells, and that Ca(2+)-dependent PKC isoforms are involved in this process. Based on utrophin's ability to partially compensate dystrophin disfunction, knowledge on the mechanism involved on NRG-1 up-regulation could be important for new therapeutic strategies design. PMID:22613991

  19. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Morino, Katsutaro; Mengistu, Lemecha; Ishibashi, Taishi; Kiriyama, Kohei; Ikami, Takao; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders. PMID:27340504

  20. Phorbol ester-induced inhibition of. beta. -adrenergic - and vasopressin-mediated responses in an established smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    A-10 cells which are derived from embryonic rat thoracic aorta contain a high density of vasopressin receptors and relatively fewer ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. The effects of vasopressin binding to these cells are two-fold: a) inhibition of isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation, and; b) stimulation of phosphatidyl inositol turnover. Incubation of these cells with phorbol dibutyrate leads to an attenuation of the responses mediated by ..beta..-adrenergic agonist as well as vasopressin. This effect of phorbol ester is concentration- and time-dependent and can be observed as early as five minutes. The inactive phorbol ester (4 ..cap alpha.. phorbol 12,13-didecanoate) is ineffective in inhibiting ..beta..-adrenergic agonist and vasopressin-mediated responses. Since present evidence indicates that the enzyme protein kinase C (PK-C) is involved in both short-term and long-term regulatory processes such as secretion, smooth muscle contraction and cell growth, these data suggest that both ..beta..-adrenergic and vasopressin receptors and/or some mediator(s) of ..beta..-adrenergic and/or vasopressin responses may be phosphorylated by protein kinase C resulting in an attenuated response of these two hormones.

  1. Simvastatin represses protein synthesis in the muscle-derived C₂C₁₂ cell line with a concomitant reduction in eukaryotic initiation factor 2B expression.

    PubMed

    Tuckow, Alexander P; Jefferson, Sarah J; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2011-03-01

    Statins are a widely prescribed class of cholesterol lowering drugs whose use is frequently associated with muscle-related ailments. A number of mechanisms have been implicated in statin-induced myotoxicity including alterations in both protein synthesis and protein degradation. The objective of the present study was to explore the mechanism(s) contributing to the statin-induced reduction in protein synthesis in the muscle-derived C₂C₁₂ cell line. Cells were treated with 10 μM simvastatin or vehicle alone for 24 h in 1% serum. Cells exposed to simvastatin exhibited reduced rates of protein synthesis, as evidenced by [(35)S]methionine and [(35)S]cysteine incorporation into protein. The reduction in protein synthesis occurred with a concomitant decrease in expression and activity of eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B), a regulated and rate-controlling guanine nucleotide exchange factor known to affect global rates of protein synthesis. The reductions in protein synthesis and eIF2B expression were prevented by coincubation with mevalonate. Simvastatin treatment also resulted in a proteasome-sensitive reduction in the protein expression of all the subunits of the eIF2B heteropentameric complex. Finally, increased phosphorylation of the catalytic ε-subunit at Ser(535) was observed, an event consistent with an observed reduction in eIF2B activity. These results suggest that repression of eIF2B expression and activity may contribute, at least in part, to the statin-induced reduction in protein synthesis. PMID:21224482

  2. Muscle stem cells at a glance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu Xin; Dumont, Nicolas A; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Muscle stem cells facilitate the long-term regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. This self-renewing population of satellite cells has only recently been defined through genetic and transplantation experiments. Although muscle stem cells remain in a dormant quiescent state in uninjured muscle, they are poised to activate and produce committed progeny. Unlike committed myogenic progenitor cells, the self-renewal capacity gives muscle stem cells the ability to engraft as satellite cells and capitulate long-term regeneration. Similar to other adult stem cells, understanding the molecular regulation of muscle stem cells has significant implications towards the development of pharmacological or cell-based therapies for muscle disorders. This Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will review satellite cell characteristics and therapeutic potential, and provide an overview of the muscle stem cell hallmarks: quiescence, self-renewal and commitment. PMID:25300792

  3. Blasted Cell Line Names

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren A.; Yordy, John S.; Liu, Wenbin; Shen, Li; Baggerly, Keith A.; Giri, Uma; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Ang, K. Kian; Story, Michael D.; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D.; Heymach, John V.; Coombes, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: While trying to integrate multiple data sets collected by different researchers, we noticed that the sample names were frequently entered inconsistently. Most of the variations appeared to involve punctuation, white space, or their absence, at the juncture between alphabetic and numeric portions of the cell line name. Results: Reasoning that the variant names could be described in terms of mutations or deletions of character strings, we implemented a simple version of the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment algorithm and applied it to the cell line names. All correct matches were found by this procedure. Incorrect matches only occured when a cell line was present in one data set but not in the other. The raw match scores tended to be substantially worse for the incorrect matches. Conclusions: A simple application of the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment algorithm provides a useful first pass at matching sample names from different data sets. PMID:21082038

  4. Coaxing stem cells for skeletal muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Karl J.A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a tremendous ability to regenerate, attributed to a well-defined population of muscle stem cells called satellite cells. However, this ability to regenerate diminishes with age and can also be dramatically affected by multiple types of muscle diseases, or injury. Extrinsic and/or intrinsic defects in the regulation of satellite cells are considered to be major determinants for the diminished regenerative capacity. Maintenance and replenishment of the satellite cell pool is one focus for muscle regenerative medicine, which will be discussed. There are other sources of progenitor cells with myogenic capacity, which may also support skeletal muscle repair. However, all of these myogenic cell populations have inherent difficulties and challenges in maintaining or coaxing their derivation for therapeutic purpose. This review will highlight recent reported attributes of these cells and new bioengineering approaches to creating a supply of myogenic stem cells or implants applicable for acute and/or chronic muscle disorders. PMID:25049085

  5. Syndecan-4-expressing muscle progenitor cells in the SP engraft as satellite cells during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kathleen Kelly; Hall, John K; Troy, Andrew A; Cornelison, D D W; Majka, Susan M; Olwin, Bradley B

    2009-03-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells, located between the basal lamina and plasma membrane of myofibers, are required for skeletal muscle regeneration. The capacity of satellite cells as well as other cell lineages including mesoangioblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, and side population (SP) cells to contribute to muscle regeneration has complicated the identification of a satellite stem cell. We have characterized a rare subset of the muscle SP that efficiently engrafts into the host satellite cell niche when transplanted into regenerating muscle, providing 75% of the satellite cell population and 30% of the myonuclear population, respectively. These cells are found in the satellite cell position, adhere to isolated myofibers, and spontaneously undergo myogenesis in culture. We propose that this subset of SP cells (satellite-SP cells), characterized by ABCG2, Syndecan-4, and Pax7 expression, constitutes a self-renewing muscle stem cell capable of generating both satellite cells and their myonuclear progeny in vivo. PMID:19265661

  6. Isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, So-ichiro; Ma, Yuran; Ohtani, Takuji; Watanabe, Yoko; Murakami, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has great regenerative capacity which is dependent on muscle stem cells, also known as satellite cells. A loss of satellite cells and/or their function impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and leads to a loss of skeletal muscle power; therefore, the molecular mechanisms for maintaining satellite cells in a quiescent and undifferentiated state are of great interest in skeletal muscle biology. Many studies have demonstrated proteins expressed by satellite cells, including Pax7, M-cadherin, Cxcr4, syndecan3/4, and c-met. To further characterize satellite cells, we established a method to directly isolate satellite cells using a monoclonal antibody, SM/C-2.6. Using SM/C-2.6 and microarrays, we measured the genes expressed in quiescent satellite cells and demonstrated that Hesr3 may complement Hesr1 in generating quiescent satellite cells. Although Hesr1- or Hesr3-single knockout mice show a normal skeletal muscle phenotype, including satellite cells, Hesr1/Hesr3-double knockout mice show a gradual decrease in the number of satellite cells and increase in regenerative defects dependent on satellite cell numbers. We also observed that a mouse's genetic background affects the regenerative capacity of its skeletal muscle and have established a line of DBA/2-background mdx mice that has a much more severe phenotype than the frequently used C57BL/10-mdx mice. The phenotype of DBA/2-mdx mice also seems to depend on the function of satellite cells. In this review, we summarize the methodology of direct isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of satellite cells based on our results. The relationship between the regenerative capacity of satellite cells and progression of muscular disorders is also summarized. In the last part, we discuss application of the accumulating scientific information on satellite cells to treatment of patients with muscular disorders. PMID:24273513

  7. Laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell stemness and muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H.; E. Mason, Christopher; Strickland, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-resident PDGFRβ+ cells, which include pericytes and PW1+ interstitial cells (PICs), play a dual role in muscular dystrophy. They can either undergo myogenesis to promote muscle regeneration or differentiate into adipocytes and other cells to compromise regeneration. How the differentiation and fate determination of PDGFRβ+ cells are regulated, however, remains unclear. Here, by utilizing a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that PDGFRβ+ cell-derived laminin inhibits their proliferation and adipogenesis, but is indispensable for their myogenesis. In addition, we show that laminin alone is able to partially reverse the muscle dystrophic phenotype in these mice at the molecular, structural and functional levels. Further RNAseq analysis reveals that laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell differentiation/fate determination via gpihbp1. These data support a critical role of laminin in the regulation of PDGFRβ+ cell stemness, identify an innovative target for future drug development and may provide an effective treatment for muscular dystrophy. PMID:27138650

  8. Laminin regulates PDGFRβ(+) cell stemness and muscle development.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H; E Mason, Christopher; Strickland, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-resident PDGFRβ(+) cells, which include pericytes and PW1(+) interstitial cells (PICs), play a dual role in muscular dystrophy. They can either undergo myogenesis to promote muscle regeneration or differentiate into adipocytes and other cells to compromise regeneration. How the differentiation and fate determination of PDGFRβ(+) cells are regulated, however, remains unclear. Here, by utilizing a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that PDGFRβ(+) cell-derived laminin inhibits their proliferation and adipogenesis, but is indispensable for their myogenesis. In addition, we show that laminin alone is able to partially reverse the muscle dystrophic phenotype in these mice at the molecular, structural and functional levels. Further RNAseq analysis reveals that laminin regulates PDGFRβ(+) cell differentiation/fate determination via gpihbp1. These data support a critical role of laminin in the regulation of PDGFRβ(+) cell stemness, identify an innovative target for future drug development and may provide an effective treatment for muscular dystrophy. PMID:27138650

  9. Z-line formins promote contractile lattice growth and maintenance in striated muscles of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mi-Mi, Lei; Votra, SarahBeth; Kemphues, Kenneth; Bretscher, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Muscle contraction depends on interactions between actin and myosin filaments organized into sarcomeres, but the mechanism by which actin filaments incorporate into sarcomeres remains unclear. We have found that, during larval development in Caenorhabditis elegans, two members of the actin-assembling formin family, CYK-1 and FHOD-1, are present in striated body wall muscles near or on sarcomere Z lines, where barbed ends of actin filaments are anchored. Depletion of either formin during this period stunted growth of the striated contractile lattice, whereas their simultaneous reduction profoundly diminished lattice size and number of striations per muscle cell. CYK-1 persisted at Z lines in adulthood, and its near complete depletion from adults triggered phenotypes ranging from partial loss of Z line–associated filamentous actin to collapse of the contractile lattice. These results are, to our knowledge, the first genetic evidence implicating sarcomere-associated formins in the in vivo organization of the muscle cytoskeleton. PMID:22753896

  10. CLO: The cell line ontology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lines have been widely used in biomedical research. The community-based Cell Line Ontology (CLO) is a member of the OBO Foundry library that covers the domain of cell lines. Since its publication two years ago, significant updates have been made, including new groups joining the CLO consortium, new cell line cells, upper level alignment with the Cell Ontology (CL) and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigation, and logical extensions. Construction and content Collaboration among the CLO, CL, and OBI has established consensus definitions of cell line-specific terms such as ‘cell line’, ‘cell line cell’, ‘cell line culturing’, and ‘mortal’ vs. ‘immortal cell line cell’. A cell line is a genetically stable cultured cell population that contains individual cell line cells. The hierarchical structure of the CLO is built based on the hierarchy of the in vivo cell types defined in CL and tissue types (from which cell line cells are derived) defined in the UBERON cross-species anatomy ontology. The new hierarchical structure makes it easier to browse, query, and perform automated classification. We have recently added classes representing more than 2,000 cell line cells from the RIKEN BRC Cell Bank to CLO. Overall, the CLO now contains ~38,000 classes of specific cell line cells derived from over 200 in vivo cell types from various organisms. Utility and discussion The CLO has been applied to different biomedical research studies. Example case studies include annotation and analysis of EBI ArrayExpress data, bioassays, and host-vaccine/pathogen interaction. CLO’s utility goes beyond a catalogue of cell line types. The alignment of the CLO with related ontologies combined with the use of ontological reasoners will support sophisticated inferencing to advance translational informatics development. PMID:25852852

  11. Cell death regulates muscle fiber number.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, Tatevik; Arya, Richa; Gyonjyan, Seda; Taylor, Barbara; White, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    Cell death can have both cell autonomous and non-autonomous roles in normal development. Previous studies have shown that the central cell death regulators grim and reaper are required for the developmentally important elimination of stem cells and neurons in the developing central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that cell death in the nervous system is also required for normal muscle development. In the absence of grim and reaper, there is an increase in the number of fibers in the ventral abdominal muscles in the Drosophila adult. This phenotype can be partially recapitulated by inhibition of cell death specifically in the CNS, indicating a non-autonomous role for neuronal death in limiting muscle fiber number. We also show that FGFs produced in the cell death defective nervous system are required for the increase in muscle fiber number. Cell death in the muscle lineage during pupal stages also plays a role in specifying fiber number. Our work suggests that FGFs from the CNS act as a survival signal for muscle founder cells. Thus, proper muscle fiber specification requires cell death in both the nervous system and in the developing muscle itself. PMID:27131625

  12. Effect of the ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B pore-forming complex on intracellular Ca2+ activity in the vascular smooth muscle cell line A10.

    PubMed

    Vrecl, Milka; Babnik, Monika; Sepčić, Kristina; Žužek, Monika C; Maček, Peter; Diacci, Uroš; Frangež, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B (OlyA/PlyB) is a binary pore-forming protein complex that produces a rapid cardiorespiratory arrest. Increased tonus of the coronary vascular wall produced by OlyA/PlyB may lead to ischemia, arrhythmias, the hypoxic injury of cardiomyocytes and cardiotoxicity. We evaluated the effects of OlyA/PlyB in cultured vascular smooth muscle A10 cells. Fluorometric measurements using the Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 AM and Fura-2 AM revealed that nanomolar concentrations of OlyA/PlyB increased the intracellular Ca(2+) activity [Ca(2+)]i in A10 cells. This effect was absent in a Ca(2+)-free medium, indicating that OlyA/PlyB-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was dependent on Ca(2+) influx into cells. The increase in [Ca(2+)]i by OlyA/PlyB was partially prevented by: i) the calcium channel blockers verapamil and La(3+), ii) the inhibitor of the sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) benzamil, and iii) the iso-osmotic replacement of NaCl by sucrose. The pre-treatment of cells with the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin reduced the [Ca(2+)]i increase evoked by OlyA/PlyB, whereas the plasma membrane depolarization with high K(+) in the medium did not prevent OlyA/PlyB-induced [Ca(2+)]i. In summary, our data could suggest that the OlyA/PlyB-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i is due to an influx of Ca(2+) through a variety of co-existing plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels, Ca(2+) entry through non-selective ion permeable pores formed de novo by OlyA/PlyB in the plasma membrane and calcium-induced intracellular Ca(2+) release, altogether leading to disturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis in A10 cells. PMID:26320834

  13. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  14. Potential of laryngeal muscle regeneration using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dirja, Bayu Tirta; Yoshie, Susumu; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may be a new potential cell source for laryngeal muscle regeneration in the treatment of vocal fold atrophy after recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objectives Unilateral vocal fold paralysis can lead to degeneration, atrophy, and loss of force of the thyroarytenoid muscle. At present, there are some treatments such as thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and vocal fold injection. However, such treatments cannot restore reduced mass of the thyroarytenoid muscle. iPS cells have been recognized as supplying a potential resource for cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of iPS cells for the regeneration of laryngeal muscle through the evaluation of both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods Skeletal muscle cells were generated from tdTomato-labeled iPS cells using embryoid body formation. Differentiation into skeletal muscle cells was analyzed by gene expression and immunocytochemistry. The tdTomato-labeled iPS cell-derived skeletal muscle cells were transplanted into the left atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle. To evaluate the engraftment of these cells after transplantation, immunohistochemistry was performed. Results The tdTomato-labeled iPS cells were successfully differentiated into skeletal muscle cells through an in vitro experiment. These cells survived in the atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle after transplantation. PMID:26824385

  15. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  16. The proteins in the Z line of insect flight muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bullard, B; Sainsbury, G M

    1977-01-01

    Z discs were isolated from Lethocerus flight muscle by removing the contractile proteins from myofibrils with a solution of high ionic strength. The protein composition of the Z discs was analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis; the major proteins were alpha-actinin, actin and tropomyosin. Z lines were selectively removed from intact myofibrils by digestion with crude lipase and chymotrypsin, but not by purified lipase. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:849268

  17. Heterogeneity in the muscle satellite cell population

    PubMed Central

    Biressi, Stefano; Rando, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite cells, the adult stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration, are defined by their location between the basal lamina and the fiber sarcolemma. Increasing evidence suggests that satellite cells represent a heterogeneous population of cells with distinct embryological origin and multiple levels of biochemical and functional diversity. This review focuses on the rich diversity of the satellite cell population based on studies across species. Ultimately, a more complete characterization of the heterogeneity of satellite cells will be essential to understand the functional significance in terms of muscle growth, homeostasis, tissue repair, and aging. PMID:20849971

  18. Forever young: rejuvenating muscle satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Madaro, Luca; Latella, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of aging is alteration of organismal homeostasis and progressive decline of tissue functions. Alterations of both cell intrinsic functions and regenerative environmental cues contribute to the compromised stem cell activity and reduced regenerative capability occurring in aged muscles. In this perspective, we discuss the new evidence supporting the hypothesis that skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs) are intrinsically defective in elderly muscles. In particular, we review three recent papers leading to identify fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and p16INK4a as altered signaling in satellite cells from aged mice. These pathways contribute to age-related loss of MuSCs asymmetric polarization, compromised self-renewal capacity, and acquisition of pre-senescent state. The pharmacological manipulation of those networks can open novel strategies to rejuvenate MuSCs and counteract the functional decline of skeletal muscle during aging. PMID:25954192

  19. Muscle Cells Provide Instructions for Planarian Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Witchley, Jessica N.; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E.; Owen, Jared H.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region. PMID:23954785

  20. A novel transgenic marker for migrating limb muscle precursors and for vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tidhar, A; Reichenstein, M; Cohen, D; Faerman, A; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Shani, M

    2001-01-01

    A unique pattern of LacZ expression was found in a transgenic mouse line, likely due to regulatory elements at the site of integration. Two new genes flanking the transgene were identified. At early stages of development, the transgene is transiently expressed in ventro-lateral demomyotomal cells migrating from the somites into the limb buds. At late developmental stages and in the adult, lacZ staining marks vascular smooth muscle cells throughout the vascular bed, with the exception of the major elastic arteries, and in pericytes. No expression was detected in skeletal and smooth muscles. Different patterns of expression in vascular smooth muscles was observed at distinct levels of the vascular tree, in arteries as well as in veins. Vessel injury, resulting in stimulation of smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration, is associated with transgene down-regulation. After the formation of neointima thickening, it is reactivated. This transgenic insertion may therefore be used as a useful marker to identify novel physiological cues or genetic elements involved in the regulation of the vascular smooth muscle phenotype(s). It may also provide an experimental tool for studying vasculature and the involvement of pericytes in regulating microvascular homeostasis. PMID:11146508

  1. Control of cell volume in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Huang, Christopher L-H; Fraser, James A

    2009-02-01

    Regulation of cell volume is a fundamental property of all animal cells and is of particular importance in skeletal muscle where exercise is associated with a wide range of cellular changes that would be expected to influence cell volume. These complex electrical, metabolic and osmotic changes, however, make rigorous study of the consequences of individual factors on muscle volume difficult despite their likely importance during exercise. Recent charge-difference modelling of cell volume distinguishes three major aspects to processes underlying cell volume control: (i) determination by intracellular impermeant solute; (ii) maintenance by metabolically dependent processes directly balancing passive solute and water fluxes that would otherwise cause cell swelling under the influence of intracellular membrane-impermeant solutes; and (iii) volume regulation often involving reversible short-term transmembrane solute transport processes correcting cell volumes towards their normal baselines in response to imposed discrete perturbations. This review covers, in turn, the main predictions from such quantitative analysis and the experimental consequences of comparable alterations in extracellular pH, lactate concentration, membrane potential and extracellular tonicity. The effects of such alterations in the extracellular environment in resting amphibian muscles are then used to reproduce the intracellular changes that occur in each case in exercising muscle. The relative contributions of these various factors to the control of cell volume in resting and exercising skeletal muscle are thus described. PMID:19133959

  2. 3D Timelapse Analysis of Muscle Satellite Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, DDW

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin α7β1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of “pathfinding” cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues. Stem Cells 2009;27:2527–2538 PMID:19609936

  3. Replication of Muscle Cell Using Bioimprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsuri, Fahmi; Mitchell, John S.; Alkaisi, Maan M.; Evans, John J.

    2009-07-01

    In our earlier study a heat-curable PDMS or a UV curable elastomer, was used as the replicating material to introduce Bioimprint methodology to facilitate cell imaging [1-2] But, replicating conditions for thermal polymerization is known to cause cell dehydration during curing. In this study, a new type of polymer was developed for use in living cell replica formation, and it was tested on human muscle cells. The cells were incubated and cultured according to standard biological culturing procedures, and they were grown for about 10 days. The replicas were then separated from the muscle cells and taken for analysis under an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The new polymer was designed to be biocompatible with higher resolution and fast curing process compared to other types of silicon-based organic polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Muscle cell imprints were achieved and higher resolution images were able to show the micro structures of the muscle cells, including the cellular fibers and cell membranes. The AFM is able to image features at nanoscale resolution. This capacity enables a number of characteristics of biological cells to be visualized in a unique manner. Polymer and muscle cells preparations were developed at Hamilton, in collaboration between Plant and Food Research and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury. Tapping mode was used for the AFM image analysis as it has low tip-sample forces and non-destructive imaging capability. We will be presenting the bioimprinting processes of muscle cells, their AFM imaging and characterization of the newly developed polymer.

  4. 3D timelapse analysis of muscle satellite cell motility.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, D D W

    2009-10-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin alpha 7 beta 1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of "pathfinding" cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues. PMID:19609936

  5. Isolated muscle cells as a physiological model.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M; Hauschka, S D; Hall, Z W; Eisenberg, B R; Horn, R; Walsh, J V; Tsien, R W; Jones, A W; Walker, J L; Poenie, M

    1987-09-01

    Summary of a symposium presented by the American Physiological Society (Cell and General Physiology Section and Muscle Group) at the 70th Annual Meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, St. Louis, Missouri, April 15, 1986, chaired by M. Lieberman and F. Fay. This symposium reflects a growing interest in seeking new technologies to study the basic physiological and biophysical properties of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle cells. Recognizing that technical and analytical problems associated with multicellular preparations limit the physiological significance of many experiments, investigators have increasingly focused on efforts to isolate single, functional embryonic, and adult muscle cells. Progress in obtaining physiologically relevant preparations has been both rapid and significant even though problems regarding cell purification and viability are not fully resolved. The symposium draws attention to a broad, though incomplete, range of studies using isolated or cultured muscle cells. Based on the following reports, investigators should be convinced that a variety of experiments can be designed with preparations of isolated cells and those in tissue culture to resolve questions about fundamental physiological properties of muscle cells. PMID:2443014

  6. Activated Muscle Satellite Cells Chase Ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mourikis, Philippos; Relaix, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    The in vivo behaviors of skeletal muscle stem cells, i.e., satellite cells, during homeostasis and after injury are poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Webster et al. (2016) now perform a tour de force intravital microscopic analysis of this population, showing that "ghost fiber" remnants act as scaffolds to guide satellite cell divisions after injury. PMID:26849298

  7. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  8. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  9. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  10. TRPC channels in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cobos, Jose C; Trebak, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) proteins constitute a family of seven (TRPC1-7) nonselective cation channels within the wider TRP superfamily. TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5 and TRPC6 channels are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells from human vessels of all calibers and in smooth muscle from organs such as the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract. TRPC channels have recently emerged as important players in the control of smooth muscle function. This review will focus on the retrospective analysis of studies proposing contributions of TRPC channels to native calcium entry pathways in smooth muscle and to physiological and pathophysiological responses with emphasis on the vascular system. PMID:20515740

  11. Trichloroethylene interactions with muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kössler, F

    1991-06-01

    The toxic effect of trichlorethylene (TCE) was investigated on isolated muscles prepared from frog and rats. Twitch and tetanic contractions as well as caffeine-induced contractures, were recorded. Trichloroethylene at a concentration of 0.25-4.0 mM depressed the force development of both twitch and tetanic tension in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was not influenced by the type of muscle. As TCE shortened the time to peak of twitch contractions, it may alter the Ca2+ binding kinetics. Subthreshold caffeine concentrations applied after pre-exposure to TCE (1 or 2mM) induced contractures. The same TCE exposure enhanced regular caffeine contractures through increasing the speed of tension development and the absolute force. Exposure to 5 or 10 mM TCE did not affect the first caffeine-induced contracture but enhanced the potency of the second caffeine dose given 15 min after the first. The results suggest that the interaction of TCE with membrane sites is responsible for Ca2+ release for contractile processes. PMID:1918792

  12. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  13. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells Improve Muscle Function in a Skeletal Muscle Re-Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Karla C.; Porto, Anderson; Peçanha, Ramon; Fortes, Fabio S. A.; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Goldenberg, Regina C. S.; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC) injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively). Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model. PMID:26039243

  14. Satellite Cell Heterogeneity in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Matthew T; Sacco, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    The cellular turnover required for skeletal muscle maintenance and repair is mediated by resident stem cells, also termed satellite cells. Satellite cells normally reside in a quiescent state, intermittently entering the cell cycle to fuse with neighboring myofibers and replenish the stem cell pool. However, the mechanisms by which satellite cells maintain the precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation necessary for long-term homeostasis remain unclear. Recent work has supported a previously unappreciated heterogeneity in the satellite cell compartment that may underlie the observed variability in cell fate and function. In this review, we examine the work supporting this notion as well as the potential governing principles, developmental origins, and principal determinants of satellite cell heterogeneity. PMID:26948993

  15. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes. PMID:1726925

  16. Muscle satellite cell heterogeneity and self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD. PMID:25364710

  17. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease. PMID:27039885

  18. GREG cells, a dysferlin-deficient myogenic mouse cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Glen W.; Mekhedov, Elena; Blank, Paul S.; Morree, Antoine de; Pekkurnaz, Gulcin; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2012-01-15

    The dysferlinopathies (e.g. LGMD2b, Myoshi myopathy) are progressive, adult-onset muscle wasting syndromes caused by mutations in the gene coding for dysferlin. Dysferlin is a large ({approx} 200 kDa) membrane-anchored protein, required for maintenance of plasmalemmal integrity in muscle fibers. To facilitate analysis of dysferlin function in muscle cells, we have established a dysferlin-deficient myogenic cell line (GREG cells) from the A/J mouse, a genetic model for dysferlinopathy. GREG cells have no detectable dysferlin expression, but proliferate normally in growth medium and fuse into functional myotubes in differentiation medium. GREG myotubes exhibit deficiencies in plasma membrane repair, as measured by laser wounding in the presence of FM1-43 dye. Under the wounding conditions used, the majority ({approx} 66%) of GREG myotubes lack membrane repair capacity, while no membrane repair deficiency was observed in dysferlin-normal C2C12 myotubes, assayed under the same conditions. We discuss the possibility that the observed heterogeneity in membrane resealing represents genetic compensation for dysferlin deficiency.

  19. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  20. Antidiabetic Activity of Pterospermum acerifolium Flowers and Glucose Uptake Potential of Bioactive Fraction in L6 Muscle Cell Lines with Its HPLC Fingerprint

    PubMed Central

    Paramaguru, Rathinavelusamy; Sasmal, Dinakar

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to estimate the detailed antidiabetic activity of Pterospermum acerifolium (L.) Willd flowers. In vitro alpha amylase inhibition study was carried out on 50% ethanol extract of flowers (PAFEE) and its various fractions. The active ethyl acetate fraction (PAFEF) was subfractionated into three subfractions (PAFE1, PAFE2, and PAFE3) and subjected to acute toxicity studies followed by antidiabetic screening in vivo by streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced type II diabetes. Diabetic animals treated with PAFE2 (30 mg/kg) reduced the levels of fasting blood glucose, significantly (P < 0.001) compared to that of diabetic control animals. Histological studies on drug treated groups did not show remarkable positive changes in β-cells. PAFE2 showed 32.6 ± 1.93% glucose uptake over control and, in the presence of PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, declined to 13.7 ± 2.51%. HPLC analysis of PAFE2 reveals the presence of quercetin and apigenin as major constituents and both are inhibiting the glycogen phosphorylase enzyme in molecular modelling studies. The study evidenced strongly that the probable glucose lowering mechanism of action of active subfraction PAFE2 is by increasing the glucose uptake in peripheral tissues and by inhibition of gluconeogenesis. PMID:25401101

  1. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin-4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin-4 (Ten-4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten-4-deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten-4-deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten-4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten-4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. PMID:26013034

  2. Stimulating Cardiac Muscle by Light: Cardiac Optogenetics by Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiheng; Valiunas, Virginijus; Lu, Zongju; Bien, Harold; Liu, Huilin; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Rosati, Barbara; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Background After the recent cloning of light-sensitive ion channels and their expression in mammalian cells, a new field, optogenetics, emerged in neuroscience, allowing for precise perturbations of neural circuits by light. However, functionality of optogenetic tools has not been fully explored outside neuroscience; and a non-viral, non-embryogenesis based strategy for optogenetics has not been shown before. Methods and Results We demonstrate the utility of optogenetics to cardiac muscle by a tandem cell unit (TCU) strategy, where non-excitable cells carry exogenous light-sensitive ion channels, and when electrically coupled to cardiomyocytes, produce optically-excitable heart tissue. A stable channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expressing cell line was developed, characterized and used as a cell delivery system. The TCU strategy was validated in vitro in cell pairs with adult canine myocytes (for a wide range of coupling strengths) and in cardiac syncytium with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. For the first time, we combined optical excitation and optical imaging to capture light-triggered muscle contractions and high-resolution propagation maps of light-triggered electrical waves, found to be quantitatively indistinguishable from electrically-triggered waves. Conclusions Our results demonstrate feasibility to control excitation and contraction in cardiac muscle by light using the TCU approach. Optical pacing in this case uses less energy, offers superior spatiotemporal control, remote access and can serve not only as an elegant tool in arrhythmia research, but may form the basis for a new generation of light-driven cardiac pacemakers and muscle actuators. The TCU strategy is extendable to (non-viral) stem cell therapy and is directly relevant to in vivo applications. PMID:21828312

  3. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  4. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I in skeletal muscle and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Frost, R A; Lang, C H

    2003-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are potent regulators of muscle mass. Transgenic mice that over-express these proteins exhibit dramatically enlarged skeletal muscles. In contrast, malnutrition, critical illness, sepsis, and aging are all associated with a dramatic reduction in muscle mass and function. The circulating concentration of IGF-I and the expression of IGF-I in skeletal muscle are also reduced during catabolic states. Consequently, GH has been used clinically to increase lean body mass in patients with muscle wasting. Likewise, delivery of IGF-I specifically into muscle has been proposed as a genetic therapy for muscle disorders. A better understanding of the regulation of IGF-I expression in skeletal muscle and muscle cells is therefore of importance. Yet, our knowledge in this area has been limited by a lack of GH responsive muscle cells. In addition the IGF-I gene spans over 90 kb of genomic DNA and it exhibits a very complex regulatory pattern. This review will summarize our knowledge of the control of muscle mass by GH, IGF-I, anabolic steroids, exercise and other growth enhancing hormones. We will also highlight recent advances in the regulation of IGF-I and signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) by GH. A special emphasis will be placed on the interaction of IGF-I and proinflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscle and muscle cells. PMID:12621363

  5. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-jiang; Li, Ping-hua; Huang, Rui-hua; Sun, Wen-xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-jun; Liu, Hong-lin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells. PMID:26104526

  6. Osteogenic potential of alpha smooth muscle actin expressing muscle resident progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Brya G; Torreggiani, Elena; Roeder, Emilie; Matic, Igor; Grcevic, Danka; Kalajzic, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a pathological process where bone forms in connective tissues such as skeletal muscle. Previous studies have suggested that muscle-resident non-myogenic mesenchymal progenitors are the likely source of osteoblasts and chondrocytes in HO. However, the previously identified markers of muscle-resident osteoprogenitors label up to half the osteoblasts within heterotopic lesions, suggesting other cell populations are involved. We have identified alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) as a marker of osteoprogenitor cells in bone and periodontium, and of osteo-chondro progenitors in the periosteum during fracture healing. We therefore utilized a lineage tracing approach to evaluate whether αSMACreERT2 identifies osteoprogenitors in the muscle. We show that in the muscle, αSMACreERT2 labels both perivascular cells, and satellite cells. αSMACre-labeled cells undergo osteogenic differentiation in vitro and form osteoblasts and chondrocytes in BMP2-induced HO in vivo. In contrast, Pax7CreERT2-labeled muscle satellite cells were restricted to myogenic differentiation in vitro, and rarely contributed to HO in vivo. Our data indicate that αSMACreERT2 labels a large proportion of osteoprogenitors in skeletal muscle, and therefore represents another marker of muscle-resident cells with osteogenic potential under HO-inducing stimulus. In contrast, muscle satellite cells make minimal contribution to bone formation in vivo. PMID:26721734

  7. Collagen formation by transformed smooth muscle cells after arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Chidi, C C; DePalma, R G

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five normocholesterolemic rabbits were sacrificed at intervals up to 60 days after the thoracic aortas were de-endothelialized. Ultrastructural studies of both the re-endothelialized and nonendothelialized intima were done. The smooth muscle cells in the re-endothelialized intima showed segmental structural changes typically associated with transformation to a secretory cell type; abundant accumulations of collagen were in juxtaposition with these cells. The nonendothelialized intima did not demonstrate similar smooth muscle cell changes and collagen accumulation. These observations suggest that regenerating endothelial cells and intimal smooth muscle cells interact to cause smooth muscle cell transformation and collagen accumulation during arterial repair. PMID:7455897

  8. Fat cell invasion in long-term denervated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    de Castro Rodrigues, Antonio; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Rosa, Geraldo Marco; dos Santos, Nícolas Bertolaccini; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Lauris, José Roberto P

    2007-01-01

    There are several differences between red and white muscles submitted to different experimental conditions, especially following denervation: a) denervation atrophy is more pronounced in red than white muscles; b) the size of the fibers in the red muscles does not vary between different parts of the muscle before and after denervation, when compared to white muscles; c) the regional difference in the white muscles initially more pronounced after denervation than red muscle; d) red muscle fibers and fibers of the deep white muscle present degenerative changes such as disordered myofibrils and sarcolemmal folds after long-term denervation; e) myotube-like fibers with central nuclei occur in the red muscle more rapidly than white after denervation. Denervation of skeletal muscles causes, in addition to fibers atrophy, loss of fibers with subsequent regeneration, but the extent of fat cell percentage invasion is currently unknown. The present article describes a quantitative study on fat cell invasion percentage in red m. soleus and white m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL) rat muscles at 7 weeks for up to 32 weeks postdenervation. The results indicate that the percentage of fat cells increase after denervation and it is steeper than the age-related fat invasion in normal muscles. The fat percentage invasion is more pronounced in red compared with white muscle. All experimental groups present a statistically significant difference as regard fat cell percentage invasion. PMID:17941108

  9. Reaction of human smooth muscle antibody with thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Biberfeld, Gunnel; Fagraeus, Astrid; Lenkei, Rodica

    1974-01-01

    Sera from cases of active chronic hepatitis or acute hepatitis containing smooth muscle antibodies reacted by immunofluorescence with the membrane region of sectioned thyroid cells from thyrotoxic glands. With non-toxic glands the reaction was negative or weak. The prerequisite for a positive reaction was that the complement of the sera had been heat-inactivated. Absorption with smooth muscle antigen abolished the reaction of smooth muscle antibody positive sera with thyroid cells. Some smooth muscle antibody negative sera from cases with disorders other than liver disease were found to give a similar immunofluorescence staining of the membrane region of sectioned thyroid cells, but these antibodies were not absorbed with smooth muscle antigen. Culture of thyroid cells was found to increase the number of cells reacting with smooth muscle antibody. In contrast, the thyroid cell antigen reacting with smooth muscle antibody negative sera was lost during culture. PMID:4619977

  10. Dense-body aggregates as plastic structures supporting tension in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Herrera, Ana M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-11-01

    The wall of hollow organs of vertebrates is a unique structure able to generate active tension and maintain a nearly constant passive stiffness over a large volume range. These properties are predominantly attributable to the smooth muscle cells that line the organ wall. Although smooth muscle is known to possess plasticity (i.e., the ability to adapt to large changes in cell length through structural remodeling of contractile apparatus and cytoskeleton), the detailed structural basis for the plasticity is largely unknown. Dense bodies, one of the most prominent structures in smooth muscle cells, have been regarded as the anchoring sites for actin filaments, similar to the Z-disks in striated muscle. Here, we show that the dense bodies and intermediate filaments formed cable-like structures inside airway smooth muscle cells and were able to adjust the cable length according to cell length and tension. Stretching the muscle cell bundle in the relaxed state caused the cables to straighten, indicating that these intracellular structures were connected to the extracellular matrix and could support passive tension. These plastic structures may be responsible for the ability of smooth muscle to maintain a nearly constant tensile stiffness over a large length range. The finding suggests that the structural plasticity of hollow organs may originate from the dense-body cables within the smooth muscle cells. PMID:20709732

  11. Lkb1 Deletion Promotes Ectopic Lipid Accumulation in Muscle Progenitor Cells and Mature Muscles

    PubMed Central

    SHAN, TIZHONG; ZHANG, PENGPENG; BI, PENGPENG; KUANG, SHIHUAN

    2015-01-01

    Excessive intramyocellular triglycerides (muscle lipids) are associated with reduced contractile function, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes, but what governs lipid accumulation in muscle is unclear. Here we report a role of Lkb1 in regulating lipid metabolism in muscle stem cells and their descendent mature muscles. We used MyodCre and Lkb1flox/flox mice to specifically delete Lkb1 in myogenic cells including stem and differentiated cells, and examined the lipid accumulation and gene expression of myoblasts cultured from muscle stem cells (satellite cells). Genetic deletion of Lkb1 in myogenic progenitors led to elevated expression of lipogenic genes and ectopic lipid accumulation in proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, the Lkb1-deficient myoblasts differentiated into adipocyte-like cells upon adipogenic induction. However, these adipocyte-like cells maintained myogenic gene expression with reduced ability to form myotubes efficiently. Activation of AMPK by AICAR prevented ectopic lipid formation in the Lkb1-null myoblasts. Notably, Lkb1-deficient muscles accumulated excessive lipids in vivo in response to high-fat diet feeding. These results demonstrate that Lkb1 acts through AMPK to limit lipid deposition in muscle stem cells and their derivative mature muscles, and point to the possibility of controlling muscle lipid content using AMPK activating drugs. PMID:25251157

  12. Expression of an insulin-regulatable glucose carrier in muscle and fat endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaró, Senen; Palacín, Manuel; Pilch, Paul F.; Testar, Xavier; Zorzano, Antonio

    1989-12-01

    INSULIN rapidly stimulates glucose use in the major target tissues, muscle and fat, by modulating a tissue-specific glucose transporter isoform1-6. Access of glucose to the target tissue is restricted by endothelial cells which line the walls of nonfenestrated capillaries of fat and muscle7. Thus, we examined whether the capillary endothelial cells are actively involved in the modulation of glucose availability by these tissues. We report here the abundant expression of the muscle/fat glucose transporter isoform in endothelial cells, using an immunocytochemical analysis with a monoclonal antibody specific for this isoform1. This expression is restricted to endothelial cells from the major insulin target tissues, and it is not detected in brain and liver where insulin does not activate glucose transport. The expression of the muscle/fat transporter isoform in endothelial cells is significantly greater than in the neighbouring muscle and fat cells. Following administration of insulin to animals in vivo, there occurs a rapid increase in the number of muscle/fat transporters present in the lumenal plasma membrane of the capillary endothelial cells. These results document that insulin promotes the translocation of the muscle/fat glucose transporter in endothelial cells. It is therefore likely that endothelial cells play an important role in the regulation of glucose use by the major insulin target tissues in normal and diseased states.

  13. Muscle stem cells contribute to myofibers in sedentary adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Alexandra C.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Flygare, Steven D.; Fox, Zachary D.; Colasanto, Mary P.; Mathew, Sam J.; Yandell, Mark; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is essential for mobility, stability, and whole body metabolism, and muscle loss, for instance during sarcopenia, has profound consequences. Satellite cells (muscle stem cells) have been hypothesized, but not yet demonstrated, to contribute to muscle homeostasis and a decline in their contribution to myofiber homeostasis to play a part in sarcopenia. To test their role in muscle maintenance, we genetically labeled and ablated satellite cells in adult sedentary mice. We demonstrate via genetic lineage experiments that even in the absence of injury, satellite cells contribute to myofibers in all adult muscles, although the extent and timing differs. However, genetic ablation experiments showed that satellite cells are not globally required to maintain myofiber cross-sectional area of uninjured adult muscle. PMID:25971691

  14. Functional heterogeneity of side population cells in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Ojima, Koichi; Fukada, So-ichiro; Ikemoto, Madoka; Masuda, Satoru; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi . E-mail: takeda@ncnp.go.jp

    2006-03-17

    Skeletal muscle regeneration has been exclusively attributed to myogenic precursors, satellite cells. A stem cell-rich fraction referred to as side population (SP) cells also resides in skeletal muscle, but its roles in muscle regeneration remain unclear. We found that muscle SP cells could be subdivided into three sub-fractions using CD31 and CD45 markers. The majority of SP cells in normal non-regenerating muscle expressed CD31 and had endothelial characteristics. However, CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells, which are a minor subpopulation in normal muscle, actively proliferated upon muscle injury and expressed not only several regulatory genes for muscle regeneration but also some mesenchymal lineage markers. CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells showed the greatest myogenic potential among three SP sub-fractions, but indeed revealed mesenchymal potentials in vitro. These SP cells preferentially differentiated into myofibers after intramuscular transplantation in vivo. Our results revealed the heterogeneity of muscle SP cells and suggest that CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells participate in muscle regeneration.

  15. Fetal muscle-derived cells can repair dystrophic muscles in mdx mice

    SciTech Connect

    Auda-Boucher, Gwenola; Rouaud, Thierry; Lafoux, Aude; Levitsky, Dmitri; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Talon, Sophie; Fontaine-Perus, Josiane; Gardahaut, Marie-France . E-mail: Marie-France.Gardahaut@univ-nantes.fr

    2007-03-10

    We have previously reported that CD34{sup +} cells purified from mouse fetal muscles can differentiate into skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo when injected into muscle tissue of dystrophic mdx mice. In this study, we investigate the ability of such donor cells to restore dystrophin expression, and to improve the functional muscle capacity of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of mdx mice. For this purpose green fluorescent-positive fetal GFP{sup +}/CD34{sup +} cells or desmin{sup +}/{sup -}LacZ/CD34{sup +} cells were transplanted into irradiated or non-irradiated mdx EDL muscle. Donor fetal muscle-derived cells predominantly fused with existing fibers. Indeed more than 50% of the myofibers of the host EDL contained donor nuclei delivering dystrophin along 80-90% of the length of their sarcolemma. The presence of significant amounts of dystrophin (about 60-70% of that found in a control wild-type mouse muscle) was confirmed by Western blot analyses. Dystrophin expression also outcompeted that of utrophin, as revealed by a spatial shift in the distribution of utrophin. At 1 month post-transplant, the recipient muscle appeared to have greater resistance to fatigue than control mdx EDL muscle during repeated maximal contractions.

  16. STAT3 Regulates Self-Renewal of Adult Muscle Satellite Cells during Injury-Induced Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Xiao, Fang; Wang, Gang; Wei, Xiuqing; Jiang, Lei; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Haixia; Diao, Yarui; Wang, Huating; Ip, Nancy Y; Cheung, Tom H; Wu, Zhenguo

    2016-08-23

    Recent studies have shown that STAT3 negatively regulates the proliferation of muscle satellite cells (MuSCs) and injury-induced muscle regeneration. These studies have been largely based on STAT3 inhibitors, which may produce off-target effects and are not cell type-specific in vivo. Here, we examine the role of STAT3 in MuSCs using two different mouse models: a MuSC-specific Stat3 knockout line and a Stat3 (MuSC-specific)/dystrophin (Dmd) double knockout (dKO) line. Stat3(-/-) MuSCs from both mutant lines were defective in proliferation. Moreover, in both mutant strains, the MuSC pool shrank, and regeneration was compromised after injury, with defects more pronounced in dKO mice along with severe muscle inflammation and fibrosis. We analyzed the transcriptomes of MuSCs from dKO and Dmd(-/-) control mice and identified multiple STAT3 target genes, including Pax7. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of STAT3 in adult MuSCs that regulates their self-renewal during injury-induced muscle regeneration. PMID:27524611

  17. Intracellular energetic units in red muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Saks, V A; Kaambre, T; Sikk, P; Eimre, M; Orlova, E; Paju, K; Piirsoo, A; Appaix, F; Kay, L; Regitz-Zagrosek, V; Fleck, E; Seppet, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of regulation of mitochondrial respiration by endogenous and exogenous ADP in muscle cells in situ was studied in skinned cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. Endogenous ADP production was initiated by addition of MgATP; under these conditions the respiration rate and ADP concentration in the medium were dependent on the calcium concentration, and 70-80% of maximal rate of respiration was achieved at ADP concentration below 20 microM in the medium. In contrast, when exogenous ADP was added, maximal respiration rate was observed only at millimolar concentrations. An exogenous ADP-consuming system consisting of pyruvate kinase (PK; 20-40 units/ml) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP; 5 mM), totally suppressed respiration activated by exogenous ADP, but the respiration maintained by endogenous ADP was not suppressed by more than 20-40%. Creatine (20 mM) further activated respiration in the presence of ATP and PK+PEP. Short treatment with trypsin (50-500 nM for 5 min) decreased the apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP from 300-350 microM to 50-60 microM, increased inhibition of respiration by PK+PEP system up to 70-80%, with no changes in MgATPase activity and maximal respiration rates. Electron-microscopic observations showed detachment of mitochondria and disordering of the regular structure of the sarcomere after trypsin treatment. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed a group of at least seven low-molecular-mass proteins in cardiac skinned fibres which were very sensitive to trypsin and not present in glycolytic fibres, which have low apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP. It is concluded that, in oxidative muscle cells, mitochondria are incorporated into functional complexes ('intracellular energetic units') with adjacent ADP-producing systems in myofibrils and in sarcoplasmic reticulum, probably due to specific interaction with cytoskeletal elements responsible for mitochondrial distribution in the cell. It is suggested that these complexes represent the basic

  18. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function. PMID:25460248

  19. Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Rainey, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human adrenal cortex secretes mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens. These steroids are produced from unique cell types located within the three distinct zones of the adrenal cortex. Disruption of adrenal steroid production results in a variety of diseases that can lead to hypertension, metabolic syndrome, infertility and androgen excess. The adrenal cortex is also a common site for the development of adenomas, and rarely the site for the development of carcinomas. The adenomas can lead to diseases associated with adrenal steroid excess, while the carcinomas are particularly aggressive and have a poor prognosis. In vitro cell culture models provide an important tool to examine molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling both the normal and pathologic function of the adrenal cortex. Herein we discuss the human adrenocortical cell lines and their use as model systems for adrenal studies. PMID:21924324

  20. Response of the JAK-STAT pathway to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrel striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samantha M; Tessier, Shannon N; Tye, Joann; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-03-01

    Over the course of the torpor-arousal cycle, hibernators must make behavioral, physiological, and molecular rearrangements in order to keep a very low metabolic rate and retain organ viability. 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) remain immobile during hibernation, and although the mechanisms of skeletal muscle survival are largely unknown, studies have shown minimal muscle loss in hibernating organisms. Additionally, the ground squirrel heart undergoes cold-stress, reversible cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia-reperfusion without experiencing fatal impairment. This study examines the role of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway in the regulation of cell stress in cardiac and skeletal muscles, comparing euthermic and hibernating ground squirrels. Immunoblots showed a fivefold decrease in JAK3 expression during torpor in skeletal muscle, along with increases in STAT3 and 5 phosphorylation and suppressors of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) protein levels. Immunoblots also showed coordinated increases in STAT1, 3 and 5 phosphorylation and STAT1 inhibitor protein expression in cardiac muscle during torpor. PCR analysis revealed that the activation of these pro-survival signaling cascades did not result in coordinate changes in downstream genes such as anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family gene expression. Overall, these results indicate activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting a response to cellular stress during hibernation. PMID:26885984

  1. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Koshi N.; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Kazuo; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  2. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  3. The muscle satellite cell at 50: the formative years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In February 1961, Alexander Mauro described a cell 'wedged' between the plasma membrane of the muscle fibre and the surrounding basement membrane. He postulated that it could be a dormant myoblast, poised to repair muscle when needed. In the same month, Bernard Katz also reported a cell in a similar location on muscle spindles, suggesting that it was associated with development and growth of intrafusal muscle fibres. Both Mauro and Katz used the term 'satellite cell' in relation to their discoveries. Today, the muscle satellite cell is widely accepted as the resident stem cell of skeletal muscle, supplying myoblasts for growth, homeostasis and repair. Since 2011 marks both the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the satellite cell, and the launch of Skeletal Muscle, it seems an opportune moment to summarise the seminal events in the history of research into muscle regeneration. We start with the 19th-century pioneers who showed that muscle had a regenerative capacity, through to the descriptions from the mid-20th century of the underlying cellular mechanisms. The journey of the satellite cell from electron microscope curio, to its gradual acceptance as a bona fide myoblast precursor, is then charted: work that provided the foundations for our understanding of the role of the satellite cell. Finally, the rapid progress in the age of molecular biology is briefly discussed, and some ongoing debates on satellite cell function highlighted. PMID:21849021

  4. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Nam, Deokhwa; Li, Yong; Ma, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  5. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise. PMID:26203859

  6. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise. PMID:26203859

  7. Visualizing the Functional Heterogeneity of Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Ogawa, Shizuka; Ono, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells are satellite cells that play crucial roles in tissue repair and regeneration after muscle injury. Accumulating evidence indicates that satellite cells are genetically and functionally heterogeneous, even within the same muscle. A small population of satellite cells possesses "stemness" and exhibits the remarkable ability to regenerate through robust self-renewal when transplanted into a regenerating muscle niche. In contrast, not all satellite cells self-renew. For example, some cells are committed myogenic progenitors that immediately undergo myogenic differentiation with minimal cell division after activation. Recent studies illuminate the cellular and molecular characteristics of the functional heterogeneity among satellite cells. To evaluate heterogeneity and stem cell dynamics, here we describe methods to conduct a clonal analysis of satellite cells and to visualize a slowly dividing cell population. PMID:27052612

  8. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  9. Epigenetic regulation of smooth muscle cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renjing; Leslie, Kristen L; Martin, Kathleen A

    2015-04-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) are the major cell type in blood vessels. Their principal function in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through vessel wall contraction and relaxation. Unlike many other mature cell types in the adult body, SMC do not terminally differentiate but retain a remarkable plasticity. They have the unique ability to toggle between a differentiated and quiescent "contractile" state and a highly proliferative and migratory "synthetic" phenotype in response to environmental stresses. While there have been major advances in our understanding of SMC plasticity through the identification of growth factors and signals that can influence the SMC phenotype, how these regulate SMC plasticity remains unknown. To date, several key transcription factors and regulatory cis elements have been identified that play a role in modulating SMC state. The frontier in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying SMC plasticity has now advanced to the level of epigenetics. This review will summarize the epigenetic regulation of SMC, highlighting the role of histone modification, DNA methylation, and our most recent identification of a DNA demethylation pathway in SMC that is pivotal in the regulation of the SMC phenotypic state. Many disorders are associated with smooth muscle dysfunction, including atherosclerosis, the major underlying cause of stroke and coronary heart disease, as well as transplant vasculopathy, aneurysm, asthma, hypertension, and cancer. An increased understanding of the major regulators of SMC plasticity will lead to the identification of novel target molecules that may, in turn, lead to novel drug discoveries for the treatment of these diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity. PMID:24937434

  10. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering. PMID:26880982

  11. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering. PMID:26880982

  12. Action of Obestatin in Skeletal Muscle Repair: Stem Cell Expansion, Muscle Growth, and Microenvironment Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration. PMID:25762009

  13. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26892967

  14. Characterization of an epithelial cell line from bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    German, Tania; Barash, Itamar

    2002-05-01

    Elucidation of the bovine mammary gland's unique characteristics depends on obtaining an authentic cell line that will reproduce its function in vitro. Representative clones from bovine mammary cell populations, differing in their attachment capabilities, were cultured. L-1 cells showed strong attachment to the plate, whereas H-7 cells detached easily. Cultures established from these clones were nontumorigenic upon transplantation to an immunodeficient host; they exhibited the epithelial cell characteristics of positive cytokeratin but not smooth muscle actin staining. Both cell lines depended on fetal calf serum for proliferation. They exhibited distinct levels of differentiation on Matrigel in serum-free, insulin-supplemented medium on the basis of their organization and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) secretion. H-7 cells organized into mammospheres, whereas L-1 cells arrested in a duct-like morphology. In both cell lines, prolactin activated phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription, Stat5-a regulator of milk protein gene transcription, and of PHAS-I-an inhibitor of translation initiation in its nonphosphorylated form. De novo synthesis and secretion of BLG were detected in differentiated cultures: in L-1 cells, BLG was dependent on lactogenic hormones for maximal induction but was less stringently controlled than was beta-casein in the mouse CID-9 cell line. L-1 cells also encompassed a near-diploid chromosomal karyotype and may serve as a tool for studying functional characteristics of the bovine mammary gland. PMID:12418925

  15. Context matters: in vivo and in vitro influences on muscle satellite cell activity.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, D D W

    2008-10-15

    Skeletal muscle is formed during development by the progressive specification, proliferation, migration, and fusion of myoblasts to form terminally differentiated, contractile, highly patterned myofibers. Skeletal muscle is repaired or replaced postnatally by a similar process, involving a resident myogenic stem cell population referred to as satellite cells. In both cases, the activity of the myogenic precursor cells in question is regulated by local signals from the environment, frequently involving other, non-muscle cell types. However, while the majority of studies on muscle development were done in the context of the whole embryo, much of the current work on muscle satellite cells has been done in vitro, or on satellite cell-derived cell lines. While significant practical reasons for these approaches exist, it is almost certain that important influences from the context of the injured and regenerating muscle are lost, while potential tissue culture artifacts are introduced. This review will briefly address extracellular influences on satellite cells in vivo and in vitro that would be expected to impinge on their activity. PMID:18759329

  16. Robust generation and expansion of skeletal muscle progenitors and myocytes from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Michael; Kocharyan, Avetik; Liu, Jun; Skerjanc, Ilona S; Stanford, William L

    2016-05-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a developmental model to study early embryonic and tissue development, tease apart human disease processes, perform drug screens to identify potential molecular effectors of in situ regeneration, and provide a source for cell and tissue based transplantation. Highly efficient differentiation protocols have been established for many cell types and tissues; however, until very recently robust differentiation into skeletal muscle cells had not been possible unless driven by transgenic expression of master regulators of myogenesis. Nevertheless, several breakthrough protocols have been published in the past two years that efficiently generate cells of the skeletal muscle lineage from pluripotent stem cells. Here, we present an updated version of our recently described 50-day protocol in detail, whereby chemically defined media are used to drive and support muscle lineage development from initial CHIR99021-induced mesoderm through to PAX7-expressing skeletal muscle progenitors and mature skeletal myocytes. Furthermore, we report an optional method to passage and expand differentiating skeletal muscle progenitors approximately 3-fold every 2weeks using Collagenase IV and continued FGF2 supplementation. Both protocols have been optimized using a variety of human pluripotent stem cell lines including patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. Taken together, our differentiation and expansion protocols provide sufficient quantities of skeletal muscle progenitors and myocytes that could be used for a variety of studies. PMID:26404920

  17. Epigenetic regulation of smooth muscle cell plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renjing; Leslie, Kristen L.; Martin, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) are the major cell type in blood vessels. Their principle function in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through vessel wall contraction and relaxation. Unlike many other mature cell types in the adult body, SMC do not terminally differentiate but retain a remarkable plasticity. They have the unique ability to toggle between a differentiated and quiescent “contractile” state and a highly proliferative and migratory “synthetic” phenotype in response to environmental stresses. While there have been major advances in our understanding of SMC plasticity through the identification of growth factors and signals that can influence the SMC phenotype, how these regulate SMC plasticity remains unknown. To date, several key transcription factors and regulatory cis elements have been identified that play a role in modulating SMC state. The frontier in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying SMC plasticity has now advanced to the level of epigenetics. This review will summarize the epigenetic regulation of SMC, highlighting the role of histone modification, DNA methylation, and our most recent identification of a DNA demethylation pathway in SMC that is pivotal in the regulation of the SMC phenotypic state. Many disorders are associated with smooth muscle dysfunction, including atherosclerosis, the major underlying cause of stroke and coronary heart disease, as well as transplant vasculopathy, aneurysm, asthma, hypertension, and cancer. An increased understanding of the major regulators of SMC plasticity will lead to the identification of novel target molecules that may, in turn, lead to novel drug discoveries for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:24937434

  18. Turning terminally differentiated skeletal muscle cells into regenerative progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Lööf, Sara; Borg, Paula; Nader, Gustavo A; Blau, Helen M; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    The ability to repeatedly regenerate limbs during the entire lifespan of an animal is restricted to certain salamander species among vertebrates. This ability involves dedifferentiation of post-mitotic cells into progenitors that in turn form new structures. A long-term enigma has been how injury leads to dedifferentiation. Here we show that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation during newt limb regeneration depends on a programmed cell death response by myofibres. We find that programmed cell death-induced muscle fragmentation produces a population of 'undead' intermediate cells, which have the capacity to resume proliferation and contribute to muscle regeneration. We demonstrate the derivation of proliferating progeny from differentiated, multinucleated muscle cells by first inducing and subsequently intercepting a programmed cell death response. We conclude that cell survival may be manifested by the production of a dedifferentiated cell with broader potential and that the diversion of a programmed cell death response is an instrument to achieve dedifferentiation. PMID:26243583

  19. PDT-induced apoptosis in arterial smooth muscles cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamekye, Isaac; Renick, R.; Gilbert, C.; McEwan, Jean R.; Evan, G.; Bishop, Christopher C. R.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    PDT kills smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vivo and thus prevents intimal hyperplasia after angioplasty. It causes little inflammation and structural integrity of the artery is not compromised. We have studied the process of the SMC death in vitro. Cultured rat SMC (cell line sv40 ATCC) were sensitized with aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc), and then irradiated with 675 nm laser light (2.5 J/cm2). Controls were studied using only sensitizer or laser for treatment. The cells were incubated and the dying process observed with a time lapse video and microscope system. PDT caused a characteristic pattern of death. Cells lost contact with neighbors, shrank, and showed hyperactivity and membrane ruffling. The cells imploded into active and condensed membrane bound vesicles which were terminally reduced to residual bodies. These are the morphological changes of apoptosis. The control cells which were given AlS2Pc alone or laser alone showed no death. PDT induced cultured arterial SMC death by apoptosis rather than necrosis. An apoptotic mechanism of cell death in vivo would explain the relative lack of inflammation and local tissue destruction in the face of massive death.

  20. Shared signaling systems in myeloid cell-mediated muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, James G.; Dorshkind, Kenneth; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Much of the focus in muscle regeneration has been placed on the identification and delivery of stem cells to promote regenerative capacity. As those efforts have advanced, we have learned that complex features of the microenvironment in which regeneration occurs can determine success or failure. The immune system is an important contributor to that complexity and can determine the extent to which muscle regeneration succeeds. Immune cells of the myeloid lineage play major regulatory roles in tissue regeneration through two general, inductive mechanisms: instructive mechanisms that act directly on muscle cells; and permissive mechanisms that act indirectly to influence regeneration by modulating angiogenesis and fibrosis. In this article, recent discoveries that identify inductive actions of specific populations of myeloid cells on muscle regeneration are presented, with an emphasis on how processes in muscle and myeloid cells are co-regulated. PMID:24595286

  1. Establishment and Characterization of Rat Portal Myofibroblast Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Fausther, Michel; Goree, Jessica R.; Lavoie, Élise G.; Graham, Alicia L.; Sévigny, Jean; Dranoff, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The major sources of scar-forming myofibroblasts during liver fibrosis are activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and portal fibroblasts (PF). In contrast to well-characterized HSC, PF remain understudied and poorly defined. This is largely due to the facts that isolation of rodent PF for functional studies is technically challenging and that PF cell lines had not been established. To address this, we have generated two polyclonal portal myofibroblast cell lines, RGF and RGF-N2. RGF and RGF-N2 were established from primary PF isolated from adult rat livers that underwent culture activation and subsequent SV40-mediated immortalization. Specifically, Ntpdase2/Cd39l1-sorted primary PF were used to generate the RGF-N2 cell line. Both cell lines were functionally characterized by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, immunoblot and bromodeoxyuridine-based proliferation assay. First, immortalized RGF and RGF-N2 cells are positive for phenotypic myofibroblast markers alpha smooth muscle actin, type I collagen alpha-1, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, PF-specific markers elastin, type XV collagen alpha-1 and Ntpdase2/Cd39l1, and mesenchymal cell marker ecto-5’-nucleotidase/Cd73, while negative for HSC-specific markers desmin and lecithin retinol acyltransferase. Second, both RGF and RGF-N2 cell lines are readily transfectable using standard methods. Finally, RGF and RGF-N2 cells attenuate the growth of Mz-ChA-1 cholangiocarcinoma cells in co-culture, as previously demonstrated for primary PF. Immortalized rat portal myofibroblast RGF and RGF-N2 cell lines express typical markers of activated PF-derived myofibroblasts, are suitable for DNA transfection, and can effectively inhibit cholangiocyte proliferation. Both RGF and RGF-N2 cell lines represent novel in vitro cellular models for the functional studies of portal (myo)fibroblasts and their contribution to the progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:25822334

  2. Myogenic Progenitors from Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells for Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Magli, Alessandro; Incitti, Tania; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2016-01-01

    Muscle homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells which, in both pathologic and non-pathologic conditions, are able to repair or generate new muscle fibers. Although muscle stem cells have tremendous regenerative potential, their application in cell therapy protocols is prevented by several restrictions, including the limited ability to grow ex vivo. Since pluripotent stem cells have the unique potential to both self-renew and expand almost indefinitely, they have become an attractive source of progenitors for regenerative medicine studies. Our lab has demonstrated that embryonic stem cell (ES)-derived myogenic progenitors retain the ability to repair existing muscle fibers and contribute to the pool of resident stem cells. Because of their relevance in both cell therapy and disease modeling, in this chapter we describe the protocol to derive myogenic progenitors from murine ES cells followed by their intramuscular delivery in a murine muscular dystrophy model. PMID:27492174

  3. ASIC proteins regulate smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Grifoni, Samira C; Jernigan, Nikki L; Hamilton, Gina; Drummond, Heather A

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate Acid Sensing Ion Channel (ASIC) protein expression and importance in cellular migration. We recently demonstrated that Epithelial Na(+)Channel (ENaC) proteins are required for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration; however, the role of the closely related ASIC proteins has not been addressed. We used RT-PCR and immunolabeling to determine expression of ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3 and ASIC4 in A10 cells. We used small interference RNA to silence individual ASIC expression and determine the importance of ASIC proteins in wound healing and chemotaxis (PDGF-bb)-initiated migration. We found ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3, but not ASIC4, expression in A10 cells. ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3 siRNA molecules significantly suppressed expression of their respective proteins compared to non-targeting siRNA (RISC) transfected controls by 63%, 44%, and 55%, respectively. Wound healing was inhibited by 10, 20, and 26% compared to RISC controls following suppression of ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3, respectively. Chemotactic migration was inhibited by 30% and 45%, respectively, following suppression of ASIC1 and ASIC3. ASIC2 suppression produced a small, but significant, increase in chemotactic migration (4%). Our data indicate that ASIC expression is required for normal migration and may suggest a novel role for ASIC proteins in cellular migration. PMID:17936312

  4. Smooth muscle cell calcium activation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is controlled by the Ca2+ and Rho kinase signalling pathways. While the SMC Rho kinase system seems to be reasonably constant, there is enormous variation with regard to the mechanisms responsible for generating Ca2+ signals. One way of dealing with this diversity is to consider how this system has been adapted to control different SMC functions. Phasic SMCs (vas deferens, uterus and bladder) rely on membrane depolarization to drive Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. This depolarization can be induced by neurotransmitters or through the operation of a membrane oscillator. Many tonic SMCs (vascular, airway and corpus cavernosum) are driven by a cytosolic Ca2+ oscillator that generates periodic pulses of Ca2+. A similar oscillator is present in pacemaker cells such as the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and atypical SMCs that control other tonic SMCs (gastrointestinal, urethra, ureter). The changes in membrane potential induced by these cytosolic oscillators does not drive contraction directly but it functions to couple together individual oscillators to provide the synchronization that is a characteristic feature of many tonic SMCs. PMID:18787034

  5. VAMP2 is expressed in muscle satellite cells and up-regulated during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tajika, Yuki; Sato, Mahito; Murakami, Tohru; Takata, Kuniaki; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    Membrane trafficking is one of the most important mechanisms involved in the establishment and maintenance of the forms and functions of the cell. However, it is poorly understood in skeletal muscle cells. In this study, we have focused on vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs), which are components of the vesicle docking and fusion complex, and have performed immunostaining to investigate the expression of VAMPs in rat skeletal muscle tissue. We have found that VAMP2, but not VAMP1 or VAMP3, is expressed in satellite cells. VAMP2 is also expressed in myofibers in the soleus muscle and nerve endings. This is consistent with previous studies in which VAMP2 has been shown to regulate GLUT4 trafficking in slow-twitch myofibers in soleus muscle and neurotransmitter release in nerve endings. As satellite cells are quiescent myogenic cells, the expression of VAMP2 has further been examined in regenerating muscles after injury by the snake venom, cardiotoxin; we have observed enhanced expression of VAMP2 in immature myotubes with a peak at 3 days after injury. Our findings suggest that VAMP2 plays roles in quiescent satellite cells and is involved in muscle regeneration. The nature of the material transported in the VAMP2-bearing vesicles in satellite cells and myotubes is still under investigation. PMID:17468895

  6. Development of the smooth muscle foam cell: uptake of macrophage lipid inclusions.

    PubMed

    Wolfbauer, G; Glick, J M; Minor, L K; Rothblat, G H

    1986-10-01

    A possible mechanism for the formation of smooth muscle foam cells in the atherosclerotic lesion was explored. Cultured macrophages (J774 cell line) were induced to form cytoplasmic cholesteryl ester inclusions by exposure to acetylated low density lipoprotein in the presence of cholesterol-rich phospholipid dispersions. The macrophages were disrupted by brief sonication, and the inclusions were isolated by flotation. When these inclusions were placed in direct contact with cultured smooth muscle cells, cellular uptake of the inclusions in a time- and dose-dependent manner was observed. Light and electron microscopy indicated the presence of lipid inclusions throughout the cytoplasm of the cells. Uptake of inclusion lipid by the smooth muscle cells was inhibited by several metabolic inhibitors, indicating that the process is dependent on metabolic activity. A modest but significant hydrolysis of the cholesteryl ester was observed, showing that the stored cholesteryl esters are metabolically available. PMID:3020555

  7. Comparison of Muscle Fiber and Meat Quality Characteristics in Different Japanese Quail Lines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. M.; Hwang, S.; Lee, K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the growth performance, fiber characteristics of the pectoralis major muscle, and meat quality characteristics in the heavy weight (HW) and random bred control (RBC) quail lines and genders. The HW male exhibited more than two times greater body (245.7 vs 96.1 g, p<0.05) and pectoralis major muscle (PMW; 37.1 vs 11.1 g, p<0.05) weights compared to the RBC female. This growth performance in the HW line was associated with a greater muscle fiber area (1,502 vs 663.0 μm2, p<0.001) compared to the RBC line. Greater muscle mass of the HW male was accompanied by a higher percentage of type IIB fiber compared to the HW female (64.0% vs 51.0%, p<0.05). However, muscle fiber hyperplasia (increase in fiber number) has had a somewhat limited effect on PMW between the two lines. On the other hand, the HW line harboring a higher proportion of type IIB fiber showed rapid pH decline at the early postmortem period (6.23 vs 6.41, p<0.05) and lighter meat surface (53.5 vs 47.3, p<0.05) compared to the RBC line harboring a lower proportion of type IIB fiber. There were no significant differences observed in the measurement of water-holding capacity including drip loss (2.74% vs 3.07%, p>0.05) and cooking loss (21.9% vs 20.4%, p>0.05) between the HW and RBC lines. Therefore, the HW quail line developed by selection from the RBC quail, was slightly different in the meat quality characteristics compared to the RBC line, and a marked difference was found in growth performance between the two quail lines. PMID:27383804

  8. Applications of calcium electroporation to effective apoptosis induction in fibrosarcoma cells and stimulation of normal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zielichowska, Anna; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta; Michel, Olga; Kulbacka, Julita

    2016-06-01

    The electroporation (EP) supports various types of anticancer therapies by the selective transport of cytostatics. Increase in intracellular calcium level by EP may be a new approach to fibrosarcoma treatment. Calcium is one of the most important factors of cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death (apoptosis or necrosis). Calcium level balanced by electroporation can cause different effects on normal and pathological cells. The efficiency and safety of electroporation combined with Ca(2+) ions were examined in our study. The two muscle cell lines were used: normal rat skeletal muscle cells - L6 and cancer muscle cells - Wehi-164 (fibrosarcoma). Two CaCl2 concentrations were tested: 0.5 mM and 5 mM combined with EP parameters: 1000 V/cm, 1200 V/cm, and 1500 V/cm. The results show that EP supported by Ca(2+) is cytotoxic for Wehi-164 cells and simultaneously safe for normal muscle cells. The main type of cell death - apoptosis - was confirmed by Tunnel and Annexin V/PI assay. Additionally, sPLA2 pro-tumorigenic influence was proved by immunocytochemistry. Moreover, EP with 0.5 mM of Ca(2+) slightly stimulates the normal muscle cells - L6 to increase proliferation. PMID:26874618

  9. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool. PMID:27198673

  10. Intensity increases of actin layer-lines on activation of the Limulus muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Maéda, Y; Boulin, C; Gabriel, A; Sumner, I; Koch, M H

    1986-01-01

    Small angle x-ray diffraction patterns were recorded from isometrically contracting Limulus (horseshoe crab) telson levator muscle using a multiwire proportional-area detector on the storage ring DORIS. In the pattern a substantial increase in intensity is observed on the thin-filament-associated layer-line at 1/38 nm-1 (the first actin layer-line) with a maximum increase at a radial spacing of R = 0.07 nm-1 but there is a much smaller change in the intensity of the 5.9-nm layer-line, which also arises from the thin filament structure. The results suggest that during contraction the myosin heads, presumably being attached to the thin filaments, are arranged along the long-stranded helical tracks of the thin filaments but that the spatial relationship between the heads and the actin monomers varies. Intensity increases have also been observed (Maéda et al., manuscript in preparation) in the part of the patterns from frog muscle and barnacle muscle, which are attributable to the first actin layer-line. It is thus likely that the intensity increase of the first actin layer-line on the Limulus pattern is associated not with structural features which are special to Limulus muscle, but with the tension generating processes that are shared by muscles in general. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3801566

  11. Caveolar nanospaces in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, L M

    2006-01-01

    Caveolae, specialized membrane nanodomains, have a key role in signaling processes, including calcium handling in smooth muscle cells (SMC). We explored the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of peripheral cytoplasmic space at the nanoscale level and the close spatial relationships between caveolae, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and mitochondria, as ultrastructural basis for an excitation-contraction coupling system and, eventually, for excitation - transcription coupling. About 150 electron micrographs of SMC showed that superficial SR and peripheral mitochondria are rigorously located along the caveolar domains of plasma membrane, alternating with plasmalemmal dense plaques. Electron micrographs made on serial ultrathin sections were digitized, then computer-assisted organellar profiles were traced on images, and automatic 3D reconstruction was obtained using the ‘Reconstruct’ software. The reconstruction was made for 1 μm3 in rat stomach (muscularis mucosae) and 10 μm3 in rat urinary bladder (detrusor smooth muscle). The close appositions (about 15 nm distance) of caveolae, peripheral SR, and mitochondria create coherent cytoplasmic nanoscale subdomains. Apparently, 80% of caveolae establish close contacts with SR and about 10% establish close contacts with mitochondria in both types of SMC. Thus, our results show that caveolae and peripheral SR build Ca2+release units in which mitochondria often could play a part. The caveolae-SR couplings occupy 4.19% of the cellular volume in stomach and 3.10% in rat urinary bladder, while caveolae-mitochondria couplings occupy 3.66% and 3.17%, respectively. We conclude that there are strategic caveolae-SR or caveolae-mitochondria contacts at the nanoscale level in the cortical cytoplasm of SMC, presumably responsible for a vectorial control of free Ca2+ cytoplasmic concentrations in definite nanospaces. This may account for slective activation of specific Ca2+ signaling pathways. PMID:16796817

  12. Reduction of type IIb myosin and IIB fibers in tibialis anterior muscle of mini-muscle mice from high-activity lines.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Geneviève M; Guderley, Helga; Joanisse, Denis R; Garland, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    Selective breeding of laboratory house mice (Mus domesticus) for high voluntary wheel running has generated four replicate lines that show an almost threefold increase in daily wheel-running distances as compared with four nonselected control lines. An unusual hindlimb "mini-muscle" phenotype (small muscles, increased mitochondrial enzyme levels, disorganized fiber distribution) has increased in frequency in two of the four replicate selected lines. The gene of major effect that accounts for this phenotype is an autosomal recessive that has been mapped to a 2.6335 Mb interval on MMU11, but not yet identified. This study examined the tibialis anterior muscle to determine whether changes in muscle fiber types could explain such modifications in muscle size and properties. Although selected and control lines did not exhibit systematic differences in the fiber types present in the tibialis anterior muscle, as assessed by electrophoresis of myosin heavy chains (MHC) and by histochemistry, mini-muscle mice lacked type IIB fibers and the corresponding MHCs. Mini-muscle tibialis show increased activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase compared with the normally sized muscles, likely the result of the modified fiber types in the muscle. The mini-muscle phenotype is the major means through which selective breeding for high wheel running has modified the functional capacities of the hindlimb muscles, as normally sized tibialis anterior muscles from control and selected lines did not show general differences in their enzymatic capacities, MHC profiles or fiber type composition, with the exception of an elevated hexokinase activity and a reduced GPa activity in the selected lines. PMID:19177556

  13. Adult stem cells: the therapeutic potential of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Stewart, Claire E H

    2006-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells have revolutionised our understanding of normal and deregulated growth and development. The potential to produce cells and tissues as needed offers enormous therapeutic potential. The use of these cells, however, is accompanied by ongoing ethical, religious and biomedical issues. The expansion potential and plasticity of adult stem cells have therefore received much interest. Adult skeletal muscle is highly adaptable, responding to both the hypertrophic and degenerative stresses placed upon it. This extreme plasticity is in part regulated by resident stem cells. In addition to regenerating muscle, if exposed to osteogenic or adipogenic inducers, these cells spontaneously form osteoblasts or adipocytes. The potential for and heterogeneity of muscle stem cells is underscored by the observation that CD45+ muscle side population cells are capable of reconstituting bone marrow in lethally irradiated mice and of contributing to neo-vascularisation of regenerating muscle. Finally, first attempts to replace infarcted myocardium relied on injection of skeletal myoblasts into the heart. Cells successfully engrafted and cardiac function was improved. Harnessing their differentiation/trans-differentiation capacity provides enormous potential for adult stem cells. In this review, current understanding of the different stem cells within muscle will be discussed as will their potential utility for regenerative medicine. PMID:18220864

  14. Skeletal muscle satellite cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Greg; Hartzell, Charles R.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cells are postnatal myoblasts responsible for providing additional nuclei to growing or regenerating muscle cells. Satellite cells retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro and therefore provide a useful model to study postnatal muscle development. Most culture systems used to study postnatal muscle development are limited by the two-dimensional (2-D) confines of the culture dish. Limiting proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in 2-D could potentially limit cell-cell contacts important for developing the level of organization in skeletal muscle obtained in vivo. Culturing satellite cells on microcarrier beads suspended in the High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) designed by NASA provides a low shear, three-dimensional (3-D) environment to study muscle development. Primary cultures established from anterior tibialis muscles of growing rats (approximately 200 gm) were used for all studies and were composed of greater than 75 % satellite cells. Different inoculation densities did not affect the proliferative potential of satellite cells in the HARV. Plating efficiency, proliferation, and glucose utilization were compared between 2-D flat culture and 3-D HARV culture. Plating efficiency (cells attached - cells plated x 100) was similar between the two culture systems. Proliferation was reduced in HARV cultures and this reduction was apparent for both satellite cells and non-satellite cells. Furthermore, reduction in proliferation within the HARV could not be attributed to reduced substrate availability since glucose levels in media from HARV and 2-D cell culture were similar. Morphologically, microcarrier beads within the HARVS were joined together by cells into three-dimensional aggregates composed of greater than 10 beads/aggregate. Aggregation of beads did not occur in the absence of cells. Myotubes were often seen on individual beads or spanning the surface of two beads. In summary, proliferation and differentiation of

  15. Fetal stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration: a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Pozzobon, Michela; Franzin, Chiara; Piccoli, Martina; De Coppi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    More than 40% of the body mass is represented by muscle tissue, which possesses the innate ability to regenerate after damage through the activation of muscle-specific stem cells, namely satellite cells. Muscle diseases, in particular chronic degenerative states of skeletal muscle such as dystrophies, lead to a perturbation of the regenerative process, which causes the premature exhaustion of satellite cell reservoir due to continuous cycles of degeneration/regeneration. Nowadays, the research is focused on different therapeutic approaches, ranging from gene and cell to pharmacological therapy, but still there is no definitive cure in particular for genetic muscle disease. Keeping this in mind, in this article, we will give special consideration to muscle diseases and the use of fetal derived stem cells as a new approach for therapy. Cells of fetal origin, from cord blood to placenta and amniotic fluid, can be easily obtained without ethical concern, expanded and differentiated in culture, and possess immune-modulatory properties. The in vivo approach in animal models can be helpful to study the mechanism underneath the operating principle of the stem cell reservoir, namely the niche, which holds great potential to understand the onset of muscle pathologies. PMID:25221507

  16. Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptors in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael J.; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Kraemer, Rosemary; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Mahadeo, Debbie; Sharif, Setareh; Kaplan, David R.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Parada, Luis; Toran-Allerand, C. Dominique; Hajjar, David P.; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    1995-01-01

    The neurotrophins, a family of related polypeptide growth factors including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3 and NT-4/5 promote the survival and differentiation of distinctive sets of embryonic neurons. Here we define a new functional role for neurotrophins, as autocrine or local paracrine mediators of vascular smooth muscle cell migration. We have identified neurotrophins, and their cognate receptors, the trk tyrosine kinases, in human and rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo. In vitro, cultured human smooth muscle cells express BDNF; NT-3; and trk A, B, and C Similarly, rat smooth muscle cells expressed all three trk receptors as well as all four neurotrophins. Moreover, NGF induces cultured human smooth muscle cell migration at subnanomolar concentrations. In the rat aortic balloon deendothelialization model of vascular injury, the expression of NGF, BDNF, and their receptors trk A and trk B increased dramatically in the area of injury within 3 days and persisted during the formation of the neointima. In human coronary atherosclerotic lesions, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5, and the trk B and trk C receptors could be demonstrated in smooth muscle cells. These findings suggest that neurotrophins play an important role in regulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells to injury. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:7639328

  17. Eccentric exercise facilitates mesenchymal stem cell appearance in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Carmen; Huntsman, Heather D; Liu, Jianming; Zou, Kai; Boppart, Marni D

    2012-01-01

    Eccentric, or lengthening, contractions result in injury and subsequently stimulate the activation and proliferation of satellite stem cells which are important for skeletal muscle regeneration. The discovery of alternative myogenic progenitors in skeletal muscle raises the question as to whether stem cells other than satellite cells accumulate in muscle in response to exercise and contribute to post-exercise repair and/or growth. In this study, stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) positive, non-hematopoetic (CD45⁻) cells were evaluated in wild type (WT) and α7 integrin transgenic (α7Tg) mouse muscle, which is resistant to injury yet liable to strain, 24 hr following a single bout of eccentric exercise. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ stem cells were increased 2-fold in WT muscle post-exercise. The α7 integrin regulated the presence of Sca-1⁺ cells, with expansion occurring in α7Tg muscle and minimal cells present in muscle lacking the α7 integrin. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ cells isolated from α7Tg muscle following exercise were characterized as mesenchymal-like stem cells (mMSCs), predominantly pericytes. In vitro multiaxial strain upregulated mMSC stem cells markers in the presence of laminin, but not gelatin, identifying a potential mechanistic basis for the accumulation of these cells in muscle following exercise. Transplantation of DiI-labeled mMSCs into WT muscle increased Pax7⁺ cells and facilitated formation of eMHC⁺DiI⁻ fibers. This study provides the first demonstration that mMSCs rapidly appear in skeletal muscle in an α7 integrin dependent manner post-exercise, revealing an early event that may be necessary for effective repair and/or growth following exercise. The results from this study also support a role for the α7 integrin and/or mMSCs in molecular- and cellular-based therapeutic strategies that can effectively combat disuse muscle atrophy. PMID:22253772

  18. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  19. Adult Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Muscle Connective Tissue and Satellite Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Dreyfus, Patrick A.; Chretien, Fabrice; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Kirova, Youlia; Caramelle, Philippe; Garcia, Luis; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Gherardi, Romain K.

    2004-01-01

    Skeletal muscle includes satellite cells, which reside beneath the muscle fiber basal lamina and mainly represent committed myogenic precursor cells, and multipotent stem cells of unknown origin that are present in muscle connective tissue, express the stem cell markers Sca-1 and CD34, and can differentiate into different cell types. We tracked bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells in both muscle connective tissue and satellite cell niches of irradiated mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing BM cells. An increasing number of GFP+ mononucleated cells, located both inside and outside of the muscle fiber basal lamina, were observed 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. Sublaminal cells expressed unambiguous satellite cell markers (M-cadherin, Pax7, NCAM) and fused into scattered GFP+ muscle fibers. In muscle connective tissue there were GFP+ cells located close to blood vessels that expressed the ScaI or CD34 stem-cell antigens. The rate of settlement of extra- and intralaminal compartments by BM-derived cells was compatible with the view that extralaminal cells constitute a reservoir of satellite cells. We conclude that both muscle satellite cells and stem cell marker-expressing cells located in muscle connective tissue can derive from BM in adulthood. PMID:14982831

  20. Differences in the Expression and Distribution of Flotillin-2 in Chick, Mice and Human Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Possidonio, Ana Claudia Batista; Soares, Carolina Pontes; Portilho, Débora Morueco; Midlej, Victor; Benchimol, Marlene; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Myoblasts undergo a series of changes in the composition and dynamics of their plasma membranes during the initial steps of skeletal muscle differentiation. These changes are crucial requirements for myoblast fusion and allow the formation of striated muscle fibers. Membrane microdomains, or lipid rafts, have been implicated in myoblast fusion. Flotillins are scaffold proteins that are essential for the formation and dynamics of lipid rafts. Flotillins have been widely studied over the last few years, but still little is known about their role during skeletal muscle differentiation. In the present study, we analyzed the expression and distribution of flotillin-2 in chick, mice and human muscle cells grown in vitro. Primary cultures of chick myogenic cells showed a decrease in the expression of flotillin-2 during the first 72 hours of muscle differentiation. Interestingly, flotillin-2 was found to be highly expressed in chick myogenic fibroblasts and weakly expressed in chick myoblasts and multinucleated myotubes. Flotillin-2 was distributed in vesicle-like structures within the cytoplasm of chick myogenic fibroblasts, in the mouse C2C12 myogenic cell line, and in neonatal human muscle cells. Cryo-immunogold labeling revealed the presence of flotillin-2 in vesicles and in Golgi stacks in chick myogenic fibroblasts. Further, brefeldin A induced a major reduction in the number of flotillin-2 containing vesicles which correlates to a decrease in myoblast fusion. These results suggest the involvement of flotillin-2 during the initial steps of skeletal myogenesis. PMID:25105415

  1. Progenitors of skeletal muscle satellite cells express the muscle determination gene, MyoD

    PubMed Central

    Kanisicak, Onur; Mendez, Julio J.; Yamamoto, Shoko; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Goldhamer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite cells are tissue-specific stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Although satellite cells were identified almost 50 years ago, the identity of progenitor populations from which they derive remains controversial. We developed MyoDiCre knockin mice, and used Cre/lox lineage analysis to determine whether satellite cell progenitors express MyoD, a marker of myogenic commitment. Recombination status of satellite cells was determined by confocal microscopy of isolated muscle fibers and by electron microscopic observation of muscle tissue fixed immediately following isolation, using R26R-EYFP and R26R (β-gal) reporter mice, respectively. We show that essentially all adult satellite cells associated with limb and body wall musculature, as well as the diaphragm and extraocular muscles, originate from MyoD+ progenitors. Neonatal satellite cells were Cre-recombined, but only a small minority exhibited ongoing Cre expression, indicating that most satellite cells had expressed MyoD prenatally. We also show that satellite cell development in MyoD-null mice is not due to functional compensation by MyoD non-expressing lineages. The results suggest that satellite cells are derived from committed myogenic progenitors, irrespective of the anatomical location, embryological origin, or physiological properties of associated musculature. PMID:19464281

  2. TRIM32 regulates skeletal muscle stem cell differentiation and is necessary for normal adult muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Sarah; Otto, Anthony; Wu, Xiaoli; Miller, Pamela; Stelzer, Sandra; Wen, Yefei; Kuang, Shihuan; Wrogemann, Klaus; Patel, Ketan; Ding, Hao; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2012-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H) is an inherited autosomal recessive disease of skeletal muscle caused by a mutation in the TRIM32 gene. Currently its pathogenesis is entirely unclear. Typically the regeneration process of adult skeletal muscle during growth or following injury is controlled by a tissue specific stem cell population termed satellite cells. Given that TRIM32 regulates the fate of mammalian neural progenitor cells through controlling their differentiation, we asked whether TRIM32 could also be essential for the regulation of myogenic stem cells. Here we demonstrate for the first time that TRIM32 is expressed in the skeletal muscle stem cell lineage of adult mice, and that in the absence of TRIM32, myogenic differentiation is disrupted. Moreover, we show that the ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 controls this process through the regulation of c-Myc, a similar mechanism to that previously observed in neural progenitors. Importantly we show that loss of TRIM32 function induces a LGMD2H-like phenotype and strongly affects muscle regeneration in vivo. Our studies implicate that the loss of TRIM32 results in dysfunctional muscle stem cells which could contribute to the development of LGMD2H. PMID:22299041

  3. Bone marrow-derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongxu; Martinez, Carlo O; Ochoa, Oscar; Ruiz-Willhite, Lourdes; Bonilla, Jose R; Centonze, Victoria E; Waite, Lindsay L; Michalek, Joel E; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2009-02-01

    Limb regeneration requires the coordination of multiple stem cell populations to recapitulate the process of tissue formation. Therefore, bone marrow (BM) -derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration was examined in mice lacking the CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Myofiber size, numbers of myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs), and recruitment of BM-derived cells and macrophages were assessed after cardiotoxin-induced injury of chimeric mice produced by transplanting BM from wild-type (WT) or CCR2(-/-) mice into irradiated WT or CCR2(-/-) host mice. Regardless of the host genotype, muscle regeneration and recruitment of BM-derived cells and macrophages were similar in mice replenished with WT BM, whereas BM-derived cells and macrophage accumulation were decreased and muscle regeneration was impaired in all animals receiving CCR2(-/-) BM. Furthermore, numbers of MPCs (CD34(+)/Sca-1(-)/CD45(-) cells) were significantly increased in mice receiving CCR2(-/-) BM despite the decreased size of regenerated myofibers. Thus, the expression of CCR2 on BM-derived cells regulated macrophage recruitment into injured muscle, numbers of MPC, and the extent of regenerated myofiber size, all of which were independent of CCR2 expression on host-derived cells. Future studies in regenerative medicine must include consideration of the role of BM-derived cells, possibly macrophages, in CCR2-dependent events that regulate effective skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:18827026

  4. Intensification of the 5.9-nm actin layer line in contracting muscle.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, I; Yagi, N; Miura, H; Ozeki, M; Izumi, T

    According to the cross-bridge model of muscle contraction, an interaction of myosin heads with interdigitating actin filaments produces tension. Although X-ray equatorial diffraction patterns of active (contracting) muscle show that the heads are in the vicinity of the actin filaments, structural proof of actual attachment of heads to actin during contraction has been elusive. We show here that during contraction of frog skeletal muscle, the 5.9-nm layer line arising from the genetic helix of actin is intensified by as much as 56% of the change which occurs when muscle enters rigor, using a two-dimensional X-ray detector. This provides strong structural evidence that myosin heads do in fact attach during contraction. PMID:6334236

  5. Estrogens maintain skeletal muscle and satellite cell functions.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Ono, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    Estrogens have crucial roles in an extensive range of physiological functions regulating cellular proliferation and differentiation, development, homeostasis, and metabolism. Therefore, prolonged estrogen insufficiency influences various types of tissues expressing estrogen receptors (ERs). Although ERs are expressed in skeletal muscle and its stem cells, called satellite cells, how prolonged estrogen insufficiency affects their function remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of estrogen reduction on muscle in young ovariectomized (OVX) female mice. We found that reduced estrogens resulted in muscle atrophy in a time-dependent manner. Muscle force generation was reduced in OVX mice. Interestingly, prolonged estrogen insufficiency shifted fiber types toward faster myosin heavy chain isoforms. The number of satellite cells per isolated myofiber was unchanged, while satellite cell expansion, differentiation, and self-renewal were all markedly impaired in OVX mice. Indeed, muscle regeneration was significantly compromised in OVX mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that estrogens are essential for comprehensively maintaining muscle function with its insufficiency affecting muscle strength and regeneration in young female mice. PMID:27048232

  6. Tobacco constituents are mitogenic for arterial smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Hefton, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP) purified from flue-cured tobacco leaves, tar-derived material (TAR), the water soluble, nondialyzable, delipidized extract of cigarette smoke condensate, rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, but not adventitial fibroblasts. The mitogenicity appears to depend on polyphenol epitopes on carrier molecules. Ellagic acid, another plant polyphenol, inhibited arterial smooth-muscle proliferation. These results suggest that a number of ubiquitous, plant-derived substances may influence smooth-muscle cell proliferation in the arterial wall.

  7. Skeletal Muscle Characterization of Japanese Quail Line Selectively Bred for Lower Body Weight as an Avian Model of Delayed Muscle Growth with Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Min; Suh, Yeunsu; Shin, Sangsu; Lee, Kichoon

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to extensively characterize the skeletal muscle development in the low weight (LW) quail selected from random bred control (RBC) Japanese quail in order to provide a new avian model of impaired and delayed growth in physically normal animals. The LW line had smaller embryo and body weights than the RBC line in all age groups (P<0.05). During 3 to 42 d post-hatch, the LW line exhibited approximately 60% smaller weight of pectoralis major muscle (PM), mainly resulting from lower fiber numbers compared to the RBC line (P<0.05). During early post-hatch period when myotubes are still actively forming, the LW line showed impaired PM growth with prolonged expression of Pax7 and lower expression levels of MyoD, Myf-5, and myogenin (P<0.05), likely leading to impairment of myogenic differentiation and consequently, reduced muscle fiber formation. Additionally, the LW line had delayed transition of neonatal to adult myosin heavy chain isoform, suggesting delayed muscle maturation. This is further supported by the finding that the LW line continued to grow unlike the RBC line; difference in the percentages of PMW to body weights between both quail lines diminished with increasing age from 42 to 75 d post-hatch. This delayed muscle growth in the LW line is accompanied by higher levels of myogenin expression at 42 d (P<0.05), higher percentage of centered nuclei at 42 d (P<0.01), and greater rate of increase in fiber size between 42 and 75 d post-hatch (P<0.001) compared to the RBC line. Analysis of physiological, morphological, and developmental parameters during muscle development of the LW quail line provided a well-characterized avian model for future identification of the responsible genes and for studying mechanisms of hypoplasia and delayed muscle growth. PMID:24763754

  8. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  9. Human Muscle Satellite Cells as Targets of Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ozden, Simona; Huerre, Michel; Riviere, Jean-Pierre; Coffey, Lark L.; Afonso, Philippe V.; Mouly, Vincent; de Monredon, Jean; Roger, Jean-Christophe; El Amrani, Mohamed; Yvin, Jean-Luc; Jaffar, Marie-Christine; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Sourisseau, Marion; Schwartz, Olivier; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Desprès, Philippe; Gessain, Antoine; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Background Chikungunya (CHIK) virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells), and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. Conclusions/Significance This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans. PMID:17565380

  10. Cell death, clearance and immunity in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sciorati, C; Rigamonti, E; Manfredi, A A; Rovere-Querini, P

    2016-06-01

    The skeletal muscle is an immunologically unique tissue. Leukocytes, virtually absent in physiological conditions, are quickly recruited into the tissue upon injury and persist during regeneration. Apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy coexist in the injured/regenerating muscles, including those of patients with neuromuscular disorders, such as inflammatory myopathies, dystrophies, metabolic and mitochondrial myopathies and drug-induced myopathies. Macrophages are able to alter their function in response to microenvironment conditions and as a consequence coordinate changes within the tissue from the early injury throughout regeneration and eventual healing, and regulate the activation and the function of stem cells. Early after injury, classically activated macrophages ('M1') dominate the picture. Alternatively activated M2 macrophages predominate during resolution phases and regulate the termination of the inflammatory responses. The dynamic M1/M2 transition is increasingly felt to be the key to the homeostasis of the muscle. Recognition and clearance of debris originating from damaged myofibers and from dying stem/progenitor cells, stromal cells and leukocytes are fundamental actions of macrophages. Clearance of apoptotic cells and M1/M2 transition are causally connected and represent limiting steps for muscle healing. The accumulation of apoptotic cells, which reflects their defective clearance, has been demonstrated in various tissues to prompt autoimmunity against intracellular autoantigens. In the muscle, in the presence of type I interferon, apoptotic myoblasts indeed cause the production of autoantibodies, lymphocyte infiltration and continuous cycles of muscle injury and regeneration, mimicking human inflammatory myopathies. The clearance of apoptotic cells thus modulates the homeostatic response of the skeletal muscle to injury. Conversely, defects in the process may have deleterious local effects, guiding maladaptive tissue remodeling with collagen and fat

  11. Endothelial Cells Direct Mesenchymal Stem Cells Toward a Smooth Muscle Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cho-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms. PMID:24914692

  12. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Kumar, Arun; Das, Rudra Nayan; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-βPS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  13. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-βPS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  14. Arsenic induces sustained impairment of skeletal muscle and muscle progenitor cell ultrastructure and bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Brown, Elke; Stolz, Donna; Ferrari, Ricardo; Goodpaster, Bret; Deasy, Bridget; Distefano, Giovanna; Roperti, Alexandra; Cheikhi, Amin; Garciafigueroa, Yesica; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2014-09-01

    Over 4 million individuals in the United States, and over 140 million individuals worldwide, are exposed daily to arsenic-contaminated drinking water. Human exposures can range from below the current limit of 10 μg/L to over 1mg/L, with 100 μg/L promoting disease in a large portion of those exposed. Although increased attention has recently been paid to myopathy following arsenic exposure, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying clinical symptoms remain poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that arsenic induces lasting muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and impairs metabolism. Compared to nonexposed controls, mice exposed to drinking water containing 100 μg/L arsenite for 5 weeks demonstrated impaired muscle function, mitochondrial myopathy, and altered oxygen consumption that were concomitant with increased mitochondrial fusion gene transcription. There were no differences in the levels of inorganic arsenic or its monomethyl and dimethyl metabolites between controls and exposed muscles, confirming that arsenic does not accumulate in muscle. Nevertheless, muscle progenitor cells isolated from exposed mice recapitulated the aberrant myofiber phenotype and were more resistant to oxidative stress, generated more reactive oxygen species, and displayed autophagic mitochondrial morphology, compared to cells isolated from nonexposed mice. These pathological changes from a possible maladaptive oxidative stress response provide insight into declines in muscle functioning caused by exposure to this common environmental contaminant. PMID:24960579

  15. Dexamethasone effects on creatine kinase activity and insulin-like growth factor receptors in cultured muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Stuart, Charles A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, Clarence F.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of dexamethasone on the activity of creatine kinase (CK) and the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) binding were investigated using skeletal- and cardiac-muscle-derived cultured cell lines (mouse, C2C12; rat, L6 and H9c2). It was found that, in skeletal muscle cells, dexamethasone treatment during differentiation of skeletal-muscle cells caused dose-dependent increases in CK activity and increases in the degree of myotube formation, whereas cardiac cells (H9c2) exhibited very low CK activity during culture or dexamethasone treatment. Results for IGF-I binding were similar in all three cell lines. The IGF-I binding to dexamethasone-treated cells (50 nM for 24 hr on the day prior to confluence) resulted in an increased number of available binding sites, with no effect on the binding affinities.

  16. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  17. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  18. Serotonin augments smooth muscle differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Nobuaki; McCuaig, Sarah; O'Sullivan, Michael J; Martin, James G

    2014-05-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) contain a subset of multipotent stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that serotonin, a biogenic amine released by platelets and mast cells, can induce the smooth muscle differentiation of BMSCs. Brown Norway rat BMSCs stimulated with serotonin had increased expression of the smooth muscle markers smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and α actin (α-SMA) by qPCR and Western blot, indicating smooth muscle differentiation. This was accompanied by a concomitant down-regulation of the microRNA miR-25-5p, which was found to negatively regulate smooth muscle differentiation. Serotonin upregulated serum response factor (SRF) and myocardin, transcription factors known to induce contractile protein expression in smooth muscle cells, while it down-regulated Elk1 and Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), known to induce proliferation. Serotonin increased SRF binding to promoter regions of the MHC and α-SMA genes, assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Induction of smooth muscle differentiation by serotonin was blocked by the knock-down of SRF and myocardin. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was constitutively expressed by BMSCs and serotonin triggered its release. Inhibition of miR-25-5p augmented TGF-β1 expression, however the differentiation of BMSCs was not mediated by TGF-β1. These findings demonstrate that serotonin promotes a smooth muscle-like phenotype in BMSCs by altering the balance of SRF, myocardin, Elk1 and KLF4 and miR-25-5p is involved in modulating this balance. Therefore, serotonin potentially contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases characterized by tissue remodeling with increased smooth muscle mass. PMID:24595007

  19. Endothelin B receptors on human endothelial and smooth-muscle cells show equivalent binding pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M A; Haleen, S J; Welch, K M; Cheng, X M; Reynolds, E E

    1998-07-01

    We have described the pharmacologic profiles of endothelin B receptors in human endothelial cells and vascular and nonvascular smooth-muscle cells. First, by amplifying endothelin B receptor numbers through the use of phosphoramidon and intact cell-binding techniques, we demonstrated the presence of these receptors in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (100% endothelin B receptors), human aortic smooth-muscle cells (22% endothelin B, 78% endothelin A receptors), and human bronchial smooth-muscle cells (55% endothelin B, 45% endothelin A receptors) by using [125I]-endothelin-1 radioligand binding. The typical binding profiles of the endothelin B receptors were established through competition binding curve analysis with endothelin-1, endothelin-3, sarafotoxin 6c, and the endothelin A receptor-selective antagonist BQ-123. In the presence of BQ-123, a diverse group of antagonists, including PD 142893, BQ-788, SB 209670, and Ro 47-0203, were used to probe for binding differences indicative of multiple endothelin B-receptor subtypes. The results indicate a rank order of potency for the antagonists of BQ-788 > SB 209670 > PD 142893 > Ro 47-0203 for each cell line, and that between any of these human cell lines, measurements of [125I]-endothelin-1-binding antagonism for each of the four test compounds differed by less than twofold. Although this study cannot discount the possibility of more than one endothelin B-receptor subtype in humans, it does indicate that these tissues express receptors that show equivalent binding pharmacology. PMID:9676729

  20. Functional Overload Enhances Satellite Cell Properties in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Machida, Masanao; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle represents a plentiful and accessible source of adult stem cells. Skeletal-muscle-derived stem cells, termed satellite cells, play essential roles in postnatal growth, maintenance, repair, and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Although it is well known that the number of satellite cells increases following physical exercise, functional alterations in satellite cells such as proliferative capacity and differentiation efficiency following exercise and their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we found that functional overload, which is widely used to model resistance exercise, causes skeletal muscle hypertrophy and converts satellite cells from quiescent state to activated state. Our analysis showed that functional overload induces the expression of MyoD in satellite cells and enhances the proliferative capacity and differentiation potential of these cells. The changes in satellite cell properties coincided with the inactivation of Notch signaling and the activation of Wnt signaling and likely involve modulation by transcription factors of the Sox family. These results indicate the effects of resistance exercise on the regulation of satellite cells and provide insight into the molecular mechanism of satellite cell activation following physical exercise. PMID:26779264

  1. Piperine Congeners as Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mair, Christina E; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Wimmer, Laurin; Nemetz-Fiedler, Daniel; Sider, Nadine; Heiss, Elke H; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-08-01

    Successful vascular healing after percutaneous coronary interventions is related to the inhibition of abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and efficient re-endothelialization. In the search for vascular smooth muscle cell anti-proliferative agents from natural sources we identified piperine (1), the main pungent constituent of the fruits from Piper nigrum (black pepper). Piperine inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 21.6 µM, as quantified by a resazurin conversion assay. Investigations of ten piperamides isolated from black pepper fruits and 15 synthesized piperine derivatives resulted in the identification of three potent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibitors: the natural alkaloid pipertipine (4), and the two synthetic derivatives (2E,4E)-N,N-dibutyl-5-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dienamide (14) and (E)-N,N-dibutyl-3-(naphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)acrylamide (20). They showed IC50 values of 3.38, 6.00, and 7.85 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the synthetic compound (2E,4E)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (12) was found to be cell type selective, by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 11.8 µM without influencing the growth of human endothelial cells. PMID:26132851

  2. THP-1 cell line: an in vitro cell model for immune modulation approach.

    PubMed

    Chanput, Wasaporn; Mes, Jurriaan J; Wichers, Harry J

    2014-11-01

    THP-1 is a human leukemia monocytic cell line, which has been extensively used to study monocyte/macrophage functions, mechanisms, signaling pathways, and nutrient and drug transport. This cell line has become a common model to estimate modulation of monocyte and macrophage activities. This review attempts to summarize and discuss recent publications related to the THP-1 cell model. An overview on the biological similarities and dissimilarities between the THP-1 cell line and human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) derived-monocytes and macrophages, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the use of THP-1 cell line, is included. The review summarizes different published co-cultivation studies of THP-1 cells with other cell types, for instance, intestinal cells, adipocytes, T-lymphocytes, platelets, and vascular smooth muscle cells, which can be an option to study cell-cell interaction in vitro and can be an approach to better mimic in vivo conditions. Macrophage polarization is a relatively new topic which gains interest for which the THP-1 cell line also may be relevant. Besides that an overview of newly released commercial THP-1 engineered-reporter cells and THP-1 inflammasome test-cells is also given. Evaluation of recent papers leads to the conclusion that the THP-1 cell line has unique characteristics as a model to investigate/estimate immune-modulating effects of compounds in both activated and resting conditions of the cells. Although the THP-1 response can hint to potential responses that might occur ex vivo or in vivo, these should be, however, validated by in vivo studies to draw more definite conclusions. PMID:25130606

  3. Standards for Cell Line Authentication and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth D.; Plant, Anne L.

    2016-01-01

    Different genomic technologies have been applied to cell line authentication, but only one method (short tandem repeat [STR] profiling) has been the subject of a comprehensive and definitive standard (ASN-0002). Here we discuss the power of this document and why standards such as this are so critical for establishing the consensus technical criteria and practices that can enable progress in the fields of research that use cell lines. We also examine other methods that could be used for authentication and discuss how a combination of methods could be used in a holistic fashion to assess various critical aspects of the quality of cell lines. PMID:27300367

  4. Effects of methyl isocyanate on rat muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D; Goyle, S; Phillips, B J; Tee, A; Beech, L; Butler, W H

    1988-04-01

    Since the Bhopal disaster, in which the causal agent was methyl isocyanate (MIC), exposed people have complained of various disorders including neuromuscular dysfunction. In an attempt to gain some information about the response of muscle tissue to MIC its effects were investigated in cells in culture isolated from muscle of 2 day old rats. After treatment with a range of MIC concentrations (0.025-0.5 microliter/5 ml culture) the total number of nuclei of the two main cell types (fibroblasts and myoblasts) and the number of nuclei in muscle fibres (myotubes) were recorded. At lower doses which had little effect on the total number of nuclei, the formation of muscle fibres--that is, fusion of muscle cells--was prevented as the proportion of nuclei in myotubes was decreased. At higher doses both cell types were killed. This would suggest either an effect on muscle differentiation or a selective toxicity towards myoblasts. The observations were supported by light and electron microscopy. PMID:3378004

  5. Muscle glycogen and cell function--Location, location, location.

    PubMed

    Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, J

    2015-12-01

    The importance of glycogen, as a fuel during exercise, is a fundamental concept in exercise physiology. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not evenly distributed in skeletal muscle fibers, but rather localized in distinct pools. In this review, we present the available evidence regarding the subcellular localization of glycogen in skeletal muscle and discuss this from the perspective of skeletal muscle fiber function. The distribution of glycogen in the defined pools within the skeletal muscle varies depending on exercise intensity, fiber phenotype, training status, and immobilization. Furthermore, these defined pools may serve specific functions in the cell. Specifically, reduced levels of these pools of glycogen are associated with reduced SR Ca(2+) release, muscle relaxation rate, and membrane excitability. Collectively, the available literature strongly demonstrates that the subcellular localization of glycogen has to be considered to fully understand the role of glycogen metabolism and signaling in skeletal muscle function. Here, we propose that the effect of low muscle glycogen on excitation-contraction coupling may serve as a built-in mechanism, which links the energetic state of the muscle fiber to energy utilization. PMID:26589115

  6. Functional Overloading of Dystrophic Mice Enhances Muscle-Derived Stem Cell Contribution to Muscle Contractile Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Ferrari, Ricardo J.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Carvell, George; Boninger, Michael L.; Huard, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of functional overloading on the transplantation of muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) into dystrophic muscle and the ability of transplanted cells to increase dystrophic muscle’s ability to resist overloading-induced weakness. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Laboratory. Animals Male mice (N=10) with a dystrophin gene mutation. Interventions MDSCs were intramuscularly transplanted into the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL). Functional overloading of the EDL was performed by surgical ablation of the EDL’s synergist. Main Outcome Measures The total number of dystrophin-positive fibers/cross-section (as a measure of stem cell engraftment), the average number of CD31+ cells (as a measure of capillarity), and in vitro EDL contractile strength. Independent t tests were used to investigate the effect of overloading on engraftment, capillarity, and strength. Paired t tests were used to investigate the effect of MDSC engraftment on strength and capillarity. Results MDSC transplantation protects dystrophic muscles against overloading-induced weakness (specific twitch force: control 4.5N/cm2±2.3; MDSC treated 7.9N/cm2±1.4) (P=.02). This improved force production following overloading is concomitant with an increased regeneration by transplanted MDSCs (MDSC: 26.6±20.2 dystrophin-positive fibers/cross-section; overloading + MDSC: 170.6±130.9 dystrophin-positive fibers/cross-section [P=.03]). Overloading-induced increases in skeletal muscle capillarity is significantly correlated with increased MDSC engraftment (R2=.80, P=.01). Conclusions These findings suggest that the functional contribution of transplanted MDSCs may rely on activity-dependent mechanisms, possibly mediated by skeletal muscle vascularity. Rehabilitation modalities may play an important role in the development of stem cell transplantation strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. PMID:19154831

  7. Early attempts at production of prawn cell lines.

    PubMed

    Owens, L; Smith, J

    1999-01-01

    This report describes some unsuccessful attempts to produce continuous cell lines from penaeid prawn tissues in the late 1980s. This information is presented so that others might save time by not repeating the unsuccessful measures that were attempted. The osmolarity of Penaeus monodon haemolymph was measured at 687 mOsmol/kg (N = 10). Of the media tested, the best medium for cell growth and maintenance was shown to be double strength L-15, supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum, and 10% prawn muscle extract at 28 degrees C ( approximately 675.5 mOsmol/kg). Prawn muscle extract was made by homogenizing 30 g of prawn muscle in 50/50 ratio of distilled water/autoclaved seawater, clarified stepwise by centrifugation at 2k, 14k, 14k xg for 30 minutes each. The resultant supernatant was heat-inactivated on occasions with no improvement in growth. Preconditioned medium, cholesterol, galactose and trehalose supplements and the use of Cell-Tak did not improve growth conditions, and haemolymph extracts were detrimental to the cells. In addition it was shown that Nunc 25 cm(2) plastic culture flasks were better than Linbro and both were better than glass as substrates. The fate of 101 individual primary cell cultures, established from penaeid prawns, was as follows. Fifteen of the cultures succumbed to bacterial contamination, five became contaminated with fungi, four with thauastrochytrids, four succumbed to presumptive viral autocultures and two to ciliate contamination. Cell cultures derived from heart tissue could be maintained for a mean of 12.7 days (sd 9.7d), those derived from the epidermis 15.6 days (sd 9.0d), ovarian tissue 10 days (sd 2d), lymphoid organ 6.8 days (sd 0.4d), nerve cord and hepatopancreas 2 days. The most persistent cell cultures -- those derived from the heart explants -- contained dividing cells at 40 days, and epidermis cells were still dividing at 30 days. The longest lasting, non- proliferating, but viable, cell cultures were those of

  8. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  9. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  10. Role of mitochondria on muscle cell death and meat tenderization.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Verónica; Oliván, Mamen

    2013-05-01

    The possibility that mitochondria are involved in cellular dysfunction is particularly high in situations associated with increases in free radical activity, like hypoxia or ischemia; therefore its potential role in the muscle post-mortem metabolism is reviewed. In the dying muscle, different routes of cell death catabolism (apoptosis, autophagy) may occur having great influence on the process of conversion of muscle into meat. Mitochondria are the first and also one of the main organelles affected by post-mortem changes; therefore they are decisive in the subsequent cellular responses influencing the pathway to cell demise and thus, the final meat quality. Depending on the cell death programme followed by muscle cells after exsanguination, diverse proteases would be activated to a different extent, which is also reviewed in order to understand how they affect meat tenderization. This review also summarizes recent patents relating cell death processes and meat tenderness. Further research is encouraged as there is still a need of knowledge on cell death post-mortem processes to increase our understanding of the conversion of muscle into meat. PMID:23432120

  11. Osteogenic cell fractions isolated from mouse tongue muscle

    PubMed Central

    HARADA, KOJI; HARADA, TOYOKO; FERDOUS, TARANNUM; TAKENAWA, TAKANORI; UEYAMA, YOSHIYA

    2015-01-01

    The use of stem cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of bone defects. However, successful treatments rely upon the availability of cells that are easily obtained and that appropriately differentiate into osteoblasts. The tongue potentially represents a source of autologous cells for such purposes. In the present study, the ability of stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) positive cells derived from tongue muscle to differentiate into osteoblasts was investigated. The tongue muscles were excised from Jcl-ICR mice and tongue muscle-derived Sca-1-positive cells (TDSCs) were isolated from the tongue muscle using a magnetic cell separation system with microbeads. TDSCs were cultured in plastic dishes or gelatin sponges of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with bone differentiation-inducing medium. The expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, fibronectin, osteocalcin, osteonectin and osteopontin) was investigated in cultured TDSCs by western blot analysis. The formation of mineralized matrices was examined using alizarin red S and Von Kossa staining. Bone formation was investigated in cultured TDSCs by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemstry. In the present study, the expression of Sca-1 in mouse tongue muscle was demonstrated and TDSCs were isolated at high purity. TDSCs differentiated into cells of osteoblast lineage, as demonstrated by the upregulation of osteoblastic marker expression. The formation of mineralized matrices was confirmed by alizarin red S or Von Kossa staining in vitro. Bone formation was observed in the gelatin sponges of β-TCP, which were subsequently implanted under the skin of the backs of nude mice. These results suggested that TDSCs retain their osteogenic differentiation potential and therefore the tongue muscle may be used as a source of stem cells for bone regeneration. PMID:25684092

  12. Isolation of Nuclei from Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells and Myofibers for Use in Chromatin lmmunoprecipitation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Mallappa, Chandrashekara; Dacwag Vallaster, Caroline S.; lmbalzano, Anthony N.

    2014-01-01

    Studies investigating mechanisms controlling gene regulation frequently examine specific DNA sequences using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to determine whether specific regulatory factors or modified histones are present. While use of primary cells or cell line models for differentiating or differentiated tissue is widespread, the ability to assess factor binding and histone modification in tissue defines the events that occur in vivo and provides corroboration for studies in cultured cells. Many tissues can be analyzed with minimal modification to existing ChIP protocols that are designed for cultured cells; however, some tissues, such as skeletal muscle, are problematic in that accessibility of the cross-linking agent is limited. We describe a method to isolate skeletal muscle tissue nuclei suitable for use in ChIP protocols. Furthermore, we utilize a simple fractionation of digested skeletal muscle tissue that can separate mature myofibers from satellite cells, which are responsible for postnatal skeletal muscle regeneration, thereby allowing simultaneous preparation of nuclei from both cell types. PMID:22130858

  13. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  14. Satellite cell depletion prevents fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Egner, Ingrid M; Bruusgaard, Jo C; Gundersen, Kristian

    2016-08-15

    The largest mammalian cells are the muscle fibers, and they have multiple nuclei to support their large cytoplasmic volumes. During hypertrophic growth, new myonuclei are recruited from satellite stem cells into the fiber syncytia, but it was recently suggested that such recruitment is not obligatory: overload hypertrophy after synergist ablation of the plantaris muscle appeared normal in transgenic mice in which most of the satellite cells were abolished. When we essentially repeated these experiments analyzing the muscles by immunohistochemistry and in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we found that overload hypertrophy was prevented in the satellite cell-deficient mice, in both the plantaris and the extensor digitorum longus muscles. We attribute the previous findings to a reliance on muscle mass as a proxy for fiber hypertrophy, and to the inclusion of a significant number of regenerating fibers in the analysis. We discuss that there is currently no model in which functional, sustainable hypertrophy has been unequivocally demonstrated in the absence of satellite cells; an exception is re-growth, which can occur using previously recruited myonuclei without addition of new myonuclei. PMID:27531949

  15. Cell-host, LINE and environment

    PubMed Central

    Del Re, Brunella; Giorgi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements -1 (LINEs, L1s) are retroelements occupying almost 17% of the human genome. L1 retrotransposition can cause deleterious effects on the host-cell and it is generally inhibited by suppressive mechanisms, but it can occur in some specific cells during early development as well as in some tumor cells and in the presence of several environmental factors. In a recent publication we reported that extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field can affect L1 retrotransposition in neuroblastoma cells. In this commentary we discuss the interaction between environment and L1 activity in the light of the new emerging paradigm of host-LINE relationship. PMID:23734298

  16. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  17. Peptide separations by on-line MudPIT compared to isoelectric focusing in an off-gel format: Application to a membrane-enriched fraction from C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Elschenbroich, Sarah; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Sharma, Parveen; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Kislinger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    High resolution peptide separation is pivotal for successful shot-gun proteomics. The need for capable techniques propels invention and improvement of ever more sophisticated approaches. Recently, Agilent Technologies has introduced the OFFGEL fractionator, which conducts peptide separation by isoelectric focusing in an off-gel setup. This platform has been shown to accomplish high resolution of peptides for diverse sample types, yielding valuable advantages over comparable separation techniques. In this study, we deliver the first comparison of the newly emerging OFFGEL approach to the well-established on-line MudPIT platform. Samples from a membrane-enriched fraction isolated from murine C2C12 cells were subjected to replicate analysis by OFFGEL (12 fractions, pH 3 – 10) followed by RP-LC-MS/MS or 12-step on-line MudPIT. OFFGEL analyses yielded 1398 proteins (identified by 10,269 peptides) while 1428 proteins (11,078 peptides) were detected with the MudPIT approach. Thus, our data shows that both platforms produce highly comparable results in terms of protein/peptide identifications and reproducibility for the sample type analyzed. We achieve more accurate peptide focusing after OFFGEL fractionation with 88 % of all peptides binned to a single fraction, as compared to 61 % of peptides detected in only one step in MudPIT analyses. Our study suggests that both platforms are equally capable of high quality peptide separation of a sample with medium complexity, rendering them comparably valuable for comprehensive proteomic analyses. PMID:19670906

  18. Trichinella spiralis: nurse cell formation with emphasis on analogy to muscle cell repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiliang; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Lj; Nagano, Isao; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2008-01-01

    Trichinella infection results in formation of a capsule in infected muscles. The capsule is a residence of the parasite which is composed of the nurse cell and fibrous wall. The process of nurse cell formation is complex and includes infected muscle cell response (de-differentiation, cell cycle re-entry and arrest) and satellite cell responses (activation, proliferation and differentiation). Some events that occur during the nurse cell formation are analogous to those occurring during muscle cell regeneration/repair. This article reviews capsule formation with emphasis on this analogy. PMID:18710582

  19. Oral Gingival Cell Cigarette Smoke Exposure Induces Muscle Cell Metabolic Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Baeder, Andrea C.; Napa, Kiran; Richardson, Sarah T.; Taylor, Oliver J.; Andersen, Samantha G.; Wilcox, Shalene H.; Winden, Duane R.; Reynolds, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure compromises health through damaging multiple physiological systems, including disrupting metabolic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of oral gingiva in mediating the deleterious metabolic effects of cigarette smoke exposure on skeletal muscle metabolic function. Using an in vitro conditioned medium cell model, skeletal muscle cells were incubated with medium from gingival cells treated with normal medium or medium containing suspended cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Following incubation of muscle cells with gingival cell conditioned medium, muscle cell mitochondrial respiration and insulin signaling and action were determined as an indication of overall muscle metabolic health. Skeletal muscle cells incubated with conditioned medium of CSE-treated gingival cells had a profound reduction in mitochondrial respiration and respiratory control. Furthermore, skeletal muscle cells had a greatly reduced response in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Altogether, these results provide a novel perspective on the mechanism whereby cigarette smoke affects systemic metabolic function. In conclusion, we found that oral gingival cells treated with CSE create an altered milieu that is sufficient to both disrupted skeletal muscle cell mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27034671

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 influences cell cycle progression in muscle satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Mathieu; Figeac, Nicolas; White, Robert B.; Knopp, Paul; Zammit, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle retains a resident stem cell population called satellite cells, which are mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, but can be activated to produce myoblast progeny for muscle homeostasis, hypertrophy and repair. We have previously shown that satellite cell activation is partially controlled by the bioactive phospholipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and that S1P biosynthesis is required for muscle regeneration. Here we investigate the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) in regulating murine satellite cell function. S1PR3 levels were high in quiescent myogenic cells before falling during entry into cell cycle. Retrovirally-mediated constitutive expression of S1PR3 led to suppressed cell cycle progression in satellite cells, but did not overtly affect the myogenic program. Conversely, satellite cells isolated from S1PR3-null mice exhibited enhanced proliferation ex-vivo. In vivo, acute cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration was enhanced in S1PR3-null mice, with bigger muscle fibres compared to control mice. Importantly, genetically deleting S1PR3 in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy produced a less severe muscle dystrophic phenotype, than when signalling though S1PR3 was operational. In conclusion, signalling though S1PR3 suppresses cell cycle progression to regulate function in muscle satellite cells. PMID:23911934

  1. Comparable patterns of muscle facilitation evoked by individual corticomotoneuronal (CM) cells and by single intracortical microstimuli in primates: evidence for functional groups of CM cells.

    PubMed

    Cheney, P D; Fetz, E E

    1985-03-01

    We compared the averaged responses of forelimb muscles to action potentials of single motor cortex cells and to single intracortical microstimuli (S-ICMS). Activity of precentral neurons and 12 identified forelimb muscles (6 flexors and 6 extensors of wrist and fingers) was recorded in macaques while they performed alternating ramp-and-hold wrist movements. Action potentials of cells that covaried reliably with wrist flexion or extension were used to compile spike-triggered averages (spike-TAs) of rectified electromyographic (EMG) activity of six synergistically coactivated muscles. Cells whose spikes were followed by a clear postspike facilitation (PSF) of rectified muscle activity were designated corticomotoneuronal (CM) cells. CM cells typically facilitated a subset of the coactivated muscles called the cell's target muscles. The relative strength of the PSF in different target muscles ranged from clear increases above base-line fluctuations to weak but significant effects. For each CM cell we characterized the "PSF profile" of facilitation across different muscles, defined as the relative strength of PSF in each of the coactivated agonist muscles. After identifying the CM cell's target muscles, we delivered S-ICMS through the microelectrode at the same site. Biphasic stimuli were delivered during the same wrist movements in which the recorded CM cell had been active. Stimulus intensities were too weak (typically 5-10 microA) and their repetition rate too slow (5-15 Hz) to evoke muscle excitation evident in the raw EMG record. However, stimulus-triggered averages (stimulus-TAs) of the rectified EMGs of coactivated muscles revealed consistent patterns of poststimulus facilitation (PStimF). In most cases the muscles facilitated by the CM cell in spike-TAs (n = 60) were also facilitated by S-ICMS in stimulus-TAs. At sites of CM cells the threshold stimulus intensities for evoking a statistically significant effect were between 0.5 and 2 microA. S-ICMS of 5 micro

  2. Further considerations on in vitro skeletal muscle cell death

    PubMed Central

    Battistelli, Michela; Salucci, Sara; Burattini, Sabrina; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Summary The present review discusses the apoptotic behavior induced by chemical and physical triggers in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, comparing myoblast to myotube sensitivity, and investigating it by means of morphological, biochemical and cytofluorimetric analyses. After all treatments, myotubes, differently from myoblasts, showed a poor sensitivity to cell death. Intriguingly, in cells exposed to staurosporine, etoposide and UVB radiation, apoptotic and normal nuclei within the same fibercould be revealed. The presence of nuclear-dependent “territorial” death domains in the syncytium could explain a delayed cell death of myotubes compared to mononucleated cells. Moreover, autophagic granules abundantly appeared in myotubes after each treatment. Autophagy could protect muscle cell integrity against chemical and physical stimuli, making C2C12 myotubes, more resistant to cell death induction. PMID:24596689

  3. Research Sees Potential to Make Bone, Muscle from Human Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sees Potential to Make Bone, Muscle From Human Stem Cells Could be a major advance for regenerative medicine, ... muscle and 10 other cells types from human stem cells within a matter of days. The researchers from ...

  4. Down-regulation of lipoprotein lipase increases glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Veronica; Saraff, Kumuda; Medh, Jheem D.

    2009-11-06

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic hypoglycemic agents used to treat type 2 diabetes. TZDs target the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) and improve systemic insulin sensitivity. The contributions of specific tissues to TZD action, or the downstream effects of PPAR-{gamma} activation, are not very clear. We have used a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6 cells) to demonstrate that TZDs directly target PPAR-{gamma} in muscle cells. TZD treatment resulted in a significant repression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression in L6 cells. This repression correlated with an increase in glucose uptake. Down-regulation of LPL message and protein levels using siRNA resulted in a similar increase in insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Thus, LPL down-regulation improved insulin sensitivity independent of TZDs. This finding provides a novel method for the management of insulin resistance.

  5. New insights in endothelial and smooth muscle cell communication.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Víctor Arana; De Haro, Roberto; Sosa-Melgarejo, Jorge; Méndez, José D

    2007-01-01

    Based on immunohistochemical techniques against connexins and the intercellular flux of staining molecules, it has previously been shown that electrotonic communication occurs among endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, this due to the presence of myoendothelial gap junctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the density of myoendothelial contacts in the left coronary and internal mammary arteries as well as in the left saphenous vein by means of electron microscopy, the distance between both cells participating in an myoendothelial contact with a semi-automatic image analysis system and the presence of homocellular and heterocellular gap junctions between endothelial and smooth muscle cells by using the immunohistochemical technique and confocal microscopy in thoracic aorta were also analyzed. The results are that all blood vessels studied present myoendothelial contacts, while density studies show that they are more abundant in the saphenous vein. The myoendothelial contact distance is constant and in no case the cytoplasmic processes reach the plasma membrane of the partner cell toward which they are advanced. Homocellular gap junctions were found between smooth muscle cells and between endothelial cells. Heterocellular gap junctions were absent, evidencing the possibility that signaling molecules between endothelial and smooth muscle cells may be transferred through plasma membranes as was once thought and not necessarily by electrotonic communication. PMID:17383847

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors block differentiation of skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P; Viñals, F; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1996-08-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation involves myoblast alignment, elongation, and fusion into multinucleate myotubes, together with the induction of regulatory and structural muscle-specific genes. Here we show that two phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors, LY294002 and wortmannin, blocked an essential step in the differentiation of two skeletal muscle cell models. Both inhibitors abolished the capacity of L6E9 myoblasts to form myotubes, without affecting myoblast proliferation, elongation, or alignment. Myogenic events like the induction of myogenin and of glucose carrier GLUT4 were also blocked and myoblasts could not exit the cell cycle, as measured by the lack of mRNA induction of p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Overexpresssion of MyoD in 10T1/2 cells was not sufficient to bypass the myogenic differentiation blockade by LY294002. Upon serum withdrawal, 10T1/2-MyoD cells formed myotubes and showed increased levels of myogenin and p21. In contrast, LY294002-treated cells exhibited none of these myogenic characteristics and maintained high levels of Id, a negative regulator of myogenesis. These data indicate that whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is not indispensable for cell proliferation or in the initial events of myoblast differentiation, i.e. elongation and alignment, it appears to be essential for terminal differentiation of muscle cells. PMID:8702591

  7. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Della Gatta, Paul A.; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M.; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J.; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. Results: We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. Conclusion: These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26903873

  8. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  9. Caveolae internalization repairs wounded cells and muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Corrotte, Matthias; Almeida, Patricia E; Tam, Christina; Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Millis, Bryan A; Cortez, Mauro; Miller, Heather; Song, Wenxia; Maugel, Timothy K; Andrews, Norma W

    2013-01-01

    Rapid repair of plasma membrane wounds is critical for cellular survival. Muscle fibers are particularly susceptible to injury, and defective sarcolemma resealing causes muscular dystrophy. Caveolae accumulate in dystrophic muscle fibers and caveolin and cavin mutations cause muscle pathology, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that muscle fibers and other cell types repair membrane wounds by a mechanism involving Ca2+-triggered exocytosis of lysosomes, release of acid sphingomyelinase, and rapid lesion removal by caveolar endocytosis. Wounding or exposure to sphingomyelinase triggered endocytosis and intracellular accumulation of caveolar vesicles, which gradually merged into larger compartments. The pore-forming toxin SLO was directly visualized entering cells within caveolar vesicles, and depletion of caveolin inhibited plasma membrane resealing. Our findings directly link lesion removal by caveolar endocytosis to the maintenance of plasma membrane and muscle fiber integrity, providing a mechanistic explanation for the muscle pathology associated with mutations in caveolae proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00926.001 PMID:24052812

  10. Channel Gating Dependence on Pore Lining Helix Glycine Residues in Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Mowrey, David D; Mendez Giraldez, Raul; Wang, Ying; Pasek, Daniel A; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2015-07-10

    Type 1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) release Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to initiate skeletal muscle contraction. The role of RyR1-G4934 and -G4941 in the pore-lining helix in channel gating and ion permeation was probed by replacing them with amino acid residues of increasing side chain volume. RyR1-G4934A, -G4941A, and -G4941V mutant channels exhibited a caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release response in HEK293 cells and bound the RyR-specific ligand [(3)H]ryanodine. In single channel recordings, significant differences in the number of channel events and mean open and close times were observed between WT and RyR1-G4934A and -G4941A. RyR1-G4934A had reduced K(+) conductance and ion selectivity compared with WT. Mutations further increasing the side chain volume at these positions (G4934V and G4941I) resulted in reduced caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells, low [(3)H]ryanodine binding levels, and channels that were not regulated by Ca(2+) and did not conduct Ca(2+) in single channel measurements. Computational predictions of the thermodynamic impact of mutations on protein stability indicated that although the G4934A mutation was tolerated, the G4934V mutation decreased protein stability by introducing clashes with neighboring amino acid residues. In similar fashion, the G4941A mutation did not introduce clashes, whereas the G4941I mutation resulted in intersubunit clashes among the mutated isoleucines. Co-expression of RyR1-WT with RyR1-G4934V or -G4941I partially restored the WT phenotype, which suggested lessening of amino acid clashes in heterotetrameric channel complexes. The results indicate that both glycines are important for RyR1 channel function by providing flexibility and minimizing amino acid clashes. PMID:25998124

  11. Implantation of muscle satellite cells overexpressing myogenin improves denervated muscle atrophy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, H.; Lv, Y.; Shen, X.Q.; Xu, J.H.; Lu, H.; Fu, L.C.; Duan, T.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) overexpressing myogenin (MyoG) on denervated muscle atrophy. Rat MSCs were isolated and transfected with the MyoG-EGFP plasmid vector GV143. MyoG-transfected MSCs (MTMs) were transplanted into rat gastrocnemius muscles at 1 week after surgical denervation. Controls included injections of untransfected MSCs or the vehicle only. Muscles were harvested and analyzed at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Immunofluorescence confirmed MyoG overexpression in MTMs. The muscle wet weight ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after MTM injection (67.17±6.79) compared with muscles injected with MSCs (58.83±5.31) or the vehicle (53.00±7.67; t=2.37, P=0.04 and t=3.39, P=0.007, respectively). The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was also larger at 2 weeks after MTM injection (2.63×103±0.39×103) compared with MSC injection (1.99×103±0.58×103) or the vehicle only (1.57×103±0.47×103; t=2.24, P=0.049 and t=4.22, P=0.002, respectively). At 4 and 24 weeks post-injection, the muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area were similar across all three experimental groups. Immunohistochemistry showed that the MTM group had larger MyoG-positive fibers. The MTM group (3.18±1.13) also had higher expression of MyoG mRNA than other groups (1.41±0.65 and 1.03±0.19) at 2 weeks after injection (t=2.72, P=0.04). Transplanted MTMs delayed short-term atrophy of denervated muscles. This approach can be optimized as a novel stand-alone therapy or as a bridge to surgical re-innervation of damaged muscles. PMID:26871970

  12. Difference in Membrane Repair Capacity Between Cancer Cell Lines and a Normal Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; McNeil, Anna K; Novak, Ivana; McNeil, Paul L; Gehl, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Electroporation-based treatments and other therapies that permeabilize the plasma membrane have been shown to be more devastating to malignant cells than to normal cells. In this study, we asked if a difference in repair capacity could explain this observed difference in sensitivity. Membrane repair was investigated by disrupting the plasma membrane using laser followed by monitoring fluorescent dye entry over time in seven cancer cell lines, an immortalized cell line, and a normal primary cell line. The kinetics of repair in living cells can be directly recorded using this technique, providing a sensitive index of repair capacity. The normal primary cell line of all tested cell lines exhibited the slowest rate of dye entry after laser disruption and lowest level of dye uptake. Significantly, more rapid dye uptake and a higher total level of dye uptake occurred in six of the seven tested cancer cell lines (p < 0.05) as well as the immortalized cell line (p < 0.001). This difference in sensitivity was also observed when a viability assay was performed one day after plasma membrane permeabilization by electroporation. Viability in the primary normal cell line (98 % viable cells) was higher than in the three tested cancer cell lines (81-88 % viable cells). These data suggest more effective membrane repair in normal, primary cells and supplement previous explanations why electroporation-based therapies and other therapies permeabilizing the plasma membrane are more effective on malignant cells compared to normal cells in cancer treatment. PMID:27312328

  13. The effect of temperature on proliferation and differentiation of chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells isolated from different muscle types.

    PubMed

    Harding, Rachel L; Halevy, Orna; Yahav, Shlomo; Velleman, Sandra G

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are a muscle stem cell population that mediate posthatch muscle growth and repair. Satellite cells respond differentially to environmental stimuli based upon their fiber-type of origin. The objective of this study was to determine how temperatures below and above the in vitro control of 38°C affected the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells isolated from the chicken anaerobic pectoralis major (p. major) or mixed fiber biceps femoris (b.femoris) muscles. The satellite cells isolated from the p. major muscle were more sensitive to both cold and hot temperatures compared to the b.femoris satellite cells during both proliferation and differentiation. The expressions of myogenic regulatory transcription factors were also different between satellite cells from different fiber types. MyoD expression, which partially regulates proliferation, was generally expressed at higher levels in p. major satellite cells compared to the b.femoris satellite cells from 33 to 43°C during proliferation and differentiation. Similarly, myogenin expression, which is required for differentiation, was also expressed at higher levels in p. major satellite cells in response to both cold and hot temperatures during proliferation and differentiation than b. femoris satellite cells. These data demonstrate that satellite cells from the anaerobic p. major muscle are more sensitive than satellite cells from the aerobic b. femoris muscle to both hot and cold thermal stress during myogenic proliferation and differentiation. PMID:27125667

  14. Effective Young's modulus of the artificial muscle twisted by fishing lines: Analysis and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Donghua; Zhang, Xingyi; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2015-09-01

    Artificial muscles transformed by fishing lines or sewing thread, have distinguished advantages, e. g., fast, scalable, nonhysteretic, and long-life, which have been proposed by Haines et al. [Science 343, 868 (2014)]. In this paper, we present a geometrical model to predict the effective Young's modulus of the basic structure that is twisted by three fishing lines with the same diameter. Moreover, series of experiments are carried out to verify the present model, and it is found the theoretical calculations take good agreements with the experimental results.

  15. Muscle Satellite Cells: Exploring the Basic Biology to Rule Them

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Camila F.; Fernandes, Stephanie A.; Ribeiro Junior, Antonio F.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle is a postmitotic tissue with an enormous capacity to regenerate upon injury. This is accomplished by resident stem cells, named satellite cells, which were identified more than 50 years ago. Since their discovery, many researchers have been concentrating efforts to answer questions about their origin and role in muscle development, the way they contribute to muscle regeneration, and their potential to cell-based therapies. Satellite cells are maintained in a quiescent state and upon requirement are activated, proliferating, and fusing with other cells to form or repair myofibers. In addition, they are able to self-renew and replenish the stem pool. Every phase of satellite cell activity is highly regulated and orchestrated by many molecules and signaling pathways; the elucidation of players and mechanisms involved in satellite cell biology is of extreme importance, being the first step to expose the crucial points that could be modulated to extract the optimal response from these cells in therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the basic aspects about satellite cells biology and briefly discuss recent findings about therapeutic attempts, trying to raise questions about how basic biology could provide a solid scaffold to more successful use of these cells in clinics. PMID:27042182

  16. Possible Role of Non-Muscle Alpha-Actinins in Muscle Cell Mechanosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ogneva, Irina V.; Biryukov, Nikolay S.; Leinsoo, Toomas A.; Larina, Irina M.

    2014-01-01

    The main hypothesis suggested that changes in the external mechanical load would lead to different deformations of the submembranous cytoskeleton and, as a result, dissociation of different proteins from its structure (induced by increased/decreased mechanical stress). The study subjects were fibers of the soleus muscle and cardiomyocytes of Wistar rats. Changes in external mechanical conditions were reconstructed by means of antiorthostatic suspension of the animals by their tails for 6, 12, 18, 24 and 72 hours. Transversal stiffness was measured by atomic force microscopy imaging; beta-, gamma-actin, alpha-actinin 1 and alpha-actinin 4 levels in membranous and cytoplasmic fractions were quantified by Western blot analysis; expression rates of the corresponding genes were studied using RT-PCR. Results: In 6 hours, alpha-actinin 1 and alpha-actinin 4 levels decreased in the membranous fraction of proteins of cardiomyocytes and soleus muscle fibers, respectively, but increased in the cytoplasmic fraction of the abovementioned cells. After 6–12 hours of suspension, the expression rates of beta-, gamma-actin, alpha-actinin 1 and alpha-actinin 4 were elevated in the soleus muscle fibers, but the alpha-actinin 1 expression rate returned to the reference level in 72 hours. After 18–24 hours, the expression rates of beta-actin and alpha-actinin 4 increased in cardiomyocytes, while the alpha-actinin 1 expression rate decreased in soleus muscle fibers. After 12 hours, the beta- and gamma-actin content dropped in the membranous fraction and increased in the cytoplasmic protein fractions from both cardiomyocytes and soleus muscle fibers. The stiffness of both cell types decreased after the same period of time. Further, during the unloading period the concentration of nonmuscle actin and different isoforms of alpha-actinins increased in the membranous fraction from cardiomyocytes. At the same time, the concentration of the abovementioned proteins decreased in the soleus

  17. Chromatin signaling in muscle stem cells: interpreting the regenerative microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Arianna; Palacios, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Muscle regeneration in the adult occurs in response to damage at expenses of a population of adult stem cells, the satellite cells. Upon injury, either physical or genetic, signals released within the satellite cell niche lead to the commitment, expansion and differentiation of the pool of muscle progenitors to repair damaged muscle. To achieve this goal satellite cells undergo a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming to coordinately activate and repress specific subset of genes. Although the epigenetics of muscle regeneration has been extensively discussed, less emphasis has been put on how extra-cellular cues are translated into the specific chromatin reorganization necessary for progression through the myogenic program. In this review we will focus on how satellite cells sense the regenerative microenvironment in physiological and pathological circumstances, paying particular attention to the mechanism through which the external stimuli are transduced to the nucleus to modulate chromatin structure and gene expression. We will discuss the pathways involved and how alterations in this chromatin signaling may contribute to satellite cells dysfunction during aging and disease. PMID:25904863

  18. A population of Pax7-expressing muscle progenitor cells show differential responses to muscle injury dependent on developmental stage and injury extent

    PubMed Central

    Knappe, Stefanie; Zammit, Peter S.; Knight, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration in vertebrates occurs by the activation of quiescent progenitor cells that express pax7 to repair and replace damaged myofibers. We have developed a mechanical injury paradigm in zebrafish to determine whether developmental stage and injury size affect the regeneration dynamics of skeletal muscle. We found that both small focal injuries, and large injuries affecting the entire myotome, lead to expression of myf5 and myogenin, which was prolonged in older larvae, indicating a slower process of regeneration. We characterized the endogenous behavior of a population of muscle-resident Pax7-expressing cells using a pax7a:eGFP transgenic line and found that GFP+ cell migration in the myotome dramatically declined between 5 and 7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Following a small single myotome injury, GFP+ cells responded by extending processes, before migrating to the injured myofibers. Furthermore, these cells responded more rapidly to injury in 4 dpf larvae compared to 7 dpf. Interestingly, we did not see GFP+ myofibers after repair of small injuries, indicating that pax7a-expressing cells did not contribute to myofiber formation in this injury context. On the contrary, numerous GFP+ myofibers could be observed after an extensive single myotome injury. Both injury models were accompanied by an increased number of proliferating GFP+ cells, which was more pronounced in larvae injured at 4 dpf than 7 dpf. This indicates intriguing developmental differences, at these early ages. Our data also suggests an interesting disparity in the role that pax7a-expressing muscle progenitor cells play during skeletal muscle regeneration, which may reflect the extent of muscle damage. PMID:26379543

  19. Proteome Profiling and Ultrastructural Characterization of the Human RCMH Cell Line: Myoblastic Properties and Suitability for Myopathological Studies.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Buchkremer, Stephan; Weis, Joachim; Brauers, Eva; Hoss, Mareike; Rütten, Stephan; Caviedes, Pablo; Zahedi, René P; Roos, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Studying (neuro)muscular disorders is a major topic in biomedicine with a demand for suitable model systems. Continuous cell culture (in vitro) systems have several technical advantages over in vivo systems and became widely used tools for discovering physiological/pathophysiological mechanisms in muscle. In particular, myoblast cell lines are suitable model systems to study complex biochemical adaptations occurring in skeletal muscle and cellular responses to altered genetic/environmental conditions. Whereas most in vitro studies use extensively characterized murine C2C12 cells, a comprehensive description of an equivalent human cell line, not genetically manipulated for immortalization, is lacking. Therefore, we characterized human immortal myoblastic RCMH cells using scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and proteomics. Among more than 6200 identified proteins we confirm the known expression of proteins important for muscle function. Comparing the RCMH proteome with two well-defined nonskeletal muscle cells lines (HeLa, U2OS) revealed a considerable enrichment of proteins important for muscle function. SEM/TEM confirmed the presence of agglomerates of cytoskeletal components/intermediate filaments and a prominent rough ER. In conclusion, our results indicate RMCH as a suitable in vitro model for investigating muscle function-related processes such as mechanical stress burden and mechanotransduction, EC coupling, cytoskeleton, muscle cell metabolism and development, and (ER-associated) myopathic disorders. PMID:26781476

  20. Hydrogen peroxide induced responses of cat tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, V; Oike, M; Tanaka, H; Inoue, R; Ito, Y

    1997-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (10−6 and 10−3 M) on membrane potential, membrane currents, intracellular calcium concentration, resting muscle tone and contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol were examined in cat tracheal strips and isolated smooth muscle cells. H2O2 (10−4 and 10−5 M) enhanced the amplitude of contractions and excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.) evoked by EFS without changing muscle tone and resting membrane potential of the tracheal smooth muscle, and enhanced the contraction induced by carbachol (10−8 M). At an increased concentration (10−3 M), H2O2 elevated resting muscle tone and marginally hyperpolarized the membrane in the majority of the cells. In 51 out of 56 cells examined, H2O2 (10−6–10−3 M) elicited an outward current at a holding potential of −40 mV and enhanced the frequency of the spontaneous transient outward current (STOC). In 20 cells the outward current was preceded by a small inward current. In the other cells, H2O2 elicited only an inward current or did not affect the background current. In Ca2+ free solution the action of H2O2 on the resting muscle tone, STOCs, background current and on the current induced by ramp depolarization was significantly reduced. H2O2 (10−4 M) increased the intracellular ionized calcium concentration both in the absence and presence of external Ca2+. However, the effect developed faster and was of a higher amplitude in the presence of external Ca2+. These results suggest that H2O2 increases intracellular Ca2+, with a subsequent augmentation of stimulation-evoked contractions, and enhances Ca2+ and voltage-sensitive potassium conductance. PMID:9222542

  1. Improved Neurological Outcome by Intramuscular Injection of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in a Muscle Denervation Model

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hong-Lin; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Lu, Zong-Han; Chiang, Chien-Yi; Yang, Dar-Yu; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The skeletal muscle develops various degrees of atrophy and metabolic dysfunction following nerve injury. Neurotrophic factors are essential for muscle regeneration. Human amniotic fluid derived stem cells (AFS) have the potential to secrete various neurotrophic factors necessary for nerve regeneration. In the present study, we assess the outcome of neurological function by intramuscular injection of AFS in a muscle denervation and nerve anastomosis model. Materials and Methods Seventy two Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200–250 gm were enrolled in this study. Muscle denervation model was conducted by transverse resection of a sciatic nerve with the proximal end sutured into the gluteal muscle. The nerve anastomosis model was performed by transverse resection of the sciatic nerve followed by four stitches reconnection. These animals were allocated to three groups: control, electrical muscle stimulation, and AFS groups. Results NT-3 (Neurotrophin 3), BDNF (Brain derived neurotrophic factor), CNTF (Ciliary neurotrophic factor), and GDNF (Glia cell line derived neurotrophic factor) were highly expressed in AFS cells and supernatant of culture medium. Intra-muscular injection of AFS exerted significant expression of several neurotrophic factors over the distal end of nerve and denervated muscle. AFS caused high expression of Bcl-2 in denervated muscle with a reciprocal decrease of Bad and Bax. AFS preserved the muscle morphology with high expression of desmin and acetylcholine receptors. Up to two months, AFS produced significant improvement in electrophysiological study and neurological functions such as SFI (sciatic nerve function index) and Catwalk gait analysis. There was also significant preservation of the number of anterior horn cells and increased nerve myelination as well as muscle morphology. Conclusion Intramuscular injection of AFS can protect muscle apoptosis and likely does so through the secretion of various neurotrophic factors. This protection

  2. Smooth Muscle Enriched Long Noncoding RNA (SMILR) Regulates Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Margaret D.; Pinel, Karine; Dakin, Rachel; Vesey, Alex T.; Diver, Louise; Mackenzie, Ruth; Garcia, Raquel; Welsh, Paul; Sattar, Naveed; Hamilton, Graham; Joshi, Nikhil; Dweck, Marc R.; Miano, Joseph M.; McBride, Martin W.; Newby, David E.; McDonald, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Phenotypic switching of vascular smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state is implicated in diverse vascular pathologies, including atherogenesis, plaque stabilization, and neointimal hyperplasia. However, very little is known about the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during this process. Here, we investigated a role for lncRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cell biology and pathology. Methods and Results— Using RNA sequencing, we identified >300 lncRNAs whose expression was altered in human saphenous vein vascular smooth muscle cells following stimulation with interleukin-1α and platelet-derived growth factor. We focused on a novel lncRNA (Ensembl: RP11-94A24.1), which we termed smooth muscle–induced lncRNA enhances replication (SMILR). Following stimulation, SMILR expression was increased in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was detected in conditioned media. Furthermore, knockdown of SMILR markedly reduced cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we noted that expression of genes proximal to SMILR was also altered by interleukin-1α/platelet-derived growth factor treatment, and HAS2 expression was reduced by SMILR knockdown. In human samples, we observed increased expression of SMILR in unstable atherosclerotic plaques and detected increased levels in plasma from patients with high plasma C-reactive protein. Conclusions— These results identify SMILR as a driver of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suggest that modulation of SMILR may be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce vascular pathologies. PMID:27052414

  3. Refractory lining for electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Cook, Glenn M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contcat with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight oxygen and not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom.

  4. Isolation, immortalization, and characterization of a human breast epithelial cell line with stem cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2002-01-01

    The epithelial compartment of the human breast comprises two distinct lineages: the luminal epithelial and the myoepithelial lineage. We have shown previously that a subset of the luminal epithelial cells could convert to myoepithelial cells in culture signifying the possible existence of a progenitor cell. We therefore set out to identify and isolate the putative precursor in the luminal epithelial compartment. Using cell surface markers and immunomagnetic sorting, we isolated two luminal epithelial cell populations from primary cultures of reduction mammoplasties. The major population coexpresses sialomucin (MUC+) and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA+) whereas the minor population has a suprabasal position and expresses epithelial specific antigen but no sialomucin (MUC−/ESA+). Two cell lines were further established by transduction of the E6/E7 genes from human papilloma virus type 16. Both cell lines maintained a luminal epithelial phenotype as evidenced by expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin-1 and occludin, and by generation of a high transepithelial electrical resistance on semipermeable filters. Whereas in clonal cultures, the MUC+/ESA+ epithelial cell line was luminal epithelial restricted in its differentiation repertoire, the suprabasal-derived MUC−/ESA+ epithelial cell line was able to generate itself as well as MUC+/ESA+ epithelial cells and Thy-1+/α-smooth muscle actin+ (ASMA+) myoepithelial cells. The MUC−/ESA+ epithelial cell line further differed from the MUC+/ESA+ epithelial cell line by the expression of keratin K19, a feature of a subpopulation of epithelial cells in terminal duct lobular units in vivo. Within a reconstituted basement membrane, the MUC+/ESA+ epithelial cell line formed acinus-like spheres. In contrast, the MUC−/ESA+ epithelial cell line formed elaborate branching structures resembling uncultured terminal duct lobular units both by morphology and marker expression. Similar structures were obtained by

  5. Biomechanical Origins of Muscle Stem Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James B; Cheng, Richard Y; Davoudi, Sadegh; Gilbert, Penney M

    2016-04-10

    Skeletal muscle, the most abundant and widespread tissue in the human body, contracts upon receiving electrochemical signals from the nervous system to support essential functions such as thermoregulation, limb movement, blinking, swallowing and breathing. Reconstruction of adult muscle tissue relies on a pool of mononucleate, resident muscle stem cells, known as "satellite cells", expressing the paired-box transcription factor Pax7 necessary for their specification during embryonic development and long-term maintenance during adult life. Satellite cells are located around the myofibres in a niche at the interface of the basal lamina and the host fibre plasma membrane (i.e., sarcolemma), at a very low frequency. Upon damage to the myofibres, quiescent satellite cells are activated and give rise to a population of transient amplifying myogenic progenitor cells, which eventually exit the cell cycle permanently and fuse to form new myofibres and regenerate the tissue. A subpopulation of satellite cells self-renew and repopulate the niche, poised to respond to future demands. Harnessing the potential of satellite cells relies on a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms guiding their regulation in vivo. Over the past several decades, studies revealed many signal transduction pathways responsible for satellite cell fate decisions, but the niche cues driving the activation and silencing of these pathways are less clear. Here we explore the scintillating possibility that considering the dynamic changes in the biophysical properties of the skeletal muscle, namely stiffness, and the stretch and shear forces to which a myofibre can be subjected to may provide missing information necessary to gain a full understanding of satellite cell niche regulation. PMID:26004541

  6. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Carlos; Yee, Sarah; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Kobayashi, Miharu; Vaswani, Kanchan; Kvaskoff, David; Illanes, Sebastian E.; Mitchell, Murray D.; Rice, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA) remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT) interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration. Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37°C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected, and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo) isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™). Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software). Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30%) invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 × 108 ± 2.5 × 108 particles/106 cells) compared to JEG-3 (2.86 × 108 ± 0.78 × 108 particles/106 cells). VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (−exosomes) (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, vs. control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p < 0.05). Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes. Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content, and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls. PMID:25157233

  7. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Nakatani, Masashi; Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Asami; Yamada, Harumoto; Kasai, Takehiro; Masuda, Satoru; Narita, Asako; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Nishino, Ichizo; Tsuchida, Kunihiro

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases. PMID:27509136

  8. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  9. Muscarinic receptor size on smooth muscle cells and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.M.; Jung, C.Y.; Grover, A.K.

    1986-08-01

    The loss of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) binding following high-energy radiation was used to compare the muscarinic receptor size on single smooth muscle cells isolated by collagenase digestion from the canine stomach and on plasma membranes derived from intact gastric smooth muscle without exposure to exogenous proteolysis. Radiation inactivation of galactose oxidase (68 kdaltons), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (160 kdaltons), and pyruvate kinase (224 kdaltons) activities were used as molecular-weight standards. Radiation inactivation of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding to rat brain membranes, which gave a target size of 86 kdaltons, served as an additional control. In isolated smooth muscle cells, the calculated size of the muscarinic receptor was 80 +/- 8 kdaltons. In contrast, in a smooth muscle enriched plasma membrane preparation, muscarinic receptor size was significantly smaller at 45 +/- 3 kdaltons. Larger molecular sizes were obtained either in the presence of protease inhibitors (62 +/- 4 kdaltons) or by using a crude membrane preparation of gastric smooth muscle 86 +/- 7 kdaltons).

  10. Deteriorating Infrastructure in the Aged Muscle Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Joseph T

    2016-08-01

    Following an injury, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic remodeling to facilitate tissue repair. In a new study, Lukjanenko and colleagues show how an age-associated change in this process affects the regenerative ability of muscle stem cells (MuSCs). PMID:27494671

  11. Isolation of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells by Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Cheung, Tom H.; Charville, Gregory W.; Rando, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The prospective isolation of purified stem cell populations has dramatically altered the field of stem cell biology and has been a major focus of research across tissues in different organisms. Muscle stem cells are now among the most intensely studied stem cell populations in mammalian systems and the prospective isolation of these cells has allowed cellular and molecular characterizations not dreamed of a decade ago. In this protocol, we describe how to isolate muscle stem cells from limb muscles of adult mice by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We provide a detailed description of the physical and enzymatic dissociation of mononucleated cells from limb muscles, a procedure that is essential to maximize cell yield. We then describe a FACS-based method for obtaining exquisitely pure populations of either quiescent or activated muscle stem cells (VCAM+/CD31−/CD45−/Sca1−). The protocol also allows for the isolation of endothelial cells, hematopoietic cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from muscle tissue. PMID:26401916

  12. Noninvasive Tracking of Quiescent and Activated Muscle Stem Cell (MuSC) Engraftment Dynamics In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew T V; Blau, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Muscle stem cells play a central role in muscle regeneration. Most studies in the field of muscle regeneration focus on the unraveling of muscle stem cell biology to devise strategies for treating failing muscles as seen in aging and muscle-related diseases. However, the common method used in assessing stem cell function in vivo is laborious, as it involves time-consuming immunohistological analyses by microscopy on serial cryo-sections of the muscle post stem cell transplantation. Here we describe an alternative method, which adapts the bioluminescence imaging (BLI) technique to allow noninvasive tracking of engrafted stem-cell function in vivo in real-time. This assay system enables longitudinal studies in the same mice over time and reveals parameters, not feasible by traditional analysis, such as the magnitude and dynamics of engrafted muscle stem cell expansion in vivo in response to a particular drug treatment or muscle injury. PMID:27492173

  13. Expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and downstream muscle-specific proteins in ground squirrel skeletal and heart muscle during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    The thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) undergoes remarkable adaptive changes during hibernation. Interestingly, skeletal muscle remodelling occurs during the torpor-arousal cycle of hibernation to prevent net muscle loss despite inactivity. Reversible cardiomyocyte hypertrophy occurs in cardiac muscle, allowing the heart to preserve cardiac output during hibernation, while avoiding chronic maladaptive hypertrophy post-hibernation. We propose that calcium signalling proteins [calcineurin (Cn), calmodulin (CaM), and calpain], the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) family of transcription factors, and the NFAT targets myoferlin and myomaker contribute significantly to adaptations taking place in skeletal and cardiac muscle during hibernation. Protein-level analyses were performed over several conditions: euthermic room temperature (ER), euthermic cold room (EC), entrance into (EN), early (ET), and late torpor (LT) time points, in addition to early (EA), interbout (IA), and late arousal (LA) time points using immunoblotting and DNA-protein interaction (DPI) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). In skeletal and cardiac muscle, NFATc2 protein levels were elevated during torpor. NFATc4 increased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle in both tissues, and NFATc1 showed this trend in cardiac muscle only. NFATc3 showed an elevation in DNA-binding activity but not expression during torpor. Myoferlin protein levels dramatically increased during torpor in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Myomaker levels also increased significantly in cardiac muscle during torpor. Cardiac Cn levels remained stable, whereas CaM and calpain decreased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle. Activation and/or upregulation of NFATc2, c3, myoferlin, and myomaker at torpor could be part of a stress-response mechanism to preserve skeletal muscle mass, whereas CaM and calpain appear to initiate the rapid reversal of cardiac hypertrophy during arousal through

  14. Umbelliprenin Induces Apoptosis in CLL Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ziai, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Omid; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Zamani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease that requires innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. Many Ferula species, including F. asa-foetida, synthesize terpenyloxy coumarins. One of these coumarins is umbelliprenin, which has been implicated with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines. In this study induction of apoptosis by umbelliprenin on Jurkat T-CLL and Raji B-CLL cell lines was studied. In this regard, cells were incubated with various concentrations of umbelliprenin in-vitro for different times and assayed for apoptosis with annexin V–FITC/PI double staining flowcytometry method. Results showed that umbelliprenin induced apoptosis in leukemic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that CLL cells were more susceptible to umbelliprenin induced cell death than normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs). Moreover, we study the induction of apoptosis in Jurkat cells by umbelliprenin in the presence of interleukin 4 (IL-4) as an agent that causes resistance to apoptosis in CLL cells, was also student. We showed that IL-4 can not reduce apoptotic effect of umbelliprenin. The preferential toxicity of umbelliprenin for CLL cells, supports the hypothesis that oral administration of umbelliprenin in the form of foods or folk medicines containing this coumarin, might enhance protection against the development of CLL in man with little side effects. In conclusion, umbelliprenin may be an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of CLL, and thus clinical studies with umbelliprenin may be appropriate. PMID:24250490

  15. Hypertonic upregulation of amino acid transport system A in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, J G; Klus, L R; Steenbergen, D K; Kempson, S A

    1994-08-01

    The A10 line of vascular smooth muscle cells has Na+ dependent transport systems for alanine, proline, and Pi, whereas uptake of leucine, myo-inositol and D-glucose is Na+ independent. When A10 cells were incubated for 4 h in medium made hypertonic by addition of sucrose, there was a marked increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of alanine and proline but no change in Na(+)-dependent Pi uptake or Na(+)-independent uptake of leucine and inositol. Intracellular alanine content was increased 61% by the hypertonic treatment. Other nonpenetrating solutes, such as cellobiose and mannitol, reproduced the effect of sucrose, but urea, a penetrating solute, did not. Studies with 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid revealed that the upregulation by hypertonicity involved only system A. Increases in alanine and proline uptake also occurred after incubating the cells in isotonic medium containing 0.1 mM ouabain, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Na+ may be part of the intracellular signal for upregulation of system A. Hypertonic upregulation of Na(+)-dependent alanine transport occurred also in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. The response was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that gene transcription and protein synthesis play important roles in the mechanism leading to increased alanine uptake. We conclude that vascular smooth muscle cells, during prolonged hypertonic stress, activate system A and accumulate specific neutral amino acids which may act as organic osmolytes to help maintain normal cell volume. PMID:8074188

  16. Effects of teicoplanin on cell number of cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kashkolinejad-Koohi, Tahere; Saadat, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic with a wide variation in human serum half-life. It is also a valuable alternative of vancomycin. There is however no study on its effect on cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of teicoplanin on cultured cell lines CHO, Jurkat E6.1 and MCF-7. The cultured cells were exposed to teicoplanin at final concentrations of 0–11000 μg/ml for 24 hours. To determine cell viability, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test was performed. At low concentrations of teicoplanin the numbers of cultured cells (due to cell proliferation) were increased in the three cell lines examined. The maximum cell proliferation rates were observed at concentrations of 1000, 400, and 200 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. Cell toxicity was observed at final concentrations over 2000, 6000, and 400 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. A dose-dependent manner of cell toxicity was observed. Our present findings indicated that teicoplanin at clinically used concentrations induced cell proliferation. It should therefore be used cautiously, particularly in children, pregnant women and patients with cancer.

  17. Insulin regulates lipid and glucose metabolism similarly in two lines of rainbow trout divergently selected for muscle fat content.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junyan; Panserat, Stéphane; Kamalam, Biju Sam; Aguirre, Peyo; Véron, Vincent; Médale, Françoise

    2014-08-01

    Two experimental rainbow trout lines were developed through divergent selection for low (Lean 'L' line) or high (Fat 'F' line) muscle fat content. Previous nutritional studies suggested that these lines differed in their regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Since insulin acts as an anabolic hormone by regulating lipid and glucose metabolism, we put forward the hypothesis that F line might have a stronger sensitivity to insulin than L line. In order to test this hypothesis, bovine insulin was injected into rainbow trout of the two lines fasted for 48 h. As expected, insulin induced hypoglycemia and activated Akt-TOR signaling both in the liver and muscle of the two lines. We demonstrate that this was coupled with increased expression of insulin dependent glucose transporter (GLUT4) and transcription factors of fatty acid anabolism (LXR and SREBP1c) in the muscle and liver, respectively, and lower mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation enzymes (CPT1a, CPT1b and HOAD) in the white muscle of both lines. Regarding the genotype effect, TOR signaling response to insulin was stronger in F line as reflected by the higher phosphorylation of S6 protein and elevated mRNA levels of lipogenic enzyme (FAS) in the liver of F line. This observation was concordant with the higher plasma concentrations of free fatty acids and triglycerides in F line. Moreover, mRNA levels of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes (G6Pase2, FBPase and PEPCK) and muscle fatty acid oxidation enzymes (CPT1a, CPT1b, HOAD and ACO) were higher in the F line. However, very few insulin-genotype interactions were detected, indicating that insulin induced similar changes in lipid and glucose metabolism in both lines. PMID:24830905

  18. Necdin enhances muscle reconstitution of dystrophic muscle by vessel-associated progenitors, by promoting cell survival and myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pessina, P; Conti, V; Tonlorenzi, R; Touvier, T; Meneveri, R; Cossu, G; Brunelli, S

    2012-05-01

    Improving stem cell therapy is a major goal for the treatment of muscle diseases, where physiological muscle regeneration is progressively exhausted. Vessel-associated stem cells, such as mesoangioblasts (MABs), appear to be the most promising cell type for the cell therapy for muscular dystrophies and have been shown to significantly contribute to restoration of muscle structure and function in different muscular dystrophy models. Here, we report that melanoma antigen-encoding gene (MAGE) protein necdin enhances muscle differentiation and regeneration by MABs. When necdin is constitutively overexpressed, it accelerates their differentiation and fusion in vitro and it increases their efficacy in reconstituting regenerating myofibres in the α-sarcoglycan dystrophic mouse. Moreover, necdin enhances survival when MABs are exposed to cytotoxic stimuli that mimic the inflammatory dystrophic environment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that overexpression of necdin may be a crucial tool to boost therapeutic applications of MABs in dystrophic muscle. PMID:22095287

  19. Intracerebral transplants of primary muscle cells: a potential 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, S.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    After the transplantation of rat primary muscle cells into the caudate or cortex of recipient rats, the muscle cells were able to persist for at least 6 months. Muscle cells transfected with expression plasmids prior to transplantation were able to express reporter genes in the brains for at least 2 months. These results suggest that muscle cells might be a useful 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain.

  20. Adhesion and Fusion of Muscle Cells Are Promoted by Filopodia.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dagan; Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-08-01

    Indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila are generated during pupariation by fusion of hundreds of myoblasts with larval muscle templates (myotubes). Live observation of these muscles during the fusion process revealed multiple long actin-based protrusions that emanate from the myotube surface and require Enabled and IRSp53 for their generation and maintenance. Fusion is blocked when formation of these filopodia is compromised. While filopodia are not required for the signaling process underlying critical myoblast cell-fate changes prior to fusion, myotube-myoblast adhesion appears to be filopodia dependent. Without filopodia, close apposition between the cell membranes is not achieved, the cell-adhesion molecule Duf is not recruited to the myotube surface, and adhesion-dependent actin foci do not form. We therefore propose that the filopodia are necessary to prime the heterotypic adhesion process between the two cell types, possibly by recruiting the cell-adhesion molecule Sns to discrete patches on the myoblast cell surface. PMID:27505416

  1. Muscle progenitor cells proliferation doesn't sufficiently contribute to maintaining stretched soleus muscle mass during gravitational unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarakina, M. V.; Turtikova, O. V.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.; Kokontcev, A. A.; Shenkman, B. S.

    Skeletal muscle work hypertrophy is usually connected with muscle progenitor satellite cells (SC) activation with subsequent incorporation of their nuclei into myofibers. Passive stretch of unloaded muscle was earlier established to prevent atrophic processes and is accompanied by enhanced protein synthesis. We hypothesized that elimination of SC proliferation capacity by γ-irradiation would partly avert stretched muscle fiber capability to maintain their size under the conditions of gravitational unloading. To assess the role of muscle progenitor (satellite) cells in development of passive stretch preventive effect SC proliferation was suppressed by local exposing to ionized radiation (2500 rad), subsequent hindlimb suspension or hindlimb suspension with concomitant passive stretch were carried out. Reduction of myofiber cross-sectional area and decrease in myonuclei number accompanying unloaded muscle atrophy were completely abolished by passive stretch both in irradiated and sham-treated animals. We conclude that SC did not make essential contribution to passive stretch preventive action under the conditions of simulated weightlessness.

  2. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research. PMID:12631387

  3. TRANSFECTION OF INSECT CELL LINES USING POLYETHYLENIMINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect cell lines have been widely used in recombinant baculovirus expression systems and transient gene expression studies. Critical to these applications have been the transfection of foreign DNA. This has been widely done using labor intensive and cytotoxic liposome-based transfection reagents....

  4. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Felthaus, O.; Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O.; Brockhoff, G.; Reck, A.; Zeitler, K.; Hautmann, M.; Reichert, T.E.; Schmalz, G.; Morsczeck, C.

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  5. Expression of different phenotypes in cell lines from canine mammary spindle-cell tumours and osteosarcomas indicating a pluripotent mammary stem cell origin.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E; Moller, M; Blankenstein, M A; Andersson, L; Westermark, B

    2000-06-01

    Mammary spindle-cell tumours and sarcomas seem to be restricted to dogs and humans. Two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary spindle-cell tumours (CMT-U304 and CMT-U309) and two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary osteosarcomas (CMT-U334 and CMT-U335) were established to study the mesenchymal phenotypes of mammary tumours in the female dog. The cells from the spindle-cell tumours expressed cytokeratin, vimentin and smooth muscle actin filaments. When these cells were inoculated subcutaneously into female and male nude mice they formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as spindle-cell tumours, fibroma and rhabdomyoid tumours (n = 6/8). The cells from the osteosarcomas expressed vimentin filaments and also formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as chondroid, rhabdomyoid, smooth muscle-like and spindle-cell tumours (n = 6/10). The cell lines CMT-U304, CMT-U309 and CMT-U335 had receptors for progesterone but none of the four cell lines had receptors for estrogen. All four cell lines and their corresponding primary tumours showed identical allelic patterns in microsatellite analysis. By in situ hybridization with genomic DNA we could verify that all formed tumours but one were of canine origin. Our results support the hypothesis that canine mammary tumours are derived from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:10965996

  6. Rejuvenating Muscle Stem Cell Function: Restoring Quiescence and Overcoming Senescence.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2016-04-01

    Elderly humans gradually lose strength and the capacity to repair skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle repair requires functional skeletal muscle satellite (or stem) cells (SMSCs) and progenitor cells. Diminished stem cell numbers and increased dysfunction correlate with the observed gradual loss of strength during aging. Recent reports attribute the loss of stem cell numbers and function to either increased entry into a presenescent state or the loss of self-renewal capacity due to an inability to maintain quiescence resulting in stem cell exhaustion. Earlier work has shown that exposure to factors from blood of young animals and other treatments could restore SMSC function. However, cells in the presenescent state are refractory to the beneficial effects of being transplanted into a young environment. Entry into the presenescent state results from loss of autophagy, leading to increased ROS and epigenetic modification at the CDKN2A locus due to decreased H2Aub, upregulating cell senescence biomarker p16ink4a. However, the presenescent SMSCs can be rejuvenated by agents that stimulate autophagy, such as the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Autophagy plays a critical role in SMSC homeostasis. These results have implications for the development of senolytic therapies that attempt to destroy p16ink4a expressing cells, since such therapies would also destroy a reservoir of potentially rescuable regenerative stem cells. Other work suggests that in humans, loss of SMSC self-renewal capacity is primarily due to decreased expression of sprouty1. DNA hypomethylation at the SPRY1 gene locus downregulates sprouty1, causing inability to maintain quiescence and eventual exhaustion of the stem cell population. A unifying hypothesis posits that in aging humans, first loss of quiescence occurs, depleting the stem cell population, but that remaining SMSCs are increasingly subject to presenescence in the very old. PMID:27000748

  7. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  8. A human gallbladder adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R T; Woods, L K; Moore, G E; McGavran, L; Quinn, L A; Semple, T U

    1981-06-01

    A continuous cell line, COLO 346, was established from a liver metastasis in a patient with adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. COLO 346 grew as an adherent monolayer of pleomorphic epithelioid cells. COLO 346 cells produced esterone, but no estradiol, progesterone, or cortisol. No adrenocorticotropic hormones, beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin, carcinoembryonic antigen, or alpha-fetoprotein production by the cells was detected. Cell doubling time was 36 h. Seven allelic isozymes were assayed. COLO 346 had a chromosome mode of 74 at 21 months postestablishment with 6 marker chromosomes present in 100% of the cells analyzed. COLO 346 has been in continuous culture for over 2 yr and is available to other investigators for their studies. PMID:7262900

  9. Antiproliferative efficacy of Tabernaemontana divaricata against HEP2 cell line and Vero cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Selvakumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laryngeal cancer may also be called cancer of the larynx or laryngeal carcinoma. Conventional plants are a precious source of novel anticancer agents and are still in performance better role in health concern. The study was intended to estimation of the anticancer activity of the chloroformic extract of Tabernaemontana divaricata on the human epidermoid larynx carcinoma cell line (Hep 2). Materials and Method: The aerial parts (leaves, stem, and flowers) of T. divaricata were tested for its inhibitory effect in 96 microplate formats against Hep 2 cell line. The anticancer activity of samples on Hep 2 and Vero was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and various enzymatic parameters like catalase, reduced glutathione (GSH), GSH peroxidase, and superoxide anion scavenging activity. Viable cells were determined by the absorbance at 540 nm. Measurements were performed, and the concentration required for a 50% inhibition of viability (IC50) was determined graphically. The effect of the samples on the proliferation of Hep 2 and Vero cells was expressed as the % cell viability. Results: The extract on Hep 2 cell line up to 7.8 μg/ml and that IC50 value on Hep 2 cell line was 112 μg whereas 94 μg for Vero cell line. Hence, T. divaricata has lesser significant action on Vero cell line. Conclusion: Medicinal plant drug discovery continues to provide new and important leads against various pharmacological targets including cancer. Our results clearly indicate the anticancer property of the medicinal plant T. divaricata against the human laryngeal carcinoma cell lines (Hep 2 cell line). PMID:26109773

  10. Human vascular smooth muscle cells express a urate transporter.

    PubMed

    Price, Karen L; Sautin, Yuri Y; Long, David A; Zhang, Li; Miyazaki, Hiroki; Mu, Wei; Endou, Hitoshi; Johnson, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    An elevated serum uric acid is associated with the development of hypertension and renal disease. Renal regulation of urate excretion is largely controlled by URAT1 (SLC22A12), a member of the organic anion transporter superfamily. This study reports the specific expression of URAT1 on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. Expression of URAT1 was localized to the cell membrane. Evidence that the URAT1 transporter was functional was provided by the finding that uptake of 14C-urate was significantly inhibited in the presence of probenecid, an organic anion transporter inhibitor. It is proposed that URAT1 may provide a mechanism by which uric acid enters the human vascular smooth muscle cell, a finding that may be relevant to the role of uric acid in cardiovascular disease. PMID:16775029

  11. Stem Cells for the Treatment of Skeletal Muscle Injury

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Andres J; Wright, Vonda J; Fu, Freddie H; Huard, Johhny

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are extremely common, accounting for up to 35-55% of all sports injuries and quite possibly impacting all musculoskeletal traumas. These injuries result in the formation of fibrosis that may lead to development of painful contractures, increases their risk for repeat injuries, and limits their ability to return to a baseline or pre-injury level of function. The development of successful therapies for these injuries must consider the pathophysiology of these musculoskeletal conditions. We discuss the direct use of muscle-derived stem cells and some key cell population dynamics, as well as the use of clinically applicable modalities which may enhance the local supply of stem cells to the zone of injury by promoting angiogenesis. PMID:19064161

  12. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction. PMID:26874281

  13. Characterization of swine testicular cell line as immature porcine Sertoli cell line.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changping; Song, Huibin; Guan, Kaifeng; Zhou, Jiawei; Xia, Xuanyan; Li, Fenge

    2016-04-01

    Swine testicular (ST) cell line is isolated from swine fetal testes and has been widely used in biomedical research fields related to pig virus infection. However, the potential benefit and utilization of ST cells in boar reproductive studies has not been fully explored. As swine fetal testes mainly contain multiple types of cells such as Leydig cells, Sertoli cells, gonocytes, and peritubular myoid cells, it is necessary to clarify the cell type of ST cell line. In this study, we identified ST cell line was a collection of Sertoli cells by analyzing the unique morphological characteristic with satellite karyosomes and determining the protein expression of two markers (androgen-binding protein, ABP; Fas ligand, FASL) of Sertoli cells. Then ST cells were further confirmed to be immature Sertoli cells by examining the expression of three markers (anti-Mullerian hormone, AMH; keratin 18, KRT18; follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, FSHR). In conclusion, ST cells are a collection of immature Sertoli cells which can be good experimental materials for the researches involved in Sertoli cell functions and maturation, or even in boar reproductions. PMID:26744029

  14. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  15. Fear responses and postmortem muscle characteristics of turkeys of two genetic lines.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, M A; Lee, H C; Kang, I; Swanson, J C

    2015-09-01

    Commercial turkey production has increased greatly in recent decades. Along with increased production, problems with turkey meat quality have also increased. Research with other species has demonstrated that differences in meat quality exist among pigs and cattle differing in characteristics such as fearfulness. However, associations between fear responses and postmortem (PM) muscle characteristics related to the meat quality of turkeys have not been examined. This study evaluated the test-retest repeatability of responses of male commercial (COMM) and randombred (RB) turkeys in an open field (OF) test, which is used to assess fear and activity levels of poultry. Another objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between behavioral OF responses and PM breast muscle characteristics (pH and R-value) that are related to meat quality. Thirdly, this study evaluated differences in pH and R-value between the turkey lines. Male COMM and RB turkeys were each housed in groups in 4 pens. Turkeys were individually tested in an OF (2.74×2.74 m, divided into 81 squares) at 1, 4, and 11 wk (COMM N=27; RB N=33). Turkeys were then grouped into clusters based on a cluster analysis of OF behavior. Turkeys were processed and meat quality characteristics were evaluated at 15-17 wk for COMM and 20-21 wk for RB turkeys. Results were analyzed using a mixed model (SAS 9.4). Breast muscle pH and R-value did not differ between genetic lines, and there were no differences in pH and R-value among clusters within genetic lines. These findings suggest that OF responses measured during rearing are not related to PM breast muscle pH and R-value, which ultimately affect meat quality. Further research is needed to assess whether other types of fear responses are associated with meat quality and whether differences in R-value between genetic lines are associated with differences in other meat quality characteristics. PMID:26195807

  16. Identification and characterization of a non-satellite cell muscle resident progenitor during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kathryn J; Pannérec, Alice; Cadot, Bruno; Parlakian, Ara; Besson, Vanessa; Gomes, Edgar R; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David A

    2010-03-01

    Satellite cells are resident myogenic progenitors in postnatal skeletal muscle involved in muscle postnatal growth and adult regenerative capacity. Here, we identify and describe a population of muscle-resident stem cells, which are located in the interstitium, that express the cell stress mediator PW1 but do not express other markers of muscle stem cells such as Pax7. PW1(+)/Pax7(-) interstitial cells (PICs) are myogenic in vitro and efficiently contribute to skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo as well as generating satellite cells and PICs. Whereas Pax7 mutant satellite cells show robust myogenic potential, Pax7 mutant PICs are unable to participate in myogenesis and accumulate during postnatal growth. Furthermore, we found that PICs are not derived from a satellite cell lineage. Taken together, our findings uncover a new and anatomically identifiable population of muscle progenitors and define a key role for Pax7 in a non-satellite cell population during postnatal muscle growth. PMID:20118923

  17. Smooth Muscle-Like Tissue Constructs with Circumferentially Oriented Cells Formed by the Cell Fiber Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Amy Y.; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  18. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  19. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  20. Development of Polydimethylsiloxane Substrates with Tunable Elastic Modulus to Study Cell Mechanobiology in Muscle and Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Palchesko, Rachelle N.; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yan; Feinberg, Adam W.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanics is an important component in the regulation of cell shape, proliferation, migration and differentiation during normal homeostasis and disease states. Biomaterials that match the elastic modulus of soft tissues have been effective for studying this cell mechanobiology, but improvements are needed in order to investigate a wider range of physicochemical properties in a controlled manner. We hypothesized that polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) blends could be used as the basis of a tunable system where the elastic modulus could be adjusted to match most types of soft tissue. To test this we formulated blends of two commercially available PDMS types, Sylgard 527 and Sylgard 184, which enabled us to fabricate substrates with an elastic modulus anywhere from 5 kPa up to 1.72 MPa. This is a three order-of-magnitude range of tunability, exceeding what is possible with other hydrogel and PDMS systems. Uniquely, the elastic modulus can be controlled independently of other materials properties including surface roughness, surface energy and the ability to functionalize the surface by protein adsorption and microcontact printing. For biological validation, PC12 (neuronal inducible-pheochromocytoma cell line) and C2C12 (muscle cell line) were used to demonstrate that these PDMS formulations support cell attachment and growth and that these substrates can be used to probe the mechanosensitivity of various cellular processes including neurite extension and muscle differentiation. PMID:23240031

  1. Dystrophin expression following the transplantation of normal muscle precursor cells protects mdx muscle from contraction-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Joel; Dumont, Nicolas; Lebel, Carl; Quenneville, Simon P; Côté, Claude H; Frenette, Jérome; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most frequent muscular dystrophy. Currently, there is no cure for the disease. The transplantation of muscle precursor cells (MPCs) is one of the possible treatments, because it can restore the expression of dystrophin in DMD muscles. In this study, we investigated the effects of myoblasts injected with cardiotoxin on the contractile properties and resistance to eccentric contractions of transplanted and nontransplanted muscles. We used the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) as a model for our study. We conclude that the sole presence of dystrophin in a high percentage of muscle fibers is not sufficient by itself to increase the absolute or the specific force in the EDL of transplanted mdx muscle. This lack of strength increase may be due to the extensive damage that was produced by the cardiotoxin, which was coinjected with the myoblasts. However, the dystrophin presence is sufficient to protect muscle from eccentric damage as indicated by the force drop results. PMID:20650035

  2. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina; Kaufmann, Andreas M.

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  3. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, I. J.; Wagner, W. D.; Owens, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion. Images Figure 6 PMID:2316626

  4. Slow-Adhering Stem Cells Derived from Injured Skeletal Muscle Have Improved Regenerative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaodong; Xiang, Guosheng; Rathbone, Christopher R.; Pan, Haiying; Bellayr, Ian H.; Walters, Thomas J.; Li, Yong

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of myogenic cell sources have been used for repair of injured and diseased muscle including muscle stem cells, which can be isolated from skeletal muscle as a group of slow-adhering cells on a collagen-coated surface. The therapeutic use of muscle stem cells for improving muscle regeneration is promising; however, the effect of injury on their characteristics and engraftment potential has yet to be described. In the present study, slow-adhering stem cells (SASCs) from both laceration-injured and control noninjured skeletal muscles in mice were isolated and studied. Migration and proliferation rates, multidifferentiation potentials, and differences in gene expression in both groups of cells were compared in vitro. Results demonstrated that a larger population of SASCs could be isolated from injured muscle than from control noninjured muscle. In addition, SASCs derived from injured muscle demonstrated improved migration, a higher rate of proliferation and multidifferentiation, and increased expression of Notch1, STAT3, Msx1, and MMP2. Moreover, when transplanted into dystrophic muscle in MDX/SCID mice, SASCs from injured muscle generated greater engraftments with a higher capillary density than did SASCs from control noninjured muscle. These data suggest that traumatic injury may modify stem cell characteristics through trophic factors and improve the transplantation potential of SASCs in alleviating skeletal muscle injuries and diseases. PMID:21684246

  5. Lactography as an approach to monitor glucose metabolism on-line in brain and muscle.

    PubMed

    Korf, J; de Boer, J

    1990-01-01

    1. Thus far metabolic processes in the intact animal (or man) have been studied either by the analysis of body fluids, of biopsies, of tissue obtained post mortem or by techniques, requiring dedicated and expensive equipment (such as positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance spectroscopy). 2. Here we describe a relatively simple and inexpensive technique, that can be applied in vivo to study metabolism in brain regions and muscle in the freely moving rat and in human peripheral tissue. 3. The method is based on microdialysis allowing continuous sampling from the extracellular space, the enzymatic conversion of lactate and the on-line detection of fluorescent NADH. 4. Examples of the application of our technique include the monitoring of lactate efflux from various brain regions of behaving animals under a variety of stress exposures, during ischemia or hypoxia and drug treatments. 5. The results indicate that in brain lactate is not exclusively formed under hypoxia and that neuronal activation leads also to lactate formation, possibly due to the compartmentation of both the involved enzymes and the energy metabolism. 6. The increase of lactate formation in contracting or ischemic muscle or during exercise could also be followed on-line in the rat, suggesting that our approach allows the continuous monitoring of anaerobic metabolism in man e.g. during traumatic or arteriosclerotic limb ischemia or lactic acidosis in shock states. 7. The principle of our approach can easily be adapted to other metabolites, thus enabling to monitor other metabolic pathways in vivo as well. PMID:2276411

  6. A human gallbladder adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Johzaki, H; Iwasaki, H; Nishida, T; Isayama, T; Kikuchi, M

    1989-12-01

    A cell strain (FU-GBC-1) was established from cancerous ascites of a 68-year-old male patient with well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. By light and electron microscopy, the cultured cells showed the morphologic features of adenocarcinoma characterized by gland-like structures, intracellular microcystic spaces, and mucous production. Immunoperoxidase stains showed that FU-GBC-1 cells expressed several epithelial tumor antigens including CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The cell strain has been in continuous culture up to passage 44 for 1 1/2 years, with the population doubling time of 120 hours. The cytogenetic analysis by a G-band technique showed a constant loss of chromosome Y in FU-GBC-1 cells. The modal chromosome number at passage 12 was 82 with a range of 77 to 85. Flow cytometry with an ethidium bromide technique additionally confirmed aneuploid DNA content (4C) in the cultured cells at passage 12 and 35. Inoculation of FU-GBC-1 cells into the dermis of BALB/c nude mice produced transplantable adenocarcinoma identical to the original tumor. Because no continuous cell lines of the well-differentiated type of gallbladder adenocarcinoma have been reported in the literature currently, the newly established cell strain we report may yield a useful system for studying the morphologic and biologic characteristics of gallbladder adenocarcinoma. PMID:2680052

  7. Dystrophin delivery in dystrophin-deficient DMDmdx skeletal muscle by isogenic muscle-derived stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ikezawa, Makoto; Cao, Baohong; Qu, Zhuqing; Peng, Hairong; Xiao, Xiao; Pruchnic, Ryan; Kimura, Shigemi; Miike, Teruhisa; Huard, Johnny

    2003-11-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal muscle disease caused by a lack of dystrophin expression at the sarcolemma of muscle fibers. We investigated retroviral vector delivery of dystrophin in dystrophin-deficient DMD(mdx) (hereafter referred to as mdx) mice via an ex vivo approach using mdx muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs). We generated a retrovirus carrying a functional human mini-dystrophin (RetroDys3999) and used it to stably transduce mdx MDSCs obtained by the preplate technique (MD3999). These MD3999 cells expressed dystrophin and continued to express stem cell markers, including CD34 and Sca-1. MD3999 cells injected into mdx mouse skeletal muscle were able to deliver dystrophin. Though a relatively low number of dystrophin-positive myofibers was generated within the gastrocnemius muscle, these fibers persisted for up to 24 weeks postinjection. The injection of cells from additional MDSC/Dys3999 clones into mdx skeletal muscle resulted in varying numbers of dystrophin-positive myofibers, suggesting a differential regenerating capacity among the clones. At 2 and 4 weeks postinjection, the infiltration of CD4- and CD8-positive lymphocytes and a variety of cytokines was detected within the injected site. These data suggest that the transplantation of retrovirally transduced mdx MDSCs can enable persistent dystrophin restoration in mdx skeletal muscle; however, the differential regenerating capacity observed among the MDSC/Dys3999 clones and the postinjection immune response are potential challenges facing this technology. PMID:14577915

  8. A Novel Selectable Islet 1 Positive Progenitor Cell Reprogrammed to Expandable and Functional Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizabeth C; Huang, Chien-Ling; Sawhney, Neha; Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; Clover, Anthony J P; Martin, Kenneth; Browne, Tara C; Whelan, Derek; Kumar, Arun H S; Mackrill, John J; Wang, Shaohua; Schmeckpeper, Jeffrey; Stocca, Alessia; Pierce, William G; Leblond, Anne-Laure; Cai, Liquan; O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Buneker, Chirlei K; Choi, Janet; MacSharry, John; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Caplice, Noel M

    2016-05-01

    Disorders affecting smooth muscle structure/function may require technologies that can generate large scale, differentiated and contractile smooth muscle cells (SMC) suitable for cell therapy. To date no clonal precursor population that provides large numbers of differentiated SMC in culture has been identified in a rodent. Identification of such cells may also enhance insight into progenitor cell fate decisions and the relationship between smooth muscle precursors and disease states that implicate differentiated SMC.  In this study, we used classic clonal expansion techniques to identify novel self-renewing Islet 1 (Isl-1) positive primitive progenitor cells (PPC) within rat bone marrow that exhibited canonical stem cell markers and preferential differentiation towards a smooth muscle-like fate. We subsequently used molecular tagging to select Isl-1 positive clonal populations from expanded and de novo marrow cell populations. We refer to these previously undescribed cells as the PPC given its stem cell marker profile, and robust self-renewal capacity. PPC could be directly converted into induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) using single transcription factor (Kruppel-like factor 4) knockdown or transactivator (myocardin) overexpression in contrast to three control cells (HEK 293, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) where such induction was not possible. iSMC exhibited immuno- and cytoskeletal-phenotype, calcium signaling profile and contractile responses similar to bona fide SMC. Passaged iSMC could be expanded to a scale sufficient for large scale tissue replacement.  PPC and reprogramed iSMC so derived may offer future opportunities to investigate molecular, structure/function and cell-based replacement therapy approaches to diverse cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary diseases that have as their basis smooth muscle cell functional aberrancy or numerical loss. Stem Cells 2016;34:1354-1368. PMID:26840832

  9. Cellular dynamics of regeneration reveals role of two distinct Pax7 stem cell populations in larval zebrafish muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Pipalia, Tapan G.; Koth, Jana; Roy, Shukolpa D.; Hammond, Christina L.; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterogeneity of stem cells or their niches is likely to influence tissue regeneration. Here we reveal stem/precursor cell diversity during wound repair in larval zebrafish somitic body muscle using time-lapse 3D confocal microscopy on reporter lines. Skeletal muscle with incision wounds rapidly regenerates both slow and fast muscle fibre types. A swift immune response is followed by an increase in cells at the wound site, many of which express the muscle stem cell marker Pax7. Pax7+ cells proliferate and then undergo terminal differentiation involving Myogenin accumulation and subsequent loss of Pax7 followed by elongation and fusion to repair fast muscle fibres. Analysis of pax7a and pax7b transgenic reporter fish reveals that cells expressing each of the duplicated pax7 genes are distinctly localised in uninjured larvae. Cells marked by pax7a only or by both pax7a and pax7b enter the wound rapidly and contribute to muscle wound repair, but each behaves differently. Low numbers of pax7a-only cells form nascent fibres. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that the more numerous pax7b-marked cells frequently fuse to pre-existing fibres, contributing more strongly than pax7a-only cells to repair of damaged fibres. pax7b-marked cells are more often present in rows of aligned cells that are observed to fuse into a single fibre, but more rarely contribute to nascent regenerated fibres. Ablation of a substantial portion of nitroreductase-expressing pax7b cells with metronidazole prior to wounding triggered rapid pax7a-only cell accumulation, but this neither inhibited nor augmented pax7a-only cell-derived myogenesis and thus altered the cellular repair dynamics during wound healing. Moreover, pax7a-only cells did not regenerate pax7b cells, suggesting a lineage distinction. We propose a modified founder cell and fusion-competent cell model in which pax7a-only cells initiate fibre formation and pax7b cells contribute to fibre growth. This newly discovered cellular

  10. Glucocorticoid actions on L6 muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Max, S.R.; Konagaya, M.; Konagaya, Y.

    1986-05-01

    Glucocorticoids exert striking catabolic effects on skeletal muscle. The mechanism of these effects remains poorly understood. They employed L6 muscle cells in culture to ascertain whether intracellular glucocorticoid receptors are involved. Studies in vitro permit exploration of glucocorticoid effects in the absence of other hormonal influences. L6 myoblasts were induced to form differentiated myotubes by growth in 1% serum. L6 myotubes were found to possess a high-affinity, limited capacity intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (apparent K/sub D/ = 5 x 10/sup -10/ M; B/sub max/ = 711 pmols/g protein) with ligand specificity similar to that of glucocorticoid receptors from classical glucocorticoid target tissues. Further, (/sup 3/H) triamcinolone acetonide specific binding to L6 cell homogenates was blocked by a glucocorticoid antagonist, RU38486 (11..beta..-(4-dimethyl-aminophenyl)-17..beta..-hydroxy-17..cap alpha..-(prop-l-ynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one). Dexamethasone (10/sup -5/M) caused a 10-fold increase in the activity of gluatmine synthetase in L6 myotubes; this increase was prevented by RU38486. Similarly, dexamethasone (10/sup -5/M) caused a 20% decrease in (/sup 12/C) leucine incorporation into protein. This effect also was blocked by RU38486. Thus, induction of glutamine synthetase and diminution of protein synthesis by dexamethasone require intracellular glucocorticoid receptors. L6 cells should prove particularly valuable for further studies of glucocorticoid actions on skeletal muscle.

  11. The ins and outs of muscle stem cell aging.

    PubMed

    Brack, Andrew S; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity to regenerate by virtue of its resident stem cells (satellite cells). This capacity declines with aging, although whether this is due to extrinsic changes in the environment and/or to cell-intrinsic mechanisms associated to aging has been a matter of intense debate. Furthermore, while some groups support that satellite cell aging is reversible by a youthful environment, others support cell-autonomous irreversible changes, even in the presence of youthful factors. Indeed, whereas the parabiosis paradigm has unveiled the environment as responsible for the satellite cell functional decline, satellite cell transplantation studies support cell-intrinsic deficits with aging. In this review, we try to shed light on the potential causes underlying these discrepancies. We propose that the experimental paradigm used to interrogate intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of stem cell function may be a part of the problem. The assays deployed are not equivalent and may overburden specific cellular regulatory processes and thus probe different aspects of satellite cell properties. Finally, distinct subsets of satellite cells may be under different modes of molecular control and mobilized preferentially in one paradigm than in the other. A better understanding of how satellite cells molecularly adapt during aging and their context-dependent deployment during injury and transplantation will lead to the development of efficacious compensating strategies that maintain stem cell fitness and tissue homeostasis throughout life. PMID:26783424

  12. Cell stress molecules in the skeletal muscle of GNE myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations of the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine-kinase (GNE)-gene are causally related to GNE myopathy. Yet, underlying pathomechanisms of muscle fibre damage have remained elusive. In sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), the pro-inflammatory cell-stress mediators αB-crystallin and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are crucial markers of the disease pathology. Methods 10 muscle biopsies from GNE myopathy patients were analyzed for mRNA-expression of markers of cell-stress, inflammation and β-amyloid and compared to non-myopathic controls. Using double-labeling immunohistochemistry, serial sections of skeletal muscle biopsies were stained for amyloid precursor protein (APP), major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I, αB-crystallin, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), interleukin (IL)-1β, β-amyloid, iNOS, and phosphorylated neurofilament (P-neurofilament) as well as hematoxylin/eosin histochemistry. Corresponding areas of all biopsies with a total of 2,817 muscle fibres were quantitatively assessed for all markers. Results mRNA-expression of APP, NCAM, iNOS, TNF-α and TGF-β was higher in GNE myopathy compared to controls, yet this was not statistically significant. The mRNA-expression of APP and αB-crystallin significantly correlated with the expression of several pro-inflammatory and cell-stress-associated markers as NCAM, IL-1β, TGF-β, CCL-3, and CCL4. By immunohistochemistry, αB-crystallin and iNOS were co-upregulated and the number of fibres positive for αB-crystallin, NCAM, MHC-I and iNOS significantly correlated with each other. A large fraction of fibres positive for αB-crystallin were double positive for iNOS and vice-versa. Moreover, several fibres with structural abnormalities were positive for αB-crystallin and iNOS. Notably, particularly normal appearing fibres displayed an overexpression of these molecules. Conclusions The cell-stress molecules αB-crystallin and iNOS are overexpressed in GNE

  13. Molecular circuitry of stem cell fate in skeletal muscle regeneration, ageing and disease.

    PubMed

    Almada, Albert E; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-05-01

    Satellite cells are adult myogenic stem cells that repair damaged muscle. The enduring capacity for muscle regeneration requires efficient satellite cell expansion after injury, their differentiation to produce myoblasts that can reconstitute damaged fibres and their self-renewal to replenish the muscle stem cell pool for subsequent rounds of injury and repair. Emerging studies indicate that misregulation of satellite cell fate and function can contribute to age-associated muscle dysfunction and influence the severity of muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It has also become apparent that satellite cell fate during muscle regeneration and ageing, and in the context of DMD, is governed by an intricate network of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators. Targeted manipulation of this network may offer unique opportunities for muscle regenerative medicine. PMID:26956195

  14. Expression of nuclear lamin A and muscle-specific proteins in differentiating muscle cells in ovo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Primary cultures and tissue samples of chicken embryonic muscle were immunologically probed for the expression of muscle-specific proteins, such as myosin heavy chain and the tropomyosins, as well as for the nuclear lamina protein, lamin A. As determined by quantitative immunoblotting, the expression of lamin A and the muscle-specific proteins were at low levels or absent in predifferentiation myoblasts both in vitro and in ovo. During differentiation, an increase of lamin A expression preceded the induction to high levels of expression of muscle-specific proteins. Immunofluorescence staining of chicken embryonic muscle cells in culture also indicates an accumulation of lamin A before the induction of muscle-specific proteins expression. Furthermore, the accumulation of lamin A reached a plateau before the muscle-specific proteins during muscle development. In two dimensional NEPHGE gel analysis of immunoprecipitated lamin A, no detectable change in the ratio of the acidic/basic isoelectric variants of lamin A was observed during myogenesis. A potential role for lamin A in the mechanisms which underlie the differential and coordinate expression of muscle-specific genes is proposed. PMID:2668298

  15. Skeletal muscle perfusion and stem cell delivery in muscle disorders using intra-femoral artery canulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Nadine; Hunt, Samuel D; Wu, Jianbo; Darabi, Radbod

    2015-11-15

    Muscular dystrophies are among major inherited muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle damage and fibrosis with no definitive cure. Recently, gene or cell based therapies have been developed to restore the missing gene expression or replace the damaged tissues. In order to test the efficiency of these therapies in mice models of muscular dystrophies, the arterial route of delivery is very advantageous as it provides uniform muscle exposure to the therapeutic agents or cells. Although there are few reports of arterial delivery of the therapeutic agents or cells in mice, there is no in-depth description and evaluation of its efficacy in perfusion of downstream muscles. This study is aimed to develop a practical method for intra-femoral artery perfusion in mice and to evaluate perfusion efficiency using near-infrared-fluorescence (NIRF) imaging as well as histology following stem cell delivery. Our results provide a practical guide to perform this delicate method in mice. By using a sensitive fluorescent dye, different muscle groups of the hindlimb have been evaluated for proper perfusion. As the final step, we have validated the efficiency of arterial cell delivery into muscles using human iPS-derived myogenic cells in an immunodeficient mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (NSG-mdx(4cv)). PMID:26341268

  16. Electrical stimulation as a biomimicry tool for regulating muscle cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ramalingam, Murugan; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need to understand muscle cell behaviors and to engineer muscle tissues to replace defective tissues in the body. Despite a long history of the clinical use of electric fields for muscle tissues in vivo, electrical stimulation (ES) has recently gained significant attention as a powerful tool for regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro. ES aims to mimic the electrical environment of electroactive muscle cells (e.g., cardiac or skeletal muscle cells) by helping to regulate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. As a result, it can be used to enhance the alignment and differentiation of skeletal or cardiac muscle cells and to aid in engineering of functional muscle tissues. Additionally, ES can be used to control and monitor force generation and electrophysiological activity of muscle tissues for bio-actuation and drug-screening applications in a simple, high-throughput, and reproducible manner. In this review paper, we briefly describe the importance of ES in regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro, as well as the major challenges and prospective potential associated with ES in the context of muscle tissue engineering. PMID:23823664

  17. Electrical stimulation as a biomimicry tool for regulating muscle cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ahadian, Samad; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ramalingam, Murugan; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need to understand muscle cell behaviors and to engineer muscle tissues to replace defective tissues in the body. Despite a long history of the clinical use of electric fields for muscle tissues in vivo, electrical stimulation (ES) has recently gained significant attention as a powerful tool for regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro. ES aims to mimic the electrical environment of electroactive muscle cells (e.g., cardiac or skeletal muscle cells) by helping to regulate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. As a result, it can be used to enhance the alignment and differentiation of skeletal or cardiac muscle cells and to aid in engineering of functional muscle tissues. Additionally, ES can be used to control and monitor force generation and electrophysiological activity of muscle tissues for bio-actuation and drug-screening applications in a simple, high-throughput, and reproducible manner. In this review paper, we briefly describe the importance of ES in regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro, as well as the major challenges and prospective potential associated with ES in the context of muscle tissue engineering. PMID:23823664

  18. The role of nNOS and PGC-1α in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Sara; Lettieri Barbato, Daniele; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2014-11-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) are two fundamental factors involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle cell metabolism. nNOS exists as several alternatively spliced variants, each having a specific pattern of subcellular localisation. Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a second messenger in signal transduction pathways that lead to the expression of metabolic genes involved in oxidative metabolism, vasodilatation and skeletal muscle contraction. PGC-1α is a transcriptional coactivator and represents a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis by promoting the transcription of mitochondrial genes. PGC-1α can be induced during physical exercise, and it plays a key role in coordinating the oxidation of intracellular fatty acids with mitochondrial remodelling. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that NO could act as a key regulator of PGC-1α expression; however, the link between nNOS and PGC-1α in skeletal muscle remains only poorly understood. In this Commentary, we review important metabolic pathways that are governed by nNOS and PGC-1α, and aim to highlight how they might intersect and cooperatively regulate skeletal muscle mitochondrial and lipid energetic metabolism and contraction. PMID:25217629

  19. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C.; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O’Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G.; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H. C.; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R.; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modeling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies over 80% within six days. Upon purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  20. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O'Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H C; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L; Gerszten, Robert E; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A

    2015-08-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modelling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF-A or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies exceeding 80% within six days. On purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  1. Regulation of metabolism by dietary carbohydrates in two lines of rainbow trout divergently selected for muscle fat content.

    PubMed

    Kamalam, Biju Sam; Medale, Françoise; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Polakof, Sergio; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine; Panserat, Stephane

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies in two rainbow trout lines divergently selected for lean (L) or fat (F) muscle suggested that they differ in their ability to metabolise glucose. In this context, we investigated whether genetic selection for high muscle fat content led to a better capacity to metabolise dietary carbohydrates. Juvenile trout from the two lines were fed diets with or without gelatinised starch (17.1%) for 10 weeks, after which blood, liver, muscle and adipose tissues were sampled. Growth rate, feed efficiency and protein utilisation were lower in the F line than in the L line. In both lines, intake of carbohydrates was associated with a moderate post-prandial hyperglycaemia, a protein sparing effect, an enhancement of nutrient (TOR-S6) signalling cascade and a decrease of energy-sensing enzyme (AMPK). Gene expression of hepatic glycolytic enzymes was higher in the F line fed carbohydrates compared with the L line, but concurrently transcripts for the gluconeogenic enzymes was also higher in the F line, possibly impairing glucose homeostasis. However, the F line showed a higher gene expression of hepatic enzymes involved in lipogenesis and fatty acid bioconversion, in particular with an increased dietary carbohydrate intake. Enhanced lipogenic potential coupled with higher liver glycogen content in the F line suggests better glucose storage ability than the L line. Overall, the present study demonstrates the changes in hepatic intermediary metabolism resulting from genetic selection for high muscle fat content and dietary carbohydrate intake without, however, any interaction for an improved growth or glucose utilisation in the peripheral tissues. PMID:22786633

  2. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells: Background and Methods for Isolation and Analysis in a Primary Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Danoviz, Maria Elena; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2012-01-01

    Summary Repair of adult skeletal muscle depends on satellite cells, myogenic stem cells located between the basal lamina and the plasmalemma of the myofiber. Standardized protocols for the isolation and culture of satellite cells are key tools for understanding cell autonomous and extrinsic factors that regulate their performance. Knowledge gained from such studies can contribute important insights to developing strategies for the improvement of muscle repair following trauma and in muscle wasting disorders. This chapter provides an introduction to satellite cell biology and further describes the basic protocol used in our laboratory to isolate and culture satellite cells from adult skeletal muscle. The cell culture conditions detailed herein support proliferation and differentiation of satellite cell progeny and the development of reserve cells, which are thought to reflect the in vivo self-renewal ability of satellite cells. Additionally, this chapter describes our standard immunostaining protocol that allows the characterization of satellite cell progeny by the temporal expression of characteristic transcription factors and structural proteins associated with different stages of myogenic progression. While emphasis is given here to the isolation and characterization of satellite cells from mouse hindlimb muscles, the protocols are suitable for other muscle types (such as diaphragm and extraocular muscles) and for muscles from other species, including chicken and rat. Altogether, the basic protocols described are straightforward and facilitate the study of diverse aspects of skeletal muscle stem cells. PMID:22130829

  3. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity promotes survival of human muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Elise; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Notarnicola, Cécile; Rouger, Karl; Serratrice, Nicolas; Bonnieu, Anne; Gay, Stéphanie; Bacou, Francis; Duret, Cédric; Carnac, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a family of enzymes that efficiently detoxify aldehydic products generated by reactive oxygen species and might therefore participate in cell survival. Because ALDH activity has been used to identify normal and malignant cells with stem cell properties, we asked whether human myogenic precursor cells (myoblasts) could be identified and isolated based on their levels of ALDH activity. Human muscle explant-derived cells were incubated with ALDEFLUOR, a fluorescent substrate for ALDH, and we determined by flow cytometry the level of enzyme activity. We found that ALDH activity positively correlated with the myoblast-CD56+ fraction in those cells, but, we also observed heterogeneity of ALDH activity levels within CD56-purified myoblasts. Using lentiviral mediated expression of shRNA we demonstrated that ALDH activity was associated with expression of Aldh1a1 protein. Surprisingly, ALDH activity and Aldh1a1 expression levels were very low in mouse, rat, rabbit and non-human primate myoblasts. Using different approaches, from pharmacological inhibition of ALDH activity by diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of class I ALDH, to cell fractionation by flow cytometry using the ALDEFLUOR assay, we characterized human myoblasts expressing low or high levels of ALDH. We correlated high ALDH activity ex vivo to resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxic effect and in vivo to improved cell viability when human myoblasts were transplanted into host muscle of immune deficient scid mice. Therefore detection of ALDH activity, as a purification strategy, could allow non-toxic and efficient isolation of a fraction of human myoblasts resistant to cytotoxic damage. PMID:19840193

  5. Prooxidative toxicity and selenoprotein suppression by cerivastatin in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmeister, Jessica; Tews, Martha; Kromer, Andrea; Moosmann, Bernd

    2012-12-17

    Statins are the most widely used drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In spite of their overall favorable safety profile, they do possess serious myotoxic potential, whose molecular origin has remained equivocal. Here, we demonstrate in cultivated myoblasts and skeletal muscle cells that cerivastatin at nanomolar concentrations interferes with selenoprotein synthesis and evokes a heightened vulnerability of the cells toward oxidative stressors. A correspondingly increased vulnerability was found with atorvastatin, albeit at higher concentrations than with cerivastatin. In selenium-saturated cells, cerivastatin caused a largely indiscriminate suppression of selenoprotein biosynthesis and reduced the steady state-levels of glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1) and selenoprotein N (SelN). Selenite, ebselen, and ubiquinone were unable to prevent the devitalizing effect of statin treatment, despite the fact that the cellular baseline resistance against tert-butyl hydroperoxide was significantly increased by picomolar sodium selenite. Mevalonic acid, in contrast, entirely prevented the statin-induced decrease in peroxide resistance. These results indicate that muscle cells may be particularly susceptible to a statin-induced suppression of essential antioxidant selenoproteins, which provides an explanation for the disposition of these drugs to evoke adverse muscular side-effects. PMID:23092657

  6. Development and epithelial organisation of muscle cells in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nematostella vectensis, a member of the cnidarian class Anthozoa, has been established as a promising model system in developmental biology, but while information about the genetic regulation of embryonic development is rapidly increasing, little is known about the cellular organization of the various cell types in the adult. Here, we studied the anatomy and development of the muscular system of N. vectensis to obtain further insights into the evolution of muscle cells. Results The muscular system of N. vectensis is comprised of five distinct muscle groups, which are differentiated into a tentacle and a body column system. Both systems house longitudinal as well as circular portions. With the exception of the ectodermal tentacle longitudinal muscle, all muscle groups are of endodermal origin. The shape and epithelial organization of muscle cells vary considerably between different muscle groups. Ring muscle cells are formed as epitheliomuscular cells in which the myofilaments are housed in the basal part of the cell, while the apical part is connected to neighboring cells by apical cell-cell junctions. In the longitudinal muscles of the column, the muscular part at the basal side is connected to the apical part by a long and narrow cytoplasmic bridge. The organization of these cells, however, remains epitheliomuscular. A third type of muscle cell is represented in the longitudinal muscle of the tentacle. Using transgenic animals we show that the apical cell-cell junctions are lost during differentiation, resulting in a detachment of the muscle cells to a basiepithelial position. These muscle cells are still located within the epithelium and outside of the basal matrix, therefore constituting basiepithelial myocytes. We demonstrate that all muscle cells, including the longitudinal basiepithelial muscle cells of the tentacle, initially differentiate from regular epithelial cells before they alter their epithelial organisation. Conclusions A wide range of

  7. Muscle cell membranes from early degeneration muscle cell fibers in Solenopsis are leaky to lanthanum: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.

    1985-06-01

    Lanthanum infusion techniques, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis were utilized to compare the permeability of muscle cell membranes from normal and degenerating muscle fibers of Solenopsis spp. In normal fibers, the electron-dense tracer was limited to components of the sarcotubular system. However, the insemination-induced degeneration of muscle fibers was characterized by the presence of an electron-dense precipitate within the myofibrils and mitochondria as well as in the extramyofibrillar spaces. The electron-dense material was subsequently identified by elemental analysis to be lanthanum. Such data indicate that one of the earliest stages of muscle degeneration involves an alteration in cell membrane permeability.

  8. Identification of separate slow and fast muscle precursor cells in vivo, prior to somite formation.

    PubMed

    Devoto, S H; Melançon, E; Eisen, J S; Westerfield, M

    1996-11-01

    We have examined the development of specific muscle fiber types in zebrafish axial muscle by labeling myogenic precursor cells with vital fluorescent dyes and following their subsequent differentiation and fate. Two populations of muscle precursors, medial and lateral, can be distinguished in the segmental plate by position, morphology and gene expression. The medial cells, known as adaxial cells, are large, cuboidal cells adjacent to the notochord that express myoD. Surprisingly, after somite formation, they migrate radially away from the notochord, becoming a superficial layer of muscle cells. A subset of adaxial cells develop into engrailed-expressing muscle pioneers. Adaxial cells differentiate into slow muscle fibers of the adult fish. We have named the lateral population of cells in the segmental plate, lateral presomitic cells. They are smaller, more irregularly shaped and separated from the notochord by adaxial cells; they do not express myoD until after somite formation. Lateral presomitic cells remain deep in the myotome and they differentiate into fast muscle fibers. Thus, slow and fast muscle fiber types in zebrafish axial muscle arise from distinct populations of cells in the segmental plate that develop in different cellular environments and display distinct behaviors. PMID:8951054

  9. Morphologic, molecular, and ultrastructural characterization of a feline synovial cell sarcoma and derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Cazzini, Paola; Frontera-Acevedo, Karelma; Garner, Bridget; Howerth, Elizabeth; Torres, Bryan; Northrup, Nicole; Sakamoto, Kaori

    2015-05-01

    A 2.5-year-old, male, neutered cat presented with a 5-month history of progressive right hind limb lameness and an enlarged right popliteal lymph node. Radiographs revealed significant bony lysis of the tarsus and distal tibia, and fine-needle aspirate of the bone lesion and lymph node revealed a neoplastic population of cells with uncertain origin. Amputation was elected, and the mass was submitted for histology and cellular culture for better characterization. Histologic examination revealed a mixture of spindle-shaped cells and larger, round to polygonal cells. All cells were immunoreactive for vimentin, and only the larger polygonal cells were also positive for cytokeratin. All cells were negative for desmin, smooth muscle actin, cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD18, CD79a, macrophage antibody (MAC)387, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Cultured neoplastic cells failed to express CD18, and were not able to secrete the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1 (IL-1)β, and IL-6 when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide, disproving that the cells originated from the macrophage or monocyte line. Ultrastructurally, neoplastic cells were characterized by abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, interdigitating cellular processes, and membrane condensations. Based on location and cytologic, histologic, ultrastructural, and functional studies, this neoplasm was considered a synovial cell sarcoma. PMID:25901004

  10. Generation of skeletal muscle from transplanted embryonic stem cells in dystrophic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagavati, Satyakam . E-mail: satyakamb@hotmail.com; Xu Weimin

    2005-07-29

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have great therapeutic potential because of their capacity to proliferate extensively and to form any fully differentiated cell of the body, including skeletal muscle cells. Successful generation of skeletal muscle in vivo, however, requires selective induction of the skeletal muscle lineage in cultures of ES cells and following transplantation, integration of appropriately differentiated skeletal muscle cells with recipient muscle. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe progressive muscle wasting disease due to a mutation in the dystrophin gene and the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD, are characterized by the absence of the muscle membrane associated protein, dystrophin. Here, we show that co-culturing mouse ES cells with a preparation from mouse muscle enriched for myogenic stem and precursor cells, followed by injection into mdx mice, results occasionally in the formation of normal, vascularized skeletal muscle derived from the transplanted ES cells. Study of this phenomenon should provide valuable insights into skeletal muscle development in vivo from transplanted ES cells.