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Sample records for muscle cells stimulated

  1. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  2. Stimulating Cardiac Muscle by Light: Cardiac Optogenetics by Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiheng; Valiunas, Virginijus; Lu, Zongju; Bien, Harold; Liu, Huilin; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Rosati, Barbara; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Background After the recent cloning of light-sensitive ion channels and their expression in mammalian cells, a new field, optogenetics, emerged in neuroscience, allowing for precise perturbations of neural circuits by light. However, functionality of optogenetic tools has not been fully explored outside neuroscience; and a non-viral, non-embryogenesis based strategy for optogenetics has not been shown before. Methods and Results We demonstrate the utility of optogenetics to cardiac muscle by a tandem cell unit (TCU) strategy, where non-excitable cells carry exogenous light-sensitive ion channels, and when electrically coupled to cardiomyocytes, produce optically-excitable heart tissue. A stable channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expressing cell line was developed, characterized and used as a cell delivery system. The TCU strategy was validated in vitro in cell pairs with adult canine myocytes (for a wide range of coupling strengths) and in cardiac syncytium with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. For the first time, we combined optical excitation and optical imaging to capture light-triggered muscle contractions and high-resolution propagation maps of light-triggered electrical waves, found to be quantitatively indistinguishable from electrically-triggered waves. Conclusions Our results demonstrate feasibility to control excitation and contraction in cardiac muscle by light using the TCU approach. Optical pacing in this case uses less energy, offers superior spatiotemporal control, remote access and can serve not only as an elegant tool in arrhythmia research, but may form the basis for a new generation of light-driven cardiac pacemakers and muscle actuators. The TCU strategy is extendable to (non-viral) stem cell therapy and is directly relevant to in vivo applications. PMID:21828312

  3. Electrical stimulation as a biomimicry tool for regulating muscle cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ramalingam, Murugan; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need to understand muscle cell behaviors and to engineer muscle tissues to replace defective tissues in the body. Despite a long history of the clinical use of electric fields for muscle tissues in vivo, electrical stimulation (ES) has recently gained significant attention as a powerful tool for regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro. ES aims to mimic the electrical environment of electroactive muscle cells (e.g., cardiac or skeletal muscle cells) by helping to regulate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. As a result, it can be used to enhance the alignment and differentiation of skeletal or cardiac muscle cells and to aid in engineering of functional muscle tissues. Additionally, ES can be used to control and monitor force generation and electrophysiological activity of muscle tissues for bio-actuation and drug-screening applications in a simple, high-throughput, and reproducible manner. In this review paper, we briefly describe the importance of ES in regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro, as well as the major challenges and prospective potential associated with ES in the context of muscle tissue engineering. PMID:23823664

  4. Electrical stimulation as a biomimicry tool for regulating muscle cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ahadian, Samad; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ramalingam, Murugan; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need to understand muscle cell behaviors and to engineer muscle tissues to replace defective tissues in the body. Despite a long history of the clinical use of electric fields for muscle tissues in vivo, electrical stimulation (ES) has recently gained significant attention as a powerful tool for regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro. ES aims to mimic the electrical environment of electroactive muscle cells (e.g., cardiac or skeletal muscle cells) by helping to regulate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. As a result, it can be used to enhance the alignment and differentiation of skeletal or cardiac muscle cells and to aid in engineering of functional muscle tissues. Additionally, ES can be used to control and monitor force generation and electrophysiological activity of muscle tissues for bio-actuation and drug-screening applications in a simple, high-throughput, and reproducible manner. In this review paper, we briefly describe the importance of ES in regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro, as well as the major challenges and prospective potential associated with ES in the context of muscle tissue engineering. PMID:23823664

  5. Design and performance of an electrical stimulator for long-term contraction of cultured muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Mario; Bragós, Ramón; Gómez-Foix, Anna M

    2004-01-01

    Excitability in muscle cells manifests itself as contractility and may be evoked by electrical stimulation. Here we describe an electrical stimulator device applicable to cells seeded on standard multiwell plates and demonstrate how it effectively stimulates synchronous contraction of skeletal muscle C2C12 cells without damaging them. The electrical stimulator of cultured cells (ESCC) consists of two connection cards and a network of platinum electrodes positioned in such way that each well in a row is uniformly stimulated. The ESCC may produce a range of outputs based on the stimulation parameters it receives from a commercial pulse generator and can be placed in a standard cell incubator, allowing for long-term stimulation as required for biochemical and molecular biological assays. We show that a 90-min stimulation of C2C12 myotubes at 50 V, 30 ms of pulse duration, and 3 Hz of frequency enhances glucose metabolism and glycogen mobilization while oppositely modulating the activity ratio of glycogen metabolizing enzymes. Thus, we demonstrate that long-term electrical stimulation of C2C12 myotubes with the ESCC results in contractility and metabolic changes, as seen in exercising muscle. PMID:14740487

  6. Wnt7a stimulates myogenic stem cell motility and engraftment resulting in improved muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Bentzinger, C Florian; von Maltzahn, Julia; Dumont, Nicolas A; Stark, Danny A; Wang, Yu Xin; Nhan, Kevin; Frenette, Jérôme; Cornelison, D D W; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-04-14

    Wnt7a/Fzd7 signaling stimulates skeletal muscle growth and repair by inducing the symmetric expansion of satellite stem cells through the planar cell polarity pathway and by activating the Akt/mTOR growth pathway in muscle fibers. Here we describe a third level of activity where Wnt7a/Fzd7 increases the polarity and directional migration of mouse satellite cells and human myogenic progenitors through activation of Dvl2 and the small GTPase Rac1. Importantly, these effects can be exploited to potentiate the outcome of myogenic cell transplantation into dystrophic muscles. We observed that a short Wnt7a treatment markedly stimulated tissue dispersal and engraftment, leading to significantly improved muscle function. Moreover, myofibers at distal sites that fused with Wnt7a-treated cells were hypertrophic, suggesting that the transplanted cells deliver activated Wnt7a/Fzd7 signaling complexes to recipient myofibers. Taken together, we describe a viable and effective ex vivo cell modulation process that profoundly enhances the efficacy of stem cell therapy for skeletal muscle. PMID:24711502

  7. Wnt7a stimulates myogenic stem cell motility and engraftment resulting in improved muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Bentzinger, C. Florian; von Maltzahn, Julia; Dumont, Nicolas A.; Stark, Danny A.; Wang, Yu Xin; Nhan, Kevin; Frenette, Jérôme; Cornelison, DDW

    2014-01-01

    Wnt7a/Fzd7 signaling stimulates skeletal muscle growth and repair by inducing the symmetric expansion of satellite stem cells through the planar cell polarity pathway and by activating the Akt/mTOR growth pathway in muscle fibers. Here we describe a third level of activity where Wnt7a/Fzd7 increases the polarity and directional migration of mouse satellite cells and human myogenic progenitors through activation of Dvl2 and the small GTPase Rac1. Importantly, these effects can be exploited to potentiate the outcome of myogenic cell transplantation into dystrophic muscles. We observed that a short Wnt7a treatment markedly stimulated tissue dispersal and engraftment, leading to significantly improved muscle function. Moreover, myofibers at distal sites that fused with Wnt7a-treated cells were hypertrophic, suggesting that the transplanted cells deliver activated Wnt7a/Fzd7 signaling complexes to recipient myofibers. Taken together, we describe a viable and effective ex vivo cell modulation process that profoundly enhances the efficacy of stem cell therapy for skeletal muscle. PMID:24711502

  8. Collagen degradation and platelet-derived growth factor stimulate the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Stringa, E; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Gavrilovic, J

    2000-06-01

    Cell migration is a key event in many biological processes and depends on signals from both extracellular matrix and soluble motogenic factors. During atherosclerotic plaque development, vascular smooth muscle cells migrate from the tunica media to the intima through a basement membrane and interstitial collagenous matrix and proliferate to form a neointima. Matrix metalloproteinases have previously been implicated in neointimal formation and in this study smooth muscle cell adhesion and migration on degraded collagen have been evaluated. Vascular smooth muscle cells adhered to native intact collagen type I and to its first degradation by-product, 3/4 fragment (generated by collagenase-3 cleavage), unwound at 35 degrees C to mimic physiological conditions. PDGF-BB pre-treatment induced a fourfold stimulation of smooth muscle cell motility on the collagen 3/4 fragment whereas no increase in smooth muscle cell motility on collagen type I was observed. Cell migration on collagen type I was mediated by alpha2 integrin, whereas PDGF-BB-stimulated migration on the 3/4 collagen fragment was dependent on alphavbeta3 integrin. alphavbeta3 integrin was organised in clusters concentrated at the leading and trailing edges of the cells and was only expressed when cells were exposed to the 3/4 collagen fragment. Tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of PDGF receptor-beta tyrosine kinase activity, resulted in complete abolition of migration of PDGF-BB treated cells on collagen type I and 3/4 fragment. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the cellular migratory response to soluble motogens can be regulated by proteolytic modification of the extracellular matrix. PMID:10806116

  9. Mechanical coupling of smooth muscle cells using local and global stimulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Craig; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses can directly alter many cellular processes, including signal transduction, growth, differentiation, and survival. These stresses, generated primarily by myosin activity within the cytoskeleton, regulate both cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions. We report studies of mechanical cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions using patterned arrays of flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microposts combined with application of global stretch or local chemical stimulation. Bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells are patterned onto micropost arrays to create multicellular structures to probe intercellular coupling. Global stimulation is applied by building the micropost arrays on a flexible membrane that can be stretched while allowing simultaneous observation of cell traction forces. Results for triangle wave stretches of single cells show increasing traction forces with increasing strain, and immediate weakening of traction forces as strain is decreased. ``Spritzing,'' a laminar flow technique, is used to expose a single cell within a construct to a drug treatment while cell traction forces are recorded via the microposts. Results will be described showing the response of cells to external stimulation both directly and through intercellular coupling.

  10. PKCε regulates contraction-stimulated GLUT4 traffic in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenyan; Bilan, Philip J; Yu, Junna; Gao, Jing; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Chu, Guilan; Yao, Zhi; Klip, Amira

    2011-01-01

    The signaling pathways that stimulate glucose uptake in response to muscle contraction are not well defined. Recently, we showed that carbachol, an acetylcholine analog, stimulates contraction of C2C12 myotube cultures and the rapid arrival of myc-epitope tagged GLUT4 glucose transporters at the cell surface. Here, we explore a role for protein kinase C (PKC) in regulating GLUT4 traffic. Cell surface carbachol-induced GLUT4myc levels were partly inhibited by the conventional/novel PKC inhibitors GF-109203X, Gö6983, and Ro-31-8425 but not by the conventional PKC inhibitor Gö6976. C2C12 myotubes expressed several novel isoforms of PKC mRNA with PKCδ and PKCε in greater abundance. Carbachol stimulated phosphorylation of PKC isoforms and translocation of PKCδ and PKCε to membranes within 5 min. However, only a peptidic inhibitor of PKCε translocation (myristoylated-EAVSLKPT), but not one of PKCδ (myristoylated-SFNSYELGSL), prevented the GLUT4myc response to carbachol. Significant participation of PKCε in the carbachol-induced gain of GLUT4myc at the surface of C2C12 myotubes was further supported through siRNA-mediated PKCε protein knockdown. These findings support a role for novel PKC isoforms, especially PKCε, in contraction-stimulated GLUT4 traffic in muscle cells. PMID:20658540

  11. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  12. Muscle Stimulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Goddard Space Flight Center contract, Electrologic of America was able to refine the process of densely packing circuitry on personal computer boards, providing significant contributions to the closed-loop systems for the Remote Manipulator System Simulator. The microcircuitry work was then applied to the StimMaster FES Ergometer, an exercise device used to stimulate muscles suffering from paralysis. The electrical stimulation equipment was developed exclusively for V-Care Health Systems, Inc. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  13. Inhibition by forskolin of insulin-stimulated glucose transport in L6 muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Klip, A; Ramlal, T; Douen, A G; Bilan, P J; Skorecki, K L

    1988-01-01

    The cardioactive diterpene forskolin is a known activator of adenylate cyclase, but recently a specific interaction of this compound with the glucose transporter has been identified that results in the inhibition of glucose transport in several human and rat cell types. We have compared the sensitivity of basal and insulin-stimulated hexose transport to inhibition by forskolin in skeletal muscle cells of the L6 line. Forskolin completely inhibited both basal and insulin-stimulated hexose transport when present during the transport assay. The inhibition of basal transport was completely reversible upon removal of the diterpene. In contrast, insulin-stimulated hexose transport did not recover, and basal transport levels were attained instead. This effect of inhibiting (or reversing) the insulin-stimulated fraction of transport is a novel effect of the diterpene. Forskolin treatment also inhibited the stimulated fraction of transport when the stimulus was by 4 beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, reversing back to basal levels. Half-maximal inhibition of the above-basal insulin-stimulated transport was achieved with 35-50 microM-forskolin, and maximal inhibition with 100 microM. Forskolin did not inhibit 125I-insulin binding under conditions where it caused significant inhibition of insulin-stimulated hexose transport. Forskolin significantly elevated the cyclic AMP levels in the cells; however its inhibitory effect on the above basal, insulin-stimulated fraction of hexose transport was not mediated by cyclic AMP since: (i) 8-bromo cyclic AMP and cholera toxin did not mimic this effect of the diterpene, (ii) significant decreases in cyclic AMP levels caused by 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine in the presence of forskolin did not prevent inhibition of insulin-stimulated hexose transport, (iii) isobutylmethylxanthine did not potentiate forskolin effects on glucose transport but did potentiate the elevation in cyclic AMP, and (iv) 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which does not activate adenylate

  14. Applications of calcium electroporation to effective apoptosis induction in fibrosarcoma cells and stimulation of normal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zielichowska, Anna; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta; Michel, Olga; Kulbacka, Julita

    2016-06-01

    The electroporation (EP) supports various types of anticancer therapies by the selective transport of cytostatics. Increase in intracellular calcium level by EP may be a new approach to fibrosarcoma treatment. Calcium is one of the most important factors of cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death (apoptosis or necrosis). Calcium level balanced by electroporation can cause different effects on normal and pathological cells. The efficiency and safety of electroporation combined with Ca(2+) ions were examined in our study. The two muscle cell lines were used: normal rat skeletal muscle cells - L6 and cancer muscle cells - Wehi-164 (fibrosarcoma). Two CaCl2 concentrations were tested: 0.5 mM and 5 mM combined with EP parameters: 1000 V/cm, 1200 V/cm, and 1500 V/cm. The results show that EP supported by Ca(2+) is cytotoxic for Wehi-164 cells and simultaneously safe for normal muscle cells. The main type of cell death - apoptosis - was confirmed by Tunnel and Annexin V/PI assay. Additionally, sPLA2 pro-tumorigenic influence was proved by immunocytochemistry. Moreover, EP with 0.5 mM of Ca(2+) slightly stimulates the normal muscle cells - L6 to increase proliferation. PMID:26874618

  15. Nitric oxide suppresses a Ca(2+)-stimulated Cl- current in smooth muscle cells of opossum esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Vogalis, F; Goyal, R K

    1998-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) hyperpolarizes visceral smooth muscles. Using the patch-clamp technique, we investigated the possibility that NO-mediated hyperpolarization in the circular muscle of opossum esophagus results from the suppression of a Ca(2+)-stimulated Cl- current. Smooth muscle cells were dissociated from the circular layer and bathed in high-K+ Ca(2+)-EGTA-buffered solution. Macroscopic ramp currents were recorded from cell-attached patches. Contaminating K(+)-channel currents were blocked with tetrapentylammonium chloride (200 microM) added to all solutions. Raising bath Ca2+ concentration above 150 nM in the presence of A-23187 (10 microM) activated a leak current (IL-Ca) with an EC50 of 1.2 microM at -100 mV. The reversal potential (Erev) of IL-Ca (-8.5 +/- 1.8 mV, n = 8) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from Erev of the background current (+4.2 +/- 1.2 mV, n = 8). Equimolar substitution of 135 mM Cl- in the pipette solution with gluconate significantly shifted Erev of IL-Ca to +16.6 +/- 3.4 mV (n = 4) (P < 0.05 compared with background), whereas replacement of total Na+ with Tris+ suppressed IL-Ca but did not affect Erev (-15 +/- 3 mV, n = 3; P > 0.05). IL-Ca was inhibited by DIDS (500 microM). Diethylenetriamine-NO adduct (200 microM), a NO donor, and 8-bromo-cGMP (200 microM) suppressed IL-Ca by 59 +/- 15% (n = 5) and 62 +/- 21% (n = 4) at -100 mV, respectively. We conclude that in opossum esophageal smooth muscle NO-mediated hyperpolarization may be produced by suppression of a Ca(2+)-stimulated Cl(-)-permeable conductance via formation of cGMP. PMID:9612270

  16. Glucose transport in human skeletal muscle cells in culture. Stimulation by insulin and metformin.

    PubMed Central

    Sarabia, V; Lam, L; Burdett, E; Leiter, L A; Klip, A

    1992-01-01

    Primary human muscle cell cultures were established and the regulation of glucose transport was investigated. Primary cultures were allowed to proceed to the stage of myotubes through fusion of myoblasts or were used for clonal selection based on fusion potential. In clonally selected cultures, hexose (2-deoxy-glucose) uptake into myotubes was linear within the time of study and inhibitable by cytochalasin B (IC50 = 400 nM). Cytochalasin B photolabeled a protein(s) of 45,000-50,000 D in a D-glucose-protectable manner, suggesting identity with the glucose transporters. In the myotube stage, the cells expressed both the GLUT1 and GLUT4 glucose transporter protein isoforms at an average molar ratio of 7:1. Preincubation in media of increasing glucose concentrations (range 5-25 mM) progressively decreased the rate of 2-deoxyglucose uptake. Insulin elevated 2-deoxyglucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner, with half maximal stimulation achieved at 3.5 nM. Insulin also stimulated the transport of the nonmetabolizable hexose 3-O-methylglucose, as well as the activity of glycogen synthase, responsible for nonoxidative glucose metabolism. The oral antihyperglycemic drug metformin stimulated the cytochalasin B-sensitive component of both 2-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose uptake. Maximal stimulation was observed at 8 h of exposure to 50 microM metformin, and this effect was not prevented by incubation with the protein-synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. The relative effect of metformin was higher in cells incubated in 25 mM glucose than in 5 mM glucose, consistent with its selective action in hyperglycemic conditions in vivo. Metformin (50 microM for 24 h) was more effective than insulin (1 microM for 1 h) in stimulating hexose uptake and the hormone was effective on top of the stimulation caused by the biguanide, suggesting independent mechanisms of action. Images PMID:1401073

  17. Production of inositol trisphosphates upon. cap alpha. -adrenergic stimulation in BC3H-1 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ambler, S.K.; Thompson, B.; Brown, J.H.; Taylor, P.

    1986-05-01

    Activation of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in BC3H-1 muscle cells rapidly mobilizes intracellular and results in a paradoxically slower accumulation of inositol trisphosphate. A possible explanation for this discrepancy may be provided by the recent findings of Irvine et al. of additional Ins P3 isomers besides the Ca/sup + +/-mobilizing isomer, Ins 1,4,5-P3. They have eluted and separated the inositol phosphates of BC3H-1 cells with an NH/sub 4//sup +/ x HCO/sub 2//sup -//H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ gradient on a Whatman Partisil 10SAX column using Hewlett-Packard HPLC. Commercial (/sup 3/H)Ins 1,4,5-P3 and (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates from carbachol-stimulated parotid glands were used as standards. Little or no Ins 1,3,4-P3 could be detected in control or phenylephrine-treated BC3H-1 cells. Ins 1,4,5-P3 followed the pattern of agonist stimulation observed previously. As a positive control, Ins P3 isomers were also measured in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Muscarinic stimulation of 1321N1 cells results in both the rapid accumulation of Ins P3 and Ca/sup + +/ mobilization. There is no detectable basal Ins 1,3,4-P3, but carbachol stimulates a rapid production of this compound in 1321N1 cells. Agonist activation also results in a rapid increase in Ins 1,4,5-P3 above basal values. These studies indicate that Ins 1,3,4-P3 does not contribute to the InsP3 signal in BC3H-1 cells and multiple mechanisms may exist for the coupling of receptors to PI turnover.

  18. Blocking interferon {beta} stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Stephan H; Bot, Pieter T; Fledderus, Joost O; van der Laan, A M; Volger, Oscar L; Laufs, Ulrich; Böhm, Michael; de Vries, Carlie J M; Horrevoets, Anton J G; Piek, Jan J; Hoefer, Imo E; van Royen, Niels

    2010-11-01

    Increased interferon (IFN)-β signaling in patients with insufficient coronary collateralization and an inhibitory effect of IFNβ on collateral artery growth in mice have been reported. The mechanisms of IFNβ-induced inhibition of arteriogenesis are unknown. In stimulated monocytes from patients with chronic total coronary artery occlusion and decreased arteriogenic response, whole genome expression analysis showed increased expression of IFNβ-regulated genes. Immunohistochemically, the IFNβ receptor was localized in the vascular media of murine collateral arteries. Treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with IFNβ resulted in an attenuated proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor-1A (p21). The growth inhibitory effect of IFNβ was attenuated by inhibition of p21 by RNA interference. IFNβ-treated THP1 monocytes showed enhanced apoptosis. Subsequently, we tested if collateral artery growth can be stimulated by inhibition of IFNβ-signaling. RNA interference of the IFNβ receptor-1 (IFNAR1) increased VSMC proliferation, cell cycle progression, and reduced p21 gene expression. IFNβ signaling and FAS and TRAIL expression were attenuated in monocytes from IFNAR1(-/-) mice, indicating reduced monocyte apoptosis. Hindlimb perfusion restoration 1 week after femoral artery ligation was improved in IFNAR1(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice as assessed by infusion of fluorescent microspheres. These results demonstrate that IFNβ inhibits collateral artery growth and VSMC proliferation through p21-dependent cell cycle arrest and induction of monocyte apoptosis. Inhibition of IFNβ stimulates VSMC proliferation and collateral artery growth. PMID:20736166

  19. Lovastatin stimulates human vascular smooth muscle cell expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, a potent inhibitor of low-density lipoprotein-stimulated cell growth.

    PubMed

    Emmanuele, Luca; Ortmann, Jana; Doerflinger, Tim; Traupe, Tobias; Barton, Matthias

    2003-02-28

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) stimulate ectopic bone formation in skeletal muscle. Here we show that human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) abundantly express mRNA encoding for BMP receptor type II, BMP-2, and BMP-7 proteins. Treatment with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitor lovastatin (34 microM) increased BMP-2 gene transcription >14-fold as measured by real-time PCR analysis (P<0.05 vs. solvent control). Moreover, VSMC proliferation stimulated with native low-density lipoprotein (100 microg of protein/mL) was prevented by either human recombinant BMP-2 or BMP-7 at concentrations of 100 ng/mL (P<0.05). Both BMPs also inhibited basal cell proliferation (P<0.05). Induction of BMPs and subsequent inhibition of VSMC growth and/or induction of vascular bone formation could contribute to the mechanisms by which statins increase plaque stability in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:12593849

  20. Hepatoma-derived growth factor stimulates smooth muscle cell growth and is expressed in vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Allen D.; Lobe, David R.; Matsumura, Martin E.; Nakamura, Hideji; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2000-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is the first member identified of a new family of secreted heparin-binding growth factors highly expressed in the fetal aorta. The biologic role of HDGF in vascular growth is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that HDGF mRNA is expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), most prominently in proliferating SMCs, 8–24 hours after serum stimulation. Exogenous HDGF and endogenous overexpression of HDGF stimulated a significant increase in SMC number and DNA synthesis. Rat aortic SMCs transfected with a hemagglutinin-epitope–tagged rat HDGF cDNA contain HA-HDGF in their nuclei during S-phase. We also detected native HDGF in nuclei of cultured SMCs, of SMCs and endothelial cells from 19-day fetal (but not in the adult) rat aorta, of SMCs proximal to abdominal aortic constriction in adult rats, and of SMCs in the neointima formed after endothelial denudation of the rat common carotid artery. Moreover, HDGF colocalizes with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in SMCs in human atherosclerotic carotid arteries, suggesting that HDGF helps regulate SMC growth during development and in response to vascular injury. PMID:10712428

  1. Thrombin Ca(2+)-dependently stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in BC3H1 muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Offermanns, S; Bombien, E; Schultz, G

    1993-01-01

    The proteinase thrombin, known to act via heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors, is a mitogenic agent for different cell types, including the mouse muscle cell line BC3H1. In this study, the effect of thrombin on tyrosine phosphorylation was examined using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Thrombin was found to induce phosphorylation of 65-70 and 110-120 kDa proteins in BC3H1 cells. The effect of thrombin was concentration-dependent, being half-maximal and maximal at concentrations of 0.03 and 1 unit/ml respectively. The thrombin-induced increase in phosphorylation was rapid (< or = 10 s) and transient, with a peak response after about 1-2 min. The effect of thrombin could be mimicked by the thrombin receptor agonist peptide SFLLRN-NH2. Preincubation of cells with pertussis toxin (PT) had no effect on thrombin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor and insulin stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of different proteins, among which were 65-70 and 110-120 kDa proteins. The phorbol ester 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) as well as the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 both stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins identical to those phosphorylated by thrombin, suggesting that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and elevation of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration alone are sufficient to induce tyrosine phosphorylation. However, calphostin C and other PKC inhibitors, which completely inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PMA, had no influence on the effect of thrombin, whereas loading of cells with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator bis-(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-NNN'N'-tetra-acetic acid totally blocked thrombin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus tyrosine phosphorylation stimulated by thrombin is an early PT-insensitive cellular response which is either directly mediated by elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or by a presently unknown mechanism that requires an elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Images Figure 1

  2. Excitation-induced cell damage and beta2-adrenoceptor agonist stimulated force recovery in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Gissel, Hanne; Fredsted, Anne; Clausen, Torben

    2006-02-01

    Intensive exercise leads to a loss of force, which may be long lasting and associated with muscle cell damage. To simulate this impairment and to develop means of compensating the loss of force, extensor digitorum longus muscles from 4-wk-old rats were fatigued using intermittent 40-Hz stimulation (10 s on, 30 s off). After stimulation, force recovery, cell membrane leakage, and membrane potential were followed for 240 min. The 30-60 min of stimulation reduced tetanic force to approximately 10% of the prefatigue level, followed by a spontaneous recovery to approximately 20% in 120-240 min. Loss of force was associated with a decrease in K+ content, gain of Na+ and Ca2+ content, leakage of the intracellular enzyme lactic acid dehydrogenase (10-fold increase), and depolarization (13 mV). Stimulation of the Na+-K+ pump with either the beta2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol, epinephrine, rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (rCGRP), or dibutyryl cAMP improved force recovery by 40-90%. The beta-blocker propranolol abolished the effect of epinephrine on force recovery but not that of CGRP. Both spontaneous and salbutamol-induced force recovery were prevented by ouabain. The salbutamol-induced force recovery was associated with repolarization of the membrane potential (12 mV) to the level measured in unfatigued muscles. In conclusion, in muscles exposed to fatiguing stimulation leading to a considerable loss of force, cell leakage, and depolarization, stimulation of the Na+-K+ pump induces repolarization and improves force recovery, possibly due to the electrogenic action of the Na+-K+ pump. This mechanism may be important for the restoration of muscle function after intense exercise. PMID:16210418

  3. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population and Cyclic AMP Production in Chicken and Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Strietzel, Catherine J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (PAR) and its coupling to Adenosine 3'5' Cyclic Monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the PAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture, were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the PAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability, of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the PAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  4. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  5. The role of selective cyclooxygenase isoforms in human intestinal smooth muscle cell stimulated prostanoid formation and proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Longo, W E; Erickson, B; Panesar, N; Mazuski, J E; Robinson, S; Kaminski, D L

    1998-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle plays a major role in the repair of injured intestine and contributes to the prostanoid pool during intestinal inflammatory states. Cyclooxygenase (COX), which catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostanoids exists in two isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of COX-1 and COX-2 in the production of prostanoids by human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cells when stimulated by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Furthermore the effects of specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors on the proliferation of smooth muscle cells was also evaluated. Confluent monolayer cultures of HISM cells were incubated with IL-1beta or LPS for 0-24h while control cells received medium alone. PGE2 and PGI2 as 6-keto-PGF1alpha and LTB4 were measured by a specific radioimmunoassay. COX enzymes were evaluated by Western immunoblotting. Unstimulated and stimulated cells were exposed to the specific COX-1 inhibitor valerylsalicylic acid (VSA) and the COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 and SC-58125. The effects of serum on proliferation were then evaluated in the presence of each of the specific COX inhibitors by incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA. IL-1beta and LPS increased both PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1alpha in a dose dependent fashion with enhanced production detected two hours following exposure. Neither stimulus stimulated LTB4 release. Immunoblot analysis using isoform-specific antibodies showed that both COX-1 and COX-2 were present constitutively. Furthermore, COX-1 was upregulated by each inflammatory stimulus. In a separate set of experiments cells were pretreated with either the selective COX-1 inhibitor VSA or the selective COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 or SC-58125 prior to treatment with IL-1beta or LPS. The COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors decreased both basal and IL-1beta and LPS stimulated prostanoid release. Spontaneous DNA synthesis was present and serum consistently increased

  6. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population and Coupling Efficiency in Chicken and Rat Skeleton Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Strietzel, Catherine J.

    1999-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the bAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the bAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. Thus, in chicken muscle cells an enhanced level of contraction reduced the coupling efficiency of bAR for cyclic AMP production by approximately 55% compared to controls. In contrast, the bAR population in rat muscle cells was increased by approximately 25% by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was also increased by almost two-fold. Thus, in rat muscle cells an enhanced level of contraction increased the coupling efficiency of bAR for cyclic AMP production by approximately 50% compared to controls. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in both rat muscle cells and chicken muscle cells were not affected by electrical stimulation.

  7. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells mitigates glucocorticoid-induced decreases in prostaglandin production and prostaglandin synthase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, J. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1994-01-01

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) induces a decline in protein synthesis and protein content in tissue cultured, avian skeletal muscle cells, and this atrophy is attenuated by repetitive mechanical stretch. Since the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin mitigated this stretch attenuation of muscle atrophy, the effects of Dex and mechanical stretch on prostaglandin production and prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) activity were examined. In static cultures, 10(-8) M Dex reduced PGF2 alpha production 55-65% and PGE2 production 84-90% after 24-72 h of incubation. Repetitive 10% stretch-relaxations of non-Dex-treated cultures increased PGF2 alpha efflux 41% at 24 h and 276% at 72 h, and increased PGE2 production 51% at 24 h and 236% at 72 h. Mechanical stimulation of Dex-treated cultures increased PGF2 alpha production 162% after 24 h, returning PGF2 alpha efflux to the level of non-Dex-treated cultures. At 72 h, stretch increased PGF2 alpha efflux 65% in Dex-treated cultures. Mechanical stimulation of Dex-treated cultures also increased PGE2 production at 24 h, but not at 72 h. Dex reduced PGHS activity in the muscle cultures by 70% after 8-24 h of incubation, and mechanical stimulation of the Dex-treated cultures increased PGHS activity by 98% after 24 h. Repetitive mechanical stimulation attenuates the catabolic effects of Dex on cultured skeletal muscle cells in part by mitigating the Dex-induced declines in PGHS activity and prostaglandin production.

  8. Nonlinear relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and norepinephrine-stimulated calcium flux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, W.S.; Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Alexander, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    To determine the relationship between vascular alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and receptor-coupled calcium flux, the authors have studied (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding and l-norepinephrine-induced /sup 45/Ca efflux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from the rabbit aorta. In a crude cellular homogenate, (/sup 3/H)prazosin bound to a single high affinity site, whereas l-norepinephrine (NE) binding was best described by a two-site model. NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was concentration-dependent (EC/sup 50/ = 108 nM) and potently inhibited by prazosin (IC/sup 50/ = 0.15 nM). For the total receptor pool identified by (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding, the relationship between receptor occupancy by NE and NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was markedly nonlinear, such that 50% of maximum NE-stimulated efflux occurred with occupancy of only approximately 7% of receptors. These two experimental approaches provide direct evidence for the presence in cultured rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells of a sizable pool of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in excess of those needed for maximum NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux. This evidence of ''spare'' receptors, together with the finding of two affinity states of agonist binding, raises the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in this system.

  9. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, I. J.; Wagner, W. D.; Owens, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion. Images Figure 6 PMID:2316626

  10. Electrical stimulation induces calcium-dependent up-regulation of neuregulin-1β in dystrophic skeletal muscle cell lines.

    PubMed

    Juretić, Nevenka; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Caviedes, Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Riveros, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a neuromuscular disease originated by reduced or no expression of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that provides structural integrity to muscle fibres. A promising pharmacological treatment for DMD aims to increase the level of a structural dystrophin homolog called utrophin. Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1), a growth factor that potentiates myogenesis, induces utrophin expression in skeletal muscle cells. Microarray analysis of total gene expression allowed us to determine that neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) is one of 150 differentially expressed genes in electrically stimulated (400 pulses, 1 ms, 45 Hz) dystrophic human skeletal muscle cells (RCDMD). We investigated the effect of depolarization, and the involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) and PKC isoforms on NRG-1β expression in dystrophic myotubes. Electrical stimulation of RCDMD increased NRG-1β mRNA and protein levels, and mRNA enhancement was abolished by actinomycin D. NRG-1β transcription was inhibited by BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, and by inhibitors of IP(3)-dependent slow Ca(2+) transients, like 2-APB, Ly 294002 and Xestospongin B. Ryanodine, a fast Ca(2+) signal inhibitor, had no effect on electrical stimulation-induced expression. BIM VI (general inhibitor of PKC isoforms) and Gö 6976 (specific inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC isoforms) abolished NRG-1β mRNA induction. Our results suggest that depolarization induced slow Ca(2+) signals stimulate NRG-1β transcription in RCDMD cells, and that Ca(2+)-dependent PKC isoforms are involved in this process. Based on utrophin's ability to partially compensate dystrophin disfunction, knowledge on the mechanism involved on NRG-1 up-regulation could be important for new therapeutic strategies design. PMID:22613991

  11. Mechanical Coupling of Smooth Muscle Cells Using Microengineered Substrates and Local Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Craig; Hunter, David; Tung, Leslie; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Mechanical stresses directly affect many cellular processes, including signal transduction, growth, differentiation, and survival. Cells can themselves generate such stresses by activating myosin to contract the actin cytoskeleton, which in turn can regulate both cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions. We are studying mechanical forces at cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions using arrays of selectively patterned flexible PDMS microposts combined with the ability to apply local chemical stimulation. Micropipette ``spritzing'', a laminar flow technique, uses glass micropipettes mounted on a microscope stage to deliver drugs to controlled regions within a cellular construct while cell traction forces are recorded via the micropost array. The pipettes are controlled by micromanipulators allowing for rapid and precise movement across the array and the ability to treat multiple constructs within a sample. This technique allows for observing the propagation of a chemically induced mechanical stimulus through cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. We have used this system to administer the acto-myosin inhibitors Blebbistatin and Y-27632 to single cells and observed the subsequent decrease in cell traction forces. Experiments using trypsin-EDTA have shown this system to be capable of single cell manipulation through removal of one cell within a pair configuration while leaving the other cell unaffected. This project is supported in part by NIH grant HL090747

  12. Endothelin stimulates a sustained 1,2-diacylglycerol increase and protein kinase C activation in bovine aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.; Chao, T.; Hu, K.Q.; King, G.L.

    1989-07-14

    Endothelin is a long-lasting potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We report here that in bovine aortic smooth muscle cells, endothelin biphasically increased total cellular diacylglycerol (DAG) content. When cellular DAG was labeled with (/sup 14/C) glycerol for 48h, endothelin stimulated (/sup 14/C)DAG formation in a biphasic pattern. Only one prolonged phase of DAG accumulation was observed when cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)glycerol for 2 h. Endothelin induced an increase in the membranous protein kinase C (PKC) activities, which lasted for more than 20 min. These data suggest that (i) endothelin stimulates a sustained generation of DAG, (ii) this accumulation of DAG results in a sustained translocation of cytosolic PKC activities to the membrane.

  13. Electrical Stimulation Counteracts Muscle Decline in Seniors

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Helmut; Barberi, Laura; Löfler, Stefan; Sbardella, Simona; Burggraf, Samantha; Fruhmann, Hannah; Carraro, Ugo; Mosole, Simone; Sarabon, Nejc; Vogelauer, Michael; Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Cvecka, Jan; Romanello, Vanina; Pietrangelo, Laura; Protasi, Feliciano; Sandri, Marco; Zampieri, Sandra; Musaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The loss in muscle mass coupled with a decrease in specific force and shift in fiber composition are hallmarks of aging. Training and regular exercise attenuate the signs of sarcopenia. However, pathologic conditions limit the ability to perform physical exercise. We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES) is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function. We analyzed, at functional, structural, and molecular level, the effects of ES training on healthy seniors with normal life style, without routine sport activity. ES was able to improve muscle torque and functional performances of seniors and increased the size of fast muscle fibers. At molecular level, ES induced up-regulation of IGF-1 and modulation of MuRF-1, a muscle-specific atrophy-related gene. ES also induced up-regulation of relevant markers of differentiating satellite cells and of extracellular matrix remodeling, which might guarantee shape and mechanical forces of trained skeletal muscle as well as maintenance of satellite cell function, reducing fibrosis. Our data provide evidence that ES is a safe method to counteract muscle decline associated with aging. PMID:25104935

  14. A form of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) lacking the transmembrane domains and the COOH-terminal end stimulates metabolism in muscle and liver cells.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Jessica; Paz, José C; Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Sala, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Noguera, Eduard; Pich, Sara; Palacín, Manuel; Enríquez, José Antonio; Zorzano, Antonio

    2013-11-15

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein that participates in mitochondrial fusion, is required to maintain normal mitochondrial metabolism in skeletal muscle and liver. Given that muscle Mfn2 is repressed in obese or type 2 diabetic subjects, this protein may have a potential pathophysiological role in these conditions. To evaluate whether the metabolic effects of Mfn2 can be dissociated from its function in mitochondrial dynamics, we studied a form of human Mfn2, lacking the two transmembrane domains and the COOH-terminal coiled coil (ΔMfn2). This form localized in mitochondria but did not alter mitochondrial morphology in cells or in skeletal muscle fibers. The expression of ΔMfn2 in mouse skeletal muscle stimulated glucose oxidation and enhanced respiratory control ratio, which occurred in the absence of changes in mitochondrial mass. ΔMfn2 did not stimulate mitochondrial respiration in Mfn2-deficient muscle cells. The expression of ΔMfn2 in mouse liver or in hepatoma cells stimulated gluconeogenesis. In addition, ΔMfn2 activated basal and maximal respiration both in muscle and liver cells. In all, we show that a form of Mfn2 lacking mitochondrial fusion activity stimulates mitochondrial function and enhances glucose metabolism in muscle and liver tissues. This study suggests that Mfn2 regulates metabolism independently of changes in mitochondrial morphology. PMID:23941871

  15. Stimulation by endothelin-1 of mitogen-activated protein kinases and DNA synthesis in bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Malarkey, K.; Chilvers, E. R.; Lawson, M. F.; Plevin, R.

    1995-01-01

    1. In cultures of bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF), bradykinin (BK) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulated the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of both pp42 and pp44 kDa forms of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. 2. Both ET-1 and PDGF stimulated a sustained activation of MAP kinase whilst the response to BK was transient. 3. Activation of MAP kinase occurred in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 values: ET-1, 2.3 +/- 1.3 nM; BK, 8.7 +/- 4.1 nM, PDGF, 9.7 +/- 3.2 ng ml-1). 4. Pretreatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor Ro-318220, significantly reduced ET-1 activation of MAP kinase at 2 and 5 min but enhanced MAP kinase activation at 60 min. 5. Following chronic phorbol ester pretreatment, BK-stimulated activation of MAP kinase was abolished whilst the responses to PDGF and ET-1 were only partly reduced (80 and 45% inhibition respectively). 6. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin reduced ET-1 stimulated activation of MAP kinase particularly at later times (60 min), but left the responses to both PDGF and BK unaffected. 7. ET-1 also stimulated a 3 fold increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation which was abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. In contrast, PDGF stimulated a 131 fold increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation which was not affected by pertussis toxin. 8. These results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive activation of MAP kinase may play an important role in ET-1-stimulated DNA synthesis but that activation of MAP kinase alone is not sufficient to induce the magnitude of DNA synthesis observed in response to PDGF. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8564258

  16. Function-Based Discovery of Significant Transcriptional Temporal Patterns in Insulin Stimulated Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Camillo, Barbara; Irving, Brian A.; Schimke, Jill; Sanavia, Tiziana; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin action on protein synthesis (translation of transcripts) and post-translational modifications, especially of those involving the reversible modifications such as phosphorylation of various signaling proteins, are extensively studied but insulin effect on transcription of genes, especially of transcriptional temporal patterns remains to be fully defined. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify significant transcriptional temporal patterns we utilized primary differentiated rat skeletal muscle myotubes which were treated with insulin and samples were collected every 20 min for 8 hours. Pooled samples at every hour were analyzed by gene array approach to measure transcript levels. The patterns of transcript levels were analyzed based on a novel method that integrates selection, clustering, and functional annotation to find the main temporal patterns associated to functional groups of differentially expressed genes. 326 genes were found to be differentially expressed in response to in vitro insulin administration in skeletal muscle myotubes. Approximately 20% of the genes that were differentially expressed were identified as belonging to the insulin signaling pathway. Characteristic transcriptional temporal patterns include: (a) a slow and gradual decrease in gene expression, (b) a gradual increase in gene expression reaching a peak at about 5 hours and then reaching a plateau or an initial decrease and other different variable pattern of increase in gene expression over time. Conclusion/Significance The new method allows identifying characteristic dynamic responses to insulin stimulus, common to a number of genes and associated to the same functional group. The results demonstrate that insulin treatment elicited different clusters of gene transcript profile supporting a temporal regulation of gene expression by insulin in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:22396763

  17. Store depletion induces Gαq-mediated PLCβ1 activity to stimulate TRPC1 channels in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian; Miralles, Francesc; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Large, William A.; Albert, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ stores activates store-operated channels (SOCs) composed of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 1 proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which contribute to important cellular functions. We have previously shown that PKC is obligatory for activation of TRPC1 SOCs in VSMCs, and the present study investigates if the classic phosphoinositol signaling pathway involving Gαq-mediated PLC activity is responsible for driving PKC-dependent channel gating. The G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S, anti-Gαq antibodies, the PLC inhibitor U73122, and the PKC inhibitor GF109203X all inhibited activation of TRPC1 SOCs, and U73122 and GF109203X also reduced store-operated PKC-dependent phosphorylation of TRPC1 proteins. Three distinct SR Ca2+ store-depleting agents, 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester, cyclopiazonic acid, and N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamineed, induced translocations of the fluorescent biosensor GFP-PLCδ1-PH from the cell membrane to the cytosol, which were inhibited by U73122. Knockdown of PLCβ1 with small hairpin RNA reduced both store-operated PLC activity and stimulation of TRPC1 SOCs. Immunoprecipitation studies and proximity ligation assays revealed that store depletion induced interactions between TRPC1 and Gαq, and TRPC1 and PLCβ1. We propose a novel activation mechanism for TRPC1 SOCs in VSMCs, in which store depletion induces formation of TRPC1-Gαq-PLCβ1 complexes that lead to PKC stimulation and channel gating.—Shi, J., Miralles, F., Birnbaumer, L., Large, W. A., Albert, A. P. Store depletion induces Gαq-mediated PLCβ1 activity to stimulate TRPC1 channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:26467792

  18. Ghrelin stimulates myogenic differentiation in a mouse muscle satellite cell line and in primary cultures of bovine myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Flores, D; Mora, O; Tamariz, E; González-Dávalos, L; González-Gallardo, A; Antaramian, A; Shimada, A; Varela-Echavarría, A; Romano-Muñoz, J L

    2012-08-01

    Ghrelin is an acylated hormone that influences food intake, energy metabolism and reproduction, among others. Ghrelin may also stimulate proliferating myoblast cell differentiation and multinucleated myotube fusion. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of human ghrelin (hGHRL) and human ghrelin fragment 1-18 (hGHRL1-18) on myoblast differentiation by means of mRNA expression and protein level. Two types of cells were tested, the cell line i28 obtained from mouse skeletal muscle and primary cultures of bovine myoblasts. Both ghrelin and its N-terminal fragment hGHRL1-18 were used at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nm. Treatments were applied to pre-confluent cultures and were maintained for 4 days. We determined that between 0.1 and 100 nm, hGHRL and hGRHL1-18 had similar effects on myogenic differentiation of i28 cells (p < 0.01). On the other hand, only the higher concentrations (10 and 100 nm) of hGHRL stimulated bovine myoblast differentiation. These results could be attributed to the presence, in both i28 cells and in bovine myoblasts, of the mRNA for GHS-R1a and CD36 receptors. The use of ghrelin in livestock production is still questionable because of the limited effects shown in this study, and additional research is needed in this field. PMID:21777295

  19. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%–99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G1/G0 cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials. PMID:26761017

  20. Stimulation of albumin endocytosis by cationized ferritin in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, E.A.; Kelley, J.L.; Suenram, C.A.; Valente, A.J.; Abreu-Macomber, M.; Schwartz, C.J.

    1985-12-01

    Anionic microdomains within the aortic smooth muscle cell (SMC) surface glycocalyx represent a potential barrier to the endocytosis of anionic plasma proteins. Cultured SMCs exposed briefly to cationized ferritin (CF) exhibit ultrastructural aggregations of surface anionic sites resulting in intervening areas essentially devoid of anionic charge. Preincubation of cultured aortic medial SMCs with 0.2 mg/ml CF for 1 minute at 37 C resulted in a 4-fold increase in binding and a 13-fold increase in internalization of /sup 125/I-human serum albumin (/sup 125/I-HSA) relative to cells pretreated with native ferritin. When both the CF preincubation and the endocytosis were performed at 4 C, the influence of CF was abolished. Studies at 4 C indicated that CF pretreatment of SMC at 37 C induced high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) saturable /sup 125/I-HSA binding, in addition to low-affinity nonsaturable binding. These results were further confirmed by binding competition studies using increasing concentrations of unlabeled HSA. In contrast, low-density lipoprotein, a large anionic molecule, failed to compete with /sup 125/I-HSA for binding sites on CF-pretreated SMCs at either 4 or 37 C. Pulse-chase studies at 37 C indicated that 20-30% of internalized /sup 125/I-HSA was degraded, and 40-50% exocytosed within 24 hours in CF-treated cells. CF pretreatment of the SMCs did not significantly enhance the uptake of /sup 14/C-sucrose as a measure of fluid-phase endocytosis at 30 and 60 minutes. The results of these studies emphasize the potentially important regulatory roles of cell-surface anionic charge distribution and cationic molecules in cellular endocytosis.

  1. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  2. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Barbara M.; Lam, Amy; Griffin, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Lack of neural innervation due to neurological damage renders muscle unable to produce force. Use of electrical stimulation is a medium in which investigators have tried to find a way to restore movement and the ability to perform activities of daily living. Different methods of applying electrical current to modify neuromuscular activity are electrical stimulation (ES), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and functional electrical stimulation (FES). This review covers the aspects of electrical stimulation used for rehabilitation and functional purposes. Discussed are the various parameters of electrical stimulation, including frequency, pulse width/duration, duty cycle, intensity/amplitude, ramp time, pulse pattern, program duration, program frequency, and muscle group activated, and how they affect fatigue in the stimulated muscle. PMID:22737049

  3. Nitric oxide stimulates matrix synthesis and deposition by adult human aortic smooth muscle cells within three-dimensional cocultures.

    PubMed

    Simmers, Phillip; Gishto, Arsela; Vyavahare, Narendra; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R

    2015-04-01

    Vascular diseases are characterized by the over-proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vessel wall, leading to compromise in cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling pathways. Tissue engineering approaches to regulate SMC over-proliferation and enhance healthy ECM synthesis showed promise, but resulted in low crosslinking efficiency. Here, we report the benefits of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) cues, delivered from S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), to cell proliferation and matrix deposition by adult human aortic SMCs (HA-SMCs) within three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic cocultures. A coculture platform with two adjacent, permeable 3D culture chambers was developed to enable paracrine signaling between vascular cells. HA-SMCs were cultured in these chambers within collagen hydrogels, either alone or in the presence of human aortic endothelial cells (HA-ECs) cocultures, and exogenously supplemented with varying GSNO dosages (0-100 nM) for 21 days. Results showed that EC cocultures stimulated SMC proliferation within GSNO-free cultures. With increasing GSNO concentration, HA-SMC proliferation decreased in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while HA-EC proliferation increased. GSNO (100 nM) significantly enhanced the protein amounts synthesized by HA-SMCs, in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while lower dosages (1-10 nM) offered marginal benefits. Multi-fold increases in the synthesis and deposition of elastin, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronic acid, and lysyl oxidase crosslinking enzyme (LOX) were noted at higher GSNO dosages, and coculturing with ECs significantly furthered these trends. Similar increases in TIMP-1 and MMP-9 levels were noted within cocultures with increasing GSNO dosages. Such increases in matrix synthesis correlated with NO-stimulated increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression within EC and SMC

  4. Efficient generation of smooth muscle cells from adipose-derived stromal cells by 3D mechanical stimulation can substitute the use of growth factors in vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Mojtaba; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A M; Poot, André A; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Occluding artery disease causes a high demand for bioartificial replacement vessels. We investigated the combined use of biodegradable and creep-free poly (1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) with smooth muscle cells (SMC) derived by biochemical or mechanical stimulation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASC) to engineer bioartificial arteries. Biochemical induction of cultured ASC to SMC was done with TGF-β1 for 7d. Phenotype and function were assessed by qRT-PCR, immunodetection and collagen contraction assays. The influence of mechanical stimulation on non-differentiated and pre-differentiated ASC, loaded in porous tubular PTMC scaffolds, was assessed after culturing under pulsatile flow for 14d. Assays included qRT-PCR, production of extracellular matrix and scanning electron microscopy. ASC adhesion and TGF-β1-driven differentiation to contractile SMC on PTMC did not differ from tissue culture polystyrene controls. Mesenchymal and SMC markers were increased compared to controls. Interestingly, pre-differentiated ASC had only marginal higher contractility than controls. Moreover, in 3D PTMC scaffolds, mechanical stimulation yielded well-aligned ASC-derived SMC which deposited ECM. Under the same conditions, pre-differentiated ASC-derived SMC maintained their SMC phenotype. Our results show that mechanical stimulation can replace TGF-β1 pre-stimulation to generate SMC from ASC and that pre-differentiated ASC keep their SMC phenotype with increased expression of SMC markers. PMID:26989865

  5. External physical and biochemical stimulation to enhance skeletal muscle bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Plock, Jan; Eberli, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Cell based muscle tissue engineering carries the potential to revert the functional loss of muscle tissue caused by disease and trauma. Although muscle tissue can be bioengineered using various precursor cells, major limitations still remain. Recent findings In the last decades several cellular pathways playing a crucial role in muscle tissue regeneration have been described. These pathways can be influenced by external stimuli and they not only orchestrate the regenerative process after physiologic wear and muscle trauma, but they also play an important part in aging and maintaining the stem cell niche, which is required to maintain long-term muscle function. Summary In this review article we will highlight possible new avenues using external physical and biochemical stimulation in order to optimize muscle bioengineering. PMID:25453267

  6. Nitric Oxide Stimulates Matrix Synthesis and Deposition by Adult Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells Within Three-Dimensional Cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Simmers, Phillip; Gishto, Arsela; Vyavahare, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Vascular diseases are characterized by the over-proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vessel wall, leading to compromise in cell–cell and cell–matrix signaling pathways. Tissue engineering approaches to regulate SMC over-proliferation and enhance healthy ECM synthesis showed promise, but resulted in low crosslinking efficiency. Here, we report the benefits of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) cues, delivered from S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), to cell proliferation and matrix deposition by adult human aortic SMCs (HA-SMCs) within three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic cocultures. A coculture platform with two adjacent, permeable 3D culture chambers was developed to enable paracrine signaling between vascular cells. HA-SMCs were cultured in these chambers within collagen hydrogels, either alone or in the presence of human aortic endothelial cells (HA-ECs) cocultures, and exogenously supplemented with varying GSNO dosages (0–100 nM) for 21 days. Results showed that EC cocultures stimulated SMC proliferation within GSNO-free cultures. With increasing GSNO concentration, HA-SMC proliferation decreased in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while HA-EC proliferation increased. GSNO (100 nM) significantly enhanced the protein amounts synthesized by HA-SMCs, in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while lower dosages (1–10 nM) offered marginal benefits. Multi-fold increases in the synthesis and deposition of elastin, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronic acid, and lysyl oxidase crosslinking enzyme (LOX) were noted at higher GSNO dosages, and coculturing with ECs significantly furthered these trends. Similar increases in TIMP-1 and MMP-9 levels were noted within cocultures with increasing GSNO dosages. Such increases in matrix synthesis correlated with NO-stimulated increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression within EC

  7. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulate Platelets and Facilitate Thrombus Formation through Platelet CLEC-2: Implications in Atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Osamu; Hokamura, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiaki; Osada, Makoto; Tsukiji, Nagaharu; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Umemura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The platelet receptor CLEC-2 is involved in thrombosis/hemostasis, but its ligand, podoplanin, is expressed only in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated CLEC-2 ligands in vessel walls. Recombinant CLEC-2 bound to early atherosclerotic lesions and normal arterial walls, co-localizing with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry showed that recombinant CLEC-2, but not an anti-podoplanin antibody, bound to VSMCs, suggesting that CLEC-2 ligands other than podoplanin are present in VSMCs. VSMCs stimulated platelet granule release and supported thrombus formation under flow, dependent on CLEC-2. The time to occlusion in a FeCl3-induced animal thrombosis model was significantly prolonged in the absence of CLEC-2. Because the internal elastic lamina was lacerated in our FeCl3-induced model, we assume that the interaction between CLEC-2 and its ligands in VSMCs induces thrombus formation. Protein arrays and Biacore analysis were used to identify S100A13 as a CLEC-2 ligand in VSMCs. However, S100A13 is not responsible for the above-described VSMC-induced platelet activation, because S100A13 is not expressed on the surface of normal VSMCs. S100A13 was released upon oxidative stress and expressed in the luminal area of atherosclerotic lesions. Suspended S100A13 did not activate platelets, but immobilized S100A13 significantly increased thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces. Taken together, we proposed that VSMCs stimulate platelets through CLEC-2, possibly leading to thrombus formation after plaque erosion and stent implantation, where VSMCs are exposed to blood flow. Furthermore, we identified S100A13 as one of the ligands on VSMCs. PMID:26418160

  8. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulate Platelets and Facilitate Thrombus Formation through Platelet CLEC-2: Implications in Atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Osamu; Hokamura, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiaki; Osada, Makoto; Tsukiji, Nagaharu; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Umemura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The platelet receptor CLEC-2 is involved in thrombosis/hemostasis, but its ligand, podoplanin, is expressed only in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated CLEC-2 ligands in vessel walls. Recombinant CLEC-2 bound to early atherosclerotic lesions and normal arterial walls, co-localizing with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry showed that recombinant CLEC-2, but not an anti-podoplanin antibody, bound to VSMCs, suggesting that CLEC-2 ligands other than podoplanin are present in VSMCs. VSMCs stimulated platelet granule release and supported thrombus formation under flow, dependent on CLEC-2. The time to occlusion in a FeCl3-induced animal thrombosis model was significantly prolonged in the absence of CLEC-2. Because the internal elastic lamina was lacerated in our FeCl3-induced model, we assume that the interaction between CLEC-2 and its ligands in VSMCs induces thrombus formation. Protein arrays and Biacore analysis were used to identify S100A13 as a CLEC-2 ligand in VSMCs. However, S100A13 is not responsible for the above-described VSMC-induced platelet activation, because S100A13 is not expressed on the surface of normal VSMCs. S100A13 was released upon oxidative stress and expressed in the luminal area of atherosclerotic lesions. Suspended S100A13 did not activate platelets, but immobilized S100A13 significantly increased thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces. Taken together, we proposed that VSMCs stimulate platelets through CLEC-2, possibly leading to thrombus formation after plaque erosion and stent implantation, where VSMCs are exposed to blood flow. Furthermore, we identified S100A13 as one of the ligands on VSMCs. PMID:26418160

  9. Response Gene to Complement 32 Promotes Vascular Lesion Formation through Stimulation of Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Ning; Shi, Ning; Xie, Wei-bing; Guo, Xia; Chen, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study are to determine the role of response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) in vascular lesion formation after experimental angioplasty and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results Using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model, we documented for the first time that neointima formation was closely associated with a significantly increased expression of RGC-32 protein. shRNA Knockdown of RGC-32 via adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene delivery dramatically inhibited the lesion formation by 62% as compared to control groups 14 days after injury. Conversely, RGC-32 overexpression significantly promoted the neointima formation by 33%. Gain and loss of function studies in primary culture of rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) indicated that RGC-32 is essential for both the proliferation and migration of RASMCs. RGC-32 induced RASMC proliferation by enhancing p34CDC2 activity. RGC-32 stimulated the migration of RASMC via inducing focal adhesion contact and stress fiber formation. These effects were caused by the enhanced ROKα activity due to RGC-32-induced downregulation of Rad GTPase. Conclusions RGC-32 plays an important role in vascular lesion formation following vascular injury. Increased RGC-32 expression in vascular injury appears to be a novel mechanism underlying the migration and proliferation of vascular SMCs. Therefore, targeting RGC-32 is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of vascular remodeling in proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:21636805

  10. Potent PPARγ Ligands from Swietenia macrophylla Are Capable of Stimulating Glucose Uptake in Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wai Kwan; Goh, Bey Hing; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku

    2015-01-01

    Numerous documented ethnopharmacological properties have been associated with Swietenia macrophylla (Meliaceae), with its seed extract reported to display anti-hypoglycemic activities in diabetic rats. In the present study, three compounds isolated from the seeds of S. macrophylla were tested on a modified ELISA binding assay and showed to possess PPARγ ligand activity. They were corresponded to PPARγ-mediated cellular response, stimulated adipocyte differentiation but produced lower amount of fat droplets compared to a conventional anti-diabetic agent, rosiglitazone. The up-regulation of adipocytes was followed by increased adipocyte-related gene expressions such as adiponectin, adipsin, and PPARγ. The S. macrophylla compounds also promoted cellular glucose uptake via the translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporter. PMID:26703529

  11. Differentiation-specific alterations to glutathione synthesis in and hormonally stimulated release from human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cotgreave, Ian A; Goldschmidt, Lina; Tonkonogi, Michail; Svensson, Michael

    2002-03-01

    Muscle atrophy and cachexia are associated with many human diseases. These catabolic states are often associated with the loss of glutathione (GSH), which is thought to contribute to the induction of oxidative stress within the muscle. Glutathione synthesis and secretary characteristics were studied in human skeletal muscle myoblasts and myotube-like cells derived from the myoblasts by growth factor restriction. Differentiation was associated with a shift in the sulfur amino acid precursor specificity for synthesis of GSH from cystine to cysteine, as well as loss in ability to use extracellular glutathione and activation of methionine use. The thiol drug N-acetylcysteine was also shown to be an effective precursor irrespective of the state of differentiation. Additionally, myoblasts and myotube cultures were shown to secrete GSH continually, but only the differentiated cells responded to stress hormones such as glucagon, vasopressin, and phenylephrine, by increased secretion of the tripeptide. The data suggest that the skeletal muscle cells may provide an important hormonally regulated extra-hepatic source of systemic GSH and also shed light on the mechanisms of accelerated turnover of GSH operating during strenuous muscle activity and trauma. The data may also provide biochemical rationales for the nutritional and/or pharmacological manipulation of GSH with sulfur amino acid precursors during the treatment of muscle-specific oxidative stress and atrophy. PMID:11821257

  12. Ribozyme-mediated gene knock down strategy to dissect the consequences of PDGF stimulation in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMCs), due to their plasticity and ability to shift from a physiological contractile-quiescent phenotype to a pathological proliferating-activated status, play a central role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. PDGF-BB, among a series of cytokines and growth factors, has been identified as the critical factor in this phenotypic switch. In order to obtain new insights on the molecular effects triggered by PDGF-BB, a hammerhead ribozyme targeting the membrane receptor PDGFR-β was applied to inhibit PDGF pathway in porcine VSMCs. Findings Ribozymes, loaded on a cationic polymer-based vehicle, were delivered into cultured VSMCs. A significant impairment of the activation mechanisms triggered by PDGF-BB was demonstrated since cell migration decreased after treatments. In order to functionally validate the effects of PDGFR-β partial knock down we focused on the phosphorylation status of two proteins, protein disulfide isomerase-A3 (PDI-A3) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP-60), previously identified as indicative of VSMC phenotypic switch after PDGF-BB stimulation. Interestingly, while PDI-A3 phosphorylation was counteracted by the ribozyme administration indicating that PDI-A3 is a factor downstream the receptor signalling cascade, the HSP-60 phosphorylation status was greatly increased by the ribozyme administration. Conclusion These contradictory observations suggested that PDGF-BB might trigger different parallel pathways that could be modulated by alternative isoforms of the receptors for the growth factor. In conclusion the knock down strategy here described enables to discriminate between two tightly intermingled pathways. Moreover it opens new attractive perspectives in functional investigations where combined gene knock down and proteomic technologies would allow the identification of key factors and pathways involved in VSMC-linked pathological disorders. PMID:22676333

  13. Combined intermittent hypobaric hypoxia and muscle electro-stimulation: a method to increase circulating progenitor cell concentration?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our goal was to test whether short-term intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH) at a level well tolerated by healthy humans could, in combination with muscle electro-stimulation (ME), mobilize circulating progenitor cells (CPC) and increase their concentration in peripheral circulation. Methods Nine healthy male subjects were subjected, as the active group (HME), to a protocol involving IHH plus ME. IHH exposure consisted of four, three-hour sessions at a barometric pressure of 540 hPa (equivalent to an altitude of 5000 m). These sessions took place on four consecutive days. ME was applied in two separate 20-minute periods during each IHH session. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein on three consecutive days immediately before the experiment, and then 24 h, 48 h, 4 days, 7 days and 14 days after the last day of hypoxic exposure. Four months later a control study was carried out involving seven of the original subjects (CG), who underwent the same protocol of blood samples but without receiving any special stimulus. Results In comparison with the CG the HME group showed only a non-significant increase in the number of CPC CD34+ cells on the fourth day after the combined IHH and ME treatment. Conclusion CPC levels oscillated across the study period and provide no firm evidence to support an increased CPC count after IHH plus ME, although it is not possible to know if this slight increase observed is physiologically relevant. Further studies are required to understand CPC dynamics and the physiology and physiopathology of the hypoxic stimulus. PMID:24947505

  14. Mimicking muscle activity with electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lise A.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation is a rehabilitation technology that can restore some degree of motor function in individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury or stroke. One way to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of muscle stimulation needed to elicit complex upper limb movements is to use electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from able-bodied subjects as a template for electrical stimulation. However, this requires a transfer function to convert the recorded (or predicted) EMG signals into an appropriate pattern of electrical stimulation. Here we develop a generalized transfer function that maps EMG activity into a stimulation pattern that modulates muscle output by varying both the pulse frequency and the pulse amplitude. We show that the stimulation patterns produced by this transfer function mimic the active state measured by EMG insofar as they reproduce with good fidelity the complex patterns of joint torque and joint displacement.

  15. 21 CFR 890.5860 - Ultrasound and muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. 890.5860 Section... Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. (a) Ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use in applying therapeutic deep heat for selected medical conditions—(1) Identification. An ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use...

  16. 21 CFR 890.5860 - Ultrasound and muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. 890.5860 Section... Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. (a) Ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use in applying therapeutic deep heat for selected medical conditions—(1) Identification. An ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use...

  17. 21 CFR 890.5860 - Ultrasound and muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. 890.5860 Section... Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. (a) Ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use in applying therapeutic deep heat for selected medical conditions—(1) Identification. An ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use...

  18. 21 CFR 890.5860 - Ultrasound and muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. 890.5860 Section... Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. (a) Ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use in applying therapeutic deep heat for selected medical conditions—(1) Identification. An ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5860 - Ultrasound and muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. 890.5860 Section... Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. (a) Ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use in applying therapeutic deep heat for selected medical conditions—(1) Identification. An ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use...

  20. Beneficial Effect of Mechanical Stimulation on the Regenerative Potential of Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Is Lost by Inhibiting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, Sarah A.; Chen, William C.W.; Tang, Ying; Proto, Jonathan D.; Mlakar, Logan; Wang, Bing; Huard, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Objective We previously reported that mechanical stimulation increased the effectiveness of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) for tissue repair. The objective of this study was to determine the importance of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on mechanically stimulated MDSCs in a murine model of muscle regeneration. Approach and Results MDSCs were transduced with retroviral vectors encoding the LacZ reporter gene (lacZ-MDSCs), the soluble VEGF receptor Flt1 (sFlt1-MDSCs), or a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting messenger RNA of VEGF (shRNA_VEGF MDSCs). Cells were subjected to 24 hours of mechanical cyclic strain and immediately transplanted into the gastrocnemius muscles of mdx/scid mice. Two weeks after transplantation, angiogenesis, fibrosis, and regeneration were analyzed. There was an increase in angiogenesis in the muscles transplanted with mechanically stimulated lacZMDSCs compared with nonstimulated lacZ-MDSCs, sFlt1-MDSCs, and shRNA _VEGF MDSCs. Dystrophin-positive myofiber regeneration was significantly lower in the shRNA_VEGF-MDSC group compared with the lacZ-MDSC and sFlt1-MDSC groups. In vitro proliferation of MDSCs was not decreased by inhibition of VEGF; however, differentiation into myotubes and adhesion to collagen were significantly lower in the shRNA_VEGF-MDSC group compared with the lacZ-MDSC and sFlt1-MDSC groups. Conclusions The beneficial effects of mechanical stimulation on MDSC-mediated muscle repair are lost by inhibiting VEGF. PMID:23723372

  1. Effects of moderate electrical stimulation on reactive species production by primary rat skeletal muscle cells: cross talk between superoxide and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Rafael Herling; Silveira, Leonardo Dos Reis; Hirabara, Sandro Massao; Curi, Rui; Sweeney, Gary; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina

    2012-06-01

    The effects of a moderate electrical stimulation on superoxide and nitric oxide production by primary cultured skeletal muscle cells were evaluated. The involvement of the main sites of these reactive species production and the relationship between superoxide and nitric oxide production were also examined. Production of superoxide was evaluated by cytochrome c reduction and dihydroethidium oxidation assays. Electrical stimulation increased superoxide production after 1 h incubation. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor caused a partial decrease of superoxide generation and a significant amount of mitochondria-derived superoxide was also observed. Nitric oxide production was assessed by nitrite measurement and by using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2-DA) assay. Using both methods an increased production of nitric oxide was obtained after electrical stimulation, which was also able to induce an increase of iNOS content and NF-κB activation. The participation of superoxide in nitric oxide production was investigated by incubating cells with DAF-2-DA in the presence or absence of electrical stimulation, a superoxide generator system (xanthine-xanthine oxidase), a mixture of NOS inhibitors and SOD-PEG. Our data show that the induction of muscle contraction by a moderate electrical stimulation protocol led to an increased nitric oxide production that can be controlled by superoxide generation. The cross talk between these reactive species likely plays a role in exercise-induced maintenance and adaptation by regulating muscular glucose metabolism, force of contraction, fatigue, and antioxidant systems activities. PMID:21898396

  2. 21 CFR 890.1850 - Diagnostic muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic muscle stimulator. 890.1850 Section 890... muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic muscle stimulator is a device used mainly with an electromyograph machine to initiate muscle activity. It is intended for medical purposes, such as to...

  3. 21 CFR 890.1850 - Diagnostic muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diagnostic muscle stimulator. 890.1850 Section 890... muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic muscle stimulator is a device used mainly with an electromyograph machine to initiate muscle activity. It is intended for medical purposes, such as to...

  4. 21 CFR 890.1850 - Diagnostic muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic muscle stimulator. 890.1850 Section 890... muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic muscle stimulator is a device used mainly with an electromyograph machine to initiate muscle activity. It is intended for medical purposes, such as to...

  5. 21 CFR 890.1850 - Diagnostic muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diagnostic muscle stimulator. 890.1850 Section 890... muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic muscle stimulator is a device used mainly with an electromyograph machine to initiate muscle activity. It is intended for medical purposes, such as to...

  6. 21 CFR 890.1850 - Diagnostic muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diagnostic muscle stimulator. 890.1850 Section 890... muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic muscle stimulator is a device used mainly with an electromyograph machine to initiate muscle activity. It is intended for medical purposes, such as to...

  7. NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells by induction of {eta}{omicron}-1

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyoung Chul; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Kwang Youn; Chang, Ki Churl Kang, Young Jin

    2008-11-28

    We investigated whether NS-398, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, induces HO-1 in IL-1{beta}-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). NS-398 reduced the production of PGE{sub 2} without modulation of expression of COX-2 in IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. NS-398 increased HO-1 mRNA and protein in a dose-dependent manner, but inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. Furthermore, SnPPIX, a HO-1 inhibitor, reversed the effects of NS-398 on PGE{sub 2} production, suggesting that COX-2 activity can be affected by HO-1. Hemin, a HO-1 inducer, also reduced the production of PGE{sub 2} and proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. CORM-2, a CO-releasing molecule, but not bilirubin inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC. NS-398 inhibited proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC in a HbO{sub 2}-sensitive manner. In conclusion, NS-398 inhibits proliferation of IL-1{beta}-stimulated VSMC by HO-1-derived CO. Thus, NS-398 may facilitate the healing process of vessels in vascular inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis.

  8. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A.; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  9. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  10. Increased expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in stimulated muscle.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Clare; Pette, Dirk; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2003-01-10

    Chronic low-frequency stimulation has been used as a model for investigating responses of skeletal muscle fibres to enhanced neuromuscular activity under conditions of maximum activation. Fast-to-slow isoform shifting of markers of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the contractile apparatus demonstrated successful fibre transitions prior to studying the effect of chronic electro-stimulation on the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Comparative immunoblotting revealed that the alpha- and delta-subunits of the receptor were increased in 10-78 day stimulated specimens, while an associated component of the surface utrophin-glycoprotein complex, beta-dystroglycan, was not drastically changed in stimulated fast skeletal muscle. Previous studies have shown that electro-stimulation induces degeneration of fast glycolytic fibres, trans-differentiation leading to fast-to-slow fibre transitions and activation of muscle precursor cells. In analogy, our results indicate a molecular modification of the central functional unit of the post-synaptic muscle surface within existing neuromuscular junctions and/or during remodelling of nerve-muscle contacts. PMID:12504123

  11. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  12. A diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor, R59022, stimulates glucose transport through a MKK3/6-p38 signaling pathway in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Nagamine, Miho; Tanno, Satoshi; Motomura, Wataru; Kohgo, Yutaka; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2007-08-17

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is one of lipid-regulating enzymes, catalyzes phosphorylation of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid. Because skeletal muscle, a major insulin-target organ for glucose disposal, expresses DGK, we investigated in the present study a role of DGK on glucose transport in skeletal muscle cells. PCR study showed that C2C12 myotubes expressed DGKalpha, delta, epsilon, zeta, or theta isoform mRNA. R59022, a specific inhibitor of DGK, significantly increased glucose transport, p38 and MKK3/6 activation in C2C12 myotubes. The R59022-induced glucose transport was blocked by SB203580, a specific p38 inhibitor. In contrast, R59022 failed to stimulate both possible known mechanisms to enhance glucose transport, an IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway, muscle contraction signaling or GLUT1 and 4 expression. All these results suggest that DGK may play a role in glucose transport in the skeletal muscle cells through modulating a MKK3/6-p38 signaling pathway. PMID:17588539

  13. Cafestol, a Bioactive Substance in Coffee, Stimulates Insulin Secretion and Increases Glucose Uptake in Muscle Cells: Studies in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Mellbye, Fredrik Brustad; Jeppesen, Per Bendix; Hermansen, Kjeld; Gregersen, Søren

    2015-10-23

    Diet and exercise intervention can delay or prevent development of type-2-diabetes (T2D), and high habitual coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of developing T2D. This study aimed to test whether selected bioactive substances in coffee acutely and/or chronically increase insulin secretion from β-cells and improve insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle cells. Insulin secretion from INS-1E rat insulinoma cells was measured after acute (1-h) and long-term (72-h) incubation with bioactive substances from coffee. Additionally, we measured uptake of radioactive glucose in human skeletal muscle cells (SkMC) after incubation with cafestol. Cafestol at 10(-8) and 10(-6) M acutely increased insulin secretion by 12% (p < 0.05) and 16% (p < 0.001), respectively. Long-term exposure to 10(-10) and 10(-8) M cafestol increased insulin secretion by 34% (p < 0.001) and 68% (p < 0.001), respectively. Caffeic acid also increased insulin secretion acutely and chronically. Chlorogenic acid, trigonelline, oxokahweol, and secoisolariciresinol did not significantly alter insulin secretion acutely. Glucose uptake in SkMC was significantly enhanced by 8% (p < 0.001) in the presence of 10(-8) M cafestol. This newly demonstrated dual action of cafestol suggests that cafestol may contribute to the preventive effects on T2D in coffee drinkers and be of therapeutic interest. PMID:26465380

  14. mTOR Complexes Repress Hypertrophic Agonist-Stimulated Expression of Connective Tissue Growth Factor in Adult Cardiac Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Sundararaj, Kamala; Pleasant, Dorea L; Moschella, Phillip C; Panneerselvam, Kavin; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2016-02-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes fibrosis in various organs. In the heart, both cardiomyocytes (CM) and cardiac fibroblasts have been reported as a source of CTGF expression, aiding cardiac fibrosis. Although the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) forms 2 distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, and plays a central role in integrating biochemical signals for protein synthesis and cellular homeostasis, we explored its role in CTGF expression in adult feline CM. CM were stimulated with 10 μM phenylephrine (PE), 200 nM angiotensin (Ang), or 100 nM insulin for 24 hours. PE and Ang, but not insulin, caused an increase in CTGF mRNA expression with the highest expression observed with PE. Inhibition of mTOR with torin1 but not rapamycin significantly enhanced PE-stimulated CTGF expression. Furthermore, silencing of raptor and rictor using shRNA adenoviral vectors to suppress mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively, or blocking phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling with LY294002 (LY) or Akt signaling by dominant-negative Akt expression caused a substantial increase in PE-stimulated CTGF expression as measured by both mRNA and secreted protein levels. However, studies with dominant-negative delta isoform of protein kinase C demonstrate that delta isoform of protein kinase C is required for both agonist-induced CTGF expression and mTORC2/Akt-mediated CTGF suppression. Finally, PE-stimulated CTGF expression was accompanied with a corresponding increase in Smad3 phosphorylation and pretreatment of cells with SIS3, a Smad3 specific inhibitor, partially blocked the PE-stimulated CTGF expression. Therefore, a PI3K/mTOR/Akt axis plays a suppressive role on agonist-stimulated CTGF expression where the loss of this mechanism could be a contributing factor for the onset of cardiac fibrosis in the hypertrophying myocardium. PMID:26371948

  15. 21 CFR 890.5850 - Powered muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered muscle stimulator. 890.5850 Section 890...) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5850 Powered muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A powered muscle stimulator is an electrically powered device intended...

  16. 21 CFR 890.5850 - Powered muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered muscle stimulator. 890.5850 Section 890...) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5850 Powered muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A powered muscle stimulator is an electrically powered device intended...

  17. 21 CFR 890.5850 - Powered muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered muscle stimulator. 890.5850 Section 890...) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5850 Powered muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A powered muscle stimulator is an electrically powered device intended...

  18. 21 CFR 890.5850 - Powered muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered muscle stimulator. 890.5850 Section 890...) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5850 Powered muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A powered muscle stimulator is an electrically powered device intended...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5850 - Powered muscle stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered muscle stimulator. 890.5850 Section 890...) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5850 Powered muscle stimulator. (a) Identification. A powered muscle stimulator is an electrically powered device intended...

  20. Acute molecular response of mouse hindlimb muscles to chronic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, R. C.; Bombach, K. L.; Ankrapp, D. P.; Krill-Burger, J. M.; Sciulli, C. M.; Petrosko, P.; Wiseman, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulation of the mouse hindlimb via the sciatic nerve was performed for a 4-h period to investigate acute muscle gene activation in a model of muscle phenotype conversion. Initial force production (1.6 ± 0.1 g/g body wt) declined 45% within 10 min and was maintained for the remainder of the experiment. Force returned to initial levels upon study completion. An immediate-early growth response was present in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle (FOS, JUN, activating transcription factor 3, and musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene) with a similar but attenuated pattern in the soleus muscle. Transcript profiles showed decreased fast fiber-specific mRNA (myosin heavy chains 2A and 2B, fast troponins T3 and I, α-tropomyosin, muscle creatine kinase, and parvalbumin) and increased slow transcripts (myosin heavy chain-1β/slow, troponin C slow, and tropomyosin 3y) in the EDL versus soleus muscles. Histological analysis of the EDL revealed glycogen depletion without inflammatory cell infiltration in stimulated versus control muscles, whereas ultrastructural analysis showed no evidence of myofiber damage after stimulation. Multiple fiber type-specific transcription factors (tea domain family member 1, nuclear factor of activated T cells 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and -β, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α) increased in the EDL along with transcription factors characteristic of embryogenesis (Kruppel-like factor 4; SRY box containing 17; transcription factor 15; PBX/knotted 1 homeobox 1; and embryonic lethal, abnormal vision). No established in vivo satellite cell markers or genes activated in our parallel experiments of satellite cell proliferation in vitro (cyclins A2, B2, C, and E1 and MyoD) were differentially increased in the stimulated muscles. These results indicated that the molecular onset of fast to slow phenotype conversion occurred in the EDL within 4 h of stimulation

  1. Carnosic acid stimulates glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells via a PME-1/PP2A/PKB signalling axis.

    PubMed

    Lipina, Christopher; Hundal, Harinder S

    2014-11-01

    Carnosic acid (CA) is a major constituent of the labiate herbal plant Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), which has been shown to exhibit a number of beneficial health properties. In particular, recently there has been growing interest into the anti-obesity effects conveyed by CA, including its ability to counteract obesity-associated hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms underlying its anti-diabetic responses are not fully understood. In this study, we hypothesized that CA may act to improve glycaemic status through enhancing peripheral glucose clearance. Herein, we demonstrate that CA acts to mimic the metabolic actions of insulin by directly stimulating glucose uptake in rat skeletal L6 myotubes, concomitant with increased translocation of the GLUT4 glucose transporter to the plasma membrane. Mechanistically, CA-induced glucose transport was found to be dependent on protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) but not AMPK, despite both kinases being activated by CA. Crucially, in accordance with its ability to activate PKB and stimulate glucose uptake, we show that CA conveys these effects through a pathway involving PME-1 (protein phosphatase methylesterase-1), a key negative regulator of the serine/threonine phosphatase PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A). Herein, we demonstrate that CA promotes PME-1 mediated demethylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit leading to its suppressed activity, and in doing so, alleviates the repressive action of PP2A towards PKB. Collectively, our findings provide new insight into how CA may improve glucose homeostasis through enhancing peripheral glucose clearance in tissues such as skeletal muscle through a PME-1/PP2A/PKB signalling axis, thereby mitigating pathological effects associated with the hyperglycaemic state. PMID:25038454

  2. Arginase inhibition reduces interleukin-1β-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by increasing nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jeongyeon; Ryoo, Sungwoo

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Arginase inhibition suppressed proliferation of IL-1β-stimulated VSMCs in dose-dependent manner. •NO production from IL-1β-induced iNOS expression was augmented by arginase inhibition, reducing VSMC proliferation. •Incubation with cGMP analogues abolished IL-1β-dependent proliferation of VSMCs. -- Abstract: We investigated whether arginase inhibition suppressed interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the possible mechanisms involved. IL-1β stimulation increased VSMC proliferation, while the arginase inhibitor BEC and transfection of the antisense (AS) oligonucleotide against arginase I decreased VSMC proliferation and was associated with increased protein content of the cell cycle regulator p21Waf1/Cip1. IL-1β incubation induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect arginase I and II expression. Consistent with this data, IL-1β stimulation resulted in increase in NO production that was significantly augmented by arginase inhibition. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W abolished IL-1β-mediated NO production and further accentuated IL-1β-stimulated cell proliferation. Incubation with NO donors GSNO and DETA/NO in the presence of IL-1β abolished VSMCs proliferation and increased p21Waf1/Cip1 protein content. Furthermore, incubation with the cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP prevented IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation. In conclusion, arginase inhibition augmented iNOS-dependent NO production that resulted in suppression of IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner.

  3. Stimulation with monochromatic green light during incubation alters satellite cell mitotic activity and gene expression in relation to embryonic and posthatch muscle growth of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H J; Wang, J; Wu, S G; Qiao, X; Yue, H Y; Yao, J H; Qi, G H

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that monochromatic green light stimuli during embryogenesis accelerated posthatch body weight (BW) and pectoral muscle growth of broilers. In this experiment, we further investigated the morphological and molecular basis of this phenomenon. Fertile broiler eggs (Arbor Acres, n=880) were pre-weighed and randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 incubation treatment groups: (1) dark condition (control group), and (2) monochromatic green light group (560 nm). The monochromatic lighting systems sourced from light-emitting diode lamps and were equalized at the intensity of 15 lx at eggshell level. The dark condition was set as a commercial control from day 1 until hatching. After hatch, 120 male 1-day-old chicks from each group were housed under incandescent white light with an intensity of 30 lx at bird-head level. No effects of light stimuli during embryogenesis on hatching time, hatchability, hatching weight and bird mortality during the feeding trial period were observed in the present study. Compared with the dark condition, the BW, pectoral muscle weight and myofiber cross-sectional areas were significantly greater on 7-day-old chicks incubated under green light. Green light also increased the satellite cell mitotic activity of pectoral muscle on 1- and 3-day-old birds. In addition, green light upregulated MyoD, myogenin and myostatin mRNA expression in late embryos and/ or newly hatched chicks. These data suggest that stimulation with monochromatic green light during incubation promote muscle growth by enhancing proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in late embryonic and newly hatched stages. Higher expression of myostatin may ultimately help prevent excessive proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in birds incubated under green light. PMID:24168791

  4. Mapping of electrical muscle stimulation using MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Harris, Robert T.; Woodard, Daniel; Dudley, Gary A.

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of muscle contractile activity elicited by electromyostimulation (EMS) was mapped and compared to the contractile-activity pattern produced by voluntary effort. This was done by examining the patterns and the extent of contrast shift, as indicated by T2 values, im magnetic resonance (MR) images after isometric activity of the left m. quadriceps of human subjects was elicited by EMS (1-sec train of 500-microsec sine wave pulses at 50 Hz) or voluntary effort. The results suggest that, whereas EMS stimulates the same fibers repeatedly, thereby increasing the metabolic demand and T2 values, the voluntary efforts are performed by more diffuse asynchronous activation of skeletal muscle even at forces up to 75 percent of maximal to maintain performance.

  5. Angiotensin II stimulates /sup 3/H-leucine and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.D.; Smith, J.B.

    1987-05-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG) stimulates the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate with the consequent formation of inositol trisphosphate and diacylglycerol in cultured smooth muscle cells derived from rat aorta. They have observed the effects of ANG on protein and DNA synthesis by measuring the incorporation of /sup 3/H-leucine and /sup 3/H-thymidine, respectively, into acid-precipitable material. Aortic muscle cells were grown to confluence in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and incubated for 24 hours in serum-free medium to arrest growth. Then fresh serum-free medium was added with the following additions: ANG (100 nM), insulin (2 ..mu..g/ml), or 10% FBS. After an additional 24 hours the cells were pulse labeled for 30 min with either /sup 3/H-leucine or /sup 3/H-thymidine. FBS increased /sup 3/H-leucine incorporation by -2.5 fold and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 7-10 fold. ANG or insulin increased /sup 3/H-leucine incorporation by 40-50%, and the combination of ANG and insulin was nearly as effective as 10% FBS. ANG stimulated /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by -2.5 fold. Insulin, which was less effective than ANG, increased /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by about 50%. ANG and insulin added together synergistically increased /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 5-6 fold. An ANG antagonist, Sarl,leu8-ANG, at 2 ..mu..M markedly decreased /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation in the presence of ANG and insulin.

  6. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  7. Stimulant actions of volatile anaesthetics on smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rang, H. P.

    1964-01-01

    A number of volatile anaesthetics, and some compounds synthesized in the search for new anaesthetics, have been tested on guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle in vitro. All the compounds produced a contractile response. This effect did not correlate well with convulsant activity in vivo among the compounds tested. Two kinds of stimulant effect were distinguishable: (1) Rapid, transient contractions, abolished by cocaine or lachesine; most of the anaesthetics in clinical use had this action. (2) Slow, sustained contractions, unaffected by cocaine or lachesine; this effect predominated among the fluorinated ring compounds. Hexamethonium and mepyramine did not affect the contractile response to any of the compounds. The first type of effect presumably represents excitation of postganglionic nerve cells, while the second type is a direct action on the muscle cell. The action of perfluorobenzene, which is of the latter kind, was studied further. Adrenaline and lack of calcium diminished the contraction in parallel with the contraction to histamine, which suggests that the cell membrane was the site of action; in contrast to the stimulant action of histamine or acetylcholine, the effect was highly temperature-sensitive, being almost abolished by cooling to 32° C, and enhanced at 40° C. The depressant action of anaesthetics on smooth muscle is affected very little by temperature changes. These findings are discussed in relation to other observations which suggest a stimulant action of volatile anaesthetics on excitable tissues. Protein denaturation is tentatively suggested as a mechanism of action. PMID:14190470

  8. Protein kinase C requirement of Ca2+ channel stimulation by intracellular ATP in guinea-pig basilar artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, D; Beech, D J

    1997-01-01

    1. Smooth muscle cells were isolated from guinea-pig basilar artery and conventional whole-cell recordings of Ca2+ channel activity were made at room temperature within 7 h of the isolation procedure. The purpose of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the stimulatory action of intracellular ATP on Ca2+ channels. 2. High (millimolar) concentrations of ATP were needed to produce stimulation of Ca2+ channels, and neither ADP nor AMP mimicked the action of ATP. 3.The ATP effect was not mimicked by stable ATP derivatives (AMP-PNP or AMP-PCP) and was abolished by incubation of cells in non-specific protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or H-7) or specific protein kinase C inhibitors (GF109203x, calphostin C or chelerythrine) but not by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tyrphostin B42 and genistein). 4. The data suggest that ATP-induced stimulation of L-type Ca2+ channels requires functional activity of a protein kinase C isozyme. PMID:9147319

  9. Stainless Steel Ions Stimulate Increased Thrombospondin-1-Dependent TGF-Beta Activation by Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Implications for In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Pallero, Manuel A.; Talbert Roden, Melissa; Chen, Yiu-Fai; Anderson, Peter G.; Lemons, Jack; Brott, Brigitta C.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite advances in stent design, in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a significant clinical problem. All implant metals exhibit corrosion, which results in release of metal ions. Stainless steel (SS), a metal alloy widely used in stents, releases ions to the vessel wall and induces reactive oxygen species, inflammation and fibroproliferative responses. The molecular mechanisms are unknown. TGF-β is known to be involved in the fibroproliferative responses of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in restenosis, and TGF-β antagonists attenuate ISR. We hypothesized that SS ions induce the latent TGF-β activator, thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), through altered oxidative signaling to stimulate increased TGF-β activation and VSMC phenotype change. Methods VSMCs were treated with SS metal ion cocktails, and morphology, TSP1, extracellular matrix production, desmin and TGF-β activity were assessed by immunoblotting. Results SS ions stimulate the synthetic phenotype, increased TGF-β activity, TSP1, increased extracellular matrix and downregulation of desmin in VSMCs. Furthermore, SS ions increase hydrogen peroxide and decrease cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling, a known repressor of TSP1 transcription. Catalase blocks SS ion attenuation of PKG signaling and increased TSP1 expression. Conclusions These data suggest that ions from stent alloy corrosion contribute to ISR through stimulation of TSP1-dependent TGF-β activation. PMID:20016205

  10. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  11. Heat shock protein 60 stimulates the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via Toll-like receptor 4 and ERK MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Chenxu; Wei, Xuge; Li, Pei; Cui, Ying; Qin, Yuanhua; Wei, Xiaoqing; Jin, Minli; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that heat shock protein (HSP) 60 is strongly associated with the pathology of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the precise mechanisms by which HSP60 promotes atherosclerosis remain unclear. In the present study, we found that HSP60 mRNA and protein expression levels in the thoracic aorta are enhanced not only in a mouse model of AS but also in high-fat diet (HFD) mice. HSP60 expression and secretion was activated by platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and interleukin (IL)-8 in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). HSP60 was found to induce VSMC migration, and exposure to HSP60 activated ERK MAPK signaling. U0126, an inhibitor of ERK, reduced VSMC migration. The HSP60-stimulated VSMCs were found to express TLR4 mRNA but not TLR2 mRNA. Knockdown of TLR4 by siRNA reduced HSP60-induced VSMC migration and HSP60-induced ERK activation. Finally, HSP60 induced IL-8 secretion in VSMCs. Together these results suggest that HSP60 is involved in the stimulation of VSMC migration, via TLR4 and ERK MAPK activation. Meanwhile, activation of HSP60 is one of the most powerful methods of sending a ‘danger signal’ to the immune system to generate IL-8, which assists in the management of an infection or disease. PMID:26477505

  12. Suppressive effect of formononetin on platelet-derived growth factor-BB-stimulated proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Suixin; Cai, Ying; Xie, Kangling; Zhang, Wenliang; Dong, Lei; Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Fan; Dun, Yaoshan; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) has been implicated in intimal hyperplasia, atherosclerosis and restenosis following percutaneous coronary intervention. Formononetin, a phytoestrogen extracted from the root of Astragalus membranaceus, has been widely used in Chinese tradition medicine due to its protective effects against certain symptoms of cancer, hypertension, inflammation, hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity and ovariectomy-induced bone loss. However, the effect of formononetin on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs, as well as the underlying molecular mechanism, remains largely unclear. In the present study, treatment with formononetin significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration of human VSMCs. Investigation into the underlying molecular mechanism revealed that the administration of formononetin suppressed PDGF-BB-stimulated switch of VSMCs to a proliferative phenotype. Furthermore, treatment with formononetin inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced upregulation of cell cycle-related proteins, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP2) and MMP9. In addition, the that administration of formononetin inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT induced by PDGF-BB in VSMCs. The present results suggest that formononetin has a suppressive effect on PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs proliferation and migration, which may occur partly via the inhibition of AKT signaling pathway. Therefore, formononetin may be useful for the treatment of intimal hyperplasia, atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:27588108

  13. Calcineurin/Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells–Coupled Vanilliod Transient Receptor Potential Channel 4 Ca2+ Sparklets Stimulate Airway Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Limin; Sullivan, Michelle N.; Chase, Marlee; Gonzales, Albert L.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) contributes to the remodeling and irreversible obstruction of airways during severe asthma, but the mechanisms underlying this disease process are poorly understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that Ca2+ influx through the vanilliod transient receptor potential channel (TRPV) 4 stimulates ASMC proliferation. We found that synthetic and endogenous TRPV4 agonists increase proliferation of primary ASMCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Ca2+ influx through individual TRPV4 channels produces Ca2+ microdomains in ASMCs, called “TRPV4 Ca2+ sparklets.” We also show that TRPV4 channels colocalize with the Ca2+/calmodulin–dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin in ASMCs. Activated calcineurin dephosphorylates nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factors cytosolic (c) to allow nuclear translocation and activation of synthetic transcriptional pathways. We show that ASMC proliferation in response to TRPV4 activity is associated with calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of the NFATc3 isoform tagged with green florescent protein. Our findings suggest that Ca2+ microdomains created by TRPV4 Ca2+ sparklets activate calcineurin to stimulate nuclear translocation of NFAT and ASMC proliferation. These findings further suggest that inhibition of TRPV4 could diminish asthma-induced airway remodeling. PMID:24392954

  14. Inhibitory effects of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate on serum-stimulated rat aortic smooth muscle cells via nuclear factor-{kappa}B down-modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dong-Wook; Lim, Hye Ryeon; Baek, Hyun Sook; Lee, Mi Hee; Lee, Seung Jin; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Park, Jong-Chul . E-mail: parkjc@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    The abnormal growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. Although (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) has antiproliferative effects on various cells, relatively a little is known about precise mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of EGCG on SMCs. In this study, the inhibitory effects of EGCG on attachment, proliferation, migration, and cell cycle of rat aortic SMCs (RASMCs) with serum stimulation were investigated. Also, the involvement of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) during these inhibitions by EGCG was examined. EGCG treatment resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition in attachment and proliferation of RASMCs induced by serum. While non-treated RASMCs migrated into denuded area in response to serum and showed essentially complete closure after 36 h, EGCG-treated cells covered only 31% of the area even after 48 h of incubation. Furthermore, EGCG treatment resulted in an appreciable cell cycle arrest at both G0/G1- and G2/M-phases. The immunoblot analysis revealed that the constitutive expression of NF-{kappa}B/p65 nuclear protein in RASMCs was lowered by EGCG in both the cytosol and the nucleus in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the EGCG-caused inhibitory effects on RASMCs may be mediated through NF-{kappa}B down-modulation.

  15. Anti-Proliferative Effects of Rutin on OLETF Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulated by Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sung Hoon; Yu, Jae Myung; Lee, Seong Jin; Kang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Jung; Kim, Doo Man

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. Rutin is a major representative of the flavonol subclass of flavonoids and has various pharmacological activities. Currently, data are lacking regarding its effects on VSMC proliferation induced by intermittent hyperglycemia. Here, we demonstrate the effects of rutin on VSMC proliferation and migration according to fluctuating glucose levels. Materials and Methods Primary cultures of male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat VSMCs were obtained from enzymatically dissociated rat thoracic aortas. VSMCs were incubated for 72 h with alternating normal (5.5 mmol/L) and high (25.0 mmol/L) glucose media every 12 h. Proliferation and migration of VSMCs, the proliferative molecular pathway [including p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), p38 MAPK, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and Akt], the migratory pathway (big MAPK 1, BMK1), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptotic pathway were analyzed. Results We found enhanced proliferation and migration of VSMCs when cells were incubated in intermittent high glucose conditions, compared to normal glucose. These effects were lowered upon rutin treatment. Intermittent treatment with high glucose for 72 h increased the expression of phospho-p44/42 MAPK (extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, ERK1/2), phospho-MEK1/2, phospho-PI3K, phospho-NF-κB, phospho-BMK1, and ROS, compared to treatment with normal glucose. These effects were suppressed by rutin. Phospho-p38 MAPK, phospho-Akt, JNK, and apoptotic pathways [B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-xL, Bcl-2, phospho-Bad, and caspase-3] were not affected by fluctuations in glucose levels. Conclusion Fluctuating glucose levels increased proliferation and migration of OLETF rat VSMCs via MAPK (ERK1/2), BMK1, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways. These effects

  16. Altered ROS production, NF-κB activation and interleukin-6 gene expression induced by electrical stimulation in dystrophic mdx skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; López, José R; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    -κB activation and IL-6 expression. Exposure to lipopolysaccharide induced a dramatic increase in both NF-κB activation and IL-6 expression in both wt and mdx myotubes, suggesting that the altered IL-6 gene expression after electrical stimulation in mdx muscle cells is due to dysregulation of Ca2+ release and ROS production, both of which impinge on NF-κB signaling. IL-6 is a key metabolic modulator that is released by the skeletal muscle to coordinate a multi-systemic response (liver, muscle, and adipocytes) during physical exercise; the alteration of this response in dystrophic muscles may contribute to an abnormal response to contraction and exercise. PMID:25857619

  17. ASIC1-mediated calcium entry stimulates NFATc3 nuclear translocation via PICK1 coupling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V; Plomaritas, Danielle R; Herbert, Lindsay M; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Browning, Carly; Jernigan, Nikki L

    2016-07-01

    The development of chronic hypoxia (CH)-induced pulmonary hypertension is associated with increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) Ca(2+) influx through acid-sensing ion channel-1 (ASIC1) and activation of the Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor known as nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c3 (NFATc3). Whether Ca(2+) influx through ASIC1 contributes to NFATc3 activation in the pulmonary vasculature is unknown. Furthermore, both ASIC1 and calcineurin have been shown to interact with the scaffolding protein known as protein interacting with C kinase-1 (PICK1). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that ASIC1 contributes to NFATc3 nuclear translocation in PASMC in a PICK1-dependent manner. Using both ASIC1 knockout (ASIC1(-/-)) mice and pharmacological inhibition of ASIC1, we demonstrate that ASIC1 contributes to CH-induced (1 wk at 380 mmHg) and endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced (10(-7) M) Ca(2+) responses and NFATc3 nuclear import in PASMC. The interaction between ASIC1/PICK1/calcineurin was shown using a Duolink in situ Proximity Ligation Assay. Inhibition of PICK1 by using FSC231 abolished ET-1-induced and ionomycin-induced NFATc3 nuclear import, but it did not alter ET-1-mediated Ca(2+) responses, suggesting that PICK1 acts downstream of Ca(2+) influx. The key findings of the present work are that 1) Ca(2+) influx through ASIC1 mediates CH- and ET-1-induced NFATc3 nuclear import and 2) the scaffolding protein PICK1 is necessary for NFATc3 nuclear import. Together, these data provide an essential link between CH-induced ASIC1-mediated Ca(2+) influx and activation of the NFATc3 transcription factor. Identification of this ASIC1/PICK1/NFATc3 signaling complex increases our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the vascular remodeling and increased vascular contractility that are associated with CH-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27190058

  18. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  19. Water uptake in stimulated cat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Watson, P D; Garner, R P; Ward, D S

    1993-04-01

    Isolated vasodilated cat hindlimb skeletal muscles were perfused at constant flow and stimulated at 4 Hz for 2-4 min in three studies. Water uptake rates were measured gravimetrically or calculated from venous protein concentration changes. Venous plasma sodium, potassium, chloride, and osmolality were also measured. Maximum water uptake rates averaged 1.8 +/- 0.2 (SE) ml.min-1 x 100 g-1, reaching twice that in some experiments. Water uptake continued after stimulation had ceased. Constant-flow perfusion maintained a constant capillary pressure that was corroborated by measurements of arterial and venous perfusate pressures. Water uptake rate was not influenced by hematocrit but was highly correlated with plasma flow rate. The evidence strongly suggests that small-molecule osmotic pressure was the primary pressure causing the transcapillary water flux. Venous plasma sodium and chloride concentrations increased almost as much as protein (108 and 87% of the protein increase, respectively), as would be expected when water fluxes are driven by small-molecule osmotic pressure. Peak potassium efflux averaged 36 +/- 3 mu eq.min-1 x 100 g-1, but potassium did not contribute significantly to the osmotic gradient. PMID:8476122

  20. Thermosensitivity of muscle: high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle tissue induces muscle pain in humans.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mense, S

    2002-04-15

    Small-calibre afferent units responding to thermal stimuli have previously been reported to exist in muscle. The question as to whether these receptors in humans mediate subjective thermal sensations from muscle remains unresolved. The aims of the present study were to determine in humans whether intramuscular injection of warm and cold isotonic saline elicits temperature sensations, muscle pain or any other sensations. In 15 subjects, no thermal sensations assessed on a temperature visual analogue scale (VAS) could be detected with intramuscular injections of isotonic saline (1.5 ml) into the anterior tibial muscle at temperatures ranging from 8 to 48 degrees C. The same subjects recorded strongly increasing scores on a temperature VAS when thermal stimuli in the same intensity range were applied to the skin overlying the muscle by a contact thermode. However, I.M. isotonic saline of 48 degrees C induced muscle pain with peak scores of 3.2 +/- 0.8 cm on a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10 cm. Using the the McGill pain questionnaire a subgroup, of subjects qualitatively described the pain using the 'thermal hot' and 'dullness' word groups. Temperature measurements within the muscle during the stimulating injections showed that the time course of the pain sensation elicited by saline at 48 degrees C paralleled that of the intramuscular temperature and far outlasted the injection time. The present data show that high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle is associated with muscle pain. High-threshold warm-sensitive receptors may mediate the pain following activation by temperatures of 48 degrees C or more. Taken together, the data indicate that thermosensation from a given volume of muscle is less potent than nociception. PMID:11956350

  1. MicroRNA-31 controls phenotypic modulation of human vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating its target gene cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jie; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Li, Yang; Xu, Kai; Tian, Xiao-Xiang; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Tao, Jie; Sun, Ming-Yu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-05-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been shown to play an important role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. However, the mechanism regulating CREG upstream signaling remains unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been found to play a critical role in cell differentiation via target-gene regulation. This study aimed to identify a miRNA that binds directly to CREG, and may thus be involved in CREG-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation. Computational analysis indicated that miR-31 bound to the CREG mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). miR-31 was upregulated in quiescent differentiated VSMCs and downregulated in proliferative cells stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor and serum starvation, demonstrating a negative relationship with the VSMC differentiation marker genes, smooth muscle α-actin, calponin and CREG. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, CREG and VSMC differentiation marker gene expression levels were shown to be suppressed by a miR-31 mimic, but increased by a miR-31 inhibitor at both protein and mRNA levels. Notably, miR-31 overexpression or inhibition affected luciferase expression driven by the CREG 3′-UTR containing the miR-31 binding site. Furthermore, miR-31-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation was inhibited in CREG-knockdown human VSMCs. We also determined miR-31 levels in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with or without in stent restenosis and in healthy controls. miR-31 levels were higher in the serum of CAD patients with restenosis compared to CAD patients without restenosis and in healthy controls. In summary, these data demonstrate that miR-31 not only directly binds to its target gene CREG and modulates the VSMC phenotype through this interaction, but also can be an important biomarker in diseases involving VSMC

  2. Altered ROS production, NF-κB activation and Interleukin-6 gene expression induced by electrical stimulation of in dystrophic mdx skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Altamirano, Francisco; Valladares, Denisse; López, José R.; Allen, Paul D.; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    . Exposure to LPS induced a dramatic increase in both NF-κB and IL-6 expression in both wt and mdx myotubes, suggesting that the altered IL-6 gene expression after ES in mdx muscle cells is due to dysregulation of Ca2+ release and ROS production, both of which impinge on NF-κB signaling. IL-6 is a key metabolic modulator that is released by skeletal muscle to coordinate a multi-systemic response (liver, muscle, and adipocytes) during physical exercise; the alteration of this response in dystrophic muscles may contribute to an abnormal response to contraction and exercise. PMID:25857619

  3. Lobaric Acid Inhibits VCAM-1 Expression in TNF-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Modulation of NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ii-Seul; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2016-01-01

    Lichens have been known to possess multiple biological activities, including anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Hence, VCAM-1 is a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of the inflammatory disease. However, the effect of lobaric acid on VCAM-1 has not yet been investigated and characterized. For this study, we examined the effect of lobaric acid on the inhibition of VCAM-1 in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated mouse vascular smooth muscle cells. Western blot and ELISA showed that the increased expression of VCAM-1 by TNF-α was significantly suppressed by the pre-treatment of lobaric acid (0.1-10 μg/ml) for 2 h. Lobaric acid abrogated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity through preventing the degradation of IκB and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Lobaric acid also inhibited the expression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNF-R1). Overall, our results suggest that lobaric acid inhibited VCAM-1 expression through the inhibition of p38, ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and downregulation of TNF-R1 expression. Therefore, it is implicated that lobaric acid may suppress inflammation by altering the physiology of the atherosclerotic lesion. PMID:26759698

  4. Lobaric Acid Inhibits VCAM-1 Expression in TNF-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Modulation of NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ii-Seul; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2016-01-01

    Lichens have been known to possess multiple biological activities, including anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Hence, VCAM-1 is a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of the inflammatory disease. However, the effect of lobaric acid on VCAM-1 has not yet been investigated and characterized. For this study, we examined the effect of lobaric acid on the inhibition of VCAM-1 in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated mouse vascular smooth muscle cells. Western blot and ELISA showed that the increased expression of VCAM-1 by TNF-α was significantly suppressed by the pre-treatment of lobaric acid (0.1–10 μg/ml) for 2 h. Lobaric acid abrogated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity through preventing the degradation of IκB and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Lobaric acid also inhibited the expression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNF-R1). Overall, our results suggest that lobaric acid inhibited VCAM-1 expression through the inhibition of p38, ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and downregulation of TNF-R1 expression. Therefore, it is implicated that lobaric acid may suppress inflammation by altering the physiology of the atherosclerotic lesion. PMID:26759698

  5. Acute Stimulation of Transplanted Neurons Improves Motoneuron Survival, Axon Growth, and Muscle Reinnervation

    PubMed Central

    Grumbles, Robert M.; Liu, Yang; Thomas, Christie M.; Wood, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Few options exist for treatment of pervasive motoneuron death after spinal cord injury or in neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Local transplantation of embryonic motoneurons into an axotomized peripheral nerve is a promising approach to arrest the atrophy of denervated muscles; however, muscle reinnervation is limited by poor motoneuron survival. The aim of the present study was to test whether acute electrical stimulation of transplanted embryonic neurons promotes motoneuron survival, axon growth, and muscle reinnervation. The sciatic nerve of adult Fischer rats was transected to mimic the widespread denervation seen after disease or injury. Acutely dissociated rat embryonic ventral spinal cord cells were transplanted into the distal tibial nerve stump as a neuron source for muscle reinnervation. Immediately post-transplantation, the cells were stimulated at 20 Hz for 1 h. Other groups were used to control for the cell transplantation and stimulation. When neurons were stimulated acutely, there were significantly more neurons, including cholinergic neurons, 10 weeks after transplantation. This led to enhanced numbers of myelinated axons, reinnervation of more muscle fibers, and more medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles were functionally connected to the transplant. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy significantly. These data support the concept that electrical stimulation rescues transplanted motoneurons and facilitates muscle reinnervation. PMID:23544978

  6. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  7. Impaired insulin-stimulated glucose transport in ATM-deficient mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ching, James Kain; Spears, Larry D; Armon, Jennifer L; Renth, Allyson L; Andrisse, Stanley; Collins, Roy L; Fisher, Jonathan S

    2013-06-01

    There are reports that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a role in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, although this is not the case in some cell types. Because Akt plays a key role in insulin signaling, which leads to glucose transport in skeletal muscle, the predominant tissue in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal, we examined whether insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and (or) glucose transport would be decreased in skeletal muscle of mice lacking functional ATM, compared with muscle from wild-type mice. We found that in vitro insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was normal in soleus muscle from mice with 1 nonfunctional allele of ATM (ATM+/-) and from mice with 2 nonfunctional alleles (ATM-/-). However, insulin did not stimulate glucose transport or the phosphorylation of AS160 in ATM-/- soleus. ATM protein level was markedly higher in wild-type extensor digitorum longus (EDL) than in wild-type soleus. In EDL from ATM-/- mice, insulin did not stimulate glucose transport. However, in contrast to findings for soleus, insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was blunted in ATM-/- EDL, concomitant with a tendency for insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity to be decreased. Together, the findings suggest that ATM plays a role in insulin-stimulated glucose transport at the level of AS160 in muscle comprised of slow and fast oxidative-glycolytic fibers (soleus) and at the level of Akt in muscle containing fast glycolytic fibers (EDL). PMID:23724874

  8. Andrographolide Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation through JNK-Akt-p65 Signaling Cascade in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ying; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Lee, Lin-Wen; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Andrographolide is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata, a herbal medicine widely used for treating anti-inflammation in Asia. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of andrographolide in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exposed to a proinflammatory stimulus, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Treating TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs with andrographolide suppressed the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in a concentration-dependent manner. A reduction in TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Akt, and p65 phosphorylation was observed in andrographolide-treated VSMCs. However, andrographolide affected neither IκBα degradation nor p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation under these conditions. Both treatment with LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt inhibitor, and treatment with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, markedly reversed the andrographolide-mediated inhibition of p65 phosphorylation. In addition, LY294002 and SP600125 both diminished Akt phosphorylation, whereas LY294002 had no effects on JNK phosphorylation. These results collectively suggest that therapeutic interventions using andrographolide can benefit the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases, and andrographolide-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activity in TNF-α-stimulated VSMCs occurs through the JNK-Akt-p65 signaling cascade, an IκBα-independent mechanism. PMID:25114952

  9. Microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation facilitates regeneration of injured skeletal muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujiya, Hiroto; Ogura, Yuji; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Nakamura, Ayane; Ohashi, Kazuya; Uematsu, Daiki; Aoki, Haruhito; Musha, Haruki; Goto, Katsumasa

    2015-06-01

    Conservative therapies, mainly resting care for the damaged muscle, are generally used as a treatment for skeletal muscle injuries (such as muscle fragmentation). Several past studies reported that microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) facilitates a repair of injured soft tissues and shortens the recovery period. However, the effects of MENS on the regeneration in injured skeletal muscle are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of MENS on the regenerative process of injured skeletal muscle and to elucidate whether satellite cells in injured skeletal muscle are activated by MENS by using animal models. Male C57BL/6J mice, aged 7 weeks old, were used (n = 30). Mice were randomly divided into two groups: (1) cardiotoxin (CTX)-injected (CX, n = 15) and (2) CTX-injected with MENS treatment (MX, n=15) groups. CTX was injected into tibialis anterior muscle (TA) of mice in CX and MX groups to initiate the necrosis-regeneration cycle of the muscle. TA was dissected 1, 2, and 3 weeks after the injection. Muscle weight, muscle protein content, the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle fibers, the relative percentage of fibers having central nuclei, and the number of muscle satellite cells were evaluated. MENS facilitated the recovery of the muscle dry weight and protein content relative to body weight, and the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle fibers in CTX-induced injured TA muscle. The number of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells was increased by MENS during the regenerating period. Decrease in the percentages of fibers with central nuclei after CTX-injection was facilitated by MENS. MENS may facilitate the regeneration of injured skeletal muscles by activating the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles. Key pointsMicrocurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) facilitated the recovery of the relative muscle dry weight, the relative muscle protein content, and the mean cross-sectional areas of muscle

  10. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by heat shock in L6 skeletal-muscle cells: regulatory role of site-specific phosphorylation of glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byoung; Duddy, Noreen; Ragolia, Louis; Begum, Najma

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1(G)) is essential for basal and exercise-induced glycogen synthesis, which is mediated in part by dephosphorylation and activation of glycogen synthase (GS). In the present study, we examined the potential role of site-specific phosphorylation of PP-1(G) in heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. L6 rat skeletal-muscle cells were stably transfected with wild-type PP-1(G) or with PP-1(G) mutants in which site-1 (S1) Ser(48) and site-2 (S2) Ser(67) residues were substituted with Ala. Cells expressing wild-type and PP-1(G) mutants, S1, S2 and S1/S2, were examined for potential alterations in glycogen synthesis after a 60 min heat shock at 45 degrees C, followed by analysis of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen at 37 degrees C. PP-1(G) S1 mutation caused a 90% increase in glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment, whereas the PP-1(G) S2 mutant was not sensitive to heat stress. The S1/S2 double mutant was comparable with wild-type, which showed a 30% increase over basal. Heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis was accompanied by increased PP-1 and GS activities. The highest activation was observed in S1 mutant. Heat shock also resulted in a rapid and sustained Akt/ glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3 beta) phosphorylation. Wortmannin blocked heat-shock-induced Akt/GSK-3 beta phosphorylation, prevented 2-deoxyglucose uptake and abolished the heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. Muscle glycogen levels regulate GS activity and glycogen synthesis and were found to be markedly depleted in S1 mutant on heat-shock treatment, suggesting that PP-1(G) S1 Ser phosphorylation may inhibit glycogen degradation during thermal stimulation, as S1 mutation resulted in excessive glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment. In contrast, PP-1(G) S2 Ser phosphorylation may promote glycogen breakdown under stressful conditions. Heat-shock-induced glycogenesis appears to be mediated via phosphoinositide 3

  11. Regulation of exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a Ser/Thr kinase that has been thought to be an important mediator for exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is an upstream kinase for AMPK and AMPK-related protein kinases, of which the function in skeletal muscle has not been well documented. Our group and others have generated mice lacking AMPK activity in skeletal muscle, as well as muscle-specific LKB1 knockout mice. In this review, we discuss the potential role of AMPK and LKB1 in regulating exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. We also discuss our recent study, demonstrating the molecular mechanism of obesity-induced development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. PMID:27462580

  12. Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated PDE1 regulates the beta-catenin/TCF signaling through PP2A B56 gamma subunit in proliferating vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kye-Im; Jono, Hirofumi; Miller, Clint L.; Cai, Yujun; Lim, Soyeon; Liu, Xuan; Gao, Pingjin; Abe, Jun-Ichi; Li, Jian-Dong; Yan, Chen

    2010-01-01

    The phenotypic change of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), from a “contractile” phenotype to “synthetic” phenotype, is crucial for pathogenic vascular remodeling in vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Ca2+-calmodulin stimulated phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) isozymes, including PDE1A and PDE1C, play integral roles in regulating the proliferation of synthetic VSMCs. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain unknown. In this study, we explore the role and mechanism of PDE1 isoforms in regulating β-catenin/TCF signaling in VSMCs, a pathway important for vascular remodeling through promoting VSMC growth and survival. We found that inhibition of PDE1 activity markedly attenuated β-catenin/TCF signaling by down-regulating β-catenin protein. The effect of PDE1 inhibition on β-catenin protein reduction is exerted via promoting GSK3β activation, β-catenin phosphorylation, and subsequent β-catenin protein degradation. Moreover, PDE1 inhibition specifically upregulated phosphatase PP2A B56γ subunit gene expression, which is responsible for the effects of PDE1 inhibition on GSK3β and β-catenin/TCF signaling. Further more, the effect of PDE1 inhibition on β-catenin was specifically mediated by PDE1A but not PDE1C isozyme. Interestingly, in synthetic VSMCs PP2A B56γ, phospho-GSK3β, and phospho-β-catenin were all found in the nucleus, suggesting that PDE1A regulates nuclear β-catenin protein stability through the nuclear PP2A-GSK3β-β-catenin signaling axis. Taken together these findings provide direct evidence for the first time that PP2A B56γ is a critical mediator for PDE1A in the regulation of β-catenin signaling in proliferating VSMCs. PMID:21078118

  13. Tracheal Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulated by Stem Cell Factor-c-Kit Coordinate the Production of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Mediated by Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 3.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luis Cezar Farias de; Danilucci, Taís Marolato; Chaves-Neto, Antonio Hernandes; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Silva, Tereza Cristina Cardoso da; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanism involved in the stem cell factor (SCF)-induced production of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) in tracheal smooth muscle cells (tSMCs) and the signaling pathway involved in the process. tSMC primary cultures were stimulated with SCF and evaluated at 24 h. Cells treated with specific antibodies did not show any immunolabeling for cytokeratin or fibroblast activation protein, but were positive for α-smooth muscle actin, indicating the purity of the primary cell line. Western blot analysis showed constitutive phosphorylation of c-Kit, as well as increased total protein and phosphorylated c-Kit levels in tSMCs after SCF stimulation. Flow cytometry analysis also showed an increase in cell-surface c-Kit expression in the presence of SCF. SCF induced TGF-β mRNA expression in tSMCs, as well as the production of TGF-β1, CCL3, and FGF-2. Pretreatment with anti-CCL3 antibody blocked TGF-β1 expression and partially inhibited FGF-2 production. On the other hand, anti-c-Kit antibody blocked TGF-β1 expression and FGF-2 production. Thus, TGF-β1 and FGF-2 production were mediated by CCL3 production through c-Kit. Pretreatment with mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1, p38, and Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitors showed that the effects mediated by SCF were involved with the modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Development of inhibitors targeting CCL3 through MAPK activation could thus be an attractive strategy to inhibit tSMC activation during asthma. PMID:27123814

  14. Effects of electrical stimulation in C2C12 muscle constructs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyoungshin; Bhalla, Rajat; Saigal, Rajiv; Radisic, Milica; Watson, Nicki; Langer, Robert; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation affects the deposition of extracellular matrices and cellular differentiation. Type I collagen is one of the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins; however, not much is known about the effects of electrical stimulation on collagen type I deposition in C2C12 cells. Thus, we studied the effects of electrical voltage and stimulation frequency in 3D cultured C2C12 muscle cells in terms of metabolic activity, type I collagen deposition and cell morphology. Electrically excitable C2C12 muscle cells were seeded in collagen scaffolds and stimulated with rectangular signals of voltage (2, 5, 7 V) and frequency (1, 2 Hz), using parallel carbon electrodes spaced 1 cm apart. Metabolic activity was quantified by the glucose: lactate concentration ratio in the medium. Apoptotic activity was assessed by TUNEL staining and changes in collagen deposition were identified by immunohistology. The ultrastructure of the tissue was examined by TEM. Glucose and lactate analysis indicated that all groups had similar metabolic activity. TUNEL stain showed no significant difference in apoptotic damage induced by electrical stimulation compared to the control. Samples stimulated at 2 Hz exhibited reduced collagen deposition compared to the control and 1 Hz stimulated samples. Muscle-protein marker desmin was highly expressed in constructs stimulated with 1 Hz/5 V sample. TEM revealed that the stimulated samples developed highly organized sarcomeres, which coincided with improved contractile properties in the 1 Hz/5 V- and 2 Hz/5 V-stimulated groups. Our data implicate that a specific electrical frequency may modulate type I collagen accumulation and a specific voltage may affect the differentiation of muscle sarcomeres in excitable cells. PMID:18512267

  15. Cross talk between MMP2-Spm-Cer-S1P and ERK1/2 in proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells under angiotensin II stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Animesh; Sarkar, Jaganmay; Pramanik, Pijush Kanti; Chakraborti, Tapati; Chakraborti, Sajal

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to establish the mechanism associated with the proliferation of PASMCs under ANG II stimulation. The results showed that treatment of PASMCs with ANG II induces an increase in cell proliferation and 100 nM was the optimum concentration for maximum increase in proliferation of the cells. Pretreatment of the cells with AT1, but not AT2, receptor antagonist inhibited ANG II induced cell proliferation. Pretreatment with pharmacological and genetic inhibitors of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and sphingosine kinase (SPHK) prevented ANG II-induced cell proliferation. ANG II has also been shown to induce SMase activity, SPHK phosphorylation and S1P production. In addition, ANG II caused an increase in proMMP-2 expression and activation, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and NADPH oxidase activation. Upon inhibition of MMP-2, SMase activity and S1P level were curbed leading to inhibition of cell proliferation. SPHK was phosphorylated by ERK1/2 during ET-1 stimulation of the cells. ANG II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proMMP-2 expression and activation in the cells were abrogated upon inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity. Overall, NADPH oxidase plays an important role in proMMP-2 expression and activation and that MMP-2 mediated SMC proliferation occurs through the involvement of Spm-Cer-S1P signaling axis under ANG II stimulation of PASMCs. PMID:27210740

  16. Direct and reflex responses in perineal muscles on electrical stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Vodusek, D B; Janko, M; Lokar, J

    1983-01-01

    Responses in the external anal and urethral sphincters as well as in the bulbocavernosus muscle have been evoked by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the penis (or clitoris), perineum and the peri-anal region and recorded electromyographically in 82 male subjects 5 to 73 years old and in nine female subjects 18 to 55 years old, who had no systemic diseases or demonstrable sacral nervous system lesion. On perineal stimulation (including the penis or clitoris) reflex responses with a typical latency of 33 ms and which exhibit no habituation were obtained in all muscles examined. Stimulation of the peri-anal region gave habituating reflex responses with a typical latency of 55 ms in all muscles examined. On perineal, and sometimes also peri-anal stimulation, stable short latency responses with typical latencies of 5 and 13 ms were recorded; both were considered to be direct responses. The different evoked muscle responses obtained by stimulation in the perineal and peri-anal region have to be distinguished when the bulbocavernosus and anal reflexes are recorded for evaluation of sacral nervous system lesions. PMID:6842203

  17. Electrical stimulation characteristics of denervated orbicularis oculi muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Keyong; Jin, Cheng; Wang, Yiting; Geng, Liang; Sun, Yajing; Tian, Hongchang

    2015-08-01

    This research is to study the electrical stimulation characteristics of orbicularis oculi muscle and the characteristics of the mechanical contraction. We observed the stimulus current diffusion regularity and its relationship with mechanical contraction in the orbicularis oculi muscle using an electrode gathering line. Under different stimulus intensities of 2 or 4 mA, the closer the recording electrodes were to the stimulating electrode, the larger was the amplitude. When the recording electrode and stimulating electrode distance increased, the amplitude declined linearly with decreasing function. In addition, current conduction across the muscle fiber was studied. Under different stimulus intensities of 2 or 4 mA, it was found that the closer the recording electrodes were to the stimulating electrode, the larger was the amplitude. When the recording electrode and stimulating electrode distance increased, the amplitude declined linearly with decreasing function. The transverse current reached a maximum 4 mA range, and increasing the current intensity did not increase the propagation range. Under different stimulation intensities, the larger the stimulus intensity, the greater is the potential change and the faster is the attenuation. Longitudinal current, even in the range of 6 mm, can still record electrical activity. While a transverse current diffuser has a maximum range of 4 mm, increasing the current intensity does not increase the propagation range. PMID:25724806

  18. An Implanted, Stimulated Muscle Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Gustafson, Kenneth; Kilgore, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A totally implantable piezoelectric generator system able to harness power from electrically activated muscle could be used to augment the power systems of implanted medical devices, such as neural prostheses, by reducing the number of battery replacement surgeries or by allowing periods of untethered functionality. The features of our generator design are no moving parts and the use of a portion of the generated power for system operation and regulation. A software model of the system has been developed and simulations have been performed to predict the output power as the system parameters were varied within their constraints. Mechanical forces that mimic muscle forces have been experimentally applied to a piezoelectric generator to verify the accuracy of the simulations and to explore losses due to mechanical coupling. Depending on the selection of system parameters, software simulations predict that this generator concept can generate up to approximately 700 W of power, which is greater than the power necessary to drive the generator, conservatively estimated to be 50 W. These results suggest that this concept has the potential to be an implantable, self-replenishing power source and further investigation is underway.

  19. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  20. The combined effect of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in rat tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Murakami, Shinichiro; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori; Fujino, Hidemi

    2011-05-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used to prevent muscle atrophy, but this method is different in many previous studies, appropriate stimulation protocol is still not decided. Although resistance exercise has also been shown to be an effective countermeasure on muscle atrophy, almost previous studies carried out an electrical stimulation without resistance. It was hypothesized that electrical stimulation without resistance is insufficient to contract skeletal muscle forcefully, and the combination of electrical stimulation and forceful resistance contraction is more effective than electrical stimulation without resistance to attenuate muscle atrophy. This study investigated the combined effects of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in the rat tibialis anterior muscle. The animals were divided into control, hindlimb unloading (HU), hindlimb unloading plus electrical stimulation (ES), and hindlimb unloading plus the combination of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction (ES+IC). Electrical stimulation was applied to the tibialis anterior muscle percutaneously for total 240 sec per day. In the ES+IC group, the ankle joint was fixed to produce resistance isometric contraction during electrical stimulation. After 7 days, the cross-sectional areas of each muscle fiber type in the HU group decreased. Those were prevented in the ES+IC group rather than the ES group. The expression of heat shock protein 72 was enhanced in the ES and ES+IC groups. These results indicated that although electrical stimulation is effective to prevent muscle atrophy, the combination of electrical stimulation and isometric contraction have further effect. PMID:21619551

  1. Electrical Stimulation of Coleopteran Muscle for Initiating Flight.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hao Yu; Li, Yao; Cao, Feng; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Some researchers have long been interested in reconstructing natural insects into steerable robots or vehicles. However, until recently, these so-called cyborg insects, biobots, or living machines existed only in science fiction. Owing to recent advances in nano/micro manufacturing, data processing, and anatomical and physiological biology, we can now stimulate living insects to induce user-desired motor actions and behaviors. To improve the practicality and applicability of airborne cyborg insects, a reliable and controllable flight initiation protocol is required. This study demonstrates an electrical stimulation protocol that initiates flight in a beetle (Mecynorrhina torquata, Coleoptera). A reliable stimulation protocol was determined by analyzing a pair of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), flight muscles that oscillate the wings. DLM stimulation has achieved with a high success rate (> 90%), rapid response time (< 1.0 s), and small variation (< 0.33 s; indicating little habituation). Notably, the stimulation of DLMs caused no crucial damage to the free flight ability. In contrast, stimulation of optic lobes, which was earlier demonstrated as a successful flight initiation protocol, destabilized the beetle in flight. Thus, DLM stimulation is a promising secure protocol for inducing flight in cyborg insects or biobots. PMID:27050093

  2. Electrical Stimulation of Coleopteran Muscle for Initiating Flight

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Hao Yu; Li, Yao; Cao, Feng; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Some researchers have long been interested in reconstructing natural insects into steerable robots or vehicles. However, until recently, these so-called cyborg insects, biobots, or living machines existed only in science fiction. Owing to recent advances in nano/micro manufacturing, data processing, and anatomical and physiological biology, we can now stimulate living insects to induce user-desired motor actions and behaviors. To improve the practicality and applicability of airborne cyborg insects, a reliable and controllable flight initiation protocol is required. This study demonstrates an electrical stimulation protocol that initiates flight in a beetle (Mecynorrhina torquata, Coleoptera). A reliable stimulation protocol was determined by analyzing a pair of dorsal longitudinal muscles (DLMs), flight muscles that oscillate the wings. DLM stimulation has achieved with a high success rate (> 90%), rapid response time (< 1.0 s), and small variation (< 0.33 s; indicating little habituation). Notably, the stimulation of DLMs caused no crucial damage to the free flight ability. In contrast, stimulation of optic lobes, which was earlier demonstrated as a successful flight initiation protocol, destabilized the beetle in flight. Thus, DLM stimulation is a promising secure protocol for inducing flight in cyborg insects or biobots. PMID:27050093

  3. Mathematically modeling the effects of electrically stimulating skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J B; Kim, J; Cheng, L K; Röhrle, O; Shorten, P R; Soboleva, T K; Clarke, R D; Pullan, A J

    2006-01-01

    A framework for modeling the activation of skeletal muscle is presented for studying functional electrical stimulation. A mathematical model of the cellular responses of skeletal muscle, created at AgResearch (Ruakura, New Zealand www.agresearch.co.nz), has been integrated with an anatomical, finite element model of the semitendinosus muscle, which was constructed from CT scans of the hind limb of a sheep. The tibial nerve was also constructed from digitized CT scans, and has been modeled using the Hodgkin Huxley neural model. The relevant cellular equations have been solved over these geometries. The results obtained, i.e speed of action potential propagation through the nerve and muscle, and the duration of twitch force, agree with published values. PMID:17946255

  4. Use of flow, electrical, and mechanical stimulation to promote engineering of striated muscles

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Swathi; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering involves design of high-fidelity tissue substitutes for predictive experimental assays in vitro and cell-based regenerative therapies in vivo. Design of striated muscle tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, has been particularly challenging due to a high metabolic demand and complex cellular organization and electromechanical function of the native tissues. Successful engineering of highly functional striated muscles may thus require creation of biomimetic culture conditions involving medium perfusion, electrical and mechanical stimulation. When optimized, these external cues are expected to synergistically and dynamically activate important intracellular signaling pathways leading to accelerated muscle growth and development. This review will discuss the use of different types of tissue culture bioreactors aimed at providing conditions for enhanced structural and functional maturation of engineered striated muscles. PMID:24366526

  5. 21 CFR 884.5940 - Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic... Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5940 Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. (a) Identification. A powered vaginal muscle stimulator is an electrically powered device designed to...

  6. 21 CFR 884.5940 - Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic... Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5940 Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. (a) Identification. A powered vaginal muscle stimulator is an electrically powered device designed to...

  7. 21 CFR 884.5940 - Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic... Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5940 Powered vaginal muscle stimulator for therapeutic use. (a) Identification. A powered vaginal muscle stimulator is an electrically powered device designed to...

  8. Recovery Effect of the Muscle Fatigue by the Magnetic Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Kousuke; Nuruki, Atsuo; Tsujimura, Sei-Ichi; Tamari, Youzou; Yunokuchi, Kazutomo

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of magnetic stimulation for muscle fatigue. The six healthy subjects participated in the experiment with the repetition grasp using a hand dynamometer. The measurement of EMG (electromyography) and MMG (mechanomyography) is performed on the left forearm. All subjects performed MVC (maximum voluntary contraction), and repeated exercise in 80%MVC after the MVC measurement. The repetition task was entered when display muscular strength deteriorated. We used an EMG and MMG for the measurement of the muscle fatigue. Provided EMG and MMG waves were calculated integral calculus value (iEMG, and iMMG). The result of iEMG and iMMG were divided by muscular strength, because we calculate integral calculus value per the unit display muscular strength. The result of our study, we found recovery effect by the magnetic stimulation in voluntarily muscular strength and iEMG. However, we can not found in a figure of iMMG.

  9. Suppression of the increasing level of acetylcholine-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ in guinea pig airway smooth muscle cells by mabuterol

    PubMed Central

    SONG, XIRUI; ZHAO, CHAO; DAI, CAILING; REN, YANXIN; AN, NAN; WEN, HUIMIN; PAN, LI; CHENG, MAOSHENG; ZHANG, YUYANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to establish an effective method for the in vitro culture of guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, and also investigate the suppressive effect of mabuterol hydrochloride (Mab) on the increased level of intracellular Ca2+ in ASM cells induced with acetylcholine (Ach). Two different methods, i.e. with or without collagenase to pretreat tracheal tissues, were applied to the manufacture of ASM cells. Cell viability was determined with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthinazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence were used for the identification of ASM cells. Different concentration levels (10−3, 10−4, 10−5, 10−6 and 10−7 mmol/l) of Mab were administered 5 min before Ach (10−4 M) treatment, respectively. The Ca2+ fluorescent probe, Fura-2/AM or Fluo-3/AM were applied to the inspection of Ca2+ fluorescent intensity with Varioskan Flash, immunocytometry systems and an inverted system microscope, respectively. The results showed that the fresh method, in which isolated tracheal tissues were previously treated with collagenase for 20 min, was more advantageous for the preparation of guinea pig ASM cells compared to when the enzyme was not used. The time for the ASM cells to initially migrate out of the ‘tissue blocks’ and the culture having to be generated due to the thick cell density was significantly less. On identification with immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescent staining, >95% of the cells were ASM cells. Mab (10−3−10−7 mmol/l) significantly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induced by Ach in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory rates of intracellular Ca2+ by different concentrations of Mab, from low to high, were 14.93, 24.73, 40.06, 48.54 and 57.13%, respectively, when Varioskan Flash was used for determination. In conclusion, this novel method has a shorter harvesting period for ASM cells. Mab can suppress the increasing level of intracellular Ca2

  10. Fatigue and non-fatigue mathematical muscle models during functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhijun; Bai, Er-wei; Shields, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical muscle stimulation demonstrates potential for preventing muscle atrophy and for restoring functional movement after spinal cord injury (SCI). Control systems used to optimize delivery of electrical stimulation protocols depend upon the algorithms generated using computational models of paralyzed muscle force output. The Hill-Huxley-type model, while being highly accurate, is also very complex, making it difficult for real-time implementation. In this paper, we propose a Wiener-Hammerstein system to model the paralyzed skeletal muscle under electrical stimulus conditions. The proposed model has substantial advantages in identification algorithm analysis and implementation including computational complexity and convergence, which enable it to be used in real-time model implementation. Experimental data sets from the soleus muscles of fourteen subjects with SCI were collected and tested. The simulation results show that the proposed model outperforms the Hill-Huxley-type model not only in peak force prediction, but also in fitting performance for force output of each individual stimulation train. PMID:23667385

  11. Muscle stem cells at a glance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu Xin; Dumont, Nicolas A; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Muscle stem cells facilitate the long-term regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. This self-renewing population of satellite cells has only recently been defined through genetic and transplantation experiments. Although muscle stem cells remain in a dormant quiescent state in uninjured muscle, they are poised to activate and produce committed progeny. Unlike committed myogenic progenitor cells, the self-renewal capacity gives muscle stem cells the ability to engraft as satellite cells and capitulate long-term regeneration. Similar to other adult stem cells, understanding the molecular regulation of muscle stem cells has significant implications towards the development of pharmacological or cell-based therapies for muscle disorders. This Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will review satellite cell characteristics and therapeutic potential, and provide an overview of the muscle stem cell hallmarks: quiescence, self-renewal and commitment. PMID:25300792

  12. In vivo stimulation of oestrogen receptor α increases insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, Brittany K; Bomhoff, Gregory L; Morris, Jill K; Geiger, Paige C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies suggest oestrogen receptor α (ERα) is involved in oestrogen-mediated regulation of glucose metabolism and is critical for maintenance of whole body insulin action. Despite this, the effect of direct ERα modulation in insulin-responsive tissues is unknown. The purpose of the current study was to determine the impact of ERα activation, using the ER subtype-selective ligand propylpyrazoletriyl (PPT), on skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Two-month-old female Sprague–Dawley rats, ovariectomized for 1 week, were given subcutaneous injections of PPT (10 mg kg−1), oestradiol benzoate (EB; 20 μg kg−1), the ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 10 mg kg−1) or vehicle every 24 h for 3 days. On the fourth day, insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake was measured in vitro and insulin signalling intermediates were assessed via Western blotting. Activation of ERα with PPT resulted in increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into the slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, activation of insulin signalling intermediates (as measured by phospho-Akt (pAkt) and pAkt substrate (PAS)) and phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). GLUT4 protein was increased only in the EDL muscle. Rats treated with EB or DPN for 3 days did not show an increase in insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake compared to vehicle-treated animals. These new findings reveal that direct activation of ERα positively mediates glucose uptake and insulin action in skeletal muscle. Evidence that oestrogens and ERα stimulate glucose uptake has important implications for understanding mechanisms of glucose homeostasis, particularly in postmenopausal women. PMID:21486807

  13. 15d-PGJ{sub 2} stimulates HO-1 expression through p38 MAP kinase and Nrf-2 pathway in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Hyun-Joung; Lee, Kuy-Sook; Lee, Seahyoung; Park, Jin-Hee; Choi, Hye-Eun; Go, Sang Hee; Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Hyun-Young

    2007-08-15

    15d-PGJ{sub 2}, a potent endogenous ligand for peroxisome proliferators activated receptor-{gamma}, is a cyclopentenone-type prostaglandin produced by many different types of cells. Pertinent to its effect on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC), antiproliferative effects have been most frequently reported. In the present study, we investigated the effect of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} on HO-1 expression that has been reported to inhibit VSMC proliferation. According to our data, 15d-PGJ{sub 2} significantly induced ROS/NO production and HO-1 expression in rVSMCs. We also observed 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced translocation of Nrf-2. In addition, ROS scavenger pretreatment suppressed 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced HO-1 expression while PPAR{gamma} antagonist did not, suggesting nuclear translocation of Nrf-2 and subsequent HO-1 expression was ROS dependent rather than PPAR{gamma} dependent. Furthermore, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK abolished 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced HO-1 expression. These data suggest that 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced up-regulation of HO-1 is independent of PPAR{gamma} but dependent of ROS and p38 MAPK pathway. The present study reports for the first time that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} induces HO-1 expression possibly using Nrf-2 pathway as a response to ROS in VSMCs.

  14. Electrolysis cell stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.; Phillips, B. R.; Evangelista, J.

    1978-01-01

    Computer program represents attempt to understand and model characteristics of electrolysis cells. It allows user to determine how cell efficiency is affected by temperature, pressure, current density, electrolyte concentration, characteristic dimensions, membrane resistance, and electrolyte circulation rate. It also calculates ratio of bubble velocity to electrolyte velocity for anode and cathode chambers.

  15. An ethanol root extract of Cynanchum wilfordii containing acetophenones suppresses the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in TNF-α-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells through the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    KOO, HYUN JUNG; SOHN, EUN-HWA; PYO, SUHKNEUNG; WOO, HAN GOO; PARK, DAE WON; HAM, YOUNG-MIN; JANG, SEON-A; PARK, SOO-YEONG; KANG, SE CHAN

    2015-01-01

    The root of Cynanchum wilfordii (C. wilfordii) contains several biologically active compounds which have been used as traditional medicines in Asia. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of an ethanol root extract of C. wilfordii (CWE) on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The inhibitory effects of CWE on vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression under an optimum extraction condition were examined. CWE suppressed the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 and the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HASMCs. Consistent with the in vitro observations, CWE inhibited the aortic expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in atherogenic diet-fed mice. CWE also downregulated the expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB p65) and its uclear translocation in the stimulated HASMCs. In order to identify the active components in CWE, we re-extracted CWE using several solvents, and found that the ethyl acetate fraction was the most effective in suppressing the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Four major acetophenones were purified from the ethyl acetate fraction, and two components, p-hydroxyacetophenone and cynandione A, potently inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the stimulated HASMCs. We assessed and determined the amounts of these two active components from CWE, and our results suggested that the root of C. wilfordii and its two bioactive acetophenones may be used for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis and vascular inflammatory diseases. PMID:25716870

  16. An ethanol root extract of Cynanchum wilfordii containing acetophenones suppresses the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in TNF-α-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells through the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Pyo, Suhkneung; Woo, Han Goo; Park, Dae Won; Ham, Young-Min; Jang, Seon-A; Park, Soo-Yeong; Kang, Se Chan

    2015-04-01

    The root of Cynanchum wilfordii (C. wilfordii) contains several biologically active compounds which have been used as traditional medicines in Asia. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of an ethanol root extract of C. wilfordii (CWE) on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The inhibitory effects of CWE on vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression under an optimum extraction condition were examined. CWE suppressed the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 and the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HASMCs. Consistent with the in vitro observations, CWE inhibited the aortic expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in atherogenic diet-fed mice. CWE also downregulated the expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB p65) and its uclear translocation in the stimulated HASMCs. In order to identify the active components in CWE, we re-extracted CWE using several solvents, and found that the ethyl acetate fraction was the most effective in suppressing the expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Four major acetophenones were purified from the ethyl acetate fraction, and two components, p-hydroxyacetophenone and cynandione A, potently inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the stimulated HASMCs. We assessed and determined the amounts of these two active components from CWE, and our results suggested that the root of C. wilfordii and its two bioactive acetophenones may be used for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis and vascular inflammatory diseases. PMID:25716870

  17. Dynamic skeletal muscle stimulation and its potential in bone adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Y-X.; Lam, H.; Ferreri, S.; Rubin, C.

    2016-01-01

    To identify mechanotransductive signals for combating musculoskeletal deterioration, it is essential to determine the components and mechanisms critical to the anabolic processes of musculoskeletal tissues. It is hypothesized that the interaction between bone and muscle may depend on fluid exchange in these tissues by mechanical loading. It has been shown that intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia. Optimized MS signals, i.e., low-intensity and high frequency, may be critical in maintaining bone mass and mitigating muscle atrophy. The objectives for this review are to discuss the potential for MS to induce ImP and strains on bone, to regulate bone adaptation, and to identify optimized stimulation frequency in the loading regimen. The potential for MS to regulate blood and fluid flow will also be discussed. The results suggest that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics with minimal mechanical strain in bone. The response was shown to be dependent on loading frequency, serving as a critical mediator in mitigating bone loss. A specific regimen of dynamic MS may be optimized in vivo to attenuate disuse osteopenia and serve as a biomechanical intervention in the clinical setting. PMID:20190376

  18. Physiologic force-frequency in engineered heart muscle by electromechanical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Godier-Furnémont, Amandine F. G.; Tiburcy, Malte; Wagner, Eva; Dewenter, Matthias; Lämmle, Simon; El-Armouche, Ali; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of mature mammalian ventricular myocardium is a positive force-frequency relationship (FFR). Despite evidence of organotypic structural and molecular maturation, a positive FFR has not been observed in mammalian tissue engineered heart muscle. We hypothesized that concurrent mechanical and electrical stimulation at frequencies matching physiological heart rate will result in functional maturation. To this end, we investigated the role of such biomimetic mechanical and electrical stimulation in functional maturation in engineered heart muscle (EHM) comprising collagen type I and neonatal rat heart cells. Following tissue consolidation (8 days), EHM were subjected to electrical field stimulation at 0, 2, 4, or 6 Hz for 5 days, while strained on flexible poles to facilitate auxotonic contractions. EHM stimulated at 2 and 4 Hz displayed a similarly enhanced inotropic reserve, but a clearly diverging FFR. The positive FFR in 4 Hz stimulated EHM was associated with reduced calcium sensitivity, frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation, and enhanced post-rest potentiation. This was paralleled on the cellular level with improved calcium storage and release capacity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, increased amounts of SERCA2a and RyR2 protein, and enhanced T-tubulation. We demonstrate that electromechanical stimulation at a frequency matching closely the physiological heart rate supports functional maturation in mammalian EHM. The observed positive FFR in EHM has important implications for the applicability of EHM in cardiovascular research and drug testing. PMID:25985155

  19. Rotenone-stimulated superoxide release from mitochondrial complex I acutely augments L-type Ca2+ current in A7r5 aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Rikuo; Dhagia, Vidhi; Lakhkar, Anand; Patel, Dhara; Wolin, Michael S; Gupte, Sachin A

    2016-05-01

    Voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa,L) induces contraction of arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and ICa,L is increased by H2O2 in ASMCs. Superoxide released from the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) is dismutated to H2O2 We studied whether superoxide per se acutely modulates ICa,L in ASMCs using cultured A7r5 cells derived from rat aorta. Rotenone is a toxin that inhibits complex I of the MRC and increases mitochondrial superoxide release. The superoxide content of mitochondria was estimated using mitochondrial-specific MitoSOX and HPLC methods, and was shown to be increased by a brief exposure to 10 μM rotenone. ICa,L was recorded with 5 mM BAPTA in the pipette solution. Rotenone administration (10 nM to 10 μM) resulted in a greater ICa,L increase in a dose-dependent manner to a maximum of 22.1% at 10 μM for 1 min, which gradually decreased to 9% after 5 min. The rotenone-induced ICa,L increase was associated with a shift in the current-voltage relationship (I-V) to a hyperpolarizing direction. DTT administration resulted in a 17.9% increase in ICa,L without a negative shift in I-V, and rotenone produced an additional increase with a shift. H2O2 (0.3 mM) inhibited ICa,L by 13%, and additional rotenone induced an increase with a negative shift. Sustained treatment with Tempol (4-hydroxy tempo) led to a significant ICa,L increase but it inhibited the rotenone-induced increase. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor, partially inhibited ICa,L and completely suppressed the rotenone-induced increase. Superoxide released from mitochondria affected protein kinases and resulted in stronger ICa,L preceding its dismutation to H2O2 The removal of nitric oxide is a likely mechanism for the increase in ICa,L. PMID:26873970

  20. Comparison of coil designs for peripheral magnetic muscle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goetz, S M; Herzog, H-G; Gattinger, N; Gleich, B

    2011-10-01

    The recent application of magnetic stimulation in rehabilitation is often said to solve key drawbacks of the established electrical method. Magnetic fields cause less pain, allow principally a better penetration of inhomogeneous biologic tissue and do not require skin contact. However, in most studies the evoked muscle force has been disappointing. In this paper, a comparison of a classical round circular geometry, a commercial muscle-stimulation coil and a novel design is presented, with special emphasis on the physical field properties. These systems show markedly different force responses for the same magnetic energy and highlight the enormous potential of different coil geometries. The new design resulted in a slope of the force recruiting curve being more than two and a half times higher than the other coils. The data were analyzed with respect to the underlying physical causes and field conditions. After a parameter-extraction approach, the results for the three coils span a two-dimensional space with clearly distinguishable degrees of freedom, which can be manipulated nearly separately and reflect the two main features of a field; the peak amplitude and its decay with the distance. PMID:21832812

  1. Generation of Electrical Power from Stimulated Muscle Contractions Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Kilgore, Kevin; Ercegovic, David B.

    2004-01-01

    This project is a collaborative effort between NASA Glenn Research Center's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts (RAC) Project, part of the NASA Aerospace Propulsion and Power Program of the Aerospace Technology Enterprise, and Case Western Reserve University's Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Center. The RAC Project foresees implantable power requirements for future applications such as organically based sensor platforms and robotics that can interface with the human senses. One of the goals of the FES Center is to develop a totally implantable neural prosthesis. This goal is based on feedback from patients who would prefer a system with an internal power source over the currently used system with an external power source. The conversion system under investigation would transform the energy produced from a stimulated muscle contraction into electrical energy. We hypothesize that the output power of the system will be greater than the input power necessary to initiate, sustain, and control the electrical conversion system because of the stored potential energy of the muscle. If the system can be made biocompatible, durable, and with the potential for sustained use, then the biological power source will be a viable solution.

  2. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle mitigates glucocorticoid induced decreases in prostaglandin synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, Joseph A.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) induces a decline in protein synthesis and protein content of tissue cultured, avian skeletal muscle cells, and this atrophy is attenuated by repetitive mechanical stretch. Since the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin mitigated this stretch attenuation of muscle atrophy, the role of prostaglandins as growth modulators in these processes was examined. Dex at 10(exp -8) M reduced PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production 55 percent - 65 percent and PGE(sub 2) production 84 - 90 percent after 24 - 72 h of incubation in static cultures. Repetitive 10 percent stretch-relaxations of the non-Dex treated cultures increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux 41 percent at 24 h and 276 percent at 72 h and increased PGE(sub 2) production 51 percent at 24 h and 236 percent at 72 h. Mechanical stimulation of Dex treated cultures increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production 162 percent after 24 h, thus returning PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux to the level of non-Dex treated cultures. At 72 h, stretch increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux 65 percent in Dex treated cultures, but PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production was 45-84 percent less than non-Dex treated cultures. Mechanical stimulation of Dex treated cultures increased PGE(sub 2) production at 24 h, but not at 72 h. Dex reduced prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) activity in the muscle cultures by 70 percent after 8 - 24 h of incubation, and mechanical stimulation increased PGHS activity of the Dex treated cultures by 98 percent. It is concluded that repetitive mechanical stimulation attenuates the catabolic effects of Dex on cultured skeletal muscle cells in part by reversing the Dex-induced declines in PGHS activity and prostaglandin production.

  3. Endothelial Cells Stimulate Self-Renewal and Expand Neurogenesis of Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qin; Goderie, Susan K.; Jin, Li; Karanth, Nithin; Sun, Yu; Abramova, Natalia; Vincent, Peter; Pumiglia, Kevin; Temple, Sally

    2004-05-01

    Neural stem cells are reported to lie in a vascular niche, but there is no direct evidence for a functional relationship between the stem cells and blood vessel component cells. We show that endothelial cells but not vascular smooth muscle cells release soluble factors that stimulate the self-renewal of neural stem cells, inhibit their differentiation, and enhance their neuron production. Both embryonic and adult neural stem cells respond, allowing extensive production of both projection neuron and interneuron types in vitro. Endothelial coculture stimulates neuroepithelial cell contact, activating Notch and Hes1 to promote self-renewal. These findings identify endothelial cells as a critical component of the neural stem cell niche.

  4. In vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy of chronically stimulated canine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Clark, B J; Acker, M A; McCully, K; Subramanian, H V; Hammond, R L; Salmons, S; Chance, B; Stephenson, L W

    1988-02-01

    Chronic stimulation converts skeletal muscle of mixed fiber type to a uniform muscle made up of type I, fatigue-resistant fibers. Here, the bioenergetic correlates of fatigue resistance in conditioned canine latissimus dorsi are assessed with in vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy. After chronic electrical stimulation, five dogs underwent 31P-NMR spectroscopic and isometric tension measurements on conditioned and contralateral control muscle during stimulation for 200, 300, 500, and 800 ms of an 1,100-ms duty cycle. With stimulation, phosphocreatine (PCr) fell proportional to the degree of stimulation in both conditioned and control muscle but fell significantly less in conditioned muscle at all but the least intense stimulation period (200 ms). Isometric tension, expressed as a tension time index per gram muscle, was significantly greater in the conditioned muscle at the two longest stimulation periods. The overall small change in PCr and the lack of a plateau in tension observed in the conditioned muscle are similar to that seen in cardiac muscle during increased energy demand. This study indicates that the conditioned muscle's markedly enhanced resistance to fatigue is in part the result of its increased capacity for oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:3348365

  5. In vivo sup 31 P-NMR spectroscopy of chronically stimulated canine skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.J. III; McCully, A.K.; Subramanian, H.V.; Hammond, R.L.; Salmons, S.; Chance, B.; Stephenson, L.W. Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia Univ. of Birmingham )

    1988-02-01

    Chronic stimulation converts skeletal muscle of mixed fiber type to a uniform muscle made up of type I, fatigue-resistant fibers. Here, the bioenergetic correlates of fatigue resistance in conditioned canine latissimus dorsi are assessed with in vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) spectroscopy. After chronic electrical stimulation, five dogs underwent {sup 31}P-NMR spectroscopic and isometric tension measurements on conditioned and contralateral control muscle during stimulation for 200, 300, 500, and 800 ms of an 1,100-ms duty cycle. With stimulation, phosphocreatine (PCr) fell proportional to the degree of stimulation in both conditioned and control muscle but fell significantly less in conditioned muscle at all the least intense stimulation period (200 ms). Isometric tension, expressed as a tension time index per gram muscle, was significantly greater in the conditioned muscle at the two longest stimulation periods. The overall small change in PCr and the lack of a plateau in tension observed in the conditioned muscle are similar to that seen in cardiac muscle during increased energy demand. This study indicates that the conditioned muscle's markedly enhanced resistance to fatigue is in part the result of its increased capacity for oxidative phosphorylation.

  6. Coaxing stem cells for skeletal muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Karl J.A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a tremendous ability to regenerate, attributed to a well-defined population of muscle stem cells called satellite cells. However, this ability to regenerate diminishes with age and can also be dramatically affected by multiple types of muscle diseases, or injury. Extrinsic and/or intrinsic defects in the regulation of satellite cells are considered to be major determinants for the diminished regenerative capacity. Maintenance and replenishment of the satellite cell pool is one focus for muscle regenerative medicine, which will be discussed. There are other sources of progenitor cells with myogenic capacity, which may also support skeletal muscle repair. However, all of these myogenic cell populations have inherent difficulties and challenges in maintaining or coaxing their derivation for therapeutic purpose. This review will highlight recent reported attributes of these cells and new bioengineering approaches to creating a supply of myogenic stem cells or implants applicable for acute and/or chronic muscle disorders. PMID:25049085

  7. The Effect of Mechanical Vibration Stimulation of Perception Subthreshold on the Muscle Force and Muscle Reaction Time of Lower Leg

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huigyun; Kwak, Kiyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical vibration stimulation on the muscle force and muscle reaction time of lower leg according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A vibration stimulation with perception threshold intensity was applied on the Achilles tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. EMG measurement and analysis system were used to analyze the change of muscle force and muscle reaction time according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A root-mean-square (RMS) value was extracted using analysis software and Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) and Premotor Time (PMT) were analyzed. The measurement results showed that perception threshold was different from application sites of vibration frequency. Also, the muscle force and muscle reaction time showed difference according to the presence of vibration, frequency, and intensity. This result means that the vibration stimulation causes the change on the muscle force and muscle reaction time and affects the muscles of lower leg by the characteristics of vibration stimulation. PMID:27382244

  8. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  9. Chronic Stimulation-Induced Changes in the Rodent Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Colleen A.; Butterfield, Timothy A.; Dietrich, Maria; Andreatta, Richard D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Fry, Lisa; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Therapies for certain voice disorders purport principles of skeletal muscle rehabilitation to increase muscle mass, strength, and endurance. However, applicability of limb muscle rehabilitation to the laryngeal muscles has not been tested. In this study, the authors examined the feasibility of the rat thyroarytenoid muscle to remodel as a…

  10. Thyroid Hormone Stimulation of Autophagy Is Essential for Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Activity in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesmana, Ronny; Sinha, Rohit A; Singh, Brijesh K; Zhou, Jin; Ohba, Kenji; Wu, Yajun; Yau, Winifred W Y; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yen, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) and autophagy share similar functions in regulating skeletal muscle growth, regeneration, and differentiation. Although TH recently has been shown to increase autophagy in liver, the regulation and role of autophagy by this hormone in skeletal muscle is not known. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrated that TH induces autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in skeletal muscle. TH induction of autophagy involved reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulation of 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1) signaling. TH also increased mRNA and protein expression of key autophagy genes, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), Sequestosome 1 (p62), and Ulk1, as well as genes that modulated autophagy and Forkhead box O (FOXO) 1/3a. TH increased mitochondrial protein synthesis and number as well as basal mitochondrial O2 consumption, ATP turnover, and maximal respiratory capacity. Surprisingly, mitochondrial activity and biogenesis were blunted when autophagy was blocked in muscle cells by Autophagy-related gene (Atg)5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Induction of ROS and 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by TH played a significant role in the up-regulation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PPARGC1A), the key regulator of mitochondrial synthesis. In summary, our findings showed that TH-mediated autophagy was essential for stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in skeletal muscle. Moreover, autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis were coupled in skeletal muscle via TH induction of mitochondrial activity and ROS generation. PMID:26562261

  11. Low frequency chronic electrical stimulation of normal and dystrophic chicken muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, E A; Barnard, P J; Jarvis, J C; Lai, J

    1986-01-01

    The fast-twitch posterior latissimus dorsi muscle of normal and genetically dystrophic chickens was subjected to continuous indirect electrical stimulation at 10 Hz for periods of 4-8 weeks. To sustain this in vivo nerve stimulation an internally implantable miniature stimulator device was designed. This regime of stimulation caused complete fatigue of the normal muscle within 5 min of its initiation. The dystrophic muscles maintained a very small degree of contractile activity during this initial phase. Tangible twitching of the muscle returned in 5 week birds between 3 and 5 days and in 10 week birds between 11 and 16 days after implantation. After 4 weeks of stimulation, no significant change was measured in the time-to-peak of the isometric twitch response, nor in the half-relaxation time. The resistance to fatigue was significantly increased in the stimulated muscles when tested with a series of tetani at 40 Hz. The mean fibre area was decreased, in all muscles stimulated for longer than 3 weeks, in comparison to their contralateral controls, except where fibre splitting in dystrophic birds abnormally reduced the control value. The majority fibre type of the muscle was changed from type IIB to IIA. The histochemical reactions for both NADH-linked oxidation and phosphorylase were distinctly increased in the stimulated muscles. In normal muscle, stimulation increased somewhat the number of nuclei per unit area and changed their intracellular distribution, so that a greater proportion was found adjacent to the sarcolemma. The normal posterior latissimus dorsi muscle responded to chronic stimulation with increases of 3-6-fold in its acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The maximum change in AChE occurred after 2 weeks stimulation; a steady level, 3 times that of the control unstimulated muscle, persisted at later times. Chronic stimulation suppressed the over-production of AChE that is characteristic of dystrophic chicken fast-twitch muscle, to attain a level

  12. Interaction of transcutaneous spinal stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation in human leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Roy, François D; Bosgra, Dillen; Stein, Richard B

    2014-06-01

    Transcutaneous spinal stimulation is a noninvasive method that can activate dorsal and/or ventral roots depending on the location and intensity of stimulation. Reflex root-evoked potentials (REPs) were studied in muscles that traditionally evoke large (soleus) and small H-reflexes (tibialis anterior), as well as muscles where H-reflexes are difficult to study (hamstrings). This study characterizes the interaction of the REP and the motor-evoked potential (MEP). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivered 11-25 ms before spinal stimulation resulted in more than linear summation of the two responses. Because of overlap, the modulation was quantified after subtracting the contribution of the conditioning MEP or REP. At rest, the mean-rectified soleus response was facilitated by up to ~250 μV (21-times the MEP or 161% of the REP). The increases were more reliable during a voluntary contraction (up to ~300 μV, 517% of the MEP or 181% of the REP). At the 13-ms interval, the mean-rectified response in the pre-contracted hamstrings was increased by 227% of the MEP or 300% of the REP. In some subjects, TMS could also eliminate the post-activation depression produced using two spinal stimuli, confirming that the interaction can extend to presynaptic spinal neurons. The spatiotemporal facilitation in tibialis anterior was not significant. However, the large MEP was facilitated when the spinal stimulus preceded TMS by 100-150 ms, presumably because of rebound excitation. These strong interactions may be important for inducing motor plasticity and improved training procedures for recovery after neurological damage. PMID:24531641

  13. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle generates lipid-related second messengers by phospholipase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Shansky, Janet; Karlisch, Patricia; Solerssi, Rosa Lopez

    1991-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of cultured avian skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of prostaglandins E2 and F2(alpha) which regulate protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. Mechnical stimulation significantly increases the breakdown rate of (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipids, releasing free (3)H-arachidonic acid, and the rate-limiting precursor of prostaglandin synthesis. Mechanical stimulation also significantly increases (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation and intracellular levels of inositol phosphates from myo-2-(3)H inositol labelled phospholipids. Phospholipase A2, phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC), and phospholipase D (PLD) are activated by stretch. The lipase inhibitors bromophenacylbromide and RHC80267 together reduce stretch-induced prostaglandin production by 73-83 percent. The stretch-induced increases in prostaglandin production, (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipid breakdown, and (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation occur independently of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin insensitive) whereas the formation of inositol phosphates from myo-2-(3)H inositol labelled phospholipids are dependent on cellular electrical activity. These results indicate that mechanical stimulation increases the lipid-related second messengers arachidonic acid, diacylglycerol, and prostaglandins through activation of specific phospholipases such as PLA2 and PLD, but not by activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC.

  14. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle generates lipid-related second messengers by phospholipase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Shansky, J.; Karlisch, P.; Solerssi, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of cultured avian skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of prostaglandins (PG) E2 and F2 alpha which regulate protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. These stretch-induced PG increases are reduced in low extracellular calcium medium and by specific phospholipase inhibitors. Mechanical stimulation increases the breakdown rate of 3H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipids, releasing free 3H-arachidonic acid, the rate-limiting precursor of PG synthesis. Mechanical stimulation also increases 3H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation and intracellular levels of inositol phosphates from myo-[2-3H]inositol labelled phospholipids. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC), and phospholipase D (PLD) are all activated by stretch. The stretch-induced increases in PG production, 3H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipid breakdown, and 3H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation occur independently of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin insensitive) whereas the formation of inositol phosphates from myo-[2-3H]inositol labelled phospholipids is dependent on cellular electrical activity. These results indicate that mechanical stimulation increases the lipid-related second messengers arachidonic acid, diacylglycerol, and PG through activation of specific phospholipases such as PLA2 and PLD, but not by activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC.

  15. MEAT SCIENCE AND MUSCLE BIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM--mechanism of growth hormone stimulation of skeletal muscle growth in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Ge, X

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone, also called somatotropin (ST), is a polypeptide hormone produced by the anterior pituitary. The major functions of GH include stimulating bone and skeletal muscle growth, lipolysis, milk production, and expression of the IGF-I gene in the liver. Based on these functions, recombinant bovine ST (bST) and recombinant porcine ST (pST) have been used to improve milk production in dairy cows and lean tissue growth in pigs, respectively. However, despite these applications, the mechanisms of action of GH are not fully understood. Indeed, there has been a lot of controversy over the role of liver-derived circulating IGF-I and locally produced IGF-I in mediating the growth-stimulatory effect of GH during the last 15 yr. It is in this context that we have conducted studies to further understand how GH stimulates skeletal muscle growth in cattle. Our results do not support a role of skeletal muscle-derived IGF-I in GH-stimulated skeletal muscle growth in cattle. Our results indicate that GH stimulates skeletal muscle growth in cattle, in part, by stimulating protein synthesis in muscle through a GH receptor-mediated, IGF-I-independent mechanism. In this review, besides discussing these results, we also argue that liver-derived circulating IGF-I should be still considered as the major mechanism that mediates the growth-stimulatory effect of GH on skeletal muscle in cattle and other domestic animals. PMID:24166991

  16. Eccentric exercise facilitates mesenchymal stem cell appearance in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Carmen; Huntsman, Heather D; Liu, Jianming; Zou, Kai; Boppart, Marni D

    2012-01-01

    Eccentric, or lengthening, contractions result in injury and subsequently stimulate the activation and proliferation of satellite stem cells which are important for skeletal muscle regeneration. The discovery of alternative myogenic progenitors in skeletal muscle raises the question as to whether stem cells other than satellite cells accumulate in muscle in response to exercise and contribute to post-exercise repair and/or growth. In this study, stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) positive, non-hematopoetic (CD45⁻) cells were evaluated in wild type (WT) and α7 integrin transgenic (α7Tg) mouse muscle, which is resistant to injury yet liable to strain, 24 hr following a single bout of eccentric exercise. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ stem cells were increased 2-fold in WT muscle post-exercise. The α7 integrin regulated the presence of Sca-1⁺ cells, with expansion occurring in α7Tg muscle and minimal cells present in muscle lacking the α7 integrin. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ cells isolated from α7Tg muscle following exercise were characterized as mesenchymal-like stem cells (mMSCs), predominantly pericytes. In vitro multiaxial strain upregulated mMSC stem cells markers in the presence of laminin, but not gelatin, identifying a potential mechanistic basis for the accumulation of these cells in muscle following exercise. Transplantation of DiI-labeled mMSCs into WT muscle increased Pax7⁺ cells and facilitated formation of eMHC⁺DiI⁻ fibers. This study provides the first demonstration that mMSCs rapidly appear in skeletal muscle in an α7 integrin dependent manner post-exercise, revealing an early event that may be necessary for effective repair and/or growth following exercise. The results from this study also support a role for the α7 integrin and/or mMSCs in molecular- and cellular-based therapeutic strategies that can effectively combat disuse muscle atrophy. PMID:22253772

  17. LEUCINE STIMULATION OF SKELETAL MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS DURING PROLONGED LEUCINE INFUSION IS DEPENDENT ON AMINO ACID AVAILABILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine stimulates protein synthesis in cultured cells, mature rats and neonatal pigs. We have reported that leucine infusion increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs during a 60-min infusion. When leucine infusion was prolonged for 120 min, however, protein synthesis was no...

  18. Oral Gingival Cell Cigarette Smoke Exposure Induces Muscle Cell Metabolic Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Baeder, Andrea C.; Napa, Kiran; Richardson, Sarah T.; Taylor, Oliver J.; Andersen, Samantha G.; Wilcox, Shalene H.; Winden, Duane R.; Reynolds, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure compromises health through damaging multiple physiological systems, including disrupting metabolic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of oral gingiva in mediating the deleterious metabolic effects of cigarette smoke exposure on skeletal muscle metabolic function. Using an in vitro conditioned medium cell model, skeletal muscle cells were incubated with medium from gingival cells treated with normal medium or medium containing suspended cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Following incubation of muscle cells with gingival cell conditioned medium, muscle cell mitochondrial respiration and insulin signaling and action were determined as an indication of overall muscle metabolic health. Skeletal muscle cells incubated with conditioned medium of CSE-treated gingival cells had a profound reduction in mitochondrial respiration and respiratory control. Furthermore, skeletal muscle cells had a greatly reduced response in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Altogether, these results provide a novel perspective on the mechanism whereby cigarette smoke affects systemic metabolic function. In conclusion, we found that oral gingival cells treated with CSE create an altered milieu that is sufficient to both disrupted skeletal muscle cell mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27034671

  19. Effects of electrical stimulation on histochemical muscle fiber staining, quality, and composition of camel and cattle Longissimus thoracis muscles.

    PubMed

    Kadim, I T; Mahgoub, O; Al-Marzooqi, W; Khalaf, S K; Mansour, M H; Al-Sinani, S S H; Al-Amri, I S

    2009-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation on muscle fiber type, meat quality, and composition of Longissimus thoracis muscles from one-humped camels and Dofari Omani cattle of a comparable age range were investigated. A low-voltage electrical stimulation with 90 V, 14 Hz (pulse of 7.5-millisecond duration every 70 milliseconds) 20 min postmortem was applied. Samples from the left muscle were collected from 20 (2 to 3 y) camels and 24 cattle (1 to 3 y). For chemical composition, muscle samples were dried in a freeze dryer, and then ground to determine moisture, protein, fat, and ash. Macro- and micro-minerals were determined using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometer. Quality characteristics of the meat were evaluated using shear force value, pH, sarcomere, myofibrillar fragmentation index, expressed juice, cooking loss percent, and CIE L*, a*, b* color values. Electrical stimulation resulted in a significantly (P < 0.05) more rapid pH fall in the muscle during the first 24 h after slaughter in both species. Muscles from electrically stimulated carcasses had significantly (P < 0.05) lower ultimate pH, longer sarcomere, and lower shear force values than those from nonstimulated carcasses. Lightness (L*), myofibrillar fragmentation, and expressed juice were significantly (P < 0.05) higher for stimulated than for nonstimulated muscles. Muscles of camels had significantly (P < 0.05) higher expressed juice, cooking loss percent, redness color (a*), and lower fat, Mg, K, and P than those from cattle. Electrical stimulation improved quality characteristics of meat from both species. This indicates that meat quality of local camel and cattle can be improved by electrical stimulation and consequently improves their acceptability to consumers and better marketability. PMID:19200120

  20. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Della Gatta, Paul A.; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M.; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J.; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. Results: We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. Conclusion: These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26903873

  1. Syndecan-4-expressing muscle progenitor cells in the SP engraft as satellite cells during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kathleen Kelly; Hall, John K; Troy, Andrew A; Cornelison, D D W; Majka, Susan M; Olwin, Bradley B

    2009-03-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells, located between the basal lamina and plasma membrane of myofibers, are required for skeletal muscle regeneration. The capacity of satellite cells as well as other cell lineages including mesoangioblasts, mesenchymal stem cells, and side population (SP) cells to contribute to muscle regeneration has complicated the identification of a satellite stem cell. We have characterized a rare subset of the muscle SP that efficiently engrafts into the host satellite cell niche when transplanted into regenerating muscle, providing 75% of the satellite cell population and 30% of the myonuclear population, respectively. These cells are found in the satellite cell position, adhere to isolated myofibers, and spontaneously undergo myogenesis in culture. We propose that this subset of SP cells (satellite-SP cells), characterized by ABCG2, Syndecan-4, and Pax7 expression, constitutes a self-renewing muscle stem cell capable of generating both satellite cells and their myonuclear progeny in vivo. PMID:19265661

  2. Rac1 is a novel regulator of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R; Maarbjerg, Stine J; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A

    2013-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (~60-100%) and humans (~40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20-58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P < 0.01). In agreement, the contraction-stimulated increment in glucose uptake was decreased by 27% (P = 0.1) and 40% (P < 0.05) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively, of muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P < 0.01) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively. These are the first data to show that Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:23274900

  3. Rac1 Is a Novel Regulator of Contraction-Stimulated Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R.; Maarbjerg, Stine J.; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T.; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (∼60–100%) and humans (∼40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20–58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P < 0.01). In agreement, the contraction-stimulated increment in glucose uptake was decreased by 27% (P = 0.1) and 40% (P < 0.05) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively, of muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P < 0.01) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively. These are the first data to show that Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:23274900

  4. Cell death regulates muscle fiber number.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, Tatevik; Arya, Richa; Gyonjyan, Seda; Taylor, Barbara; White, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    Cell death can have both cell autonomous and non-autonomous roles in normal development. Previous studies have shown that the central cell death regulators grim and reaper are required for the developmentally important elimination of stem cells and neurons in the developing central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that cell death in the nervous system is also required for normal muscle development. In the absence of grim and reaper, there is an increase in the number of fibers in the ventral abdominal muscles in the Drosophila adult. This phenotype can be partially recapitulated by inhibition of cell death specifically in the CNS, indicating a non-autonomous role for neuronal death in limiting muscle fiber number. We also show that FGFs produced in the cell death defective nervous system are required for the increase in muscle fiber number. Cell death in the muscle lineage during pupal stages also plays a role in specifying fiber number. Our work suggests that FGFs from the CNS act as a survival signal for muscle founder cells. Thus, proper muscle fiber specification requires cell death in both the nervous system and in the developing muscle itself. PMID:27131625

  5. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  6. Using evoked EMG as a synthetic force sensor of isometric electrically stimulated muscle.

    PubMed

    Erfanian, A; Chizeck, H J; Hashemi, R M

    1998-02-01

    A method for the estimation of the force generated by electrically stimulated muscle during isometric contraction is developed here. It is based upon measurements of the evoked electromyogram (EMG) [EEMG] signal. Muscle stimulation is provided to the quadriceps muscle of a paralyzed human subject using percutaneous intramuscular electrodes, and EEMG signals are collected using surface electrodes. Through the use of novel signal acquisition and processing techniques, as well as a mathematical model that reflects both the excitation and activation phenomena involved in isometric muscle force generation, accurate prediction of stimulated muscle forces is obtained for large time horizons. This approach yields synthetic muscle force estimates for both unfatigued and fatigued states of the stimulated muscle. In addition, a method is developed that accomplishes automatic recalibration of the model to account for day-to-day changes in pickup electrode mounting as well as other factors contributing to EEMG gain variations. It is demonstrated that the use of the measured EEMG as the input to a predictive model of muscle torque generation is superior to the use of the electrical stimulation signal as the model input. This is because the measured EEMG signal captures all of the neural excitation, whereas stimulation-to-torque models only reflect that portion of the neural excitation that results directly from stimulation. The time-varying properties of the excitation process cannot be captured by existing stimulation-to-torque models, but they are tracked by the EEMG-to-torque models that are developed here. This work represents a promising approach to the real-time estimation of stimulated muscle force in functional neuromuscular stimulation applications. PMID:9473842

  7. Influence of electrical stimulation on hip joint adductor muscle activity during maximum effort

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated whether hip adductor activity was influenced by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 nondisabled males. Each subject was asked to adduct the hip joint with maximum effort. The electromyogram of the adductor longus was recorded under two experimental conditions, with and without electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. [Results] In the presence of electrical stimulation, muscle activity decreased to 72.9% (57.8–89.3%) of that without stimulation. [Conclusion] These results suggested that inactivation of the adductor group was promoted by electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata. PMID:27313387

  8. Concept Developed for an Implanted Stimulated Muscle-Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Kilgore, Kevin; Ercegovic, David; Gustafson, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Implanted electronic devices are typically powered by batteries or transcutaneous power transmission. Batteries must be replaced or recharged, and transcutaneous power sources burden the patient or subject with external equipment prone to failure. A completely self-sustaining implanted power source would alleviate these limitations. Skeletal muscle provides an available autologous power source containing native chemical energy that produces power in excess of the requirements for muscle activation by motor nerve stimulation. A concept has been developed to convert stimulated skeletal muscle power into electrical energy (see the preceding illustration). We propose to connect a piezoelectric generator between a muscle tendon and bone. Electrically stimulated muscle contractions would exert force on the piezoelectric generator, charging a storage circuit that would be used to power the stimulator and other devices.

  9. Overexpression of follistatin in trout stimulates increased muscling.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Erika F; Phelps, Michael P; Fuentes, Fernando D; Bradley, Terence M

    2009-07-01

    Deletion or inhibition of myostatin in mammals has been demonstrated to markedly increase muscle mass by hyperplasia, hypertrophy, or a combination of both. Despite a remarkably high degree of conservation with the mammalian protein, the function of myostatin remains unknown in fish, many species of which continue muscle growth throughout the lifecycle by hyperplasia. Transgenic rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) overexpressing follistatin, one of the more efficacious antagonists of myostatin, were produced to investigate the effect of this protein on muscle development and growth. P(1) transgenics overexpressing follistatin in muscle tissue exhibited increased epaxial and hypaxial muscling similar to that observed in double-muscled cattle and myostatin null mice. The hypaxial muscling generated a phenotype reminiscent of well-developed rectus abdominus and intercostal muscles in humans and was dubbed "six pack." Body conformation of the transgenic animals was markedly altered, as measured by condition factor, and total muscle surface area increased. The increased muscling was due almost exclusively to hyperplasia as evidenced by a higher number of fibers per unit area and increases in the percentage of smaller fibers and the number of total fibers. In several individuals, asymmetrical muscling was observed, but no changes in mobility or behavior of follistatin fish were observed. The findings indicate that overexpression of follistatin in trout, a species with indeterminate growth rate, enhances muscle growth. It remains to be determined whether the double muscling in trout is due to inhibition of myostatin, other growth factors, or both. PMID:19474387

  10. Smooth Muscle Enriched Long Noncoding RNA (SMILR) Regulates Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Margaret D.; Pinel, Karine; Dakin, Rachel; Vesey, Alex T.; Diver, Louise; Mackenzie, Ruth; Garcia, Raquel; Welsh, Paul; Sattar, Naveed; Hamilton, Graham; Joshi, Nikhil; Dweck, Marc R.; Miano, Joseph M.; McBride, Martin W.; Newby, David E.; McDonald, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Phenotypic switching of vascular smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state is implicated in diverse vascular pathologies, including atherogenesis, plaque stabilization, and neointimal hyperplasia. However, very little is known about the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during this process. Here, we investigated a role for lncRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cell biology and pathology. Methods and Results— Using RNA sequencing, we identified >300 lncRNAs whose expression was altered in human saphenous vein vascular smooth muscle cells following stimulation with interleukin-1α and platelet-derived growth factor. We focused on a novel lncRNA (Ensembl: RP11-94A24.1), which we termed smooth muscle–induced lncRNA enhances replication (SMILR). Following stimulation, SMILR expression was increased in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was detected in conditioned media. Furthermore, knockdown of SMILR markedly reduced cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we noted that expression of genes proximal to SMILR was also altered by interleukin-1α/platelet-derived growth factor treatment, and HAS2 expression was reduced by SMILR knockdown. In human samples, we observed increased expression of SMILR in unstable atherosclerotic plaques and detected increased levels in plasma from patients with high plasma C-reactive protein. Conclusions— These results identify SMILR as a driver of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suggest that modulation of SMILR may be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce vascular pathologies. PMID:27052414

  11. The TMS Map Scales with Increased Stimulation Intensity and Muscle Activation.

    PubMed

    van de Ruit, Mark; Grey, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    One way to study cortical organisation, or its reorganisation, is to use transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to construct a map of corticospinal excitability. TMS maps are reported to be acquired with a wide variety of stimulation intensities and levels of muscle activation. Whilst MEPs are known to increase both with stimulation intensity and muscle activation, it remains to be established what the effect of these factors is on the map's centre of gravity (COG), area, volume and shape. Therefore, the objective of this study was to systematically examine the effect of stimulation intensity and muscle activation on these four key map outcome measures. In a first experiment, maps were acquired with a stimulation intensity of 110, 120 and 130% of resting threshold. In a second experiment, maps were acquired at rest and at 5, 10, 20 and 40% of maximum voluntary contraction. Map area and map volume increased with both stimulation intensity (P < 0.01) and muscle activation (P < 0.01). Neither the COG nor the map shape changed with either stimulation intensity or muscle activation (P > 0.09 in all cases). This result indicates the map simply scales with stimulation intensity and muscle activation. PMID:26337508

  12. Serotonin augments smooth muscle differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Nobuaki; McCuaig, Sarah; O'Sullivan, Michael J; Martin, James G

    2014-05-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) contain a subset of multipotent stem cells. Here, we demonstrate that serotonin, a biogenic amine released by platelets and mast cells, can induce the smooth muscle differentiation of BMSCs. Brown Norway rat BMSCs stimulated with serotonin had increased expression of the smooth muscle markers smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and α actin (α-SMA) by qPCR and Western blot, indicating smooth muscle differentiation. This was accompanied by a concomitant down-regulation of the microRNA miR-25-5p, which was found to negatively regulate smooth muscle differentiation. Serotonin upregulated serum response factor (SRF) and myocardin, transcription factors known to induce contractile protein expression in smooth muscle cells, while it down-regulated Elk1 and Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), known to induce proliferation. Serotonin increased SRF binding to promoter regions of the MHC and α-SMA genes, assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Induction of smooth muscle differentiation by serotonin was blocked by the knock-down of SRF and myocardin. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was constitutively expressed by BMSCs and serotonin triggered its release. Inhibition of miR-25-5p augmented TGF-β1 expression, however the differentiation of BMSCs was not mediated by TGF-β1. These findings demonstrate that serotonin promotes a smooth muscle-like phenotype in BMSCs by altering the balance of SRF, myocardin, Elk1 and KLF4 and miR-25-5p is involved in modulating this balance. Therefore, serotonin potentially contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases characterized by tissue remodeling with increased smooth muscle mass. PMID:24595007

  13. Potential of laryngeal muscle regeneration using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dirja, Bayu Tirta; Yoshie, Susumu; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may be a new potential cell source for laryngeal muscle regeneration in the treatment of vocal fold atrophy after recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objectives Unilateral vocal fold paralysis can lead to degeneration, atrophy, and loss of force of the thyroarytenoid muscle. At present, there are some treatments such as thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and vocal fold injection. However, such treatments cannot restore reduced mass of the thyroarytenoid muscle. iPS cells have been recognized as supplying a potential resource for cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of iPS cells for the regeneration of laryngeal muscle through the evaluation of both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods Skeletal muscle cells were generated from tdTomato-labeled iPS cells using embryoid body formation. Differentiation into skeletal muscle cells was analyzed by gene expression and immunocytochemistry. The tdTomato-labeled iPS cell-derived skeletal muscle cells were transplanted into the left atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle. To evaluate the engraftment of these cells after transplantation, immunohistochemistry was performed. Results The tdTomato-labeled iPS cells were successfully differentiated into skeletal muscle cells through an in vitro experiment. These cells survived in the atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle after transplantation. PMID:26824385

  14. The effects of electrical stimulation exercise on muscles injected with botulinum toxin type-A (botox).

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Rafael; Horisberger, Monika; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Van der Marel, Robert; Herzog, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is a frequently used treatment modality for a variety of neuromuscular disorders. It acts by preventing acetylcholine release at the motor nerve endings, inducing muscle paralysis. Although considered safe, studies suggest that BTX-A injections create adverse effects on target and non-target muscles. We speculate that these adverse effects are reduced by direct electrical stimulation (ES) exercising of muscles. The aims were to determine the effects of ES exercise on strength, mass, and contractile material in BTX-A injected muscles, and to investigate if BTX-A injections affect non-target muscles. Seventeen New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were divided into three groups: (1) Control group received saline injections; (2) BTX-A group received monthly BTX-A (3.5 U/kg) injections into the quadriceps for six months and (3) BTX-A+ES group received monthly BTX-A injections and ES exercise three times a week for six months. Outcome measures included knee extensor torque, muscle mass, and contractile material percentage area in injected and contralateral, non-injected quadriceps. Glycogen depletion and direct muscle stimulation were used to assess possible muscle inhibition in non-injected quadriceps. ES exercise partially prevented muscle weakness, atrophy, and contractile material loss in injected muscles, and mostly prevented muscle degeneration in contralateral, non-injected muscles. Non-injected muscles of BTX-A+ES group showed higher force with direct muscle compared to nerve stimulation, and retained glycogen following the depletion protocol, suggesting that BTX-A inhibited activation in non-target muscles. We conclude that ES exercise provides some protection from degeneration to target and non-target muscles during BTX-A treatments. PMID:23122225

  15. Induction of the hyaluronic acid-binding protein, tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6, in cervical smooth muscle cells by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and prostaglandin E(2).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Toshio; Savani, Rashmin C; Watari, Michiko; Day, Anthony J; Strauss, Jerome F

    2002-04-01

    Immediately before parturition the cervix undergoes striking changes in structure (ripening) that facilitate dilatation and effacement. Cervical ripening shares many features in common with inflammation-associated tissue remodeling, making it a valuable process to explore with respect to the biochemical events in extracellular matrix restructuring. Cervical ripening can be pharmacologically induced with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Among the biochemical changes in the cervix at parturition is a marked increase in the hyaluronic acid (HA) content. HA and HA-binding proteins have been implicated in tissue hydration, release of collagenase, and leukocyte migration, but their roles in cervical ripening have not been explored. In the present study we examined the ability of PGE(2) to induce expression of the HA-binding protein, tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene (TSG)-6, in human cervical smooth muscle cells (hCSMCs) and compared the PGE(2) response to that of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), an established inducer of TSG-6. TNF-alpha stimulated TSG-6 mRNA accumulation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with the maximal response observed at 10 ng/ml after 6 hours of incubation. PGE(2) stimulated TSG-6 mRNA expression, but the magnitude of response was substantially less than that produced by TNF-alpha, and it was maximal only after 24 hours of incubation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to assess the induction of TSG-6 mRNA and nascent transcripts at 24 hours of treatment. Induction of TSG-6 mRNA and nascent transcripts in response to 10 micromol/L of PGE(2) was 5.7-fold and 6.3-fold greater than control values, respectively, whereas TNF-alpha (10 ng/ml) induced TSG-6 mRNA and nascent transcripts by 80-fold and 134-fold, respectively. TNF-alpha and PGE(2) stimulated secretion of TSG-6 into the culture medium as detected by Western blotting. The effects of PGE(2) on secretion of TSG-6 were delayed compared to TNF-alpha. A 1

  16. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  17. The influence of antagonist muscle electrical stimulation on maximal hip adduction force

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine whether electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle decreases voluntary maximum resistance to passive abduction motion in participants without disease of the central nervous system. [Subjects] The participants were 16 healthy men. [Methods] The hip joint was moved from 10° adduction to 0° adduction with an angular velocity of 7°/s. During the passive leg motion, the subject was asked to resist the motion with maximum force. Two experimental conditions were prepared: (1) electrical stimulation provided to the tensor fascia lata muscle during the passive motion; and (2) no electrical stimulation provided. [Results] The force was 10.2 ± 3.5 kgf with electrical stimulation and 12.2 ± 3.8 kgf without electrical stimulation. [Conclusion] The results suggested that the maximum hip adduction force decreased in participants because of electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle. PMID:26957742

  18. A novel transgenic marker for migrating limb muscle precursors and for vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tidhar, A; Reichenstein, M; Cohen, D; Faerman, A; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Shani, M

    2001-01-01

    A unique pattern of LacZ expression was found in a transgenic mouse line, likely due to regulatory elements at the site of integration. Two new genes flanking the transgene were identified. At early stages of development, the transgene is transiently expressed in ventro-lateral demomyotomal cells migrating from the somites into the limb buds. At late developmental stages and in the adult, lacZ staining marks vascular smooth muscle cells throughout the vascular bed, with the exception of the major elastic arteries, and in pericytes. No expression was detected in skeletal and smooth muscles. Different patterns of expression in vascular smooth muscles was observed at distinct levels of the vascular tree, in arteries as well as in veins. Vessel injury, resulting in stimulation of smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration, is associated with transgene down-regulation. After the formation of neointima thickening, it is reactivated. This transgenic insertion may therefore be used as a useful marker to identify novel physiological cues or genetic elements involved in the regulation of the vascular smooth muscle phenotype(s). It may also provide an experimental tool for studying vasculature and the involvement of pericytes in regulating microvascular homeostasis. PMID:11146508

  19. Electrical Muscle Stimulation: An Effective Form of Exercise and Early Mobilization to Preserve Muscle Strength in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karatzanos, Eleftherios; Gerovasili, Vasiliki; Zervakis, Dimitrios; Tripodaki, Elli-Sophia; Apostolou, Kleovoulos; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Emmanouil; Mitsiou, Georgios; Tsimpouki, Dimitra; Routsi, Christina; Nanas, Serafim

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This is a secondary analysis of previously published data to investigate the effects of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) on strength of various muscle groups in critically ill patients. Methods. One hundred forty-two consecutive patients, with APACHE II score ≥ 13, were randomly assigned to the EMS or the control group. EMS sessions were applied daily on vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and peroneus longus of both lower extremities. Various muscle groups were evaluated with the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale for muscle strength. Handgrip strength assessment was also employed. Results. Twenty four patients in the EMS group and 28 patients in the control group were finally evaluated. EMS patients achieved higher MRC scores than controls (P ≤ 0.05) in wrist flexion, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. Collectively, the EMS group performed higher (P < 0.01) in the legs and overall. Handgrip strength correlated (P ≤ 0.01) with the upper and lower extremities' muscle strength and the overall MRC scores. Conclusions. EMS has beneficial effects on the strength of critically ill patients mainly affecting muscle groups stimulated, while it may also affect muscle groups not involved presenting itself as a potential effective means of muscle strength preservation and early mobilization in this patient population. PMID:22545212

  20. Effects of stimulation frequency versus pulse duration modulation on muscle fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Kesar, Trisha; Chou, Li-Wei; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A.

    2008-01-01

    During functional electrical stimulation (FES), both the frequency and intensity can be increased to increase muscle force output and counteract the effects of muscle fatigue. Most current FES systems, however, deliver a constant frequency and only vary the stimulation intensity to control muscle force. This study compared muscle performance and fatigue produced during repetitive electrical stimulation using three different strategies: (1) constant pulse-duration and stepwise increases in frequency (frequency-modulation); (2) constant frequency and stepwise increases in pulse-duration (pulse-duration-modulation); and (3) constant frequency and pulse-duration (no-modulation). Surface electrical stimulation was delivered to the quadriceps femoris muscles of 12 healthy individuals and isometric forces were recorded. Muscle performance was assessed by measuring the percent changes in the peak forces and force–time integrals between the first and the last fatiguing trains. Muscle fatigue was assessed by measuring percent declines in peak force between the 60 Hz pre- and post-fatigue testing trains. The results showed that frequency-modulation showed better performance for both peak forces and force–time integrals in response to the fatiguing trains than pulse-duration-modulation, while producing similar levels of muscle fatigue. Although frequency-modulation is not commonly used during FES, clinicians should consider this strategy to improve muscle performance. PMID:17317219

  1. Acupuncture plus low-frequency electrical stimulation (Acu-LFES) attenuates denervation-induced muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhen; Hu, Li; Cheng, Jinzhong; Klein, Janet D; Hassounah, Faten; Cai, Hui; Li, Min; Wang, Haidong; Wang, Xiaonan H

    2016-02-15

    Muscle wasting occurs in a variety of clinical situations, including denervation. There is no effective pharmacological treatment for muscle wasting. In this study, we used a tibial nerve denervation model to test acupuncture plus low-frequency electric stimulation (Acu-LFES) as a therapeutic strategy for muscle atrophy. Acupuncture needles were connected to an SDZ-II electronic acupuncture device delivering pulses at 20 Hz and 1 mA; the treatment was 15 min daily for 2 wk. Acu-LFES prevented soleus and plantaris muscle weight loss and increased muscle cross-sectional area in denervated mice. The abundances of Pax7, MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic myosin heavy chain were significantly increased by Acu-LFES in both normal and denervated muscle. The number of central nuclei was increased in Acu-LFES-treated muscle fibers. Phosphorylation of Akt was downregulated by denervation leading to a decline in muscle mass; however, Acu-LFES prevented the denervation-induced decline largely by upregulation of the IGF-1 signaling pathway. Acu-LFES reduced the abundance of muscle catabolic proteins forkhead O transcription factor and myostatin, contributing to the attenuated muscle atrophy. Acu-LFES stimulated the expression of macrophage markers (F4/80, IL-1b, and arginase-1) and inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IFNγ, and TNFα) in normal and denervated muscle. Acu-LFES also stimulated production of the muscle-specific microRNAs miR-1 and miR-206. We conclude that Acu-LFES is effective in counteracting denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and increasing muscle regeneration. Upregulation of IGF-1, downregulation of myostatin, and alteration of microRNAs contribute to the attenuation of muscle atrophy in denervated mice. PMID:26679610

  2. Hydrogen peroxide induced responses of cat tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, V; Oike, M; Tanaka, H; Inoue, R; Ito, Y

    1997-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (10−6 and 10−3 M) on membrane potential, membrane currents, intracellular calcium concentration, resting muscle tone and contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol were examined in cat tracheal strips and isolated smooth muscle cells. H2O2 (10−4 and 10−5 M) enhanced the amplitude of contractions and excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.) evoked by EFS without changing muscle tone and resting membrane potential of the tracheal smooth muscle, and enhanced the contraction induced by carbachol (10−8 M). At an increased concentration (10−3 M), H2O2 elevated resting muscle tone and marginally hyperpolarized the membrane in the majority of the cells. In 51 out of 56 cells examined, H2O2 (10−6–10−3 M) elicited an outward current at a holding potential of −40 mV and enhanced the frequency of the spontaneous transient outward current (STOC). In 20 cells the outward current was preceded by a small inward current. In the other cells, H2O2 elicited only an inward current or did not affect the background current. In Ca2+ free solution the action of H2O2 on the resting muscle tone, STOCs, background current and on the current induced by ramp depolarization was significantly reduced. H2O2 (10−4 M) increased the intracellular ionized calcium concentration both in the absence and presence of external Ca2+. However, the effect developed faster and was of a higher amplitude in the presence of external Ca2+. These results suggest that H2O2 increases intracellular Ca2+, with a subsequent augmentation of stimulation-evoked contractions, and enhances Ca2+ and voltage-sensitive potassium conductance. PMID:9222542

  3. Effects of a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system on hemiplegic gait and muscle forces

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing-guang; Rong, Ke; Qian, Zhenyun; Wen, Chen; Zhang, Songning

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to design and implement a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system and investigate acute effects of functional electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris on ankle and knee sagittal-plane kinematics and related muscle forces of hemiplegic gait. [Subjects and Methods] A multichannel dynamic electrical stimulation system was developed with 8-channel low frequency current generators. Eight male hemiplegic patients were trained for 4 weeks with electric stimulation of the tibia anterior and rectus femoris muscles during walking, which was coupled with active contraction. Kinematic data were collected, and muscle forces of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris of the affected limbs were analyzed using a musculoskelatal modeling approach before and after training. A paired sample t-test was used to detect the differences between before and after training. [Results] The step length of the affected limb significantly increased after the stimulation was applied. The maximum dorsiflexion angle and maximum knee flexion angle of the affected limb were both increased significantly during stimulation. The maximum muscle forces of both the tibia anterior and rectus femoris increased significantly during stimulation compared with before functional electrical stimulation was applied. [Conclusion] This study established a functional electrical stimulation strategy based on hemiplegic gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. The multichannel functional electrical stimulation system successfully corrected foot drop and altered circumduction hemiplegic gait pattern. PMID:26696734

  4. Paradoxical effects of increased expression of PGC-1α on muscle mitochondrial function and insulin-stimulated muscle glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol Soo; Befroy, Douglas E.; Codella, Roberto; Kim, Sheene; Reznick, Richard M.; Hwang, Yu-Jin; Liu, Zhen-Xiang; Lee, Hui-Young; Distefano, Alberto; Samuel, Varman T.; Zhang, Dongyan; Cline, Gary W.; Handschin, Christoph; Lin, Jiandie; Petersen, Kitt F.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α has been shown to play critical roles in regulating mitochondria biogenesis, respiration, and muscle oxidative phenotype. Furthermore, reductions in the expression of PGC-1α in muscle have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. To determine the effect of increased muscle-specific PGC-1α expression on muscle mitochondrial function and glucose and lipid metabolism in vivo, we examined body composition, energy balance, and liver and muscle insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies and muscle energetics by using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in transgenic mice. Increased expression of PGC-1α in muscle resulted in a 2.4-fold increase in mitochondrial density, which was associated with an ≈60% increase in the unidirectional rate of ATP synthesis. Surprisingly, there was no effect of increased muscle PGC-1α expression on whole-body energy expenditure, and PGC-1α transgenic mice were more prone to fat-induced insulin resistance because of decreased insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake. The reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake could most likely be attributed to a relative increase in fatty acid delivery/triglyceride reesterfication, as reflected by increased expression of CD36, acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase1, and mitochondrial acyl-CoA:glycerol-sn-3-phosphate acyltransferase, that may have exceeded mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, resulting in increased intracellular lipid accumulation and an increase in the membrane to cytosol diacylglycerol content. This, in turn, caused activation of PKCθ, decreased insulin signaling at the level of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation, and skeletal muscle insulin resistance. PMID:19066218

  5. THE EFFECTS OF CHRONIC IMMUNE STIMULATION ON MUSCLE GROWTH IN RAINBOW TROUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful production of aquaculture species depends on efficient growth with low susceptibility to disease. Therefore, selection programs have focused on rapid growth combined with disease resistance. However, chronic immune stimulation diminishes muscle growth (a syndrome referred to as cachexia),...

  6. Bioelectrical activity of limb muscles during cold shivering of stimulation of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of caloric and electric stimulation of the vestibular receptors on the EMG activity of limb muslces in anesthetized cats during cold induced shivering involved flexor muscles alone. Both types of stimulation suppressed bioelectrical activity more effectively in the ipsilateral muscles. The suppression of shivering activity seems to be due to the increased inhibitory effect of descending labyrinth pathways on the function of flexor motoneurons.

  7. Functional electrical stimulation of intrinsic laryngeal muscles under varying loads in exercising horses.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Jon; Regner, Abby; Jarvis, Jonathan C; Priest, David; Sanders, Ira; Soderholm, Leo V; Mitchell, Lisa M; Ducharme, Norm G

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral vocal fold paralysis (BVCP) is a life threatening condition and appears to be a good candidate for therapy using functional electrical stimulation (FES). Developing a working FES system has been technically difficult due to the inaccessible location and small size of the sole arytenoid abductor, the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle. A naturally-occurring disease in horses shares many functional and etiological features with BVCP. In this study, the feasibility of FES for equine vocal fold paralysis was explored by testing arytenoid abduction evoked by electrical stimulation of the PCA muscle. Rheobase and chronaxie were determined for innervated PCA muscle. We then tested the hypothesis that direct muscle stimulation can maintain airway patency during strenuous exercise in horses with induced transient conduction block of the laryngeal motor nerve. Six adult horses were instrumented with a single bipolar intra-muscular electrode in the left PCA muscle. Rheobase and chronaxie were within the normal range for innervated muscle at 0.55±0.38 v and 0.38±0.19 ms respectively. Intramuscular stimulation of the PCA muscle significantly improved arytenoid abduction at all levels of exercise intensity and there was no significant difference between the level of abduction achieved with stimulation and control values under moderate loads. The equine larynx may provide a useful model for the study of bilateral fold paralysis. PMID:21904620

  8. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on masticatory muscles in elderly stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joong-San; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on masticatory muscle activation in elderly stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 20 elderly patients diagnosed with stroke and 10 healthy elderly individuals. The neuromuscular electrical stimulation group received stimulation on the masseter muscle in the affected side for 30 min each day, 3 times per week for 8 weeks. In all the subjects, surface electromyography was used to measure activity of the masseter and temporal muscles in both sides under resting and clenching conditions. [Results] In the neuromuscular electrical stimulation group, after the intervention, an increase in the activity of all of the masticatory muscles was observed during clenching, with a significant increase in the activity of the masseter muscle in the affected side. Significant differences between the groups were not observed after the interventions. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation effectively improves muscle activity in elderly stroke patients during clenching, and that this technique can be applied particularly for the improvement of the clenching activity of the masseter muscle in the affected side. PMID:26504289

  9. Kinematic MRI study of upper-airway biomechanics using electrical muscle stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennick, Michael J.; Margulies, Susan S.; Ford, John C.; Gefter, Warren B.; Pack, Allan I.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a new and powerful method to study the movement and function of upper airway muscles. Our method is to use direct electrical stimulation of individual upper airway muscles, while performing state of the art high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have adapted a paralyzed isolated UA cat model so that positive or negative static pressure in the UA can be controlled at specific levels while electrical muscle stimulation is applied during MRI. With these techniques we can assess the effect of muscle stimulation on airway cross-sectional area compliance and soft tissue motion. We are reporting the preliminary results and MRI techniques which have enabled us to examine changes in airway dimensions which result form electrical stimulation of specific upper airway dilator muscles. The results of this study will be relevant to the development of new clinical treatments for obstructive sleep apnea by providing new information as to exactly how upper airway muscles function to dilate the upper airway and the strength of stimulation required to prevent the airway obstruction when overall muscle tone may not be sufficient to maintain regular breathing.

  10. The comparative effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics and muscle relaxants on electrical field stimulation response in rat bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang Ho; Min, Young Sil; Lee, Sang Joon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that several aminoglycoside antibiotics have a potential of prolonging the action of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants by drug interactions acting pre-synaptically to inhibit acetylcholine release, but antibiotics itself also have a strong effect on relaxing the smooth muscle. In this study, four antibiotics of aminoglycosides such as gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin and neomycin were compared with skeletal muscle relaxants baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine, and a smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine. The muscle strips isolated from the rat bladder were stimulated with pulse trains of 40 V in amplitude and 10 s in duration, with pulse duration of 1 ms at the frequency of 1-8 Hz, at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 Hz respectively. To test the effect of four antibiotics on bladder smooth muscle relaxation, each of them was treated cumulatively from 1 μM to 0.1 mM with an interval of 5 min. Among the four antibiotics, gentamicin and neomycin inhibited the EFS response. The skeletal muscle relaxants (baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine) and inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA and glycine) did not show any significant effect. However, papaverine, had a significant effect in the relaxation of the smooth muscle. It was suggested that the aminoglycoside antibiotics have inhibitory effect on the bladder smooth muscle. PMID:27260628

  11. Heterogeneity in the muscle satellite cell population

    PubMed Central

    Biressi, Stefano; Rando, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite cells, the adult stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration, are defined by their location between the basal lamina and the fiber sarcolemma. Increasing evidence suggests that satellite cells represent a heterogeneous population of cells with distinct embryological origin and multiple levels of biochemical and functional diversity. This review focuses on the rich diversity of the satellite cell population based on studies across species. Ultimately, a more complete characterization of the heterogeneity of satellite cells will be essential to understand the functional significance in terms of muscle growth, homeostasis, tissue repair, and aging. PMID:20849971

  12. Dietary obacunone supplementation stimulates muscle hypertrophy, and suppresses hyperglycemia and obesity through the TGR5 and PPARγ pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Horiba, Taro; Katsukawa, Masahiro; Mita, Moeko; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-08-07

    Obacunone is a limonoid that is predominantly found in Citrus. Although various biological activities of limonoids have been reported, little is known about the beneficial effects of obacunone on metabolic disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary obacunone supplementation on obese KKAy mice, to clarify the function of obacunone in metabolic regulation. Mice were pair-fed a normal diet either alone or supplemented with 0.1% w/w obacunone for 28 days. Compared with the control, obacunone-fed mice had lower glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose, and white adipose tissue weight, although there was no significant difference in body weight. Obacunone treatment also significantly increased the weight of the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. Reporter gene assays revealed that obacunone stimulated the transcriptional activity of the bile acids-specific G protein-coupled receptor, TGR5, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, obacunone inhibited adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and antagonized ligand-stimulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcriptional activity. These results suggest that obacunone stimulates muscle hypertrophy and prevents obesity and hyperglycemia, and that these beneficial effects are likely to be mediated through the activation of TGR5 and inhibition of PPARγ transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Citrus limonoid obacunone prevents hyperglycemia in obese, diabetic KKAy mice. • Obacunone reduces fat content and stimulates muscle hypertrophy in KKAy mice. • Obacunone stimulates TGR5 transcriptional activities. • Obacunone antagonizes PPARγ and inhibits lipid accumulation in adipocytes.

  13. Muscle Responses to Stimulation of the Tadpole Tail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funkhouser, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Describes use of tail muscles and spinal cord in the tadpole as an alternative source for muscle-and-nerve experiments. Includes explanation of simple dissection and preparation of tadpole; instructions for experiments such as threshold, strength of stimulus, frequency of stimulus, single twitch, tetanus, fatigue, effects of temperature on…

  14. Regulation of VEGF and bFGF mRNA expression and other proliferative compounds in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L; Schjerling, P; Hellsten, Y

    2004-01-01

    The role of muscle contraction, prostanoids, nitric oxide and adenosine in the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and endothelial cell proliferative compounds in skeletal muscle cell cultures was examined. VEGF and bFGF mRNA, protein release as well as the proliferative effect of extracellular medium was determined in non-stimulated and electro-stimulated rat and human skeletal muscle cells. In rat skeletal muscle cells these aspects were also determined after treatment with inhibitors and/or donors of nitric oxide (NO), prostanoids and adenosine. Electro-stimulation caused an elevation in the VEGF and bFGF mRNA levels of rat muscle cells by 33% and 43% (P < 0.05), respectively, and in human muscle cells VEGF mRNA was elevated by 24%. Medium from electro-stimulated human, but not rat muscle cells induced a 126% higher (P < 0.05) endothelial cell proliferation than medium from non-stimulated cells. Cyclooxygenase inhibition of rat muscle cells induced a 172% increase (P < 0.05) in VEGF mRNA and a 104% increase in the basal VEGF release. Treatment with the NO donor SNAP (0.5 microM) decreased (P < 0.05) VEGF and bFGF mRNA by 42 and 38%, respectively. Medium from SNAP treated muscle cells induced a 45% lower (P < 0.05) proliferation of endothelial cells than control medium. Adenosine enhanced the basal VEGF release from muscle cells by 75% compared to control. The present data demonstrate that contractile activity, NO, adenosine and products of cyclooxygenase regulate the expression of VEGF and bFGF mRNA in skeletal muscle cells and that contractile activity and NO regulate endothelial cell proliferative compounds in muscle extracellular fluid. PMID:15609080

  15. Chronic effects of low-frequency low-intensity electrical stimulation of stretched human muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, Boris S.; Lyubaeva, Ekaterina V.; Popov, Daniil V.; Netreba, Aleksey I.; Bravy, Yan R.; Tarakin, Pavel P.; Lemesheva, Yulia S.; Vinogradova, Olga L.

    2007-02-01

    Effects of low-frequency electrical stimulation, which is currently considered to be a possible countermeasure for long-duration spaceflights, with and without stretch were evaluated. Twelve young male volunteers were randomly distributed into two groups. In one group anterior thigh muscles—knee extensors of both legs were stimulated with frequency of 15 Hz for 4.5 wks, six times a week; each session was 6-h long. In the other group, electrical stimulation with the same parameters was applied to stretched knee extensors. Following stimulation the subjects exhibited an increase in fatigue resistance, and in the succinate dehydrogenase activity and a 10% gain in the percentage of muscle fibers with slow myosin heavy chain isoforms. In a stimulated group the peak voluntary strength went down significantly, the CSA of fast muscle fibers in m. quadriceps femoris became slightly less in size (10%). Electrical stimulation of the stretched muscles induced an insignificant decline in their strength and an increase of cross-sectional area of muscle fibers of both types. Thus chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation may be proposed as a candidate countermeasure against muscle strength and mass loss if it is combined with stretch.

  16. Forever young: rejuvenating muscle satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Madaro, Luca; Latella, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of aging is alteration of organismal homeostasis and progressive decline of tissue functions. Alterations of both cell intrinsic functions and regenerative environmental cues contribute to the compromised stem cell activity and reduced regenerative capability occurring in aged muscles. In this perspective, we discuss the new evidence supporting the hypothesis that skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs) are intrinsically defective in elderly muscles. In particular, we review three recent papers leading to identify fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and p16INK4a as altered signaling in satellite cells from aged mice. These pathways contribute to age-related loss of MuSCs asymmetric polarization, compromised self-renewal capacity, and acquisition of pre-senescent state. The pharmacological manipulation of those networks can open novel strategies to rejuvenate MuSCs and counteract the functional decline of skeletal muscle during aging. PMID:25954192

  17. Muscle Cells Provide Instructions for Planarian Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Witchley, Jessica N.; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E.; Owen, Jared H.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region. PMID:23954785

  18. Contributions to muscle force and EMG by combined neural excitation and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Crago, Patrick E; Makowski, Nathaniel S; Cole, Natalie M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stimulation of muscle for research or clinical interventions is often superimposed on ongoing physiological activity, without a quantitative understanding of the impact of the stimulation on the net muscle activity and the physiological response. Experimental studies show that total force during stimulation is less than the sum of the isolated voluntary and stimulated forces, but the occlusion mechanism is not understood. Approach We develop a model of efferent motor activity elicited by superimposing stimulation during a physiologically activated contraction. The model combines action potential interactions due to collision block, source resetting, and refractory periods with previously published models of physiological motor unit recruitment, rate modulation, force production, and EMG generation in human first dorsal interosseous muscle to investigate the mechanisms and effectiveness of stimulation on the net muscle force and EMG. Main Results Stimulation during a physiological contraction demonstrates partial occlusion of force and the neural component of the EMG, due to action potential interactions in motor units activated by both sources. Depending on neural and stimulation firing rates as well as on force-frequency properties, individual motor unit forces can be greater, smaller, or unchanged by the stimulation. In contrast, voluntary motor unit EMG potentials in simultaneously stimulated motor units show progressive occlusion with increasing stimulus rate. The simulations predict that occlusion would be decreased by a reverse stimulation recruitment order. Significance The results are consistent with and provide a mechanistic interpretation of previously published experimental evidence of force occlusion. The models also predict two effects that have not been reported previously - voluntary EMG occlusion and the advantages of a proximal stimulation site. This study provides a basis for the rational design of both future experiments and clinical

  19. Contributions to muscle force and EMG by combined neural excitation and electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.; Cole, Natalie M.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of muscle for research or clinical interventions is often superimposed on ongoing physiological activity without a quantitative understanding of the impact of the stimulation on the net muscle activity and the physiological response. Experimental studies show that total force during stimulation is less than the sum of the isolated voluntary and stimulated forces, but the occlusion mechanism is not understood. Approach. We develop a model of efferent motor activity elicited by superimposing stimulation during a physiologically activated contraction. The model combines action potential interactions due to collision block, source resetting, and refractory periods with previously published models of physiological motor unit recruitment, rate modulation, force production, and EMG generation in human first dorsal interosseous muscle to investigate the mechanisms and effectiveness of stimulation on the net muscle force and EMG. Main results. Stimulation during a physiological contraction demonstrates partial occlusion of force and the neural component of the EMG, due to action potential interactions in motor units activated by both sources. Depending on neural and stimulation firing rates as well as on force-frequency properties, individual motor unit forces can be greater, smaller, or unchanged by the stimulation. In contrast, voluntary motor unit EMG potentials in simultaneously stimulated motor units show progressive occlusion with increasing stimulus rate. The simulations predict that occlusion would be decreased by a reverse stimulation recruitment order. Significance. The results are consistent with and provide a mechanistic interpretation of previously published experimental evidence of force occlusion. The models also predict two effects that have not been reported previously—voluntary EMG occlusion and the advantages of a proximal stimulation site. This study provides a basis for the rational design of both future experiments and clinical

  20. Ovarian stimulation and granulosa-cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, W; Kruitwagen, R; Bastiaans, B; Hanselaar, T; Rolland, R

    1993-04-17

    Ovarian stimulation in the treatment of infertility is far from physiological because patients and their ovaries are exposed to high concentrations of gonadotropins. Many studies have focused on the two most common side-effects of ovarian stimulation--ie, hyperstimulation and multiple pregnancy. We describe 12 patients in whom granulosa-cell tumour was discovered after ovarian stimulation treatment with clomiphene citrate and/or gonadotropins. Although we cannot prove a causal link between the tumour and the medication, investigations in animals have shown a relation between gonadotropin exposition and the development of granulosa-cell tumours. The possible relation of ovarian stimulation and granulosa-cell tumours in human beings has not been published before. We postulate three explanations for this finding; first, the granulosa-cell tumour is present in the ovary, waiting for a hormonal trigger; second, increased follicle stimulating hormone concentrations are oncogenic to granulosa cell; and third, the onset of the granulosa-cell tumour during ovarian stimulation is coincidental. We recommend that ovarian stimulation is done only if there is a valid indication after proper assessment of the ovaries, and that women who have had ovarian stimulation are followed for longer than at present. PMID:8096944

  1. In Vivo Demonstration of a Self-Sustaining, Implantable, Stimulated-Muscle-Powered Piezoelectric Generator Prototype

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, B. E.; Kilgore, K. L.; Gustafson, K. J.

    2010-01-01

    An implantable, stimulated-muscle-powered piezoelectric active energy harvesting generator was previously designed to exploit the fact that the mechanical output power of muscle is substantially greater than the electrical power necessary to stimulate the muscle’s motor nerve. We reduced to practice the concept by building a prototype generator and stimulator. We demonstrated its feasibility in vivo, using rabbit quadriceps to drive the generator. The generated power was sufficient for self-sustaining operation of the stimulator and additional harnessed power was dissipated through a load resistor. The prototype generator was developed and the power generating capabilities were tested with a mechanical muscle analog. In vivo generated power matched the mechanical muscle analog, verifying its usefulness as a test-bed for generator development. Generator output power was dependent on the muscle stimulation parameters. Simulations and in vivo testing demonstrated that for a fixed number of stimuli/minute, two stimuli applied at a high frequency generated greater power than single stimuli or tetanic contractions. Larger muscles and circuitry improvements are expected to increase available power. An implanted, self-replenishing power source has the potential to augment implanted battery or transcutaneously powered electronic medical devices. PMID:19657742

  2. Microfluidic cell arrays for metabolic monitoring of stimulated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-04-01

    An array of PDMS microchambers was aligned to an array of sensor electrodes and stimulating microelectrodes, which was used for the electrochemical monitoring of the metabolic activity of single isolated adult ventricular myocytes inside the chamber array, stimulated within a transient electric field. The effect of the accumulation of metabolic byproducts in the limited extracellular volume of the picolitre chambers was demonstrated by measuring single muscle cell contraction optically, while concomitant changes in intracellular calcium transients and pH were recorded independently using fluorescent indicator dyes. Both the amplitude of the cell shortening and the magnitude of the intracellular calcium transients decreased over time and both nearly ceased after 20 min of continuous stimulation in the limited extracellullar volume. The intracellular pH decreased gradually during 20 min of continuous stimulation after which a dramatic pH drop was observed, indicating the breakdown of the intracellular buffering capacity. After continuous stimulation, intracellular lactate was released into the microchamber through cell electroporation and was detected electrochemically at a lactate microbiosensor, within the chamber. A mitochondrial uncoupler was used to mimic ischaemia and thus to enhance the cellular content of lactate. Under these circumstances, intracellular lactate concentrations were found to have risen to approximately 15 mM. This array system has the potential of simultaneous electrochemical and optical monitoring of extracellular and intracellular metabolites from single beating heart cells at a controlled metabolic state. PMID:20333720

  3. Effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) on evoked muscular output in paraplegic quadriceps muscle.

    PubMed

    Rabischong, E; Ohanna, F

    1992-07-01

    In order to assess the effects of FES on muscle output, chronic electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle was applied for half an hour twice a day for 2 months, in 10 thoracic level traumatic paraplegic patients. Results concerning torque (at 6 different muscle lengths) and fatigue were measured using a strain gauge transducer in isometric condition, and compared with the findings in 15 paraplegic patients who had not received electrical stimulation, and with 10 able bodied subjects with normal motor functions. With training, muscle strength was very significantly improved whilst fatigue resistance remained at a low level. The peak torque was not found to be of the same muscle length when comparing paraplegics and control subjects; it seemed to demonstrate that length-tension relationship of the muscular actuator was changing when it was electrically activated. Moreover, the force recorded in paraplegics remained markedly lower than in able bodied people. PMID:1508560

  4. Stromal derived factor‐1 and granulocyte‐colony stimulating factor treatment improves regeneration of Pax7−/− mice skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Kamil; Archacki, Rafał; Archacka, Karolina; Stremińska, Władysława; Paciorek, Anna; Gołąbek, Magdalena; Ciemerych, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The skeletal muscle has the ability to regenerate after injury. This process is mediated mainly by the muscle specific stem cells, that is, satellite cells. In case of extensive damage or under pathological conditions, such as muscular dystrophy, the process of muscle reconstruction does not occur properly. The aim of our study was to test whether mobilized stem cells, other than satellite cells, could participate in skeletal muscle reconstruction. Methods Experiments were performed on wild‐type mice and mice lacking the functional Pax7 gene, that is, characterized by the very limited satellite cell population. Gastrocnemius mice muscles were injured by cardiotoxin injection, and then the animals were treated by stromal derived factor‐1 (Sdf‐1) with or without granulocyte‐colony stimulating factor (G‐CSF) for 4 days. The muscles were subjected to thorough assessment of the tissue regeneration process using histological and in vitro methods, as well as evaluation of myogenic factors' expression at the transcript and protein levels. Results Stromal derived factor‐1 alone and Sdf‐1 in combination with G‐CSF significantly improved the regeneration of Pax7−/− skeletal muscles. The Sdf‐1 and G‐CSF treatment caused an increase in the number of mononucleated cells associated with muscle fibres. Further analysis showed that Sdf‐1 and G‐CSF treatment led to the rise in the number of CD34+ and Cxcr4+ cells and expression of Cxcr7. Conclusions Stromal derived factor‐1 and G‐CSF stimulated regeneration of the skeletal muscles deficient in satellite cells. We suggest that mobilized CD34+, Cxcr4+, and Cxcr7+ cells can efficiently participate in the skeletal muscle reconstruction and compensate for the lack of satellite cells. PMID:27239402

  5. Control of cell volume in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Huang, Christopher L-H; Fraser, James A

    2009-02-01

    Regulation of cell volume is a fundamental property of all animal cells and is of particular importance in skeletal muscle where exercise is associated with a wide range of cellular changes that would be expected to influence cell volume. These complex electrical, metabolic and osmotic changes, however, make rigorous study of the consequences of individual factors on muscle volume difficult despite their likely importance during exercise. Recent charge-difference modelling of cell volume distinguishes three major aspects to processes underlying cell volume control: (i) determination by intracellular impermeant solute; (ii) maintenance by metabolically dependent processes directly balancing passive solute and water fluxes that would otherwise cause cell swelling under the influence of intracellular membrane-impermeant solutes; and (iii) volume regulation often involving reversible short-term transmembrane solute transport processes correcting cell volumes towards their normal baselines in response to imposed discrete perturbations. This review covers, in turn, the main predictions from such quantitative analysis and the experimental consequences of comparable alterations in extracellular pH, lactate concentration, membrane potential and extracellular tonicity. The effects of such alterations in the extracellular environment in resting amphibian muscles are then used to reproduce the intracellular changes that occur in each case in exercising muscle. The relative contributions of these various factors to the control of cell volume in resting and exercising skeletal muscle are thus described. PMID:19133959

  6. Intramuscular Electrical Stimulation of Facial Muscles in Humans and Chimpanzees: Duchenne Revisited and Extended

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Bridget M.; Vick, Sarah-Jane; Parr, Lisa A.; Bard, Kim A.; Smith Pasqualini, Marcia C.; Gothard, Katalin M.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    The pioneering work of Duchenne (1862/1990) was replicated in humans using intramuscular electrical stimulation and extended to another species (Pan troglodytes: chimpanzees) to facilitate comparative facial expression research. Intramuscular electrical stimulation, in contrast to the original surface stimulation, offers the opportunity to activate individual muscles as opposed to groups of muscles. In humans, stimulation resulted in appearance changes in line with Facial Action Coding System (FACS) action units (AUs), and chimpanzee facial musculature displayed functional similarity to human facial musculature. The present results provide objective identification of the muscle substrate of human and chimpanzee facial expressions—data that will be useful in providing a common language to compare the units of human and chimpanzee facial expression. PMID:16938079

  7. Replication of Muscle Cell Using Bioimprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsuri, Fahmi; Mitchell, John S.; Alkaisi, Maan M.; Evans, John J.

    2009-07-01

    In our earlier study a heat-curable PDMS or a UV curable elastomer, was used as the replicating material to introduce Bioimprint methodology to facilitate cell imaging [1-2] But, replicating conditions for thermal polymerization is known to cause cell dehydration during curing. In this study, a new type of polymer was developed for use in living cell replica formation, and it was tested on human muscle cells. The cells were incubated and cultured according to standard biological culturing procedures, and they were grown for about 10 days. The replicas were then separated from the muscle cells and taken for analysis under an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The new polymer was designed to be biocompatible with higher resolution and fast curing process compared to other types of silicon-based organic polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Muscle cell imprints were achieved and higher resolution images were able to show the micro structures of the muscle cells, including the cellular fibers and cell membranes. The AFM is able to image features at nanoscale resolution. This capacity enables a number of characteristics of biological cells to be visualized in a unique manner. Polymer and muscle cells preparations were developed at Hamilton, in collaboration between Plant and Food Research and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury. Tapping mode was used for the AFM image analysis as it has low tip-sample forces and non-destructive imaging capability. We will be presenting the bioimprinting processes of muscle cells, their AFM imaging and characterization of the newly developed polymer.

  8. Evoked EMG-based torque prediction under muscle fatigue in implanted neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Zhang, Qin; Guiraud, David; Fattal, Charles

    2011-10-01

    In patients with complete spinal cord injury, fatigue occurs rapidly and there is no proprioceptive feedback regarding the current muscle condition. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the muscle state and assess the expected muscle response to improve the current FES system toward adaptive force/torque control in the presence of muscle fatigue. Our team implanted neural and epimysial electrodes in a complete paraplegic patient in 1999. We carried out a case study, in the specific case of implanted stimulation, in order to verify the corresponding torque prediction based on stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) when muscle fatigue is occurring during electrical stimulation. Indeed, in implanted stimulation, the relationship between stimulation parameters and output torques is more stable than external stimulation in which the electrode location strongly affects the quality of the recruitment. Thus, the assumption that changes in the stimulation-torque relationship would be mainly due to muscle fatigue can be made reasonably. The eEMG was proved to be correlated to the generated torque during the continuous stimulation while the frequency of eEMG also decreased during fatigue. The median frequency showed a similar variation trend to the mean absolute value of eEMG. Torque prediction during fatigue-inducing tests was performed based on eEMG in model cross-validation where the model was identified using recruitment test data. The torque prediction, apart from the potentiation period, showed acceptable tracking performances that would enable us to perform adaptive closed-loop control through implanted neural stimulation in the future.

  9. Evoked EMG-based torque prediction under muscle fatigue in implanted neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Zhang, Qin; Guiraud, David; Fattal, Charles

    2011-12-01

    In patients with complete spinal cord injury, fatigue occurs rapidly and there is no proprioceptive feedback regarding the current muscle condition. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the muscle state and assess the expected muscle response to improve the current FES system toward adaptive force/torque control in the presence of muscle fatigue. Our team implanted neural and epimysial electrodes in a complete paraplegic patient in 1999. We carried out a case study, in the specific case of implanted stimulation, in order to verify the corresponding torque prediction based on stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) when muscle fatigue is occurring during electrical stimulation. Indeed, in implanted stimulation, the relationship between stimulation parameters and output torques is more stable than external stimulation in which the electrode location strongly affects the quality of the recruitment. Thus, the assumption that changes in the stimulation-torque relationship would be mainly due to muscle fatigue can be made reasonably. The eEMG was proved to be correlated to the generated torque during the continuous stimulation while the frequency of eEMG also decreased during fatigue. The median frequency showed a similar variation trend to the mean absolute value of eEMG. Torque prediction during fatigue-inducing tests was performed based on eEMG in model cross-validation where the model was identified using recruitment test data. The torque prediction, apart from the potentiation period, showed acceptable tracking performances that would enable us to perform adaptive closed-loop control through implanted neural stimulation in the future. PMID:21975831

  10. Isolated muscle cells as a physiological model.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M; Hauschka, S D; Hall, Z W; Eisenberg, B R; Horn, R; Walsh, J V; Tsien, R W; Jones, A W; Walker, J L; Poenie, M

    1987-09-01

    Summary of a symposium presented by the American Physiological Society (Cell and General Physiology Section and Muscle Group) at the 70th Annual Meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, St. Louis, Missouri, April 15, 1986, chaired by M. Lieberman and F. Fay. This symposium reflects a growing interest in seeking new technologies to study the basic physiological and biophysical properties of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle cells. Recognizing that technical and analytical problems associated with multicellular preparations limit the physiological significance of many experiments, investigators have increasingly focused on efforts to isolate single, functional embryonic, and adult muscle cells. Progress in obtaining physiologically relevant preparations has been both rapid and significant even though problems regarding cell purification and viability are not fully resolved. The symposium draws attention to a broad, though incomplete, range of studies using isolated or cultured muscle cells. Based on the following reports, investigators should be convinced that a variety of experiments can be designed with preparations of isolated cells and those in tissue culture to resolve questions about fundamental physiological properties of muscle cells. PMID:2443014

  11. Activated Muscle Satellite Cells Chase Ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mourikis, Philippos; Relaix, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    The in vivo behaviors of skeletal muscle stem cells, i.e., satellite cells, during homeostasis and after injury are poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Webster et al. (2016) now perform a tour de force intravital microscopic analysis of this population, showing that "ghost fiber" remnants act as scaffolds to guide satellite cell divisions after injury. PMID:26849298

  12. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Muscle Aging and Sarcopenia and Effects of Electrical Stimulation in Seniors

    PubMed Central

    Barberi, Laura; Scicchitano, Bianca Maria

    2015-01-01

    The prolongation of skeletal muscle strength in aging and neuromuscular disease has been the objective of numerous studies employing a variety of approaches. It is generally accepted that cumulative failure to repair damage related to an overall decrease in anabolic processes is a primary cause of functional impairment in muscle. The functional performance of skeletal muscle tissues declines during post- natal life and it is compromised in different diseases, due to an alteration in muscle fiber composition and an overall decrease in muscle integrity as fibrotic invasions replace functional contractile tissue. Characteristics of skeletal muscle aging and diseases include a conspicuous reduction in myofiber plasticity (due to the progressive loss of muscle mass and in particular of the most powerful fast fibers), alteration in muscle-specific transcriptional mechanisms, and muscle atrophy. An early decrease in protein synthetic rates is followed by a later increase in protein degradation, to affect biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters of muscle fibers during the aging process. Alterations in regenerative pathways also compromise the functionality of muscle tissues. In this review we will give an overview of the work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging and sarcopenia and the effects of electrical stimulation in seniors.. PMID:26913161

  13. Oxytocin-Stimulated NFAT Transcriptional Activation in Human Myometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Craig A.; López Bernal, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a peptide hormone that binds the OXT receptor on myometrial cells, initiating an intracellular signaling cascade, resulting in accumulation of intracellular calcium and smooth muscle contraction. In other systems, an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ stimulates nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is transcriptionally active in arterial and ileal smooth muscle. Here we have investigated the role of NFAT in the mechanism of action of OXT. Human myometrial cells expressed all five NFAT isoforms (NFATC1–C4 and -5). Myometrial cells were transduced with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a NFATC1-EFP reporter, and a semi-automated imaging system was used to monitor effects of OXT on reporter localization in live cells. OXT induced a concentration-dependent nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP in a reversible manner, which was inhibited by OXT antagonists and calcineurin inhibitors. Pulsatile stimulation with OXT caused intermittent, pulse-frequency-dependent, nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP, which was more efficient than sustained stimulation. OXT induced nuclear translocation of endogenous NFAT that was transcriptionally active, because OXT stimulated activity of a NFAT-response element-luciferase reporter and induced calcineurin-NFAT dependent expression of RGS2, RCAN1, and PTGS2 (COX2) mRNA. Furthermore, OXT-dependent transcription was dependent on protein neosynthesis; cycloheximide abolished RGS2 transcription but augmented RCAN1 and COX2 transcriptional readouts. This study identifies a novel signaling mechanism within the myometrium, whereby calcineurin-NFAT signaling mediates OXT-induced transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we show NFATC1-EFP is responsive to pulses of OXT, a mechanism by which myometrial cells could decode OXT pulse frequency. PMID:22902539

  14. Relationship Between Intensity of Quadriceps Muscle Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Strength Recovery After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Balter, Jaclyn E.; Wolfe, Pamela; Eckhoff, Donald G.; Schwartz, Robert S.; Schenkman, Margaret; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can facilitate the recovery of quadriceps muscle strength after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), yet the optimal intensity (dosage) of NMES and its effect on strength after TKA have yet to be determined. Objective The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the intensity of NMES application was related to the recovery of quadriceps muscle strength early after TKA. A secondary objective was to quantify quadriceps muscle fatigue and activation immediately after NMES to guide decisions about the timing of NMES during rehabilitation sessions. Design This study was an observational experimental investigation. Methods Data were collected from 30 people who were 50 to 85 years of age and who received NMES after TKA. These people participated in a randomized controlled trial in which they received either standard rehabilitation or standard rehabilitation plus NMES to the quadriceps muscle to mitigate strength loss. For the NMES intervention group, NMES was applied 2 times per day at the maximal tolerable intensity for 15 contractions beginning 48 hours after surgery over the first 6 weeks after TKA. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation training intensity and quadriceps muscle strength and activation were assessed before surgery and 3.5 and 6.5 weeks after TKA. Results At 3.5 weeks, there was a significant association between NMES training intensity and a change in quadriceps muscle strength (R2=.68) and activation (R2=.22). At 6.5 weeks, NMES training intensity was related to a change in strength (R2=.25) but not to a change in activation (R2=.00). Furthermore, quadriceps muscle fatigue occurred during NMES sessions at 3.5 and 6.5 weeks, whereas quadriceps muscle activation did not change. Limitations Some participants reached the maximal stimulator output during at least 1 treatment session and might have tolerated more stimulation. Conclusions Higher NMES training intensities were associated with

  15. A single session of neuromuscular electrical stimulation does not augment postprandial muscle protein accretion.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Marlou L; Wall, Benjamin T; Kramer, Irene Fleur; Zorenc, Antoine H; Goessens, Joy P B; Gijsen, Annemie P; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-07-01

    The loss of muscle mass and strength that occurs with aging, termed sarcopenia, has been (at least partly) attributed to an impaired muscle protein synthetic response to food intake. Previously, we showed that neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can stimulate fasting muscle protein synthesis rates and prevent muscle atrophy during disuse. We hypothesized that NMES prior to protein ingestion would increase postprandial muscle protein accretion. Eighteen healthy elderly (69 ± 1 yr) males participated in this study. After a 70-min unilateral NMES protocol was performed, subjects ingested 20 g of intrinsically l-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine-labeled casein. Plasma samples and muscle biopsies were collected to assess postprandial mixed muscle and myofibrillar protein accretion as well as associated myocellular signaling during a 4-h postprandial period in both the control (CON) and stimulated (NMES) leg. Protein ingestion resulted in rapid increases in both plasma phenylalanine concentrations and l-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine enrichments, which remained elevated during the entire 4-h postprandial period (P < 0.05). Mixed-muscle protein-bound l-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine enrichments increased significantly over time following protein ingestion, with no differences between the CON (0.0164 ± 0.0019 MPE) and NMES (0.0164 ± 0.0019 MPE) leg (P > 0.05). In agreement, no differences were observed in the postprandial rise in myofibrillar protein bound l-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine enrichments between the CON and NMES legs (0.0115 ± 0.0014 vs. 0.0133 ± 0.0013 MPE, respectively, P > 0.05). Significant increases in mTOR and P70S6K phosphorylation status were observed in the NMES-stimulated leg only (P < 0.05). We conclude that a single session of NMES prior to food intake does not augment postprandial muscle protein accretion in healthy older men. PMID:27279248

  16. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  17. [Reaction of the tympanic tensor muscle--elicited by nasally applied trigeminal stimulants].

    PubMed

    Rauchfuss, A; Hiller, E; Leitner, H; Wöllmer, W

    1987-03-01

    Computerised evaluation of tensor muscle reaction was carried out by using a biosignal analysing unit triggered by nasal inhalation. The trigeminus nerve was stimulated by application of 3-molar acetylacetic acid into the nasal respiratory air, inducing a contraction of the tympanic muscle, followed by a change in impedance. This change in impedance of the tympanic membrane ossicle system was recorded and printed out on a display. In this manner evidence was obtained of a tensor muscle reaction induced by the third branch of the trigeminal nerve as efference, and demonstrated for the first time. This reflex arc had long been considered as being of negligible clinical importance before its stimulation and measurement had become possible. It is a generally accepted theory that the reflex arc of the m. tensor tympani is linked to the formatio reticularis which assesses the sensory afferences. For this reason, the reflex arc habituates rapidly, and continuous stimulation is no longer possible. PMID:3586795

  18. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  19. Assessing viability of extracorporeal preserved muscle transplants using external field stimulation: a novel tool to improve methods prolonging bridge-to-transplantation time

    PubMed Central

    Taeger, Christian D.; Friedrich, Oliver; Dragu, Adrian; Weigand, Annika; Hobe, Frieder; Drechsler, Caroline; Geppert, Carol I.; Arkudas, Andreas; Münch, Frank; Buchholz, Rainer; Pollmann, Charlotte; Schramm, Axel; Birkholz, Torsten; Horch, Raymund E.; Präbst, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Preventing ischemia-related cell damage is a priority when preserving tissue for transplantation. Perfusion protocols have been established for a variety of applications and proven to be superior to procedures used in clinical routine. Extracorporeal perfusion of muscle tissue though cumbersome is highly desirable since it is highly susceptible to ischemia-related damage. To show the efficacy of different perfusion protocols external field stimulation can be used to immediately visualize improvement or deterioration of the tissue during active and running perfusion protocols. This method has been used to show the superiority of extracorporeal perfusion using porcine rectus abdominis muscles perfused with heparinized saline solution. Perfused muscles showed statistically significant higher ability to exert force compared to nonperfused ones. These findings can be confirmed using Annexin V as marker for cell damage, perfusion of muscle tissue limits damage significantly compared to nonperfused tissue. The combination of extracorporeal perfusion and external field stimulation may improve organ conservation research. PMID:26145230

  20. Assessing viability of extracorporeal preserved muscle transplants using external field stimulation: a novel tool to improve methods prolonging bridge-to-transplantation time.

    PubMed

    Taeger, Christian D; Friedrich, Oliver; Dragu, Adrian; Weigand, Annika; Hobe, Frieder; Drechsler, Caroline; Geppert, Carol I; Arkudas, Andreas; Münch, Frank; Buchholz, Rainer; Pollmann, Charlotte; Schramm, Axel; Birkholz, Torsten; Horch, Raymund E; Präbst, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Preventing ischemia-related cell damage is a priority when preserving tissue for transplantation. Perfusion protocols have been established for a variety of applications and proven to be superior to procedures used in clinical routine. Extracorporeal perfusion of muscle tissue though cumbersome is highly desirable since it is highly susceptible to ischemia-related damage. To show the efficacy of different perfusion protocols external field stimulation can be used to immediately visualize improvement or deterioration of the tissue during active and running perfusion protocols. This method has been used to show the superiority of extracorporeal perfusion using porcine rectus abdominis muscles perfused with heparinized saline solution. Perfused muscles showed statistically significant higher ability to exert force compared to nonperfused ones. These findings can be confirmed using Annexin V as marker for cell damage, perfusion of muscle tissue limits damage significantly compared to nonperfused tissue. The combination of extracorporeal perfusion and external field stimulation may improve organ conservation research. PMID:26145230

  1. Assessing viability of extracorporeal preserved muscle transplants using external field stimulation: a novel tool to improve methods prolonging bridge-to-transplantation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeger, Christian D.; Friedrich, Oliver; Dragu, Adrian; Weigand, Annika; Hobe, Frieder; Drechsler, Caroline; Geppert, Carol I.; Arkudas, Andreas; Münch, Frank; Buchholz, Rainer; Pollmann, Charlotte; Schramm, Axel; Birkholz, Torsten; Horch, Raymund E.; Präbst, Konstantin

    2015-07-01

    Preventing ischemia-related cell damage is a priority when preserving tissue for transplantation. Perfusion protocols have been established for a variety of applications and proven to be superior to procedures used in clinical routine. Extracorporeal perfusion of muscle tissue though cumbersome is highly desirable since it is highly susceptible to ischemia-related damage. To show the efficacy of different perfusion protocols external field stimulation can be used to immediately visualize improvement or deterioration of the tissue during active and running perfusion protocols. This method has been used to show the superiority of extracorporeal perfusion using porcine rectus abdominis muscles perfused with heparinized saline solution. Perfused muscles showed statistically significant higher ability to exert force compared to nonperfused ones. These findings can be confirmed using Annexin V as marker for cell damage, perfusion of muscle tissue limits damage significantly compared to nonperfused tissue. The combination of extracorporeal perfusion and external field stimulation may improve organ conservation research.

  2. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  3. TRPC channels in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cobos, Jose C; Trebak, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) proteins constitute a family of seven (TRPC1-7) nonselective cation channels within the wider TRP superfamily. TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5 and TRPC6 channels are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells from human vessels of all calibers and in smooth muscle from organs such as the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract. TRPC channels have recently emerged as important players in the control of smooth muscle function. This review will focus on the retrospective analysis of studies proposing contributions of TRPC channels to native calcium entry pathways in smooth muscle and to physiological and pathophysiological responses with emphasis on the vascular system. PMID:20515740

  4. Alteration of Muscle Function After Electrical Stimulation Bout of Knee Extensors and Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Vanderthommen, Marc; Triffaux, Mylène; Demoulin, Christophe; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Croisier, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to study the effects on muscle function of an electrical stimulation bout applied unilaterally on thigh muscles in healthy male volunteers. One group (ES group, n = 10) received consecutively 100 isometric contractions of quadriceps and 100 isometric contractions of hamstrings (on-off ratio 6-6 s) induced by neuromuscular electrical stimulations (NMES). Changes in muscle torque, muscle soreness (0-10 VAS), muscle stiffness and serum creatine kinase (CK) activity were assessed before the NMES exercise (pre-ex) as well as 24h (d+1), 48h (d+2) and 120h (d+5) after the bout. A second group (control group, n = 10) were submitted to the same test battery than the ES group and with the same time-frame. The between-group comparison indicated a significant increase in VAS scores and in serum levels of CK only in the ES group. In the ES group, changes were more pronounced in hamstrings than in quadriceps and peaked at d+2 (quadriceps VAS scores = 2.20 ± 1.55 a.u. (0 at pre-ex); hamstrings VAS scores = 3.15 ± 2.14 a.u. (0 at pre-ex); hip flexion angle = 62 ± 5° (75 ± 6° at pre-ex); CK activity = 3021 ± 2693 IU·l-1 (136 ± 50 IU·l-1 at pre-ex)). The results of the present study suggested the occurrence of muscle damage that could have been induced by the peculiar muscle recruitment in NMES and the resulting overrated mechanical stress. The sensitivity to the damaging effects of NMES appeared higher in the hamstrings than in quadriceps muscles. Key points A stimulation bout of quadriceps and hamstrings that reflects usual application of NMES, increases indirect markers of muscle damage (muscle soreness, muscle weakness and stiffness and serum CK activity). The occurrence of muscle damage could have been induced by the peculiar muscle recruitment in NMES and the resulting overrated mechanical stress. The sensitivity to the damaging effects of NMES appears higher in the hamstrings than in quadriceps muscles. PMID:24150067

  5. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction. PMID:26874281

  6. A robust transcutaneous electro-muscle stimulator (RTES): a multi-modality tool.

    PubMed

    McPartland, M D; Mook, D J

    1995-06-01

    This paper introduces a transcutaneous electro-muscle stimulator design that has a wide range of output capabilities. Because of this, the unit is referred to as a robust transcutaneous electro-muscle stimulator (RTES). The RTES is a constant current stimulator that is designed to be capable of generating significant tetanic contractions from large muscle groups, such as the quadriceps. It is capable of generating complex current pulse profiles and has been tested at pulse frequencies greater than 7500 Hz. It is routinely used to generate rectangular, bi-phasic pulses in muscle-modelling studies in ranges of widths from 3 to 1000 microseconds, amplitudes from -50 to +50 mA and frequencies from 10 to 60 Hz. The design extrema on pulse width and amplitude, are 1000 microseconds and +/- 100 mA respectively. Because of the stimulator's robust output characteristics, it is suitable for many types of electro-stimulation studies including pain management, edema reduction and more. PMID:7633760

  7. Cutaneous Recording and Stimulation of Muscles Using Organic Electronic Textiles.

    PubMed

    Papaiordanidou, Maria; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Rezaei-Mazinani, Shahab; Lonjaret, Thomas; Martin, Alain; Ismailova, Esma

    2016-08-01

    Electronic textiles are an emerging field providing novel and non-intrusive solutions for healthcare. Conducting polymer-coated textiles enable a new generation of fully organic surface electrodes for electrophysiological evaluations. Textile electrodes are able to assess high quality muscular monitoring and to perform transcutaneous electrical stimulation. PMID:27242014

  8. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES. PMID:27110556

  9. Daily in vivo neuromuscular stimulation effects on immobilized rat hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, P F; Lapointe, M A

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effects of a daily regimen of near-maximal contractions, produced via in vivo electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve, on functional and histochemical properties of rat hindlimb muscles immobilized for 28 days in a plaster cast. Rats had knee and ankle joints of one hindlimb immobilized; then while anesthetized, half of the group was subjected to a daily regimen of 480 semifused tetanic contractions (50 Hz) via fine-wire electrodes chronically implanted around the sciatic nerve. Immobilization caused significant decreases in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle weights, fiber cross-sectional areas, and twitch and tetanic strength measured in situ. In addition, immobilized soleus muscles had faster time to peak tension (TPT) and higher proportions of fast-twitch fibers, whereas immobilized gastrocnemius muscles demonstrated faster half-relaxation times (RT1/2) and total twitch durations (TPT plus RT1/2). The only significant effects of the imposed contractions were evident in the gastrocnemius in which stimulation prevented the shortening of RT1/2 and total twitch duration and resulted in significantly higher relative tensions at 50 Hz and higher fatigue resistance. Muscle activity of this type imposed on immobilized muscle is ineffective in attenuating atrophy but can, in fast muscle such as gastrocnemius, prevent changes in twitch characteristics resulting from immobilization, as well as augment contractile responses during semifused and fatiguing contractions. PMID:7153129

  10. Contraction and AICAR Stimulate IL-6 Vesicle Depletion From Skeletal Muscle Fibers In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Hans P.M.M.; Brandauer, Josef; Schjerling, Peter; Koh, Ho-Jin; Treebak, Jonas T.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Galbo, Henrik; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that interleukin 6 (IL-6) is released from contracting skeletal muscles; however, the cellular origin, secretion kinetics, and signaling mechanisms regulating IL-6 secretion are unknown. To address these questions, we developed imaging methodology to study IL-6 in fixed mouse muscle fibers and in live animals in vivo. Using confocal imaging to visualize endogenous IL-6 protein in fixed muscle fibers, we found IL-6 in small vesicle structures distributed throughout the fibers under basal (resting) conditions. To determine the kinetics of IL-6 secretion, intact quadriceps muscles were transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged IL-6 (IL-6-EGFP), and 5 days later anesthetized mice were imaged before and after muscle contractions in situ. Contractions decreased IL-6-EGFP–containing vesicles and protein by 62% (P < 0.05), occurring rapidly and progressively over 25 min of contraction. However, contraction-mediated IL-6-EGFP reduction was normal in muscle-specific AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2-inactive transgenic mice. In contrast, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased IL-6-EGFP vesicles, an effect that was inhibited in the transgenic mice. In conclusion, resting skeletal muscles contain IL-6–positive vesicles that are expressed throughout myofibers. Contractions stimulate the rapid reduction of IL-6 in myofibers, occurring through an AMPKα2-independent mechanism. This novel imaging methodology clearly establishes IL-6 as a contraction-stimulated myokine and can be used to characterize the secretion kinetics of other putative myokines. PMID:23761105

  11. Trichloroethylene interactions with muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kössler, F

    1991-06-01

    The toxic effect of trichlorethylene (TCE) was investigated on isolated muscles prepared from frog and rats. Twitch and tetanic contractions as well as caffeine-induced contractures, were recorded. Trichloroethylene at a concentration of 0.25-4.0 mM depressed the force development of both twitch and tetanic tension in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was not influenced by the type of muscle. As TCE shortened the time to peak of twitch contractions, it may alter the Ca2+ binding kinetics. Subthreshold caffeine concentrations applied after pre-exposure to TCE (1 or 2mM) induced contractures. The same TCE exposure enhanced regular caffeine contractures through increasing the speed of tension development and the absolute force. Exposure to 5 or 10 mM TCE did not affect the first caffeine-induced contracture but enhanced the potency of the second caffeine dose given 15 min after the first. The results suggest that the interaction of TCE with membrane sites is responsible for Ca2+ release for contractile processes. PMID:1918792

  12. Rejuvenating Muscle Stem Cell Function: Restoring Quiescence and Overcoming Senescence.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2016-04-01

    Elderly humans gradually lose strength and the capacity to repair skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle repair requires functional skeletal muscle satellite (or stem) cells (SMSCs) and progenitor cells. Diminished stem cell numbers and increased dysfunction correlate with the observed gradual loss of strength during aging. Recent reports attribute the loss of stem cell numbers and function to either increased entry into a presenescent state or the loss of self-renewal capacity due to an inability to maintain quiescence resulting in stem cell exhaustion. Earlier work has shown that exposure to factors from blood of young animals and other treatments could restore SMSC function. However, cells in the presenescent state are refractory to the beneficial effects of being transplanted into a young environment. Entry into the presenescent state results from loss of autophagy, leading to increased ROS and epigenetic modification at the CDKN2A locus due to decreased H2Aub, upregulating cell senescence biomarker p16ink4a. However, the presenescent SMSCs can be rejuvenated by agents that stimulate autophagy, such as the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Autophagy plays a critical role in SMSC homeostasis. These results have implications for the development of senolytic therapies that attempt to destroy p16ink4a expressing cells, since such therapies would also destroy a reservoir of potentially rescuable regenerative stem cells. Other work suggests that in humans, loss of SMSC self-renewal capacity is primarily due to decreased expression of sprouty1. DNA hypomethylation at the SPRY1 gene locus downregulates sprouty1, causing inability to maintain quiescence and eventual exhaustion of the stem cell population. A unifying hypothesis posits that in aging humans, first loss of quiescence occurs, depleting the stem cell population, but that remaining SMSCs are increasingly subject to presenescence in the very old. PMID:27000748

  13. Neutral sphingomyelinase-3 mediates TNF-stimulated oxidant activity in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Jennifer S.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; McLean, Julie B.; Deevska, Gergana M.; Bonnell, Mark R.; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N.; Reid, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Sphingolipid and oxidant signaling affect glucose uptake, atrophy, and force production of skeletal muscle similarly and both are stimulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF), suggesting a connection between systems. Sphingolipid signaling is initiated by neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase), a family of agonist-activated effector enzymes. Northern blot analyses suggest that nSMase3 may be a striated muscle-specific nSMase. The present study tested the hypothesis that nSMase3 protein is expressed in skeletal muscle and functions to regulate TNF-stimulated oxidant production. Results We demonstrate constitutive nSMase activity in skeletal muscles of healthy mice and humans and in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. nSMase3 (Smpd4 gene) mRNA is highly expressed in muscle. An nSMase3 protein doublet (88 and 85 kD) is derived from alternative mRNA splicing of exon 11. The proteins partition differently. The full-length 88 kD isoform (nSMase3a) fractionates with membrane proteins that are resistant to detergent extraction; the 85 kD isoform lacking exon 11 (nSMase3b) is more readily extracted and fractionates with detergent soluble membrane proteins; neither variant is detected in the cytosol. By immunofluorescence microscopy, nSMase3 resides in both internal and sarcolemmal membranes. Finally, myotube nSMase activity and cytosolic oxidant activity are stimulated by TNF. Both if these responses are inhibited by nSMase3 knockdown. Innovation These findings identify nSMase3 as an intermediate that links TNF receptor activation, sphingolipid signaling, and skeletal muscle oxidant production. Conclusion Our data show that nSMase3 acts as a signaling nSMase in skeletal muscle that is essential for TNF-stimulated oxidant activity. PMID:25180167

  14. Microstimulators and Intramuscular Hook Electrodes for the Stimulation of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Walter, James S; Dunn, Robert B; Wurster, Robert D; Laghi, Franco

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objectives: We determined the feasibility of stimulating the major muscles of respiration with different types of electrodes. Intramuscular hook electrodes, model microstimulators (M-Micro) developed in our laboratory, and commercial radiofrequency microstimulators (RFM) (Alfred Mann Foundation, Valencia, CA), were employed in this investigation. Methods: In 8 anesthetized dogs, M-Micro were placed bilaterally on the diaphragm and in the abdominal muscles, and hook electrodes were placed in the 3rd and 5th intercostal regions adjacent to the intercostal nerves known to support inspiration. In 3 of the 8 animals, RFMs (Alfred Mann Foundation) in addition to the M-Micros were sutured to each hemidiaphragm at the same optimal site for phrenic nerve stimulation. During a hyperventilation-induced apnea, 2-second stimulations were applied to the diaphragm and with various combinations of diaphragm plus supporting muscles, both thoracic and abdominal. Results: Diaphragm stimulation alone provided tidal volumes adequate for basal alveolar ventilation. However, implantation of the RFM required greater contact with the muscle. Stimulating other respiratory muscles along with the diaphragm further increased tidal volumes. The hook electrodes, M-Micro, and RFM performed equally well. Conclusions: In the acute dog model, M-Micro and hook electrodes can provide an implant system for the maintenance of ventilation. Support of the intercostal and abdominal muscles has the potential to reduce the contraction requirements of the diaphragm with decreased likelihood of diaphragm fatigue and hypoventilation. Whether the electrodes under investigation could provide an implant system for long-term ventilation needs to be determined. PMID:17853655

  15. Glycogen depletion and resynthesis during 14 days of chronic low-frequency stimulation of rabbit muscle.

    PubMed

    Prats, C; Bernal, C; Cadefau, J A; Frias, J; Tibolla, M; Cussó, R

    2002-10-10

    Electro-stimulation alters muscle metabolism and the extent of this change depends on application intensity and duration. The effect of 14 days of chronic electro-stimulation on glycogen turnover and on the regulation of glycogen synthase in fast-twitch muscle was studied. The results showed that macro- and proglycogen degrade simultaneously during the first hour of stimulation. After 3 h, the muscle showed net synthesis, with an increase in the proglycogen fraction. The glycogen content peaked after 4 days of stimulation, macroglycogen being the predominant fraction at that time. Glycogen synthase was determined during electro-stimulation. The activity of this enzyme was measured at low UDPG concentration with either high or low Glu-6-P content. Western blots were performed against glycogen synthase over a range of stimulation periods. Activation of this enzyme was maximum before the net synthesis of glycogen, partial during net synthesis, and low during late synthesis. These observations suggest that the more active, dephosphorylated and very low phosphorylated forms of glycogen synthase may participate in the first steps of glycogen resynthesis before net synthesis is observed, while partially phosphorylated forms are most active during glycogen elongation. PMID:12383944

  16. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  17. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  18. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  19. In ovo L-arginine supplementation stimulates myoblast differentiation but negatively affects muscle development of broiler chicken after hatching.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wang, Y; Willems, E; Willemsen, H; Franssens, L; Buyse, J; Decuypere, E; Everaert, N

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that in ovo feeding (IOF) of L-arginine (L-Arg) enhances nitric oxide (NO) production, stimulates the process of myogenesis, and regulates post-hatching muscle growth. Different doses of L-Arg were injected into the amnion of chicken embryos at embryonic day (ED) 16. After hatching, the body weight of individual male chickens was recorded weekly for 3 weeks. During in vitro experiments, myoblasts of the pectoralis major (PM) were extracted at ED16 and were incubated in medium containing 0.01 mm L-Arg, 0.05 mm L-Arg, and (or) 0.05 mm L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). When 25 mg/kg L-Arg/initial egg weight was injected, no difference was observed in body weight at hatch, but a significant decrease was found during the following 3 weeks compared to that of the non-injected and saline-injected control, and this also affected the growth of muscle mass. L-NAME inhibited gene expression of myogenic differentiation antigen (MyoD), myogenin, NOS, and follistatin, decreased the cell viability, and increased myostatin (MSTN) gene expression. 0.05 mm L-Arg stimulated myogenin gene expression but also depressed muscle cell viability. L-NAME blocked the effect of 0.05 mm L-Arg on myogenin mRNA levels when co-incubated with 0.05 mm L-Arg. L-Arg treatments had no significant influence on NOS mRNA gene expression, but had inhibiting effect on follistatin gene expression, while L-NAME treatments had effects on both. These results suggested that L-Arg stimulated myoblast differentiation, but the limited number of myoblasts would form less myotubes and then less myofibers, while the latter limited the growth of muscle mass. PMID:25846259

  20. Measurement of voluntary activation of fresh and fatigued human muscles using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Gabrielle; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, S C

    2003-01-01

    Recently, transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex (TMS) revealed impaired voluntary activation of muscles during maximal efforts. Hence, we evaluated its use as a measure of voluntary activation over a range of contraction strengths in both fresh and fatigued muscles, and compared it with standard twitch interpolation using nerve stimulation. Subjects contracted the elbow flexors isometrically while force and EMG from biceps and triceps were recorded. In one study, eight subjects made submaximal and maximal test contractions with rests to minimise fatigue. In the second study, eight subjects made sustained maximal contractions to reduce force to 60 % of the initial value, followed by brief test contractions. Force responses were recorded following TMS or electrical stimulation of the biceps motor nerve. In other contractions, EMG responses to TMS (motor evoked potentials, MEPs) or to stimulation at the brachial plexus (maximal M waves, Mmax) were recorded. During contractions of 50 % maximum, TMS elicited large MEPs in biceps (> 90 % Mmax) which decreased in size (to ≈70 % Mmax) with maximal efforts. This suggests that faster firing rates made some motor units effectively refractory. With fatigue, MEPs were also smaller but remained > 70 % Mmax for contractions of 50–100 % maximum. For fresh and fatigued muscle, the superimposed twitch evoked by motor nerve and motor cortex stimulation decreased with increasing contraction strength. For nerve stimulation the relation was curvilinear, and for TMS it was linear for contractions of 50–100 % maximum (r2 = 1.00). Voluntary activation was derived using the expression: (1 – superimposed twitch/resting twitch) × 100. The resting twitch was measured directly for nerve stimulation and for TMS, it was estimated by extrapolation of the linear regression between the twitch and voluntary force. For cortical stimulation, this resulted in a highly linear relation between voluntary activation and force

  1. Porcine bladder urothelial, myofibroblast, and detrusor muscle cells: characterization and ATP release.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ying; Mansfield, Kylie J; Sandow, Shaun L; Sadananda, Prajni; Burcher, Elizabeth; Moore, Kate H

    2011-01-01

    ATP is released from the bladder mucosa in response to stretch, but the cell types responsible are unclear. Our aim was to isolate and characterize individual populations of urothelial, myofibroblast, and detrusor muscle cells in culture, and to examine agonist-stimulated ATP release. Using female pig bladders, urothelial cells were isolated from bladder mucosa following trypsin-digestion of the luminal surface. The underlying myofibroblast layer was dissected, minced, digested, and cultured until confluent (10-14 days). A similar protocol was used for muscle cells. Cultures were used for immunocytochemical staining and/or ATP release investigations. In urothelial cultures, immunoreactivity was present for the cytokeratin marker AE1/AE3 but not the contractile protein α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) or the cytoskeletal filament vimentin. Neither myofibroblast nor muscle cell cultures stained for AE1/AE3. Myofibroblast cultures partially stained for α-SMA, whereas muscle cultures were 100% stained. Both myofibroblast and muscle stained for vimentin, however, they were morphologically distinct. Ultrastructural studies verified that the suburothelial layer of pig bladder contained abundant myofibroblasts, characterized by high densities of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Baseline ATP release was higher in urothelial and myofibroblast cultures, compared with muscle. ATP release was significantly stimulated by stretch in all three cell populations. Only urothelial cells released ATP in response to acid, and only muscle cells were stimulated by capsaicin. Tachykinins had no effect on ATP release. In conclusion, we have established a method for culture of three cell populations from porcine bladder, a well-known human bladder model, and shown that these are distinct morphologically, immunologically, and pharmacologically. PMID:21713125

  2. Molecular transformations in sarcoplasmic reticulum of fast-twitch muscle by electro-stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, C; Pette, D

    1979-02-01

    Chronic electro-stimulation of fast-twitch rabbit muscle with the frequency pattern received by a slow-twitch muscle induces a progressive transformation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. After 2 days stimulation activities of Ca2+-dependent ATPase and of Ca2+ transport begin to decrease, and are paralleled by a progressive decrease in Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent phosphoprotein formation, reduced rate of dephosphorylation and a rearrangement of the electrophoretic polypeptide and phosphoprotein patterns. These findings suggest a transformation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum to resemble that of a slow-twitch muscle. This transformation is paralleled by increase in time-to-peak of twitch contraction and half relaxation time and occurs before conversion of the myosin light chain pattern is observed. The parallel time course of changes in contractile properties of stimulated muscle and the molecular and functional properties of the sarcoplasmic reticulum emphasizes the definitive role of the latter in determining the twitch characteristics of fast and slow twitch muscles. PMID:154404

  3. Restoration of grasp following paralysis through brain-controlled stimulation of muscles.

    PubMed

    Ethier, C; Oby, E R; Bauman, M J; Miller, L E

    2012-05-17

    Patients with spinal cord injury lack the connections between brain and spinal cord circuits that are essential for voluntary movement. Clinical systems that achieve muscle contraction through functional electrical stimulation (FES) have proven to be effective in allowing patients with tetraplegia to regain control of hand movements and to achieve a greater measure of independence in daily activities. In existing clinical systems, the patient uses residual proximal limb movements to trigger pre-programmed stimulation that causes the paralysed muscles to contract, allowing use of one or two basic grasps. Instead, we have developed an FES system in primates that is controlled by recordings made from microelectrodes permanently implanted in the brain. We simulated some of the effects of the paralysis caused by C5 or C6 spinal cord injury by injecting rhesus monkeys with a local anaesthetic to block the median and ulnar nerves at the elbow. Then, using recordings from approximately 100 neurons in the motor cortex, we predicted the intended activity of several of the paralysed muscles, and used these predictions to control the intensity of stimulation of the same muscles. This process essentially bypassed the spinal cord, restoring to the monkeys voluntary control of their paralysed muscles. This achievement is a major advance towards similar restoration of hand function in human patients through brain-controlled FES. We anticipate that in human patients, this neuroprosthesis would allow much more flexible and dexterous use of the hand than is possible with existing FES systems. PMID:22522928

  4. Restoration of grasp following paralysis through brain-controlled stimulation of muscles

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, C.; Oby, E.R.; Bauman, M.J.; Miller, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury lack the connections between brain and spinal cord circuits essential for voluntary movement. Clinical systems that achieve muscle contraction through functional electrical stimulation (FES) have proven to be effective in allowing patients with tetraplegia to regain control of hand movement and to achieve a greater measure of independence in activities of daily living 1,2. In typical systems, the patient uses residual proximal limb movements to trigger pre-programmed stimulation that causes the paralyzed muscles to contract, allowing use of one or two basic grasps. Instead, we have developed, in primates, an FES system that is controlled by recordings made from microelectrodes permanently implanted in the brain. We simulated some of the effects of the paralysis caused by C5-C6 spinal cord injury 3 by injecting a local anesthetic to block the median and ulnar nerves at the elbow. Then, using recordings from approximately 100 neurons in the motor cortex, we predicted the intended activity of several of the paralyzed muscles, and used these predictions to control the intensity of stimulation of the same muscles. This process essentially bypassed the spinal cord, restoring to the monkeys voluntary control of their paralyzed muscles. This achievement represents a major advance toward similar restoration of hand function in human patients through brain-controlled FES. We anticipate that in human patients, this neuroprosthesis would allow much more flexible and dexterous use of the hand than is possible with existing FES systems. PMID:22522928

  5. Amino acids augment muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs during acute endotoxemia by stimulating mTOR-dependent translation initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In skeletal muscle of adults, sepsis reduces protein synthesis by depressing translation initiation and induces resistance to branched-chain amino acid stimulation. Normal neonates maintain a high basal muscle protein synthesis rate that is sensitive to amino acid stimulation. In the present study...

  6. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by leucine is dependent on plasma amino acid availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported that a physiological increase in plasma leucine increased translation initiation factor activity during 60- and 120-min leucine infusion. Muscle protein synthesis was stimulated at 60 min but not at 120 min, perhaps due to the decrease (-50%) in plasma essential amino acids (AA). ...

  7. Long-term leucine induced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis is amino acid dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusing leucine for 1 h increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the neonate, but this is not sustained for 2 h unless the corresponding fall in amino acids is prevented. This study aimed to determine whether a continuous leucine infusion can stimulate protein synthesis for a prolonged period...

  8. Prolonged stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by leucine in neonates is dependent on amino acid availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in amino acids and insulin after a meal independently stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonates by activating the intracellular signalling pathways that regulate mRNA translation. Leucine, in particular, is important in mediating the response to amino acids. Previously, w...

  9. Role of skeletal muscle mitochondrial density on exercise-stimulated lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Jose E; Johannsen, Neil M; Bajpeyi, Sudip; Costford, Sheila R; Zhang, Zhengyu; Gupta, Alok K; Ravussin, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial density is proposed to lead to impaired muscle lipid oxidation and increased lipid accumulation in sedentary individuals. We assessed exercise-stimulated lipid oxidation by imposing a prolonged moderate-intensity exercise in men with variable skeletal muscle mitochondrial density as measured by citrate synthase (CS) activity. After a 2-day isoenergetic high-fat diet, lipid oxidation was measured before and during exercise (650 kcal at 50% VO(2)max) in 20 healthy men with either high (HI-CS = 24 ± 1; mean ± s.e.) or low (LO-CS = 17 ± 1 nmol/min/mg protein) muscle CS activity. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and immediately after exercise. Respiratory exchange data and blood samples were collected at rest and throughout the exercise. HI-CS subjects had higher VO(2)max (50 ± 1 vs. 44 ± 2 ml/kg fat free mass/min; P = 0.01), lower fasting respiratory quotient (RQ) (0.81 ± 0.01 vs. 0.85 ± 0.01; P = 0.04) and higher ex vivo muscle palmitate oxidation (866 ± 168 vs. 482 ± 78 nmol/h/mg muscle; P = 0.05) compared to LO-CS individuals. However, whole-body exercise-stimulated lipid oxidation (20 ± 2 g vs. 19 ± 1 g; P = 0.65) and plasma glucose, lactate, insulin, and catecholamine responses were similar between the two groups. In conclusion, in response to the same energy demand during a moderate prolonged exercise bout, reliance on lipid oxidation was similar in individuals with high and low skeletal muscle mitochondrial density. This data suggests that decreased muscle mitochondrial density may not necessarily impair reliance on lipid oxidation over the course of the day since it was normal under a high-lipid oxidative demand condition. Twenty-four-hour lipid oxidation and its relationship with mitochondrial density need to be assessed. PMID:21681225

  10. Antagonistic control of muscle cell size by AMPK and mTORC1.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Rémi; Lantier, Louise; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Sotiropoulos, Athanassia; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit

    2011-08-15

    Nutrition and physical activity have profound effects on skeletal muscle metabolism and growth. Regulation of muscle mass depends on a thin balance between growth-promoting and growth-suppressing factors. Over the past decade, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase has emerged as an essential factor for muscle growth by mediating the anabolic response to nutrients, insulin, insulin-like growth factors and resistance exercise. As opposed to the mTOR signaling pathway, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is switched on during starvation and endurance exercise to upregulate energy-conserving processes. Recent evidence indicates that mTORC1 (mTOR Complex 1) and AMPK represent two antagonistic forces governing muscle adaption to nutrition, starvation and growth stimulation. Animal knockout models with impaired mTORC1 signaling showed decreased muscle mass correlated with increased AMPK activation. Interestingly, AMPK inhibition in p70S6K-deficient muscle cells restores cell growth and sensitivity to nutrients. Conversely, muscle cells lacking AMPK have increased mTORC1 activation with increased cell size and protein synthesis rate. We also demonstrated that the hypertrophic action of MyrAkt is enhanced in AMPK-deficient muscle, indicating that AMPK acts as a negative feedback control to restrain muscle hypertrophy. Our recent results extend this notion by showing that AMPKα1, but not AMPKα2, regulates muscle cell size through the control of mTORC1 signaling. These results reveal the diverse functions of the two catalytic isoforms of AMPK, with AMPKα1 playing a predominant role in the control of muscle cell size and AMPKα2 mediating muscle metabolic adaptation. Thus, the crosstalk between AMPK and mTORC1 signaling is a highly regulated way to control changes in muscle growth and metabolic rate imposed by external cues. PMID:21799304

  11. Defined electrical stimulation emphasizing excitability for the development and testing of engineered skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Khodabukus, Alastair; Baar, Keith

    2012-05-01

    Electrical stimulation is required for the maturation of skeletal muscle and as a way to nondestructively monitor muscle development. However, the wrong stimulation parameters can result in electrochemical damage that impairs muscle development/regeneration. The goal of the current study was to determine what aspect of an electrical impulse, specifically the pulse amplitude or pulse width, was detrimental to engineered muscle function and subsequently how engineered muscle responded to continuous electrical stimulation for 24 h. Acute stimulation at a pulse amplitude greater than six-times rheobase resulted in a 2.4-fold increase in the half-relaxation time (32.3±0.49 ms vs. 77.4±4.35 ms; p<0.05) and a 1.59-fold increase in fatigability (38.2%±3.61% vs. 60.6%±4.52%; p<0.05). No negative effects were observed when the pulse energy was increased by lengthening the pulse width, indicating electrochemical damage was due to electric fields at or above six-times rheobase. Continuous stimulation for 24 h at electric fields greater than 0.5 V/mm consistently resulted in ∼2.5-fold increase in force (0.30±0.04 kN/m² vs. 0.67±0.06 kN/m²; p<0.05). Forty per cent of this increase in force was dependent on the mammalian target of rapamycin (RAP) complex 1 (mTORC1), as RAP prevented this portion of the increase in force (CON=0.30±0.04 kN/m² to 0.67±0.06 kN/m² compared with RAP=0.21±0.01 kN/m² to 0.37±0.04 kN/m²; p<0.05). Since there was no increase in myosin heavy chain, the remaining increase in force over the 24 h of stimulation is likely due to cytoskeletal rearrangement. These data indicate that electrochemical damage occurs in muscle at a voltage field greater than six-times rheobase and therefore optimal muscle stimulation should be performed using lower electric fields (two- to four-times rheobase). PMID:22092374

  12. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells Improve Muscle Function in a Skeletal Muscle Re-Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Karla C.; Porto, Anderson; Peçanha, Ramon; Fortes, Fabio S. A.; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Goldenberg, Regina C. S.; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC) injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively). Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model. PMID:26039243

  13. Satellite Cell Heterogeneity in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Matthew T; Sacco, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    The cellular turnover required for skeletal muscle maintenance and repair is mediated by resident stem cells, also termed satellite cells. Satellite cells normally reside in a quiescent state, intermittently entering the cell cycle to fuse with neighboring myofibers and replenish the stem cell pool. However, the mechanisms by which satellite cells maintain the precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation necessary for long-term homeostasis remain unclear. Recent work has supported a previously unappreciated heterogeneity in the satellite cell compartment that may underlie the observed variability in cell fate and function. In this review, we examine the work supporting this notion as well as the potential governing principles, developmental origins, and principal determinants of satellite cell heterogeneity. PMID:26948993

  14. Glass Probe Stimulation of Hair Cell Stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anthony W; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells are designed to sense mechanical stimuli of sound using their apical stereocilia hair bundles. Mechanical deflection of this hair bundle is converted into an electrical signal through gating of mechano-electric transduction channels. Stiff probe stimulation of hair bundles is an invaluable tool for studying the transduction channel and its associated processes because of the speed and ability to precisely control hair bundle position. Proper construction of these devices is critical to their ultimate performance as is appropriate placement of the probe onto the hair bundle. Here we describe the construction and use of a glass probe coupled to a piezo-electric actuator for stimulating hair bundles, including the basic technique for positioning of the stimulating probe onto the hair bundle. These piezo-electric stimulators can be adapted to other mechanically sensitive systems. PMID:27259944

  15. Low-frequency stimulation regulates metabolic gene expression in paralyzed muscle

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael; Suneja, Manish

    2015-01-01

    The altered metabolic state after a spinal cord injury compromises systemic glucose regulation. Skeletal muscle atrophies and transforms into fast, glycolytic, and insulin-resistant tissue. Osteoporosis is common after spinal cord injury and limits the ability to exercise paralyzed muscle. We used a novel approach to study the acute effect of two frequencies of stimulation (20 and 5 Hz) on muscle fatigue and gene regulation in people with chronic paralysis. Twelve subjects with chronic (>1 yr) and motor complete spinal cord injury (ASIA A) participated in the study. We assessed the twitch force before and after a single session of electrical stimulation (5 or 20 Hz). We controlled the total number of pulses delivered for each protocol (10,000 pulses). Three hours after the completion of the electrical stimulation (5 or 20 Hz), we sampled the vastus lateralis muscle and examined genes involved with metabolic transcription, glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondria remodeling. We discovered that the 5-Hz stimulation session induced a similar amount of fatigue and a five- to sixfold increase (P < 0.05) in key metabolic transcription factors, including PGC-1α, NR4A3, and ABRA as the 20-Hz session. Neither session showed a robust regulation of genes for glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, or mitochondria remodeling. We conclude that a low-force and low-frequency stimulation session is effective at inducing fatigue and regulating key metabolic transcription factors in human paralyzed muscle. This strategy may be an acceptable intervention to improve systemic metabolism in people with chronic paralysis. PMID:25635001

  16. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by long-term insulin infusion in severely burned patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Y; Aarsland, A; Herndon, D N; Chinkes, D L; Pierre, E; Nguyen, T T; Patterson, B W; Wolfe, R R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if long-term (7 days) infusion of insulin can ameliorate altered protein kinetics in skeletal muscle of severely burned patients and to investigate the hypothesis that changes in protein kinetics during insulin infusion are associated with an increased rate of transmembrane amino acid transport from plasma into the intracellular free amino acid pool. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: In critically ill patients, vigorous nutritional support alone may often fail to entirely curtail muscle catabolism; insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis in normal volunteers. METHODS: Nine patients with severe burns were studied once during enteral feeding alone (control period), and once after 7 days of high-dose insulin. The order of treatment with insulin was randomized. Data were derived from a model based on a primed-continuous infusion of L-[15N]phenylalanine, sampling of blood from the femoral artery and vein, and biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle. RESULTS: Net leg muscle protein balance was significantly (p < 0.05) negative during the control period. Exogenous insulin eliminated this negative balance by stimulating protein synthesis approximately 350% (p < 0.01). This was made possible in part by a sixfold increase in the inward transport of amino acids from blood (p < 0.01). There was also a significant increase in leg muscle protein breakdown. The new rates of synthesis, breakdown, and inward transport during insulin were in balance, such that there was no difference in the intracellular phenylalanine concentration from the control period. The fractional synthetic rate of protein in the wound was also stimulated by insulin by approximately 50%, but the response was variable and did not reach significance. CONCLUSIONS: Exogenous insulin may be useful in promoting muscle protein synthesis in severely catabolic patients. PMID:7677459

  17. The effect of muscle stimulation during resistive training on performance parameters.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S L; Ariel, G B; Saar, D; Penny, M A; Railey, P

    1986-01-01

    This study compared changes in movement velocity, force, and work from bilateral quadriceps muscle stimulation during resistive squatting exercise to identical exercise without stimulation. Both the group undergoing resistive training over 24 sessions (N = 9) and the group receiving the same treatment in conjunction with stimulation during the last 12 sessions (N = 9) showed significant improvements in measures of movement velocity, force, total work, power, sprint time, and vertical jump distance when compared to a control group receiving no treatment (N = 9). All subjects were baseline tested and tested at 3, 6, and 7 week intervals. Both experimental groups improved significantly for all measures, but the electrical stimulation group did not produce more significant changes overall than those with resistive training alone. However, when compared to control measures, the effect of electrical stimulation-augmented responses among some measures was more pronounced than the effect of resistive training alone. PMID:3752341

  18. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  19. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  20. Muscle satellite cell heterogeneity and self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD. PMID:25364710

  1. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease. PMID:27039885

  2. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  3. Expression of an insulin-regulatable glucose carrier in muscle and fat endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaró, Senen; Palacín, Manuel; Pilch, Paul F.; Testar, Xavier; Zorzano, Antonio

    1989-12-01

    INSULIN rapidly stimulates glucose use in the major target tissues, muscle and fat, by modulating a tissue-specific glucose transporter isoform1-6. Access of glucose to the target tissue is restricted by endothelial cells which line the walls of nonfenestrated capillaries of fat and muscle7. Thus, we examined whether the capillary endothelial cells are actively involved in the modulation of glucose availability by these tissues. We report here the abundant expression of the muscle/fat glucose transporter isoform in endothelial cells, using an immunocytochemical analysis with a monoclonal antibody specific for this isoform1. This expression is restricted to endothelial cells from the major insulin target tissues, and it is not detected in brain and liver where insulin does not activate glucose transport. The expression of the muscle/fat transporter isoform in endothelial cells is significantly greater than in the neighbouring muscle and fat cells. Following administration of insulin to animals in vivo, there occurs a rapid increase in the number of muscle/fat transporters present in the lumenal plasma membrane of the capillary endothelial cells. These results document that insulin promotes the translocation of the muscle/fat glucose transporter in endothelial cells. It is therefore likely that endothelial cells play an important role in the regulation of glucose use by the major insulin target tissues in normal and diseased states.

  4. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin-4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin-4 (Ten-4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten-4-deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten-4-deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten-4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten-4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. PMID:26013034

  5. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  6. Muscle and bone plasticity after spinal cord injury: Review of adaptations to disuse and to electrical muscle stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Shields, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    The paralyzed musculoskeletal system retains a remarkable degree of plasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI). In response to reduced activity, muscle atrophies and shifts toward a fast-fatigable phenotype arising from numerous changes in histochemistry and metabolic enzymes. The loss of routine gravitational and muscular loads removes a critical stimulus for maintenance of bone mineral density (BMD), precipitating neurogenic osteoporosis in paralyzed limbs. The primary adaptations of bone to reduced use are demineralization of epiphyses and thinning of the diaphyseal cortical wall. Electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscle markedly reduces deleterious post-SCI adaptations. Recent studies demonstrate that physiological levels of electrically induced muscular loading hold promise for preventing post-SCI BMD decline. Rehabilitation specialists will be challenged to develop strategies to prevent or reverse musculoskeletal deterioration in anticipation of a future cure for SCI. Quantifying the precise dose of stress needed to efficiently induce a therapeutic effect on bone will be paramount to the advancement of rehabilitation strategies. PMID:18566946

  7. Implantable power generation system utilizing muscle contractions excited by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Genta; Hijikata, Wataru; Tomioka, Kota; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2016-06-01

    An implantable power generation system driven by muscle contractions for supplying power to active implantable medical devices, such as pacemakers and neurostimulators, is proposed. In this system, a muscle is intentionally contracted by an electrical stimulation in accordance with the demands of the active implantable medical device for electrical power. The proposed system, which comprises a small electromagnetic induction generator, electrodes with an electrical circuit for stimulation and a transmission device to convert the linear motion of the muscle contractions into rotational motion for the magneto rotor, generates electrical energy. In an ex vivo demonstration using the gastrocnemius muscle of a toad, which was 28 mm in length and weighed 1.3 g, the electrical energy generated by the prototype exceeded the energy consumed for electrical stimulation, with the net power being 111 µW. It was demonstrated that the proposed implantable power generation system has the potential to replace implantable batteries for active implantable medical devices. PMID:27006422

  8. Sympathetic Responses to Noxious Stimulation of Muscle and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Alexander R.; Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute pain triggers adaptive physiological responses that serve as protective mechanisms that prevent continuing damage to tissues and cause the individual to react to remove or escape the painful stimulus. However, an extension of the pain response beyond signaling tissue damage and healing, such as in chronic pain states, serves no particular biological function; it is maladaptive. The increasing number of chronic pain sufferers is concerning, and the associated disease burden is putting healthcare systems around the world under significant pressure. The incapacitating effects of long-lasting pain are not just psychological – reflexes driven by nociceptors during the establishment of chronic pain may cause serious physiological consequences on regulation of other body systems. The sympathetic nervous system is inherently involved in a host of physiological responses evoked by noxious stimulation. Experimental animal and human models demonstrate a diverse array of heterogeneous reactions to nociception. The purpose of this review is to understand how pain affects the sympathetic nervous system by investigating the reflex cardiovascular and neural responses to acute pain and the long-lasting physiological responses to prolonged (tonic) pain. By observing the sympathetic responses to long-lasting pain, we can begin to understand the physiological consequences of long-term pain on cardiovascular regulation. PMID:27445972

  9. Sympathetic Responses to Noxious Stimulation of Muscle and Skin.

    PubMed

    Burton, Alexander R; Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2016-01-01

    Acute pain triggers adaptive physiological responses that serve as protective mechanisms that prevent continuing damage to tissues and cause the individual to react to remove or escape the painful stimulus. However, an extension of the pain response beyond signaling tissue damage and healing, such as in chronic pain states, serves no particular biological function; it is maladaptive. The increasing number of chronic pain sufferers is concerning, and the associated disease burden is putting healthcare systems around the world under significant pressure. The incapacitating effects of long-lasting pain are not just psychological - reflexes driven by nociceptors during the establishment of chronic pain may cause serious physiological consequences on regulation of other body systems. The sympathetic nervous system is inherently involved in a host of physiological responses evoked by noxious stimulation. Experimental animal and human models demonstrate a diverse array of heterogeneous reactions to nociception. The purpose of this review is to understand how pain affects the sympathetic nervous system by investigating the reflex cardiovascular and neural responses to acute pain and the long-lasting physiological responses to prolonged (tonic) pain. By observing the sympathetic responses to long-lasting pain, we can begin to understand the physiological consequences of long-term pain on cardiovascular regulation. PMID:27445972

  10. Contraction of gut smooth muscle cells assessed by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Yohei; Akiho, Hirotada; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Here we discuss the development of a novel cell imaging system for the evaluation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. SMCs were isolated from the circular and longitudinal muscular layers of mouse small intestine by enzymatic digestion. SMCs were stimulated by test agents, thereafter fixed in acrolein. Actin in fixed SMCs was stained with phalloidin and cell length was determined by measuring diameter at the large end of phalloidin-stained strings within the cells. The contractile response was taken as the decrease in the average length of a population of stimulated-SMCs. Various mediators and chemically identified compounds of daikenchuto (DKT), pharmaceutical-grade traditional Japanese prokinetics, were examined. Verification of the integrity of SMC morphology by phalloidin and DAPI staining and semi-automatic measurement of cell length using an imaging analyzer was a reliable method by which to quantify the contractile response. Serotonin, substance P, prostaglandin E2 and histamine induced SMC contraction in concentration-dependent manner. Two components of DKT, hydroxy-α-sanshool and hydroxy-β-sanshool, induced contraction of SMCs. We established a novel cell imaging technique to evaluate SMC contractility. This method may facilitate investigation into SMC activity and its role in gastrointestinal motility, and may assist in the discovery of new prokinetic agents. PMID:25837933

  11. Depression of corticomotor excitability after muscle fatigue induced by electrical stimulation and voluntary contraction

    PubMed Central

    Kotan, Shinichi; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of muscle fatigue induced by tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) and submaximal isometric contraction on corticomotor excitability. Experiments were performed in a cross-over design. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Corticomotor excitability was recorded before and after thumb opposition muscle fatigue tasks, in which 10% of the maximal tension intensity was induced by tetanic ES or voluntary contraction (VC). The participants were 10 healthy individuals who performed each task for 10 min. Surface electrodes placed over the abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle recorded MEPs. F- and M-waves were elicited from APB by supramaximal ES of the median nerve. After the tetanic ES- and VC tasks, MEP amplitudes were significantly lower than before the task. However, F- and M-wave amplitudes remained unchanged. These findings suggest that corticospinal excitability is reduced by muscle fatigue as a result of intracortical inhibitory mechanisms. Our results also suggest that corticomotor excitability is reduced by muscle fatigue caused by both VC and tetanic ES. PMID:26150781

  12. Thermal Mechanisms of Millimeter Wave Stimulation of Excitable Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Priest, Michael F.; Siegel, Peter H.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between millimeter waves (MMWs) and biological systems have received increasing attention due to the growing use of MMW radiation in technologies ranging from experimental medical devices to telecommunications and airport security. Studies have shown that MMW exposure alters cellular function, especially in neurons and muscles. However, the biophysical mechanisms underlying such effects are still poorly understood. Due to the high aqueous absorbance of MMW, thermal mechanisms are likely. However, nonthermal mechanisms based on resonance effects have also been postulated. We studied MMW stimulation in a simplified preparation comprising Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing proteins that underlie membrane excitability. Using electrophysiological recordings simultaneously with 60 GHz stimulation, we observed changes in the kinetics and activity levels of voltage-gated potassium and sodium channels and a sodium-potassium pump that are consistent with a thermal mechanism. Furthermore, we showed that MMW stimulation significantly increased the action potential firing rate in oocytes coexpressing voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels, as predicted by thermal terms in the Hodgkin-Huxley model of neurons. Our results suggest that MMW stimulation produces significant thermally mediated effects on excitable cells via basic thermodynamic mechanisms that must be taken into account in the study and use of MMW radiation in biological systems. PMID:23790370

  13. Longitudinal growth of skeletal myotubes in vitro in a new horizontal mechanical cell stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Karlisch, Patricia

    1989-01-01

    A tissue-culture model system for growing skeletal-muscle cells under more dynamic conditions than found in normal tissue-culture environments is described. A computerized device presented allows mechanical stimulation of the cell's substratum by 300 to 400 pct in length in the horizontal plane. Cell growth rates and skeletal-muscle organogenesis are stimulated in this in vitro system. It is noted that longitudinal myotube growth observed is accompanied by increased rates of cell proliferation and myoblast fusion. Prestretching the collagen-coated substratum before cell plating is shown to lead to increased cell proliferation, myotube orientation, and longitudinal myotube growth. The effects of substratum stretching on myogenesis in the model system are also assessed and attributed to alterations in the cell's extracellular matrix.

  14. Biaxial cell stimulation: A mechanical validation.

    PubMed

    Bieler, F H; Ott, C E; Thompson, M S; Seidel, R; Ahrens, S; Epari, D R; Wilkening, U; Schaser, K D; Mundlos, S; Duda, G N

    2009-08-01

    To analyse mechanotransduction resulting from tensile loading under defined conditions, various devices for in vitro cell stimulation have been developed. This work aimed to determine the strain distribution on the membrane of a commercially available device and its consistency with rising cycle numbers, as well as the amount of strain transferred to adherent cells. The strains and their behaviour within the stimulation device were determined using digital image correlation (DIC). The strain transferred to cells was measured on eGFP-transfected bone marrow-derived cells imaged with a fluorescence microscope. The analysis was performed by determining the coordinates of prominent positions on the cells, calculating vectors between the coordinates and their length changes with increasing applied tensile strain. The stimulation device was found to apply homogeneous (mean of standard deviations approx. 2% of mean strain) and reproducible strains in the central well area. However, on average, only half of the applied strain was transferred to the bone marrow-derived cells. Furthermore, the strain measured within the device increased significantly with an increasing number of cycles while the membrane's Young's modulus decreased, indicating permanent changes in the material during extended use. Thus, strain magnitudes do not match the system readout and results require careful interpretation, especially at high cycle numbers. PMID:19446815

  15. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates ubiquitin-conjugating activity and expression of genes for specific E2 and E3 proteins in skeletal muscle myotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Chen, Yuling; Li, Andrew S.; Reid, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to promote muscle atrophy in chronic wasting diseases, but the underlying mechanism has not been determined. Here we show that H2O2 stimulates ubiquitin conjugation to muscle proteins through transcriptional regulation of the enzymes (E2 and E3 proteins) that conjugate ubiquitin to muscle proteins. Incubation of C2C12 myotubes with 100 microM H2O2 increased the rate of 125I-labeled ubiquitin conjugation to muscle proteins in whole cell extracts. This response required at least 4-h exposure to H2O2 and persisted for at least 24 h. Preincubating myotubes with cycloheximide or actinomycin D blocked H2O2 stimulation of ubiquitin-conjugating activity, suggesting that gene transcription is required. Northern blot analyses revealed that H2O2 upregulates expression of specific E3 and E2 proteins that are thought to regulate muscle catabolism, including atrogin1/MAFbx, MuRF1, and E214k. These results suggest that ROS stimulate protein catabolism in skeletal muscle by upregulating the ubiquitin conjugation system.

  16. Electrical stimulation of the lumbrical muscles in an incomplete quadriplegic patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Carroll, S G; Bird, S F; Brown, D J

    1992-03-01

    The increasing number of incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries means that more attention needs to be focused on the rehabilitation of the incomplete quadriplegic hand. A case study, describing the application of electrical stimulation for strengthening the paretic lumbrical muscles, is presented. A 2 week strengthening program resulted in a 33% increase in the force produced by the lumbrical muscles. No loss of strength had occurred 4 weeks after cessation of the treatment. The magnitude and speed of this result should be of interest to those clinicians who seek to maximise patient independence in minimal time. PMID:1630853

  17. Graphene electrodes for stimulation of neuronal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerbitzer, Berit; Krauss, Peter; Nick, Christoph; Yadav, Sandeep; Schneider, Joerg J.; Thielemann, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Graphene has the ability to improve the electrical interface between neuronal cells and electrodes used for recording and stimulation purposes. It provides a biocompatible coating for common electrode materials such as gold and improves the electrode properties. Graphene electrodes are also prepared on SiO2 substrate to benefit from its optical properties like transparency. We perform electrochemical and Raman characterization of gold electrodes with graphene coating and compare them with graphene on SiO2 substrate. It was found that the substrate plays an important role in the performance of graphene and show that graphene on SiO2 substrate is a very promising material combination for stimulation electrodes.

  18. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I in skeletal muscle and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Frost, R A; Lang, C H

    2003-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are potent regulators of muscle mass. Transgenic mice that over-express these proteins exhibit dramatically enlarged skeletal muscles. In contrast, malnutrition, critical illness, sepsis, and aging are all associated with a dramatic reduction in muscle mass and function. The circulating concentration of IGF-I and the expression of IGF-I in skeletal muscle are also reduced during catabolic states. Consequently, GH has been used clinically to increase lean body mass in patients with muscle wasting. Likewise, delivery of IGF-I specifically into muscle has been proposed as a genetic therapy for muscle disorders. A better understanding of the regulation of IGF-I expression in skeletal muscle and muscle cells is therefore of importance. Yet, our knowledge in this area has been limited by a lack of GH responsive muscle cells. In addition the IGF-I gene spans over 90 kb of genomic DNA and it exhibits a very complex regulatory pattern. This review will summarize our knowledge of the control of muscle mass by GH, IGF-I, anabolic steroids, exercise and other growth enhancing hormones. We will also highlight recent advances in the regulation of IGF-I and signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) by GH. A special emphasis will be placed on the interaction of IGF-I and proinflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscle and muscle cells. PMID:12621363

  19. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-jiang; Li, Ping-hua; Huang, Rui-hua; Sun, Wen-xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-jun; Liu, Hong-lin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells. PMID:26104526

  20. The effect of muscle length and rate of fusimotor stimulation on the frequency of discharge in primary endings from muscle spindles in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D. M.; Proske, U.

    1972-01-01

    1. Responses from the primary endings of muscle spindles in the soleus muscle of the cat were recorded during repetitive fusimotor stimulation at a number of different muscle lengths. 2. An increase in the rate of stimulation increased the size of both the peak and the plateau of the responses to stimulation of both static and dynamic fusimotor fibres. 3. Responses, with the exception of the peak frequency of the discharge during dynamic fusimotor stimulation, increased in size on raising the muscle length up to maximum body length. The peak of the dynamic response reached its highest value at intermediate lengths. 4. The effect of increasing stimulation rate and muscle length was to reduce both the latency and time to peak of fusimotor responses. The change in latency with muscle length was particularly dramatic at low stimulus rates. 5. In an attempt to compare fusimotor responses with the behaviour of extrafusal muscle fibres, a model is proposed which consists of a mixture of extrafusal tension and rate of change of tension. This model could simulate the static fusimotor responses reported here. PMID:4260709

  1. Skeletal muscle beta-receptors and isoproterenol-stimulated vasodilation in canine heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, M.J.; Lanoce, V.; Molinoff, P.B.; Wilson, J.R. )

    1989-11-01

    To investigate whether heart failure alters beta-adrenergic receptors on skeletal muscle and its associated vasculature, the density of beta-adrenergic receptors, isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, and coupling of the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein were compared in 18 control dogs and 16 dogs with heart failure induced by 5-8 wk of ventricular pacing at 260 beats/min. Hindlimb vascular responses to isoproterenol were compared in eight controls and eight of the dogs with heart failure. In dogs with heart failure, the density of beta-receptors on skeletal muscle was reduced in both gastrocnemius (control: 50 +/- 5; heart failure: 33 +/- 8 fmol/mg of protein) and semitendinosus muscle (control: 43 +/- 9; heart failure: 27 +/- 9 fmol/mg of protein, both P less than 0.05). Receptor coupling to the ternary complex, as determined by isoproterenol competition curves with and without guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), was unchanged. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was significantly decreased in semitendinosus muscle (control: 52.4 +/- 4.6; heart failure: 36.5 +/- 9.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P less than 0.05) and tended to be decreased in gastrocnemius muscle (control: 40.1 +/- 8.5; heart failure: 33.5 +/- 4.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P = NS). Isoproterenol-induced hindlimb vasodilation was not significantly different in controls and in dogs with heart failure. These findings suggest that heart failure causes downregulation of skeletal muscle beta-adrenergic receptors, probably due to receptor exposure to elevated catecholamine levels, but does not reduce beta-receptor-mediated vasodilation in muscle.

  2. Osteogenic potential of alpha smooth muscle actin expressing muscle resident progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Brya G; Torreggiani, Elena; Roeder, Emilie; Matic, Igor; Grcevic, Danka; Kalajzic, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a pathological process where bone forms in connective tissues such as skeletal muscle. Previous studies have suggested that muscle-resident non-myogenic mesenchymal progenitors are the likely source of osteoblasts and chondrocytes in HO. However, the previously identified markers of muscle-resident osteoprogenitors label up to half the osteoblasts within heterotopic lesions, suggesting other cell populations are involved. We have identified alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) as a marker of osteoprogenitor cells in bone and periodontium, and of osteo-chondro progenitors in the periosteum during fracture healing. We therefore utilized a lineage tracing approach to evaluate whether αSMACreERT2 identifies osteoprogenitors in the muscle. We show that in the muscle, αSMACreERT2 labels both perivascular cells, and satellite cells. αSMACre-labeled cells undergo osteogenic differentiation in vitro and form osteoblasts and chondrocytes in BMP2-induced HO in vivo. In contrast, Pax7CreERT2-labeled muscle satellite cells were restricted to myogenic differentiation in vitro, and rarely contributed to HO in vivo. Our data indicate that αSMACreERT2 labels a large proportion of osteoprogenitors in skeletal muscle, and therefore represents another marker of muscle-resident cells with osteogenic potential under HO-inducing stimulus. In contrast, muscle satellite cells make minimal contribution to bone formation in vivo. PMID:26721734

  3. Isoproterenol directs hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells to differentiate in vitro to cardiac muscle cells which can be induced to form beating heart-muscle tissue sheets.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Aiko; Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells are located in the bulge area of the follicle. Previous studies have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. HAP stem cells effected nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle cells was greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol. In the present study, we observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. These results demonstrate that HAP stem cells have great potential to form beating cardiac muscle cells in tissue sheets. PMID:27104748

  4. Collagen formation by transformed smooth muscle cells after arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Chidi, C C; DePalma, R G

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five normocholesterolemic rabbits were sacrificed at intervals up to 60 days after the thoracic aortas were de-endothelialized. Ultrastructural studies of both the re-endothelialized and nonendothelialized intima were done. The smooth muscle cells in the re-endothelialized intima showed segmental structural changes typically associated with transformation to a secretory cell type; abundant accumulations of collagen were in juxtaposition with these cells. The nonendothelialized intima did not demonstrate similar smooth muscle cell changes and collagen accumulation. These observations suggest that regenerating endothelial cells and intimal smooth muscle cells interact to cause smooth muscle cell transformation and collagen accumulation during arterial repair. PMID:7455897

  5. Fat cell invasion in long-term denervated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    de Castro Rodrigues, Antonio; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Rosa, Geraldo Marco; dos Santos, Nícolas Bertolaccini; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Lauris, José Roberto P

    2007-01-01

    There are several differences between red and white muscles submitted to different experimental conditions, especially following denervation: a) denervation atrophy is more pronounced in red than white muscles; b) the size of the fibers in the red muscles does not vary between different parts of the muscle before and after denervation, when compared to white muscles; c) the regional difference in the white muscles initially more pronounced after denervation than red muscle; d) red muscle fibers and fibers of the deep white muscle present degenerative changes such as disordered myofibrils and sarcolemmal folds after long-term denervation; e) myotube-like fibers with central nuclei occur in the red muscle more rapidly than white after denervation. Denervation of skeletal muscles causes, in addition to fibers atrophy, loss of fibers with subsequent regeneration, but the extent of fat cell percentage invasion is currently unknown. The present article describes a quantitative study on fat cell invasion percentage in red m. soleus and white m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL) rat muscles at 7 weeks for up to 32 weeks postdenervation. The results indicate that the percentage of fat cells increase after denervation and it is steeper than the age-related fat invasion in normal muscles. The fat percentage invasion is more pronounced in red compared with white muscle. All experimental groups present a statistically significant difference as regard fat cell percentage invasion. PMID:17941108

  6. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  7. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels. PMID:19160674

  8. Reaction of human smooth muscle antibody with thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Biberfeld, Gunnel; Fagraeus, Astrid; Lenkei, Rodica

    1974-01-01

    Sera from cases of active chronic hepatitis or acute hepatitis containing smooth muscle antibodies reacted by immunofluorescence with the membrane region of sectioned thyroid cells from thyrotoxic glands. With non-toxic glands the reaction was negative or weak. The prerequisite for a positive reaction was that the complement of the sera had been heat-inactivated. Absorption with smooth muscle antigen abolished the reaction of smooth muscle antibody positive sera with thyroid cells. Some smooth muscle antibody negative sera from cases with disorders other than liver disease were found to give a similar immunofluorescence staining of the membrane region of sectioned thyroid cells, but these antibodies were not absorbed with smooth muscle antigen. Culture of thyroid cells was found to increase the number of cells reacting with smooth muscle antibody. In contrast, the thyroid cell antigen reacting with smooth muscle antibody negative sera was lost during culture. PMID:4619977

  9. Different alterations in the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the athlete's heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Nuutila, P; Knuuti, M J; Heinonen, O J; Ruotsalainen, U; Teräs, M; Bergman, J; Solin, O; Yki-Järvinen, H; Voipio-Pulkki, L M; Wegelius, U

    1994-01-01

    Physical training increases skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Since training also causes functional and structural changes in the myocardium, we compared glucose uptake rates in the heart and skeletal muscles of trained and untrained individuals. Seven male endurance athletes (VO2max 72 +/- 2 ml/kg/min) and seven sedentary subjects matched for characteristics other than VO2max (43 +/- 2 ml/kg/min) were studied. Whole body glucose uptake was determined with a 2-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, and regional glucose uptake in femoral and arm muscles, and myocardium using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose uptake in the athletes was increased by 68% in whole body (P < 0.0001), by 99% in the femoral muscles (P < 0.01), and by 62% in arm muscles (P = 0.06), but it was decreased by 33% in the heart muscle (P < 0.05) as compared with the sedentary subjects. The total glucose uptake rate in the heart was similar in the athletes and control subjects. Left ventricular mass in the athletes was 79% greater (P < 0.001) and the meridional wall stress smaller (P < 0.001) as estimated by echocardiography. VO2max correlated directly with left ventricular mass (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) and inversely with left ventricular wall stress (r = -0.86, P < 0.001). Myocardial glucose uptake correlated directly with the rate-pressure product (r = 0.75, P < 0.02) and inversely with left ventricular mass (r = -0.60, P < 0.05) or with the whole body glucose disposal (r = -0.68, P < 0.01). Thus, in athletes, (a) insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is enhanced in the whole body and skeletal muscles, (b) whereas myocardial glucose uptake per muscle mass is reduced possibly due to decreased wall stress and energy requirements or the use of alternative fuels, or both. Images PMID:8182160

  10. Low-frequency electrical stimulation attenuates muscle atrophy in CKD--a potential treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li; Klein, Janet D; Hassounah, Faten; Cai, Hui; Zhang, Cong; Xu, Ping; Wang, Xiaonan H

    2015-03-01

    Effective therapeutic strategies to treat CKD-induced muscle atrophy are urgently needed. Low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFES) may be effective in preventing muscle atrophy, because LFES is an acupuncture technique that mimics resistance exercise by inducing muscle contraction. To test this hypothesis, we treated 5/6-nephrectomized mice (CKD mice) and control mice with LFES for 15 days. LFES prevented soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle weight loss and loss of hind-limb muscle grip in CKD mice. LFES countered the CKD-induced decline in the IGF-1 signaling pathway and led to increases in markers of protein synthesis and myogenesis and improvement in muscle protein metabolism. In control mice, we observed an acute response phase immediately after LFES, during which the expression of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-6) increased. Expression of the M1 macrophage marker IL-1β also increased acutely, but expression of the M2 marker arginase-1 increased 2 days after initiation of LFES, paralleling the change in IGF-1. In muscle cross-sections of LFES-treated mice, arginase-1 colocalized with IGF-1. Additionally, expression of microRNA-1 and -206, which inhibits IGF-1 translation, decreased in the acute response phase after LFES and increased at a later phase. We conclude that LFES ameliorates CKD-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by upregulation of the IGF-1 signaling pathway, which improves protein metabolism and promotes myogenesis. The upregulation of IGF-1 may be mediated by decreased expression of microRNA-1 and -206 and/or activation of M2 macrophages. PMID:25228359

  11. Force responses to controlled stretches of electrically stimulated human muscle-tendon complex.

    PubMed

    Cook, C S; McDonagh, M J

    1995-05-01

    Human first dorsal interosseus muscle was tetanized using percutaneous electrical stimulation. During the tetanus the muscle was subjected to constant velocity stretches. The stretch produced an enhancement of muscular force of up to 80% during the stretch. The size of the enhancement was dependent on both the amplitude and the velocity of the stretch. During an isometric hold phase after the stretch, the force decayed quickly for the first 100 ms and thereafter much more slowly, reaching a level 30% higher than the isometric force without pre-stretch. The force during this hold phase was dependent on amplitude of stretch but was independent of stretch velocity. The interaction of tendon elasticity and muscle fibre mechanics in producing these responses is discussed. Implications for normal human movements are also explored. PMID:7640012

  12. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  13. The optimal interstimulus interval and repeatability of paired associative stimulation when the soleus muscle is targeted.

    PubMed

    Kumpulainen, Susanne; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Peltonen, Jussi; Voigt, Michael; Avela, Janne

    2012-09-01

    Changes in the excitability of the cortical projections to muscles in the upper and lower limbs can be induced in the intact human by paired associative stimulation (PAS). An interstimulus interval (ISI) of 25 ms between peripheral nerve and transcranial magnetic stimuli has been found to be effective when targeting hand muscles. The optimal ISI to induce plasticity changes in the cortical projections to lower limbs is still not well established. The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to investigate the effect of PAS with four different ISIs based on the individual latency of the sensory evoked potential (SEP plus 6, 12, 18 and 24 ms) and second, to evaluate the repeatability of the established optimal ISI. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to measure changes in the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) of the soleus (SOL) muscle before and after the PAS interventions. Significant increases in the amplitude of SOL MEPs (88 %) were attained with an ISI of SEP latency plus 18 ms (P32 + 18 ms). The PAS effect was long-lasting, input-specific and supraspinal in origin. The intraclass correlation coefficient to test the repeatability of the PAS intervention with the optimal ISI was 0.85. The results show that the excitability of cortical projections to the soleus muscle can be repeatedly increased after PAS with an optimal ISI of SEP plus 18 ms. PMID:22836519

  14. Na,K-ATPase α2 activity in mammalian skeletal muscle T-tubules is acutely stimulated by extracellular K+

    PubMed Central

    Hakimjavadi, Hesamedin; Lingrel, Jerry B.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase α2 isoform is the predominant Na,K-ATPase in adult skeletal muscle and the sole Na,K-ATPase in the transverse tubules (T-tubules). In quiescent muscles, the α2 isozyme operates substantially below its maximal transport capacity. Unlike the α1 isoform, the α2 isoform is not required for maintaining resting ion gradients or the resting membrane potential, canonical roles of the Na,K-ATPase in most other cells. However, α2 activity is stimulated immediately upon the start of contraction and, in working muscles, its contribution is crucial to maintaining excitation and resisting fatigue. Here, we show that α2 activity is determined in part by the K+ concentration in the T-tubules, through its K+ substrate affinity. Apparent K+ affinity was determined from measurements of the K1/2 for K+ activation of pump current in intact, voltage-clamped mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers. Pump current generated by the α2 Na,K-ATPase, Ip, was identified as the outward current activated by K+ and inhibited by micromolar ouabain. Ip was outward at all potentials studied (−90 to −30 mV) and increased with depolarization in the subthreshold range, −90 to −50 mV. The Q10 was 2.1 over the range of 22–37°C. The K1/2,K of Ip was 4.3 ± 0.3 mM at −90 mV and was relatively voltage independent. This K+ affinity is lower than that reported for other cell types but closely matches the dynamic range of extracellular K+ concentrations in the T-tubules. During muscle contraction, T-tubule luminal K+ increases in proportion to the frequency and duration of action potential firing. This K1/2,K predicts a low fractional occupancy of K+ substrate sites at the resting extracellular K+ concentration, with occupancy increasing in proportion to the frequency of membrane excitation. The stimulation of preexisting pumps by greater K+ site occupancy thus provides a rapid mechanism for increasing α2 activity in working muscles. PMID:26371210

  15. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  16. Effects of Abdominal Stimulation during Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Function of Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Shim, Je-myung; Kwon, Hae-yeon; Kim, Ha-roo; Kim, Bo-in

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to verify a new method for improving respiratory functions by applying both abdominal stimulation and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) to train the inspiratory muscle and the expiratory muscle simultaneously, to improve the efficiency of IMT of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] Eighteen stroke patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 9) and a control group (n = 9). [Methods] The experimental group was administered IMT with abdominal stimulation, and the control group was administered only IMT. During the intervention period, the experimental group and control group received training 20 min/day, 3 times/wk, for 4 weeks. To examine the lung functions of the subjects, FVC, FEV1, PEF, and FEF25–75 were measured using an electronic spirometer. The diaphragm thickness ratio was calculated from measurements made with a 7.5-MHz linear probe ultrasonic imaging system. [Result] The experimental group and the control group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness ratio on the paretic side, but not on the non-paretic side. With regard to lung function, the experimental group showed significant increases in FEV1, PEF, and FEF25–75. The changes between before and after the intervention in the two groups were compared with each other, and the results showed significant differences in FEV1 and PEF. [Conclusion] The present study identified that IMT accompanied by abdominal stimulation improved the pulmonary function of chronic stroke patients. PMID:24567679

  17. Ursolic acid stimulates mTORC1 signaling after resistance exercise in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Riki; Sato, Koji; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Nakazato, Koichi; Fujita, Satoshi

    2013-09-15

    A recent study identified ursolic acid (UA) as a potent stimulator of muscle protein anabolism via PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby suggesting that UA can increase Akt-independent mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activation induced by resistance exercise via Akt signaling. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of UA on resistance exercise-induced mTORC1 activation. The right gastrocnemius muscle of male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 11 wk was isometrically exercised via percutaneous electrical stimulation (stimulating ten 3-s contractions per set for 5 sets), while the left gastrocnemius muscle served as the control. UA or placebo (PLA; corn oil only) was injected intraperitoneally immediately after exercise. The rats were killed 1 or 6 h after the completion of exercise and the target tissues removed immediately. With placebo injection, the phosphorylation of p70(S6K) at Thr(389) increased 1 h after resistance exercise but attenuated to the control levels 6 h after the exercise. On the other hand, the augmented phosphorylation of p70(S6K) was maintained even 6 h after exercise when UA was injected immediately after exercise. A similar trend of prolonged phosphorylation was observed in PRAS40 Thr(246), whereas UA alone or resistance exercise alone did not alter its phosphorylation level at 6 h after intervention. These results indicate that UA is able to sustain resistance exercise-induced mTORC1 activity. PMID:23900420

  18. Lkb1 Deletion Promotes Ectopic Lipid Accumulation in Muscle Progenitor Cells and Mature Muscles

    PubMed Central

    SHAN, TIZHONG; ZHANG, PENGPENG; BI, PENGPENG; KUANG, SHIHUAN

    2015-01-01

    Excessive intramyocellular triglycerides (muscle lipids) are associated with reduced contractile function, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes, but what governs lipid accumulation in muscle is unclear. Here we report a role of Lkb1 in regulating lipid metabolism in muscle stem cells and their descendent mature muscles. We used MyodCre and Lkb1flox/flox mice to specifically delete Lkb1 in myogenic cells including stem and differentiated cells, and examined the lipid accumulation and gene expression of myoblasts cultured from muscle stem cells (satellite cells). Genetic deletion of Lkb1 in myogenic progenitors led to elevated expression of lipogenic genes and ectopic lipid accumulation in proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, the Lkb1-deficient myoblasts differentiated into adipocyte-like cells upon adipogenic induction. However, these adipocyte-like cells maintained myogenic gene expression with reduced ability to form myotubes efficiently. Activation of AMPK by AICAR prevented ectopic lipid formation in the Lkb1-null myoblasts. Notably, Lkb1-deficient muscles accumulated excessive lipids in vivo in response to high-fat diet feeding. These results demonstrate that Lkb1 acts through AMPK to limit lipid deposition in muscle stem cells and their derivative mature muscles, and point to the possibility of controlling muscle lipid content using AMPK activating drugs. PMID:25251157

  19. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  20. Muscle stem cells contribute to myofibers in sedentary adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Alexandra C.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Flygare, Steven D.; Fox, Zachary D.; Colasanto, Mary P.; Mathew, Sam J.; Yandell, Mark; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is essential for mobility, stability, and whole body metabolism, and muscle loss, for instance during sarcopenia, has profound consequences. Satellite cells (muscle stem cells) have been hypothesized, but not yet demonstrated, to contribute to muscle homeostasis and a decline in their contribution to myofiber homeostasis to play a part in sarcopenia. To test their role in muscle maintenance, we genetically labeled and ablated satellite cells in adult sedentary mice. We demonstrate via genetic lineage experiments that even in the absence of injury, satellite cells contribute to myofibers in all adult muscles, although the extent and timing differs. However, genetic ablation experiments showed that satellite cells are not globally required to maintain myofiber cross-sectional area of uninjured adult muscle. PMID:25971691

  1. Functional heterogeneity of side population cells in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Ojima, Koichi; Fukada, So-ichiro; Ikemoto, Madoka; Masuda, Satoru; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi . E-mail: takeda@ncnp.go.jp

    2006-03-17

    Skeletal muscle regeneration has been exclusively attributed to myogenic precursors, satellite cells. A stem cell-rich fraction referred to as side population (SP) cells also resides in skeletal muscle, but its roles in muscle regeneration remain unclear. We found that muscle SP cells could be subdivided into three sub-fractions using CD31 and CD45 markers. The majority of SP cells in normal non-regenerating muscle expressed CD31 and had endothelial characteristics. However, CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells, which are a minor subpopulation in normal muscle, actively proliferated upon muscle injury and expressed not only several regulatory genes for muscle regeneration but also some mesenchymal lineage markers. CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells showed the greatest myogenic potential among three SP sub-fractions, but indeed revealed mesenchymal potentials in vitro. These SP cells preferentially differentiated into myofibers after intramuscular transplantation in vivo. Our results revealed the heterogeneity of muscle SP cells and suggest that CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells participate in muscle regeneration.

  2. A biological micro actuator: graded and closed-loop control of insect leg motion by electrical stimulation of muscles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Bin Aziz, Mohamed Fareez; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect-machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  3. A Biological Micro Actuator: Graded and Closed-Loop Control of Insect Leg Motion by Electrical Stimulation of Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Aziz, Mohamed Fareez Bin; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect–machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  4. Fetal muscle-derived cells can repair dystrophic muscles in mdx mice

    SciTech Connect

    Auda-Boucher, Gwenola; Rouaud, Thierry; Lafoux, Aude; Levitsky, Dmitri; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Talon, Sophie; Fontaine-Perus, Josiane; Gardahaut, Marie-France . E-mail: Marie-France.Gardahaut@univ-nantes.fr

    2007-03-10

    We have previously reported that CD34{sup +} cells purified from mouse fetal muscles can differentiate into skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo when injected into muscle tissue of dystrophic mdx mice. In this study, we investigate the ability of such donor cells to restore dystrophin expression, and to improve the functional muscle capacity of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of mdx mice. For this purpose green fluorescent-positive fetal GFP{sup +}/CD34{sup +} cells or desmin{sup +}/{sup -}LacZ/CD34{sup +} cells were transplanted into irradiated or non-irradiated mdx EDL muscle. Donor fetal muscle-derived cells predominantly fused with existing fibers. Indeed more than 50% of the myofibers of the host EDL contained donor nuclei delivering dystrophin along 80-90% of the length of their sarcolemma. The presence of significant amounts of dystrophin (about 60-70% of that found in a control wild-type mouse muscle) was confirmed by Western blot analyses. Dystrophin expression also outcompeted that of utrophin, as revealed by a spatial shift in the distribution of utrophin. At 1 month post-transplant, the recipient muscle appeared to have greater resistance to fatigue than control mdx EDL muscle during repeated maximal contractions.

  5. Simulation of surface EMG for the analysis of muscle activity during whole body vibratory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fratini, Antonio; Bifulco, Paolo; Romano, Maria; Clemente, Fabrizio; Cesarelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to reproduce the effect of motor-unit synchronization on surface EMG recordings during vibratory stimulation to highlight vibration evoked muscle activity. The authors intended to evaluate, through numerical simulations, the changes in surface EMG spectrum in muscles undergoing whole body vibration stimulation. In some specific bands, in fact, vibration induced motion artifacts are also typically present. In addition, authors meant to compare the simulated EMGs with respect to real recordings in order to discriminate the effect of synchronization of motor units discharges with vibration frequencies from motion artifacts. Computations were performed using a model derived from previous studies and modified to consider the effect of vibratory stimulus, the motor unit synchronization and the endplates-electrodes relative position on the EMG signal. Results revealed that, in particular conditions, synchronization of MUs' discharge generates visible peaks at stimulation frequency and its harmonics. However, only a part of the total power of surface EMGs might be enclosed within artifacts related bands (± 1 Hz centered at the stimulation frequency and its superior harmonics) even in case of strong synchronization of motor units discharges with the vibratory stimulus. PMID:24183387

  6. Adaptive change in electrically stimulated muscle: a framework for the design of clinical protocols.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Stanley

    2009-12-01

    Adult mammalian skeletal muscles have a remarkable capacity for adapting to increased use. Although this behavior is familiar from the changes brought about by endurance exercise, it is seen to a much greater extent in the response to long-term neuromuscular stimulation. The associated phenomena include a markedly increased resistance to fatigue, and this is the key to several clinical applications. However, a more rational basis is needed for designing regimes of stimulation that are conducive to an optimal outcome. In this review I examine relevant factors, such as the amount, frequency, and duty cycle of stimulation, the influence of force generation, and the animal model. From these considerations a framework emerges for the design of protocols that yield an overall functional profile appropriate to the application. Three contrasting examples illustrate the issues that need to be addressed clinically. PMID:19902542

  7. An investigation of the action of the hamstring muscles during standing in crouch using functional electrical stimulation (FES).

    PubMed

    Stewart, C; Postans, N; Schwartz, M H; Rozumalski, A; Roberts, A P

    2008-10-01

    The hamstring muscle moment arms indicate that they act as hip extensors and knee flexors. Previous work using induced acceleration (IA) analysis and functional electrical stimulation (FES) has, however, revealed counter-intuitive muscle actions, particularly for biarticular muscles during the stance phase of normal gait. In conditions such as cerebral palsy the hamstrings have been associated with the development of pathological gait patterns, particularly crouch gait. This study examines the role of these muscles in the control of crouched standing postures. Five unimpaired adult subjects had their muscles stimulated during quiet standing in different degrees of crouch. Kinematic and kinetic changes were observed and measured using a 3D motion analysis system. The hamstring muscles were shown to act strongly to retrovert the pelvis and extend the hip. The action at the knee changes as crouch increases, moving from flexing to extending. PMID:18579383

  8. Intracellular energetic units in red muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Saks, V A; Kaambre, T; Sikk, P; Eimre, M; Orlova, E; Paju, K; Piirsoo, A; Appaix, F; Kay, L; Regitz-Zagrosek, V; Fleck, E; Seppet, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of regulation of mitochondrial respiration by endogenous and exogenous ADP in muscle cells in situ was studied in skinned cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres. Endogenous ADP production was initiated by addition of MgATP; under these conditions the respiration rate and ADP concentration in the medium were dependent on the calcium concentration, and 70-80% of maximal rate of respiration was achieved at ADP concentration below 20 microM in the medium. In contrast, when exogenous ADP was added, maximal respiration rate was observed only at millimolar concentrations. An exogenous ADP-consuming system consisting of pyruvate kinase (PK; 20-40 units/ml) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP; 5 mM), totally suppressed respiration activated by exogenous ADP, but the respiration maintained by endogenous ADP was not suppressed by more than 20-40%. Creatine (20 mM) further activated respiration in the presence of ATP and PK+PEP. Short treatment with trypsin (50-500 nM for 5 min) decreased the apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP from 300-350 microM to 50-60 microM, increased inhibition of respiration by PK+PEP system up to 70-80%, with no changes in MgATPase activity and maximal respiration rates. Electron-microscopic observations showed detachment of mitochondria and disordering of the regular structure of the sarcomere after trypsin treatment. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed a group of at least seven low-molecular-mass proteins in cardiac skinned fibres which were very sensitive to trypsin and not present in glycolytic fibres, which have low apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP. It is concluded that, in oxidative muscle cells, mitochondria are incorporated into functional complexes ('intracellular energetic units') with adjacent ADP-producing systems in myofibrils and in sarcoplasmic reticulum, probably due to specific interaction with cytoskeletal elements responsible for mitochondrial distribution in the cell. It is suggested that these complexes represent the basic

  9. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy. PMID:27398454

  10. Leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs by enhancing mTORC1 activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle in the neonate grows at a rapid rate due in part to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which leucine stimulates protein synthesis in neonatal muscle, overnight-fasted 7-day-old piglets were tr...

  11. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function. PMID:25460248

  12. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle increases prostaglandin F2(alpha) synthesis and cyclooxygenase activity by a pertussis toxin sensitive mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Shansky, Janet; Solerssi, Rosa; Chromiak, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of differentiated skeletal muscle in tissue culture increases the production of prostaglandin F(sub 2(alpha)), an anabolic stimulator of myofiber growth. Within 4 h of initiating mechanical activity, the activity of cyclooxygenase, a regulatory enzyme in prostaglandin synthesis, was increased 82% (P is less than .005), and this increase was maintained for at least 24 h. Kinetic analysis of the stretch-activated cyclooxygenase indicated a two to three-fold decrease in the enzyme's K(sub m) with no change in V(sub max). The stretch-induced increase in enzymatic activity was not inhibited by cycloheximide, was independent of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin-insensitive), but was prevented by the G protein inhibitor pertussis toxin. Pertussis toxin also inhibited the stretch-induced increases in PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production, and cell growth. It is concluded that stretch of skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of the anabolic modulator PGF(sub 2(alpha)) by a G protein-dependent process which involves activation of cyclooxygenase by a posttranslational mechanism.

  13. Red blood cells do not contribute to removal of K+ released from exhaustively working forearm muscle.

    PubMed

    Maassen, N; Foerster, M; Mairbäurl, H

    1998-07-01

    K+ released from exercising muscle via K+ channels needs to be removed from the interstitium into the blood to maintain high muscle cell membrane potential and allow normal muscle contractility. Uptake by red blood cells has been discussed as one mechanism that would also serve to regulate red blood cell volume, which was found to be constant despite increased plasma osmolality and K+ concentration ([K+pl]). We evaluated exercise-related changes in [K+pl], pH, osmolality, mean cellular Hb concentration, cell water, and red blood cell K+ concentration during exhaustive handgrip exercise. Unidirectional 86Rb+ (K+) uptake by red blood cells was measured in media with elevated extracellular K+, osmolarity, and catecholamines to simulate particularly those exercise-related changes in plasma composition that are known to stimulate K+ uptake. During exercise [K+pl] increased from 4.4 +/- 0.7 to 7.1 +/- 0.5 mmol/l plasma water and red blood cell K+ concentration increased from 137.2 +/- 6.0 to 144.6 +/- 4.6 mmol/l cell water (P cells was increased by approximately 20% on stimulation, caused by activation of the Na+-K+ pump and Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport. Results indicate the K+ content of red blood cells did not change as cells passed the exhaustively exercising forearm muscle despite the elevated [K+pl]. The tendency for an increase in intracellular K+ concentration was due to a slight, although statistically not significant, decrease in red blood cell volume. K+ uptake, although elevated, was too small to move significant amounts of K+ into red blood cells. Our results suggest that red blood cells do not contribute to the removal of K+ released from muscle and do not regulate their volume by K+ uptake during exhaustive forearm exercise. PMID:9655793

  14. Stem Cell Stimulation of Endogenous Myocyte Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Brian R.; Canty, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodeling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted during the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone marrow- and peripheral blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the preclinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair, and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischemic heart disease patients. PMID:23577634

  15. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta induces loss of epithelial character and smooth muscle cell differentiation in epicardial cells.

    PubMed

    Compton, Leigh A; Potash, Dru A; Mundell, Nathan A; Barnett, Joey V

    2006-01-01

    During embryogenesis, epicardial cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), invade the myocardium, and differentiate into components of the coronary vasculature, including smooth muscle cells. We tested the hypothesis that transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) stimulates EMT and smooth muscle differentiation of epicardial cells. In epicardial explants, TGFbeta1 and TGFbeta2 induce loss of epithelial morphology, cytokeratin, and membrane-associated Zonula Occludens-1 and increase the smooth muscle markers calponin and caldesmon. Inhibition of activin receptor-like kinase (ALK) 5 blocks these effects, whereas constitutively active (ca) ALK5 increases cell invasion by 42%. Overexpression of Smad 3 did not mimic the effects of caALK5. Inhibition of p160 rho kinase or p38 MAP kinase prevented the loss of epithelial morphology in response to TGFbeta, whereas only inhibition of p160 rho kinase blocked TGFbeta-stimulated caldesmon expression. These data demonstrate that TGFbeta stimulates loss of epithelial character and smooth muscle differentiation in epicardial cells by means of a mechanism that requires ALK5 and p160 rho kinase. PMID:16258965

  17. The muscle satellite cell at 50: the formative years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In February 1961, Alexander Mauro described a cell 'wedged' between the plasma membrane of the muscle fibre and the surrounding basement membrane. He postulated that it could be a dormant myoblast, poised to repair muscle when needed. In the same month, Bernard Katz also reported a cell in a similar location on muscle spindles, suggesting that it was associated with development and growth of intrafusal muscle fibres. Both Mauro and Katz used the term 'satellite cell' in relation to their discoveries. Today, the muscle satellite cell is widely accepted as the resident stem cell of skeletal muscle, supplying myoblasts for growth, homeostasis and repair. Since 2011 marks both the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the satellite cell, and the launch of Skeletal Muscle, it seems an opportune moment to summarise the seminal events in the history of research into muscle regeneration. We start with the 19th-century pioneers who showed that muscle had a regenerative capacity, through to the descriptions from the mid-20th century of the underlying cellular mechanisms. The journey of the satellite cell from electron microscope curio, to its gradual acceptance as a bona fide myoblast precursor, is then charted: work that provided the foundations for our understanding of the role of the satellite cell. Finally, the rapid progress in the age of molecular biology is briefly discussed, and some ongoing debates on satellite cell function highlighted. PMID:21849021

  18. Fuzzy control with amplitude/pulse-width modulation of nerve electrical stimulation for muscle force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-C. K.; Liu, W.-C.; Chan, C.-C.; Ju, M.-S.

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to study the performance of fuzzy logic controllers combined with simplified hybrid amplitude/pulse-width (AM/PW) modulation to regulate muscle force via nerve electrical stimulation. The recruitment curves with AM/PW and AM modulations were constructed for the calf muscles of rabbits. Integrated with the modulation methods, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and three fuzzy logic controllers were designed and applied for the electrical stimulation of tibial nerves to control the ankle torque under isometric conditions. The performance of the two modulation methods combined with the four controllers was compared when the ankle was fixed at three positions for both in vivo experiments and model simulations using a nonlinear muscle model. For the animal experiments, AM/PW modulation performed better than AM modulation alone. The fuzzy PI controller performed marginally better and was resistant to external noises, though it tended to have a larger overshoot. The performance of the controllers had a similar trend in the three different joint positions, and the simulation results with the nonlinear model matched the experimental results well. In conclusion, AM/PW modulation improved controller performance, while the contribution of fuzzy logic was only marginal.

  19. Fuzzy control with amplitude/pulse-width modulation of nerve electrical stimulation for muscle force control.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C K; Liu, W-C; Chan, C-C; Ju, M-S

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to study the performance of fuzzy logic controllers combined with simplified hybrid amplitude/pulse-width (AM/PW) modulation to regulate muscle force via nerve electrical stimulation. The recruitment curves with AM/PW and AM modulations were constructed for the calf muscles of rabbits. Integrated with the modulation methods, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and three fuzzy logic controllers were designed and applied for the electrical stimulation of tibial nerves to control the ankle torque under isometric conditions. The performance of the two modulation methods combined with the four controllers was compared when the ankle was fixed at three positions for both in vivo experiments and model simulations using a nonlinear muscle model. For the animal experiments, AM/PW modulation performed better than AM modulation alone. The fuzzy PI controller performed marginally better and was resistant to external noises, though it tended to have a larger overshoot. The performance of the controllers had a similar trend in the three different joint positions, and the simulation results with the nonlinear model matched the experimental results well. In conclusion, AM/PW modulation improved controller performance, while the contribution of fuzzy logic was only marginal. PMID:22422279

  20. Lymphatic Muscle Cells in Rat Mesenteric Lymphatic Vessels of Various Ages

    PubMed Central

    Bridenbaugh, Eric A.; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Jupiter, Daniel; Nagai, Takashi; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies on aging-associated changes in mesenteric lymph flow in situ demonstrated predominance of the severe negative chronotropic effect of aging on the contractility of aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV). At the same time, contraction amplitude of the aged vessels was only slightly diminished by aging and can be rapidly stimulated within 5–15 minutes. However, the detailed quantitative evaluation of potential aging-associated changes in muscle cells investiture in MLV has never been performed. Methods and Results In this study we, for the first time, performed detailed evaluation of muscle cells investiture in MLV in reference to the position of lymphatic valve in different zones of lymphangion within various age groups (3-mo, 9-mo and 24-mo Fischer-344 rats). Using visual and quantitative analyses of the images of MLV immunohistochemically labeled for actin, we confirmed that the zones located close upstream (pre-valve zones) and above lymphatic valves (valve zones) possess the lowest investiture of lymphatic muscle cells. Most of the high muscle cells investiture zones exist downstream to the lymphatic valve (post-valve zones). The muscle cells investiture of these zones is not affected by aging, while pre-valve and valve zones demonstrate significant aging-associated decrease in muscle cells investiture. Conclusions The low muscle cells investiture zones in lymphatic vessels consist of predominantly longitudinally oriented muscle cells which are positioned in pre-valve and valve zones and connect adjacent lymphangions. These cells may provide important functional impact on the biomechanics of the lymphatic valve gating and electrical coupling between lymphangions, while their aging-associated changes may delimit adaptive reserves of aged lymphatic vessels. PMID:23531183

  1. Hyaluronan stimulates pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Kohi, Shiro; Koga, Atsuhiro; Hirata, Keiji; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but functional significance of HA in the aggressive phenotype remains unknown. We used different models to investigate the effect of HA on PDAC cell motility by wound healing and transwell migration assay. Changes in cell motility were examined in 8 PDAC cell lines in response to inhibition of HA production by treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) and to promotion by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or by co-culture with tumor-derived stromal fibroblasts. We also investigated changes in cell motility by adding exogenous HA. Additionally, mRNA expressions of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases were examined using real time RT-PCR. Inhibition of HA by 4-MU significantly decreased the migration, whereas promotion of HA by TPA or co-culture with tumor-derived fibroblasts significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. The changes in HA production by these treatments tended to be associated with changes in HAS3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous HA, especially low-molecular-weight HA, significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. These findings suggest that HA stimulates PDAC cell migration and thus represents an ideal therapeutic target to prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:26684359

  2. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Nam, Deokhwa; Li, Yong; Ma, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  3. Intramedullary Pressure and Matrix Strain Induced by Oscillatory Skeletal Muscle Stimulation and its Potential in Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lam, Hoyan

    2010-01-01

    Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by oscillatory muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia, i.e., hindlimb suspension (HLS). To test this hypothesis, we evaluated a) MS induced ImP and bone strain as function of stimulation frequency, and b) the adaptive responses to functional disuse, and disuse plus 1Hz and 20Hz stimulation in vivo. Femoral ImP and bone strain generated by MS were measured in the frequencies of 1Hz-100Hz in four rats. Forty retired breeder rats were used for the in vivo HLS study. The quadriceps muscle was stimulated at frequencies of 1 Hz and 20 Hz, 10min/d for 4 weeks. The metaphyseal trabecular bone quantity and microstructure at the distal femur were evaluated using μCT, while bone formation indices were analyzed using histomorphometric techniques. Oscillatory MS generated a maximum ImP of 45±9 mmHg at 20 Hz and produced a maximum matrix strain of 128±19 με at 10 Hz. Our analyses from the in vivo study showed that MS at 20 Hz was able to attenuate trabecular bone loss and partially maintain the microstructure induced by HLS. Conversely, there was no evidence of an adaptive effect of stimulation at 1 Hz on disused skeleton. The results suggested that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics and mechanical strain in bone, which serves as a critical mediator of adaptation. These results clearly demonstrated the ability of MS in attenuating bone loss from the disuse osteopenia and could hold potential in mitigating skeletal degradation imposed by conditions of disuse, which may serve as a biomechanical intervention in clinic application. PMID:19081096

  4. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise. PMID:26203859

  5. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise. PMID:26203859

  6. Setup and procedure for online identification of electrically stimulated muscle with Matlab Simulink.

    PubMed

    Ponikvar, M; Munih, M

    2001-09-01

    This paper first describes a laboratory setup for biomechanical experiments that runs within the universal simulation environment Matlab Simulink. The overall system comprises a personal computer, two AMTI (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA 02472) force plates, Parotec force-sensor shoe insoles, Optotrak system for noncontact three-dimensional (3-D)-position measuring, and a computer-controlled four-channel electrical stimulator. Conceptually, the most important application is implementation of closed-loop electrical stimulation of intact and paralyzed subjects in the laboratory. Second, the system was tested in real-time muscle model identification procedure during a standing experiment. The plantarflexors of three nonimpaired subjects were excited with pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBSs) with small deviations around selected operating points. Electrically stimulated muscles were presented with a linear local dynamic block that was identified with a recursive least-square method (RARX). RARX block was designed with fundamental Matlab Simulink blocks that support real-time operation. Introduced was online estimation of model output, which offers a great manner of instant model validation. Two modes of operation with online validation were tested. In the first mode, the operating point for selected excitation level was identified online. In the second mode, the operating point was measured in preceding experiments. Both procedures resulted in satisfying second-order models that will be used in the adaptive controller design. PMID:11561666

  7. Activation and suppression of the trapezius muscle induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Jahns, R

    1998-01-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and silent periods (SPs) in the trapezius muscle induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were investigated in 15 healthy subjects. Stimuli were applied with a Novametrix Magnetic stimulator using a 14 cm circular coil 4 cm lateral to the vertex on the biauricular line. Surface electrodes were used for simultaneous bilateral electromyographic recordings of the trapezius. TMS invariably induced contralateral MEPs (latency 10.5 +/- 1.3 ms, mean +/- SD), with ipsilateral responses in 53% of the subjects (latency 11.1 +/- 2.5 ms). The mean duration of the SPs was approximately 90 ms on both sides. There were no significant side differences between any of the MEP or SP parameters. To study the influence of subcortical inhibition phenomena TMS induced responses were assessed following electrical mental nerve stimulation with interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 0-100 ms. MEP latencies significantly increased at ISI of 10-100 ms, whereas MEP amplitudes and SPs did not change. These findings may reflect a trigeminal induced exteroceptive suppression of trapezius muscle activity. PMID:9637939

  8. [Changes in multi-locally recorded muscle responses following cortex stimulation in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Meyer, B U; Zipper, S; Conrad, B; Benecke, R

    1988-12-01

    The application of transcranial brain stimulation widens the range of neurophysiological tools available for the diagnostic evaluation of impaired function in central conduction pathways. A standardized examination of 25 patients with multiple sclerosis (diagnoses of different certainties using the classification by Bauer) was performed with electrical brain stimulation and EMG recordings from 3 muscles in each of the upper and lower extremities (Fig. 2). The occurrence and the change (amplitude, latency) of abnormal cortically evoked muscle responses correlated with the distribution and the severity of the clinical motor deficits respectively (Fig. 1 to 4 and Tab. 1). Furthermore, in some cases, abnormal responses were found in clinically unaffected limbs. Non-invasive stimulation of the motor cortex may reveal lesions affecting the function of the fast conducting component of the corticospinal tract even when there is no pathological clinical finding. In patients suspected of having multiple sclerosis the use of this technique may allow greater diagnostic certainty or even an early diagnosis. PMID:2850152

  9. A new vibrator to stimulate muscle proprioceptors in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Montant, Marie; Romaiguère, Patricia; Roll, Jean-Pierre

    2009-03-01

    Studying cognitive brain functions by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) requires appropriate stimulation devices that do not interfere with the magnetic fields. Since the emergence of fMRI in the 90s, a number of stimulation devices have been developed for the visual and auditory modalities. Only few devices, however, have been developed for the somesthesic modality. Here, we present a vibration device for studying somesthesia that is compatible with high magnetic field environments and that can be used in fMRI machines. This device consists of a poly vinyl chloride (PVC) vibrator containing a wind turbine and of a pneumatic apparatus that controls 1-6 vibrators simultaneously. Just like classical electromagnetic vibrators, our device stimulates muscle mechanoreceptors (muscle spindles) and generates reliable illusions of movement. We provide the fMRI compatibility data (phantom test), the calibration curve (vibration frequency as a function of air flow), as well as the results of a kinesthetic test (perceived speed of the illusory movement as a function of vibration frequency). This device was used successfully in several brain imaging studies using both fMRI and magnetoencephalography. PMID:18412129

  10. Visualizing the Functional Heterogeneity of Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Ogawa, Shizuka; Ono, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells are satellite cells that play crucial roles in tissue repair and regeneration after muscle injury. Accumulating evidence indicates that satellite cells are genetically and functionally heterogeneous, even within the same muscle. A small population of satellite cells possesses "stemness" and exhibits the remarkable ability to regenerate through robust self-renewal when transplanted into a regenerating muscle niche. In contrast, not all satellite cells self-renew. For example, some cells are committed myogenic progenitors that immediately undergo myogenic differentiation with minimal cell division after activation. Recent studies illuminate the cellular and molecular characteristics of the functional heterogeneity among satellite cells. To evaluate heterogeneity and stem cell dynamics, here we describe methods to conduct a clonal analysis of satellite cells and to visualize a slowly dividing cell population. PMID:27052612

  11. Epigenetic regulation of smooth muscle cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renjing; Leslie, Kristen L; Martin, Kathleen A

    2015-04-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) are the major cell type in blood vessels. Their principal function in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through vessel wall contraction and relaxation. Unlike many other mature cell types in the adult body, SMC do not terminally differentiate but retain a remarkable plasticity. They have the unique ability to toggle between a differentiated and quiescent "contractile" state and a highly proliferative and migratory "synthetic" phenotype in response to environmental stresses. While there have been major advances in our understanding of SMC plasticity through the identification of growth factors and signals that can influence the SMC phenotype, how these regulate SMC plasticity remains unknown. To date, several key transcription factors and regulatory cis elements have been identified that play a role in modulating SMC state. The frontier in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying SMC plasticity has now advanced to the level of epigenetics. This review will summarize the epigenetic regulation of SMC, highlighting the role of histone modification, DNA methylation, and our most recent identification of a DNA demethylation pathway in SMC that is pivotal in the regulation of the SMC phenotypic state. Many disorders are associated with smooth muscle dysfunction, including atherosclerosis, the major underlying cause of stroke and coronary heart disease, as well as transplant vasculopathy, aneurysm, asthma, hypertension, and cancer. An increased understanding of the major regulators of SMC plasticity will lead to the identification of novel target molecules that may, in turn, lead to novel drug discoveries for the treatment of these diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity. PMID:24937434

  12. Skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs is stimulated by A-ketoisocaproic acid, but not by norleucine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In neonatal pigs, skeletal muscle protein synthesis is stimulated when plasma leucine is increased within the physiological postprandial range. We previously have shown that valine and isoleucine were not able to stimulate protein synthesis when their plasma concentrations were elevated within the ...

  13. An Epidermal Stimulation and Sensing Platform for Sensorimotor Prosthetic Control, Management of Lower Back Exertion, and Electrical Muscle Activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baoxing; Akhtar, Aadeel; Liu, Yuhao; Chen, Hang; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Park, Sung Ii; Boyce, Brandon; Kim, Hyunjin; Yu, Jiwoo; Lai, Hsin-Yen; Jung, Sungyoung; Zhou, Yuhao; Kim, Jeonghyun; Cho, Seongkyu; Huang, Yonggang; Bretl, Timothy; Rogers, John A

    2016-06-01

    The design of an ultrathin, conformal electronic device that integrates electrotactile stimulation with electromyography, temperature, and strain sensing in a single, simple platform is reported. Experiments demonstrate simultaneous use of multiple modes of operation of this type of device in the sensorimotor control of robotic systems, in the monitoring of lower back exertion and in muscle stimulation. PMID:26469201

  14. Dynamic Foot Stimulation Attenuates Soleus Muscle Atrophy Induced by Hindlimb Unloading in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyparos, Antonios; Feeback, Daniel L.; Layne, Charles S.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    Unloading-induced myofiber atrophy is a phenomenon that occurs in the aging population, bed-ridden patients and astronauts. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not dynamic foot stimulation (DFS) applied to the plantar surface of the rat foot can serve as a countermeasure to the soleus muscle atrophy normally observed in hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty mature adult (6-month-old) male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into ambulatory control (AMB), hindlimb unloaded alone (HU), or hindlimb unloaded with the application of DFS (HU+DFS) groups. A dynamic pattern of pressure was applied to the right foot of each HU animal using a specially fabricated boot containing an inflatable air bladder connected to a solenoid air pump controlled by a laptop computer. The anti-atrophic effects of DFS were quantified morphometrically in frozen cross-sections of soleus muscle stained using the metachromatic-ATPase fiber typing technique. Application of DFS during HU significantly counteracted the atrophic response observed in the soleus by preventing approximately 85% of the reduction in Type I myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA) observed during HU. However, DFS did not protect type II fibers of the soleus from HU-induced atrophy or any fiber type in the soleus muscle of the contralateral control leg of the DFS-treated HU animals. These results illustrate that the application of DFS to the rat foot is an effective countermeasure to soleus muscle atrophy induced by HU.

  15. Metabolic Effects of Insulin and IGFs on Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montserrat, Núria; Capilla, Encarnación; Navarro, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of gilthead sea bream myocytes were performed in order to examine the relative metabolic function of insulin compared with IGF-I and IGF-II (insulin-like growth factors, IGFs) at different stages in the cell culture. In these cells, the in vitro effects of insulin and IGFs on 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and l-alanine uptake were studied in both myocytes (day 4) and small myotubes (day 9). 2-DG uptake in gilthead sea bream muscle cells was increased in the presence of insulin and IGFs in a time dependent manner and along with muscle cell differentiation. On the contrary, l-alanine uptake was also stimulated by insulin and IGFs but showed an inverse pattern, being the uptake higher in small myocytes than in large myotubes. The results of preincubation with inhibitors (PD-98059, wortmannin, and cytochalasin B) on 2-DG uptake indicated that insulin and IGFs stimulate glucose uptake through the same mechanisms, and evidenced that mitogenesis activator protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K–Akt transduction pathways mediate the metabolic function of these peptides. In the same way, we observed that GLUT4 protein synthesis was stimulated in the presence of insulin and IGFs in gilthead sea bream muscle cells in a different manner at days 4 or 9 of the culture. In summary we describe here, for the first time, the effects of insulin and IGFs on 2-DG and l-alanine uptake in primary culture of gilthead sea bream muscle cells. We show that both MAPK and PI3K–Akt transduction pathways are needed in order to control insulin and IGFs actions in these cells. Moreover, changes in glucose uptake can be explained by the action of the GLUT4 transporter, which is stimulated in the presence of insulin and IGFs throughout the cell culture. PMID:22654873

  16. The Inhibitory Mechanism of Gentamicin on Electrical Field Stimulation Response in Rat Bladder Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Min, Chang Ho; Wang, YiYi; Bae, Jinhyung; Han, Jung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To see the inhibitory mechanism of gentamicin in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) using the rat bladder smooth muscle, atropine or guanethidine was treated but had no effect. Methylsergide, a non-selective 5-HT1, 5-HT2 receptor antagonist was also treated but had on effect. Kinase inhibitors, such as chelerythrine (PKC inhibitor), ML-9 (MLCK inhibitor), or Y27632 (rho kinase inhibitor) were pretreated before gentamicin treatment, but did not have effect. For U73122, a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor however, the inhibitory effect to gentamicin was significantly attenuated in all frequencies given by the EFS. Therefore gentamicin induced inhibitory effect on EFS response in rat bladder smooth muscle was not mediated by the activation of adrenergic, cholinergic, or serotonergic receptor. The inhibition of gentamicin might be mediated through the PLC dependent pathway, but not through the PKC, MLCK or rho kinase dependent pathway. PMID:26330761

  17. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Abigail N; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2–5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function. PMID:24654267

  18. Action of Obestatin in Skeletal Muscle Repair: Stem Cell Expansion, Muscle Growth, and Microenvironment Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration. PMID:25762009

  19. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26892967

  20. Activation of a muscle-specific actin gene promoter in serum-stimulated fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Stoflet, E S; Schmidt, L J; Elder, P K; Korf, G M; Foster, D N; Strauch, A R; Getz, M J

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of AKR-2B mouse fibroblasts with serum growth factors or inhibitors of protein synthesis, such as cycloheximide, results in a stimulation of cytoskeletal beta-actin transcription but has no effect on transcription of muscle-specific isotypes, such as the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) alpha-actin gene. Deletion mapping and site-specific mutagenesis studies demonstrated that a single "CArG" element of the general form CC(A/T)6GG was necessary and possibly sufficient to impart serum and cycloheximide-inducibility to the beta-actin promoter. Although the VSM alpha-actin promoter exhibits at least three similar sequence elements, it remained refractory to serum and cycloheximide induction. However, deletion of a 33 base pair sequence between -191 and -224 relative to the transcription start site resulted in the transcriptional activation of this muscle-specific promoter in rapidly growing or serum-stimulated fibroblasts. Although the activity of this truncated promoter was potentiated by cycloheximide in a manner indistinguishable from that of the beta-actin promoter, this was dependent on a more complex array of interacting elements. These included at least one CArG box and a putative upstream activating element closely associated with the -191 to -224 inhibitory sequences. These results demonstrate that the expression of a muscle-specific actin gene in fibroblasts is suppressed by a cis-acting negative control element and that in the absence of this element, the promoter is responsive to growth factor-induced signal transduction pathways. Images PMID:1421567

  1. Reactive hyperemia is not responsible for stimulating muscle protein synthesis following blood flow restriction exercise.

    PubMed

    Gundermann, David M; Fry, Christopher S; Dickinson, Jared M; Walker, Dillon K; Timmerman, Kyle L; Drummond, Micah J; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2012-05-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) to contracting skeletal muscle during low-intensity resistance exercise training increases muscle strength and size in humans. However, the mechanism(s) underlying these effects are largely unknown. We have previously shown that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) are stimulated following an acute bout of BFR exercise. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that reactive hyperemia is the mechanism responsible for stimulating mTORC1 signaling and MPS following BFR exercise. Six young men (24 ± 2 yr) were used in a randomized crossover study consisting of two exercise trials: low-intensity resistance exercise with BFR (BFR trial) and low-intensity resistance exercise with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a pharmacological vasodilator infusion into the femoral artery immediately after exercise to simulate the reactive hyperemia response after BFR exercise (SNP trial). Postexercise mixed-muscle fractional synthetic rate from the vastus lateralis increased by 49% in the BFR trial (P < 0.05) with no change in the SNP trial (P > 0.05). BFR exercise increased the phosphorylation of mTOR, S6 kinase 1, ribosomal protein S6, ERK1/2, and Mnk1-interacting kinase 1 (P < 0.05) with no changes in mTORC1 signaling in the SNP trial (P > 0.05). We conclude that reactive hyperemia is not a primary mechanism for BFR exercise-induced mTORC1 signaling and MPS. Further research is necessary to elucidate the cellular mechanism(s) responsible for the increase in mTOR signaling, MPS, and hypertrophy following acute and chronic BFR exercise. PMID:22362401

  2. Spinal inhibition of phrenic motoneurones by stimulation of afferents from leg muscle in the cat: blockade by strychnine.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, F L; Millhorn, D E; Waldrop, T

    1987-08-01

    1. Phrenic nerve responses to stimulation of calf muscle receptors or their afferents were studied in paralysed high (C1) spinal cats whose phrenic nerve activity was evoked by activation of the intercostal-to-phrenic reflex. End-tidal PCO2 was maintained at a constant level by means of a servo-controlled ventilator. 2. Physical stimulation of calf muscles or electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve uniformly caused inhibition of phrenic activity evoked by facilitatory conditioning stimuli. The degree of inhibition gradually decreased as muscle stimulation continued, and there was a post-stimulus augmentation of phrenic activity. 3. Pre-treatment with subconvulsive doses of strychnine, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter glycine, partially or completely blocked the inhibitory effects on phrenic activity of muscle-afferent stimulation. The blockade was reversible with time. 4. Pre-treatment with a subconvulsive dose of bicuculline, an antagonist of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), had no effect on the inhibitory mechanism. 5. We conclude that glycine is an important transmitter of the inhibition of phrenic motoneurones induced by muscle-afferent stimulation, but that GABA is not involved in this inhibitory mechanism. PMID:3681723

  3. Identification of a Modified Wiener-Hammerstein System and Its Application in Electrically Stimulated Paralyzed Skeletal Muscle Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Er-Wei; Cai, Zhijun; Dudley-Javorosk, Shauna; Shields, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    Electrical muscle stimulation demonstrates potential for restoring functional movement and preventing muscle atrophy after spinal cord injury (SCI). Control systems used to optimize delivery of electrical stimulation protocols depend upon mathematical models of paralyzed muscle force outputs. While accurate, the Hill-Huxley-type model is very complex, making it difficult to implement for real-time control. As an alternative, we propose a modified Wiener-Hammerstein system to model the paralyzed skeletal muscle dynamics under electrical stimulus conditions. Experimental data from the soleus muscles of individuals with SCI was used to quantify the model performance. It is shown that the proposed Wiener-Hammerstein system is at least comparable to the Hill-Huxley-type model. On the other hand, the proposed system involves a much smaller number of unknown coefficients. This has substantial advantages in identification algorithm analysis and implementation including computational complexity, convergence and also in real time model implementation for control purposes. PMID:23467426

  4. Epigenetic regulation of smooth muscle cell plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renjing; Leslie, Kristen L.; Martin, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) are the major cell type in blood vessels. Their principle function in the body is to regulate blood flow and pressure through vessel wall contraction and relaxation. Unlike many other mature cell types in the adult body, SMC do not terminally differentiate but retain a remarkable plasticity. They have the unique ability to toggle between a differentiated and quiescent “contractile” state and a highly proliferative and migratory “synthetic” phenotype in response to environmental stresses. While there have been major advances in our understanding of SMC plasticity through the identification of growth factors and signals that can influence the SMC phenotype, how these regulate SMC plasticity remains unknown. To date, several key transcription factors and regulatory cis elements have been identified that play a role in modulating SMC state. The frontier in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying SMC plasticity has now advanced to the level of epigenetics. This review will summarize the epigenetic regulation of SMC, highlighting the role of histone modification, DNA methylation, and our most recent identification of a DNA demethylation pathway in SMC that is pivotal in the regulation of the SMC phenotypic state. Many disorders are associated with smooth muscle dysfunction, including atherosclerosis, the major underlying cause of stroke and coronary heart disease, as well as transplant vasculopathy, aneurysm, asthma, hypertension, and cancer. An increased understanding of the major regulators of SMC plasticity will lead to the identification of novel target molecules that may, in turn, lead to novel drug discoveries for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:24937434

  5. Reevaluation of indirect field stimulation technique to demonstrate oxime effectiveness in OP-poisoning in muscles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seeger, T; Worek, F; Szinicz, L; Thiermann, H

    2007-04-20

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides or nerve agents cause severe intoxication by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, finally resulting in death due to respiratory failure. The phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation is considered as the classic model to investigate the effect of OP intoxications and oxime treatment at the neuromuscular junction. However, this preparation is unsuitable for larger species or for muscle strips from biopsies where no nerve is available for stimulation. An alternative technique is the indirect field stimulation of muscles containing intramuscular nerve branches only. The proposed method by Wolthuis et al. [Wolthuis, O.L., Vanwersch, R.A.P., Van Der Wiel, H.J., 1981. The efficacy of some bis-pyridinium oximes as antidotes to soman in isolated muscles of several species including man. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 70, 355-369] was modified and experimentally reevaluated in isolated mouse diaphragms. To confirm that electrical field stimulation technique induced muscle contraction only via the neuromuscular endplate the nicotinic antagonists pancuronium or d-tubocurarine (1microM) were given. In the presence of a nicotinic antagonist hardly any contraction was blocked after indirect field stimulation technique with very short pulses (5micros, <0.6A), in contrast to direct muscle stimulation (broader pulse width, or higher amplitude >0.6A). During paraoxon circumfusion (20min, 1micromol/l) muscle force generation by indirect stimulation was almost completely blocked. Restoration of paralyzed muscle function to 80% of initial values could be achieved after paraoxon wash out (20min) and circumfusion with obidoxime (1micromol/l, 20min). This data correspond quite well to data shown earlier when using conventional nerve stimulation techniques. PMID:17250944

  6. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  7. Urinary Bladder Smooth Muscle Engineered from Adipose Stem Cells and a Three Dimensional Synthetic Composite

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Gregory S.; Zhang, Rong; Lee, Min; Xu, Yuhan; Wu, Ben; Rodríguez, Larissa V.

    2009-01-01

    Human adipose stem cells were cultured in smooth muscle inductive media and seeded into synthetic bladder composites to tissue engineer bladder smooth muscle. 85:15 poly-lactic-glycolic acid bladder dome composites were cast using an electropulled microfiber luminal surface combined with an outer porous sponge. Cell seeded bladders expressed smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, calponinin, and caldesmon via RT-PCR and immunoflourescence. Nude rats (n=45) underwent removal of half their bladder and repair using: (i) augmentation with the adipose stem cell seeded composites, (ii) augmentation with a matched acellular composite, or (iii) suture closure. Animals were followed for 12 weeks post-implantation and bladders were explanted serially. Results showed that bladder capacity and compliance were maintained in the cell seeded group throughout the 12 weeks, but deteriorated in the acellular scaffold group sequentially with time. Control animals repaired with sutures regained their baseline bladder capacities by week 12, demonstrating a long term limitation of this model. Histological analysis of explanted materials demonstrated viable adipose stem cells and increasing smooth muscle mass in the cell seeded scaffolds with time. Tissue bath stimulation demonstrated smooth muscle contraction of the seeded implants but not the acellular implants after 12 weeks in vivo. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and short term physical properties of bladder tissue engineered from adipose stem cells. PMID:19345408

  8. Mechanical forces and their second messengers in stimulating cell growth in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in modulating the growth of a number of different tissues including skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, bone, endothelium, epithelium, and lung. As interest increases in the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical forces are transduced into growth alterations, model systems are being developed to study these processes in tissue culture. This paper reviews the current methods available for mechanically stimulating tissue cultured cells. It then outlines some of the putative 'mechanogenic' second messengers involved in altering cell growth. Not surprisingly, many mechanogenic second messengers are the same as those involved in growth factor-induced cell growth. It is hypothesized that from an evolutionary standpoint, some second messenger systems may have initially evolved for unicellular organisms to respond to physical forces such as gravity and mechanical perturbation in their environment. As multicellular organisms came into existence, they appropriated these mechanogenic second messenger cascades for cellular regulation by growth factors.

  9. Wnt proteins regulate acetylcholine receptor clustering in muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a cholinergic synapse that rapidly conveys signals from motoneurons to muscle cells and exhibits a high degree of subcellular specialization characteristic of chemical synapses. NMJ formation requires agrin and its coreceptors LRP4 and MuSK. Increasing evidence indicates that Wnt signaling regulates NMJ formation in Drosophila, C. elegans and zebrafish. Results In the study we systematically studied the effect of all 19 different Wnts in mammals on acetylcholine receptor (AChR) cluster formation. We identified five Wnts (Wnt9a, Wnt9b, Wnt10b, Wnt11, and Wnt16) that are able to stimulate AChR clustering, of which Wnt9a and Wnt11 are expressed abundantly in developing muscles. Using Wnt9a and Wnt11 as example, we demonstrated that Wnt induction of AChR clusters was dose-dependent and non-additive to that of agrin, suggesting that Wnts may act via similar pathways to induce AChR clusters. We provide evidence that Wnt9a and Wnt11 bind directly to the extracellular domain of MuSK, to induce MuSK dimerization and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of the kinase. In addition, Wnt-induced AChR clustering requires LRP4. Conclusions These results identify Wnts as new players in AChR cluster formation, which act in a manner that requires both MuSK and LRP4, revealing a novel function of LRP4. PMID:22309736

  10. Turning terminally differentiated skeletal muscle cells into regenerative progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Lööf, Sara; Borg, Paula; Nader, Gustavo A; Blau, Helen M; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    The ability to repeatedly regenerate limbs during the entire lifespan of an animal is restricted to certain salamander species among vertebrates. This ability involves dedifferentiation of post-mitotic cells into progenitors that in turn form new structures. A long-term enigma has been how injury leads to dedifferentiation. Here we show that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation during newt limb regeneration depends on a programmed cell death response by myofibres. We find that programmed cell death-induced muscle fragmentation produces a population of 'undead' intermediate cells, which have the capacity to resume proliferation and contribute to muscle regeneration. We demonstrate the derivation of proliferating progeny from differentiated, multinucleated muscle cells by first inducing and subsequently intercepting a programmed cell death response. We conclude that cell survival may be manifested by the production of a dedifferentiated cell with broader potential and that the diversion of a programmed cell death response is an instrument to achieve dedifferentiation. PMID:26243583

  11. Influence of muscle metaboreceptor stimulation on middle cerebral artery blood velocity in humans.

    PubMed

    Braz, Igor D; Scott, Clare; Simpson, Lydia L; Springham, Emma L; Tan, Beverly W L; Balanos, George M; Fisher, James P

    2014-11-01

    Regional anaesthesia to attenuate skeletal muscle afferent feedback abolishes the exercise-induced increase in middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean). However, such exercise-related increases in cerebral perfusion are not preserved during post exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI) where the activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents is isolated. We tested the hypothesis that a hyperventilation-mediated decrease in the arterial partial pressure of CO2, hence cerebral vasoconstriction, masks the influence of muscle metaboreceptor stimulation on MCA Vmean during PEMI. Ten healthy men (20 ± 1 years old) performed two trials of fatiguing isometric hand-grip exercise followed by PEMI, in control conditions and with end-tidal CO2 (P ET ,CO2) clamped at ∼1 mmHg above the resting partial pressure. In the control trial, P ET ,CO2 decreased from rest during hand-grip exercise and PEMI, while MCA Vmean was unchanged from rest. By design, P ET ,CO2 remained unchanged from rest throughout the clamp trial, while MCA Vmean increased during hand-grip (+10.6 ±1.8 cm s(-1)) and PEMI (+9.2 ± 1.6 cm s(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest and control trial). Increases in minute ventilation and mean arterial pressure during hand-grip and PEMI were not different in the control and P ET ,CO2 clamp trials (P > 0.05). These findings indicate that metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents play an important role in the regional increase in cerebral perfusion observed in exercise, but that influence can be masked by a decrease in P ET ,CO2 when they are activated in isolation during PEMI. PMID:25217497

  12. Physiologic hyperinsulinemia stimulates protein synthesis and enhances transport of selected amino acids in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Biolo, G; Declan Fleming, R Y; Wolfe, R R

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms of the anabolic effect of insulin on muscle protein metabolism in healthy volunteers, using stable isotopic tracers of amino acids. Calculations of muscle protein synthesis, breakdown, and amino acid transport were based on data obtained with the leg arteriovenous catheterization and muscle biopsy. Insulin was infused (0.15 mU/min per 100 ml leg) into the femoral artery to increase femoral venous insulin concentration (from 10 +/- 2 to 77 +/- 9 microU/ml) with minimal systemic perturbations. Tissue concentrations of free essential amino acids decreased (P < 0.05) after insulin. The fractional synthesis rate of muscle protein (precursor-product approach) increased (P < 0.01) after insulin from 0.0401 +/- 0.0072 to 0.0677 +/- 0.0101%/h. Consistent with this observation, rates of utilization for protein synthesis of intracellular phenylalanine and lysine (arteriovenous balance approach) also increased from 40 +/- 8 to 59 +/- 8 (P < 0.05) and from 219 +/- 21 to 298 +/- 37 (P < 0.08) nmol/min per 100 ml leg, respectively. Release from protein breakdown of phenylalanine, leucine, and lysine was not significantly modified by insulin. Local hyperinsulinemia increased (P < 0.05) the rates of inward transport of leucine, lysine, and alanine, from 164 +/- 22 to 200 +/- 25, from 126 +/- 11 to 221 +/- 30, and from 403 +/- 64 to 595 +/- 106 nmol/min per 100 ml leg, respectively. Transport of phenylalanine did not change significantly. We conclude that insulin promoted muscle anabolism, primarily by stimulating protein synthesis independently of any effect on transmembrane transport. Images PMID:7860765

  13. Vasopressin induced production of inositol trisphosphate and calcium efflux in a smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, V.M.; Rueegg, U.T.

    1985-08-30

    Phosphatidylinositol metabolism and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were examined in a vascular smooth muscle cell line (A7r5). (Arg 8)Vasopressin stimulated the rapid formation (measurable at 1 sec) of inositol phosphates in a concentration-dependent manner. The time course for formation of inositol phosphates was similar to that for /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from preloaded cells. The efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in response to (Arg8)vasopressin could be inhibited by a vasopressin antagonist. This supports the hypothesis that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate plays a role in vasopressin stimulated calcium mobilization from an intracellular source in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

  14. The role of protein breakdown in growth, quiescence, and starvation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Libby, P; O'Brien, K V

    1984-03-01

    Protein accumulation in growing cells may be due in part to a reduction in the rate of protein breakdown. Previous studies of the relation of cell proliferation to protein degradation often produced growth arrest by conditions that may involve nutritional deprivation. However, nutrient lack can itself accelerate proteolysis and produce negative protein balance. We therefore reexamined the relation between growth and protein breakdown using a more selective method for limiting cell growth. We produced quiescent cell cultures using a chemically defined, serum-free medium supplemented with hormones and nutrients. Such media can maintain viability and near neutral protein balance in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, in part because of reduced breakdown of cellular protein. We then compared rates of protein degradation in these quiescent but not starving cells, to those of cultures stimulated to grow by addition of mitogenic substances. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, or fetuin added to insulin-containing medium stimulated growth of smooth muscle cells, but further reduced protein breakdown only slightly. Contrary to the implications of certain previous studies, our results show that proliferating cells can accumulate protein without an appreciable reduction in the rates of protein breakdown. Thus, while accelerated proteolysis appears to be an important adaptation to adverse nutritional conditions, growth of smooth muscle cells does not require changes in overall protein breakdown, but occurs primarily through an increase in protein synthesis. PMID:6365933

  15. Shared signaling systems in myeloid cell-mediated muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, James G.; Dorshkind, Kenneth; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Much of the focus in muscle regeneration has been placed on the identification and delivery of stem cells to promote regenerative capacity. As those efforts have advanced, we have learned that complex features of the microenvironment in which regeneration occurs can determine success or failure. The immune system is an important contributor to that complexity and can determine the extent to which muscle regeneration succeeds. Immune cells of the myeloid lineage play major regulatory roles in tissue regeneration through two general, inductive mechanisms: instructive mechanisms that act directly on muscle cells; and permissive mechanisms that act indirectly to influence regeneration by modulating angiogenesis and fibrosis. In this article, recent discoveries that identify inductive actions of specific populations of myeloid cells on muscle regeneration are presented, with an emphasis on how processes in muscle and myeloid cells are co-regulated. PMID:24595286

  16. Myogenic Progenitors from Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells for Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Magli, Alessandro; Incitti, Tania; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2016-01-01

    Muscle homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells which, in both pathologic and non-pathologic conditions, are able to repair or generate new muscle fibers. Although muscle stem cells have tremendous regenerative potential, their application in cell therapy protocols is prevented by several restrictions, including the limited ability to grow ex vivo. Since pluripotent stem cells have the unique potential to both self-renew and expand almost indefinitely, they have become an attractive source of progenitors for regenerative medicine studies. Our lab has demonstrated that embryonic stem cell (ES)-derived myogenic progenitors retain the ability to repair existing muscle fibers and contribute to the pool of resident stem cells. Because of their relevance in both cell therapy and disease modeling, in this chapter we describe the protocol to derive myogenic progenitors from murine ES cells followed by their intramuscular delivery in a murine muscular dystrophy model. PMID:27492174

  17. ASIC proteins regulate smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Grifoni, Samira C; Jernigan, Nikki L; Hamilton, Gina; Drummond, Heather A

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate Acid Sensing Ion Channel (ASIC) protein expression and importance in cellular migration. We recently demonstrated that Epithelial Na(+)Channel (ENaC) proteins are required for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration; however, the role of the closely related ASIC proteins has not been addressed. We used RT-PCR and immunolabeling to determine expression of ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3 and ASIC4 in A10 cells. We used small interference RNA to silence individual ASIC expression and determine the importance of ASIC proteins in wound healing and chemotaxis (PDGF-bb)-initiated migration. We found ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3, but not ASIC4, expression in A10 cells. ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3 siRNA molecules significantly suppressed expression of their respective proteins compared to non-targeting siRNA (RISC) transfected controls by 63%, 44%, and 55%, respectively. Wound healing was inhibited by 10, 20, and 26% compared to RISC controls following suppression of ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3, respectively. Chemotactic migration was inhibited by 30% and 45%, respectively, following suppression of ASIC1 and ASIC3. ASIC2 suppression produced a small, but significant, increase in chemotactic migration (4%). Our data indicate that ASIC expression is required for normal migration and may suggest a novel role for ASIC proteins in cellular migration. PMID:17936312

  18. Smooth muscle cell calcium activation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is controlled by the Ca2+ and Rho kinase signalling pathways. While the SMC Rho kinase system seems to be reasonably constant, there is enormous variation with regard to the mechanisms responsible for generating Ca2+ signals. One way of dealing with this diversity is to consider how this system has been adapted to control different SMC functions. Phasic SMCs (vas deferens, uterus and bladder) rely on membrane depolarization to drive Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. This depolarization can be induced by neurotransmitters or through the operation of a membrane oscillator. Many tonic SMCs (vascular, airway and corpus cavernosum) are driven by a cytosolic Ca2+ oscillator that generates periodic pulses of Ca2+. A similar oscillator is present in pacemaker cells such as the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and atypical SMCs that control other tonic SMCs (gastrointestinal, urethra, ureter). The changes in membrane potential induced by these cytosolic oscillators does not drive contraction directly but it functions to couple together individual oscillators to provide the synchronization that is a characteristic feature of many tonic SMCs. PMID:18787034

  19. Selective bilateral activation of leg muscles after cutaneous nerve stimulation during backward walking

    PubMed Central

    Massaad, Firas; Jansen, Karen; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Duysens, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    During human locomotion, cutaneous reflexes have been suggested to function to preserve balance. Specifically, cutaneous reflexes in the contralateral leg's muscles (with respect to the stimulus) were suggested to play an important role in maintaining stability during locomotor tasks where stability is threatened. We used backward walking (BW) as a paradigm to induce unstable gait and analyzed the cutaneous reflex activity in both ipsilateral and contralateral lower limb muscles after stimulation of the sural nerve at different phases of the gait cycle. In BW, the tibialis anterior (TA) reflex activity in the contralateral leg was markedly higher than TA background EMG activity during its stance phase. In addition, in BW a substantial reflex suppression was observed in the ipsilateral biceps femoris during the stance-swing transition in some participants, while for medial gastrocnemius the reflex activity was equal to background activity in both legs. To test whether the pronounced crossed responses in TA could be related to instability, the responses were correlated with measures of stability (short-term maximum Lyapunov exponents and step width). These measures were higher for BW compared with forward walking, indicating that BW is less stable. However, there was no significant correlation between these measures and the amplitude of the crossed TA responses in BW. It is therefore proposed that these crossed responses are related to an attempt to briefly slow down (TA decelerates the center of mass in the single-stance period) in the light of unexpected perturbations, such as provided by the sural nerve stimulation. PMID:22773779

  20. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charlie K; Gowda, Alpana; Barad, Meredith; Mackey, Sean C; Carroll, Ian R

    2009-01-01

    Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica. PMID:19772656

  1. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica. PMID:19772656

  2. Stimulation of net muscle protein synthesis by whey protein ingestion before and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Kevin D; Elliott, Tabatha A; Cree, Melanie G; Aarsland, Asle A; Sanford, Arthur P; Wolfe, Robert R

    2007-01-01

    Timing of nutrient ingestion has been demonstrated to influence the anabolic response of muscle following exercise. Previously, we demonstrated that net amino acid uptake was greater when free essential amino acids plus carbohydrates were ingested before resistance exercise rather than following exercise. However, it is unclear if ingestion of whole proteins before exercise would stimulate a superior response compared with following exercise. This study was designed to examine the response of muscle protein balance to ingestion of whey proteins both before and following resistance exercise. Healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two groups. A solution of whey proteins was consumed either immediately before exercise (PRE; n = 8) or immediately following exercise (POST; n = 9). Each subject performed 10 sets of 8 repetitions of leg extension exercise. Phenylalanine concentrations were measured in femoral arteriovenous samples to determine balance across the leg. Arterial amino acid concentrations were elevated by approximately 50%, and net amino acid balance switched from negative to positive following ingestion of proteins at either time. Amino acid uptake was not significantly different between PRE and POST when calculated from the beginning of exercise (67 +/- 22 and 27 +/- 10 for PRE and POST, respectively) or from the ingestion of each drink (60 +/- 17 and 63 +/- 15 for PRE and POST, respectively). Thus the response of net muscle protein balance to timing of intact protein ingestion does not respond as does that of the combination of free amino acids and carbohydrate. PMID:16896166

  3. Comparison of Twice Refocused Spin Echo versus Stimulated Echo Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Tracking Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Andersen, Anders; Feiweier, Thorsten; Damon, Bruce; Hardy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the precision of measuring the pennation angle and fiber length in the Vastus Lateralis (VL) using two distinctly different diffusion tensor imaging sequences. Materials and Methods We imaged the thigh of ten normal subjects on a 3T MR imager with twice refocused spin echo (TRSE) and stimulated echo (STEAM) DTI-MRI techniques. Both techniques took the same total acquisition time, employed the same diffusion weighting and gradient directions. Using the diffusion tensor images produced by each sequence muscle fiber bundles were tracked from the aponeurosis by following the first eigenvector of the diffusion tensor. From these tracks we calculated the pennation angle and fiber length. Results The STEAM acquisition resulted in significantly higher SNR, lower ADC, higher FA values and longer fibers than the TRSE. Although no difference in the pennation angle between the two acquisitions was found, the TRSE sequence had a significantly greater within subject dispersion in the pennation angle of tracked fibers which may indicate a reduction in the coherence of fiber bundles. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging of muscle using a STEAM acquisition resulted in significant improvements in the SNR and FA, resulting in tracking a larger number of muscle fiber bundles over longer distances and with less within subject dispersion. PMID:24554376

  4. Thin-fibre receptors responding to mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimulation in the skeletal muscle of the dog

    PubMed Central

    Kumazawa, T.; Mizumura, K.

    1977-01-01

    1. Unitary activities of muscular thin fibre afferents, which were not sensitive to muscle stretching, were recorded from the nerve of the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the dog. Responses to mechanical stimulation, intra-arterial injection and local application of chemical solutions, and thermal stimulation of the surface of the muscle were studied. It was observed that polymodal receptors which responded to all types of stimulation existed in the thin fibre afferents of the muscle. 2. The receptive area of these units tested by mechanical stimulation was spot-like and appeared to be located not only on the surface but in the midst of the muscle. 3. The mechanical response varied among these units with respect to the threshold and the pattern of discharges. 4. In these units, NaCl, KCl, and bradykinin consistently evoked responses, with differences in the latencies and discharge patterns, while solutions of histamine, acetylcholine and sodium citrate caused responses less consistently and less effectively. In the stretch receptors, chemical stimulation applied in the same way as tested in the thin fibre afferents produced quite different features in their responses. 5. Heating the receptive area of the muscle surface caused responses in twenty-five out of thirty-six units, which were sensitive both to mechanical and to chemical stimulations. The threshold varied from 38·0 to 48·3 °C, with a mean of 43·1 °C for C fibre units and 41 °C for A-δ fibre units. 6. The responses to heating were consistently obtained in the units responding to the surface application of chemical solutions. However, the above response was never obtained in the units which did not respond to surface chemical stimulation but responded to intra-arterial injection. These results suggest a large population of polymodal receptors in the muscular thin fibre afferents. PMID:599419

  5. Acupuncture plus Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation (Acu-LFES) Attenuates Diabetic Myopathy by Enhancing Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhen; Robinson, Alayna; Hu, Li; Klein, Janet D.; Hassounah, Faten; Li, Min; Wang, Haidong; Cai, Hui; Wang, Xiaonan H.

    2015-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity are increased in patients with muscle atrophy resulting from catabolic diseases such as diabetes. At present there is no pharmacological treatment that successfully reverses muscle wasting from catabolic conditions. We hypothesized that acupuncture plus low frequency electric stimulation (Acu-LFES) would mimic the impact of exercise and prevent diabetes-induced muscle loss. Streptozotocin (STZ) was used to induce diabetes in mice. The mice were then treated with Acu-LFES for 15 minutes daily for 14 days. Acupuncture points were selected according to the WHO Standard Acupuncture Nomenclature guide. The needles were connected to an SDZ-II electronic acupuncture device delivering pulses at 20Hz and 1mA. Acu-LFES prevented soleus and EDL muscle weight loss and increased hind-limb muscle grip function in diabetic mice. Muscle regeneration capacity was significantly increased by Acu-LFES. The expression of Pax7, MyoD, myogenin and embryo myosin heavy chain (eMyHC) was significantly decreased in diabetic muscle vs. control muscle. The suppressed levels in diabetic muscle were reversed by Acu-LFES. The IGF-1 signaling pathway was also upregulated by Acu-LFES. Phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR and p70S6K were downregulated by diabetes leading to a decline in muscle mass, however, Acu-LFES countered the diabetes-induced decline. In addition, microRNA-1 and -206 were increased by Acu-LFES after 24 days of treatment. We conclude that Acu-LFES is effective in counteracting diabetes-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by increasing IGF-1 and its stimulation of muscle regeneration. PMID:26230945

  6. VAMP2 is expressed in muscle satellite cells and up-regulated during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tajika, Yuki; Sato, Mahito; Murakami, Tohru; Takata, Kuniaki; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    Membrane trafficking is one of the most important mechanisms involved in the establishment and maintenance of the forms and functions of the cell. However, it is poorly understood in skeletal muscle cells. In this study, we have focused on vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs), which are components of the vesicle docking and fusion complex, and have performed immunostaining to investigate the expression of VAMPs in rat skeletal muscle tissue. We have found that VAMP2, but not VAMP1 or VAMP3, is expressed in satellite cells. VAMP2 is also expressed in myofibers in the soleus muscle and nerve endings. This is consistent with previous studies in which VAMP2 has been shown to regulate GLUT4 trafficking in slow-twitch myofibers in soleus muscle and neurotransmitter release in nerve endings. As satellite cells are quiescent myogenic cells, the expression of VAMP2 has further been examined in regenerating muscles after injury by the snake venom, cardiotoxin; we have observed enhanced expression of VAMP2 in immature myotubes with a peak at 3 days after injury. Our findings suggest that VAMP2 plays roles in quiescent satellite cells and is involved in muscle regeneration. The nature of the material transported in the VAMP2-bearing vesicles in satellite cells and myotubes is still under investigation. PMID:17468895

  7. Rats Bred for Low Aerobic Capacity Become Promptly Fatigued and Have Slow Metabolic Recovery after Stimulated, Maximal Muscle Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Torvinen, Sira; Silvennoinen, Mika; Piitulainen, Harri; Närväinen, Johanna; Tuunanen, Pasi; Gröhn, Olli; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    AIM Muscular fatigue is a complex phenomenon affected by muscle fiber type and several metabolic and ionic changes within myocytes. Mitochondria are the main determinants of muscle oxidative capacity which is also one determinant of muscle fatigability. By measuring the concentrations of intracellular stores of high-energy phosphates it is possible to estimate the energy production efficiency and metabolic recovery of the muscle. Low intrinsic aerobic capacity is known to be associated with reduced mitochondrial function. Whether low intrinsic aerobic capacity also results in slower metabolic recovery of skeletal muscle is not known. Here we studied the influence of intrinsic aerobic capacity on in vivo muscle metabolism during maximal, fatiguing electrical stimulation. METHODS Animal subjects were genetically heterogeneous rats selectively bred to differ for non–trained treadmill running endurance, low capacity runners (LCRs) and high capacity runners (HCRs) (n = 15–19). We measured the concentrations of major phosphorus compounds and force parameters in a contracting triceps surae muscle complex using 31P-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) combined with muscle force measurement from repeated isometric twitches. RESULTS Our results demonstrated that phosphocreatine re-synthesis after maximal muscle stimulation was significantly slower in LCRs (p<0.05). LCR rats also became promptly fatigued and maintained the intramuscular pH poorly compared to HCRs. Half relaxation time (HRT) of the triceps surae was significantly longer in LCRs throughout the stimulation protocol (p≤0.05) and maximal rate of torque development (MRTD) was significantly lower in LCRs compared to HCRs from 2 min 30 s onwards (p≤0.05). CONCLUSION We observed that LCRs are more sensitive to fatigue and have slower metabolic recovery compared to HCRs after maximal muscle contractions. These new findings are associated with reduced running capacity and with previously found lower

  8. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool. PMID:27198673

  9. Caveolar nanospaces in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, L M

    2006-01-01

    Caveolae, specialized membrane nanodomains, have a key role in signaling processes, including calcium handling in smooth muscle cells (SMC). We explored the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of peripheral cytoplasmic space at the nanoscale level and the close spatial relationships between caveolae, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and mitochondria, as ultrastructural basis for an excitation-contraction coupling system and, eventually, for excitation - transcription coupling. About 150 electron micrographs of SMC showed that superficial SR and peripheral mitochondria are rigorously located along the caveolar domains of plasma membrane, alternating with plasmalemmal dense plaques. Electron micrographs made on serial ultrathin sections were digitized, then computer-assisted organellar profiles were traced on images, and automatic 3D reconstruction was obtained using the ‘Reconstruct’ software. The reconstruction was made for 1 μm3 in rat stomach (muscularis mucosae) and 10 μm3 in rat urinary bladder (detrusor smooth muscle). The close appositions (about 15 nm distance) of caveolae, peripheral SR, and mitochondria create coherent cytoplasmic nanoscale subdomains. Apparently, 80% of caveolae establish close contacts with SR and about 10% establish close contacts with mitochondria in both types of SMC. Thus, our results show that caveolae and peripheral SR build Ca2+release units in which mitochondria often could play a part. The caveolae-SR couplings occupy 4.19% of the cellular volume in stomach and 3.10% in rat urinary bladder, while caveolae-mitochondria couplings occupy 3.66% and 3.17%, respectively. We conclude that there are strategic caveolae-SR or caveolae-mitochondria contacts at the nanoscale level in the cortical cytoplasm of SMC, presumably responsible for a vectorial control of free Ca2+ cytoplasmic concentrations in definite nanospaces. This may account for slective activation of specific Ca2+ signaling pathways. PMID:16796817

  10. Stat3 activation links a C/EBPδ to myostatin pathway to stimulate loss of muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Pan, Jenny; Dong, Yanjun; Tweardy, David J; Dong, Yanlan; Garibotto, Giacomo; Mitch, William E

    2013-09-01

    Catabolic conditions like chronic kidney disease (CKD) cause loss of muscle mass by unclear mechanisms. In muscle biopsies from CKD patients, we found activated Stat3 (p-Stat3) and hypothesized that p-Stat3 initiates muscle wasting. We created mice with muscle-specific knockout (KO) that prevents activation of Stat3. In these mice, losses of body and muscle weights were suppressed in models with CKD or acute diabetes. A small-molecule that inhibits Stat3 activation produced similar responses, suggesting a potential for translation strategies. Using CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ) KO mice and C2C12 myotubes with knockdown of C/EBPδ or myostatin, we determined that p-Stat3 initiates muscle wasting via C/EBPδ, stimulating myostatin, a negative muscle growth regulator. C/EBPδ KO also improved survival of CKD mice. We verified that p-Stat3, C/EBPδ, and myostatin were increased in muscles of CKD patients. The pathway from p-Stat3 to C/EBPδ to myostatin and muscle wasting could identify therapeutic targets that prevent muscle wasting. PMID:24011072

  11. Evaluation of Systemic Follistatin as an Adjuvant to Stimulate Muscle Repair and Improve Motor Function in Pompe Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Joseph W; Bercury, Scott D; Finn, Patrick; Cheng, Seng H; Scheule, Ronald K; Ziegler, Robin J

    2010-01-01

    Due to the lack of acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activity, Pompe mice develop glycogen storage pathology and progressive skeletal muscle dysfunction with age. Applying either gene or enzyme therapy to reconstitute GAA levels in older, symptomatic Pompe mice effectively reduces glycogen storage in skeletal muscle but provides only modest improvements in motor function. As strategies to stimulate muscle hypertrophy, such as by myostatin inhibition, have been shown to improve muscle pathology and strength in mouse models of muscular dystrophy, we sought to determine whether these benefits might be similarly realized in Pompe mice. Administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 vector encoding follistatin, an inhibitor of myostatin, increased muscle mass and strength but only in Pompe mice that were treated before 10 months of age. Younger Pompe mice showed significant muscle fiber hypertrophy in response to treatment with follistatin, but maximal gains in muscle strength were achieved only when concomitant GAA administration reduced glycogen storage in the affected muscles. Despite increased grip strength, follistatin treatment failed to improve rotarod performance. These findings highlight the importance of treating Pompe skeletal muscle before pathology becomes irreversible, and suggest that adjunctive therapies may not be effective without first clearing skeletal muscle glycogen storage with GAA. PMID:20551907

  12. Adult stem cells: the therapeutic potential of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Stewart, Claire E H

    2006-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells have revolutionised our understanding of normal and deregulated growth and development. The potential to produce cells and tissues as needed offers enormous therapeutic potential. The use of these cells, however, is accompanied by ongoing ethical, religious and biomedical issues. The expansion potential and plasticity of adult stem cells have therefore received much interest. Adult skeletal muscle is highly adaptable, responding to both the hypertrophic and degenerative stresses placed upon it. This extreme plasticity is in part regulated by resident stem cells. In addition to regenerating muscle, if exposed to osteogenic or adipogenic inducers, these cells spontaneously form osteoblasts or adipocytes. The potential for and heterogeneity of muscle stem cells is underscored by the observation that CD45+ muscle side population cells are capable of reconstituting bone marrow in lethally irradiated mice and of contributing to neo-vascularisation of regenerating muscle. Finally, first attempts to replace infarcted myocardium relied on injection of skeletal myoblasts into the heart. Cells successfully engrafted and cardiac function was improved. Harnessing their differentiation/trans-differentiation capacity provides enormous potential for adult stem cells. In this review, current understanding of the different stem cells within muscle will be discussed as will their potential utility for regenerative medicine. PMID:18220864

  13. Evoked EMG versus muscle torque during fatiguing functional electrical stimulation-evoked muscle contractions and short-term recovery in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Estigoni, Eduardo H; Fornusek, Che; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Smith, Richard M; Davis, Glen M

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether the relationship between muscle torque and m-waves remained constant after short recovery periods, between repeated intervals of isometric muscle contractions induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES). Eight subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) were recruited for the study. All subjects had their quadriceps muscles group stimulated during three sessions of isometric contractions separated by 5 min of recovery. The evoked-electromyographic (eEMG) signals, as well as the produced torque, were synchronously acquired during the contractions and during short FES bursts applied during the recovery intervals. All analysed m-wave variables changed progressively throughout the three contractions, even though the same muscle torque was generated. The peak to peak amplitude (PtpA), and the m-wave area (Area) were significantly increased, while the time between the stimulus artefact and the positive peak (PosT) were substantially reduced when the muscles became fatigued. In addition, all m-wave variables recovered faster and to a greater extent than did torque after the recovery intervals. We concluded that rapid recovery intervals between FES-evoked exercise sessions can radically interfere in the use of m-waves as a proxy for torque estimation in individuals with SCI. This needs to be further investigated, in addition to seeking a better understanding of the mechanisms of muscle fatigue and recovery. PMID:25479324

  14. Skeletal muscle satellite cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Greg; Hartzell, Charles R.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cells are postnatal myoblasts responsible for providing additional nuclei to growing or regenerating muscle cells. Satellite cells retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro and therefore provide a useful model to study postnatal muscle development. Most culture systems used to study postnatal muscle development are limited by the two-dimensional (2-D) confines of the culture dish. Limiting proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in 2-D could potentially limit cell-cell contacts important for developing the level of organization in skeletal muscle obtained in vivo. Culturing satellite cells on microcarrier beads suspended in the High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) designed by NASA provides a low shear, three-dimensional (3-D) environment to study muscle development. Primary cultures established from anterior tibialis muscles of growing rats (approximately 200 gm) were used for all studies and were composed of greater than 75 % satellite cells. Different inoculation densities did not affect the proliferative potential of satellite cells in the HARV. Plating efficiency, proliferation, and glucose utilization were compared between 2-D flat culture and 3-D HARV culture. Plating efficiency (cells attached - cells plated x 100) was similar between the two culture systems. Proliferation was reduced in HARV cultures and this reduction was apparent for both satellite cells and non-satellite cells. Furthermore, reduction in proliferation within the HARV could not be attributed to reduced substrate availability since glucose levels in media from HARV and 2-D cell culture were similar. Morphologically, microcarrier beads within the HARVS were joined together by cells into three-dimensional aggregates composed of greater than 10 beads/aggregate. Aggregation of beads did not occur in the absence of cells. Myotubes were often seen on individual beads or spanning the surface of two beads. In summary, proliferation and differentiation of

  15. In vivo exercise followed by in vitro contraction additively elevates subsequent insulin-stimulated glucose transport by rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Funai, Katsuhiko; Schweitzer, George G; Castorena, Carlos M; Kanzaki, Makoto; Cartee, Gregory D

    2010-05-01

    The cellular mechanisms whereby prior exercise enhances insulin-stimulated glucose transport (GT) are not well understood. Previous studies suggested that a prolonged increase in phosphorylation of Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) may be important for the postexercise increase in insulin sensitivity. In the current study, the effects of in vivo exercise and in vitro contraction on subsequent insulin-stimulated GT were studied separately and together. Consistent with results from previous studies, prior exercise resulted in an increase in AS160 (642)Thr phosphorylation immediately after exercise in rat epitrochlearis muscles, and this increase remained 3 h postexercise concomitant with enhanced insulin-stimulated GT. For experiments with in vitro contraction, isolated rat epitrochlearis muscles were electrically stimulated to contract in the presence or absence of rat serum. As expected, insulin-stimulated GT measured 3 h after electrical stimulation in serum, but not after electrical stimulation without serum, exceeded resting controls. Immediately after electrical stimulation with or without serum, phosphorylation of both AS160 (detected by phospho-Akt substrate, PAS, antibody, or phospho-(642)Thr antibody) and its paralog TBC1D1 (detected by phospho-(237)Ser antibody) was increased. However, both AS160 and TBC1D1 phosphorylation had reversed to resting values at 3 h poststimulation with or without serum. Increasing the amount of exercise (from 1 to 2 h) or electrical stimulation (from 5 to 10 tetani) did not further elevate insulin-stimulated GT. In contrast, the combination of prior exercise and electrical stimulation had an additive effect on the subsequent increase in insulin-stimulated GT, suggesting that these exercise and electrical stimulation protocols may amplify insulin-stimulated GT through distinct mechanisms, with a persistent increase in AS160 phosphorylation potentially important for increased insulin sensitivity after exercise, but not after in

  16. Fetal stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration: a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Pozzobon, Michela; Franzin, Chiara; Piccoli, Martina; De Coppi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    More than 40% of the body mass is represented by muscle tissue, which possesses the innate ability to regenerate after damage through the activation of muscle-specific stem cells, namely satellite cells. Muscle diseases, in particular chronic degenerative states of skeletal muscle such as dystrophies, lead to a perturbation of the regenerative process, which causes the premature exhaustion of satellite cell reservoir due to continuous cycles of degeneration/regeneration. Nowadays, the research is focused on different therapeutic approaches, ranging from gene and cell to pharmacological therapy, but still there is no definitive cure in particular for genetic muscle disease. Keeping this in mind, in this article, we will give special consideration to muscle diseases and the use of fetal derived stem cells as a new approach for therapy. Cells of fetal origin, from cord blood to placenta and amniotic fluid, can be easily obtained without ethical concern, expanded and differentiated in culture, and possess immune-modulatory properties. The in vivo approach in animal models can be helpful to study the mechanism underneath the operating principle of the stem cell reservoir, namely the niche, which holds great potential to understand the onset of muscle pathologies. PMID:25221507

  17. Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptors in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael J.; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Kraemer, Rosemary; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Mahadeo, Debbie; Sharif, Setareh; Kaplan, David R.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Parada, Luis; Toran-Allerand, C. Dominique; Hajjar, David P.; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    1995-01-01

    The neurotrophins, a family of related polypeptide growth factors including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3 and NT-4/5 promote the survival and differentiation of distinctive sets of embryonic neurons. Here we define a new functional role for neurotrophins, as autocrine or local paracrine mediators of vascular smooth muscle cell migration. We have identified neurotrophins, and their cognate receptors, the trk tyrosine kinases, in human and rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo. In vitro, cultured human smooth muscle cells express BDNF; NT-3; and trk A, B, and C Similarly, rat smooth muscle cells expressed all three trk receptors as well as all four neurotrophins. Moreover, NGF induces cultured human smooth muscle cell migration at subnanomolar concentrations. In the rat aortic balloon deendothelialization model of vascular injury, the expression of NGF, BDNF, and their receptors trk A and trk B increased dramatically in the area of injury within 3 days and persisted during the formation of the neointima. In human coronary atherosclerotic lesions, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5, and the trk B and trk C receptors could be demonstrated in smooth muscle cells. These findings suggest that neurotrophins play an important role in regulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells to injury. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:7639328

  18. Timing matters: tuning the mechanics of a muscle-tendon unit by adjusting stimulation phase during cyclic contractions.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Robertson, Benjamin D; Azizi, Emanuel; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of research on the mechanics and energetics of terrestrial locomotion has demonstrated that elastic elements acting in series with contracting muscle are critical components of sustained, stable and efficient gait. Far fewer studies have examined how the nervous system modulates muscle-tendon interaction dynamics to optimize 'tuning' or meet varying locomotor demands. To explore the fundamental neuromechanical rules that govern the interactions between series elastic elements (SEEs) and contractile elements (CEs) within a compliant muscle-tendon unit (MTU), we used a novel work loop approach that included implanted sonomicrometry crystals along muscle fascicles. This enabled us to decouple CE and SEE length trajectories when cyclic strain patterns were applied to an isolated plantaris MTU from the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus). Using this approach, we demonstrate that the onset timing of muscle stimulation (i.e. stimulation phase) that involves a symmetrical MTU stretch-shorten cycle during active force production results in net zero mechanical power output, and maximal decoupling of CE and MTU length trajectories. We found it difficult to 'tune' the muscle-tendon system for strut-like isometric force production by adjusting stimulation phase only, as the zero power output condition involved significant positive and negative mechanical work by the CE. A simple neural mechanism - adjusting muscle stimulation phase - could shift an MTU from performing net zero to net positive (energy producing) or net negative (energy absorbing) mechanical work under conditions of changing locomotor demand. Finally, we show that modifications to the classical work loop paradigm better represent in vivo muscle-tendon function during locomotion. PMID:26232413

  19. Isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, So-ichiro; Ma, Yuran; Ohtani, Takuji; Watanabe, Yoko; Murakami, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has great regenerative capacity which is dependent on muscle stem cells, also known as satellite cells. A loss of satellite cells and/or their function impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and leads to a loss of skeletal muscle power; therefore, the molecular mechanisms for maintaining satellite cells in a quiescent and undifferentiated state are of great interest in skeletal muscle biology. Many studies have demonstrated proteins expressed by satellite cells, including Pax7, M-cadherin, Cxcr4, syndecan3/4, and c-met. To further characterize satellite cells, we established a method to directly isolate satellite cells using a monoclonal antibody, SM/C-2.6. Using SM/C-2.6 and microarrays, we measured the genes expressed in quiescent satellite cells and demonstrated that Hesr3 may complement Hesr1 in generating quiescent satellite cells. Although Hesr1- or Hesr3-single knockout mice show a normal skeletal muscle phenotype, including satellite cells, Hesr1/Hesr3-double knockout mice show a gradual decrease in the number of satellite cells and increase in regenerative defects dependent on satellite cell numbers. We also observed that a mouse's genetic background affects the regenerative capacity of its skeletal muscle and have established a line of DBA/2-background mdx mice that has a much more severe phenotype than the frequently used C57BL/10-mdx mice. The phenotype of DBA/2-mdx mice also seems to depend on the function of satellite cells. In this review, we summarize the methodology of direct isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of satellite cells based on our results. The relationship between the regenerative capacity of satellite cells and progression of muscular disorders is also summarized. In the last part, we discuss application of the accumulating scientific information on satellite cells to treatment of patients with muscular disorders. PMID:24273513

  20. Calorie restriction leads to greater Akt2 activity and glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle from old rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is associated with many common age-related diseases, but moderate calorie restriction (CR) can substantially elevate glucose uptake by insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle from both young and old rats. The current study evaluated the isolated epitrochlearis muscle from ∼24.5-mo-old rats that were either fed ad libitum (AL) or subjected to CR (consuming ∼65% of ad libitum, AL, intake beginning at ∼22.5 mo old). Some muscles were also incubated with MK-2206, a potent and selective Akt inhibitor. The most important results were that in isolated muscles, CR vs. AL resulted in 1) greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake 2) that was accompanied by significantly increased insulin-mediated activation of Akt2, as indicated by greater phosphorylation on both Thr(309) and Ser(474) along with greater Akt2 activity, 3) concomitant with enhanced phosphorylation of several Akt substrates, including an Akt substrate of 160 kDa on Thr(642) and Ser(588), filamin C on Ser(2213) and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa on Thr(246), but not TBC1D1 on Thr(596); and 4) each of the CR effects was eliminated by MK-2206. These data provide compelling new evidence linking greater Akt2 activation to the CR-induced elevation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by muscle from old animals. PMID:26739650

  1. Functional Electrical Stimulation as a Safe and Effective Treatment for Equine Epaxial Muscle Spasms: Clinical Evaluations and Histochemical Morphometry of Mitochondria in Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Ravara, Barbara; Gobbo, Valerio; Carraro, Ugo; Gelbmann, Lin; Pribyl, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) has been used extensively over several decades to reverse muscle atrophy during rehabilitation for spinal cord injury patients. The benefits of the technology are being expanded into other areas, and FES has been recently utilized for injury rehabilitation and performance enhancement in horses. Six retired horses (age from 10 to 17 yrs) that had been previously used mainly for dressage riding were selected for this study. Clinical evaluation found epaxial muscle spasms in all horses with minimal to no pelvic extension when manually palpated. FES treatments were performed on the sacral/lumbar region 3 times per week for a period of 8 weeks, obtaining a total of 22 treatments per horse. The Modified Ashworth Scale for grading muscle spasms found a one grade improvement after approximately four FES treatments, indicating improved functional movement of the sacral/lumbar region, supporting the evidence by clinical palpations that a reduction in epaxial muscle spasms occurred. Skeletal muscle biopsies Pre and Post FES treatments were obtained from the longissimus lumborum muscle. Cryosections were stained with a Hemotoxylin-Eosin (H-E), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase reaction (NADH-TR). The eventual size change of the muscle fibers were evaluated by morphometry in the H-E and NADH-TR stained cryosections, while in the NADH-TR slides the histochemical density and distribution of mitochondria were also determined. The main results of the morphometric analyses were: 1) As expected for the type of FES treatment used in this study, only a couple of horses showed significant increases in mean muscle fiber size when Pre- vs Post-FES biopsies were compared; 2) In the older horses, there were sparse (or many in one horse) very atrophic and angulated muscle fibers in both Pre- and Post-FES samples, whose attributes and distribution suggests that they were denervated due to a distal neuropathy; 3) The hypothesis

  2. Group-level variations in motor representation areas of thenar and anterior tibial muscles: Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Eini; Julkunen, Petro; Säisänen, Laura; Vanninen, Ritva; Karjalainen, Pasi; Könönen, Mervi

    2010-08-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used to stimulate functional cortical areas at precise anatomical location to induce measurable responses. The stimulation has commonly been focused on anatomically predefined motor areas: TMS of that area elicits a measurable muscle response, the motor evoked potential. In clinical pathologies, however, the well-known homunculus somatotopy theory may not be straightforward, and the representation area of the muscle is not fixed. Traditionally, the anatomical locations of TMS stimulations have not been reported at the group level in standard space. This study describes a methodology for group-level analysis by investigating the normal representation areas of thenar and anterior tibial muscle in the primary motor cortex. The optimal representation area for these muscles was mapped in 59 healthy right-handed subjects using navigated TMS. The coordinates of the optimal stimulation sites were then normalized into standard space to determine the representation areas of these muscles at the group-level in healthy subjects. Furthermore, 95% confidence interval ellipsoids were fitted into the optimal stimulation site clusters to define the variation between subjects in optimal stimulation sites. The variation was found to be highest in the anteroposterior direction along the superior margin of the precentral gyrus. These results provide important normative information for clinical studies assessing changes in the functional cortical areas because of plasticity of the brain. Furthermore, it is proposed that the presented methodology to study TMS locations at the group level on standard space will be a suitable tool for research purposes in population studies. PMID:20082330

  3. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Quercioli, Franco; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Formigli, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7{sup +} satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration.

  4. Adult Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Muscle Connective Tissue and Satellite Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Dreyfus, Patrick A.; Chretien, Fabrice; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Kirova, Youlia; Caramelle, Philippe; Garcia, Luis; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Gherardi, Romain K.

    2004-01-01

    Skeletal muscle includes satellite cells, which reside beneath the muscle fiber basal lamina and mainly represent committed myogenic precursor cells, and multipotent stem cells of unknown origin that are present in muscle connective tissue, express the stem cell markers Sca-1 and CD34, and can differentiate into different cell types. We tracked bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells in both muscle connective tissue and satellite cell niches of irradiated mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing BM cells. An increasing number of GFP+ mononucleated cells, located both inside and outside of the muscle fiber basal lamina, were observed 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. Sublaminal cells expressed unambiguous satellite cell markers (M-cadherin, Pax7, NCAM) and fused into scattered GFP+ muscle fibers. In muscle connective tissue there were GFP+ cells located close to blood vessels that expressed the ScaI or CD34 stem-cell antigens. The rate of settlement of extra- and intralaminal compartments by BM-derived cells was compatible with the view that extralaminal cells constitute a reservoir of satellite cells. We conclude that both muscle satellite cells and stem cell marker-expressing cells located in muscle connective tissue can derive from BM in adulthood. PMID:14982831

  5. Basic fibroblast growth factor: its role in the control of smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C. L.; Reidy, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of an intimal lesion in an injured artery is the consequence of the replication and migration of smooth muscle cells. Recent studies have implicated basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) as an important mediator of replication in the arterial media, and platelet-derived growth factor as an important mediator of migration. However, the degree of arterial trauma produced during injury has a significant influence on the time of onset of intimal thickening, suggesting that factors released from damaged smooth muscle cells may affect migration. We have investigated the role of one of these factors, bFGF, in smooth muscle cell migration in vivo. We found that 1) deendothelialization of the rat carotid artery results in significantly more migration when it is accompanied by traumatic injury to the underlying smooth muscle; 2) the rate of migration in arteries that have been gently deendothelialized is significantly stimulated by systemic injection of bFGF; and 3) inhibition of bFGF with a blocking antibody significantly reduces the amount of migration after traumatic deendothelializing injury with a balloon catheter. These findings suggest that bFGF plays an important role in the mediation of smooth muscle cell migration after arterial injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8213998

  6. Identification and Validation of Novel Contraction-Regulated Myokines Released from Primary Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, Silja; Eckardt, Kristin; Bjørklund Holven, Kirsten; Jensen, Jørgen; Eckel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Proteins secreted by skeletal muscle, so called myokines, have been shown to affect muscle physiology and additionally exert systemic effects on other tissues and organs. Although recent profiling studies have identified numerous myokines, the amount of overlap from these studies indicates that the secretome of skeletal muscle is still incompletely characterized. One limitation of the models used is the lack of contraction, a central characteristic of muscle cells. Here we aimed to characterize the secretome of primary human myotubes by cytokine antibody arrays and to identify myokines regulated by contraction, which was induced by electrical pulse stimulation (EPS). In this study, we validated the regulation and release of two selected myokines, namely pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), which were recently described as adipokines. This study reveals that both factors, DPP4 and PEDF, are secreted by primary human myotubes. PEDF is a contraction-regulated myokine, although PEDF serum levels from healthy young men decrease after 60 min cycling at VO2max of 70%. Most interestingly, we identified 52 novel myokines which have not been described before to be secreted by skeletal muscle cells. For 48 myokines we show that their release is regulated by contractile activity. This profiling study of the human skeletal muscle secretome expands the number of myokines, identifies novel contraction-regulated myokines and underlines the overlap between proteins which are adipokines as well as myokines. PMID:23637948

  7. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca2+ signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop. PMID:24518675

  8. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca(2+) signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Buvinic, Sonja

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop. PMID:24518675

  9. Contrasting effects of midazolam on induction of heat shock protein 27 by vasopressin and heat in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, K; Kozawa, O; Niwa, M; Yamomoto, T; Matsuno, H; Ito, H; Kato, K; Dohi, S; Uematsu, T

    2001-01-01

    We previously showed that vasopressin stimulates the induction of heat shock protein (HSP) 27, a low molecular-weight HSP, through protein kinase C activation in aortic smooth muscle A10 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of midazolam, an intravenous anesthetic, on the HSP27 induction stimulated by vasopressin, heat, or sodium arsenite (arsenite) in A10 cells. Midazolam inhibited the accumulation of HSP27 induced by vasopressin or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a direct activator of protein kinase C. Midazolam also reduced the vasopressin-induced level of the mRNA for HSP27. In contrast, midazolam enhanced the HSP27-accumulation induced by heat or arsenite. Midazolam also enhanced the heat-increased level of the mRNA for HSP27. However, midazolam had no effect on the dissociation of the aggregated form of HSP27 following stimulation by vasopressin, heat, or arsenite. These results suggest that midazolam suppresses vasopressin-stimulated HSP27 induction in vascular smooth muscle cells, and that this inhibitory effect is exerted at a point downstream from protein kinase C. In contrast, midazolam enhanced heat- or arsenite-stimulated HSP27 induction. Thus, midazolam has dual effects on the HSP27 induction stimulated by various stresses in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:11746514

  10. Progenitors of skeletal muscle satellite cells express the muscle determination gene, MyoD

    PubMed Central

    Kanisicak, Onur; Mendez, Julio J.; Yamamoto, Shoko; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Goldhamer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite cells are tissue-specific stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. Although satellite cells were identified almost 50 years ago, the identity of progenitor populations from which they derive remains controversial. We developed MyoDiCre knockin mice, and used Cre/lox lineage analysis to determine whether satellite cell progenitors express MyoD, a marker of myogenic commitment. Recombination status of satellite cells was determined by confocal microscopy of isolated muscle fibers and by electron microscopic observation of muscle tissue fixed immediately following isolation, using R26R-EYFP and R26R (β-gal) reporter mice, respectively. We show that essentially all adult satellite cells associated with limb and body wall musculature, as well as the diaphragm and extraocular muscles, originate from MyoD+ progenitors. Neonatal satellite cells were Cre-recombined, but only a small minority exhibited ongoing Cre expression, indicating that most satellite cells had expressed MyoD prenatally. We also show that satellite cell development in MyoD-null mice is not due to functional compensation by MyoD non-expressing lineages. The results suggest that satellite cells are derived from committed myogenic progenitors, irrespective of the anatomical location, embryological origin, or physiological properties of associated musculature. PMID:19464281

  11. Cytokine expression and secretion by skeletal muscle cells: regulatory mechanisms and exercise effects.

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan M; Della Gatta, Paul; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Nieman, David C

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are important mediators of various aspects of health and disease, including appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. Over the past decade or so, considerable attention has focused on the potential for regular exercise to counteract a range of disease states by modulating cytokine production. Exercise stimulates moderate to large increases in the circulating concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL- 10, IL-1 receptor antagonist, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and smaller increases in tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-1β, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, IL-12p35/p40 and IL-15. Although many of these cytokines are also expressed in skeletal muscle, not all are released from skeletal muscle into the circulation during exercise. Conversely, some cytokines that are present in the circulation are not expressed in skeletal muscle after exercise. The reasons for these discrepant cytokine responses to exercise are unclear. In this review, we address these uncertainties by summarizing the capacity of skeletal muscle cells to produce cytokines, analyzing other potential cellular sources of circulating cytokines during exercise, and discussing the soluble factors and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cytokine synthesis (e.g., RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins, soluble receptors). PMID:25826432

  12. Critical role of actin-associated proteins in smooth muscle contraction, cell proliferation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dale D

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling, which are largely attributed to increased airway smooth muscle contractility and cell proliferation. It is known that both chemical and mechanical stimulation regulates smooth muscle contraction. Recent studies suggest that contractile activation and mechanical stretch induce actin cytoskeletal remodeling in smooth muscle. However, the mechanisms that control actin cytoskeletal reorganization are not completely elucidated. This review summarizes our current understanding regarding how actin-associated proteins may regulate remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton in airway smooth muscle. In particular, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) plays a critical role in regulating airway smooth muscle contraction and cell proliferation in vitro, and airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in vivo. These studies indicate that Abl may be a novel target for the development of new therapy to treat asthma. PMID:26517982

  13. Dual Control of Muscle Cell Survival by Distinct Growth Factor-Regulated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Margaret A.; Feng, Xiuhong; Everding, Daniel R.; Sieger, Kerry; Stewart, Claire E. H.; Rotwein, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In addition to their ability to stimulate cell proliferation, polypeptide growth factors are able to maintain cell survival under conditions that otherwise lead to apoptotic death. Growth factors control cell viability through regulation of critical intracellular signal transduction pathways. We previously characterized C2 muscle cell lines that lacked endogenous expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). These cells did not differentiate but underwent apoptotic death in low-serum differentiation medium. Death could be prevented by IGF analogues that activated the IGF-I receptor or by unrelated growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB). Here we analyze the signaling pathways involved in growth factor-mediated myoblast survival. PDGF treatment caused sustained activation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1 and -2), while IGF-I only transiently induced these enzymes. Transient transfection of a constitutively active Mek1, a specific upstream activator of ERKs, maintained myoblast viability in the absence of growth factors, while inhibition of Mek1 by the drug UO126 blocked PDGF-mediated but not IGF-stimulated survival. Although both growth factors activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) to similar extents, only IGF-I treatment led to sustained stimulation of its downstream kinase, Akt. Transient transfection of a constitutively active PI3-kinase or an inducible Akt promoted myoblast viability in the absence of growth factors, while inhibition of PI3-kinase activity by the drug LY294002 selectively blocked IGF- but not PDGF-mediated muscle cell survival. In aggregate, these observations demonstrate that distinct growth factor-regulated signaling pathways independently control myoblast survival. Since IGF action also stimulates muscle differentiation, these results suggest a means to regulate myogenesis through selective manipulation of different signal transduction pathways. PMID:10757809

  14. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  15. Castration differentially alters basal and leucine-stimulated tissue protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qianning; Pruznak, Anne M; Huber, Danuta; Vary, Thomas C; Lang, Charles H

    2009-11-01

    Reduced testosterone as a result of catabolic illness or aging is associated with loss of muscle and increased adiposity. We hypothesized that these changes in body composition occur because of altered rates of protein synthesis under basal and nutrient-stimulated conditions that are tissue specific. The present study investigated such mechanisms in castrated male rats (75% reduction in testosterone) with demonstrated glucose intolerance. Over 9 wk, castration impaired body weight gain, which resulted from a reduced lean body mass and preferential sparing of adipose tissue. Castration decreased gastrocnemius weight, but this atrophy was not associated with reduced basal muscle protein synthesis or differences in plasma IGF-I, insulin, or individual amino acids. However, oral leucine failed to normally stimulate muscle protein synthesis in castrated rats. In addition, castration-induced atrophy was associated with increased 3-methylhistidine excretion and in vitro-determined ubiquitin proteasome activity in skeletal muscle, changes that were associated with decreased atrogin-1 or MuRF1 mRNA expression. Castration decreased heart and kidney weight without reducing protein synthesis and did not alter either cardiac output or glomerular filtration. In contradistinction, the weight of the retroperitoneal fat depot was increased in castrated rats. This increase was associated with an elevated rate of basal protein synthesis, which was unresponsive to leucine stimulation. Castration also decreased whole body fat oxidation. Castration increased TNFα, IL-1α, IL-6, and NOS2 mRNA in fat but not muscle. In summary, the castration-induced muscle wasting results from an increased muscle protein breakdown and the inability of leucine to stimulate protein synthesis, whereas the expansion of the retroperitoneal fat depot appears mediated in part by an increased basal rate of protein synthesis-associated increased inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:19755668

  16. TRIM32 regulates skeletal muscle stem cell differentiation and is necessary for normal adult muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Sarah; Otto, Anthony; Wu, Xiaoli; Miller, Pamela; Stelzer, Sandra; Wen, Yefei; Kuang, Shihuan; Wrogemann, Klaus; Patel, Ketan; Ding, Hao; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2012-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H) is an inherited autosomal recessive disease of skeletal muscle caused by a mutation in the TRIM32 gene. Currently its pathogenesis is entirely unclear. Typically the regeneration process of adult skeletal muscle during growth or following injury is controlled by a tissue specific stem cell population termed satellite cells. Given that TRIM32 regulates the fate of mammalian neural progenitor cells through controlling their differentiation, we asked whether TRIM32 could also be essential for the regulation of myogenic stem cells. Here we demonstrate for the first time that TRIM32 is expressed in the skeletal muscle stem cell lineage of adult mice, and that in the absence of TRIM32, myogenic differentiation is disrupted. Moreover, we show that the ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 controls this process through the regulation of c-Myc, a similar mechanism to that previously observed in neural progenitors. Importantly we show that loss of TRIM32 function induces a LGMD2H-like phenotype and strongly affects muscle regeneration in vivo. Our studies implicate that the loss of TRIM32 results in dysfunctional muscle stem cells which could contribute to the development of LGMD2H. PMID:22299041

  17. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  18. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  19. Analysis of biological effects in human endothelial cells after stimulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Zhang; Sun, Yeqing; Xu, Dan

    Space environment is characterized by strong radiation, ultra-high vacuum, weak magnetic field and microgravity. Among them, microgravity (10-4-10-6g) in space is different from gravity (1g) on earth, possibly causing visual disorders, muscle alterations, bone loss and dysfunction of cardiovascular systems. To study about microgravity environment, the most advanced rotary cell culture system (RCCS-1) was used to do stimulated microgravity (SMG) experiments in the ground. Up to now, most of studies focus on the biological effects under stimulated microgravity, but it is less known about the cellular response after stimulated microgravity. In the present study, we explored the subsequent effects of stimulated microgravity on human endothelial cells (HUVEC-C) after these cells were cultured on RCCS-1 for 48 hours. We co-cultured HUVEC-C cells with HillexⅡmicrocarriers in 60-mm culture dishes for 24h, followed by transferring them to RCCS-1 so that cells remain to be the state of SMG. In parallel, HUVEC-C cells were co-cultured with microcarriers in the ground condition. We found that stimulated microgravity induced cytoskeleton remodeling, cell cycle G2/M arrest and cellular senescence, consistent with previous reports. To study the subsequent effects of stimulated microgravity, we make cells detach from microcarriers and observed various effects including cell growth, cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, apoptosis and senescence. The results showed that those cells undergoing stimulated microgravity appeared obvious growth inhibition, a transition from the decrease in cell adhesion ability and cytoskeleton remodeling within 24h to induction of apoptosis and senescence-like phenotype in the later time with slight changes in cell cycle. Analysis of protein expression in western blot demonstrated that apoptosis-related protein PTEN was up-regulated on the time-dependent pattern after stimulated microgravity, indicating that PTEN-PI3K-Akt pathway might play an

  20. Effects of noxious stimulation to the back or calf muscles on gait stability.

    PubMed

    van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Hug, François; Hodges, Paul W; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-11-26

    Gait stability is the ability to deal with small perturbations that naturally occur during walking. Changes in motor control caused by pain could affect this ability. This study investigated whether nociceptive stimulation (hypertonic saline injection) in a low back (LBP) or calf (CalfP) muscle affects gait stability. Sixteen participants walked on a treadmill at 0.94ms(-1) and 1.67ms(-1), while thorax kinematics were recorded using 3D-motion capture. From 110 strides, stability (local divergence exponent, LDE), stride-to-stride variability and root mean squares (RMS) of thorax linear velocities were calculated along the three movement axes. At 0.94ms(-1), independent of movement axes, gait stability was lower (higher LDE) and stride-to-stride variability was higher, during LBP and CalfP than no pain. This was more pronounced during CalfP, likely explained by the biomechanical function of calf muscles in gait, as supported by greater mediolateral RMS and stance time asymmetry than in LBP and no pain. At 1.67ms(-1), independent of movement axes, gait stability was greater and stride-to-stride variability was smaller with LBP than no pain and CalfP, whereas CalfP was not different from no pain. Opposite effects of LBP on gait stability between speeds suggests a more protective strategy at the faster speed. Although mediolateral RMS was greater and participants had more asymmetric stance times with CalfP than LBP and no pain, limited effect of CalfP at the faster speed could relate to greater kinematic constraints and smaller effects of calf muscle activity on propulsion at this speed. In conclusion, pain effects on gait stability depend on pain location and walking speed. PMID:26602375

  1. Effects of transmural field stimulation in isolated muscle strips from rabbit sphincter of Oddi and duodenum.

    PubMed

    Elbrønd, H; Tøttrup, A; Virchenko, S; Forman, A

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of transmural field stimulation (TMS) on isolated smooth muscle strips from rabbit sphincter of Oddi (SO), duodenal circular layer (Dc) and duodenal longitudinal layer (D1). The strips were suspended in thermostatically controlled 5-ml organ baths containing Krebs solution constantly bubbled with 5% CO2 in O2. TMS was delivered through platinum electrodes (140 V, 0.4 ms, 5 s trains, 40 Hz). The TMS responses could be divided in two main responses: (1) contraction initiated after cessation of the stimulus train, preceded by an inhibitory phase during TMS ('off'); and (2) contraction initiated during TMS ('duration'). The 'duration' response was observed in one out of 20 strips in the SO and Dc compartments, whereas 11 D1 strips (55%) showed 'duration' responses (P < 0.001). Atropine (10(-6)) converted all 'duration' responses to an 'off' response preceded by an inhibitory phase during TMS and reduced the contractile amplitudes with 40-65%. L-NNA significantly increased the number of 'duration' responses in all types of muscle, and caused a 40% increase in D1 contractile amplitude. Inhibitory responses could not be removed by atropine, propranolol and phentolamine. The results suggest that the intrinsic innervation of SO and duodenal muscle consists of a mixture of excitatory, cholinergic and inhibitory NANC pathways. The latter may utilize, wholly or partly, NO or a related compound as transmitter. A relative dominance of excitatory, cholinergic responses was present in the D1 strips, whereas inhibitory responses were dominating in the SO and Dc strips. PMID:8048339

  2. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun; Jiang, Shanping

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  3. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Stimulates Muscle Glucose Uptake by a PI3-Kinase–Dependent Pathway That Is Impaired With Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Gregory R.; Watt, Matthew J.; Ernst, Matthias; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) reverses muscle insulin resistance by increasing fatty acid oxidation through gp130-LIF receptor signaling to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). CNTF also increases Akt signaling in neurons and adipocytes. Because both Akt and AMPK regulate glucose uptake, we investigated muscle glucose uptake in response to CNTF signaling in lean and obese mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mice were injected intraperitoneally with saline or CNTF, and blood glucose was monitored. The effects of CNTF on skeletal muscle glucose uptake and AMPK/Akt signaling were investigated in incubated soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from muscle-specific AMPKα2 kinase-dead, gp130ΔSTAT, and lean and obese ob/ob and high-fat–fed mice. The effect of C2-ceramide on glucose uptake and gp130 signaling was also examined. RESULTS CNTF reduced blood glucose and increased glucose uptake in isolated muscles in a time- and dose-dependent manner with maximal effects after 30 min with 100 ng/ml. CNTF increased Akt-S473 phosphorylation in soleus and EDL; however, AMPK-T172 phosphorylation was only increased in soleus. Incubation of muscles from AMPK kinase dead (KD) and wild-type littermates with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY-294002 demonstrated that PI3-kinase, but not AMPK, was essential for CNTF-stimulated glucose uptake. CNTF-stimulated glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation were substantially reduced in obesity (high-fat diet and ob/ob) despite normal induction of gp130/AMPK signaling—effects also observed when treating myotubes with C2-ceramide. CONCLUSIONS CNTF acutely increases muscle glucose uptake by a mechanism involving the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway that does not require AMPK. CNTF-stimulated glucose uptake is impaired in obesity-induced insulin resistance and by ceramide. PMID:19136654

  4. Bone marrow-derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongxu; Martinez, Carlo O; Ochoa, Oscar; Ruiz-Willhite, Lourdes; Bonilla, Jose R; Centonze, Victoria E; Waite, Lindsay L; Michalek, Joel E; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2009-02-01

    Limb regeneration requires the coordination of multiple stem cell populations to recapitulate the process of tissue formation. Therefore, bone marrow (BM) -derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration was examined in mice lacking the CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Myofiber size, numbers of myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs), and recruitment of BM-derived cells and macrophages were assessed after cardiotoxin-induced injury of chimeric mice produced by transplanting BM from wild-type (WT) or CCR2(-/-) mice into irradiated WT or CCR2(-/-) host mice. Regardless of the host genotype, muscle regeneration and recruitment of BM-derived cells and macrophages were similar in mice replenished with WT BM, whereas BM-derived cells and macrophage accumulation were decreased and muscle regeneration was impaired in all animals receiving CCR2(-/-) BM. Furthermore, numbers of MPCs (CD34(+)/Sca-1(-)/CD45(-) cells) were significantly increased in mice receiving CCR2(-/-) BM despite the decreased size of regenerated myofibers. Thus, the expression of CCR2 on BM-derived cells regulated macrophage recruitment into injured muscle, numbers of MPC, and the extent of regenerated myofiber size, all of which were independent of CCR2 expression on host-derived cells. Future studies in regenerative medicine must include consideration of the role of BM-derived cells, possibly macrophages, in CCR2-dependent events that regulate effective skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:18827026

  5. Laminin regulates PDGFRβ(+) cell stemness and muscle development.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H; E Mason, Christopher; Strickland, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-resident PDGFRβ(+) cells, which include pericytes and PW1(+) interstitial cells (PICs), play a dual role in muscular dystrophy. They can either undergo myogenesis to promote muscle regeneration or differentiate into adipocytes and other cells to compromise regeneration. How the differentiation and fate determination of PDGFRβ(+) cells are regulated, however, remains unclear. Here, by utilizing a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that PDGFRβ(+) cell-derived laminin inhibits their proliferation and adipogenesis, but is indispensable for their myogenesis. In addition, we show that laminin alone is able to partially reverse the muscle dystrophic phenotype in these mice at the molecular, structural and functional levels. Further RNAseq analysis reveals that laminin regulates PDGFRβ(+) cell differentiation/fate determination via gpihbp1. These data support a critical role of laminin in the regulation of PDGFRβ(+) cell stemness, identify an innovative target for future drug development and may provide an effective treatment for muscular dystrophy. PMID:27138650

  6. Laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell stemness and muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H.; E. Mason, Christopher; Strickland, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-resident PDGFRβ+ cells, which include pericytes and PW1+ interstitial cells (PICs), play a dual role in muscular dystrophy. They can either undergo myogenesis to promote muscle regeneration or differentiate into adipocytes and other cells to compromise regeneration. How the differentiation and fate determination of PDGFRβ+ cells are regulated, however, remains unclear. Here, by utilizing a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that PDGFRβ+ cell-derived laminin inhibits their proliferation and adipogenesis, but is indispensable for their myogenesis. In addition, we show that laminin alone is able to partially reverse the muscle dystrophic phenotype in these mice at the molecular, structural and functional levels. Further RNAseq analysis reveals that laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell differentiation/fate determination via gpihbp1. These data support a critical role of laminin in the regulation of PDGFRβ+ cell stemness, identify an innovative target for future drug development and may provide an effective treatment for muscular dystrophy. PMID:27138650

  7. Estrogens maintain skeletal muscle and satellite cell functions.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Ono, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    Estrogens have crucial roles in an extensive range of physiological functions regulating cellular proliferation and differentiation, development, homeostasis, and metabolism. Therefore, prolonged estrogen insufficiency influences various types of tissues expressing estrogen receptors (ERs). Although ERs are expressed in skeletal muscle and its stem cells, called satellite cells, how prolonged estrogen insufficiency affects their function remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of estrogen reduction on muscle in young ovariectomized (OVX) female mice. We found that reduced estrogens resulted in muscle atrophy in a time-dependent manner. Muscle force generation was reduced in OVX mice. Interestingly, prolonged estrogen insufficiency shifted fiber types toward faster myosin heavy chain isoforms. The number of satellite cells per isolated myofiber was unchanged, while satellite cell expansion, differentiation, and self-renewal were all markedly impaired in OVX mice. Indeed, muscle regeneration was significantly compromised in OVX mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that estrogens are essential for comprehensively maintaining muscle function with its insufficiency affecting muscle strength and regeneration in young female mice. PMID:27048232

  8. Tobacco constituents are mitogenic for arterial smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Hefton, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP) purified from flue-cured tobacco leaves, tar-derived material (TAR), the water soluble, nondialyzable, delipidized extract of cigarette smoke condensate, rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, but not adventitial fibroblasts. The mitogenicity appears to depend on polyphenol epitopes on carrier molecules. Ellagic acid, another plant polyphenol, inhibited arterial smooth-muscle proliferation. These results suggest that a number of ubiquitous, plant-derived substances may influence smooth-muscle cell proliferation in the arterial wall.

  9. Involvement of mTOR in Type 2 CRF Receptor Inhibition of Insulin Signaling in Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hongxia; Li, Haochen; Grande, Rebecca; Lira, Vitor; Yan, Zhen; Harris, Thurl E; Li, Chien

    2015-06-01

    Type 2 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRFR2) is expressed in skeletal muscle and stimulation of the receptor has been shown to inhibit the effect of insulin on glucose uptake in muscle cells. Currently, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this process. In this study, we first showed that both in vivo and in vitro CRFR2 expression in muscle was closely correlated with insulin sensitivity, with elevated receptor levels observed in insulin resistant muscle cells. Stimulation of CRFR2 by urocortin 2 (Ucn 2), a CRFR2-selective ligand, in C2C12 myotubes greatly attenuated insulin-induced glucose uptake. The inhibitory effect of CRFR2 signaling required cAMP production and is involved the mammalian target of rapamycine pathway, as rapamycin reversed the inhibitory effect of CRFR2 stimulation on insulin-induced glucose uptake. Moreover, stimulation of CRFR2 failed to inhibit glucose uptake in muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor, which, similar to insulin, signals through Akt-mediated pathway but is independently of insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins to promote glucose uptake. This result argues that CRFR2 signaling modulates insulin's action likely at the levels of IRS. Consistent with this notion, Ucn 2 reduced insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, and treatment with rapamycin reversed the inhibitory effect of Ucn 2 on IRS-1 and Akt phosphorylation. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of CRFR2 signaling on insulin action is mediated by cAMP in a mammalian target of rapamycine-dependent manner, and IRS-1 is a key nodal point where CRFR2 signaling modulates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle cells. PMID:25875045

  10. Human Muscle Satellite Cells as Targets of Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ozden, Simona; Huerre, Michel; Riviere, Jean-Pierre; Coffey, Lark L.; Afonso, Philippe V.; Mouly, Vincent; de Monredon, Jean; Roger, Jean-Christophe; El Amrani, Mohamed; Yvin, Jean-Luc; Jaffar, Marie-Christine; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Sourisseau, Marion; Schwartz, Olivier; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Desprès, Philippe; Gessain, Antoine; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Background Chikungunya (CHIK) virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells), and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. Conclusions/Significance This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans. PMID:17565380

  11. Stimulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by long-term infusion of leucine is amino acid dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusing leucine for 1 hr increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs, but this is not sustained for 2 h unless the leucine-induced fall in amino acids is prevented. We aimed to determine whether continuous leucine infusion can stimulate protein synthesis for a prolonged period whe...

  12. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by prolonged parenteral infusion of leucine is dependent on amino acid availability in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine, stimulates muscle protein synthesis in neonates. Previously, we showed that a 1-h infusion of leucine increased protein synthesis, but this response was not sustained for 2 h unless the leucine-induced decrease in amino acids was prevented....

  13. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by somatotropin in pigs is independent of the somatotropin-induced increase in circulating insulin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic treatment of growing pigs with porcine somatotropin (pST) promotes protein synthesis and doubles postprandial levels of insulin, a hormone that stimulates translation initiation. This study aimed to determine whether the pST-induced increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis was mediated ...

  14. Leucine and alpha-Ketoisocaproic acid, but not norleucine, stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The branched-chain amino acid, leucine, acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of young pigs. However, the chemical structure responsible for this effect has not been identified. We have shown that the other branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine and valine, are ...

  15. The Effects of Active Exercise versus Passive Electronic Muscle Stimulation on Self-Concept, Anxiety, and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyll, Jeffery R.

    Although positive physiological and psychological changes may occur as a result of exercise, many people do not exercise regularly. Either different methods to ensure exercise adherence must be examined or new ways of acquiring the desired changes must be found. The effectiveness of one alternative method, electronic muscle stimulation, was…

  16. TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation stimulates skeletal muscle glycolytic metabolism through activation of HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Remels, A H V; Gosker, H R; Verhees, K J P; Langen, R C J; Schols, A M W J

    2015-05-01

    A shift in quadriceps muscle metabolic profile toward decreased oxidative metabolism and increased glycolysis is a consistent finding in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Chronic inflammation has been proposed as a trigger of this pathological metabolic adaptation. Indeed, the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α impairs muscle oxidative metabolism through activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Putative effects on muscle glycolysis, however, are unclear. We hypothesized that TNF-α-induced NF-κB signaling stimulates muscle glycolytic metabolism through activation of the glycolytic regulator hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Wild-type C2C12 and C2C12-IκBα-SR (blocked NF-κB signaling) myotubes were stimulated with TNF-α, and its effects on glycolytic metabolism and involvement of the HIF pathway herein were investigated. As proof of principle, expression of HIF signaling constituents was investigated in quadriceps muscle biopsies of a previously well-characterized cohort of clinically stable patients with severe COPD and healthy matched controls. TNF-α increased myotube glucose uptake and lactate production and enhanced the activity and expression levels of multiple effectors of muscle glycolytic metabolism in a NF-κB-dependent manner. In addition, TNF-α activated HIF signaling, which required classical NF-κB activation. Moreover, the knockdown of HIF-1α largely attenuated TNF-α-induced increases in glycolytic metabolism. Accordingly, the mRNA levels of HIF-1α and the HIF-1α target gene, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), were increased in muscle biopsies of COPD patients compared with controls, which was most pronounced in the patients with high levels of muscle TNF-α. In conclusion, these data show that TNF-α-induced classical NF-κB activation enhances muscle glycolytic metabolism in a HIF-1α-dependent manner. PMID:25710281

  17. High-Frequency Stimulation of Excitable Cells and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) stimulation has been shown to block conduction in excitable cells including neurons and cardiac myocytes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying conduction block are unclear. Using a multi-scale method, the influence of HF stimulation is investigated in the simplified FitzhHugh-Nagumo and biophysically-detailed Hodgkin-Huxley models. In both models, HF stimulation alters the amplitude and frequency of repetitive firing in response to a constant applied current and increases the threshold to evoke a single action potential in response to a brief applied current pulse. Further, the excitable cells cannot evoke a single action potential or fire repetitively above critical values for the HF stimulation amplitude. Analytical expressions for the critical values and thresholds are determined in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model. In the Hodgkin-Huxley model, it is shown that HF stimulation alters the dynamics of ionic current gating, shifting the steady-state activation, inactivation, and time constant curves, suggesting several possible mechanisms for conduction block. Finally, we demonstrate that HF stimulation of a network of neurons reduces the electrical activity firing rate, increases network synchronization, and for a sufficiently large HF stimulation, leads to complete electrical quiescence. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to investigate HF stimulation in biophysically-detailed ionic models of excitable cells, demonstrate possible mechanisms for HF stimulation conduction block in neurons, and provide insight into the influence of HF stimulation on neural networks. PMID:24278435

  18. Cell death, clearance and immunity in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sciorati, C; Rigamonti, E; Manfredi, A A; Rovere-Querini, P

    2016-06-01

    The skeletal muscle is an immunologically unique tissue. Leukocytes, virtually absent in physiological conditions, are quickly recruited into the tissue upon injury and persist during regeneration. Apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy coexist in the injured/regenerating muscles, including those of patients with neuromuscular disorders, such as inflammatory myopathies, dystrophies, metabolic and mitochondrial myopathies and drug-induced myopathies. Macrophages are able to alter their function in response to microenvironment conditions and as a consequence coordinate changes within the tissue from the early injury throughout regeneration and eventual healing, and regulate the activation and the function of stem cells. Early after injury, classically activated macrophages ('M1') dominate the picture. Alternatively activated M2 macrophages predominate during resolution phases and regulate the termination of the inflammatory responses. The dynamic M1/M2 transition is increasingly felt to be the key to the homeostasis of the muscle. Recognition and clearance of debris originating from damaged myofibers and from dying stem/progenitor cells, stromal cells and leukocytes are fundamental actions of macrophages. Clearance of apoptotic cells and M1/M2 transition are causally connected and represent limiting steps for muscle healing. The accumulation of apoptotic cells, which reflects their defective clearance, has been demonstrated in various tissues to prompt autoimmunity against intracellular autoantigens. In the muscle, in the presence of type I interferon, apoptotic myoblasts indeed cause the production of autoantibodies, lymphocyte infiltration and continuous cycles of muscle injury and regeneration, mimicking human inflammatory myopathies. The clearance of apoptotic cells thus modulates the homeostatic response of the skeletal muscle to injury. Conversely, defects in the process may have deleterious local effects, guiding maladaptive tissue remodeling with collagen and fat

  19. Streptomycin decreases the functional shift to a slow phenotype induced by electrical stimulation in engineered muscle.

    PubMed

    Khodabukus, Alastair; Baar, Keith

    2015-03-01

    Chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS) has long been used to induce a fast-to-slow phenotype shift in skeletal muscle. In this study, we explore the role of frequency (10 and 20 Hz), active time (15-60%), and streptomycin in inducing a fast-to-slow shift in engineered muscle. We found that C2C12 engineered muscle could respond to CLFS with an adult-like active time of 60% and found that a constant 10 Hz train of 0.6 s, followed by 0.4 s rest, induced a partial fast-to-slow phenotype shift. Following 2 weeks of CLFS, time-to-peak tension (TPT) (control [CTL]=40.9±0.2 ms; 10 Hz=58.5±3.5 ms; 20 Hz=48.2±2.7 ms) and half-relaxation time (1/2RT) (CTL=50.4±0.6 ms; 10 Hz=76.1±3.3 ms; 20 Hz=66.6±2.3 ms) slowed significantly in frequency, but not in an active time-dependent manner. Streptomycin significantly blunted the slowing of TPT and 1/2RT induced by CLFS by minimizing the fast-to-slow shift in SERCA isoform. Streptomycin (Nonstim=-42.8%±2.5%; Stim=-38.1%±3.6%) significantly prevented the improvement in fatigue resistance seen in CTL constructs (Nonstim=-58.4%±3.6%; Stim=-27.8%±1.7%). Streptomycin reduced the increase seen in GLUT4 protein following CLFS (CTL=89.4%±6.7%; STREP=41.0%±4.3%) and prevented increases in the mitochondrial proteins succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATP synthase. These data demonstrate that streptomycin significantly blunts the fast-to-slow shift induced by CLFS. In the absence of streptomycin, CLFS induced slowing of contractile dynamics and improved fatigue resistance and suggests that this model can be used to study the mechanisms underlying CLFS-induced adaptations in muscle phenotype. PMID:25333771

  20. Time Course of Central and Peripheral Alterations after Isometric Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre; Nosaka, Kazunori; Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Duhamel, Guillaume; Le Troter, Arnaud; Boudinet, Hélène; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Vilmen, Christophe; Jubeau, Marc; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Isometric contractions induced by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) have been shown to result in a prolonged force decrease but the time course of the potential central and peripheral factors have never been investigated. This study examined the specific time course of central and peripheral factors after isometric NMES-induced muscle damage. Twenty-five young healthy men were subjected to an NMES exercise consisting of 40 contractions for both legs. Changes in maximal voluntary contraction force of the knee extensors (MVC), peak evoked force during double stimulations at 10 Hz (Db10) and 100 Hz (Db100), its ratio (10∶100), voluntary activation, muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before, immediately after and throughout four days after NMES session. Changes in knee extensors volume and T2 relaxation time were also assessed at two (D2) and four (D4) days post-exercise. MVC decreased by 29% immediately after NMES session and was still 19% lower than the baseline value at D4. The decrease in Db10 was higher than in Db100 immediately and one day post-exercise resulting in a decrease (−12%) in the 10∶100 ratio. On the contrary, voluntary activation significantly decreased at D2 (−5%) and was still depressed at D4 (−5%). Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity increased after NMES and peaked at D2 and D4, respectively. T2 was also increased at D2 (6%) and D4 (9%). Additionally, changes in MVC and peripheral factors (e.g., Db100) were correlated on the full recovery period, while a significant correlation was found between changes in MVC and VA only from D2 to D4. The decrease in MVC recorded immediately after the NMES session was mainly due to peripheral changes while both central and peripheral contributions were involved in the prolonged force reduction. Interestingly, the chronological events differ from what has been reported so far for voluntary exercise-induced muscle damage. PMID:25215511

  1. Endothelial Cells Direct Mesenchymal Stem Cells Toward a Smooth Muscle Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cho-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms. PMID:24914692

  2. Migration of smooth muscle cells from the arterial anastomosis of arteriovenous fistulas requires Notch activation to form neointima.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming; Wang, Yun; Liang, Anlin; Mitch, William E; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Han, Guofeng; Cheng, Jizhong

    2015-09-01

    A major factor contributing to failure of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) is migration of smooth muscle cells into the forming neointima. To identify the source of smooth muscle cells in neointima, we created end-to-end AVFs by anastomosing the common carotid artery to the jugular vein and studied neural crest-derived smooth muscle cells from the carotid artery, which are Wnt1-positive during development. In Wnt1-cre-GFP mice, smooth muscle cells in the carotid artery but not the jugular vein are labeled with GFP. About half of the cells were GFP-positive in the neointima, indicating their migration from the carotid artery to the jugular vein in AVFs created in these mice. As fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) regulates smooth muscle cell migration, we examined FSP-1 in failed AVFs and polytetrafluoroethylene grafts from patients with end-stage kidney disease or from AVFs in mice with chronic kidney disease. In smooth muscle cells of AVFs or polytetrafluoroethylene grafts, FSP-1 and activation of Notch1 are present. In smooth muscle cells, Notch1 increased RBP-Jκ transcription factor activity and RBP-Jκ stimulated FSP-1 expression. Conditional knockout of RBP-Jκ in smooth muscle cells or general knockout of FSP-1 suppressed neointima formation in AVFs in mice. Thus, the artery of AVFs is the major source of smooth muscle cells during neointima formation. Knockout of RBP-Jκ or FSP-1 ameliorates neointima formation and might improve AVF patency during long-term follow-up. PMID:25786100

  3. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  4. Intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Quijano, J C; Raynaud, F; Nguyen, D; Piacentini, N; Meister, J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca(2+) waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca(2+) wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca(2+) wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca(2+) dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca(2+), cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca(2+) wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca(2+) wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca(2+) wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  5. Effects of Dexamethasone on Satellite Cells and Tissue Engineered Skeletal Muscle Units.

    PubMed

    Syverud, Brian C; VanDusen, Keith W; Larkin, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineered skeletal muscle has potential for application as a graft source for repairing soft tissue injuries, a model for testing pharmaceuticals, and a biomechanical actuator system for soft robots. However, engineered muscle to date has not produced forces comparable to native muscle, limiting its potential for repair and for use as an in vitro model for pharmaceutical testing. In this study, we examined the trophic effects of dexamethasone (DEX), a glucocorticoid that stimulates myoblast differentiation and fusion into myotubes, on our tissue engineered three-dimensional skeletal muscle units (SMUs). Using our established SMU fabrication protocol, muscle isolates were cultured with three experimental DEX concentrations (5, 10, and 25 nM) and compared to untreated controls. Following seeding onto a laminin-coated Sylgard substrate, the administration of DEX was initiated on day 0 or day 6 in growth medium or on day 9 after the switch to differentiation medium and was sustained until the completion of SMU fabrication. During this process, total cell proliferation was measured with a BrdU assay, and myogenesis and structural advancement of muscle cells were observed through immunostaining for MyoD, myogenin, desmin, and α-actinin. After SMU formation, isometric tetanic force production was measured to quantify function. The histological and functional assessment of the SMU showed that the administration of 10 nM DEX beginning on either day 0 or day 6 yielded optimal SMUs. These optimized SMUs exhibited formation of advanced sarcomeric structure and significant increases in myotube diameter and myotube fusion index, compared with untreated controls. Additionally, the optimized SMUs matured functionally, as indicated by a fivefold rise in force production. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the addition of DEX to our process of engineering skeletal muscle tissue improves myogenesis, advances muscle structure, and increases force production in the

  6. Skin cell proliferation stimulated by microneedles.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C

    2012-03-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7-14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm(2) of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on "ablation" (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  7. Skin Cell Proliferation Stimulated by Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Horst; Kloth, Luther C.

    2012-01-01

    A classical wound may be defined as a disruption of tissue integrity. Wounds, caused by trauma from accidents or surgery, that close via secondary intention rely on the biological phases of healing, i.e., hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling (HIPR). Depending on the wound type and severity, the inflammation phase begins immediately after injury and may last for an average of 7–14 days. Concurrent with the inflammation phase or slightly delayed, cell proliferation is stimulated followed by the activation of the remodeling (maturation) phase. The latter phase can last as long as 1 year or more, and the final healed state is represented by a scar tissue, a cross-linked collagen formation that usually aligns collagen fibers in a single direction. One may assume that skin microneedling that involves the use of dozens or as many as 200 needles that limit penetration to 1.5 mm over 1 cm2 of skin would cause trauma and bleeding followed by the classical HIPR. However, this is not the case or at least the HIPR phases are significantly curtailed and healing never ends in a scar formation. Conversely dermabrasion used in aesthetic medicine for improving skin quality is based on “ablation” (destruction or wounding of superficial skin layers), which requires several weeks for healing that involves formation of new skin layers. Such procedures provoke an acute inflammatory response. We believe that a less intense inflammatory response occurs following microneedle perforation of the skin. However, the mechanism of action of microneedling appears to be different. Here we review the potential mechanisms by which microneedling of the skin facilitates skin repair without scarring after the treatment of superficial burns, acne, hyperpigmentation, and the non-advancing periwound skin surrounding the chronic ulcerations of the integument. PMID:24527373

  8. Abnormalities of AMPK Activation and Glucose Uptake in Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells from Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Audrey E.; Jones, David E.; Walker, Mark; Newton, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post exertional muscle fatigue is a key feature in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Abnormalities of skeletal muscle function have been identified in some but not all patients with CFS. To try to limit potential confounders that might contribute to this clinical heterogeneity, we developed a novel in vitro system that allows comparison of AMP kinase (AMPK) activation and metabolic responses to exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells from CFS patients and control subjects. Methods Skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from 10 subjects with CFS and 7 age-matched controls, subjected to electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) for up to 24h and examined for changes associated with exercise. Results In the basal state, CFS cultures showed increased myogenin expression but decreased IL6 secretion during differentiation compared with control cultures. Control cultures subjected to 16h EPS showed a significant increase in both AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with unstimulated cells. In contrast, CFS cultures showed no increase in AMPK phosphorylation or glucose uptake after 16h EPS. However, glucose uptake remained responsive to insulin in the CFS cells pointing to an exercise-related defect. IL6 secretion in response to EPS was significantly reduced in CFS compared with control cultures at all time points measured. Conclusion EPS is an effective model for eliciting muscle contraction and the metabolic changes associated with exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells. We found four main differences in cultured skeletal muscle cells from subjects with CFS; increased myogenin expression in the basal state, impaired activation of AMPK, impaired stimulation of glucose uptake and diminished release of IL6. The retention of these differences in cultured muscle cells from CFS subjects points to a genetic/epigenetic mechanism, and provides a system to identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25836975

  9. Controlled electromechanical cell stimulation on-a-chip

    PubMed Central

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Rasponi, Marco; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Fiore, Gianfranco B.; Kamm, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell research has yielded promising advances in regenerative medicine, but standard assays generally lack the ability to combine different cell stimulations with rapid sample processing and precise fluid control. In this work, we describe the design and fabrication of a micro-scale cell stimulator capable of simultaneously providing mechanical, electrical, and biochemical stimulation, and subsequently extracting detailed morphological and gene-expression analysis on the cellular response. This micro-device offers the opportunity to overcome previous limitations and recreate critical elements of the in vivo microenvironment in order to investigate cellular responses to three different stimulations. The platform was validated in experiments using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These experiments demonstrated the ability for inducing changes in cell morphology, cytoskeletal fiber orientation and changes in gene expression under physiological stimuli. This novel bioengineering approach can be readily applied to various studies, especially in the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:26135970

  10. Arsenic induces sustained impairment of skeletal muscle and muscle progenitor cell ultrastructure and bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Brown, Elke; Stolz, Donna; Ferrari, Ricardo; Goodpaster, Bret; Deasy, Bridget; Distefano, Giovanna; Roperti, Alexandra; Cheikhi, Amin; Garciafigueroa, Yesica; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2014-09-01

    Over 4 million individuals in the United States, and over 140 million individuals worldwide, are exposed daily to arsenic-contaminated drinking water. Human exposures can range from below the current limit of 10 μg/L to over 1mg/L, with 100 μg/L promoting disease in a large portion of those exposed. Although increased attention has recently been paid to myopathy following arsenic exposure, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying clinical symptoms remain poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that arsenic induces lasting muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and impairs metabolism. Compared to nonexposed controls, mice exposed to drinking water containing 100 μg/L arsenite for 5 weeks demonstrated impaired muscle function, mitochondrial myopathy, and altered oxygen consumption that were concomitant with increased mitochondrial fusion gene transcription. There were no differences in the levels of inorganic arsenic or its monomethyl and dimethyl metabolites between controls and exposed muscles, confirming that arsenic does not accumulate in muscle. Nevertheless, muscle progenitor cells isolated from exposed mice recapitulated the aberrant myofiber phenotype and were more resistant to oxidative stress, generated more reactive oxygen species, and displayed autophagic mitochondrial morphology, compared to cells isolated from nonexposed mice. These pathological changes from a possible maladaptive oxidative stress response provide insight into declines in muscle functioning caused by exposure to this common environmental contaminant. PMID:24960579

  11. Skeletal muscle PLIN3 and PLIN5 are serine phosphorylated at rest and following lipolysis during adrenergic or contractile stimulation.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Rebecca E K; Vandenboom, Rene; Roy, Brian D; Peters, Sandra J

    2013-09-01

    In adipose tissue, access of adipose triglyceride and hormone-sensitive lipases (ATGL and HSL) to the lipid droplet depends on PLIN1 phosphorylation, however, PLIN1 is not expressed in skeletal muscle and the phosphorylation of the expressed PLINs has yet to be investigated. Further, direct interactions between skeletal muscle PLINs and HSL are unknown. We investigated the isolated and combined effects of epinephrine and contraction on PLIN-to-lipase interactions as well as phosphorylation. Isolated rat solei were assigned to one of four 30 min in vitro conditions (25°C): (1) rest; (2) intermittent tetanic stimulation (60 Hz for 150 msec; train rate 20/min); (3) 5 nmol/L epinephrine; (4) intermittent tetanic stimulation and 5 nmol/L epinephrine. Immunoprecipitation of serine phosphorylated proteins followed by Western blotting for PLIN2, PLIN3, PLIN5, revealed that only PLIN2 is not phosphorylated under any of the experimental conditions. This is the first study to show that in whole rat skeletal muscle PLIN3 and PLIN5 are serine phosphorylated. The degree of serine phosphorylation remained unchanged following adrenergic and/or contractile stimulation. Oil red O staining of muscle sections for lipid content shows a significant decrease following each condition, confirming lipolysis occurred (P < 0.05). PLIN2, 3, and 5 all interact with HSL and ATGL, but these interactions were unchanged following treatments. Our results show that in skeletal muscle, PLIN2 is not serine phosphorylated at rest or with lipolytic stimulation and that while PLIN3, PLIN5 are serine phosphorylated at rest, the degree of phosphorylation does not change with lipolytic stimulation. PMID:24303154

  12. Early Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to Improve Quadriceps Muscle Strength After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Balter, Jaclyn E.; Wolfe, Pamela; Eckhoff, Donald G.; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The recovery of quadriceps muscle force and function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is suboptimal, which predisposes patients to disability with increasing age. Objective The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the efficacy of quadriceps muscle neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), initiated 48 hours after TKA, as an adjunct to standard rehabilitation. Design This was a prospective, longitudinal randomized controlled trial. Methods Sixty-six patients, aged 50 to 85 years and planning a primary unilateral TKA, were randomly assigned to receive either standard rehabilitation (control) or standard rehabilitation plus NMES applied to the quadriceps muscle (initiated 48 hours after surgery). The NMES was applied twice per day at the maximum tolerable intensity for 15 contractions. Data for muscle strength, functional performance, and self-report measures were obtained before surgery and 3.5, 6.5, 13, 26, and 52 weeks after TKA. Results At 3.5 weeks after TKA, significant improvements with NMES were found for quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength, functional performance, and knee extension active range of motion. At 52 weeks, the differences between groups were attenuated, but improvements with NMES were still significant for quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength, functional performance, and some self-report measures. Limitations Treatment volume was not matched for both study arms; NMES was added to the standard of care treatment. Furthermore, testers were not blinded during testing, but used standardized scripts to avoid bias. Finally, some patients reached the maximum stimulator output during at least one treatment session and may have tolerated more stimulation. Conclusions The early addition of NMES effectively attenuated loss of quadriceps muscle strength and improved functional performance following TKA. The effects were most pronounced and clinically meaningful within the first month after surgery, but persisted through 1

  13. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  14. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  15. Myostatin inhibits proliferation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse liver cells.

    PubMed

    Watts, Rani; Ghozlan, Mostafa; Hughey, Curtis C; Johnsen, Virginia L; Shearer, Jane; Hittel, Dustin S

    2014-06-01

    Although myostatin functions primarily as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and development, accumulating biological and epidemiological evidence indicates an important contributing role in liver disease. In this study, we demonstrate that myostatin suppresses the proliferation of mouse Hepa-1c1c7 murine-derived liver cells (50%; p < 0.001) in part by reducing the expression of the cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that elicit G1-S phase transition of the cell cycle (p < 0.001). Furthermore, real-time PCR-based quantification of the long noncoding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1), recently identified as a myostatin-responsive transcript in skeletal muscle, revealed a significant downregulation (25% and 50%, respectively; p < 0.05) in the livers of myostatin-treated mice and liver cells. The importance of Malat1 in liver cell proliferation was confirmed via arrested liver cell proliferation (p < 0.05) in response to partial Malat1 siRNA-mediated knockdown. Myostatin also significantly blunted insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation in liver cells while increasing the phosphorylation of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), a protein that is essential for cancer cell proliferation and insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Together, these findings reveal a plausible mechanism by which circulating myostatin contributes to the diminished regenerative capacity of the liver and diseases characterized by liver insulin resistance. PMID:24882465

  16. Community effect triggers terminal differentiation of myogenic cells derived from muscle satellite cells by quenching Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagisawa, Michiko; Mukai, Atsushi; Shiomi, Kosuke; Song, Si-Yong; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2011-01-15

    A high concentration of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) stimulates myogenic progenitor cells to undergo heterotopic osteogenic differentiation. However, the physiological role of the Smad signaling pathway during terminal muscle differentiation has not been resolved. We report here that Smad1/5/8 was phosphorylated and activated in undifferentiated growing mouse myogenic progenitor Ric10 cells without exposure to any exogenous BMPs. The amount of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 was severely reduced during precocious myogenic differentiation under the high cell density culture condition even in growth medium supplemented with a high concentration of serum. Inhibition of the Smad signaling pathway by dorsomorphin, an inhibitor of Smad activation, or noggin, a specific antagonist of BMP, induced precocious terminal differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells in a cell density-dependent fashion even in growth medium. In addition, Smad1/5/8 was transiently activated in proliferating myogenic progenitor cells during muscle regeneration in rats. The present results indicate that the Smad signaling pathway is involved in a critical switch between growth and differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, precocious cell density-dependent myogenic differentiation suggests that a community effect triggers the terminal muscle differentiation of myogenic cells by quenching the Smad signaling.

  17. Functional Overload Enhances Satellite Cell Properties in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Machida, Masanao; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle represents a plentiful and accessible source of adult stem cells. Skeletal-muscle-derived stem cells, termed satellite cells, play essential roles in postnatal growth, maintenance, repair, and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Although it is well known that the number of satellite cells increases following physical exercise, functional alterations in satellite cells such as proliferative capacity and differentiation efficiency following exercise and their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we found that functional overload, which is widely used to model resistance exercise, causes skeletal muscle hypertrophy and converts satellite cells from quiescent state to activated state. Our analysis showed that functional overload induces the expression of MyoD in satellite cells and enhances the proliferative capacity and differentiation potential of these cells. The changes in satellite cell properties coincided with the inactivation of Notch signaling and the activation of Wnt signaling and likely involve modulation by transcription factors of the Sox family. These results indicate the effects of resistance exercise on the regulation of satellite cells and provide insight into the molecular mechanism of satellite cell activation following physical exercise. PMID:26779264

  18. Piperine Congeners as Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mair, Christina E; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Wimmer, Laurin; Nemetz-Fiedler, Daniel; Sider, Nadine; Heiss, Elke H; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-08-01

    Successful vascular healing after percutaneous coronary interventions is related to the inhibition of abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and efficient re-endothelialization. In the search for vascular smooth muscle cell anti-proliferative agents from natural sources we identified piperine (1), the main pungent constituent of the fruits from Piper nigrum (black pepper). Piperine inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 21.6 µM, as quantified by a resazurin conversion assay. Investigations of ten piperamides isolated from black pepper fruits and 15 synthesized piperine derivatives resulted in the identification of three potent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibitors: the natural alkaloid pipertipine (4), and the two synthetic derivatives (2E,4E)-N,N-dibutyl-5-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dienamide (14) and (E)-N,N-dibutyl-3-(naphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)acrylamide (20). They showed IC50 values of 3.38, 6.00, and 7.85 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the synthetic compound (2E,4E)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (12) was found to be cell type selective, by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 11.8 µM without influencing the growth of human endothelial cells. PMID:26132851

  19. The effects of transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the activation of deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with lumbar degenerative kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Jin Hyun; Jung, Gil Su; Baek, Seung Ok; Jones, Rodney; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effectiveness of three different neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) protocols for the deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with LDK were recruited. Three stimulation protocols were investigated: stimulation of the abdominal muscles (protocol A); stimulation of the lumbar muscles (protocol B); and simultaneous stimulation of the abdominal and lumbar muscles (protocol A+B). Images of the obliquus externus (OE), obliquus internus (OI), transversus abdominis (TrA), and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscles were captured by real-time ultrasound imaging (RUSI). [Results] The thickness of LM was significantly greater during stimulation than at rest for all three protocols. Thicknesses of the abdominal muscles (TrA, OI, and OE) were significantly greater during stimulation than at rest for protocols A and A+B. Thickness increases in LM were significantly greater during protocols B and A+B, but not during protocol A. Thickness increases in the abdominal muscles (TrA, OI, and OE) were significantly greater during protocols A and A+B, but not during protocol B. [Conclusion] NMES can significantly activate the deep lumbar stabilizing muscles of patients with LDK. Protocol A+B of NMES is recommended to aid postural correction and low back pain (LBP) in patients with LDK. PMID:27064323

  20. Interaction of atriopeptin III and vasopressin on calcium kinetics and contraction of aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Lehnert, H.; Caramelo, C.; Tsai, P.; Schrier, R.W.

    1988-10-01

    The cellular mechanism of the vasodilatory action of atriopeptin III (APIII) on vasopressin (AVP)-induced Ca2+ mobilization and cell shape change in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) was studied. APIII (10(-8) M) attenuated the increase of intracellular free Ca2+, (Ca2+)i, induced by 10(-8) M AVP (234.0 +/- 14.8 vs. 310.0 +/- 28.4 nM, P less than 0.01). Similar results were obtained in 45Ca2+ efflux experiments. APIII (10(-7) M), however, did not alter AVP-induced inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production, although the levels of inositol-1-phosphate were significantly reduced. The effect of APIII to block or attenuate AVP-induced Ca2+ mobilization was associated with an inhibition of AVP-stimulated cell shape change. The effect of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) on cell shape, however, occurred at lower ANF concentrations than the effect on the Ca2+ mobilization. APIII stimulated production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in VSMC. The effect of APIII on AVP-stimulated Ca2+ mobilization was partially mimicked by the stable nucleotide 8-bromo cGMP and was not affected by the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, methylene blue (10(-4) M). These results suggest that APIII exerts its vasodilatory effect, in part, by interference with vasopressor-stimulated Ca2+ mobilization in vascular smooth muscle cells, perhaps by stimulating particulate guanylate cyclase and cGMP. However, an effect of ANF on the contractile mechanism at a site independent of Ca2+ release is also suggested by the present results.

  1. Mechanisms Stimulating Muscle Wasting in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Roles of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and Myostatin

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sandhya S.; Mitch, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Catabolic conditions including chronic kidney disease (CKD), cancer, and diabetes cause muscle atrophy. The loss of muscle mass worsens the burden of disease because it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To avoid these problems or to develop treatment strategies, the mechanisms leading to muscle wasting must be identified. Specific mechanisms uncovered in CKD generally occur in other catabolic conditions. These include stimulation of protein degradation in muscle arising from activation of caspase-3 and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). The