Science.gov

Sample records for muscle homogenate fluid

  1. Thermal inactivation profiles of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in lamb skeletal muscle homogenate fluid.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Richard J; Waldron, Anna; Warne, Darian

    2010-01-31

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease in livestock and there is a debate about its role in humans in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders such as Crohn's disease, but the relationship remains unproven. Nevertheless livestock health authorities in many countries aim to lower the prevalence of this infection to reduce potential contamination of the human food supply. MAP may occur in bovine milk and data on thermal inactivation suggest pasteurisation is an effective process. Recently MAP has been identified in skeletal muscle of cattle and sheep but there are no data on its thermal inactivation in these substrates. In this study the inactivation of MAP was studied in a fluid homogenate of lamb skeletal muscle at temperatures previously identified as being relevant to cooking processes applied by domestic consumers. A PCR thermocycler was used to ensure accurate temperatures and rapid heat exchange, while radiometric culture was used to ensure sensitive detection of viable MAP for determination of D and z values. Among the two predominant strains of MAP, S and C, D(55) ranged from 56 to 89 min, D(60) was 8 to 11 min, D(65) was 26 to 35s while D(70) was 1.5 to 1.8s. Values for z were 4.21C degrees for the S strain and 4.51C degrees for the C strain. At temperatures of 65-70 degrees C, MAP appeared to be less heat tolerant in skeletal muscle fluid than in previous reports using milk as the medium. The total thermal exposure of MAP during baking of a sample of 16 leg-of-lamb roasts in domestic ovens was determined to result in more than 20 log reductions in most cases, that is the product was microbiologically safe. Based on the models used in this study, there is a low probability of survival of MAP provided that red meat is cooked to recommended standards. PMID:19896745

  2. Fluid mechanics of muscle vibrations.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, D T; Cole, N M

    1988-01-01

    The pressure field produced by an isometrically contracting frog gastrocnemius muscle is described by the fluid mechanics equations for a vibrating sphere. The equations predict a pressure amplitude that is proportional to the lateral acceleration of the muscle, inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the muscle, and cosinusoidally related to the major axis of lateral movement. The predictions are confirmed by experiments that measure the pressure amplitude distribution and by photographs of muscle movement during contraction. The lateral movement of muscle has the appearance of an oscillating system response to a step function input--the oscillation may be at the resonant frequency of the muscle and therefore may provide a means to measure muscle stiffness without actually touching the muscle. PMID:3260803

  3. On shearing fluids with homogeneous densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, D. C.; Srivastava, V. C.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study shearing spherically symmetric homogeneous density fluids in comoving coordinates. It is found that the expansion of the four-velocity of a perfect fluid is homogeneous, whereas its shear is generated by an arbitrary function of time M( t), related to the mass function of the distribution. This function is found to bear a functional relationship with density. The field equations are reduced to two coupled first order ordinary differential equations for the metric coefficients g_{11} and g_{22}. We have explored a class of solutions assuming that M is a linear function of the density. This class embodies, as a subcase, the complete class of shear-free solutions. We have discussed the off quoted work of Kustaanheimo (Comment Phys Math XIII:12, 1, 1947) and have noted that it deals with shear-free fluids having anisotropic pressure. It is shown that the anisotropy of the fluid is characterized by an arbitrary function of time. We have discussed some issues of historical priorities and credentials related to shear-free solutions. Recent controversial claims by Mitra (Astrophys Space Sci 333:351, 2011 and Gravit Cosmol 18:17, 2012) have also been addressed. We found that the singularity and the shearing motion of the fluid are closely related. Hence, there is a need for fresh look to the solutions obtained earlier in comoving coordinates.

  4. Isotropic homogeneous universe with viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, N.O.; Dias, R.S.; Banerjee, A.

    1985-04-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the isotropic homogeneous cosmological model with viscous fluid. The fluid has only bulk viscosity and the viscosity coefficient is taken to be a power function of the mass density. The equation of state assumed obeys a linear relation between mass density and pressure. The models satisfying Hawking's energy conditions are discussed. Murphy's model is only a special case of this general set of solutions and it is shown that Murphy's conclusion that the introduciton of bulk viscosity can avoid the occurrence of space-time singularity at finite past is not, in general, valid.

  5. Homogeneous and hypersurface-homogeneous shear-free perfect fluids ingeneral relativity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. B.

    1988-08-01

    Shear-free, general-relativistic perfect fluids are investigated in the case where they are either homogeneous or hypersurface-homogeneous (and, in particular, spatially homogeneous). It is assumed that the energy density μ and the presurep of the fluid are related by a barotropic equation of statep = p(μ), where μ +p ≠ 0. Under such circumstances, it follows that either the fluid's volume expansion rate θ or the fluid's vorticity (i.e., rotation) ω must vanish. In the homogeneous case, this leads to only two possibilities: either ω = θ = 0 (the Einstein static solution), or ω ≠ 0,θ = 0 (the Gödel solution). In the hypersurface-homogeneous case, the situation is more complicated: either ω = 0, θ≠ 0 (as exemplified,inter alia, by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models), or ω ≠ 0, θ = 0 (which pertains, for example, in general stationary cylindrically symmetric fluids with rigid rotation, or ω = θ = 0 (as occurs for static spherically symmetric solutions). Each possibility is further subdivided in an invariant way, and related to the studies of other authors, thereby unifying and extending these earlier works.

  6. Influence of extraction technique on the anti-oxidative potential of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) extracts in bovine muscle homogenates.

    PubMed

    Shortle, E; O'Grady, M N; Gilroy, D; Furey, A; Quinn, N; Kerry, J P

    2014-12-01

    Six extracts were prepared from hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves and flowers (HLF) and berries (HB) using solid-liquid [traditional (T) (HLFT, HBT), sonicated (S) (HLFS, HBS)] and supercritical fluid (C) extraction (HLFC, HBC) techniques. The antioxidant activities of HLF and HB extracts were characterised using in vitro antioxidant assays (TPC, DPPH, FRAP) and in 25% bovine muscle (longissimus lumborum) homogenates (lipid oxidation (TBARS), oxymyoglobin (% of total myoglobin)) after 24h storage at 4°C. Hawthorn extracts exhibited varying degrees of antioxidant potency. In vitro and muscle homogenate (TBARS) antioxidant activity followed the order: HLFS>HLFT and HBT>HBS. In supercritical fluid extracts, HLFC>HBC (in vitro antioxidant activity) and HLFC≈HBC (TBARS). All extracts (except HBS) reduced oxymyoglobin oxidation. The HLFS extract had the highest antioxidant activity in all test systems. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) exhibited potential as a technique for the manufacture of functional ingredients (antioxidants) from hawthorn for use in muscle foods. PMID:25170819

  7. Homogenization of two fluid flow in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Daly, K. R.; Roose, T.

    2015-01-01

    The macroscopic behaviour of air and water in porous media is often approximated using Richards' equation for the fluid saturation and pressure. This equation is parametrized by the hydraulic conductivity and water release curve. In this paper, we use homogenization to derive a general model for saturation and pressure in porous media based on an underlying periodic porous structure. Under an appropriate set of assumptions, i.e. constant gas pressure, this model is shown to reduce to the simpler form of Richards' equation. The starting point for this derivation is the Cahn–Hilliard phase field equation coupled with Stokes equations for fluid flow. This approach allows us, for the first time, to rigorously derive the water release curve and hydraulic conductivities through a series of cell problems. The method captures the hysteresis in the water release curve and ties the macroscopic properties of the porous media with the underlying geometrical and material properties.

  8. A Class of Homogeneous Scalar Tensor Cosmologies with a Radiation Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    We present a new class of exact homogeneous cosmological solutions with a radiation fluid for all scalar tensor theories. The solutions belong to Bianchi type VIh cosmologies. Explicit examples of nonsingular homogeneous scalar tensor cosmologies are also given.

  9. Anomalous separation of homogeneous particle-fluid mixtures: Further observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, H. S.; Hussain, F.; Goldshtik, M.

    1995-11-01

    Previously, we reported the puzzling phenomenon of separation of components from an initially uniform mixture (air and smoke) in a rotating flow device (a cylindrical can with a rotating end disk). Here we summarize further studies of this phenomenon through experiments, analysis of particle forces, and direct numerical simulation (DNS). Separation of spherical polystyrene particles when immersed in water or pure alcohol lends further credence to the phenomenon. We have studied the dependence of the particle-free column size and its establishment time on particle size, particle concentration, disk and cylinder Reynolds numbers, and fluid composition. The evolution of passive markers in DNS shows segregation similar to that observed in experiments, supporting our kinematic separation hypothesis. However, kinematic action, though important, is inadequate to explain the ``antidiffusion'' phenomenon. Although estimates show that known particle forces cannot account for the particle separation, experimental results suggest the action of a yet unknown lift force whose effect is magnified kinematically in our apparatus. At high particle concentrations or when a small amount of solute (e.g. sugar, salt, or alcohol) is added to water polystyrene particle mixtures, the flow within the column becomes unstable and the particle-free column loses its axial symmetry; this unusual behavior is not yet clearly understood.

  10. Homogenization theory for periodic distributions of elastic cylinders embedded in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ayona, Edgar; Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2012-10-01

    A multiple-scattering theory is applied to study the homogenization of clusters of elastic cylinders distributed in a isotropic lattice and embedded in a viscous fluid. Asymptotic relations are derived and employed to obtain analytical formulas for the effective parameters of homogenized clusters in which the underlying lattice has a low filling fraction. It is concluded that such clusters behave, in the low frequency limit, as an effective elastic medium. Particularly, it is found that the effective dynamical mass density follows the static estimate; i.e., the homogenization procedure does not recover the non-linear behavior obtained for the inviscid case. Moreover, the longitudinal and transversal sound speeds do not show any dependence on fluid viscosity. Numerical simulations performed for clusters made of brass cylinders embedded in glycerin support the reliability of the effective parameters resulting from the homogenization procedure reported here. PMID:23039556

  11. Collapse and dispersal of a homogeneous spin fluid in Einstein-Cartan theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, M.; Jalalzadeh, S.; Ziaie, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, we revisit the process of gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric homogeneous dust fluid which is described by the Oppenheimer-Snyder (OS) model (Oppenheimer and Snyder in Phys Rev D 56:455, 1939). We show that such a scenario would not end in a spacetime singularity when the spin degrees of freedom of fermionic particles within the collapsing cloud are taken into account. To this purpose, we take the matter content of the stellar object as a homogeneous Weyssenhoff fluid. Employing the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW metric for the interior spacetime setup, it is shown that the spin of matter, in the context of a negative pressure, acts against the pull of gravity and decelerates the dynamical evolution of the collapse in its later stages. Our results show a picture of gravitational collapse in which the collapse process halts at a finite radius, whose value depends on the initial configuration. We thus show that the spacetime singularity that occurs in the OS model is replaced by a non-singular bounce beyond which the collapsing cloud re-expands to infinity. Depending on the model parameters, one can find a minimum value for the boundary of the collapsing cloud or correspondingly a threshold value for the mass content below which the horizon formation can be avoided. Our results are supported by a thorough numerical analysis.

  12. Impact of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux in Jeffrey Fluid Flow with Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sumaira; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional stretched flow of Jeffrey fluid in view of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux is addressed. Effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are also considered. Suitable transformations are used to form ordinary differential equations. Convergent series solutions are computed. Impact of significant parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration and skin friction coefficient is addressed. Analysis of thermal relaxation is made. The obtained results show that ratio of relaxation to retardation times and Deborah number have inverse relation for velocity profile. Temperature distribution has decreasing behavior for Prandtl number and thermal relaxation time. Also concentration decreases for larger values of strength of homogeneous reaction parameter while it increases for strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter. PMID:26859675

  13. Impact of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux in Jeffrey Fluid Flow with Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sumaira; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional stretched flow of Jeffrey fluid in view of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux is addressed. Effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are also considered. Suitable transformations are used to form ordinary differential equations. Convergent series solutions are computed. Impact of significant parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration and skin friction coefficient is addressed. Analysis of thermal relaxation is made. The obtained results show that ratio of relaxation to retardation times and Deborah number have inverse relation for velocity profile. Temperature distribution has decreasing behavior for Prandtl number and thermal relaxation time. Also concentration decreases for larger values of strength of homogeneous reaction parameter while it increases for strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter. PMID:26859675

  14. Suppression of turbulent energy cascade due to phase separation in homogenous binary mixture fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Youhei; Okamoto, Sachiya

    2015-11-01

    When a multi-component fluid mixture becomes themophysically unstable state by quenching from well-melting condition, phase separation due to spinodal decomposition occurs, and a self-organized structure is formed. During phase separation, free energy is consumed for the structure formation. In our previous report, the phase separation in homogenous turbulence was numerically simulated and the coarsening process of phase separation was discussed. In this study, we extended our numerical model to a high Schmidt number fluid corresponding to actual polymer solution. The governing equations were continuity, Navier-Stokes, and Chan-Hiliard equations as same as our previous report. The flow filed was an isotropic homogenous turbulence, and the dimensionless parameters in the Chan-Hilliard equation were estimated based on the thermophysical condition of binary mixture. From the numerical results, it was found that turbulent energy cascade was drastically suppressed in the inertial subrange by phase separation for the high Schmidt number flow. By using the identification of turbulent and phase separation structure, we discussed the relation between total energy balance and the structures formation processes. This study is financially supported by the Grand-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) (No. T26820045) from the Ministry of Education, Cul-ture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-05-15

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO{sub 2} that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S{sub nw}) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S{sub nw}. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S{sub nw} during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S{sub nw} for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  16. Fluid Dynamics Prize Lecture: Homogeneous Dynamos in Planets and in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, F. H.

    2000-11-01

    Numerical simulations of the dynamo problem of the generation of magnetic fields by convection flows in rotating spherical fluid shells have been extended to a sufficiently large parameter regime such that extrapolation to the condition of planetary cores have become feasible. Besides dipolar fields, hemispherical and quadrupolar fields are preferred in various regimes of the parameter space. In the latter two cases oscillating time dependances are always found inspite of the chaotic nature of the dynamos. Subcritical dynamo states are typical and multiple dynamo states are possible. On the experimental side the homogeneous dynamo process has recently been demonstrated without the use of ferromagnetic material in Riga and Karlsruhe. Further experiments at other laboratories are expected to realize dynamos under conditions of strong turbulence.

  17. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2013-12-21

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-γ equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-γ approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  18. Retention of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus infectivity in fish tissue homogenates and fluids stored at three temperatures.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1983-01-01

    Pools of brain, kidney, spleen, liver and gut tissues from several rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri Richardson, and whole sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), fry were homogenized with a known amount of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Virus was also added to ovarian fluids and sera pooled from several rainbow trout. The plaque assay was used to determine the retention of IHNV infectivity after different storage periods at 20°C, 4°C and —20°C. The work was used to evaluate homogenization as a remote field treatment of IHNV samples before shipment to the laboratory. Maintenance of viral infectivity varied widely among different homogenates and fluids. For short-term storage, 4°C was generally the most efficient temperature for preserving infectious virus in ovarian fluids, Sera and homogenates of eggs, spleen, whole fry and brain, while infectivity was most efficiently preserved in kidney and liver homogenates by storage at −20°C. Infectious virus was not detected in any sample stored for one year at −20°C. Variations in retention of viral infectivity make homogenization of samples in the field followed by transfer to the laboratory unacceptable.

  19. A homogenization approach for characterization of the fluid-solid coupling parameters in Biot's equations for acoustic poroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, K.; van Dommelen, J. A. W.; Göransson, P.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a homogenization method is proposed to obtain the parameters of Biot's poroelastic theory from a multiscale perspective. It is assumed that the behavior of a macroscopic material point can be captured through the response of a microscopic Representative Volume Element (RVE) consisting of both a solid skeleton and a gaseous fluid. The macroscopic governing equations are assumed to be Biot's poroelastic equations and the RVE is governed by the conservation of linear momentum and the adopted linear constitutive laws under the isothermal condition. With boundary conditions relying on the macroscopic solid displacement and fluid pressure, the homogenized solid stress and fluid displacement are obtained based on energy consistency. This homogenization framework offers an approach to obtain Biot's parameters directly through the response of the RVE in the regime of Darcy's flow where the pressure gradient is dominating. A numerical experiment is performed in the form of a sound absorption test on a porous material with an idealized partially open microstructure that is described by Biot's equations where the parameters are obtained through the proposed homogenization approach. The result is evaluated by comparison with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), showing a superior performance of this approach compared to an alternative semi-phenomenological model for estimating Biot's parameters of the studied porous material.

  20. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  1. On Cattaneo-Christov heat flux in MHD flow of Oldroyd-B fluid with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Almezal, Saleh

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid over a stretching surface with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions. Characteristics of relaxation time for heat flux are captured by employing new heat flux model proposed by Christov. A system of ordinary differential equations is obtained by using suitable transformations. Convergent series solutions are derived. Impacts of various pertinent parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration are discussed. Analysis of the obtained results shows that fluid relaxation and retardation time constants have reverse behavior on the velocity and concentration fields. Also temperature distribution decreases for larger values of thermal relaxation time.

  2. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in Williamson fluid model over a stretching cylinder by using Keller box method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, M. Y.; Salahuddin, T.; Hussain, Arif; Bilal, S.; Awais, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses the effect of homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction on Williamson fluid model over a stretching cylinder. The boundary layer partial differential equations are converted into ordinary differential equation by using suitable transformations. The non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved by using implicit finite difference Keller box technique. The effects of several pertinent parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are deliberated graphically. The behavior of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are examined through graphs.

  3. Muscle fluid shift does not alter EMG global variables during sustained isometric actions.

    PubMed

    von Walden, Ferdinand; Pozzo, Marco; Elman, Ted; Tesch, Per A

    2008-10-01

    Body fluid redistribution occurs in astronauts traveling in space, potentially altering interstitial water content and hence impedance. This in turn may impact the features of electromyographic (EMG) signals measured to compare in-flight muscle function with pre- and post-flight conditions. Thus, the current study aimed at investigating the influence of similar fluid shifts on EMG spectral variables during muscle contractile activity. Ten men performed sustained isometric actions (120 s) at 20% and 60% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) following 1-h rest in the vertical or supine position. From single differential EMG signals, recorded from the soleus (SOL), the medial (MG) and lateral (LG) gastrocnemius muscles, initial value and rate of change over time (slope) of mean power frequency (MNF) and average rectified value (ARV) were assessed. MNF initial value showed dependence on muscle (P<0.01), but was unaffected by body tilt. MNF rate of change increased (P<0.001) with increased force and differed across muscles (P<0.05), but was not influenced (P=0.85) by altered body position. Thus, fluid shift resulting from vertical to supine tilt had no impact on myoelectrical manifestations of muscle fatigue. Furthermore, since such alteration of body fluid distribution resembles that occurring in microgravity, our findings suggest this may not be a methodological limitation, when comparing EMG fatigue indices on Earth versus in space. PMID:17466537

  4. Fluid shifts and muscle function in humans during acute simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Tipton, C. M.; Gollnick, P. D.; Mubarak, S. J.; Tucker, B. J.; Akeson, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The acute effects of simulated weightlessness on transcapillary fluid balance, tissue fluid shifts, muscle function, and triceps surface reflex time were studied in eight supine human subjects who were placed in a 5 degrees head-down tilt position for 8 hr. Results show a cephalic fluid shift from the legs as indicated by facial edema, nasal congestion, increased urine flow, decreased creatinine excretion, reduced calf girth, and decreased lower leg volume. The interstitial fluid pressure in the tibialis anterior muscle and subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg was found to fall significantly, while other transcapillary pressures (capillary and interstitial fluid colloid osmotic pressures) were relatively unchanged. The total water content of the soleus muscle was unchanged during the head-down tilt. After head-down tilt, isometric strength and isokinetic strength of the plantar flexors were unchanged, while the triceps surae reflex time associated with plantar flexion movement slowed slightly. These results demonstrate a dehydration effect of head-down tilt on muscle and subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg that may affect muscle function.

  5. An integrated muscle mechanic-fluid dynamic model of lamprey swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; Tytell, Eric; Fauci, Lisa

    2009-11-01

    In an effort towards a detailed understanding of the generation and control of vertebrate locomotion, including the role of the CPG and its interactions with reflexive feedback, muscle mechanics, and external fluid dynamics, we study a simple vertebrate, the lamprey. Lamprey body undulations are a result of a wave of neural activation that passes from head to tail, causing a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are mediated by passive structural forces. We present recent results from a model that fully couples a viscous, incompressible fluid with nonlinear muscle mechanics. We measure the dependence of the phase lag between activation wave and mechanical wave as a function of model parameters, such as body stiffness and muscle strength. Simulation results are compared to experiments utilizing both real and synthetic lamprey.

  6. MHD Convective Flow of Jeffrey Fluid Due to a Curved Stretching Surface with Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Maria; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at the flow of Jeffrey fluid due to a curved stretching sheet. Effect of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions is considered. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of applied magnetic field is considered. Convective boundary conditions model the heat transfer analysis. Transformation method reduces the governing nonlinear partial differential equations into the ordinary differential equations. Convergence of the obtained series solutions is explicitly discussed. Characteristics of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are analyzed by plotting graphs. Computations for pressure, skin friction coefficient and surface heat transfer rate are presented and examined. It is noted that fluid velocity and temperature through curvature parameter are enhanced. Increasing values of Biot number correspond to the enhancement in temperature and Nusselt number. PMID:27583457

  7. Vibrations of a circular cylinder submerged in a fluid with a non-homogeneous upper boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturova, I. V.

    2014-05-01

    Results of solving a linear problem on steady vibrations of a horizontal cylinder submerged in a fluid, whose upper boundary is partially closed by a solid lid, whereas the rest of the surface is free, are presented. Multipole and eigenfunction expansion methods are used. Reciprocity relations are derived. Added-mass and damping coefficients and the wave amplitudes on the free surface of the fluid are calculated.

  8. A Mathematical Model and MATLAB Code for Muscle-Fluid-Structure Simulations.

    PubMed

    Battista, Nicholas A; Baird, Austin J; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    This article provides models and code for numerically simulating muscle-fluid-structure interactions (FSIs). This work was presented as part of the symposium on Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning at the society-wide meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in 2015. Muscle mechanics and simple mathematical models to describe the forces generated by muscular contractions are introduced in most biomechanics and physiology courses. Often, however, the models are derived for simplifying cases such as isometric or isotonic contractions. In this article, we present a simple model of the force generated through active contraction of muscles. The muscles' forces are then used to drive the motion of flexible structures immersed in a viscous fluid. An example of an elastic band immersed in a fluid is first presented to illustrate a fully-coupled FSI in the absence of any external driving forces. In the second example, we present a valveless tube with model muscles that drive the contraction of the tube. We provide a brief overview of the numerical method used to generate these results. We also include as Supplementary Material a MATLAB code to generate these results. The code was written for flexibility so as to be easily modified to many other biological applications for educational purposes. PMID:26337187

  9. Turbulent Fluid Motion 5: Fourier Analysis, the Spectral Form of the Continuum Equations, and Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Background material on Fourier analysis and on the spectral form of the continuum equations, both averaged and unaveraged, are given. The equations are applied to a number of cases of homogeneous turbulence with and without mean gradients. Spectral transfer of turbulent activity between scales of motion is studied in some detail. The effects of mean shear, heat transfer, normal strain, and buoyancy are included in the analyses.

  10. A fully resolved fluid-structure-muscle-activation model for esophageal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Bhalla, Amneet P. S.; Griffith, Boyce E.; Johnson, Mark; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-11-01

    Esophageal transport is a mechanical and physiological process that transfers the ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach through a multi-layered esophageal tube. The process involves interactions between the bolus, esophageal wall composed of mucosal, circular muscle (CM) and longitudinal muscle (LM) layers, and neurally coordinated muscle activation including CM contraction and LM shortening. In this work, we present a 3D fully-resolved model of esophageal transport based on the immersed boundary method. The model describes the bolus as a Newtonian fluid, the esophageal wall as a multi-layered elastic tube represented by springs and beams, and the muscle activation as a traveling wave of sequential actuation/relaxation of muscle fibers, represented by springs with dynamic rest lengths. Results on intraluminal pressure profile and bolus shape will be shown, which are qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. Effects of activating CM contraction only, LM shortening only or both, for the bolus transport, are studied. A comparison among them can help to identify the role of each type of muscle activation. The support of grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 from NIH is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. General exact solution for homogeneous time-dependent self-gravitating perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Hojman, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    A procedure to obtain the general exact solution of Einstein equations for a self-gravitating spherically symmetric static perfect fluid obeying an arbitrary equation of state is applied to time-dependent Kantowski-Sachs line elements (with spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry). As in the static case, the solution is generated by an arbitrary function of the independent variable and its first derivative. To illustrate the results, the whole family of (plane-symmetric) solutions with a ``gamma-law'' equation of state is explicitly obtained in terms of simple known functions. It is also shown that, while in the static plane-symmetric line element, every metric is in one to one correspondence with a ``partner metric'' (both originated from the same generatrix function); in this case every generatrix function uniquely determines one metric.

  12. General exact solution for homogeneous time-dependent self-gravitating perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Hojman, Roberto

    1988-06-01

    A procedure to obtain the general exact solution of Einstein equations for a self-gravitating spherically symmetric static perfect fluid obeying an arbitrary equation of state, is applied to time dependent Kantowsky-Sachs line elements (with spherical, planar and hyperbolic symmetry). As in the static case, the solution is generated by an arbitrary function of the independent variable and its first derivative. To illustrate the results, the whole family of (plane-symmetric) solutions with a gamma-law equation of state is explicity obtained in terms of simple known functions. It is also shown that, while in the static plane-symmetric line elements, every metric is in one to one correspondence with a partner-metric (both originated from the same generatrix function), in this case every generatrix function univocally determines one metric.

  13. Power-law decay of the velocity autocorrelation function of a granular fluid in the homogeneous cooling state.

    PubMed

    Brey, J Javier; Ruiz-Montero, M J

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamic part of the velocity autocorrelation function of a granular fluid in the homogeneous cooling state has been calculated by using mode-coupling theory for a finite system with periodic boundary conditions. The existence of the shearing instability, leading to a divergent behavior of the velocity flow fluctuations, is taken into account. A time region in which the velocity autocorrelation function exhibits a power-law decay, when time is measured by the number of collisions per particle, has been been identified. Also the explicit form of the exponential asymptotic long time decay has been obtained. The theoretical prediction for the power-law decay is compared with molecular dynamics simulation results, and a good agreement is found, after taking into account finite size corrections. The effects of approaching the shearing instability are also explored. PMID:25679614

  14. Development of Haptic Display Actuated with Magnetorheological Fluid and Artificial Muscle (HAMA Device)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    To operate in Immersive Virtual Environment (IVE) with standard devices, beginners will feel difficulties to do it because they are not intuitive devices. Haptic sense is very important for intuitive operation. But existing haptic device is not suited to use in IVE for reasons of displayed sense and the size of the device itself. A device that is a portable one can only display Force-Feedback sense, and a device that can display tactile sense is impossible to be mounted on a hand. In this paper we proposed Haptic display Actuated with Magnetorheological fluid and Artificial muscle (HAMA device). It is a potable haptic device that can display Force-Feedback and tactile sense. The device is constructed of two small devices, a device for displaying Force-Feedback sense and a device for displaying tactile sence. They use Artificial Muscle and Magnetorheological fluid for an actuator. This time we developed index finger part for a trial and evaluate it.

  15. On the stability of discrete tripole, quadrupole, Thomson' vortex triangle and square in a two-layer/homogeneous rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakin, Leonid G.; Ostrovskaya, Irina V.; Sokolovskiy, Mikhail A.

    2016-05-01

    A two-layer quasigeostrophic model is considered in the f-plane approximation. The stability of a discrete axisymmetric vortex structure is analyzed for the case when the structure consists of a central vortex of arbitrary intensity Γ and two/three identical peripheral vortices. The identical vortices, each having a unit intensity, are uniformly distributed over a circle of radius R in a single layer. The central vortex lies either in the same or in another layer. The problem has three parameters ( R, Γ, α), where α is the difference between layer thicknesses. A limiting case of a homogeneous fluid is also considered. A limiting case of a homogeneous fluid is also considered. The theory of stability of steady-state motions of dynamic systems with a continuous symmetry group G is applied. The two definitions of stability used in the study are Routh stability and G-stability. The Routh stability is the stability of a one-parameter orbit of a steady-state rotation of a vortex multipole, and the G-stability is the stability of a three-parameter invariant set O G , formed by the orbits of a continuous family of steady-state rotations of a multipole. The problem of Routh stability is reduced to the problem of stability of a family of equilibria of a Hamiltonian system. The quadratic part of the Hamiltonian and the eigenvalues of the linearization matrix are studied analytically. The cases of zero total intensity of a tripole and a quadrupole are studied separately. Also, the Routh stability of a Thomson vortex triangle and square was proved at all possible values of problem parameters. The results of theoretical analysis are sustained by numerical calculations of vortex trajectories.

  16. Computational study of seismic waves in homogeneous dynamic-porosity media with thermal and fluid relaxation: Gauging Biot theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga-Goode, G.; JiméNez-HernáNdez, S.; PéRez-Flores, M. A.; Padilla-HernáNdez, R.

    2005-07-01

    The attenuation effects predicted by Hickey's poroelastic theory (Hpt) are quantified by means of seismic modeling in an unbounded, homogeneous, isotropic porous model fully saturated with water and with oil. The numerical results are compared to those predicted by Biot poroelastic theory (Bpt). As opposed to Bpt, Hpt accounts for thermomechanical coupling and viscous fluid relaxation and adequately models the transient fluctuations of porosity and mass densities as the wave compresses and dilates the porous medium during propagation. Despite all these theoretical improvements over Bpt, the numerical results show that both theories produce remarkably similar waveforms. Without considering thermal relaxation, Hpt produces less than 1% higher-amplitude attenuation and velocity dispersion than Bpt. The major contrasts correspond to the slow P wave. Thermomechanical coupling affects the fast P wave: seismic amplitudes are 1% smaller and some dispersion for the oil-permeated case can be observed. It produces no effects on the fast S or the slow P wave. Therefore these numerical experiments appear to substantiate what Biot assumed at the outset of his theoretical developments: that the effects of transient oscillations of porosity during wave propagation are negligible in terms of velocity dispersion and amplitude attenuation. Furthermore it is confirmed that in a homogeneous porous medium, the combined dissipation mechanisms mentioned are not adequate to explain the total amount of energy dissipation observed in the field or laboratory.

  17. Dynamic Structure Factor and Transport Coefficients of a Homogeneously Driven Granular Fluid in Steady State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmayr-Lee, Katharina; Zippelius, Annette; Aspelmeier, Timo

    2011-03-01

    We study the dynamic structure factor of a granular fluid of hard spheres, driven into a stationary nonequilibrium state by balancing the energy loss due to inelastic collisions with the energy input due to driving. The driving is chosen to conserve momentum, so that fluctuating hydrodynamics predicts the existence of sound modes. We present results of computer simulations which are based on an event driven algorithm. The dynamic structure factor F (q , ω) is determined for volume fractions 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 and coefficients of normal restitution 0.8 and 0.9. We observe sound waves, and compare our results for F (q , ω) with the predictions of generalized fluctuating hydrodynamics which takes into account that temperature fluctuations decay either diffusively or with a finite relaxation rate, depending on wave number and inelasticity. We determine the speed of sound and the transport coefficients and compare them to the results of kinetic theory. K.V.L. thanks the Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Goettingen, for financial support and hospitality.

  18. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-γ equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-γ approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  19. Photonic Crystal Enhancement of a Homogeneous Fluorescent Assay using Submicron Fluid Channels Fabricated by E-jet Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yafang; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement of a liquid-based homogenous fluorescence assay using the resonant electric fields from a photonic crystal (PC) surface. Because evanescent fields are confined to the liquid volume nearest to the photonic crystal, we developed a simple approach for integrating a PC fabricated on a silicon substrate within a fluid channel with submicron height, using electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing of a light-curable epoxy adhesive to define the fluid channel pattern. The PC is excited by a custom-designed compact instrument that illuminates the PC with collimated light that precisely matches the resonant coupling condition when the PC is covered with aqueous media. Using a molecular beacon nucleic acid fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) probe for a specific miRNA sequence, we demonstrate an 8x enhancement of the fluorescence emission signal, compared to performing the same assay without exciting resonance in the PC detecting a miRNA sequence at a concentration of 62nM from a liquid volume of only ~20 nl. The approach may be utilized for any liquid-based fluorescence assay for applications in point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, or pathogen detection. PMID:24376013

  20. Photonic crystal enhancement of a homogeneous fluorescent assay using submicron fluid channels fabricated by E-jet patterning.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafang; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement of a liquid-based homogenous fluorescence assay using the resonant electric fields from a photonic crystal (PC) surface. Because evanescent fields are confined to the liquid volume nearest to the photonic crystal, we developed a simple approach for integrating a PC fabricated on a silicon substrate within a fluid channel with submicron height, using electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing of a light-curable epoxy adhesive to define the fluid channel pattern. The PC is excited by a custom-designed compact instrument that illuminates the PC with collimated light that precisely matches the resonant coupling condition when the PC is covered with aqueous media. Using a molecular beacon nucleic acid fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) probe for a specific miRNA sequence, we demonstrate an 8× enhancement of the fluorescence emission signal, compared to performing the same assay without exciting resonance in the PC detecting a miRNA sequence at a concentration of 62 nM from a liquid volume of only ∼20 nL. The approach may be utilized for any liquid-based fluorescence assay for applications in point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, or pathogen detection. PMID:24376013

  1. Double porosity in fluid-saturated elastic media: deriving effective parameters by hierarchical homogenization of static problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohan, Eduard; Naili, Salah; Lemaire, Thibault

    2015-09-01

    We propose a model of complex poroelastic media with periodic or locally periodic structures observed at microscopic and mesoscopic scales. Using a two-level homogenization procedure, we derive a model coherent with the Biot continuum, describing effective properties of such a hierarchically structured poroelastic medium. The effective material coefficients can be computed using characteristic responses of the micro- and mesostructures which are solutions of local problems imposed in representative volume elements describing the poroelastic medium at the two levels of heterogeneity. In the paper, we discus various combinations of the interface between the micro- and mesoscopic porosities, influence of the fluid compressibility, or solid incompressibility. Gradient of porosity is accounted for when dealing with locally periodic structures. Derived formulae for computing the poroelastic material coefficients characterize not only the steady-state responses with static fluid, but are relevant also for quasistatic problems. The model is applicable in geology, or in tissue biomechanics, in particular for modeling canalicular-lacunar porosity of bone which can be characterized at several levels.

  2. Effect of denervation and reinnervation on oxidation of 6-(C-14) glucose by rat skeletal muscle homogenates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, D. C.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of denervation and reinnervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle on the oxidation of 6-(C-14) glucose to (C-14)O2 is investigated. Results show that the rate of (C-14)O2 production decreased dramatically following denervation and the decrease became significant 20 days after nerve section. The changes which occurred prior to day 20 apparently reflected the decline of muscle mass. The decreased (C-14)O2 production was found to be due to reduced capacity of the enzymatic system, while there was no change in the apparent affinity for glucose. Results of mixing experiments showed that the loss of oxidative capacity following denervation is not caused by the production of soluble inhibitors by degenerating muscle. Measurements of the (C-14)O2 revealed that oxidative metabolism recovered during reinnervation. The specific activity in reinnervated muscles displayed an 'overshoot' of approximately 50 percent, which returned to control levels by day 60. The time-course of the denervation-mediated change indicates that altered oxidative capacity is secondary to events that initiate dennervation changes in muscle, although diminished oxidative capacity may be of considerable metabolic significance in denervated muscle.

  3. Spectral Quasi-linearization Method for Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions on Nonlinear Convection Flow of Micropolar Fluid Saturated Porous Medium with Convective Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RamReddy, Chetteti; Pradeepa, Teegala

    2016-05-01

    Based on the nonlinear variation of density with temperature (NDT) in the buoyancy term, the mixed convection flow along a vertical plate of a micropolar fluid saturated porous medium is considered. In addition, the effect of homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction and convective boundary condition has been taken into account. Using lie scaling group transformations, the similarity representation is attained for the system of partial differential equations, prior to being solved by a spectral quasilinearization method. The results show that in the presence of aiding and opposing flow situations, both the species concentration and mass transfer rate decreases when the strength of homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction parameters are enhanced.

  4. Adaptive Force Regulation of Muscle Strengthening Rehabilitation Device With Magnetorheological Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, Jian Qiao; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    In rehabilitation from neuromuscular trauma or injury, strengthening exercises are often prescribed by physical therapists to recover as much function as possible. Strengthening equipment used in clinical settings range from low-cost devices, such as sandbag weights or elastic bands to large and expensive isotonic and isokinetic devices. The low-cost devices are incapable of measuring strength gains and apply resistance based on the lowest level of torque that is produced by a muscle group. Resistance that varies with joint angle can be achieved with isokinetic devices in which angular velocity is held constant and variable torque is generated when the patient attempts to move faster than the device but are ineffective if a patient cannot generate torque rapidly. In this paper, we report the development of a versatile rehabilitation device that can be used to strengthen different muscle groups based on the torque generating capability of the muscle that changes with joint angle. The device is low cost, is smaller than other commercially available machines, and can be programmed to apply resistance that is unique to a particular patient and that will optimize strengthening. The core of the device, a damper with smart magnetorheological fluids, provides passive exercise force. A digital adaptive control is capable of regulating exercise force precisely following the muscle strengthening profile prescribed by a physical therapist. The device could be programmed with artificial intelligence to dynamically adjust the target force profile to optimize rehabilitation effects. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and can be developed into a small, low-cost device that may be capable of providing optimal strengthening in the home. PMID:16562632

  5. Adaptive force regulation of muscle strengthening rehabilitation device with magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, Jian Qiao; Rudolph, Katherine

    2006-03-01

    In rehabilitation from neuromuscular trauma or injury, strengthening exercises are often prescribed by physical therapists to recover as much function as possible. Strengthening equipment used in clinical settings range from low-cost devices, such as sandbag weights or elastic bands to large and expensive isotonic and isokinetic devices. The low-cost devices are incapable of measuring strength gains and apply resistance based on the lowest level of torque that is produced by a muscle group. Resistance that varies with joint angle can be achieved with isokinetic devices in which angular velocity is held constant and variable torque is generated when the patient attempts to move faster than the device but are ineffective if a patient cannot generate torque rapidly. In this paper, we report the development of a versatile rehabilitation device that can be used to strengthen different muscle groups based on the torque generating capability of the muscle that changes with joint angle. The device is low cost, is smaller than other commercially available machines, and can be programmed to apply resistance that is unique to a particular patient and that will optimize strengthening. The core of the device, a damper with smart magnetorheological fluids, provides passive exercise force. A digital adaptive control is capable of regulating exercise force precisely following the muscle strengthening profile prescribed by a physical therapist. The device could be programmed with artificial intelligence to dynamically adjust the target force profile to optimize rehabilitation effects. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and can be developed into a small, low-cost device that may be capable of providing optimal strengthening in the home. PMID:16562632

  6. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  7. Improved Neurological Outcome by Intramuscular Injection of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in a Muscle Denervation Model

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hong-Lin; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Lu, Zong-Han; Chiang, Chien-Yi; Yang, Dar-Yu; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The skeletal muscle develops various degrees of atrophy and metabolic dysfunction following nerve injury. Neurotrophic factors are essential for muscle regeneration. Human amniotic fluid derived stem cells (AFS) have the potential to secrete various neurotrophic factors necessary for nerve regeneration. In the present study, we assess the outcome of neurological function by intramuscular injection of AFS in a muscle denervation and nerve anastomosis model. Materials and Methods Seventy two Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200–250 gm were enrolled in this study. Muscle denervation model was conducted by transverse resection of a sciatic nerve with the proximal end sutured into the gluteal muscle. The nerve anastomosis model was performed by transverse resection of the sciatic nerve followed by four stitches reconnection. These animals were allocated to three groups: control, electrical muscle stimulation, and AFS groups. Results NT-3 (Neurotrophin 3), BDNF (Brain derived neurotrophic factor), CNTF (Ciliary neurotrophic factor), and GDNF (Glia cell line derived neurotrophic factor) were highly expressed in AFS cells and supernatant of culture medium. Intra-muscular injection of AFS exerted significant expression of several neurotrophic factors over the distal end of nerve and denervated muscle. AFS caused high expression of Bcl-2 in denervated muscle with a reciprocal decrease of Bad and Bax. AFS preserved the muscle morphology with high expression of desmin and acetylcholine receptors. Up to two months, AFS produced significant improvement in electrophysiological study and neurological functions such as SFI (sciatic nerve function index) and Catwalk gait analysis. There was also significant preservation of the number of anterior horn cells and increased nerve myelination as well as muscle morphology. Conclusion Intramuscular injection of AFS can protect muscle apoptosis and likely does so through the secretion of various neurotrophic factors. This protection

  8. Parametric performance of circumferentially grooved heat pipes with homogeneous and graded-porosity slab wicks at cryogenic temperatures. [methane and ethane working fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groll, M.; Pittman, R. B.; Eninger, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed, potentially high-performance nonarterial wick was extensively tested. This slab wick has an axially varying porosity which can be tailored to match the local stress imposed on the wick. The purpose of the tests was to establish the usefulness of the graded-porosity slab wick at cryogenic temperatures between 110 and 260 K, with methane and ethane as working fluids. For comparison, a homogeneous (i.e., uniform porosity) slab wick was also tested. The tests included: maximum heat pipe performance as a function of fluid inventory, maximum performance as a function of operating temperature, maximum performance as a function of evaporator elevation, and influence of slab wick orientation on performance. The experimental data were compared with theoretical predictions obtained with the GRADE computer program.

  9. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  10. Is trabecular bone permeability governed by molecular ordering-induced fluid viscosity gain? Arguments from re-evaluation of experimental data in the framework of homogenization theory.

    PubMed

    Abdalrahman, T; Scheiner, S; Hellmich, C

    2015-01-21

    It is generally agreed on that trabecular bone permeability, a physiologically important quantity, is governed by the material׳s (vascular or intertrabecular) porosity as well as by the viscosity of the pore-filling fluids. Still, there is less agreement on how these two key factors govern bone permeability. In order to shed more light onto this somewhat open issue, we here develop a random homogenization scheme for upscaling Poiseuille flow in the vascular porosity, up to Darcy-type permeability of the overall porous medium "trabecular bone". The underlying representative volume element of the macroscopic bone material contains two types of phases: a spherical, impermeable extracellular bone matrix phase interacts with interpenetrating cylindrical pore channel phases that are oriented in all different space directions. This type of interaction is modeled by means of a self-consistent homogenization scheme. While the permeability of the bone matrix equals to zero, the permeability of the pore phase is found through expressing the classical Hagen-Poiseuille law for laminar flow in the format of a "micro-Darcy law". The upscaling scheme contains pore size and porosity as geometrical input variables; however, they can be related to each other, based on well-known relations between porosity and specific bone surface. As two key results, validated through comprehensive experimental data, it appears (i) that the famous Kozeny-Carman constant (which relates bone permeability to the cube of the porosity, the square of the specific surface, as well as to the bone fluid viscosity) needs to be replaced by an again porosity-dependent rational function, and (ii) that the overall bone permeability is strongly affected by the pore fluid viscosity, which, in case of polarized fluids, is strongly increased due to the presence of electrically charged pore walls. PMID:25452137

  11. The capillary filtration coefficient for evaluation of capillary fluid permeability in cat calf muscles.

    PubMed

    Kongstad, L; Grände, P O

    1998-10-01

    Measuring the capillary filtration coefficient (CFC) from the transvascular fluid filtration following a fixed increase in transcapillary hydrostatic pressure is a common method to estimate capillary hydraulic permeability (conductivity) in an organ. Constant flow pump perfusion with an artificial perfusate and a maximally dilated vascular bed are often used in CFC studies to avoid influence on CFC of variations in vascular tone, blood flow and perfusion pressure. The present study evaluates if capillary hydraulic conductivity can be estimated by the CFC method, when analyzed on a denervated cat skeletal muscle with quite well-preserved local vascular control and perfused with autologous blood. CFC was estimated by increasing venous pressure and by decreasing tissue pressure, and both during autoperfusion and pressure controlled pump perfusion. A constant filtration rate was achieved 3-4 min after the transcapillary pressure elevation, giving a CFC around 0.0090 mL min-1 mmHg-1 100 g. The CFC did not change with arterial pressure or with reduced vascular tone using the tissue pressure method, but decreased slightly with increased arterial pressure and reduced vascular tone using the venous pressure method. CFC variations with arterial pressure were larger during pump perfusion in which myogenic reactivity is depressed, indicating that influence of myogenic tone on CFC is small. We conclude that CFC can be used to evaluate capillary hydraulic conductivity, and also when arterial pressure, vascular tone and blood flow are altered within reasonable physiological limits during the experiment, and the tissue pressure method and autoperfusion is to be preferred. PMID:9805107

  12. Elastic deformations in a Hele-Shaw cell driven by local non-homogeneities of fluid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Shimon; Gat, Amir; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-11-01

    We consider a Hele-Shaw chamber with an elastic top plate, and study the effect of spatial variations in fluid properties on deformations of the plate. Specifically, we present analytical solutions for the pressure and depth-averaged flow field for axially-symmetric variations in slip velocity, viscosity, slip length, and channel height. We then focus on electroosmotic flow, which may be a practical method for obtaining gradients in slip velocity via non-uniform zeta-potential patterning of the surface. We derive an equation which relates elastic deformations of a Kirchhoff-Love plate to gradients in zeta potential, and obtain an analytical solution for the zeta potential distribution which gives rise to a local Gaussian deformation. Owing to the fact that any surface can be represented by superposition of Gaussians, we are thus able to determine the zeta potential necessary for creation of arbitrary deformations.

  13. The effects of prolonged spaceflight on the regional distribution of fluid, muscle and fat: Biostereometric results from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittle, M. W.; Herron, R. L.; Cuzzi, J. R.; Keys, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Biostereometric analysis of body form was performed several times preflight and postflight on the astronauts of all three skylab flights. The analysis was made by deriving the three-dimensional coordinates of numerous points on the body surface from stereoscopic pairs of photographs of the subject, using a stereoplotter. The volume of segments of the body, and of the body as a whole, was calculated by integration of cross sectional areas derived from the coordinate data. All nine astronauts demonstrated regional changes in volume distribution which could be related to changes in total body water, muscle mass, and fat deposits. The change in water resulted from a redistribution of fluid in response to zero gravity. Changes in muscle mass resulted from an alternation in patterns of musclar activity in the absence of gravity, and changes in fat resulted from discrepancies between the individual's caloric needs and his food consumption.

  14. Elastic recoil can either amplify or attenuate muscle-tendon power, depending on inertial vs. fluid dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher T; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2012-11-21

    Frog jumps exceed muscle power limits. To achieve this, a muscle may store elastic energy in tendon before it is released rapidly, producing 'power amplification' as tendon recoil assists the muscle to accelerate the load. Do the musculoskeletal modifications conferring power amplification help or hinder frog swimming? We used a Hill-type mathematical model of a muscle-tendon (MT) with contractile element (CE) and series elastic element (SEE) properties of frogs. We varied limb masses from 0.3 to 30 g, foot-fin areas from 0.005 to 50 cm(2) and effective mechanical advantage (EMA=in-lever/out-lever) from 0.025 to 0.1. 'Optimal' conditions produced power amplification of ~19% greater than the CE limit. Yet, other conditions caused ~80% reduction of MT power (power attenuation) due to SEE recoil absorbing power from (rather than adding to) the CE. The tendency for elastic recoil to cause power amplification vs. attenuation was load dependent: low fluid drag loads, high limb mass and EMA=0.1 caused power amplification whereas high drag, low mass and low EMA (=0.025) caused attenuation. Power amplification emerged when: (1) CE shortening velocity is 1/3V(max), (2) elastic energy storage is neither too high nor too low, and (3). peak inertial-drag force ratio ≥ ~1.5. Excessive elastic energy storage delayed the timing of recoil, causing power attenuation. Thus our model predicts that for fluid loads, the benefit from a compliant tendon is modest, and when the system is 'poorly tuned' (i.e., inappropriate EMA), MT power attenuation can be severe. PMID:22898554

  15. Homogeneity Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Tracy; Fan, Jianqing; Wu, Yichao

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the homogeneity of coefficients in high-dimensional regression, which extends the sparsity concept and is more general and suitable for many applications. Homogeneity arises when regression coefficients corresponding to neighboring geographical regions or a similar cluster of covariates are expected to be approximately the same. Sparsity corresponds to a special case of homogeneity with a large cluster of known atom zero. In this article, we propose a new method called clustering algorithm in regression via data-driven segmentation (CARDS) to explore homogeneity. New mathematics are provided on the gain that can be achieved by exploring homogeneity. Statistical properties of two versions of CARDS are analyzed. In particular, the asymptotic normality of our proposed CARDS estimator is established, which reveals better estimation accuracy for homogeneous parameters than that without homogeneity exploration. When our methods are combined with sparsity exploration, further efficiency can be achieved beyond the exploration of sparsity alone. This provides additional insights into the power of exploring low-dimensional structures in high-dimensional regression: homogeneity and sparsity. Our results also shed lights on the properties of the fussed Lasso. The newly developed method is further illustrated by simulation studies and applications to real data. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:26085701

  16. Pearson’s correlations between moisture content, drip loss, expressible fluid and salt-induced water gain of broiler pectoralis major muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moisture content, drip loss, expressible fluid, and % salt-induced water gain are widely used to estimate water states and water-holding capacity of raw meat. However, the relationships between these four measurements of broiler pectoralis (p.) major muscle describe are not well described. The objec...

  17. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  18. Muscle cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... The most common cause of muscle cramps during sports activity is not getting enough fluids. Often, drinking ... alone does not always help. Salt tablets or sports drinks, which also replenish lost minerals, can be ...

  19. Influence of successive badminton matches on muscle strength, power, and body-fluid balance in elite players.

    PubMed

    Abian-Vicen, Javier; Castanedo, Adrián; Abian, Pablo; Gonzalez-Millan, Cristina; Salinero, Juan José; Del Coso, Juan

    2014-07-01

    The aim was to analyze the influence of competitive round on muscle strength, body-fluid balance, and renal function in elite badminton players during a real competition. Body mass, jump height during a countermovement jump, handgrip force, and urine samples were obtained from 13 elite badminton players (6 men and 7 women) before and after the 2nd-round and quarterfinal matches of the national Spanish badminton championship. Sweat rate was determined by using prematch-to-postmatch body-mass change and by weighing individually labeled fluid bottles. Sweat rates were 1.04 ± 0.62 and 0.98 ± 0.43 L/h, while rehydration rate was 0.69 ± 0.26 and 0.91 ± 0.52 L/h for the 2nd round and quarterfinals, respectively. Thus, dehydration was 0.47% ± 1.03% after the 2nd round and 0.23% ± 0.43% after the quarterfinals. There were no differences in prematch-to-postmatch jump height, but jump height was reduced from 37.51 ± 8.83 cm after the 2nd-round game to 34.82 ± 7.37 cm after the quarterfinals (P < .05). No significant differences were found in handgrip force when comparing prepost matches or rounds, although there were significant differences between dominant and nondominant hands (P < .05). The succession of rounds caused the appearance of proteinuria, hematuria, glycosuria, and higher nitrite and ketone concentrations in urine. Rehydration patterns during a real badminton competition were effective to prevent dehydration. A badminton match did not affect jump height or handgrip force, but jump height was progressively reduced by the competitive round. Badminton players' renal responses reflected diminished renal flux due to the high-intensity nature of this racket sport. PMID:24235773

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Papillary Muscle Forces Using a Comprehensive Mitral Valve Model with 3D Chordal Structure.

    PubMed

    Toma, Milan; Jensen, Morten Ø; Einstein, Daniel R; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Cochran, Richard P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models of native heart valves are being used to study valve biomechanics to aid design and development of repair procedures and replacement devices. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems. Such simulations are useful for predicting the mechanical and hemodynamic loading on implanted valve devices. A current challenge for improving the accuracy of these predictions is choosing and implementing modeling boundary conditions. In order to address this challenge, we are utilizing an advanced in vitro system to validate FSI conditions for the mitral valve system. Explanted ovine mitral valves were mounted in an in vitro setup, and structural data for the mitral valve was acquired with [Formula: see text]CT. Experimental data from the in vitro ovine mitral valve system were used to validate the computational model. As the valve closes, the hemodynamic data, high speed leaflet dynamics, and force vectors from the in vitro system were compared to the results of the FSI simulation computational model. The total force of 2.6 N per papillary muscle is matched by the computational model. In vitro and in vivo force measurements enable validating and adjusting material parameters to improve the accuracy of computational models. The simulations can then be used to answer questions that are otherwise not possible to investigate experimentally. This work is important to maximize the validity of computational models of not just the mitral valve, but any biomechanical aspect using computational simulation in designing medical devices. PMID:26183963

  1. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  2. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  3. Combined analyses of creatine kinase MB, cardiac troponin I and myoglobin in pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids to investigate myocardial and skeletal muscle injury in medicolegal autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Zhu, Bao-Li; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-09-01

    Creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and myoglobin (Mb) are biochemical markers of myocardial injury; however, Mb is more abundant in skeletal muscles. The present study involved analysis of these markers in pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids (PCF and CSF) from serial medicolegal autopsy cases (n=295, within 48h) to examine their efficacy in determining the cause of death. Although these markers showed a slight postmortem time-dependent elevation, except for CK-MB in CSF, the distribution depended on the cause of death. Mb levels in PCF and CSF were higher in fatal hyperthermia (heat stroke) and methamphetamine abuse, and CK-MB in both fluids was also higher in the latter. In psychotropic drug intoxication, CK-MB, cTnI and Mb were higher in PCF, but only cTnI was elevated in CSF. In electrocution and cerebrovascular disease, each marker was higher in PCF and also relatively high in CSF. PCF cTnI level was higher in acute pulmonary embolism without significant elevation of any other markers, whereas CSF CK-MB was higher in acute blunt brain injury death and methamphetamine abuse. In most cases of delayed brain injury death, hypothermia (cold exposure) and pneumonia, these markers were low or intermediate in both PCF and CSF; however, sudden cardiac death, asphyxiation and fire fatality cases showed few characteristic findings. These observations suggest that combined analyses of these markers in postmortem PCF and CSF, in addition to blood samples, are helpful for evaluating the severity of myocardial and/or skeletal muscle damage in death processes, in particular for investigating deaths due to hyperthermia, hypothermia, electrocution and intoxication. PMID:21683643

  4. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  5. Mechanical homogenization increases bacterial homogeneity in sputum.

    PubMed

    Stokell, Joshua R; Khan, Ammad; Steck, Todd R

    2014-07-01

    Sputum obtained from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is highly viscous and often heterogeneous in bacterial distribution. Adding dithiothreitol (DTT) is the standard method for liquefaction prior to processing sputum for molecular detection assays. To determine if DTT treatment homogenizes the bacterial distribution within sputum, we measured the difference in mean total bacterial abundance and abundance of Burkholderia multivorans between aliquots of DTT-treated sputum samples with and without a mechanical homogenization (MH) step using a high-speed dispersing element. Additionally, we measured the effect of MH on bacterial abundance. We found a significant difference between the mean bacterial abundances in aliquots that were subjected to only DTT treatment and those of the aliquots which included an MH step (all bacteria, P = 0.04; B. multivorans, P = 0.05). There was no significant effect of MH on bacterial abundance in sputum. Although our results are from a single CF patient, they indicate that mechanical homogenization increases the homogeneity of bacteria in sputum. PMID:24759710

  6. Is the Universe homogeneous?

    PubMed

    Maartens, Roy

    2011-12-28

    The standard model of cosmology is based on the existence of homogeneous surfaces as the background arena for structure formation. Homogeneity underpins both general relativistic and modified gravity models and is central to the way in which we interpret observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the galaxy distribution. However, homogeneity cannot be directly observed in the galaxy distribution or CMB, even with perfect observations, since we observe on the past light cone and not on spatial surfaces. We can directly observe and test for isotropy, but to link this to homogeneity we need to assume the Copernican principle (CP). First, we discuss the link between isotropic observations on the past light cone and isotropic space-time geometry: what observations do we need to be isotropic in order to deduce space-time isotropy? Second, we discuss what we can say with the Copernican assumption. The most powerful result is based on the CMB: the vanishing of the dipole, quadrupole and octupole of the CMB is sufficient to impose homogeneity. Real observations lead to near-isotropy on large scales--does this lead to near-homogeneity? There are important partial results, and we discuss why this remains a difficult open question. Thus, we are currently unable to prove homogeneity of the Universe on large scales, even with the CP. However, we can use observations of the cosmic microwave background, galaxies and clusters to test homogeneity itself. PMID:22084298

  7. Broken Ergodicity in Ideal, Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John; Fu, Terry; Nguyen, Phu; Shum, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the statistical mechanics of numerical models of ideal homogeneous, incompressible turbulence and their relevance for dissipative fluids and magnetofluids. These numerical models are based on Fourier series and the relevant statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. However, numerical simulations clearly show that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We explain this phenomena in terms of broken ergodicity', which is defined to occur when dynamical behavior does not match ensemble predictions on very long time-scales. We review the theoretical basis of broken ergodicity, apply it to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence, and show new results from simulations using GPU (graphical processing unit) computers.

  8. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy. Disuse atrophy occurs from a lack of physical activity. In most people, muscle atrophy is caused by not using the ...

  9. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  10. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  11. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  12. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cleans the skin around the insertion site. Numbing medicine (anesthetic) is injected into the skin. A needle is placed through the skin and muscles of the chest wall into the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you ...

  13. Nonstationary homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of homogeneous condensation is reviewed and equations describing this process are presented. Numerical computer solutions to transient problems in nucleation (relaxation to steady state) are presented and compared to a prior computation.

  14. Homogeneous vortex model for liquid slosh in spinning spherical tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of forced fluid sloshing in a partially filled spinning spherical tank is solved numerically using the finite element method. The governing equations include Coriolis acceleration, empirical fluid damping and spatially homogeneous vorticity first introduced by Pfeiffer. An exponential instability similar to flutter is detected in the present simulation for fill ratios below 50 percent. This instability appears in the model as a result of the homogeneous vortex assumption since the free slosh equations are neutrally stable in the Liapunov sense.

  15. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  16. New exact perfect fluid solutions of Einstein's equations. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggla, Claes; Rosquist, Kjell

    1990-12-01

    A family of new spatially homogeneous Bianchi type VIh perfect fluid solutions of the Einstein equations is presented. The fluid flow is orthogonal to the spatially homogeneous hypersurfaces, and the pressure is proportional to the energy density.

  17. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  18. Homogeneity and Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tignanelli, H. L.; Vazquez, R. A.; Mostaccio, C.; Gordillo, S.; Plastino, A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Presentamos una metodologia de analisis de la homogeneidad a partir de la Teoria de la Informaci6n, aplicable a muestras de datos observacionales. ABSTRACT:Standard concepts that underlie Information Theory are employed in order design a methodology that enables one to analyze the homogeneity of a given data sample. Key : DATA ANALYSIS

  19. CUDA Simulation of Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John V.; Shum, Victor; Fu, Terry

    2011-01-01

    We discuss very fast Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) simulations of ideal homogeneous incompressible turbulence based on Fourier models. These models have associated statistical theories that predict that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. Prior numerical simulations have shown that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We review the theoretical basis of this "broken ergodicity" as applied to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence. Our new simulations examine the phenomenon of broken ergodicity through very long time and large grid size runs performed on a state-of-the-art CUDA platform. Results comparing various CUDA hardware configurations and grid sizes are discussed. NS and MHD results are compared.

  20. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  1. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs of a muscle disorder, tests such as an electromyogram , ...

  2. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  3. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  4. Fluid inclusion geothermometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, C.G., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions trapped within crystals either during growth or at a later time provide many clues to the histories of rocks and ores. Estimates of fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature and density can be obtained using a petrographic microscope with thin sections, and they can be refined using heating and freezing stages. Fluid inclusion studies, used in conjunction with paragenetic studies, can provide direct data on the time and space variations of parameters such as temperature, pressure, density, and composition of fluids in geologic environments. Changes in these parameters directly affect the fugacity, composition, and pH of fluids, thus directly influencing localization of ore metals. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  5. Strictly homogeneous laterally complete modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilin, V. I.; Karimov, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Let A be a laterally complete commutative regular algebra and X be a laterally complete A-module. In this paper we introduce a notion of homogeneous and strictly homogeneous A-modules. It is proved that any homogeneous A-module is strictly homogeneous A-module, if the Boolean algebra of all idempotents in A is multi-σ-finite.

  6. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous eddies

    SciTech Connect

    Pavia, E.G.

    1994-12-31

    This work deals with mesoscale warm oceanic eddies; i.e., self-contained bodies of water which transport heat, among other things, for several months and for several hundreds of kilometers. This heat transport is believed to play an important role in the atmospheric and oceanic conditions of the region where it is being transported. Here the author examines the difference in evolution between eddies modeled as blobs of homogeneous water and eddies in which density varies in the horizontal. Preliminary results suggest that instability is enhanced by inhomogeneities, which would imply that traditional modeling studies, based on homogeneous vortices have underestimated the rate of heat-release from oceanic eddies to the surroundings. The approach is modeling in the simplest form; i.e., one single active layer. Although previous studies have shown the drastic effect on stability brought by two or more dynamically-relevant homogeneous layers, the author believes the single-layer eddy-model has not been investigated thoroughly.

  7. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  8. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  9. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOEpatents

    Malmros, Mark K.; Gulbinski, III, Julian

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods.

  10. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

    1959-02-17

    Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

  11. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2002-01-01

    Plasmas, such as those found in the space environment or in plasma confinement devices, are often modeled as electrically conducting fluids. When fluids and plasmas are energetically stirred, regions of highly nonlinear, chaotic behavior known as turbulence arise. Understanding the fundamental nature of turbulence is a long-standing theoretical challenge. The present work describes a statistical theory concerning a certain class of nonlinear, finite dimensional, dynamical models of turbulence. These models arise when the partial differential equations describing incompressible, ideal (i.e., nondissipative) homogeneous fluid and magnetofluid (i.e., plasma) turbulence are Fourier transformed into a very large set of ordinary differential equations. These equations define a divergenceless flow in a high-dimensional phase space, which allows for the existence of a Liouville theorem, guaranteeing a distribution function based on constants of the motion (integral invariants). The novelty of these particular dynamical systems is that there are integral invariants other than the energy, and that some of these invariants behave like pseudoscalars under two of the discrete symmetry transformations of physics, parity, and charge conjugation. In this work the 'rugged invariants' of ideal homogeneous turbulence are shown to be the only significant scalar and pseudoscalar invariants. The discovery that pseudoscalar invariants cause symmetries of the original equations to be dynamically broken and induce a nonergodic structure on the associated phase space is the primary result presented here. Applicability of this result to dissipative turbulence is also discussed.

  12. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOEpatents

    Malmros, M.K.; Gulbinski, J. III.

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing the analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods. 12 figs.

  13. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... that affect the muscles (such as trichinosis or toxoplasmosis ) Muscle disorders such as muscular dystrophy or congenital ... nodosa Polymyalgia rheumatica Polymyositis - adult Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Toxoplasmosis Trichinosis Update Date 9/8/2014 Updated by: ...

  14. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. Causes of muscle disorders include Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy Some ... muscles Infections Certain medicines Sometimes the cause is not ...

  15. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  16. Local structures of homogeneous Hall MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2011-12-01

    Local structures of decaying homogeneous and isotropic Hall MHD turbulence are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. Regions of strong vorticity and strong current density in Hall MHD turbulence are compared to those of single-fluid MHD turbulence. An analysis by the use of a low-pass filter reveals that the introduction of the Hall term can modify not only small-scale structures of the current density but also structures of the vorticity field, especially at the scales smaller than the ion skin depth.

  17. Fluid dynamics of heart development.

    PubMed

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Miller, Laura A

    2011-09-01

    The morphology, muscle mechanics, fluid dynamics, conduction properties, and molecular biology of the developing embryonic heart have received much attention in recent years due to the importance of both fluid and elastic forces in shaping the heart as well as the striking relationship between the heart's evolution and development. Although few studies have directly addressed the connection between fluid dynamics and heart development, a number of studies suggest that fluids may play a key role in morphogenic signaling. For example, fluid shear stress may trigger biochemical cascades within the endothelial cells of the developing heart that regulate chamber and valve morphogenesis. Myocardial activity generates forces on the intracardiac blood, creating pressure gradients across the cardiac wall. These pressures may also serve as epigenetic signals. In this article, the fluid dynamics of the early stages of heart development is reviewed. The relevant work in cardiac morphology, muscle mechanics, regulatory networks, and electrophysiology is also reviewed in the context of intracardial fluid dynamics. PMID:21327946

  18. Homogeneous spaces of Dirac groupoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jotz Lean, Madeleine

    2016-06-01

    A Poisson structure on a homogeneous space of a Poisson groupoid is homogeneous if the action of the Lie groupoid on the homogeneous space is compatible with the Poisson structures. According to a result of Liu, Weinstein and Xu, Poisson homogeneous spaces of a Poisson groupoid are in correspondence with suitable Dirac structures in the Courant algebroid defined by the Lie bialgebroid of the Poisson groupoid. We show that this correspondence result fits into a more natural context: the one of Dirac groupoids, which are objects generalizing Poisson groupoids and multiplicative closed 2-forms on groupoids.

  19. A new and rapid method for the determination of nicarbazin residues in poultry feed, eggs and muscle tissue using supercritical fluid extraction and high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Matabudul, D K; Crosby, N T; Sumar, S

    1999-04-01

    A simple and rapid method, using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with off-line high-performance liquid chromatography for the isolation and determination of nicarbazin, a popular broad-spectrum coccidiostatic drug used principally in poultry, is described. Results show good repeatability with a minimum quantification level of 0.4 microgram g-1 and mean 'spiked' recoveries of 98%, 100% and 99% using poultry feeds (n = 18), eggs (n = 28) and chicken tissue (n = 20), respectively. SFE using carbon dioxide is proposed as an alternative isolation method to the current Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) procedure which involves the use of large volumes of a harmful solvent (dimethylformamide) and requires a long tedious separation and clean-up regime (6 h) prior to its determination. PMID:10605879

  20. Muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy M; Layzer, Robert B

    2005-10-01

    Muscle cramps are a common problem characterized by a sudden, painful, involuntary contraction of muscle. These true cramps, which originate from peripheral nerves, may be distinguished from other muscle pain or spasm. Medical history, physical examination, and a limited laboratory screen help to determine the various causes of muscle cramps. Despite the "benign" nature of cramps, many patients find the symptom very uncomfortable. Treatment options are guided both by experience and by a limited number of therapeutic trials. Quinine sulfate is an effective medication, but the side-effect profile is worrisome, and other membrane-stabilizing drugs are probably just as effective. Patients will benefit from further studies to better define the pathophysiology of muscle cramps and to find more effective medications with fewer side-effects. PMID:15902691

  1. Effect of heat and homogenization on in vitro digestion of milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Central to commercial fluid milk processing is the use of high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurization to ensure the safety and quality of milk, and homogenization to prevent creaming of fat-containing milk. UHT processed homogenized milk is also available commercially and is typically used to...

  2. Analysis of stability of a homogeneous state of anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V. Yu. Chernova, T. G. Stepanov, S. E.

    2015-04-15

    Small-amplitude waves in collisionless magnetized plasma are considered in the framework of one-fluid anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics with allowance for the anisotropy of the pressure and thermal flux. Stability of a homogeneous plasma state is analyzed using an eighth-order dispersion relation. Restrictions on the parameters of the homogeneous state at which the dispersion relation has no complex roots at any value of the angle between the wave vector and the unperturbed magnetic field are obtained. The applied method also makes it possible to determine the types of unstable waves.

  3. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... be done include: Complete blood count (CBC) Other blood tests to look at muscle enzymes (creatine kinase) and possibly a test for Lyme disease or a connective tissue disorder Physical therapy may be helpful.

  4. [Cellular homogeneity in diverse portions of the diaphragm].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fuentes, M A; Gea, J; Mariñán, M; Gáldiz, J B; Gallego, F; Broquetas, J M

    1998-02-01

    The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle. It is composed of two parts, the costal and crural, with both anatomical and functional differences. The general morphometric characteristics of the diaphragm have been described in various species but homogeneity throughout the muscle has not been adequately studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fiber phenotype of various parts of the diaphragm. The entire diaphragm muscles of five New Zealand rabbits were removed and each was divided into quarters. The specimens were processed for morphometry (hematoxyllineosin stains, NADH-TR and ATPase at pH levels of 4.2, 4.6 and 9.4). For each portion we measured percent and size of fibers, expressing the latter as minimum diameter (Dm), measured area (Ar) and calculated area (Ac). Left and right diaphragm hemispheres (20 portions examined) were similar for fiber percentages and sizes. For left and right halves, respectively 50 +/- 2 and 51 +/- 4% of fibers were type I; type I Dm measurements were 38 +/- 5 and 41 +/- 4 microns; type I Ar values were 1798 +/- 481 and 2030 +/- 390 micron 2; type I Ac values were 1181 +/- 360 and 1321 +/- 382 micron 2; type II Dm values were 46 +/- 4 and 46 +/- 5 microns; type II Ar values were 2466 +/- 388 micron 2 and 2539 +/- 456 micron 2; type II Ac data were 1642 +/- 255 and 1655 +/- 382 micron 2. We likewise found no differences between costal and crural portions of the muscle (n = 20). For costal and crural portions, respectively, 50 +/- 3 and 50 +/- 2% of fibers were type I; type I Dm sizes were 39 +/- 5 and 40 +/- 4 microns; type I Ar measurements were 1859 +/- 521 and 1964 +/- 365 micron 2; type I Ac figures were 1231 +/- 317 and 1266 +/- 288 micron 2; type II Dm were 47 +/- 4 and 44 +/- 3 microns; type II Ar were 2563 +/- 481 and 2430 +/- 331 micron 2; type II Ac were 1729 +/- 373 and 1557 +/- 212 micron 2. Type II fibers, however, were somewhat larger than type I fibers in all portions (p = 0.001). New Zealand rabbit

  5. Strongly Interacting Homogeneous Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Yan, Zhenjie; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    We present a homogeneous box potential for strongly interacting Fermi gases. The local density approximation (LDA) allows measurements on traditional inhomogeneous traps to observe a continuous distribution of Fermi gases in a single shot, but also suffer from a broadened response due to line-of-sight averaging over varying densities. We trap ultracold Fermionic (6 Li) in an optical homogeneous potential and characterize its flatness through in-situ tomography. A hybrid approach combining a cylindrical optical potential with a harmonic magnetic trap allows us to exploit the LDA and measure local RF spectra without requiring significant image reconstruction. We extract various quantities from the RF spectra such as the Tan's contact, and discuss further measurements of homogeneous Fermi systems under spin imbalance and finite temperature.

  6. Homogenization models for thin rigid structured surfaces and films.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Jean-Jacques; Maurel, Agnès

    2016-07-01

    A homogenization method for thin microstructured surfaces and films is presented. In both cases, sound hard materials are considered, associated with Neumann boundary conditions and the wave equation in the time domain is examined. For a structured surface, a boundary condition is obtained on an equivalent flat wall, which links the acoustic velocity to its normal and tangential derivatives (of the Myers type). For a structured film, jump conditions are obtained for the acoustic pressure and the normal velocity across an equivalent interface (of the Ventcels type). This interface homogenization is based on a matched asymptotic expansion technique, and differs slightly from the classical homogenization, which is known to fail for small structuration thicknesses. In order to get insight into what causes this failure, a two-step homogenization is proposed, mixing classical homogenization and matched asymptotic expansion. Results of the two homogenizations are analyzed in light of the associated elementary problems, which correspond to problems of fluid mechanics, namely, potential flows around rigid obstacles. PMID:27475151

  7. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-07-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power - this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical.

  8. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power – this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical. PMID:25082341

  9. Homogenizing Developmental Studies and ESL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Margaret E.

    A discussion of pragmatic issues in both developmental studies (DS) and English-as-a-second-language (ESL) instruction at the college level argues that because the two fields have common problems, challenges, and objectives, they have become homogenized as one in many institutions. Because full-time college faculty avoid teaching developmental…

  10. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction effects in peristalsis through curved geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaadi, Fuad; Alotaibi, Naif D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper looks at the influence of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions on the peristaltic transport of non-Newtonian fluid in a curved channel with wall properties. Constitutive relations for thermodynamic third grade material are utilized in the problem development. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of radial applied magnetic field is considered. The governing flow equations are developed in the presence of viscous heating. Mathematical computations are simplified employing long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations. The solutions for velocity, temperature, concentration and heat transfer coefficient are obtained and examined. The features of sundry parameters are analyzed by plotting graphs.

  11. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction effects in peristalsis through curved geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum Alsaadi, Fuad; Alotaibi, Naif D.

    2015-06-15

    This paper looks at the influence of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions on the peristaltic transport of non-Newtonian fluid in a curved channel with wall properties. Constitutive relations for thermodynamic third grade material are utilized in the problem development. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of radial applied magnetic field is considered. The governing flow equations are developed in the presence of viscous heating. Mathematical computations are simplified employing long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations. The solutions for velocity, temperature, concentration and heat transfer coefficient are obtained and examined. The features of sundry parameters are analyzed by plotting graphs.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:15911019

  13. Microfluidic converging/diverging channels optimised for homogeneous extensional deformation

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, K.; Oliveira, M. S. N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we optimise microfluidic converging/diverging geometries in order to produce constant strain-rates along the centreline of the flow, for performing studies under homogeneous extension. The design is examined for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows where the effects of aspect ratio and dimensionless contraction length are investigated. Initially, pressure driven flows of Newtonian fluids under creeping flow conditions are considered, which is a reasonable approximation in microfluidics, and the limits of the applicability of the design in terms of Reynolds numbers are investigated. The optimised geometry is then used for studying the flow of viscoelastic fluids and the practical limitations in terms of Weissenberg number are reported. Furthermore, the optimisation strategy is also applied for electro-osmotic driven flows, where the development of a plug-like velocity profile allows for a wider region of homogeneous extensional deformation in the flow field. PMID:27478523

  14. Microfluidic converging/diverging channels optimised for homogeneous extensional deformation.

    PubMed

    Zografos, K; Pimenta, F; Alves, M A; Oliveira, M S N

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we optimise microfluidic converging/diverging geometries in order to produce constant strain-rates along the centreline of the flow, for performing studies under homogeneous extension. The design is examined for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows where the effects of aspect ratio and dimensionless contraction length are investigated. Initially, pressure driven flows of Newtonian fluids under creeping flow conditions are considered, which is a reasonable approximation in microfluidics, and the limits of the applicability of the design in terms of Reynolds numbers are investigated. The optimised geometry is then used for studying the flow of viscoelastic fluids and the practical limitations in terms of Weissenberg number are reported. Furthermore, the optimisation strategy is also applied for electro-osmotic driven flows, where the development of a plug-like velocity profile allows for a wider region of homogeneous extensional deformation in the flow field. PMID:27478523

  15. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds the unborn baby (fetus) during pregnancy. It is ... in the womb, the baby floats in the amniotic fluid. The amount of amniotic fluid is greatest at ...

  16. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in peristaltic flow with convective conditions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum; Yasmin, Humaira; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in peristaltic transport of Carreau fluid in a channel with wall properties. Mathematical modelling and analysis have been carried out in the presence of Hall current. The channel walls satisfy the more realistic convective conditions. The governing partial differential equations along with long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations are solved. The results of temperature and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed for various parameters of interest. PMID:25460608

  17. Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions in Peristaltic Flow with Convective Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum; Yasmin, Humaira; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in peristaltic transport of Carreau fluid in a channel with wall properties. Mathematical modelling and analysis have been carried out in the presence of Hall current. The channel walls satisfy the more realistic convective conditions. The governing partial differential equations along with long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations are solved. The results of temperature and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed for various parameters of interest. PMID:25460608

  18. A Rapid Fluorescence Assay for Danofloxacin in Beef Muscle. Effect of Muscle Type on Limit of Quantitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, rapid fluorescence screening assay was applied to the analysis of beef muscle for danofloxacin at the U.S. tolerance level of 200 ng/g. Muscle samples were homogenized in acetic acid/acetonitrile, the resultant mixture centrifuged, and fluorescence of the supernatants was then measured. ...

  19. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  20. Homogeneous Pt-bimetallic Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao; Chi, Miaofang; More, Karren Leslie; Markovic, Nenad; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2011-01-01

    Alloying has shown enormous potential for tailoring the atomic and electronic structures, and improving the performance of catalytic materials. Systematic studies of alloy catalysts are, however, often compromised by inhomogeneous distribution of alloying components. Here we introduce a general approach for the synthesis of monodispersed and highly homogeneous Pt-bimetallic alloy nanocatalysts. Pt{sub 3}M (where M = Fe, Ni, or Co) nanoparticles were prepared by an organic solvothermal method and then supported on high surface area carbon. These catalysts attained a homogeneous distribution of elements, as demonstrated by atomic-scale elemental analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy. They also exhibited high catalytic activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), with improvement factors of 2-3 versus conventional Pt/carbon catalysts. The measured ORR catalytic activities for Pt{sub 3}M nanocatalysts validated the volcano curve established on extended surfaces, with Pt{sub 3}Co being the most active alloy.

  1. Homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for netilmicin.

    PubMed Central

    Wenk, M; Hemmann, R; Follath, F

    1982-01-01

    A newly developed homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for the determination of netilmicin in serum was evaluated and compared with a radioenzymatic assay. A total of 102 serum samples from patients treated with netilmicin were measured by both methods. This comparison showed an excellent correlation (r = 0.993). The enzyme immunoassay has proved to be precise, accurate, and specific. Because of its rapidity and the ease of performance, this method is a useful alternative to current assays for monitoring serum netilmicin concentrations. PMID:6760807

  2. Cytology exam of pleural fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin on your back is cleaned. Numbing medicine (local anesthetic) is injected in this area. The doctor inserts a needle through the skin and muscles of the chest wall into the pleural space. Fluid is collected. The needle is removed. A ...

  3. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  4. Capillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-05-19

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This "hyperbolic" force-velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136-195]. Hill's heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973-976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971-973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255-318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928-935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill's equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  5. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  6. Heterogeneous nucleation or homogeneous nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.

    2000-06-01

    The generic heterogeneous effect of foreign particles on three dimensional nucleation was examined both theoretically and experimentally. It shows that the nucleation observed under normal conditions includes a sequence of progressive heterogeneous processes, characterized by different interfacial correlation function f(m,x)s. At low supersaturations, nucleation will be controlled by the process with a small interfacial correlation function f(m,x), which results from a strong interaction and good structural match between the foreign bodies and the crystallizing phase. At high supersaturations, nucleation on foreign particles having a weak interaction and poor structural match with the crystallizing phase (f(m,x)→1) will govern the kinetics. This frequently leads to the false identification of homogeneous nucleation. Genuine homogeneous nucleation, which is the up-limit of heterogeneous nucleation, may not be easily achievable under gravity. In order to check these results, the prediction is confronted with nucleation experiments of some organic and inorganic crystals. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory.

  7. Non-homogeneous flow profiles in sheared bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Cheng, Xiang

    Bacterial suspensions under shear exhibit interesting rheological behaviors including the remarkable ``superfluidic'' state with vanishing viscosity at low shear rates. Theoretical studies have shown that such ``superfluidic'' state is linked with non-homogeneous shear flows, which are induced by coupling between nematic order of active fluids and hydrodynamics of shear flows. However, although bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been explored so far. Here, we experimentally investigate the flow behaviors of E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. Using confocal microscopy and PIV, we measure velocity profiles across gap between two shear plates. We find that with increasing shear rates, high-concentration bacterial suspensions exhibit an array of non-homogeneous flow behaviors like yield-stress flows and shear banding. We show that these non-homogeneous flows are due to collective motion of bacterial suspensions. The phase diagram of sheared bacterial suspensions is systematically mapped as functions of shear rates an bacterial concentrations. Our experiments provide new insights into rheology of bacterial suspensions and shed light on shear induced dynamics of active fluids. Chemical Engineering and Material Science department.

  8. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting a sub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  9. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002220.htm Amniotic fluid To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds ...

  10. Orthogonality Measurement for Homogenous Projects-Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivan, Ion; Sandu, Andrei; Popa, Marius

    2009-01-01

    The homogenous projects-base concept is defined. Next, the necessary steps to create a homogenous projects-base are presented. A metric system is built, which then will be used for analyzing projects. The indicators which are meaningful for analyzing a homogenous projects-base are selected. The given hypothesis is experimentally verified. The…

  11. Muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chang-Yong

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy, is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by out-of-frame mutations of the dystrophin gene. Thus, it is classified asa dystrophinopathy. The disease onset is before age 5 years. Patients with DMD present with progressive symmetrical limb-girdle muscle weakness and become wheelchair dependent after age 12 years. (2)(3). On the basis of some research evidence,cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure are usually seen in the late teens in patients with DMD. Progressive scoliosis and respiratory in sufficiency often develop once wheelchair dependency occurs. Respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy are common causes of death, and few survive beyond the third decade of life. (2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7). On the basis of some research evidence, prednisone at 0.75 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 40 mg/d) or deflazacort at 0.9 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 39 mg/d), a derivative of prednisolone (not available in the United States), as a single morning dose is recommended for DMD patients older than 5 years, which may prolong independent walking from a few months to 2 years. (2)(3)(16)(17). Based on some research evidence, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, b-blockers, and diuretics has been reported to be beneficial in DMD patients with cardiac abnormalities. (2)(3)(5)(18). Based on expert opinion, children with muscle weakness and increased serum creatine kinase levels may be associated with either genetic or acquired muscle disorders (Tables 1 and 3). (14)(15) PMID:24488829

  12. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  13. Challenges of daily data homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, C.; Auer, I.; Mestre, O.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years the growing demand of extreme value studies has led to the development of methods for the homogenisation of daily data. The behaviour of some of these methods has been investigated: Two methods (HOM: Della-Marta and Wanner, 2006 and SPLIDHOM: Mestre et al., submitted) which adjust the whole distribution of the climate element (especially minimum and maximum temperature) have been compared to the simpler Vincent's method (Vincent et al., 2002) which interpolates monthly adjustment factors onto daily data. The results indicate that the behaviour of the methods HOM and SPLIDHOM is very similar, although the complexity of these methods is different. They can improve the results compared to the Vincent's method when inhomogeneities in higher order moments occur. However, their applicability is limited since highly correlated neighbour series are required. More over, more data in the intervals before and after breaks is needed if the whole distribution shall be adjusted instead of the mean only. Due to these limitations a combination of distribution dependent adjustment methods and the Vincent method seems to be necessary for the homogenization of many time series. A dataset of Austrian daily maximum and minimum temperature data is used to illustrate the challenges of distribution dependent homogenization methods. Emphasis is placed on the estimation of the (sampling) uncertainty of these methods. Therefore a bootstrap approach is used. The accuracy of the calculated adjustments varies mainly between about 0.5°C for mean temperatures and more than one degree Celsius for the margins of the distribution. These uncertainty estimates can be valuable for extreme value studies.

  14. Glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Beck-Nielsen, H; Schroder, H D

    2000-09-01

    The present study was initiated to investigate GLUT-1 through -5 expression in developing and mature human skeletal muscle. To bypass the problems inherent in techniques using tissue homogenates, we applied an immunocytochemical approach, employing the sensitive enhanced tyramide signal amplification (TSA) technique to detect the localization of glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle. We found expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 in developing human muscle fibers showing a distinct expression pattern. 1) GLUT-1 is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells during gestation, but its expression is markedly reduced around birth and is further reduced to undetectable levels within the first year of life; 2) GLUT-3 protein expression appears at 18 wk of gestation and disappears after birth; and 3) GLUT-4 protein is diffusely expressed in muscle cells throughout gestation, whereas after birth, the characteristic subcellular localization is as seen in adult muscle fibers. Our results show that GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 seem to be of importance during muscle fiber growth and development. GLUT-5 protein was undetectable in fetal and adult skeletal muscle fibers. In adult muscle fibers, only GLUT-4 was expressed at significant levels. GLUT-1 immunoreactivity was below the detection limit in muscle fibers, indicating that this glucose transporter is of minor importance for muscle glucose supply. Thus we hypothesize that GLUT-4 also mediates basal glucose transport in muscle fibers, possibly through constant exposure to tonal contraction and basal insulin levels. PMID:10950819

  15. Voigt waves in electro-optic homogenized composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2014-08-01

    A study was undertaken into Voigt wave propagation in a homogenized composite material (HCM). The HCM investigated arose from a porous electro-optic host material infiltrated by a fluid of refractive index na, considered in the long-wavelength regime. The extended Bruggeman homogenization formalism was employed to estimate the constitutive parameters of the HCM. In principle, the directions which support Voigt wave propagation in the HCM may be controlled by means of an applied dc electric field; and the degree of control may be sensitive to the porosity of the host material, the shapes, sizes and orientations of the pores, as well as the refractive index na. Here the theoretical methodology is presented; numerical results are presented elsewhere.

  16. Development of Human Muscle Protein Measurement with MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chen; Evans, Harlan; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that micro-gravity has a strong influence on the human musculoskeletal system. A number of studies have shown that significant changes in skeletal muscles occur in both space flight and bedrest simulation. In our 5 week bedrest study, the cross-sectional area of soleus-gastrocnemius decreased about 12% while the cross-sectional area of anterior calf muscles decreased about 4%. Using volume measurements, these losses increased after 17 weeks to approximately 30% and 21% respectively. Significant muscle atrophy was also found on the SL-J crew members after only 8 days in space. It is important that these effects are fully understood so that countermeasures can be developed. The same knowledge might also be useful in preventing muscle atrophy related to other medical problems. A major problem with anatomical measurements of muscle during bed rest and microgravity is the influence of fluid shifts and water balance on the measurement of muscle volume, especially when the exposure duration is short and the atrophy is relatively small. Fluid shifts were documented in Skylab by visual observations of blood vessel distention, rapid changes in limb volume, center of mass measurements and subjective descriptions such as puffy faces and head fullness. It has been reported that the muscle water content of biopsied soleus muscles decreased following 8 hours of head down tilt bed rest. Three aspects of fluid shifts that can affect volume measurements are: first, the shift of fluid that occurs whenever there is a change from upright to a recumbent position and vice versa; second, the potential for fluid accumulation in the lower limbs resulting from muscle damage caused by overextending atrophied muscle or swelling caused by deconditioned precapillary sphincter muscles during reambulation; third, the net change of hydration level during and after bed rest or spaceflight. Because of these transitory fluid shifts, muscle protein is expected to represent muscle capacity

  17. Polyurethane phantoms with homogeneous and nearly homogeneous optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, Ville T.; Mäkynen, Anssi J.; Dayton, Amanda L.; Prahl, Scott A.

    2010-02-01

    Phantoms with controlled optical properties are often used for calibration and standardization. The phantoms are typically prepared by adding absorbers and scatterers to a clear host material. It is usually assumed that the scatterers and absorbers are uniformly dispersed within the medium. To explore the effects of this assumption, we prepared paired sets of polyurethane phantoms (both with identical masses of absorber, India ink and scatterer, titanium dioxide). Polyurethane phantoms were made by mixing two polyurethane parts (a and b) together and letting them cure in a polypropylene container. The mixture was degassed before curing to ensure a sample without bubbles. The optical properties were controlled by mixing titanium dioxide or India ink into polyurethane part (a or b) before blending the parts together. By changing the mixing sequence, we could change the aggregation of the scattering and absorbing particles. Each set had one sample with homogeneously dispersed scatterers and absorbers, and a second sample with slightly aggregated scatterers or absorbers. We found that the measured transmittance could easily vary by a factor of twenty. The estimated optical properties (using the inverse adding-doubling method) indicate that when aggregation is present, the optical properties are no longer proportional to the concentrations of absorbers or scatterers.

  18. Diffuse 18F-FDG Muscle Uptake in Trichinella spiralis Infection.

    PubMed

    Deroose, Christophe M; Van Weehaeghe, Donatienne; Tousseyn, Thomas; Van Rompuy, Anne-Sophie; Vanderschueren, Steven; Blockmans, Daniel; Gheysens, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Two patients were referred to our emergency department with myalgia, fever, general malaise, eosinophilia, and elevated serum levels of creatine kinase and troponin T. 18F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed showing a diffuse and homogenous moderately elevated glucose uptake in all muscle groups. Trichinella spiralis infection was confirmed by a muscle biopsy and detection of trichinella antibodies. The muscle biopsy was taken in the left quadriceps because of equal involvement of the skeletal muscles. The differential diagnosis of diffuse 18F-FDG muscle uptake should include trichinella infection, in particular, in the presence of infectious symptoms, eosinophilia, and biochemical signs of muscle damage. PMID:26252328

  19. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  20. Extraocular muscle function testing

    MedlinePlus

    Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye muscles. A health care provider observes the movement of ... evaluate weakness or other problem in the extraocular muscles. These problems may result in double vision or ...

  1. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  2. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  3. GLUT-3 expression in human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Peng, B. H.; Popov, V. L.; Hudnall, S. D.; Campbell, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsy homogenates contain GLUT-3 mRNA and protein. Before these studies, it was unclear where GLUT-3 was located in muscle tissue. In situ hybridization using a midmolecule probe demonstrated GLUT-3 within all muscle fibers. Fluorescent-tagged antibody reacting with affinity-purified antibody directed at the carboxy-terminus demonstrated GLUT-3 protein in all fibers. Slow-twitch muscle fibers, identified by NADH-tetrazolium reductase staining, possessed more GLUT-3 protein than fast-twitch fibers. Electron microscopy using affinity-purified primary antibody and gold particle-tagged second antibody showed that the majority of GLUT-3 was in association with triads and transverse tubules inside the fiber. Strong GLUT-3 signals were seen in association with the few nerves that traversed muscle sections. Electron microscopic evaluation of human peripheral nerve demonstrated GLUT-3 within the axon, with many of the particles related to mitochondria. GLUT-3 protein was found in myelin but not in Schwann cells. GLUT-1 protein was not present in nerve cells, axons, myelin, or Schwann cells but was seen at the surface of the peripheral nerve in the perineurium. These studies demonstrated that GLUT-3 mRNA and protein are expressed throughout normal human skeletal muscle, but the protein is predominantly found in the triads of slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  4. Spacer fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.; Bradshaw, R.D.; Wilton, B.S.; Carpenter, R.B.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a method for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a conduit extends, the wellbore having a space occupied by a drilling fluid. It comprises displacing the drilling fluid from the space with a spacer fluid comprising: sulfonated styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer, bentonite, welan gum, surfactant and a weighting agent; and displacing the spacer composition and filling the wellbore space with a settable cement composition.

  5. AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTORTECHNICAL PANEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D.J.; Bajorek, S.; Bakel, A.; Flanagan, G.; Mubayi, V.; Skarda, R.; Staudenmeier, J.; Taiwo, T.; Tonoike, K.; Tripp, C.; Wei, T.; Yarsky, P.

    2010-12-03

    Considerable interest has been expressed for developing a stable U.S. production capacity for medical isotopes and particularly for molybdenum- 99 (99Mo). This is motivated by recent re-ductions in production and supply worldwide. Consistent with U.S. nonproliferation objectives, any new production capability should not use highly enriched uranium fuel or targets. Conse-quently, Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors (AHRs) are under consideration for potential 99Mo production using low-enriched uranium. Although the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has guidance to facilitate the licensing process for non-power reactors, that guidance is focused on reactors with fixed, solid fuel and hence, not applicable to an AHR. A panel was convened to study the technical issues associated with normal operation and potential transients and accidents of an AHR that might be designed for isotope production. The panel has produced the requisite AHR licensing guidance for three chapters that exist now for non-power reactor licensing: Reac-tor Description, Reactor Coolant Systems, and Accident Analysis. The guidance is in two parts for each chapter: 1) standard format and content a licensee would use and 2) the standard review plan the NRC staff would use. This guidance takes into account the unique features of an AHR such as the fuel being in solution; the fission product barriers being the vessel and attached systems; the production and release of radiolytic and fission product gases and their impact on operations and their control by a gas management system; and the movement of fuel into and out of the reactor vessel.

  6. STEAM STIRRED HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-06-01

    A homogeneous nuclear reactor utilizing a selfcirculating liquid fuel is described. The reactor vessel is in the form of a vertically disposed tubular member having the lower end closed by the tube walls and the upper end closed by a removal fianged assembly. A spherical reaction shell is located in the lower end of the vessel and spaced from the inside walls. The reaction shell is perforated on its lower surface and is provided with a bundle of small-diameter tubes extending vertically upward from its top central portion. The reactor vessel is surrounded in the region of the reaction shell by a neutron reflector. The liquid fuel, which may be a solution of enriched uranyl sulfate in ordinary or heavy water, is mainiained at a level within the reactor vessel of approximately the top of the tubes. The heat of the reaction which is created in the critical region within the spherical reaction shell forms steam bubbles which more upwardly through the tubes. The upward movement of these bubbles results in the forcing of the liquid fuel out of the top of these tubes, from where the fuel passes downwardly in the space between the tubes and the vessel wall where it is cooled by heat exchangers. The fuel then re-enters the critical region in the reaction shell through the perforations in the bottom. The upper portion of the reactor vessel is provided with baffles to prevent the liquid fuel from splashing into this region which is also provided with a recombiner apparatus for recombining the radiolytically dissociated moderator vapor and a control means.

  7. Turbulence in homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain

    1996-11-01

    Homogeneous shear flows with an imposed mean velocity U=Syx̂ are studied in a period box of size Lx×Ly×Lz, in the statistically stationary turbulent state. In contrast with unbounded shear flows, the finite size of the system constrains the large-scale dynamics. The Reynolds number, defined by Re≡SL2y/ν varies in the range 2600⩽Re⩽11300. The total kinetic energy and enstrophy in the volume of numerical integration have large peaks, resulting in fluctuations of kinetic energy of order 30%-50%. The mechanism leading to these fluctuations is very reminiscent of the ``streaks'' responsible for the violent bursts observed in turbulent boundary layers. The large scale anisotropy of the flow, characterized by the two-point correlation tensor depends on the aspect ratio of the system. The probability distribution functions (PDF) of the components of the velocity are found to be close to Gaussian. The physics of the Reynolds stress tensor, uv, is very similar to what is found experimentally in wall bounded shear flows. The study of the two-point correlation tensor of the vorticity <ωiωj> suggests that the small scales become isotropic when the Reynolds number increases, as observed in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. However, the skewness of the z component of vorticity is independent of the Reynolds number in this range, suggesting that some small scale anisotropy remains even at very high Reynolds numbers. An analogy is drawn with the problem of turbulent mixing, where a similar anisotropy is observed.

  8. Homogeneous catalysts in hypersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Harradine, D.M.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Pack, R.T.; Schott, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Density and residence time both become unfavorably small for efficient combustion of hydrogen fuel in ramjet propulsion in air at high altitude and hypersonic speed. Raising the density and increasing the transit time of the air through the engine necessitates stronger contraction of the air flow area. This enhances the kinetic and thermodynamic tendency of H/sub 2/O to form completely, accompanied only by N/sub 2/ and any excess H/sub 2/(or O/sub 2/). The by-products to be avoided are the energetically expensive fragment species H and/or O atoms and OH radicals, and residual (2H/sub 2/ plus O/sub 2/). However, excessive area contraction raises air temperature and consequent combustion-product temperature by adiabatic compression. This counteracts and ultimately overwhelms the thermodynamic benefit by which higher density favors the triatomic product, H/sub 2/O, over its monatomic and diatomic alternatives. For static pressures in the neighborhood of 1 atm, static temperature must be kept or brought below ca. 2400 K for acceptable stability of H/sub 2/O. Another measure, whose requisite chemistry we address here, is to extract propulsive work from the combustion products early in the expansion. The objective is to lower the static temperature of the combustion stream enough for H/sub 2/O to become adequately stable before the exhaust flow is massively expanded and its composition ''frozen.'' We proceed to address this mechanism and its kinetics, and then examine prospects for enhancing its rate by homogeneous catalysts. 9 refs.

  9. Thrust wedges and fluid overpressures: Sandbox models involving pore fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    The well-known model for the critical taper of an accretionary wedge includes overpressure as a first-order parameter. Fluid overpressures reduce frictional resistance at the base of a wedge but they also act as body forces on all material particles of the wedge, in addition to that of gravity. By means of sandbox modeling, many workers have tried to verify the predictions of the critical taper model, but few of them have so far incorporated true fluid pressures. We have used scaled experiments, in which compressed air flows through sand packs, so as to model the deformation of overpressured wedges. A new apparatus provides for a horizontally varying fluid pressure, for example, a linear variation, as in the critical taper model. We have done three series of experiments, involving horizontal shortening of homogeneous or multilayered sand models for various gradients of fluid pressure. As predicted by the critical taper model, the apical angle of the resulting wedge depends on the overpressure gradient. In homogeneous sand at a high overpressure gradient, deformation becomes diffuse and looks ductile. In multilayered models, detachments form beneath layers of low permeability, so that thrusts propagate rapidly toward the undeformed foreland. The efficiency of a detachment and its ability to propagate depend not only on the fluid pressure but also on the permeability ratios between the various layers.

  10. Intramuscular pressures for monitoring different tasks and muscle conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sejersted, O. M.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Intramuscular fluid pressure (IMP) can easily be measured in man and animals. It follows the law of Laplace which means that it is determined by the tension of the muscle fibers, the recording depth and by fiber geometry (fiber curvature or pennation angle). Thick, bulging muscles create high IMPs (up to 1000 mmHg) and force transmission to tendons becomes inefficient. High resting or postexercise IMPs are indicative of a compartment syndrome due to muscle swelling within a low-compliance osseofascial boundary. IMP increases linearly with force (torque) independent of the mode or speed of contraction (isometric, eccentric, concentric). IMP is also a much better predictor of muscle force than the EMG signal. During prolonged low-force isometric contractions, cyclic variations in IMP are seen. Since IMP influences muscle blood flow through the muscle pump, autoregulating vascular elements, and compression of the intramuscular vasculature, alterations in IMP have important implications for muscle function.

  11. Muscle MRI findings in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Anna; Deschauer, Marcus; Carlier, Robert-Yves; Schrank, Bertold; Seeger, Jürgen; Walter, Maggie C; Schoser, Benedikt; Reilich, Peter; Leturq, France; Radunovic, Aleksandar; Behin, Anthony; Laforet, Pascal; Eymard, Bruno; Schreiber, Herbert; Hicks, Debbie; Vaidya, Sujit S; Gläser, Dieter; Carlier, Pierre G; Bushby, Kate; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker

    2012-10-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L (LGMD2L) is an adult-onset slowly progressive muscular dystrophy associated with recessive mutations in the ANO5 gene. We analysed the muscle MRI pattern in a cohort of 25 LGMD2L patients in order to understand the extent and progression of muscle pathology in LGM2L and assess if muscle MRI might help in the diagnostic work-up of these patients. Our results showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle pathology on muscle MRI, with a predominant involvement of the posterior compartment muscles in both the thighs and calves. The muscles of the anterior compartments in the leg together with the sartorius and gracilis muscles were best preserved, which partially overlaps with patterns observed for other recessive LGMDs. Muscle MRI therefore does not appear to be as useful in the diagnostic work up of LGMD2L as for other neuromuscular diseases, such as Bethlem myopathy or myofibrillar myopathy. PMID:22980763

  12. Immobilization/remobilization and the regulation of muscle mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almon, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between animal body weight and the wet and dry weights of the soleus and EDL muscles was derived. Procedures were examined for tissue homogenization, fractionation, protein determination and DNA determination. A sequence of procedures and buffers were developed to carry out all analyses on one small muscle. This would yield a considerable increase in analytical strength associated with paired statistics. The proposed casting procedure which was to be used for immobilization was reexamined.

  13. Renal function alterations during skeletal muscle disuse in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Bryan J.

    1992-01-01

    This project was to examine the alterations in renal functions during skeletal muscle disuse in simulated microgravity. Although this area could cover a wide range of investigative efforts, the limited funding resulted in the selection of two projects. These projects would result in data contributing to an area of research deemed high priority by NASA and would address issues of the alterations in renal response to vasoactive stimuli during conditions of skeletal muscle disuse as well as investigate the contribution of skeletal muscle disuse, conditions normally found in long term human exposure to microgravity, to the balance of fluid and macromolecules within the vasculature versus the interstitium. These two projects selected are as follows: investigate the role of angiotensin 2 on renal function during periods of simulated microgravity and skeletal muscle disuse to determine if the renal response is altered to changes in circulating concentrations of angiotensin 2 compared to appropriate controls; and determine if the shift of fluid balance from vasculature to the interstitium, the two components of extracellular fluid volume, that occur during prolonged exposure to microgravity and skeletal muscle disuse is a result, in part, to alterations in the fluid and macromolecular balance in the peripheral capillary beds, of which the skeletal muscle contains the majority of recruitment capillaries. A recruitment capillary bed would be most sensitive to alterations in Starling forces and fluid and macromolecular permeability.

  14. Electrokinetic micro-fluid mixer

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for efficiently and rapidly mixing liquids in a system operating in the creeping flow regime such as would be encountered in capillary-based systems. By applying an electric field to each liquid, the present invention is capable of mixing together fluid streams in capillary-based systems, where mechanical or turbulent stirring cannot be used, to produce a homogeneous liquid.

  15. Ecological and evolutionary consequences of biotic homogenization.

    PubMed

    Olden, Julian D; Leroy Poff, N; Douglas, Marlis R; Douglas, Michael E; Fausch, Kurt D

    2004-01-01

    Biotic homogenization, the gradual replacement of native biotas by locally expanding non-natives, is a global process that diminishes floral and faunal distinctions among regions. Although patterns of homogenization have been well studied, their specific ecological and evolutionary consequences remain unexplored. We argue that our current perspective on biotic homogenization should be expanded beyond a simple recognition of species diversity loss, towards a synthesis of higher order effects. Here, we explore three distinct forms of homogenization (genetic, taxonomic and functional), and discuss their immediate and future impacts on ecological and evolutionary processes. Our goal is to initiate future research that investigates the broader conservation implications of homogenization and to promote a proactive style of adaptive management that engages the human component of the anthropogenic blender that is currently mixing the biota on Earth. PMID:16701221

  16. Arachidonate metabolism in bovine gallbladder muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Hidaka, T.; Ueta, T.; Ogura, R.

    1983-04-01

    Incubation of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid (AA) with homogenates of bovine gallbladder muscle generated a large amount of radioactive material having the chromatographic mobility of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable product of PGI2) and smaller amounts of products that comigrated with PGF2 alpha PGE2. Formation of these products was inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The major radioactive product identified by thin-layer chromatographic mobility and by gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis was found to be 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The quantitative metabolic pattern of (1-/sup 14/C)PGH2 was virtually identical to that of (1-/sup 14/C)AA. Incubation of arachidonic acid with slices of bovine gallbladder muscle released labile anti-aggregatory material in the medium, which was inhibited by aspirin or 15-hydroperoxy-AA. These results indicate that bovine gallbladder muscle has a considerable enzymatic capacity to produce PGI2 from arachidonic acid.

  17. Fluid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Firouzjahi, H.; Namjoo, M.H.; Sasaki, M. E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} = 5/2.

  18. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  19. Muscle changes with eccentric exercise: implications on Earth and in space.

    PubMed

    Hargens, A R; Parazynski, S; Aratow, M; Friden, J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of eccentric exercise on skeletal muscle fluid pressure, morphology, and enzyme activities are reviewed. Topics related to muscle injury are the exercise protocol, intramuscular pressures, muscle soreness, resting intramuscular pressures, peak pressure during eccentric and concentric exercise, and peak pressure during isometric contractions. Enzyme activity examined levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, lactic dehydrogenase, and serum creatine kinase. Muscle morphology was examined with light microscopy and electron microscopy. Implications for exercise in space are examined. PMID:11540912

  20. [Muscle fiber atrophy].

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fibers have been classified into two major forms of red (slow twitch) and white (fast twitch) muscles. The red muscle utilizes lipid as energy source through mitochondrial metabolism and function to sustain the position against gravity (sometimes called as antigravity muscle). Under microgravity the red muscle is selectively involved. In our unloading study by hindlimb suspension experiment on rats, the one of the representative red muscle of soleus muscle underwent rapid atrophy; they reduced their weights about 50% after 2 week-unloading. In addition, myofibrils were occasionally markedly disorganized with selective thin filament loss. Mitochondria in the degenerated area were decreased in number. The white muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had mostly transformed to the red ones. It took about 1 month to recover morphologically. The satellite cell playing a major role in muscle regeneration was not activated. There still remained unsolved what are the mechanosensors to keep muscle function under normal gravity. Dr Nikawa's group proposed that one of ubiquitin ligases, Cbl-b is activated under microgravity and induces muscle fiber degeneration. There might be many factors to induce muscle atrophy and degeneration under microgravity. Further study is necessary to explore the pathomechanism of muscle atrophy in disused and under immobility conditions. PMID:23196603

  1. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  2. Inhomogeneous generalizations of Bianchi type VIh models with perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Prasad, A.

    1991-07-01

    Inhomogeneous universes admitting an Abelian G2 of isometry and filled with perfect fluid have been derived. These contain as special cases exact homogeneous universes of Bianchi type VIh. Many of these universes asymptotically tend to homogeneous Bianchi VIh universes. The models have been discussed for their physical and kinematical behaviors.

  3. Wellbore fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.L.

    1984-06-19

    The water loss properties of well completion and well workover fluids are improved by the addition of an effective amount of at least one adjuvant selected from (1) sodium carbonate with either sodium bicarbonate or an organic polycarboxylic acid or polycarboxylic acid anhydride or (2) sodium bicarbonate alone. In another embodiment, the adjuvants are added to stabilize water loss control agents in wellbore fluids, especially at elevated temperatures.

  4. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  5. Homogenization of precipitation time series with ACMANT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domonkos, Peter

    2015-10-01

    New method for the time series homogenization of observed precipitation (PP) totals is presented; this method is a unit of the ACMANT software package. ACMANT is a relative homogenization method; minimum four time series with adequate spatial correlations are necessary for its use. The detection of inhomogeneities (IHs) is performed with fitting optimal step function, while the calculation of adjustment terms is based on the minimization of the residual variance in homogenized datasets. Together with the presentation of PP homogenization with ACMANT, some peculiarities of PP homogenization as, for instance, the frequency and seasonal variation of IHs in observed PP data and their relation to the performance of homogenization methods are discussed. In climatic regions of snowy winters, ACMANT distinguishes two seasons, namely, rainy season and snowy season, and the seasonal IHs are searched with bivariate detection. ACMANT is a fully automatic method, is freely downloadable from internet and treats either daily or monthly input. Series of observed data in the input dataset may cover different periods, and the occurrence of data gaps is allowed. False zero values instead of missing data code or physical outliers should be corrected before running ACMANT. Efficiency tests indicate that ACMANT belongs to the best performing methods, although further comparative tests of automatic homogenization methods are needed to confirm or reject this finding.

  6. String pair production in non homogeneous backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, S.; Rabinovici, E.; Tallarita, G.

    2016-04-01

    We consider string pair production in non homogeneous electric backgrounds. We study several particular configurations which can be addressed with the Euclidean world-sheet instanton technique, the analogue of the world-line instanton for particles. In the first case the string is suspended between two D-branes in flat space-time, in the second case the string lives in AdS and terminates on one D-brane (this realizes the holographic Schwinger effect). In some regions of parameter space the result is well approximated by the known analytical formulas, either the particle pair production in non-homogeneous background or the string pair production in homogeneous background. In other cases we see effects which are intrinsically stringy and related to the non-homogeneity of the background. The pair production is enhanced already for particles in time dependent electric field backgrounds. The string nature enhances this even further. For spacial varying electrical background fields the string pair production is less suppressed than the rate of particle pair production. We discuss in some detail how the critical field is affected by the non-homogeneity, for both time and space dependent electric field backgrouds. We also comment on what could be an interesting new prediction for the small field limit. The third case we consider is pair production in holographic confining backgrounds with homogeneous and non-homogeneous fields.

  7. Deforestation homogenizes tropical parasitoid-host networks.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, Etienne; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2010-06-01

    Human activities drive biotic homogenization (loss of regional diversity) of many taxa. However, whether species interaction networks (e.g., food webs) can also become homogenized remains largely unexplored. Using 48 quantitative parasitoid-host networks replicated through space and time across five tropical habitats, we show that deforestation greatly homogenized network structure at a regional level, such that interaction composition became more similar across rice and pasture sites compared with forested habitats. This was not simply caused by altered consumer and resource community composition, but was associated with altered consumer foraging success, such that parasitoids were more likely to locate their hosts in deforested habitats. Furthermore, deforestation indirectly homogenized networks in time through altered mean consumer and prey body size, which decreased in deforested habitats. Similar patterns were obtained with binary networks, suggesting that interaction (link) presence-absence data may be sufficient to detect network homogenization effects. Our results show that tropical agroforestry systems can support regionally diverse parasitoid-host networks, but that removal of canopy cover greatly homogenizes the structure of these networks in space, and to a lesser degree in time. Spatiotemporal homogenization of interaction networks may alter coevolutionary outcomes and reduce ecological resilience at regional scales, but may not necessarily be predictable from community changes observed within individual trophic levels. PMID:20583715

  8. Homogenization method based on the inverse problem

    SciTech Connect

    Tota, A.; Makai, M.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method for deriving homogeneous multi-group cross sections to replace a heterogeneous region's multi-group cross sections; providing that the fluxes and the currents on the external boundary, and the region averaged fluxes are preserved. The method is developed using diffusion approximation to the neutron transport equation in a symmetrical slab geometry. Assuming that the boundary fluxes are given, two response matrices (RMs) can be defined. The first derives the boundary current from the boundary flux, the second derives the flux integral over the region from the boundary flux. Assuming that these RMs are known, we present a formula which reconstructs the multi-group cross-section matrix and the diffusion coefficients from the RMs of a homogeneous slab. Applying this formula to the RMs of a slab with multiple homogeneous regions yields a homogenization method; which produce such homogenized multi-group cross sections and homogenized diffusion coefficients, that the fluxes and the currents on the external boundary, and the region averaged fluxes are preserved. The method is based on the determination of the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the RMs. We reproduce the four-group cross section matrix and the diffusion constants from the RMs in numerical examples. We give conditions for replacing a heterogeneous region by a homogeneous one so that the boundary current and the region-averaged flux are preserved for a given boundary flux. (authors)

  9. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  10. Higher Order Macro Coefficients in Periodic Homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conca, Carlos; San Martin, Jorge; Smaranda, Loredana; Vanninathan, Muthusamy

    2011-09-01

    A first set of macro coefficients known as the homogenized coefficients appear in the homogenization of PDE on periodic structures. If energy is increased or scale is decreased, these coefficients do not provide adequate approximation. Using Bloch decomposition, it is first realized that the above coefficients correspond to the lowest energy and the largest scale. This naturally paves the way to introduce other sets of macro coefficients corresponding to higher energies and lower scales which yield better approximation. The next task is to compare their properties with those of the homogenized coefficients. This article reviews these developments along with some new results yet to be published.

  11. Fluid Management System (FMS) fluid systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system (FMS) fluid systems overview are presented. Topics addressed include: fluid management system description including system requirements (integrated nitrogen system, integrated water system, and integrated waste gas system) and physical description; and fluid management system evolution.

  12. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pietro, Massimo; van Hinsberg, Michel A. T.; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles vertically confined, by means of a linear restoring force, to move within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous isotropic turbulent velocity field. The model that we introduce and study is possibly the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy, or any other mechanism, maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer below the free surface of oceans or lakes. By varying the strength of the restoring force, we are able to control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. This allows us to analyze the statistical features of the system over a wide range of conditions going from a fully 3D incompressible flow (corresponding to the case of no confinement) to the extremely confined case corresponding to a two-dimensional slice. The background 3D turbulent velocity field is evolved by means of fully resolved direct numerical simulations. Whenever some level of vertical confinement is present, the particle trajectories deviate from that of fluid tracers and the particles experience an effectively compressible velocity field. Here, we have quantified the compressibility, the preferential concentration of the particles, and the correlation dimension by changing the strength of the restoring force. The main result is that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale η , that maximizes the clustering of the particles.

  13. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  14. Non-Homogeneous Fractal Hierarchical Weighted Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yujuan; Dai, Meifeng; Ye, Dandan

    2015-01-01

    A model of fractal hierarchical structures that share the property of non-homogeneous weighted networks is introduced. These networks can be completely and analytically characterized in terms of the involved parameters, i.e., the size of the original graph Nk and the non-homogeneous weight scaling factors r1, r2, · · · rM. We also study the average weighted shortest path (AWSP), the average degree and the average node strength, taking place on the non-homogeneous hierarchical weighted networks. Moreover the AWSP is scrupulously calculated. We show that the AWSP depends on the number of copies and the sum of all non-homogeneous weight scaling factors in the infinite network order limit. PMID:25849619

  15. Producing tritium in a homogenous reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the joint production and separation of tritium. Tritium is produced in an aqueous homogenous reactor and heat from the nuclear reaction is used to distill tritium from the lower isotopes of hydrogen.

  16. On homogeneous Einstein (α , β) -metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaili; Deng, Shaoqiang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study homogeneous Einstein (α , β) -metrics. First, we deduce a formula for Ricci curvature of a homogeneous (α , β) -metric. Based on this formula, we obtain a sufficient and necessary condition for a compact homogeneous (α , β) -metric to be Einstein and with vanishing S-curvature. Moreover, we prove that any homogeneous Ricci flat (α , β) space with vanishing S-curvature must be a Minkowski space. Finally, we consider left invariant Einstein (α , β) -metrics on Lie groups with negative Ricci constant. Under some appropriate conditions, we show that the underlying Lie groups must be two step solvable. We also present a more convenient sufficient and necessary condition for the metric to be Einstein in this special case.

  17. Homogeneous cosmological models in Yang's gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Pavelle, R.

    1979-01-01

    We present a dynamic, spatially homogeneous solution of Yang's pure space gravitational field equations which is non-Einsteinian. The predictions of this cosmological model seem to be at variance with observations.

  18. Layout optimization using the homogenization method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Kikuchi, Noboru

    1993-01-01

    A generalized layout problem involving sizing, shape, and topology optimization is solved by using the homogenization method for three-dimensional linearly elastic shell structures in order to seek a possibility of establishment of an integrated design system of automotive car bodies, as an extension of the previous work by Bendsoe and Kikuchi. A formulation of a three-dimensional homogenized shell, a solution algorithm, and several examples of computing the optimum layout are presented in this first part of the two articles.

  19. Layout optimization using the homogenization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Kikuchi, Noboru

    A generalized layout problem involving sizing, shape, and topology optimization is solved by using the homogenization method for three-dimensional linearly elastic shell structures in order to seek a possibility of establishment of an integrated design system of automotive car bodies, as an extension of the previous work by Bendsoe and Kikuchi. A formulation of a three-dimensional homogenized shell, a solution algorithm, and several examples of computing the optimum layout are presented in this first part of the two articles.

  20. Noncommutative complex structures on quantum homogeneous spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Buachalla, Réamonn

    2016-01-01

    A new framework for noncommutative complex geometry on quantum homogeneous spaces is introduced. The main ingredients used are covariant differential calculi and Takeuchi's categorical equivalence for quantum homogeneous spaces. A number of basic results are established, producing a simple set of necessary and sufficient conditions for noncommutative complex structures to exist. Throughout, the framework is applied to the quantum projective spaces endowed with the Heckenberger-Kolb calculus.

  1. Engineering skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mark; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-10-01

    Healthy skeletal muscle has a remarkable capacity for regeneration. Even at a mature age, muscle tissue can undergo a robust rebuilding process that involves the formation of new muscle cells and extracellular matrix and the re-establishment of vascular and neural networks. Understanding and reverse-engineering components of this process is essential for our ability to restore loss of muscle mass and function in cases where the natural ability of muscle for self-repair is exhausted or impaired. In this article, we will describe current approaches to restore the function of diseased or injured muscle through combined use of myogenic stem cells, biomaterials, and functional tissue-engineered muscle. Furthermore, we will discuss possibilities for expanding the future use of human cell sources toward the development of cell-based clinical therapies and in vitro models of human muscle disease. PMID:23711735

  2. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my muscles more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles ... If you have been inactive, “start low and go slow” by gradually increasing how often and how ...

  3. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  4. Muscle function loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... nervous system that cause muscle function loss include: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease) Bell's palsy Botulism ... of recent progress. Curr Opin Rheum Read More Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Botulism Broken bone Guillain-Barré syndrome Muscle cramps ...

  5. Further studies on single fibres of bovine muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Young, O A

    1982-01-01

    Young & Davey (1981) (Biochem. J. 195, 317-327) identified numbers of polymorphs of myofibrillar proteins by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of single muscle fibres isolated from three bovine muscles. Fibres were classed according to the distribution of polymorphs. The study has now been extended to eight diverse bovine muscles. The previous distinction made between fast and slow fibres is valid without exception in the extended study. Within these classes, variations in myofibrillar expression are examined within and between fibres, muscles and animals. Two slow muscles are contrasted; masseter is homogeneous in fibre type, whereas diaphragm is subtly heterogeneous, possibly arising from greater physiological demands. Of the myofibrillar polymorphs, attention is concentrated on two variants of fast-muscle myosin heavy chain. Both are present in all fast and mixed muscles examined, except sternomandibularis, and each is respectively associated with certain unidentified proteins. Within a muscle the fast-muscle myosin light-chain expression is the same irrespective of the heavy-chain variant. Histochemical techniques demonstrated that the variants are respectively associated with types IIA and IIB as defined by other investigators. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6213225

  6. Relative permeability of homogenous-wet and mixed-wet porous media as determined by pore-scale lattice Boltzmann modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C. J.; Karpyn, Z. T.; Ayala, O.

    2014-05-01

    We present a pore-scale study of two-phase relative permeability in homogenous-wet porous media, and porous media altered to a mixed-wet state. A Shan-Chen type multicomponent lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is employed to determine pore-scale fluid distributions and relative permeability. Mixed-wet states are created by altering the wettability of solid surfaces in contact with the nonwetting phase at the end of steady state simulation of initially homogenous-wet porous media. To ensure accurate representation of fluid-solid interfacial areas, we compare LB simulation results to experimental measurements of interfacial fluid-fluid and fluid-solid areas determined by X-ray computed microtomography imaging of water and oil distributions in bead packs. The LB simulations are found to match experimental trends observed for fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfacial area-saturation relationships. The relative permeability of both fluids in the homogenous-wet porous media was found to decrease with a decreasing contact angle. The relative permeability of both fluids in the altered, mixed-wet porous media was found to decrease for all mixed-wet states in comparison to the initial homogenous-wet states. The nonwetting phase relative permeability decreased significantly, while the wetting phase experienced only a minor decrease. The significance of the decrease was found to be dependent on the distribution of the unaltered solid surfaces, with less dependence on the severity of alteration.

  7. Exercising with a Muscle Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: • cramping in muscles (probably related to insufficient energy supply for muscles) • pain in muscles • weakness of exercised muscles • dark urine that looks like cola, following exercise (seek ...

  8. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  9. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  10. New forcing scheme to sustain particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallouppas, G.; George, W. K.; van Wachem, B. G. M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of forcing to sustain turbulence on the transfer function of the fluid with particles suspended in a homogeneous and isotropic flow. As mentioned by Lucci et al. ["Modulation of isotropic turbulence by particles of Taylor length-scale size," J. Fluid Mech. 650, 5-55 (2010), 10.1017/S0022112009994022], there are three limitations of forcing particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence: (a) large fluctuations on the temporal evolution of the kinetic energy are created when forcing is active at low wavenumbers, (b) the redistribution of energy is affected when forcing is performed over all wavenumbers, and (c) the nonlinear transfer function of the fluid due to the triadic interactions is affected when forcing is active over a wavenumber range. These limitations make the interpretation of the effects of particles on the energy spectrum of the fluid difficult. A new forcing scheme in physical space has been designed which avoids these limitations in wavenumber space, so the spectral effects of particles can be evaluated. The performance of this forcing scheme is tested using Direct Numerical Simulations. It is shown that the nonlinear transfer function of the fluid with the current forcing scheme is only affected at the wavenumbers it is acting, consistent with the theory. Even so, the spatial coherence and phase spectra between the two-way coupling and the fluid computed from the simulations show that the new forcing scheme is only moderately correlated even for the forced wavenumbers, with correlation coefficient typically about 10%.

  11. Recovery of impaired muscle function in severe sciatica.

    PubMed

    Balagué, F; Nordin, M; Sheikhzadeh, A; Echegoyen, A C; Skovron, M L; Bech, H; Chassot, D; Helsen, M

    2001-06-01

    were not found during the last three visits. The isokinetic tests showed a higher prevalence of muscle function impairment. At visit 5, the isokinetic test showed impaired muscle function recovery from 23% to 32%, while the manual test showed almost full recovery. The issues of agreement between manual and isokinetic muscle testing are discussed. In this selected and homogeneous cohort of patients, the prevalence of motor deficit was rather low and the outcome excellent according to the results of the manual testing. Isokinetic muscle tests showed a higher prevalence of deficit and a much slower recovery. The manual muscle test is a crude clinical test. For more indepth muscle performance evaluation, additional testing may be necessary, especially for those patients with physically demanding jobs or activities. PMID:11469737

  12. Glucocorticoids and Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Sue C; Furlow, J David

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscle, producing a catabolic effect that is opposite that of insulin. In many catabolic diseases, such as sepsis, starvation, and cancer cachexia, endogenous glucocorticoids are elevated contributing to the loss of muscle mass and function. Further, exogenous glucocorticoids are often given acutely and chronically to treat inflammatory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in muscle atrophy. This chapter will detail the nature of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy and discuss the mechanisms thought to be responsible for the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids on muscle. PMID:26215994

  13. Oxidative Metabolism in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Binzoni, T.; Quaresima, V.

    1997-06-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantages and problems of near-infrared spectroscopy measurements, in resting and exercising skeletal muscles studies, are discussed through some representative examples.

  14. Muscles within muscles: a tensiomyographic and histochemical analysis of the normal human vastus medialis longus and vastus medialis obliquus muscles

    PubMed Central

    Travnik, Ludvik; Djordjevič, Srdjan; Rozman, Sergej; Hribernik, Marija; Dahmane, Raja

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the connection between structure (anatomical and histochemical) and function (muscle contraction properties) of vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and vastus medialis longus (VML). The non-invasive tensiomyography (TMG) method was used to determine the contractile properties (contraction time; Tc) of VML and VMO muscle, as a reflection of the ratio between the slow and fast fibers in two groups of nine young men. VML and VMO significantly (P < 0.01) differ in the proportion of type 1 (59.6: 44%) and type 2b (6.3: 15%) fibers. The VML muscle is almost entirely composed of type 1 and type 2a fibers. In many samples of this muscle no type 2b fibers were found. The proportion of slow-twitch type 1 fibers is nearly twice as high as the proportion of fast-twitch type 2a fibers. These observations indicate that VML is a slower and more fatigue-resistant muscle than VMO muscle. These characteristics correspond to the different functions of the VML, which is an extensor of the knee, and to the VMO, which maintains the stable position of the patella in the femoral groove. Our results obtained by TMG provided additional evidence that muscle fibers within the segments of VM muscle were not homogenous with regard to their contractile properties, thereby confirming the histochemical results. Tc can be attributed to the higher percentage of slow-twitch fibers – type 1. The statistically shorter Tc (P ≤ 0.001) of VMO (22.8 ± 4.0 ms) compared with VML (26.7 ± 4.0 ms) in our study is consistent with previously found differences in histochemical, morphological and electrophysiological data. In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence that the VML and VMO muscles are not only anatomically and histochemically different muscles, but also functionally different biological structures. PMID:23586984

  15. Analysis of homogeneous/non-homogeneous nanofluid models accounting for nanofluid-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, R.

    2016-07-01

    This article reports an unbiased analysis for the water based rod shaped alumina nanoparticles by considering both the homogeneous and non-homogeneous nanofluid models over the coupled nanofluid-surface interface. The mechanics of the surface are found for both the homogeneous and non-homogeneous models, which were ignored in previous studies. The viscosity and thermal conductivity data are implemented from the international nanofluid property benchmark exercise. All the simulations are being done by using the experimentally verified results. By considering the homogeneous and non-homogeneous models, the precise movement of the alumina nanoparticles over the surface has been observed by solving the corresponding system of differential equations. For the non-homogeneous model, a uniform temperature and nanofluid volume fraction are assumed at the surface, and the flux of the alumina nanoparticle is taken as zero. The assumption of zero nanoparticle flux at the surface makes the non-homogeneous model physically more realistic. The differences of all profiles for both the homogeneous and nonhomogeneous models are insignificant, and this is due to small deviations in the values of the Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters.

  16. Direction of unsaturated flow in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Kaya, B.S.; Godt, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of soil moisture in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope is a transient, variably saturated physical process controlled by rainfall characteristics, hillslope geometry, and the hydrological properties of the hillslope materials. The major driving mechanisms for moisture movement are gravity and gradients in matric potential. The latter is solely controlled by gradients of moisture content. In a homogeneous and isotropic saturated hillslope, absent a gradient in moisture content and under the driving force of gravity with a constant pressure boundary at the slope surface, flow is always in the lateral downslope direction, under either transient or steady state conditions. However, under variably saturated conditions, both gravity and moisture content gradients drive fluid motion, leading to complex flow patterns. In general, the flow field near the ground surface is variably saturated and transient, and the direction of flow could be laterally downslope, laterally upslope, or vertically downward. Previous work has suggested that prevailing rainfall conditions are sufficient to completely control these flow regimes. This work, however, shows that under time-varying rainfall conditions, vertical, downslope, and upslope lateral flow can concurrently occur at different depths and locations within the hillslope. More importantly, we show that the state of wetting or drying in a hillslope defines the temporal and spatial regimes of flow and when and where laterally downslope and/or laterally upslope flow occurs. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Direction of unsaturated flow in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Basak Sener; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of soil moisture in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope is a transient, variably saturated physical process controlled by rainfall characteristics, hillslope geometry, and the hydrological properties of the hillslope materials. The major driving mechanisms for moisture movement are gravity and gradients in matric potential. The latter is solely controlled by gradients of moisture content. In a homogeneous and isotropic saturated hillslope, absent a gradient in moisture content and under the driving force of gravity with a constant pressure boundary at the slope surface, flow is always in the lateral downslope direction, under either transient or steady state conditions. However, under variably saturated conditions, both gravity and moisture content gradients drive fluid motion, leading to complex flow patterns. In general, the flow field near the ground surface is variably saturated and transient, and the direction of flow could be laterally downslope, laterally upslope, or vertically downward. Previous work has suggested that prevailing rainfall conditions are sufficient to completely control these flow regimes. This work, however, shows that under time-varying rainfall conditions, vertical, downslope, and upslope lateral flow can concurrently occur at different depths and locations within the hillslope. More importantly, we show that the state of wetting or drying in a hillslope defines the temporal and spatial regimes of flow and when and where laterally downslope and/or laterally upslope flow occurs.

  18. Einstein static universe in scalar-fluid theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmer, Christian G.; Tamanini, Nicola; Wright, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    A new Lagrangian framework has recently been proposed to describe interactions between relativistic perfect fluids and scalar fields. In this paper we investigate the Einstein static universe in this new class of theories, which have been named scalar-fluid theories. The stability of the static solutions to both homogeneous and inhomogeneous perturbations is analyzed deriving the relevant cosmological perturbation equations at the linear order. We can find several configurations corresponding to an Einstein static universes which are stable against inhomogeneous perturbations, but unstable against homogeneous perturbations. This shows the possible applications of scalar-fluid theories to the inflationary emergent universe scenario.

  19. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  20. Homogenization of Periodic Systems with Large Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaire, Grégoire; Capdeboscq, Yves; Piatnitski, Andrey; Siess, Vincent; Vanninathan, M.

    2004-11-01

    We consider the homogenization of a system of second-order equations with a large potential in a periodic medium. Denoting by ɛ the period, the potential is scaled as ɛ-2. Under a generic assumption on the spectral properties of the associated cell problem, we prove that the solution can be approximately factorized as the product of a fast oscillating cell eigenfunction and of a slowly varying solution of a scalar second-order equation. This result applies to various types of equations such as parabolic, hyperbolic or eigenvalue problems, as well as fourth-order plate equation. We also prove that, for well-prepared initial data concentrating at the bottom of a Bloch band, the resulting homogenized tensor depends on the chosen Bloch band. Our method is based on a combination of classical homogenization techniques (two-scale convergence and suitable oscillating test functions) and of Bloch waves decomposition.

  1. Rapid biotic homogenization of marine fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Magurran, Anne E; Dornelas, Maria; Moyes, Faye; Gotelli, Nicholas J; McGill, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The role human activities play in reshaping biodiversity is increasingly apparent in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the responses of entire marine assemblages are not well-understood, in part, because few monitoring programs incorporate both spatial and temporal replication. Here, we analyse an exceptionally comprehensive 29-year time series of North Atlantic groundfish assemblages monitored over 5° latitude to the west of Scotland. These fish assemblages show no systematic change in species richness through time, but steady change in species composition, leading to an increase in spatial homogenization: the species identity of colder northern localities increasingly resembles that of warmer southern localities. This biotic homogenization mirrors the spatial pattern of unevenly rising ocean temperatures over the same time period suggesting that climate change is primarily responsible for the spatial homogenization we observe. In this and other ecosystems, apparent constancy in species richness may mask major changes in species composition driven by anthropogenic change. PMID:26400102

  2. Method of Mapping Anomalies in Homogenous Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electrical conductor and antenna are positioned in a fixed relationship to one another. Relative lateral movement is generated between the electrical conductor and a homogenous material while maintaining the electrical conductor at a fixed distance from the homogenous material. The antenna supplies a time-varying magnetic field that causes the electrical conductor to resonate and generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses. Disruptions in at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses during this lateral movement are indicative of a lateral location of a subsurface anomaly. Next, relative out-of-plane movement is generated between the electrical conductor and the homogenous material in the vicinity of the anomaly's lateral location. Disruptions in at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses during this out-of-plane movement are indicative of a depth location of the subsurface anomaly. A recording of the disruptions provides a mapping of the anomaly.

  3. Applications of High and Ultra High Pressure Homogenization for Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Francesca; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the shelf-life and safety of foods have been achieved by thermal processing. Low temperature long time and high temperature short time treatments are the most commonly used hurdles for the pasteurization of fluid foods and raw materials. However, the thermal treatments can reduce the product quality and freshness. Consequently, some non-thermal pasteurization process have been proposed during the last decades, including high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric field, ultrasound (US), and high pressure homogenization (HPH). This last technique has been demonstrated to have a great potential to provide "fresh-like" products with prolonged shelf-life. Moreover, the recent developments in high-pressure-homogenization technology and the design of new homogenization valves able to withstand pressures up to 350-400 MPa have opened new opportunities to homogenization processing in the food industries and, consequently, permitted the development of new products differentiated from traditional ones by sensory and structural characteristics or functional properties. For this, this review deals with the principal mechanisms of action of HPH against microorganisms of food concern in relation to the adopted homogenizer and process parameters. In addition, the effects of homogenization on foodborne pathogenic species inactivation in relation to the food matrix and food chemico-physical and process variables will be reviewed. Also the combined use of this alternative technology with other non-thermal technologies will be considered. PMID:27536270

  4. Applications of High and Ultra High Pressure Homogenization for Food Safety

    PubMed Central

    Patrignani, Francesca; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the shelf-life and safety of foods have been achieved by thermal processing. Low temperature long time and high temperature short time treatments are the most commonly used hurdles for the pasteurization of fluid foods and raw materials. However, the thermal treatments can reduce the product quality and freshness. Consequently, some non-thermal pasteurization process have been proposed during the last decades, including high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric field, ultrasound (US), and high pressure homogenization (HPH). This last technique has been demonstrated to have a great potential to provide “fresh-like” products with prolonged shelf-life. Moreover, the recent developments in high-pressure-homogenization technology and the design of new homogenization valves able to withstand pressures up to 350–400 MPa have opened new opportunities to homogenization processing in the food industries and, consequently, permitted the development of new products differentiated from traditional ones by sensory and structural characteristics or functional properties. For this, this review deals with the principal mechanisms of action of HPH against microorganisms of food concern in relation to the adopted homogenizer and process parameters. In addition, the effects of homogenization on foodborne pathogenic species inactivation in relation to the food matrix and food chemico-physical and process variables will be reviewed. Also the combined use of this alternative technology with other non-thermal technologies will be considered. PMID:27536270

  5. Commensurability effects in holographic homogeneous lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomas; Krikun, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    An interesting application of the gauge/gravity duality to condensed matter physics is the description of a lattice via breaking translational invariance on the gravity side. By making use of global symmetries, it is possible to do so without scarifying homogeneity of the pertinent bulk solutions, which we thus term as "homogeneous holographic lattices." Due to their technical simplicity, these configurations have received a great deal of attention in the last few years and have been shown to correctly describe momentum relaxation and hence (finite) DC conductivities.

  6. Unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We use a statistical-mechanical identity closely related to the familiar virial theorem, to derive unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids. In particular, we obtain estimators for both the fluid density rho(r) in the vicinity of a fixed solute and the pair correlation g(r) of a homogeneous classical fluid. We illustrate the utility of our estimators with numerical examples, which reveal advantages over traditional histogram-based methods of computing such distributions. PMID:15638649

  7. Fluid and Electrolyte Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Smith, Scott M.; Leach, Carolyn S.; Rice, Barbara L.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis have been completed since the early human space flight programs, with comprehensive research completed on the Spacelab Life Sciences missions SLS-1 and SLS-2 flights, and more recently on the Mir 18 mission. This work documented the known shifts in fluids, the decrease in total blood volume, and indications of reduced thirst. Data from these flights was used to evaluate the nutritional needs for water, sodium, and potassium. Interpretations of the data are confounded by the inadequate energy intakes routinely observed during space flight. This in turn results in reduced fluid intake, as food provides approximately 70% water intake. Subsequently, body weight, lean body mass, total body water, and total body potassium may decrease. Given these issues, there is evidence to support a minimum required water intake of 2 L per day. Data from previous Shuttle flights indicated that water intake is 2285 +/- 715 ml/day (mean +/- SD, n=26). There are no indications that sodium intake or homeostasis is compromised during space flight. The normal or low aldosterone and urinary sodium levels suggest adequate sodium intake (4047 +/- 902 mg/day, n=26). Because excessive sodium intake is associated with hypercalciuria, the recommended maximum amount of sodium intake during flight is 3500 mg/day (i.e., similar to the Recommended Dietary Allowance, RDA). Potassium metabolism appears to be more complex. Data indicate loss of body potassium related to muscle atrophy and low dietary intake (2407 +/- 548 mg/day, n=26). Although possibly related to measurement error, the elevations in blood potassium suggest alterations in potassium homeostasis. The space RDA for minimum potassium intake is 3500 mg/day. With the documented inadequate intakes, efforts are being made to increase dietary consumption of potassium.

  8. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  9. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  10. Reynolds and Atwood Numbers Effects on Homogeneous Rayleigh Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Reynolds and Atwood numbers on turbulent mixing of a heterogeneous mixture of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities are investigated by using high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The flow occurs in a triply periodic 3D domain, with the two fluids initially segregated in random patches, and turbulence is generated in response to buoyancy. In turn, stirring produced by turbulence breaks down the scalar structures, accelerating the molecular mixing. Statistically homogeneous variable-density (VD) mixing, with density variations due to compositional changes, is a basic mixing problem and aims to mimic the core of the mixing layer of acceleration driven Rayleigh Taylor Instability (RTI). We present results covering a large range of kinematic viscosity values for density contrasts including small (A =0.04), moderate (A =0.5), and high (A =0.75 and 0.9) Atwood numbers. Particular interest will be given to the structure of the turbulence and mixing process, including the alignment between various turbulence and scalar quantities, as well as providing fidelity data for verification and validation of mix models. Arindam Banerjee acknowledges support from NSF CAREER award # 1453056.

  11. Homogeneous Catalysis by Transition Metal Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Examines four processes involving homogeneous catalysis which highlight the contrast between the simplicity of the overall reaction and the complexity of the catalytic cycle. Describes how catalysts provide circuitous routes in which all energy barriers are relatively low rather than lowering the activation energy for a single step reaction.…

  12. General Theorems about Homogeneous Ellipsoidal Inclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korringa, J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Mathematical theorems about the properties of ellipsoids are developed. Included are Poisson's theorem concerning the magnetization of a homogeneous body of ellipsoidal shape, the polarization of a dielectric, the transport of heat or electricity through an ellipsoid, and other problems. (BB)

  13. Homogeneous Immunoassays: Historical Perspective and Future Promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, Edwin F.

    1999-06-01

    The founding and growth of Syva Company is examined in the context of its leadership role in the development of homogeneous immunoassays. The simple mix and read protocols of these methods offer advantages in routine analytical and clinical applications. Early homogeneous methods were based on insensitive detection of immunoprecipitation during antigen/antibody binding. The advent of reporter groups in biology provided a means of quantitating immunochemical binding by labeling antibody or antigen and physically separating label incorporated into immune complexes from free label. Although high sensitivity was achieved, quantitative separations were experimentally demanding. Only when it became apparent that reporter groups could provide information, not only about the location of a molecule but also about its microscopic environment, was it possible to design practical non-separation methods. The evolution of early homogenous immunoassays was driven largely by the development of improved detection strategies. The first commercial spin immunoassays, developed by Syva for drug abuse testing during the Vietnam war, were followed by increasingly powerful methods such as immunochemical modulation of enzyme activity, fluorescence, and photo-induced chemiluminescence. Homogeneous methods that quantify analytes at femtomolar concentrations within a few minutes now offer important new opportunities in clinical diagnostics, nucleic acid detection and drug discovery.

  14. Extension theorems for homogenization on lattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    When applying homogenization techniques to problems involving lattice structures, it is necessary to extend certain functions defined on a perforated domain to a simply connected domain. This paper provides general extension operators which preserve bounds on derivatives of order l. Only the special case of honeycomb structures is considered.

  15. RELIABLE COMPUTATION OF HOMOGENEOUS AZEOTROPES. (R824731)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    It is important to determine the existence and composition of homogeneous azeotropes in the analysis of phase behavior and in the synthesis and design of separation systems, from both theoretical and practical standpoints. A new method for reliably locating an...

  16. Homogeneity analysis of precipitation series in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh Talaee, P.; Kouchakzadeh, Mahdi; Shifteh Some'e, B.

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of the reliability and quality of historical precipitation data is required in the modeling of hydrology and water resource processes and for climate change studies. The homogeneity of the annual and monthly precipitation data sets throughout Iran was tested using the Bayesian, Cumulative Deviations, and von Neumann tests at a significance level of 0.05. The precipitation records from 41 meteorological stations covering the years between 1966 and 2005 were considered. The annual series of Iranian precipitation were found to be homogeneous by applying the Bayesian and Cumulative Deviations tests, while the von Neumann test detected inhomogeneities at seven stations. Almost all the monthly precipitation data sets are homogeneous and considered as "useful." The outputs of the statistical tests for the homogeneity analysis of the precipitation time series had discrepancies in some cases which are related to different sensitivities of the tests to break in the time series. It was found that the von Neumann test is more sensitive than the Bayesian and Cumulative Deviations tests in the determination of inhomogeneity in the precipitation series.

  17. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  18. Obturator internus muscle abscess in children.

    PubMed

    Orlicek, S L; Abramson, J S; Woods, C R; Givner, L B

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe four cases of obturator internus muscle (OIM) abscess in children, including their clinical presentations and treatment. This was a retrospective chart review. Children and adolescents younger than 18 years discharged between July 1, 1985, and September 30, 1998, from Brenner Children's Hospital with the diagnosis of muscle abscess or pelvic abscess were identified. A total of 56 patients were identified with the diagnosis of muscle abscess or pelvic abscess. OIM abscess was defined by radiologic findings of an inflammatory process with fluid collection in the OIM, along with the clinical findings suggestive of an OIM abscess. Four of the patients met the definition of OIM muscle abscess. The common presenting features were fever, limp, and hip pain. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was diagnostic in all four patients, and Staphylococcus aureus was the causative agent in each. All the patients recovered, one after surgical drainage and the other three after antimicrobial therapy alone or with needle aspiration. The presentation of OIM pyomyositis is similar to that of psoas muscle pyomyositis and other infectious processes of the pelvis and hip. The S. aureus is the most common etiologic agent but not the only one reported. Most patients can be managed without open surgical drainage, but needle aspirations may be helpful both therapeutically and diagnostically. PMID:11675547

  19. Muscle Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Siparsky, Patrick N.; Kirkendall, Donald T.; Garrett, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle physiology in the aging athlete is complex. Sarcopenia, the age-related decrease in lean muscle mass, can alter activity level and affect quality of life. This review addresses the microscopic and macroscopic changes in muscle with age, recognizes contributing factors including nutrition and changes in hormone levels, and identifies potential pharmacologic agents in clinical trial that may aid in the battle of this complex, costly, and disabling problem. Level of Evidence: Level 5. PMID:24427440

  20. [Preferential distal muscle involvement in case of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy with (GCG) 13 expansion].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Dainari; Nakajima, Hideto; Ishida, Shimon; Sugino, Masakazu; Kimura, Fumiharu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2003-09-01

    We reported a 52-year-old woman with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) harboring expanded (GCG) 13 mutation of the poly (A) binding protein 2 gene. She presented not only ptosis and dysphagia but distal dominant muscle atrophy in four extremities. CT demonstrated distal muscle atrophy with marked fat replacement in the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, membraneous, soleus, and gastrocnemius muscles. Although OPMD is considered to be a muscle disease, this patient showed even neurogenic features in the electrophysiological and pathological findings. Although previous reports indicate that OPMD is genetically homogeneous disease, some cases with OPMD may show some atypical features associated with neurogenic involvement. PMID:14727564

  1. Atrophy of rat skeletal muscles in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Ginoza, H. S.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic rat model was used for elucidation of the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting which occurs in weightlessness. Rats were suspended from a back-harness with the head tilted downward and the hind limbs totally unloaded. A progressive decrease in the size of the soleus muscle from suspended rats was observed as a function of time. The rate of protein degradation of the homogenates from the soleus muscles of suspended and control animals was not significantly different. The rate of cell-free protein synthesis was severely repressed in the atrophied muscle. An initial rise in the levels of plasma glucose and corticosterone was observed on the second day of suspension, but they subsequently returned to normal values.

  2. Analyzing melt homogeneity in a single screw plasticizing unit of an injection molding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, K.; Praher, B.; Steinbichler, G.

    2013-10-01

    In injection molding investigations on mixing efficiency and thermal homogeneity of the melt in the screw chamber are of great interest as the directly effect the quality of the molded parts. For most injection molding applications mixing is performed in the single screw plasticizing unit of the injection molding machine. In this work, a CFD approach with two coupled fluid domains is used in order to describe the plasticizing process in an injection molding machine. One domain rotates and translates in axial direction (screw), the other one increases its length (chamber). On basis of the calculated pressure, velocity and temperature field of the polymer melt the thermal melt homogeneity is investigated. To analyze the optical-mechanical homogeneity of the melt a Euler-Lagrangian method is used to calculate the distribution of tracer particles within the screw chamber.

  3. Gravitational collapse of Hagedorn fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malafarina, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    We consider a toy model for the relativistic collapse of a homogeneous perfect fluid that takes into account an equation of state for high density matter, in the form of a Hagedorn phase, and semiclassical corrections in the strong field. We show that collapse reaches a critical minimum size and then bounces. We discuss the conditions needed for the collapse to halt and form a compact object. We argue that implications of models such as the one presented here are of great importance for astrophysics as they show that black holes may not be the only final outcome of collapse of very massive stars.

  4. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  5. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2015-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best “treatment”. PMID:27027021

  6. To homogenize, or not to homogenize, that is the question: Quartz-hosted melt inclusion analysis avenues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. N.; Roberge, J.; Todorov, T. I.; Hofstra, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt inclusions hosted in quartz can provide the only direct information about the pressure, temperature, and melt composition of pre-eruptive rhyolitic magmas, many of which are the precursors to mineralizing aqueous fluids [1]. With ideal, rapidly-quenched pumice samples, analysis of glassy quartz-hosted melt inclusions is relatively straightforward. These data can be directly interpreted to represent snapshots of metal and volatile concentrations during magma crystallization and degassing. However, most ore deposit-related igneous samples are non-ideal; being older, potentially hydrothermally altered, and often crystallized due to slow cooling in subvolcanic regions (e.g., porphyry-type deposits). In this case, analysis of crystalline melt inclusions in quartz is not straightforward and resulting data must be meticulously examined before interpretation. Many melt inclusions may have experienced post-entrapment modifications [1] such as diffusion of elements (e.g., H, Li, Na, Ag, Cu) [2], which may lead to changes in measured oxygen fugacity. Slowly cooled inclusions may crystallize, producing a heterogeneous "micro-rock" that cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic methods or electron microprobe. While crystallized inclusions can be homogenized in a high-temperature furnace, many new problems may arise such as inclusion decrepitation [3], diffusion of elements [2], and incorporation of too little or too much Si from the inclusion rim or host crystal. However, if unwanted homogenization effects are minimized by choosing ideal experimental conditions, then these homogenized inclusions can be analyzed by traditional FTIR and electron microprobe methods. The electron microprobe data from homogenized inclusions can be used as accurate internal standards for laser ablation-ICP-MS data reduction. Alternatively, crystalline inclusions can be directly analyzed for major and trace elements by laser ablation-ICP-MS [4], which considerably reduces sample preparation time, but

  7. The activities of lipases and carnitine palmitoyl-transferase in muscles from vertebrates and invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, B.; Newsholme, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    1. The activities of tri-, di- and mono-glyceride lipase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase were measured in homogenates of a variety of muscles. These activities were used to estimate the rate of utilization of glycerides and fatty acids by muscle. In muscles whose estimated rates of fat utilization can be compared with rates calculated for the intact muscle from such information as O2 uptake, there is reasonable agreement between the estimated and calculated rates. 2. In all muscles investigated the maximum rates of hydrolysis of glycerides increase in the order triglyceride, diglyceride, monoglyceride. The activity of diglyceride lipase is highest in the flight muscles of insects such as the locust, waterbug and some moths and is lowest in the flight muscles of flies, bees and the wasp. These results are consistent with the utilization of diglyceride as a fuel for some insect flight muscles. 3. In many muscles from both vertebrates and invertebrates the activity of glycerol kinase is similar to that of lipase. It is concluded that in these muscles the metabolic role of glycerol kinase is the removal of glycerol produced during lipolysis. However, in some insect flight muscles the activity of glycerol kinase is much greater than that of lipase, which suggests a different role for glycerol kinase in these muscles. PMID:4664927

  8. Drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.A.; Patel, B.B.

    1987-11-03

    A drilling fluid additive mixture is described consisting essentially of a sulfoalkylated tannin in admixture with a non-sulfoalkylated alkali-solubilized lignite wherein the weight ratio of the sulfoalkylated tannin to the non-sulfoalkylated lignite is in the range from about 2:1 to about 1:1. The sulfoalkylated tannin has been sulfoalkylated with at least one -(C(R-)/sub 2/-SO/sub 3/M side chain, wherein each R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and alkyl radicals containing from 1 to about 5 carbon atoms, and M is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and the alkali metals.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Jerrard, D A; Hanna, J R; Schindelheim, G L

    2001-08-01

    A quick and accurate diagnosis of maladies affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is imperative. Procurement and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are paramount in helping the clinician determine a patient's clinical condition. Various staining methods, measurement of white blood cell counts, glucose and protein levels, recognition of xanthochromia, and microbiologic studies are CSF parameters that are collectively important in the ultimate determination by a clinician of the presence or absence of a catastrophic CNS condition. Many of these CNS parameters have significant limitations that should be recognized to minimize under treating patients with catastrophic illness. PMID:11489408

  10. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pleural Fluid Analysis , Pericardial Fluid ...

  11. Pleural Fluid Analysis Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Pleural Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Pleural Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pericardial Fluid Analysis , Peritoneal Fluid ...

  12. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to obtain the most comprehensive and coherent picture of changes under weightlessness, a set of measurements on Skylab 2 was initiated and at every opportunity, additional studies were added. All pertinent information from ancillary sources were gleaned and collated. On Skylab 2, the initial anthropometric studies were scheduled in conjunction with muscle study. A single set of facial photographs was made in-flight. Additional measurements were made on Skylab 3, with photographs and truncal and limb girth measurements in-flight. Prior to Skylab 4, it was felt there was considerable evidence for large and rapid fluid shifts, so a series of in-flight volume and center of mass measurements and infrared photographs were scheduled to be conducted in the Skylab 4 mission. A number of changes were properly documented for the first time, most important of which were the fluid shifts. The following description of Skylab anthropometrics address work done on Skylab 4 primarily.

  13. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Murthy, G; Hargens, A R; Lehman, S; Rempel, D M

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue. PMID:11398857

  14. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  15. Paleotemperatures preserved in fluid inclusions in halite

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.M.; Spencer, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    A variety of paleoclimate proxy records allow determination of relative warming or cooling. However, if we are to understand climate change, quantification of past temperature fluctuations is essential. Our research indicates that fluid inclusions in halite can yield homogenization temperatures that record surface brine temperatures at the time of halite precipitation. To avoid problems with stretching, leaking, and initial trapping of air, samples with primary, single-phase (liquid) fluid inclusions are chilled in a freezer to nucleate vapor bubbles. We tested the reliability of this method of obtaining fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures using modern salts precipitated at Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California. Homogenization temperatures correlate well with measured brine temperatures. The same method is applied to fluid inclusions in Pleistocene halite from a core taken at the same location in Death Valley. Results are at several scales, recording diurnal temperature variations, seasonal temperature fluctuations, and longer-term warming and cooling events that correlate with major changes in the sedimentary environment related to climate. This technique is uniquely instrumental for paleoclimate studies because it offers actual, not just proxy, paleotemperature data. 27 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J.; Talbot, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A trophy of skeletal muscle; muscle a trophy associated with manned space flight; the nature, causes, and mechanisms of muscle atrophy associated with space flight, selected physiological factors, biochemical aspects, and countermeasures are addressed.

  17. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow visceral organs, ... shaped, and are also under involuntary control. Skeletal muscle fibers occur in muscles which are attached to the ...

  18. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in the walls of the heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  19. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor. ... Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are recommended for: Women ... Men with urinary stress incontinence after prostate surgery ...

  20. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  1. Autoimmune muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Patients with polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) present with the subacute onset of symmetric proximal muscle weakness, elevated muscle enzymes, myopathic findings on electromyography, and autoantibodies. DM patients are distinguished by their cutaneous manifestations. Characteristic features on muscle biopsy include the invasion of nonnecrotic muscle fibers by T cells in PM, perifascicular atrophy in DM, and myofiber necrosis without prominent inflammation in IMNM. Importantly, these are regarded as autoimmune diseases and most patients respond partially, if not completely, to immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM) usually present with the insidious onset of asymmetric weakness in distal muscles (e.g., wrist flexors, and distal finger flexors), often when more proximal muscle groups are relatively preserved. Although IBM muscle biopsies usually have focal invasion of myofibers by lymphocytes, the majority of IBM biopsies also include rimmed vacuoles. While most IBM patients do have autoantibodies, treatment with immunosuppressive agents does not improve their clinical course. Along with the presence of abnormally aggregated proteins on muscle biopsy, the refractory nature and relentless course of IBM suggest that the underlying pathophysiology may include a dominant myodegenerative component. This chapter will focus on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of the autoimmune myopathies and IBM. An emphasis will be placed on recent advances, indicating that these are a diverse family of diseases and that each of more than a dozen myositis autoantibodies is associated with a distinct clinical phenotype. PMID:27112692

  2. Structure of Skeletal Muscle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... nerves. This is directly related to the primary function of skeletal muscle, ... an impulse from a nerve cell. Generally, an artery and at least one vein ...

  3. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in binary metallic melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. V.; Spaepen, F.

    1983-01-01

    A method for calculating the homogeneous crystal nucleation frequency in binary metallic melts is developed. The free energy of crystallization is derived from regular solution models for the liquid and solid and is used, together with model-based estimates of the interfacial tension, to calculate the nucleation frequency from the classical theory. The method can account for the composition dependence of the maximum undercooling observed in a number of experiments on small droplet dispersions. It can also be used to calculate the driving force for crystal growth and to obtain more precise estimates of the homogeneous crystal nucleation frequency in glass-forming alloys. This method, although approximate, is simple to apply, and requires only knowledge of the phase diagram and a few readily available thermodynamic quantities as input data.

  4. Beyond relationships between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A.; Katz, Alexander; Arslan, Ilke; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-08-13

    Scientists who regard catalysis as a coherent field have been striving for decades to articulate the fundamental unifying principles. But because these principles seem to be broader than chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials science combined, catalytic scientists commonly interact within the sub-domains of homogeneous, heterogeneous, and bio-catalysis, and increasingly within even narrower domains such as organocatalysis, phase-transfer catalysis, acid-base catalysis, zeolite catalysis, etc. Attempts to unify catalysis have motivated researchers to find relationships between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and to mimic enzymes. These themes have inspired vibrant international meetings and workshops, and we have benefited from the idea exchanges and have some thoughts about a path forward.

  5. Homogeneous Superpixels from Markov Random Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perbet, Frank; Stenger, Björn; Maki, Atsuto

    This paper presents a novel algorithm to generate homogeneous superpixels from Markov random walks. We exploit Markov clustering (MCL) as the methodology, a generic graph clustering method based on stochastic flow circulation. In particular, we introduce a graph pruning strategy called compact pruning in order to capture intrinsic local image structure. The resulting superpixels are homogeneous, i.e. uniform in size and compact in shape. The original MCL algorithm does not scale well to a graph of an image due to the square computation of the Markov matrix which is necessary for circulating the flow. The proposed pruning scheme has the advantages of faster computation, smaller memory footprint, and straightforward parallel implementation. Through comparisons with other recent techniques, we show that the proposed algorithm achieves state-of-the-art performance.

  6. Detonation in shocked homogeneous high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.; Souers, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied shock-induced changes in homogeneous high explosives including nitromethane, tetranitromethane, and single crystals of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by using fast time-resolved emission and Raman spectroscopy at a two-stage light-gas gun. The results reveal three distinct steps during which the homogeneous explosives chemically evolve to final detonation products. These are (1) the initiation of shock compressed high explosives after an induction period, (2) thermal explosion of shock-compressed and/or reacting materials, and (3) a decay to a steady-state representing a transition to the detonation of uncompressed high explosives. Based on a gray-body approximation, we have obtained the CJ temperatures: 3800 K for nitromethane, 2950 K for tetranitromethane, and 4100 K for PETN. We compare the data with various thermochemical equilibrium calculations. In this paper we will also show a preliminary result of single-shot time-resolved Raman spectroscopy applied to shock-compressed nitromethane.

  7. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and homogeneity in polycrystals.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gunes; Darling, T W; McCall, K R

    2009-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is capable of determining the bulk elastic properties of a solid from its characteristic vibration frequencies, given the dimensions, density and shape of the sample. The model used for extracting values of the elastic constants assumes perfect homogeneity, which can be approximated by average-isotropic polycrystals. This approximation is excellent in the small grain regime assumed for most averaging procedures, but for real samples with indeterminate grain size distributions, it is not clear where the approximation breaks down. RUS measurements were made on pure copper samples where the grain size distribution was changed by progressive heat treatments in order to find a quantitative limit for the loss of homogeneity. It is found that when a measure of the largest grains is 15% of the sample's smallest dimension, the deviation in RUS fits indicates elastic inhomogeneity. PMID:18804831

  8. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  9. Homogeneity of kappa statistics in multiple samples.

    PubMed

    Reed, J F

    2000-08-01

    The measurement of intra-observer agreement when the data are categorical has been the subject of several investigators since Cohen first proposed the kappa (kappa) as a chance-corrected coefficient of agreement for nominal scales. Subsequent procedures have been developed to assess the agreement of several raters using a dichotomous classification scheme, assess majority agreement among several raters using a polytomous classification scheme, and the use of kappa as an indicator of the quality of a measurement. Further developments include inference procedures for testing the homogeneity of k>/=2 independent kappa statistics. An executable FORTRAN code for testing the homogeneity of kappa statistics (kappa(h)) across multiple sites or studies is given. The FORTRAN program listing and/or executable programs are available from the author on request. PMID:10927153

  10. Neural control of glutamine synthetase activity in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Feng, B; Konagaya, M; Konagaya, Y; Thomas, J W; Banner, C; Mill, J; Max, S R

    1990-05-01

    The mechanism of glutamine synthetase induction in rat skeletal muscle after denervation or limb immobilization was investigated. Adult male rats were subjected to midthigh section of the sciatic nerve. At 1, 2, and 5 h and 1, 2, and 7 days after denervation, rats were killed and denervated, and contralateral control soleus and plantaris muscles were excised, weighted, homogenized, and assayed for glutamine synthetase. Glutamine synthetase activity increased approximately twofold 1 h after denervation in both muscles. By 7 days postdenervation enzyme activity had increased to three times the control level in plantaris muscle and to four times the control level in soleus muscle. Increased enzyme activity after nerve section was associated with increased maximum velocity with no change in apparent Michaelis constant. Immunotitration with an antiglutamine synthetase antibody suggested that denervation caused an increase in the number of glutamine synthetase molecules in muscle. However, Northern-blot analysis revealed no increase in the steady-state level of glutamine synthetase mRNA after denervation. A mixing experiment failed to yield evidence for the presence of a soluble factor involved in regulating the activity of glutamine synthetase in denervated muscle. A combination of denervation and dexamethasone injections resulted in additive increases in glutamine synthetase. Thus the mechanism underlying increased glutamine synthetase after denervation appears to be posttranscriptional and is distinct from that of the glucocorticoid-mediated glutamine synthetase induction previously described by us. PMID:1970709

  11. A homogenization model of the annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Luzhong; Elliott, Dawn M

    2005-08-01

    The objective of this study was to use a homogenization model of the anisotropic mechanical behavior of annulus fibrosus (AF) to address some of the issues raised in structural finite element and fiber-reinforced strain energy models. Homogenization theory describes the effect of microstructure on macroscopic material properties by assuming the material is composed of repeating representative volume elements. We first developed the general homogenization model and then specifically prescribed the model to in-plane single lamella and multi-lamellae AF properties. We compared model predictions to experimentally measured AF properties and performed parametric studies. The predicted tensile moduli (E theta and E z) and their dependence on fiber volume fraction and fiber angle were consistent with measured values. However, the model prediction for shear modulus (G thetaz) was two orders of magnitude larger than directly measured values. The values of E theta and E z were strongly dependent on the model input for matrix modulus, much more so than the fiber modulus. These parametric analyses demonstrated the contribution of the matrix in AF load support, which may play a role when protoeglycans are decreased in disc degeneration, and will also be an important design factor in tissue engineering. We next compared the homogenization model to a 3-D structural finite element model and fiber-reinforced energy models. Similarities between the three model types provided confidence in the ability of these models to predict AF tissue mechanics. This study provides a direct comparison between the several types of AF models and will be useful for interpreting previous studies and elucidating AF structure-function relationships in disc degeneration and for functional tissue engineering. PMID:15958225

  12. The Architecture of a Homogeneous Vector Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, J. L.; Hawkinson, S.; Scott, K.

    A new homogeneous computer architecture combines two fundamental techniques for high-speed computing: parallelism based on the binary n-cube interconnect, and pipelined vector arithmetic. The design makes extensive use of VLSI technology, resulting in a processing node that can be economically replicated. The new system achieves a careful balance between high-speed communication and floating-point computation. This paper describes the new architecture in detail and explores some of the issues in developing effective software.

  13. Spherical cloaking with homogeneous isotropic multilayered structures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hu, Li; Xu, Xiaofei; Feng, Yijun

    2009-04-01

    We propose a practical realization of electromagnetic spherical cloaking by layered structure of homogeneous isotropic materials. By mimicking the classic anisotropic cloak by many alternating thin layers of isotropic dielectrics, the permittivity and permeability in each isotropic layer can be properly determined by effective medium theory in order to achieve invisibility. The model greatly facilitates modeling by Mie theory and realization by multilayer coating of dielectrics. Eigenmode analysis is also presented to provide insights of the discretization in multilayers. PMID:19518392

  14. Free Radical Formation after Intensive Exercise in Thoroughbred Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    MINAMI, Yoshio; KAWAI, Minako; MIGITA, Taiko C.; HIRAGA, Atsushi; MIYATA, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Although high oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle may result in severe oxidative stress, there are no direct studies that have documented free radical production in horse muscles after intensive exercise. To find a new parameter indicating the muscle adaptation state for the training of Thoroughbred horses, we examined free radical formation in the muscle by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Ten male Thoroughbred horses received conventional training for 18 weeks. Before and after the training period, all horses performed an exhaustive incremental load exercise on a 6% incline treadmill. Muscle samples of the middle gluteal muscle were taken pre-exercise and 1 min, 1 hr, and 1 day after exercise. Muscle fiber type composition was also determined in the pre-exercise samples by immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal antibody to myosin heavy chain. We measured the free radical in the muscle homogenate using EPR at room temperature, and the amount was expressed as relative EPR signal intensity. There was a significant increase in Type IIA muscle fiber composition and a decrease in Type IIX fiber composition after the training period. Before the training period, the mean value of the relative EPR signal intensity showed a significant increase over the pre-exercise value at 1 min after the exercise and an incomplete recovery at 24 hr after the exercise. While no significant changes were found in the relative EPR signal intensity after the training period. There was a significant relationship between percentages of Type IIA fiber and change rates in EPR signal intensity at 1 min after exercise. The measurement of free radicals may be useful for determining the muscle adaptation state in the training of Thoroughbred horses. PMID:24833984

  15. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  16. MULTIGRID HOMOGENIZATION OF HETEROGENEOUS POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, J.E.; Moulton, J.D.

    2000-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); this report, however, reports on only two years research, since this project was terminated at the end of two years in response to the reduction in funding for the LDRD Program at LANL. The numerical simulation of flow through heterogeneous porous media has become a vital tool in forecasting reservoir performance, analyzing groundwater supply and predicting the subsurface flow of contaminants. Consequently, the computational efficiency and accuracy of these simulations is paramount. However, the parameters of the underlying mathematical models (e.g., permeability, conductivity) typically exhibit severe variations over a range of significantly different length scales. Thus the numerical treatment of these problems relies on a homogenization or upscaling procedure to define an approximate coarse-scale problem that adequately captures the influence of the fine-scale structure, with a resultant compromise between the competing objectives of computational efficiency and numerical accuracy. For homogenization in models of flow through heterogeneous porous media, We have developed new, efficient, numerical, multilevel methods, that offer a significant improvement in the compromise between accuracy and efficiency. We recently combined this approach with the work of Dvorak to compute bounded estimates of the homogenized permeability for such flows and demonstrated the effectiveness of this new algorithm with numerical examples.

  17. Homogeneous cooling state of frictionless rod particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Alonso-Marroquin, F.; Weinhart, T.; Luding, S.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we report some theoretical results on granular gases consisting of frictionless 3D rods with low energy dissipation. We performed simulations on the temporal evolution of soft spherocylinders, using a molecular dynamics algorithm implemented on GPU architecture. A homogeneous cooling state for rods, where the time dependence of the system's intensive variables occurs only through a global granular temperature, has been identified. We have found a homogeneous cooling process, which is in excellent agreement with Haff's law, when using an adequate rescaling time τ(ξ), the value of which depends on the particle elongation ξ and the restitution coefficient. It was further found that scaled particle velocity distributions remain approximately Gaussian regardless of the particle shape. Similarly to a system of ellipsoids, energy equipartition between rotational and translational degrees of freedom was better satisfied as one gets closer to the elastic limit. Taking advantage of scaling properties, we have numerically determined the general functionality of the magnitude Dc(ξ), which describes the efficiency of the energy interchange between rotational and translational degrees of freedom, as well as its dependence on particle shape. We have detected a range of particle elongations (1.5 < ξ < 4.0), where the average energy transfer between the rotational and translational degrees of freedom results greater for spherocylinders than for homogeneous ellipsoids with the same aspect ratio.

  18. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    PubMed Central

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschöpe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation. PMID:27275824

  19. TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul; Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy; Heavens, Alan; Clarkson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

  20. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschöpe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation. PMID:27275824

  1. Gyroelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  2. Lipid peroxidation by "free" iron ions and myoglobin as affected by dietary antioxidants in simulated gastric fluids.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, Tair; Granit, Rina; Kanner, Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Grilled red turkey muscle (Doner Kabab) is a real "fast food" containing approximately 200 microM hydroperoxides, homogenized in simulated gastric fluid and oxidized more rapidly at pH 3.0 than at pH 5.0, after 180 min, producing 1200 and 600 microM hydroperoxides, respectively. The effects of "free" iron ions and metmyoglobin, two potential catalyzers of lipid peroxidation in muscle foods, were evaluated for linoleic acid peroxidation at pH 3.0 of simulated gastric fluid. The prooxidant effects of free iron ions on linoleic acid peroxidation in simulated gastric fluid was evaluated in the presence of ascorbic acid. At low concentrations of ascorbic acid, the effects were prooxidative, which was reversed at high concentrations. In the presence of metmyoglobin, ascorbic acid with or without free iron enhanced the antioxidative effect. Lipid peroxidation by an iron-ascorbic acid system was inhibited totally by 250-500 microM catechin at pH 3.0. The catechin antioxidant effect was determined also in the iron-ascorbic acid system containing metmyoglobin. In this system, catechin totally inhibited lipid peroxidation at a concentration 20-fold lower than without metmyoglobin. The ability of catechin to inhibit lipid peroxidation was also determined at a low pH with beta-carotene as a sensitive target molecule for oxidation. The results show that a significant protection was achieved only with almost 100-fold higher antioxidant concentration. Polyphenols from different groups were determined for the antioxidant activity at pH 3.0. The results show a high antioxidant activity of polyphenols with orthodihydroxylated groups at the B ring, unsaturation, and the presence of a 4-oxo group in the heterocyclic ring, as demonstrated by quercetin. PMID:15853376

  3. A compact setup to study homogeneous nucleation and condensation.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mattias; Alxneit, Ivo; Rütten, Frederik; Wuillemin, Daniel; Tschudi, Hans Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    An experiment is presented to study homogeneous nucleation and the subsequent droplet growth at high temperatures and high pressures in a compact setup that does not use moving parts. Nucleation and condensation are induced in an adiabatic, stationary expansion of the vapor and an inert carrier gas through a Laval nozzle. The adiabatic expansion is driven against atmospheric pressure by pressurized inert gas its mass flow carefully controlled. This allows us to avoid large pumps or vacuum storage tanks. Because we eventually want to study the homogeneous nucleation and condensation of zinc, the use of carefully chosen materials is required that can withstand pressures of up to 10(6) Pa resulting from mass flow rates of up to 600 l(N) min(-1) and temperatures up to 1200 K in the presence of highly corrosive zinc vapor. To observe the formation of droplets a laser beam propagates along the axis of the nozzle and the light scattered by the droplets is detected perpendicularly to the nozzle axis. An ICCD camera allows to record the scattered light through fused silica windows in the diverging part of the nozzle spatially resolved and to detect nucleation and condensation coherently in a single exposure. For the data analysis, a model is needed to describe the isentropic core part of the flow along the nozzle axis. The model must incorporate the laws of fluid dynamics, the nucleation and condensation process, and has to predict the size distribution of the particles created (PSD) at every position along the nozzle axis. Assuming Rayleigh scattering, the intensity of the scattered light can then be calculated from the second moment of the PSD. PMID:17411197

  4. Fluid channeling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald Y. (Inventor); Hitch, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fluid channeling system includes a fluid ejector, a heat exchanger, and a fluid pump disposed in series flow communication The ejector includes a primary inlet for receiving a primary fluid, and a secondary inlet for receiving a secondary fluid which is mixed with the primary fluid and discharged therefrom as ejector discharge. Heat is removed from the ejector discharge in the heat exchanger, and the heat exchanger discharge is compressed in the fluid pump and channeled to the ejector secondary inlet as the secondary fluid In an exemplary embodiment, the temperature of the primary fluid is greater than the maximum operating temperature of a fluid motor powering the fluid pump using a portion of the ejector discharge, with the secondary fluid being mixed with the primary fluid so that the ejector discharge temperature is equal to about the maximum operating temperature of the fluid motor.

  5. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  6. Slipped and lost extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Lenart, T D; Lambert, S R

    2001-09-01

    A slipped or lost muscle should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with a marked limitation of duction and inability to rotate the eye beyond the midline. Loss of a rectus muscle can occur after strabismus surgery, trauma, paranasal sinus surgery, orbital surgery, or retinal detachment surgery. The extraocular rectus muscle most frequently slipped or lost is the medial rectus muscle. Forced ductions, active force generation, saccadic velocity studies, differential intraocular pressure measurements, and orbital imaging studies may aid in identifying a slipped or lost muscle. However, no single diagnostic test provides absolute reliability for determining a lost muscle. Slipped muscles develop when the muscular capsule is imbricated without including the muscle or muscle tendon during strabismus surgery. When the capsule is reattached to the sclera, the tendon and muscle are then free to slip posteriorally from the site of attachment. Slipped muscles are retrieved by following the thin avascular muscle capsule posteriorally until the muscle is identified. A lost muscle can be found using a traditional conjunctival approach, by an external orbitotomy, or by an endoscopic transnasal approach. Although many diagnostic maneuvers are useful in identifying a lost rectus muscle, the oculocardiac reflex is the most important. Once the lost muscle is identified, the muscle should be imbricated with a nonabsorbable synthetic suture and securely reattached to the globe. PMID:11705143

  7. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  8. Thyrotoxic muscle disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Ian

    1968-01-01

    Evidence suggests that most hyperthyroid patients have a proximal myopathy. The more severe this is the more frequently are distal muscles, and ultimately, bulbar muscles involved. Probably acute thyrotoxic myopathy or encephalopathy supervenes on a previous chronic background or occurs concurrently with skeletal muscle involvement. Using careful electromyographic techniques evidence of myopathy may be found in most thyrotoxics; it disappears with adequate treatment of the primary disease. Myasthenia gravis and periodic paralysis are also associated with thyrotoxicosis and their differentiation is discussed. Infiltrative ophthalmopathy is not related to the effects of excess thyroid hormone, but is possibly due to EPS working in conjunction with LATS. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4871773

  9. Volumetric Muscle Loss.

    PubMed

    Pollot, Beth E; Corona, Benjamin T

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) injury is prevalent in severe extremity trauma and is an emerging focus area among orthopedic and regenerative medicine fields. VML injuries are the result of an abrupt, frank loss of tissue and therefore of different etiology from other standard rodent injury models to include eccentric contraction, ischemia reperfusion, crush, and freeze injury. The current focus of many VML-related research efforts is to regenerate the lost muscle tissue and thereby improve muscle strength. Herein, we describe a VML model in the anterior compartment of the hindlimb that is permissible to repeated neuromuscular strength assessments and is validated in mouse, rat, and pig. PMID:27492162

  10. Caring for muscle spasticity or spasms

    MedlinePlus

    High muscle tone - care; Increased muscle tension - care; Upper motor neuron syndrome - care; Muscle stiffness - care ... Muscle spasticity, or spasms, causes your muscles to become stiff or rigid. It can also cause exaggerated, ...

  11. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  12. Endothelial and smooth muscle histamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, R.S.; Hollis, T.M.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine is produced within the vascular wall and mediates a variety of normal and pathologic vascular responses. The interaction of histamine with its vascular cell receptors has been shown to affect factors such as actin cable formation, cyclase activities, prostacyclin synthesis, cell motility, and proliferation. In addition, abundant evidence exists to implicate an arterial nascent histamine pool in the control of vessel wall permeability under conditions of stress and injury. However, endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors have been only incompletely characterized. The authors report here the time-dependent, saturable, and trypsin sensitive binding of /sup 3/H-histamine to the endothelial cell surface. The K/sub d/ for endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors are 0.70 and 2.80 ..mu..M respectively. Histamine binding to smooth muscle cells also exhibited saturation with concentrations of /sup 3/H-histamine up to 4 ..mu..M. While the smooth muscle cell H/sub 1/ receptor binding was negligible, the H/sub 2/ receptor appeared to represent a relatively low affinity, high capacity site for histamine binding. The uptake of /sup 3/H-histamine in both cell types displayed kinetics consistent with that of fluid-phase pinocytosis.

  13. The Chemical Homogeneity of Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Determining the level of chemical homogeneity in open clusters is of fundamental importance in the study of the evolution of star-forming clouds and that of the Galactic disk. Yet limiting the initial abundance spread in clusters has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining consistent spectroscopic abundances for different stellar types. Without reference to any specific model of stellar photospheres, a model for a homogeneous cluster is that it forms a one-dimensional sequence, with any differences between members due to variations in stellar mass and observational uncertainties. I present a novel method for investigating the abundance spread in open clusters that tests this one-dimensional hypothesis at the level of observed stellar spectra, rather than constraining homogeneity using derived abundances as is traditionally done. Using high-resolution APOGEE spectra for 49 giants in M67, NGC 6819, and NGC 2420 I demonstrate that these spectra form one-dimensional sequences for each cluster. With detailed forward modeling of the spectra and Approximate Bayesian Computation, I derive strong limits on the initial abundance spread of 15 elements: <0.01 (0.02) {dex} for C and Fe, ≲0.015 (0.03) {dex} for N, O, Mg, Si, and Ni, ≲0.02 (0.03) {dex} for Al, Ca, and Mn, and ≲0.03 (0.05) {dex} for Na, S, K, Ti, and V (at 68% and 95% confidence, respectively). The strong limits on C and O imply that no pollution by massive core-collapse supernovae occurred during star formation in open clusters, which, thus, need to form within ≲6 {Myr}. Further development of this and related techniques will bring the power of differential abundances to stars other than solar twins in large spectroscopic surveys and will help unravel the history of star formation and chemical enrichment in the Milky Way through chemical tagging.

  14. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of lunar mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of high precision measurements of relative 33S/32S, 34S/32S, and 36S/32S values in lunar mare basalts. The measurements are referenced to the Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) scale, on which the international reference material, IAEA-S-1, is characterized by δ33S = -0.061‰, δ34S ≡ -0.3‰ and δ36S = -1.27‰. The present dataset confirms that lunar mare basalts are characterized by a remarkable degree of sulfur isotopic homogeneity, with most new and published SF6-based sulfur isotope measurements consistent with a single mass-dependent mean isotopic composition of δ34S = 0.58 ± 0.05‰, Δ33S = 0.008 ± 0.006‰, and Δ36S = 0.2 ± 0.2‰, relative to V-CDT, where the uncertainties are quoted as 99% confidence intervals on the mean. This homogeneity allows identification of a single sample (12022, 281) with an apparent 33S enrichment, possibly reflecting cosmic-ray-induced spallation reactions. It also reveals that some mare basalts have slightly lower δ34S values than the population mean, which is consistent with sulfur loss from a reduced basaltic melt prior to eruption at the lunar surface. Both the sulfur isotope homogeneity of the lunar mare basalts and the predicted sensitivity of sulfur isotopes to vaporization-driven fractionation suggest that less than ≈1-10% of lunar sulfur was lost after a potential moon-forming impact event.

  15. Impact of magnetohydrodynamics in bidirectional flow of nanofluid subject to second order slip velocity and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the steady three-dimensional boundary layer flow of viscous nanofluid. The flow is caused by a permeable stretching surface with second order velocity slip and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions. Water is treated as base fluid and copper as nanoparticle. An incompressible fluid fills the porous space. The fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of an applied magnetic field. A system of ordinary differential equations is obtained by using suitable transformations. Convergent series solutions are derived. Impact of various pertinent parameters on the velocity, concentration and skin friction coefficient is discussed. Analysis of the obtained results shows that the flow field is influenced appreciably by the presence of velocity slip parameters. Also concentration distribution decreases for larger values of strength of homogeneous reaction parameter while it increases for strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter.

  16. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  17. Compressible homogeneous shear: Simulation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Compressibility effects were studied on turbulence by direct numerical simulation of homogeneous shear flow. A primary observation is that the growth of the turbulent kinetic energy decreases with increasing turbulent Mach number. The sinks provided by compressible dissipation and the pressure dilatation, along with reduced Reynolds shear stress, are shown to contribute to the reduced growth of kinetic energy. Models are proposed for these dilatational terms and verified by direct comparison with the simulations. The differences between the incompressible and compressible fields are brought out by the examination of spectra, statistical moments, and structure of the rate of strain tensor.

  18. Multifractal spectra in homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, A. E.; Keefe, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Employing numerical simulations of 3-D homogeneous shear flow, the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation, scalar dissipation and vorticity fields were calculated. The results for (128) cubed simulations of this flow, and those obtained in recent experiments that analyzed 1- and 2-D intersections of atmospheric and laboratory flows, are in some agreement. A two-scale Cantor set model of the energy cascade process which describes the experimental results from 1-D intersections quite well, describes the 3-D results only marginally.

  19. Einstein billiards and spatially homogeneous cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Buyl, Sophie; Pinardi, Gaïa; Schomblond, Christiane

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we analyse the Einstein and Einstein Maxwell billiards for all spatially homogeneous cosmological models corresponding to three- and four-dimensional real unimodular Lie algebras and provide a list of those models which are chaotic in the Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifschitz (BKL) limit. Through the billiard picture, we confirm that, in D = 5 spacetime dimensions, chaos is present if off-diagonal metric elements are kept: the finite volume billiards can be identified with the fundamental Weyl chambers of hyperbolic Kac Moody algebras. The most generic cases bring in the same algebras as in the inhomogeneous case, but other algebras appear through special initial conditions.

  20. Homogeneous system UTBLI for 1964 - 1986.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, B.; Durović, L.; Jovanović, M.

    1993-09-01

    Homogeneous results of universal time determinations derived from the observations by the Transit Instrument of Belgrade Astronomical Observatory (BLI) for the interval 1964 - 1986 are presented. They were prepared in accordance with IERS standards and listed in a table. In addition, using the smoothed values of monthly averaged UT1BLI-UT1BIH, an analysis on the variation of the local system UT1BLI is carried out, and also, systematic deviations after the adopted BIH model are shown. Undoubtedly, there exists a significant 11 - 14 year periodic change of UT1BLI system.

  1. Mirror Symmetry for Quasi-Homogeneous Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnakumara, Himal; Jarvis, Tyler

    2008-10-01

    I will present an introduction to mirror symmetry in the context of string theory. Then I will describe an instance of mirror symmetry for singularties defined by quasi-homogeneous polynomials in weighted projective spaces. Milnor rings and the FJRW (Fan-Jarvis-Ruan-Witten) rings associated with these singularities and their relation to the Landua-Ginzburg A model and the Landua-Ginzburg B model will be explained. Results of the calculations for certain singularities for which the mirror symmetry conjecture has been verified will be presented.

  2. Heterogeneity versus homogeneity of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Martinez, Nicholas E; Omura, Seiichi; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The 10th International Congress of Neuroimmunology, including the 10th European School of Neuroimmunology Course, was held by the International Society of Neuroimmunology in Sitges (Barcelona, Spain) on 26–30 October 2010. The conference covered a wide spectrum of issues and challenges in both basic science and clinical aspects of neuroimmunology. Data and ideas were shared through a variety of programs, including review talks and poster sessions. One of the topics of the congress was whether multiple sclerosis is a homogenous or heterogenous disease, clinically and pathologically, throughout its course. PMID:21426254

  3. Algebraic Reynolds stress modeling of turbulence subject to rapid homogeneous and non-homogeneous compression or expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, I. A.; Wallin, S.; Brethouwer, G.; Grundestam, O.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model (EARSM) by Grigoriev et al. ["A realizable explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model for compressible turbulent flow with significant mean dilatation," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 105112 (2013)] and the related differential Reynolds stress model (DRSM) are used to investigate the influence of homogeneous shear and compression on the evolution of turbulence in the limit of rapid distortion theory (RDT). The DRSM predictions of the turbulence kinetic energy evolution are in reasonable agreement with RDT while the evolution of diagonal components of anisotropy correctly captures the essential features, which is not the case for standard compressible extensions of DRSMs. The EARSM is shown to give a realizable anisotropy tensor and a correct trend of the growth of turbulence kinetic energy K, which saturates at a power law growth versus compression ratio, as well as retaining a normalized strain in the RDT regime. In contrast, an eddy-viscosity model results in a rapid exponential growth of K and excludes both realizability and high magnitude of the strain rate. We illustrate the importance of using a proper algebraic treatment of EARSM in systems with high values of dilatation and vorticity but low shear. A homogeneously compressed and rotating gas cloud with cylindrical symmetry, related to astrophysical flows and swirling supercritical flows, was investigated too. We also outline the extension of DRSM and EARSM to include the effect of non-homogeneous density coupled with "local mean acceleration" which can be important for, e.g., stratified flows or flows with heat release. A fixed-point analysis of direct numerical simulation data of combustion in a wall-jet flow demonstrates that our model gives quantitatively correct predictions of both streamwise and cross-stream components of turbulent density flux as well as their influence on the anisotropies. In summary, we believe that our approach, based on a proper

  4. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  5. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  6. Permian paleoclimate data from fluid inclusions in halite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benison, K.C.; Goldstein, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    This study has yielded surface water paleotemperatures from primary fluid inclusions in mid Permian Nippewalla Group halite from western Kansas. A 'cooling nucleation' method is used to generate vapor bubbles in originally all-liquid primary inclusions. Then, surface water paleotemperatures are obtained by measuring temperatures of homogenization to liquid. Homogenization temperatures ranged from 21??C to 50??C and are consistent along individual fluid inclusion assemblages, indicating that the fluid inclusions have not been altered by thermal reequilibration. Homogenization temperatures show a range of up to 26??C from base to top of individual cloudy chevron growth bands. Petrographic and fluid inclusion evidence indicate that no significant pressure correction is needed for the homogenization temperature data. We interpret these homogenization temperatures to represent shallow surface water paleotemperatures. The range in temperatures from base to top of single chevron bands may reflect daily temperatures variations. These Permian surface water temperatures fall within the same range as some modern evaporative surface waters, suggesting that this Permian environment may have been relatively similar to its modern counterparts. Shallow surface water temperatures in evaporative settings correspond closely to local air temperatures. Therefore, the Permian surface water temperatures determined in this study may be considered proxies for local Permian air temperatures.

  7. Site-to-site variability of drug concentrations in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Williams, K R; Pounder, D J

    1997-09-01

    The homogeneity of drug concentrations in skeletal muscle was assessed in eight fatal overdoses. Ten to 30 random samples were taken from leg muscle weighing 1,650 to 7,985 g. For cases involving paracetamol the mean muscle-to-blood ratio ranged from 0.1 to 1.1 (n = 4) for amitriptyline 1.1 to 3.6 (n = 3), and for dothiepin 0.8 to 2.1 (n = 2). The coefficient of variance was large for all drugs, ranging from 10.5 (carbamazepine) to 50 (thioridazine). Skeletal muscle is not homogeneous with respect to drug concentrations in fatal overdose cases. Of 16 instances of drug detection in blood 2 (nortriptyline and promethazine) were not detected in muscle. Muscle-to-blood drug ratios varied significantly among cases, possibly influenced by survival time after drug ingestion. Quantitative interpretations of muscle drug levels present significant difficulties. However, skeletal muscle can be used for qualitative corroboration of blood analyses and is a suitable specimen for drug detection where none other is available. PMID:9290870

  8. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  9. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  10. Eye muscle repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your child's eyes should look normal a few weeks after the surgery. ... Surgical Approach to the Rectus Muscles. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, ... Hug D, Plummer LS, Stass-Isern M. Disorders of eye movement and ...

  11. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment. PMID:25673127

  12. Muscles of the Trunk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Muscular System » Muscle Groups » Trunk Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  13. Muscle biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  14. Muscle fatigue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... above your shoulders until they drop is one exercise that may be performed during the Tensilon test. In this test, the drug Tensilon is administered, and the response in the muscles are evaluated to help diagnose myasthenia gravis or ...

  15. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  16. Muscle residual force enhancement: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Minozzo, Fábio Carderelli; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Muscle residual force enhancement has been observed in different muscle preparations for more than half a century. Nonetheless, its mechanism remains unclear; to date, there are three generally accepted hypotheses: 1) sarcomere length non-uniformity, 2) engagement of passive elements, and 3) an increased number of cross-bridges. The first hypothesis uses sarcomere non-homogeneity and instability to explain how “weak” sarcomeres would convey the higher tension generated by an enhanced overlap from “stronger” sarcomeres, allowing the whole system to produce higher forces than predicted by the force-length relationship; non-uniformity provides theoretical support for a large amount of the experimental data. The second hypothesis suggests that passive elements within the sarcomeres (i.e., titin) could gain strain upon calcium activation followed by stretch. Finally, the third hypothesis suggests that muscle stretch after activation would alter cross-bridge kinetics to increase the number of attached cross-bridges. Presently, we cannot completely rule out any of the three hypotheses. Different experimental results suggest that the mechanisms on which these three hypotheses are based could all coexist. PMID:23525326

  17. NO synthase II in mouse skeletal muscle is associated with caveolin 3.

    PubMed Central

    Gath, I; Ebert, J; Gödtel-Armbrust, U; Ross, R; Reske-Kunz, A B; Förstermann, U

    1999-01-01

    The inducible-type NO synthase (NOS II; iNOS) is constitutively expressed in slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres of guinea-pigs [Gath, Closs, Gödtel-Armbrust, Schmitt, Nakane, Wessler and Förstermann (1996) FASEB J. 10, 1614-1620]. Here we studied the expression of NOS II in skeletal muscle of wild-type and NOS II-deficient mice and investigated the molecular basis for the membrane association of this NOS in muscle. A basal expression of NOS II mRNA and protein was detected in skeletal muscle from untreated wild-type mice; expression increased when mice were treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). No NOS II was found in any tissue of untreated or LPS-treated NOS II-deficient mice. Immunoprecipitation experiments were performed with homogenates of gastrocnemius muscle from untreated or LPS-treated wild-type mice. A NOS II-specific antibody precipitated caveolin 3 in all homogenates investigated, the effect being most pronounced in skeletal muscle from LPS-treated animals. Conversely, an antibody against caveolin 3 co-precipitated NOS II in muscle homogenates. Similarly, a weak co-precipitation of NOS II and caveolin 3 was seen in homogenates of untreated murine C2C12 myotubes; co-precipitation was markedly enhanced in cells stimulated with LPS/interferon gamma. The association of NOS II with caveolin 3 might have implications for the regulation of contraction of, and/or glucose uptake by, slow-twitch muscle fibres. PMID:10359657

  18. Homogenization in micro-magneto-mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, A.; Keip, M.-A.; Miehe, C.

    2016-07-01

    Ferromagnetic materials are characterized by a heterogeneous micro-structure that can be altered by external magnetic and mechanical stimuli. The understanding and the description of the micro-structure evolution is of particular importance for the design and the analysis of smart materials with magneto-mechanical coupling. The macroscopic response of the material results from complex magneto-mechanical interactions occurring on smaller length scales, which are driven by magnetization reorientation and associated magnetic domain wall motions. The aim of this work is to directly base the description of the macroscopic magneto-mechanical material behavior on the micro-magnetic domain evolution. This will be realized by the incorporation of a ferromagnetic phase-field formulation into a macroscopic Boltzmann continuum by the use of computational homogenization. The transition conditions between the two scales are obtained via rigorous exploitation of rate-type and incremental variational principles, which incorporate an extended version of the classical Hill-Mandel macro-homogeneity condition covering the phase field on the micro-scale. An efficient two-scale computational scenario is developed based on an operator splitting scheme that includes a predictor for the magnetization on the micro-scale. Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations demonstrate the performance of the method. They investigate micro-magnetic domain evolution driven by macroscopic fields as well as the associated overall hysteretic response of ferromagnetic solids.

  19. Emergence of Leadership within a Homogeneous Group

    PubMed Central

    Eskridge, Brent E.; Valle, Elizabeth; Schlupp, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Large scale coordination without dominant, consistent leadership is frequent in nature. How individuals emerge from within the group as leaders, however transitory this position may be, has become an increasingly common question asked. This question is further complicated by the fact that in many of these aggregations, differences between individuals are minor and the group is largely considered to be homogeneous. In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical. Using a mathematical model developed using observations of natural systems, we show that the addition of a simple concept of leadership tendencies which is inspired by observations of natural systems and is affected by experience can produce distinct leaders and followers using a nonlinear feedback loop. Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers. Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment. PMID:26226381

  20. Emergence of Leadership within a Homogeneous Group.

    PubMed

    Eskridge, Brent E; Valle, Elizabeth; Schlupp, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Large scale coordination without dominant, consistent leadership is frequent in nature. How individuals emerge from within the group as leaders, however transitory this position may be, has become an increasingly common question asked. This question is further complicated by the fact that in many of these aggregations, differences between individuals are minor and the group is largely considered to be homogeneous. In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical. Using a mathematical model developed using observations of natural systems, we show that the addition of a simple concept of leadership tendencies which is inspired by observations of natural systems and is affected by experience can produce distinct leaders and followers using a nonlinear feedback loop. Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers. Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment. PMID:26226381

  1. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric; Jackson, Matthew G.; Barrat, Jean-Alix E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  2. Homogeneous cooling of mixtures of particle shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, R. C.; Serero, D.; Pöschel, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we examine theoretically the cooling dynamics of binary mixtures of spheres and rods. To this end, we introduce a generalized mean field analytical theory, which describes the free cooling behavior of the mixture. The relevant characteristic time scale for the cooling process is derived, depending on the mixture composition and the aspect ratio of the rods. We simulate mixtures of spherocylinders and spheres using a molecular dynamics algorithm implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture. We systematically study mixtures composed of spheres and rods with several aspect ratios and varying the mixture composition. A homogeneous cooling state, where the time dependence of the system's intensive variables occurs only through a global granular temperature, is identified. We find cooling dynamics in excellent agreement with Haff's law, when using an adequate time scale. Using the scaling properties of the homogeneous cooling dynamics, we estimated numerically the efficiency of the energy interchange between rotational and translational degrees of freedom for collisions between spheres and rods.

  3. Bound potassium in muscle II.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Z

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to decide between the alternatives a) the ionized K+ is in a dissolved state in the muscle water, or b) a part of the muscle potassium is in a "bound' state. Sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta were put into glicerol for about one hour at 0-2 degrees C. Most of muscle water came out, but most of muscle potassium remained in the muscles. In contrast to this: from muscle in heat rigor more potassium was released due to glicerol treating than from the intact ones. 1. Supposition a) is experimentally refuted. 2. Supposition b) corresponds to the experimental results. PMID:6969511

  4. Ciliary fluid transport enhanced by viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Motile cilia encounter complex, non-Newtonian fluids as they beat to gain self-propulsion of cells, transport fluids, and mix particles. Recently there have been many studies on swimming in complex fluids, both experimentally and theoretically. However the role of the non-Newtonian fluid in the ciliary transport system remains largely unknown. Here we use a one-way-coupled immersed boundary method to evaluate the impacts of viscoelastic fluid (Oldroyd-B fluid) on the fluid transport generated by an array of rabbit tracheal cilia beating in a channel at low Reynolds number. Our results show that the viscoelasticity could enhance the fluid transport generated by the rabbit tracheal cilia beating pattern and the flow is sensitive to the Deborah number in the range we investigate.

  5. Effective property models for homogeneous two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, M.M.; Muzychka, Y.S.

    2008-10-15

    Using an analogy between thermal conductivity of porous media and viscosity in two-phase flow, new definitions for two-phase viscosity are proposed. These new definitions satisfy the following two conditions: namely (i) the two-phase viscosity is equal to the liquid viscosity at the mass quality = 0% and (ii) the two-phase viscosity is equal to the gas viscosity at the mass quality = 100%. These new definitions can be used to compute the two-phase frictional pressure gradient using the homogeneous modeling approach. These new models are assessed using published experimental data of two-phase frictional pressure gradient in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels in the form of Fanning friction factor (f{sub m}) versus Reynolds number (Re{sub m}). The published data include different working fluids such as R-12, R-22, argon (R740), R717, R134a, R410A and propane (R290) at different diameters and different saturation temperatures. Models are assessed on the basis minimizing the root mean square error (e{sub RMS}). It is shown that these new definitions of two-phase viscosity can be used to analyze the experimental data of two-phase frictional pressure gradient in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels using simple friction models. (author)

  6. Network Structure of Two-Dimensional Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Kunihiko; Nair, Aditya; Brunton, Steven

    2015-11-01

    The network structure of two-dimensional incompressible homogeneous turbulence is characterized by highlighting the vortical interactions in the flow field. By analyzing the degree distribution of the turbulence network, it is observed that turbulence has an underlying scale-free network that describes how vortical structures are interconnected. In the network-theoretic framework, we can identify strong vortices that serve as hubs that are strongly connected to other vortical hubs. Smaller and weaker eddies are found to be predominantly influenced by the neighboring hubs. These observations complement previous knowledge of turbulence based on vortex dynamics. The time evolution of the fluid flow network shows that the scale-free property is achieved when turbulence is sustained but is not observed when the flow reaches a laminar regime through dissipation. The finding that turbulence has a scale-free interaction network enables us to identify the type of perturbations that turbulence is resilient against. These insights from network analysis enable us to examine how the behavior of turbulent flows can be modified. This work was supported by the US Army Research Office (Grant W911NF-14-1-0386) and the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant FA9550-13-1-0183).

  7. Numerical Experiments on Homogeneous Strained Turbulence Subjected to Coriolis Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, K.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Homogeneous turbulent flows with various combinations of strain-rate, rotation rate and coriolis force capture some important aspects of more complex flows with streamline curvature and rotation. Presently, a situation is considered in which as a box of turbulence rotates, strain axes rotate with it. This is to be contrasted with the elliptic streamline flow in which the strain axes are fixed in an inertial frame. The elliptic flow is known to exhibit (inviscid) growth of turbulent energy and one might expect even more rapid growth with the strain-axes following the box. Instead, it is found that the sign of the Reynolds shear stress is reversed leading to a negative production term for turbulent energy. Partial understanding of the phenomenon is obtained from a consideration of the rotation of inertial waves relative to the strain axes as well as the "pressure-less" RDT argument put forward by Cambon etal. [J. Fluid Mech, 278, 175]. Some comparisons with the predictions of second-order closure models will be presented.

  8. Diabetic Muscle Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Morcuende, José A; Dobbs, Matthew B; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Crawford, Haemish

    2000-01-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus that is not clearly defined in the orthopaedic literature. This study is a descriptive case series of 7 new cases of diabetic muscle infarction and 55 previously reported cases in the literature. In the majority of patients, diabetic muscle infarction presents as a localized, exquisitely painful swelling and limited range of motion of the lower extremity. No cases affecting the muscles of the upper extremity have been observed. The onset is usually acute, persists for several weeks, and resolves spontaneously over several weeks to months without the need for intervention. Diabetic muscle infarction is a condition that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any diabetic patient with lower extremity pain and swelling without systemic signs of infection. Magnetic resonance imaging is sensitive and specific enough to make the diagnosis. Muscle biopsy and surgical irrigation and debridement are not recommended since they are associated with complications. Pain management and activity restriction in the acute phase followed by gentle physical therapy is the treatment of choice. Recurrences in the same or opposite limb are common. Although the short-term prognosis is very good and the majority of cases resolve spontaneously, the long-term survival is uncertain in this patient population. PMID:10934627

  9. The stability of a homogeneous suspension of chemotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, G.; Koch, Donald L.; Fitzgibbon, Sean R.

    2011-04-01

    The linear stability of a homogeneous dilute suspension of chemotactic bacteria in a constant chemoattractant gradient is analyzed. The bacteria execute a run-and-tumble motion, typified by the species E. coli, wherein periods of smooth swimming (runs) are interrupted by abrupt uncorrelated changes in swimming direction (tumbles). Bacteria tumble less frequently when swimming toward regions of higher chemoattractant concentration, leading to a mean bacterial orientation and velocity in the base state. The stability of an unbounded suspension, both with and without a chemoattractant, is controlled by coupled long wavelength perturbations of the fluid velocity and bacterial orientation fields. In the former case, the most unstable perturbations have their wave vector oriented along the chemoattractant gradient. Chemotaxis reduces the critical bacteria concentration, for the onset of collective swimming, compared with that predicted by Subramanian and Koch ["Critical bacterial concentration for the onset of collective swimming," J. Fluid Mech. 632, 359 (2009)] in the absence of a chemoattractant. A part of this decrease may be attributed to the increase in the mean tumbling time in the presence of a chemoattractant gradient. A second destabilizing influence comes from the ability of the shearing motion, associated with a velocity perturbation in which the velocity and chemical gradients are aligned, to sweep prealigned bacteria into the local extensional quadrant thereby creating a stronger destabilizing active stress than in an initially isotropic suspension. The chemoattractant gradient also fundamentally alters the unstable spectrum for any finite wavenumber. In suspensions of bacteria that do not tumble, Saintillan and Shelley ["Instabilities and pattern formation in active particle suspensions: Kinetic theory and continuum simulations," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 178103 (2008); "Instabilities, pattern formation and mixing in active suspensions," Phys. Fluids 20

  10. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  11. Synovial fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  12. Pleural fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of pleural fluid ... lungs fill a person's chest with air. If fluid builds up in the space outside the lungs ... chest, it can cause many problems. Removing the fluid can relieve a person's breathing problems and help ...

  13. Pericardial fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pericardial fluid ... the heart (the pericardium). A small amount of fluid is removed. You may have an ECG and ... x-ray after the test. Sometimes the pericardial fluid is taken during open heart surgery. The sample ...

  14. Pleural fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pleural fluid ... is used to get a sample of pleural fluid. The sample is sent to a laboratory and ... the chest wall into the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you may cough ...

  15. Muscle recruitment variations during wrist flexion exercise: MR evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleckenstein, J. L.; Watumull, D.; Bertocci, L. A.; Nurenberg, P.; Peshock, R. M.; Payne, J. A.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many exercise protocols used in physiological studies assume homogeneous and diffuse muscle recruitment. To test this assumption during a "standard" wrist flexion protocol, variations in muscle recruitment were assessed using MRI in eight healthy subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Variations were assessed by comparing the right to the left forearms and the effect of slight (15 degrees) pronation or supination at the wrist. RESULTS: Postexercise imaging showed focal regions of increased signal intensity (SI), indicating relatively strong recruitment, most often in entire muscles, although occasionally only in subvolumes of muscles. In 15 of 26 studies, flexor carpi radialis (FCR) showed more SI than flexor carpi ulnaris, while in 11 studies SI in these muscles increased equivalently. Relatively greater FCR recruitment was seen during pronation and/or use of the nondominant side. Palmaris longus, a wrist flexor, did not appear recruited in 4 of 11 forearms in which it was present. A portion of the superficial finger flexor became hyperintense in 89% of studies, while recruitment of the deep finger flexor was seen only in 43%. CONCLUSION: Inter- and intraindividual variations in forearm muscle recruitment should be anticipated in physiological studies of standard wrist flexion exercise protocols.

  16. Heat production during contraction in skeletal muscle of hypothyroid mice

    SciTech Connect

    Leijendekker, W.J.; van Hardeveld, C.; Elzinga, G. )

    1987-08-01

    The effect of hypothyroidism on tension-independent and -dependent heat produced during a twitch and a tetanic contraction of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle of mice was examined. The amount of heat produced during a twitch and the rate of heat development during a tetanus of EDL and soleus were measured at and above optimal length. The effect of hypothyroidism on force production was <30%. Straight lines were used to fit the relation between heat production and force. Hypothyroidism significantly decreases tension-independent heat during contraction of EDL and soleus muscle. Because the tension-independent heat is considered to be related to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling, these findings suggest that ATP splitting due to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling is reduced in hypothyroid mice. This conclusion was strengthened by the observation that the oxalate-supported {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-uptake activity and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-loading capacity of muscle homogenates from hypothyroid mice were reduced, respectively, to 51 and to 65% in soleus and to 63 and 73% in EDL muscle as compared with euthyroid mice. The tension-dependent rate of heat development during a tetanus was also decreased in soleus muscle of hypothyroid mice. This suggests a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis related to cross-bridge cycling in this muscle due to the hypothyroid state.

  17. Validation of the use of homogeneous reference phantoms for optical tomography of the neonatal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Rozarina M.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Gibson, Adam; Everdell, Nick; Austin, Topun; Meek, Judith H.; Arridge, Simon R.; Wyatt, John S.; Delpy, David T.

    2003-07-01

    Optical tomography is being developed at UCL as a tool for understanding the mechanisms of haemorrhagic and hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and assessing the effectiveness of novel neural rescue therapies in the newborn infant. Our 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging system measures photon flight times between multiple pairs of points on the surface of the head, and images sensitive to local variation in tissue absorption and scattering properties are reconstructed using non-linear algorithms. Several studies have been performed on premature infants using custom-built helmets, which hold up to 32 sources and detectors in contact with the head. Simulations have revealed that combining data with reference measurements acquired on a homogeneous object using the same fibre locations can significantly reduce errors in reconstructions due to uncertainty in the location of the sources and detectors. To provide the reference data, a homogeneous phantom based on a balloon filled with a scattering fluid of precisely known optical properties was made and inserted into the helmet immediately following each infant scan. In this paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of this approach by acquiring data on a realistically head-shaped phantom containing a small perturbation, and reconstructing it using the homogeneous head-shaped phantom and the fluid-filled balloon.

  18. Characteristics of Spatiotemporally Homogenized Boundary Layers at Atmospheric Reentry-like Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layers approximating those found on the NASA Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle thermal protection system during atmospheric reentry from the International Space Station have been studied by direct numerical simulation using a ``slow growth'' spatiotemporal homogenization approach recently developed by Topalian et al. The two data sets generated were Mae ~ 0 . 9 and 1 . 15 homogenized boundary layers possessing Reθ ~ 382 and 531, respectively. Edge-to-wall temperature ratios were approximately 4.15 and wall blowing velocities, vw+ =vw /uτ , were roughly 8 ×10-3 . The favorable pressure gradients had Pohlhausen parameters between 25 and 42. Nusselt numbers under 22 were observed. Small or negative displacement effects are evident. Near-wall vorticity fluctuations show qualitatively different profiles than observed by Spalart [J. Fluid Mech. 187 (1988)] or Guarini et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 414 (2000)] suggesting that the simulations have atypical structures perhaps as a consequence of wall blowing or the homogenization. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  19. Optimization of fluid front dynamics in porous media using rate control. I. Equal mobility fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sudaryanto, Bagus; Yortsos, Yannis C.

    2000-07-01

    In applications involving the injection of a fluid in a porous medium to displace another fluid, a main objective is the maximization of the displacement efficiency. For a fixed arrangement of injection and production points (sources and sinks), such optimization is possible by controling the injection rate policy. Despite its practical relevance, however, this aspect has received scant attention in the literature. In this paper, we provide a fundamental approach based on optimal control theory, for the simplified case when the fluids are miscible, of equal viscosity, and in the absence of dispersion and gravity effects. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media are considered. From a fluid dynamics viewpoint, this is a problem in the deformation of material lines in porous media, as a function of time-varying injection rates. It is shown that the optimal injection policy that maximizes the displacement efficiency, at the time of arrival of the injected fluid, is of the ''bang-bang'' type, in which the rates take their extreme values in the range allowed. This result applies to both homogeneous and heterogeneous media. Examples in simple geometries and for various constraints are shown, illustrating the efficiency improvement over the conventional approach of constant rate injection. In the heterogeneous case, the effect of the permeability heterogeneity, particularly its spatial correlation structure, on diverting the flow paths, is analyzed. It is shown that bang-bang injection remains the optimal approach, compared to constant rate, particularly if they were both designed under the assumption that the medium was homogeneous. Experiments in a homogeneous Hele-Shaw cell are found to be in good agreement with the theory. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Fluid sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studenick, D. K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inlet leak is described for sampling gases, more specifically, for selectively sampling multiple fluids. This fluid sampling device includes a support frame. A plurality of fluid inlet devices extend through the support frame and each of the fluid inlet devices include a longitudinal aperture. An opening device that is responsive to a control signal selectively opens the aperture to allow fluid passage. A closing device that is responsive to another control signal selectively closes the aperture for terminating further fluid flow.

  1. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation. PMID:15532311

  2. Effects in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The first biological action of amylin to be described was the inhibition of insulin-stimulated incorporation of radiolabeled glucose into glycogen in the isolated soleus muscle of the rat. This antagonism of insulin action in muscle was non-competitive, occurring with equal potency and efficacy at all insulin concentrations. Amylin inhibited activation of glycogen synthase, partially accounting for the inhibition of radiolabeled glucose incorporation. However, this did not account for a low rate of labeling at higher amylin concentrations, wherein the radioglycogen accumulation was even less than in incubations where insulin was absent. The principal action of amylin accounting for reduction of insulin-stimulated accumulation of glycogen was activation of glycogen phosphorylase via a cyclic AMP-, protein kinase C-dependent signaling pathway to cause glycogenolysis (glycogen breakdown). At physiological concentrations, amylin activated glycogen phosphorylase at its ED50, but because glycogen phosphorylase is present in such high activity, the resulting flux out of glycogen was estimated to be similar to insulin-mediated flux of glucosyl moieties into glycogen. Thus, in the rat, endogenous amylin secreted in response to meals appeared to mobilize carbon from skeletal muscle. Amylin-induced glycogenolysis resulted in intramuscular accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate and release of lactate from tissue beds that included muscle. When muscle glycogen was pre-labeled with tritium in the three position, amylin could be shown to evoke the release of free glucose. This is made possible by glucosyl moieties cleaved at the branch points in glycogen being released as free glucose, rather than being phosphorylated, as occurs with the bulk of the glycogen glucosyls. Free glucose is free to exit cells via facilitated transport, down a concentration gradient that might exist under such circumstances. When measured by a sensitive technique utilizing efflux of labeled glucose, amylin

  3. Fetal stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration: a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Pozzobon, Michela; Franzin, Chiara; Piccoli, Martina; De Coppi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    More than 40% of the body mass is represented by muscle tissue, which possesses the innate ability to regenerate after damage through the activation of muscle-specific stem cells, namely satellite cells. Muscle diseases, in particular chronic degenerative states of skeletal muscle such as dystrophies, lead to a perturbation of the regenerative process, which causes the premature exhaustion of satellite cell reservoir due to continuous cycles of degeneration/regeneration. Nowadays, the research is focused on different therapeutic approaches, ranging from gene and cell to pharmacological therapy, but still there is no definitive cure in particular for genetic muscle disease. Keeping this in mind, in this article, we will give special consideration to muscle diseases and the use of fetal derived stem cells as a new approach for therapy. Cells of fetal origin, from cord blood to placenta and amniotic fluid, can be easily obtained without ethical concern, expanded and differentiated in culture, and possess immune-modulatory properties. The in vivo approach in animal models can be helpful to study the mechanism underneath the operating principle of the stem cell reservoir, namely the niche, which holds great potential to understand the onset of muscle pathologies. PMID:25221507

  4. Rapid fluorescence screening assay for tetracyclines in chicken muscle.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marilyn J; Lehotay, Steven J

    2004-01-01

    A simple, rapid fluorescence assay was developed for screening tetracyclines in chicken muscle at the U.S. tolerance level (2 mg/kg). The method requires only a homogenization of the tissue in acetonitrile-ammonium hydroxide, centrifugation, addition of Mg+2, and another centrifugation before fluorescence of the supernatant is measured at 505 nm (excitation at 385 nm). Comparison of the fluorescence of control chicken muscle extracts with extracts from muscle fortified with either 2 mg/kg tetracycline, oxytetracycline, or chlortetracycline showed no overlap. A threshold level set at the average fluorescence for a series of fortified 2 mg/kg samples minus 3sigma minimized false-negative responses to provide a successful screening method. The method was tested with blinded samples as controls or samples fortified with tetracycline, oxytetracycline, or chlortetracycline in order to demonstrate its utility. This approach can provide an alternative to microbial screening assays. PMID:15287655

  5. Nanodosimetric track structure in homogeneous extended beams.

    PubMed

    Conte, V; Moro, D; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

    2015-09-01

    Physical aspects of particle track structure are important in determining the induction of clustered damage in relevant subcellular structures like the DNA and higher-order genomic structures. The direct measurement of track-structure properties of ionising radiation is feasible today by counting the number of ionisations produced inside a small gas volume. In particular, the so-called track-nanodosimeter, installed at the TANDEM-ALPI accelerator complex of LNL, measures ionisation cluster-size distributions in a simulated subcellular structure of dimensions 20 nm, corresponding approximately to the diameter of the chromatin fibre. The target volume is irradiated by pencil beams of primary particles passing at specified impact parameter. To directly relate these measured track-structure data to radiobiological measurements performed in broad homogeneous particle beams, these data can be integrated over the impact parameter. This procedure was successfully applied to 240 MeV carbon ions and compared with Monte Carlo simulations for extended fields. PMID:25848108

  6. Homogeneously dispersed multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Bajdich, Michal; García-Melchor, Max; Han, Lili; Xu, Jixian; Liu, Min; Zheng, Lirong; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Dinh, Cao Thang; Fan, Fengjia; Yuan, Mingjian; Yassitepe, Emre; Chen, Ning; Regier, Tom; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yuhang; De Luna, Phil; Janmohamed, Alyf; Xin, Huolin L; Yang, Huagui; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-04-15

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials substantially above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxyhydroxides materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxyhydroxides exhibit the lowest overpotential (191 millivolts) reported at 10 milliamperes per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. The catalyst shows no evidence of degradation after more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computational studies reveal a synergistic interplay between tungsten, iron, and cobalt in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER. PMID:27013427

  7. The homogeneity conjecture for supergravity backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José Miguel

    2009-06-01

    These notes record three lectures given at the workshop "Higher symmetries in Physics", held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in November 2008. In them we explain how to construct a Lie (super)algebra associated to a spin manifold, perhaps with extra geometric data, and a notion of privileged spinors. The typical examples are supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds; although there are more classical instances of this construction. We focus on two results: the geometric constructions of compact real forms of the simple Lie algebras of type B4, F4 and E8 from S7, S8 and S15, respectively; and the construction of the Killing superalgebra of eleven-dimensional supergravity backgrounds. As an application of this latter construction we show that supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds with enough supersymmetry are necessarily locally homogeneous.

  8. RF Spectroscopy on a Homogeneous Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenjie; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades RF spectroscopy has been established as an indispensable tool to probe a large variety of fundamental properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases. This ranges from measurement of the pairing gap over tan's contact to the quasi-particle weight of Fermi polarons. So far, most RF spectroscopy experiments have been performed in harmonic traps, resulting in an averaged response over different densities. We have realized an optical uniform potential for ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li atoms, which allows us to avoid the usual problems connected to inhomogeneous systems. Here we present recent results on RF spectroscopy of these homogeneous samples with a high signal to noise ratio. In addition, we report progress on measuring the contact of a unitary Fermi gas across the normal to superfluid transition.

  9. Analysis of homogeneous turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A. D.; Hill, J. C.; Mahalingam, S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Full turbulence simulations at low Reynolds numbers were made for the single-step, irreversible, bimolecular reaction between non-premixed reactants in isochoric, decaying homogeneous turbulence. Various initial conditions for the scalar field were used in the simulations to control the initial scalar dissipation length scale, and simulations were also made for temperature-dependent reaction rates and for non-stoichiometric and unequal diffusivity conditions. Joint probability density functions (pdf's), conditional pdf's, and various statistical quantities appearing in the moment equations were computed. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates that compressive strain-rate correlates better than other dynamical quantities with local reaction rate, and the locations of peak reaction rates seem to be insensitive to the scalar field initial conditions.

  10. Soliton production with nonlinear homogeneous lines

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.; Coleman, Phillip D.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Petney, Sharon Joy Victor; Dudley, Evan C.; Youngman, Kevin; Penner, Tim Dwight; Fang, Lu; Myers, Katherine M.

    2015-11-24

    Low- and high-voltage Soliton waves were produced and used to demonstrate collision and compression using diode-based nonlinear transmission lines. Experiments demonstrate soliton addition and compression using homogeneous nonlinear lines. We built the nonlinear lines using commercially available diodes. These diodes are chosen after their capacitance versus voltage dependence is used in a model and the line design characteristics are calculated and simulated. Nonlinear ceramic capacitors are then used to demonstrate high-voltage pulse amplification and compression. The line is designed such that a simple capacitor discharge, input signal, develops soliton trains in as few as 12 stages. We also demonstrated output voltages in excess of 40 kV using Y5V-based commercial capacitors. The results show some key features that determine efficient production of trains of solitons in the kilovolt range.

  11. Soliton production with nonlinear homogeneous lines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.; Coleman, Phillip D.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Petney, Sharon Joy Victor; Dudley, Evan C.; Youngman, Kevin; Penner, Tim Dwight; Fang, Lu; Myers, Katherine M.

    2015-11-24

    Low- and high-voltage Soliton waves were produced and used to demonstrate collision and compression using diode-based nonlinear transmission lines. Experiments demonstrate soliton addition and compression using homogeneous nonlinear lines. We built the nonlinear lines using commercially available diodes. These diodes are chosen after their capacitance versus voltage dependence is used in a model and the line design characteristics are calculated and simulated. Nonlinear ceramic capacitors are then used to demonstrate high-voltage pulse amplification and compression. The line is designed such that a simple capacitor discharge, input signal, develops soliton trains in as few as 12 stages. We also demonstrated outputmore » voltages in excess of 40 kV using Y5V-based commercial capacitors. The results show some key features that determine efficient production of trains of solitons in the kilovolt range.« less

  12. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  13. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  14. A Physiologically Based, Multi-Scale Model of Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Röhrle, O.; Davidson, J. B.; Pullan, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle’s response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modeling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle’s response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modeling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibers and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor-unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behavior of single muscle fibers within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenization. The effect of homogenization has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibers and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the tibialis anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modeling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behavior ranging from motor-unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue. PMID:22993509

  15. Waves on a vortex in a stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billant, Paul; Le Dizes, Stephane

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the waves of a vertical Rankine vortex in a strongly stratified fluid. These waves are very different from their well-known counterpart in homogeneous fluid (Kelvin waves). They exist only for non-axisymmetric azimuthal wavenumbers, their frequency is always positive and strikingly, they are weakly unstable because of radiation towards infinity. Asymptotic results that hint the instability mechanism will be presented.

  16. Thermodynamics and flow-frames for dissipative relativistic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ván, P.; Biró, T. S.

    2014-01-14

    A general thermodynamic treatment of dissipative relativistic fluids is introduced, where the temperature four vector is not parallel to the velocity field of the fluid. Generic stability and kinetic equilibrium points out a particular thermodynamics, where the temperature vector is parallel to the enthalpy flow vector and the choice of the flow fixes the constitutive functions for viscous stress and heat. The linear stability of the homogeneous equilibrium is proved in a mixed particle-energy flow-frame.

  17. High frequency homogenization for structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolde, E.; Craster, R. V.; Kaplunov, J.

    2011-03-01

    We consider a net created from elastic strings as a model structure to investigate the propagation of waves through semi-discrete media. We are particularly interested in the development of continuum models, valid at high frequencies, when the wavelength and each cell of the net are of similar order. Net structures are chosen as these form a general two-dimensional example, encapsulating the essential physics involved in the two-dimensional excitation of a lattice structure whilst retaining the simplicity of dealing with elastic strings. Homogenization techniques are developed here for wavelengths commensurate with the cellular scale. Unlike previous theories, these techniques are not limited to low frequency or static regimes, and lead to effective continuum equations valid on a macroscale with the details of the cellular structure encapsulated only through integrated quantities. The asymptotic procedure is based upon a two-scale approach and the physical observation that there are frequencies that give standing waves, periodic with the period or double-period of the cell. A specific example of a net created by a lattice of elastic strings is constructed, the theory is general and not reliant upon the net being infinite, none the less the infinite net is a useful special case for which Bloch theory can be applied. This special case is explored in detail allowing for verification of the theory, and highlights the importance of degenerate cases; the specific example of a square net is treated in detail. An additional illustration of the versatility of the method is the response to point forcing which provides a stringent test of the homogenized equations; an exact Green's function for the net is deduced and compared to the asymptotics.

  18. Homogenization of global radiosonde humidity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschek, Michael; Haimberger, Leopold

    2016-04-01

    The global radiosonde network is an important source of upper-air measurements and is strongly connected to reanalysis efforts of the 20th century. However, measurements are strongly affected by changes in the observing system and require a homogenization before they can be considered useful in climate studies. In particular humidity measurements are known to show spurious trends and biases induced by many sources, e.g. reporting practices or freezing of the sensor. We propose to detect and correct these biases in an automated way, as has been done with temperature and winds. We detect breakpoints in dew point depression (DPD) time series by employing a standard normal homogeneity test (SNHT) on DPD-departures from ERA-Interim. In a next step, we calculate quantile departures between the latter and the earlier part near the breakpoints of the time series, going back in time. These departures adjust the earlier distribution of DPD to the latter distribution, called quantile matching, thus removing for example a non climatic shift. We employ this approach to the existing radiosonde network. In a first step to verify our approach we compare our results with ERA-Interim data and brightness temperatures of humidity-sensitive channels of microwave measuring radiometers (SSMIS) onboard DMSP F16. The results show that some of the biases can be detected and corrected in an automated way, however large biases that impact the distribution of DPD values originating from known reporting practices (e.g. 30 DPD on US stations) remain. These biases can be removed but not corrected. The comparison of brightness temperatures from satellite and radiosondes proofs to be difficult as large differences result from for example representative errors.

  19. Biomarkers of peripheral muscle fatigue during exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biomarkers of peripheral muscle fatigue (BPMFs) are used to offer insights into mechanisms of exhaustion during exercise in order to detect abnormal fatigue or to detect defective metabolic pathways. This review aims at describing recent advances and future perspectives concerning the most important biomarkers of muscle fatigue during exercise. Results BPMFs are classified according to the mechanism of fatigue related to adenosine-triphosphate-metabolism, acidosis, or oxidative-metabolism. Muscle fatigue is also related to an immunological response. impaired calcium handling, disturbances in bioenergetic pathways, and genetic responses. The immunological and genetic response may make the muscle susceptible to fatigue but may not directly cause muscle fatigue. Production of BPMFs is predominantly dependent on the type of exercise. BPMFs need to change as a function of the process being monitored, be stable without appreciable diurnal variations, correlate well with exercise intensity, and be present in detectable amounts in easily accessible biological fluids. The most well-known BPMFs are serum lactate and interleukin-6. The most widely applied clinical application is screening for defective oxidative metabolism in mitochondrial disorders by means of the lactate stress test. The clinical relevance of most other BPMFs, however, is under debate, since they often depend on age, gender, physical fitness, the energy supply during exercise, the type of exercise needed to produce the BPMF, and whether healthy or diseased subjects are investigated. Conclusions Though the role of BPMFs during fatigue is poorly understood, measuring BPMFs under specific, standardised conditions appears to be helpful for assessing biological states or processes during exercise and fatigue. PMID:23136874

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, T; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A; Farooq, M

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ-perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears. PMID:27280883

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A.; Farooq, M.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ—perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears. PMID:27280883

  2. The anatomy of the hip abductor muscles.

    PubMed

    Flack, N A M S; Nicholson, H D; Woodley, S J

    2014-03-01

    The anatomy of the hip abductors has not been comprehensively examined, yet is important to understanding function and pathology in the gluteal region. For example, pathology of the hip abductor muscle-tendon complexes can cause greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and may be associated with gluteal atrophy and fatty infiltration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed morphology of gluteus medius (GMed), gluteus minimus (GMin), and tensor fascia lata (TFL), and determine whether the muscles comprised anatomical compartments. The gluteal region from 12 cadavers was dissected and data collected on attachment sites, volume, fascicular and tendinous anatomy, and innervation. Three sites of GMed origin were identified (gluteal fossa, gluteal aponeurosis, and posteroinferior edge of the iliac crest) and the distal tendon had lateral and posterior parts. GMed was the largest in volume (27.6 ± 11.6 cm(3); GMin 14.1 ± 11.1 cm(3); TFL 1.8 ± 0.8 cm(3)). Fascicles of GMin originated from the gluteal fossa, inserting onto the deep surface of its distal tendon and the hip joint capsule. TFL was encapsulated in the fascia lata, having no bony attachment. Primary innervation patterns varied for GMed, with three or four branches supplying different regions of muscle. Distinct secondary nerve branches entered four regions of GMin; no differential innervation was observed for TFL. On the basis of architectural parameters and innervation, GMed, and GMin each comprise of four compartments but TFL is a homogenous muscle. It is anticipated that these data will be useful for future clinical and functional studies of the hip abductors. PMID:23625344

  3. Homogeneity study of candidate reference material in fish matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, J. C.; Sarkis, J. E. S.; Hortellani, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    A material is perfectly homogeneous with respect to a given characteristic, or composition, if there is no difference between the values obtained from one part to another. Homogeneity is usually evaluated using analysis of variance (ANOVA). However, the requirement that populations of data to be processed must have a normal distribution and equal variances greatly limits the use of this statistical tool. A more suitable test for assessing the homogeneity of RMs, known as "sufficient homogeneity", was proposed by Fearn and Thompson. In this work, we evaluate the performance of the two statistical treatments for assessing homogeneity of methylmercury (MeHg) in candidate reference material of fish tissue.

  4. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  5. Muscle Injuries in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Delos, Demetris; Maak, Travis G.; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Muscle injuries are extremely common in athletes and often produce pain, dysfunction, and the inability to return to practice or competition. Appropriate diagnosis and management can optimize recovery and minimize time to return to play. Evidence Acquisition: Contemporary papers, both basic science and clinical medicine, that investigate muscle healing were reviewed. A Medline/PubMed search inclusive of years 1948 to 2012 was performed. Results: Diagnosis can usually be made according to history and physical examination for most injuries. Although data are limited, initial conservative management emphasizing the RICE principles and immobilization of the extremity for several days for higher grade injuries are typically all that is required. Injection of corticosteroids may clinically enhance function after an acute muscle strain. Additional adjunctive treatments (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, platelet-rich plasma, and others) to enhance muscle healing and limit scar formation show promise but need additional data to better define their roles. Conclusion: Conservative treatment recommendations will typically lead to successful outcomes after a muscle injury. There is limited evidence to support most adjunctive treatments. PMID:24459552

  6. Optimization of Fluid Front Dynamics in Porous Media Using Rate Control: I. Equal Mobility Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaryanto, Bagus; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    1999-10-18

    In applications involving this injection of a fluid in a porous medium to displace another fluid, a main objective is the maximization of the displacement efficiency. For a fixed arrangement of injection and production points (sources and sinks), such optimization is possible by controlling the injection rate policy. Despite its practical relevance, however, this aspect has received scant attention in the literature. In this paper, a fundamental approach based on optimal control theory, for the case when the fluids are miscible, of equal viscosity and in the absence of dispersion and gravity effects. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media are considered. From a fluid dynamics viewpoint, this is a problem in the deformation of material lines in porous media, as a function of time-varying injection rates.

  7. Three-dimensional vortex dynamics in superfluid /sup 4/He: Homogeneous superfluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, K.W.

    1988-08-01

    The behavior of a tangle of quantized vortex lines subject to uniform superfluid and normal-fluid driving velocities is investigated. The dynamical equation of the quantized vortices in the local approximation is supplemented by the assumption that when two such singularities cross, they undergo a reconnection. The properties of the dynamical equation, when combined with the assumption of homogeneity, imply numerous scaling relations, which are in fact observed experimentally. The primitive dynamical rules are utilized to perform extensive numerical simulations of the vortex tangle, using not only periodic, but also smooth-wall and rough-wall boundary conditions. All lead to the same homogeneous vortex-tangle state, although the case of periodic boundary conditions requires an additional trick to eliminate artificial features. The quantitative results obtained from these simulations are found to be in excellent absolute agreement with a large variety of experiments, including recent studies of the vortex-tangle anisotropy.

  8. Molecular dynamics of fluids and droplets in patterned nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, M.

    2008-07-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chain molecule fluids in nanochannels reveal new kinds of stationary flows when the walls of the channel are patterned chemically. In the single-fluid case, the patterning is shown to give rise to spatial switching between Poiseuille-like and plug-flow behaviours. In the two-fluid case, such that the two immiscible fluids wet different patches of a chemically patterned channel, the velocity field of the individual components is modulated in a way that is phase shifted relative to the single-fluid case. When the channel is homogeneous and wetting to one fluid component but non-wetting to the other then the resulting coating of the channel walls provides dissipation and thus stabilises flow of the other component. Wettability and geometrical patterning of substrates gives rise to a lotus-like effect in a rolling motion of nanodroplets along the substrate.

  9. A Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Skeletal Muscle During Hindlimb Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causey, Laura; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    During hindlimb unloading (HU) dramatic fluid shifts occur within minutes of the suspension, leading to a less precise matching of blood flow to O2 demands of skeletal muscle. Vascular resistance directs blood away from certain muscles, such as the soleus (SOL). The muscle volume gradually reduces in these muscles so that eventually the relative blood flow returns to normal. It is generally believed that muscle volume change is not due to O2 depletion, but a consequence of disuse. However, the volume of the unloaded rat muscle declines over the course of weeks, whereas the redistribution of blood flow occurs immediately. Using a Krogh Cylinder Model, the distribution of O2 was predicted in two skeletal muscles: SOL and gastrocnemius (GAS). Effects of the muscle blood flow, volume, capillary density, and O2 uptake, are included to calculate the pO2 at rest and after 10 min and 15 days of unloading. The model predicts that 32 percent of the SOL muscle tissue has a pO2 1.25 mm Hg within 10 min, whereas the GAS maintains normal O2 levels, and that equilibrium is reached only as the SOL muscle cells degenerate. The results provide evidence that there is an inadequate O2 supply to the mitochondria in the SOL muscle after 10 min HU.

  10. Effects of sample homogenization on solid phase sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W.; Newman, J.W.; Tjeerdema, R.S.; Fairey, W.R.; Stephenson, M.D.; Puckett, H.M.; Taberski, K.M.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment toxicity is typically assessed using homogenized surficial sediment samples. It has been recognized that homogenization alters sediment integrity and may result in changes in chemical bioavailability through oxidation-reduction or other chemical processes. In this study, intact (unhomogenized) sediment cores were taken from a Van Veen grab sampler and tested concurrently with sediment homogenate from the same sample in order to investigate the effect of homogenization on toxicity. Two different solid-phase toxicity test protocols were used for these comparisons. Results of amphipod exposures to samples from San Francisco Bay indicated minimal difference between intact and homogenized samples. Mean amphipod survival in intact cores relative to homogenates was similar at two contaminated sites. Mean survival was 34 and 33% in intact and homogenized samples, respectively, at Castro Cove. Mean survival was 41% and 57%, respectively, in intact and homogenized samples from Islais Creek. Studies using the sea urchin development protocol, modified for testing at the sediment/water interface, indicated considerably more toxicity in intact samples relative to homogenized samples from San Diego Bay. Measures of metal flux into the overlying water demonstrated greater flux of metals from the intact samples. Zinc flux was five times greater, and copper flux was twice as great in some intact samples relative to homogenates. Future experiments will compare flux of metals and organic compounds in intact and homogenized sediments to further evaluate the efficacy of using intact cores for solid phase toxicity assessment.

  11. Evolution of a confined turbulent jet in a long cylindrical cavity: Homogeneous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Sanchez, X.; Nath, C.; Webb, S.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2011-11-01

    The flow induced in a long cylinder by an axially discharging round turbulent jet was investigated experimentally with applications to crude oil storage in the U.S. strategic petroleum reserves (SPR). It was found that the flow does not reach a true steady state, but vacillates periodically. Digital video recordings and particle image velocimetry were used to map the flow structures and velocity/vorticity fields, from which the frequency of jet switching, jet stopping distance, mean flow, turbulence characteristics, and the influence of end-wall boundary conditions were inferred. The results were parameterized using the characteristic length D and velocity J1/2/D scales based on the jet kinematic momentum flux J and cylinder width D. The scaling laws so developed could be used to extrapolate laboratory observations to SPR flows.

  12. Electro-osmotic flow in bicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, Andrei; Sega, Marcello

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) is a widely used technique that uses the action of external electric fields on solvated ions to move fluids around in microfluidics devices. For homogeneous fluids, the characteristics of the flow can be well approximated by simple analytical models, but in multicomponent systems such as oil-in-water droplets one has to rely to numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to investigate physical properties of the EOF in a bicomponent fluid by solving the coupled equations of motions of explicit ions in interaction with a continuous model of the flow. To do so we couple the hydrodynamics equations as solved by a Shan-Chen Lattice-Boltzmann method to the molecular dynamics of the ions. The presence of explicit ions allows us to go beyond the simple Poisson-Boltzmann approximations, and investigate a variety of EOF regimes. ETN-COLLDENSE (H2020-MCSA-ITN-2014, Grant No. 642774).

  13. Artificial muscles on heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Shin, Dong Ki; Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; McGarry, Scott; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Many devices and processes produce low grade waste heat. Some of these include combustion engines, electrical circuits, biological processes and industrial processes. To harvest this heat energy thermoelectric devices, using the Seebeck effect, are commonly used. However, these devices have limitations in efficiency, and usable voltage. This paper investigates the viability of a Stirling engine coupled to an artificial muscle energy harvester to efficiently convert heat energy into electrical energy. The results present the testing of the prototype generator which produced 200 μW when operating at 75°C. Pathways for improved performance are discussed which include optimising the electronic control of the artificial muscle, adjusting the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle to work optimally with the remainder of the system, good sealing, and tuning the resonance of the displacer to minimise the power required to drive it.

  14. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases. PMID:23005525

  15. Neural control of muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Markelonis, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation regulates the physiological and biochemical properties of skeletal muscle. The mechanisms that appear to be involved in this regulation include soluble, neurally-derived polypeptides, transmitter-evoked muscle activity and the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, itself. Despite extensive research, the interacting neural mechanisms that control such macromolecules as acetylcholinesterase, the acetylcholine receptor and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase remain unclear. It may be that more simplified in vitro model systems coupled with recent dramatic advances in the molecular biology of neurally-regulated proteins will begin to allow researchers to unravel the mechanisms controlling the expression and maintenance of these macromolecules.

  16. [Muscle-skeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Vygonskaya, M V; Filatova, E G

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the most complicated aspects of low back pain. The differences between specific and nonspecific low back pain using the "red flags" system is highlighted. The authors consider the causes of pain chronification (the "yellow flags" system) and the necessity of using a biopsychosocial model. Main pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic muscle/skeletal pain are considered and the possible involvement of several mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic pain as well as the use of complex therapy is discussed. The high efficacy and safety of ketorolac in treatment of nonspecific muscle/skeletal pain is demonstrated. PMID:27042717

  17. Gene-mediated Restoration of Normal Myofiber Elasticity in Dystrophic Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Puttini, Stefania; Lekka, Małgorzata; Dorchies, Olivier M; Saugy, Damien; Incitti, Tania; Ruegg, Urs T; Bozzoni, Irene; Kulik, Andrzej J; Mermod, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Dystrophin mediates a physical link between the cytoskeleton of muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix, and its absence leads to muscle degeneration and dystrophy. In this article, we show that the lack of dystrophin affects the elasticity of individual fibers within muscle tissue explants, as probed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), providing a sensitive and quantitative description of the properties of normal and dystrophic myofibers. The rescue of dystrophin expression by exon skipping or by the ectopic expression of the utrophin analogue normalized the elasticity of dystrophic muscles, and these effects were commensurate to the functional recovery of whole muscle strength. However, a more homogeneous and widespread restoration of normal elasticity was obtained by the exon-skipping approach when comparing individual myofibers. AFM may thus provide a quantification of the functional benefit of gene therapies from live tissues coupled to single-cell resolution. PMID:19002166

  18. a Failure Analysis of Intramuscular Rigid Implants for Muscle Contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ho; Loeb, Gerald E.; Peck, Raymond A.; Singh, Jasspreet; Deshpande, Sudeep; Baker, Lucinda L.; Bryant, J. Timothy

    Several studies have been made to develop different versions of new leadless, permanently implanted small electronic devices that allow to be injected into muscles (BIONs™). Their circuitry should be protected from body fluids by thin-walled hermetic capsules of rigid and brittle materials such as glass or ceramic to include feed through for their electrodes. These packages experience repetitive stresses due to the muscle contraction from their excitations. This study provides a worst-case analysis of such stresses and methods to test and validate devices intended for such usage, along with the failure analysis and remediation strategy for a design that experienced unanticipated failures in vivo.

  19. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  20. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  1. Numerical homogenization on approach for stokesian suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, B. M.; Berlyand, L. V.; Karpeev, D. A.

    2012-01-20

    In this technical report we investigate efficient methods for numerical simulation of active suspensions. The prototypical system is a suspension of swimming bacteria in a Newtonian fluid. Rheological and other macroscopic properties of such suspensions can differ dramatically from the same properties of the suspending fluid alone or of suspensions of similar but inactive particles. Elongated bacteria, such as E. coli or B. subtilis, swim along their principal axis, propelling themselves with the help of flagella, attached at the anterior of the organism and pushing it forward in the manner of a propeller. They interact hydrodynamically with the surrounding fluid and, because of their asymmetrical shape, have the propensity to align with the local flow. This, along with the dipolar nature of bacteria (the two forces a bacterium exerts on a fluid - one due to self-propulsion and the other opposing drag - have equal magnitude and point in opposite directions), causes nearby bacteria to tend to align, resulting in a intermittent local ordering on the mesoscopic scale, which is between the microscopic scale of an individual bacterium and the macroscopic scale of the suspension (e.g., its container). The local ordering is sometimes called a collective mode or collective swimming. Thanks to self-propulsion, collective modes inject momentum into the fluid in a coherent way. This enhances the local strain rate without changing the macroscopic stress applied at the boundary of the container. The macroscopic effective viscosity of the suspension is defined roughly as the ratio of the applied stress to the bulk strain rate. If local alignment and therefore local strain-rate enhancement, are significant, the effective viscosity can be appreciably lower than that of the corresponding passive suspension or even of the surrounding fluid alone. Indeed, a sevenfold decrease in the effective viscosity was observed in experiments with B. subtilis. More generally, local collective

  2. Is Cancer Cachexia Attributed to Impairments in Basal or Postprandial Muscle Protein Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Horstman, Astrid M H; Olde Damink, Steven W; Schols, Annemie M W J; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia is a significant clinical problem associated with very poor quality of life, reduced treatment tolerance and outcomes, and a high mortality rate. Mechanistically, any sizeable loss of skeletal muscle mass must be underpinned by a structural imbalance between muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates. Recent data indicate that the loss of muscle mass with aging is, at least partly, attributed to a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to protein feeding. Whether such anabolic resistance is also evident in conditions where cachexia is present remains to be addressed. Only few data are available on muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates in vivo in cachectic cancer patients. When calculating the theoretical changes in basal or postprandial fractional muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates that would be required to lose 5% of body weight within a six-month period, we can define the changes that would need to occur to explain the muscle mass loss observed in cachectic patients. If changes in both post-absorptive and postprandial muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates contribute to the loss of muscle mass, it would take alterations as small as 1%-2% to induce a more than 5% decline in body weight. Therefore, when trying to define impairments in basal and/or postprandial muscle protein synthesis or breakdown rates using contemporary stable isotope methodology in cancer cachexia, we need to select large homogenous groups of cancer patients (>40 patients) to allow us to measure physiological and clinically relevant differences in muscle protein synthesis and/or breakdown rates. Insight into impairments in basal or postprandial muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates in cancer cachexia is needed to design more targeted nutritional, pharmaceutical and/or physical activity interventions to preserve skeletal muscle mass and, as such, to reduce the risk of complications, improve quality of life, and lower mortality rates during the various

  3. Is Cancer Cachexia Attributed to Impairments in Basal or Postprandial Muscle Protein Metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Horstman, Astrid M. H.; Olde Damink, Steven W.; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia is a significant clinical problem associated with very poor quality of life, reduced treatment tolerance and outcomes, and a high mortality rate. Mechanistically, any sizeable loss of skeletal muscle mass must be underpinned by a structural imbalance between muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates. Recent data indicate that the loss of muscle mass with aging is, at least partly, attributed to a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to protein feeding. Whether such anabolic resistance is also evident in conditions where cachexia is present remains to be addressed. Only few data are available on muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates in vivo in cachectic cancer patients. When calculating the theoretical changes in basal or postprandial fractional muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates that would be required to lose 5% of body weight within a six-month period, we can define the changes that would need to occur to explain the muscle mass loss observed in cachectic patients. If changes in both post-absorptive and postprandial muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates contribute to the loss of muscle mass, it would take alterations as small as 1%–2% to induce a more than 5% decline in body weight. Therefore, when trying to define impairments in basal and/or postprandial muscle protein synthesis or breakdown rates using contemporary stable isotope methodology in cancer cachexia, we need to select large homogenous groups of cancer patients (>40 patients) to allow us to measure physiological and clinically relevant differences in muscle protein synthesis and/or breakdown rates. Insight into impairments in basal or postprandial muscle protein synthesis and breakdown rates in cancer cachexia is needed to design more targeted nutritional, pharmaceutical and/or physical activity interventions to preserve skeletal muscle mass and, as such, to reduce the risk of complications, improve quality of life, and lower mortality rates during the various

  4. Mathematical model and solution for fingering phenomenon in double phase flow through homogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Piyush R; Pradhan, Vikas H; Desai, Khyati R

    2013-01-01

    The present paper analytically discusses the phenomenon of fingering in double phase flow through homogenous porous media by using variational iteration method. Fingering phenomenon is a physical phenomenon which occurs when a fluid contained in a porous medium is displaced by another of lesser viscosity which frequently occurred in problems of petroleum technology. In the current investigation a mathematical model is presented for the fingering phenomenon under certain simplified assumptions. An approximate analytical solution of the governing nonlinear partial differential equation is obtained using variational iteration method with the use of Mathematica software. PMID:24348161

  5. Quantitative model for predicting lymph formation and muscle compressibility in skeletal muscle during contraction and stretch

    PubMed Central

    Causey, Laura; Cowin, Stephen C.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is widely perceived as nearly incompressible despite the fact that blood and lymphatic vessels within the endomysial and perimysial spaces undergo significant changes in diameter and length during stretch and contraction. These fluid shifts between fascicle and interstitial compartments have proved extremely difficult to measure. In this paper, we propose a theoretical framework based on a space-filling hexagonal fascicle array to provide predictions of the displacement of blood and lymph into and out of the muscle’s endomysium and perimysium during stretch and contraction. We also use this model to quantify the distribution of blood and initial lymphatic (IL) vessels within a fascicle and its perimysial space using data for the rat spinotrapezius muscle. On average, there are 11 muscle fibers, 0.4 arteriole/venule pairs, and 0.2 IL vessels per fascicle. The model predicts that the blood volume in the endomysial space increases 24% and decreases 22% for a 20% contraction and stretch, respectively. However, these significant changes in blood volume in the endomysium produce a change of only ∼2% in fascicle cross-sectional area. In contrast, the entire muscle deviates from isovolumetry by 7% and 6% for a 20% contraction and stretch, respectively, largely attributable to the significantly larger blood volume changes that occur in the perimysial space. This suggests that arcade blood vessels in the perimysial space provide the primary pumping action required for the filling and emptying of ILs during muscular contraction and stretch. PMID:22615376

  6. Foam Generation in Homogeneous Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Friedman, F.; Kam, S. I.; Rossen, W. R.

    2002-10-01

    In steady gas-liquid flow in homogeneous porous media with surfactant present, there is often observed a critical injection velocity or pressure gradient ?grad p min? at which ?weak? or ?coarse? foam is abruptly converted into ?strong foam,? with reduction of one to two orders of magnitude in total mobility: i.e., ?foam generation.? Earlier research on foam generation is extended here with extensive data for a variety of porous media, permeabilities, gases (N2 and C02), surfactants, and temperatures. For bead and sandpacks, ?grad p min? scales like (1/k), where k is permeability, over 2 1/2 orders of magnitude in k; for consolidated media the relation is more complex. For dense C02 foam, ?grad p min? exists but can be less than 1 psi/ft. If pressure drop, rather than flow rates, is fixed, one observes and unstable regime between stable ?strong? and ?coarse? foam regimes; in the unstable regime ?grad p? is nonuniform in space or variable in time.

  7. Homogeneously dispersed, multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Bajdich, Michal; Garcia-Melchor, Max; Han, Lili; Xu, Jixian; Liu, Min; Zheng, Lirong; et al

    2016-03-24

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition-metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials significantly above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxy-hydroxide materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxy-hydroxide exhibits the lowest overpotential (191 mV) reported at 10 mA per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. Here, the catalyst shows no evidence of degradation following more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computationalmore » studies reveal a synergistic interplay between W, Fe and Co in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER.« less

  8. Nearsightedness of Finite Homogeneous Model Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuta, Yuki; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Kawakami, Takashi; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Yamaguchi, Kizashi; Nakamura, Haruki

    On the basis of linear response function (LRF) analysis, nearsightedness of finite systems is examined for nearly homogeneous molecular systems. We first treated with Hn (n = 2-100) to inspect the local or nonlocal responses of these systems, which are, in other words, the magnitudes of nearsightedness of the finite systems. Further, the LRFs of H100n+ (n = 0-98) have been examined in order to clarify whether the magnitude of nearsightedness depends either the size of systems or the number of electrons in systems. From our calculations, we conjectured that the number of electrons are essential for nearsightedness of electronic matter (NEM) of this type of systems. This conjecture has been confirmed from the fact that the LRFs of H100n+ (n = 0-98) are similar to those of N electrons (N = 2-100) in a square well potential, showing that attractive potentials of H100n+ (n = 0-98) do not change significantly the dependence of the magnitudes of NEM on the number of electrons.

  9. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  10. Numerical study of homogeneous nanodroplet growth.

    PubMed

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M

    2015-01-15

    We investigate the axisymmetric homogeneous growth of 10-100 nm water nanodroplets on a substrate surface. The main mechanism of droplet growth is attributed to the accumulation of laterally diffusing water monomers, formed by the absorption of water vapour in the environment onto the substrate. Under assumptions of quasi-steady thermodynamic equilibrium, the nanodroplet evolves according to the augmented Young-Laplace equation. Using continuum theory, we model the dynamics of nanodroplet growth including the coupled effects of disjoining pressure, contact angle and monomer diffusion. Our numerical results show that the initial droplet growth is dominated by monomer diffusion, and the steady late growth rate of droplet radius follows a power law of 1/3, which is unaffected by the substrate disjoining pressure. Instead, the disjoining pressure modifies the growth rate of the droplet height, which then follows a power law of 1/4. We demonstrate how spatial depletion of monomers could lead to a growth arrest of the nanodroplet, as observed experimentally. This work has further implications on the growth kinetics, transport and phase transition of liquids at the nanoscale. PMID:25454424

  11. Redatuming Operators Analysis in Homogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Fransisco de Souza; Figueiredo, Jose J. S. de; Freitas, Lucas

    2015-04-01

    A redatuming operation is used to simulate the acquisition of data in new levels, avoiding distortions produced by near-surface irregularities related to either geometric or material property heterogeneities. In this work, the application of the true-amplitude Kirchhoff redatuming (TAKR) operator on homogeneous media is compared with conventional Kirchhoff redatuming (KR) operator restricted to the zero-offset case. The TAKR and the KR operators are analytically and numerically compared in order to verify their impacts on the data at a new level. Analyses of amplitude and velocity sensitivity of the TAKR and KR were performed: one concerning the difference between the weight functions and the other related to the velocity variation. The comparisons between operators were performed using numerical examples. The feasibility of the KR and TAKR operators was demonstrated not only kinematically but also dynamically for their purposes. In other words, one preserves amplitude (KR), and the other corrects the amplitude (TAKR). In the end, we applied the operators to a GPR data set.

  12. Numerical computation of homogeneous slope stability.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuangshuang; Li, Kemin; Ding, Xiaohua; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    To simplify the computational process of homogeneous slope stability, improve computational accuracy, and find multiple potential slip surfaces of a complex geometric slope, this study utilized the limit equilibrium method to derive expression equations of overall and partial factors of safety. This study transformed the solution of the minimum factor of safety (FOS) to solving of a constrained nonlinear programming problem and applied an exhaustive method (EM) and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) to this problem. In simple slope examples, the computational results using an EM and PSO were close to those obtained using other methods. Compared to the EM, the PSO had a small computation error and a significantly shorter computation time. As a result, the PSO could precisely calculate the slope FOS with high efficiency. The example of the multistage slope analysis indicated that this slope had two potential slip surfaces. The factors of safety were 1.1182 and 1.1560, respectively. The differences between these and the minimum FOS (1.0759) were small, but the positions of the slip surfaces were completely different than the critical slip surface (CSS). PMID:25784927

  13. Homogenization models for 2-D grid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Cioranescu, D.; Rebnord, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    In the past several years, we have pursued efforts related to the development of accurate models for the dynamics of flexible structures made of composite materials. Rather than viewing periodicity and sparseness as obstacles to be overcome, we exploit them to our advantage. We consider a variational problem on a domain that has large, periodically distributed holes. Using homogenization techniques we show that the solution to this problem is in some topology 'close' to the solution of a similar problem that holds on a much simpler domain. We study the behavior of the solution of the variational problem as the holes increase in number, but decrease in size in such a way that the total amount of material remains constant. The result is an equation that is in general more complex, but with a domain that is simply connected rather than perforated. We study the limit of the solution as the amount of material goes to zero. This second limit will, in most cases, retrieve much of the simplicity that was lost in the first limit without sacrificing the simplicity of the domain. Finally, we show that these results can be applied to the case of a vibrating Love-Kirchhoff plate with Kelvin-Voigt damping. We rely heavily on earlier results of (Du), (CS) for the static, undamped Love-Kirchhoff equation. Our efforts here result in a modification of those results to include both time dependence and Kelvin-Voigt damping.

  14. Fluorescent homogeneous immunosensors for detecting pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, Ewa; Heyduk, Tomasz

    2010-01-15

    We developed a straightforward antibody-based assay for rapid homogeneous detection of bacteria. Our sensors utilize antibody recognizing cell-surface epitopes of the target cell. Two samples of the antibody are prepared, each labeled via nanometer size flexible linkers with short complementary oligonucleotides that are modified with fluorochromes that could participate in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The length of the complementary oligonucleotide sequences was designed such that very little annealing occurred in the absence of the target cells. In the presence of the target cells the two labeled antibodies bind to the surface of the cell resulting in a large local concentration of the complementary oligonucleotides that are attached to the antibody. This in turn drives the annealing of the complementary oligonucleotides which brings the fluorescence probes to close proximity producing large FRET signals proportional to the amount of target cells. Long flexible linkers used to attach the oligonucleotides to the antibody enable target-induced oligonucleotide annealing even if the density of surface antigens is only modest. We used Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium to demonstrate that this design produced sensors exhibiting rapid response time, high specificity, and sensitivity in detecting the target bacteria. PMID:19782039

  15. Homogeneous cosmology with aggressively expanding civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, S. Jay

    2015-11-01

    In the context of a homogeneous Universe, we note that the appearance of aggressively expanding advanced life is geometrically similar to the process of nucleation and bubble growth in a first-order cosmological phase transition. We exploit this similarity to describe the dynamics of life saturating the Universe on a cosmic scale, adapting the phase transition model to incorporate probability distributions of expansion and resource consumption strategies. Through a series of numerical solutions spanning several orders of magnitude in the input assumption parameters, the resulting cosmological model is used to address basic questions related to the intergalactic spreading of life, dealing with issues such as timescales, observability, competition between strategies, and first-mover advantage. Finally, we examine physical effects on the Universe itself, such as reheating and the backreaction on the evolution of the scale factor, if such life is able to control and convert a significant fraction of the available pressureless matter into radiation. We conclude that the existence of life, if certain advanced technologies are practical, could have a significant influence on the future large-scale evolution of the Universe.

  16. Theoretical studies of homogeneous catalysts mimicking nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Franco, Duvan; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen 'fixation' via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressure. This process accounts for the production of millions of tons of nitrogen compounds used for agricultural and industrial purposes, but the high temperature and pressure required result in a large energy loss, leading to several economic and environmental issues. During the last 40 years many attempts have been made to synthesize simple homogeneous catalysts that can activate dinitrogen under the same mild conditions of the nitrogenase enzymes. Several compounds, almost all containing transition metals, have been shown to bind and activate N₂ to various degrees. However, to date Mo(N₂)(HIPTN)₃N with (HIPTN)₃N= hexaisopropyl-terphenyl-triamidoamine is the only compound performing this process catalytically. In this review we describe how Density Functional Theory calculations have been of help in elucidating the reaction mechanisms of the inorganic compounds that activate or fix N₂. These studies provided important insights that rationalize and complement the experimental findings about the reaction mechanisms of known catalysts, predicting the reactivity of new potential catalysts and helping in tailoring new efficient catalytic compounds. PMID:21221062

  17. Homogeneity of Antibody Responses in Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Samanich, K.; Belisle, J. T.; Laal, S.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of the present study were twofold: (i) to compare the repertoires of antigens in culture filtrates of in vitro-grown Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are recognized by antibodies from noncavitary and cavitary tuberculosis (TB) patients and (ii) to determine the extent of variation that exists between the antigen profiles recognized by individual TB patients. Lipoarabinomannan-free culture filtrate proteins of M. tuberculosis were fractionated by one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the Western blots were probed with sera from non-human immunodeficiency virus (non-HIV)-infected cavitary and noncavitary TB patients and from HIV-infected, noncavitary TB patients. In contrast to earlier studies based on recombinant antigens of M. tuberculosis which suggested that antibody responses in TB patients were heterogeneous (K. Lyashchenko et al., 1998, Infect. Immun. 66:3936–3940, 1998), our studies with native culture filtrate proteins show that the antibody responses in TB patients show significant homogeneity in being directed against a well-defined subset of antigens. Thus, there is a well-defined subset of culture filtrate antigens that elicits antibodies during noncavitary and cavitary disease. In addition, another set of antigens is recognized primarily by cavitary TB patients. The mapping with individual patient sera presented here suggests that serodiagnostic tests based on the subset of antigens recognized during both noncavitary and cavitary TB will enhance the sensitivity of antibody detection in TB patients, especially in difficult-to-diagnose, smear-negative, noncavitary TB patients. PMID:11402004

  18. Inhomogeneous radiative forcing of homogeneous greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi; Tan, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Radiative forcing of a homogeneous greenhouse gas (HGG) can be very inhomogeneous because the forcing is dependent on other atmospheric and surface variables. In the case of doubling CO2, the monthly mean instantaneous forcing at the top of the atmosphere is found to vary geographically and temporally from positive to negative values, with the range (-2.5-5.1 W m-2) being more than 3 times the magnitude of the global mean value (2.3 W m-2). The vertical temperature change across the atmospheric column (temperature lapse rate) is found to be the best single predictor for explaining forcing variation. In addition, the masking effects of clouds and water vapor also contribute to forcing inhomogeneity. A regression model that predicts forcing from geophysical variables is constructed. This model can explain more than 90% of the variance of the forcing. Applying this model to analyzing the forcing variation in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models, we find that intermodel discrepancy in CO2 forcing caused by model climatology leads to considerable discrepancy in their projected change in poleward energy transport.

  19. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.

    1985-05-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  20. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A. PMID:27612817

  1. Homogeneous assay technology based on upconverting phosphors.

    PubMed

    Kuningas, Katri; Rantanen, Terhi; Ukonaho, Telle; Lövgren, Timo; Soukka, Tero

    2005-11-15

    Upconversion photoluminescence can eliminate problems associated with autofluorescence and scattered excitation light in homogeneous luminescence-based assays without need for temporal resolution. We have demonstrated a luminescence resonance energy-transfer-based assay utilizing inorganic upconverting (UPC) lanthanide phosphor as a donor and fluorescent protein as an acceptor. UPC phosphors are excited at near-infrared and they have narrow-banded anti-Stokes emission at visible wavelengths enabling measurement of the proximity-dependent sensitized emission with minimal background. The acceptor alone does not generate any direct emission at shorter wavelengths under near-infrared excitation. A competitive model assay for biotin was constructed using streptavidin-conjugated Er3+,Yb3+-doped UPC phosphor as a donor and biotinylated phycobiliprotein as an acceptor. UPC phosphor was excited at near-infrared (980 nm) and sensitized acceptor emission was measured at red wavelength (600 nm) by using a microtitration plate fluorometer equipped with an infrared laser diode and suitable excitation and emission filters. Lower limit of detection was in the subnanomolar concentration range. Compared to time-resolved fluorometry, the developed assay technology enabled simplified instrumentation. Excitation at near-infrared and emission at red wavelengths render the technology also suitable to analysis of strongly colored and fluorescent samples, which are often of concern in clinical immunoassays and in high-throughput screening. PMID:16285685

  2. Theoretical and computational studies of isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau

    Numerical simulations are presented for viscous incompressible homogeneous turbulent flows with periodic boundary conditions. Our numerical method is based on the spectral Fourier method. Rogallo's code is modified and extended to trace fluid particles and simulate the evolution of material line elements. The first part of the thesis is about modifying and applying the code to simulate a passive vector field convected and stretched by the so called ABC flows in the presence of viscosity. The correlation of the geometry of the physical structures of the passive vector with the external straining is investigated. It is observed that most amplifications either occur in the neighborhoods of local unstable manifolds of the stagnation points of the ABC flows, if they exist, especially those with only one positive eigenvalue, or they are confined within the chaotic regions of the ABC flows if there is no stagnation point. The second part of the thesis is an investigation of the power-law energy decay of turbulence. Two decay exponents, 1.24 and 1.54, are measured from simulations. A new similarity form for the double and triple velocity autocorrelation functions using the Taylor microscale as the scaling, consistent with the Karman-Howarth equation and a power-law energy decay, is proposed and compared with numerical results. The proposed similarity form seems applicable at small to intermediate Reynolds number. For flows with very large Reynolds number, an expansion form of energy spectrum is proposed instead. The third part of the thesis is a presentation of the Lagrangian data collected by tracking fluid particles in decaying turbulent flows. The mean growth rates of the magnitudes of material line elements, that of the vorticity due to nonlinear forces, and the mean principal rates of strain tensors are found to be proportional to the square root of the mean enstrophy. The proportional coefficients remain constant during the decay. The mean angles between material

  3. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Isotropic Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau

    Numerical simulations are presented for viscous incompressible homogeneous turbulent flows with periodic boundary conditions. Our numerical method is based on the spectral Fourier method. Rogallo's code is modified and extended to trace fluid particles and simulate the evolution of material line elements. The first part of the thesis is about modifying and applying the code to simulate a passive vector field convected and stretched by the so-called ABC flows in the presence of viscosity. The correlation of the geometry of the physical structures of the passive vector with the external straining is investigated. It is observed that most amplifications either occur in the neighborhoods of local unstable manifolds of the stagnation points of the ABC flows, if they exist, especially those with only one positive eigenvalue, or they are confined within the chaotic regions of the ABC flows if there is no stagnation point. The second part of the thesis is an investigation of the power-law energy decay of turbulence. Two decay exponents, 1.24 and 1.54, are measured from simulations. A new similarity form for the double and triple velocity autocorrelation functions using the Taylor microscale as the scaling, consistent with the Karman-Howarth equation and a power-law energy decay, is proposed and compared with numerical results. The proposed similarity form seems applicable at small to intermediate Reynolds number. For flows with very large Reynolds number, an expansion form of energy spectrum is proposed instead. The third part of the thesis is a presentation of the Lagrangian data collected by tracking fluid particles in decaying turbulent flows. The mean growth rates of the magnitudes of material line elements, that of the vorticity due to nonlinear forces, and the mean principal rates of strain tensors are found to be proportional to the square root of the mean enstrophy. The proportional coefficients remain constant during the decay. The mean angles between material

  4. Eye muscle repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ... The extraocular muscles of the eye (external to the eyeball) control the positioning of the eyes. They coordinate of the eye ...

  5. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  6. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain Can Be A Pain Page Content If ... speeds, sports hernias are frequently confused with common muscle strain ,” says Michael Sampson, DO, who practices in ...

  7. Muscle Cramp - A Common Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Muscle Cramp – A Common Pain Page Content Has a ... body’s natural tendency toward self-healing. Causes of Muscle Cramps Unfortunately, cramps can occur anywhere, anytime to ...

  8. Active vs. inactive muscle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may lose 20 to 40 percent of their muscle -- and, along with it, their strength -- as they ... have found that a major reason people lose muscle is because they stop doing everyday activities that ...

  9. A specific gastrin receptor on plasma membranes of antral smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Baur, S; Bacon, V C

    1976-12-20

    Plasma membranes with a 17 fold enrichment in 5'-nucleotidase over homogenate were prepared from antral smooth muscle. A specific gastrin receptor on the plasma membranes has been demonstrated. By Scatchard analysis receptor has a Kaff of 2x10(9)M(-1) and a binding capacity of 5x10(-14) moles/mg of membrane protein. PMID:15625862

  10. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  11. Physiological tremor reveals how thixotropy adapts skeletal muscle for posture and movement

    PubMed Central

    Vernooij, Carlijn A.; Reynolds, Raymond F.; Lakie, Martin

    2016-01-01

    People and animals can move freely, but they must also be able to stay still. How do skeletal muscles economically produce both movement and posture? Humans are well known to have motor units with relatively homogeneous mechanical properties. Thixotropic muscle properties can provide a solution by providing a temporary stiffening of all skeletal muscles in postural conditions. This stiffening is alleviated almost instantly when muscles start to move. In this paper, we probe this behaviour. We monitor both the neural input to a muscle, measured here as extensor muscle electromyography (EMG), and its output, measured as tremor (finger acceleration). Both signals were analysed continuously as the subject made smooth transitions between posture and movement. The results showed that there were marked changes in tremor which systematically increased in size and decreased in frequency as the subject moved faster. By contrast, the EMG changed little and reflected muscle force requirement rather than movement speed. The altered tremor reflects naturally occurring thixotropic changes in muscle behaviour. Our results suggest that physiological tremor provides useful and hitherto unrecognized insights into skeletal muscle's role in posture and movement. PMID:27293785

  12. Physiological tremor reveals how thixotropy adapts skeletal muscle for posture and movement.

    PubMed

    Vernooij, Carlijn A; Reynolds, Raymond F; Lakie, Martin

    2016-05-01

    People and animals can move freely, but they must also be able to stay still. How do skeletal muscles economically produce both movement and posture? Humans are well known to have motor units with relatively homogeneous mechanical properties. Thixotropic muscle properties can provide a solution by providing a temporary stiffening of all skeletal muscles in postural conditions. This stiffening is alleviated almost instantly when muscles start to move. In this paper, we probe this behaviour. We monitor both the neural input to a muscle, measured here as extensor muscle electromyography (EMG), and its output, measured as tremor (finger acceleration). Both signals were analysed continuously as the subject made smooth transitions between posture and movement. The results showed that there were marked changes in tremor which systematically increased in size and decreased in frequency as the subject moved faster. By contrast, the EMG changed little and reflected muscle force requirement rather than movement speed. The altered tremor reflects naturally occurring thixotropic changes in muscle behaviour. Our results suggest that physiological tremor provides useful and hitherto unrecognized insights into skeletal muscle's role in posture and movement. PMID:27293785

  13. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  14. Anisotropic Developments for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Rubinstein, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The general decomposition of the spectral correlation tensor R(sub ij)(k) by Cambon et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 202, 295; J. Fluid Mech., 337, 303) into directional and polarization components is applied to the representation of R(sub ij)(k) by spherically averaged quantities. The decomposition splits the deviatoric part H(sub ij)(k) of the spherical average of R(sub ij)(k) into directional and polarization components H(sub ij)(sup e)(k) and H(sub ij)(sup z)(k). A self-consistent representation of the spectral tensor in the limit of weak anisotropy is constructed in terms of these spherically averaged quantities. The directional polarization components must be treated independently: models that attempt the same representation of the spectral tensor using the spherical average H(sub ij)(k) alone prove to be inconsistent with Navier-Stokes dynamics. In particular, a spectral tensor consistent with a prescribed Reynolds stress is not unique. The degree of anisotropy permitted by this theory is restricted by realizability requirements. Since these requirements will be less severe in a more accurate theory, a preliminary account is given of how to generalize the formalism of spherical averages to higher expansion of the spectral tensor. Directionality is described by a conventional expansion in spherical harmonics, but polarization requires an expansion in tensorial spherical harmonics generated by irreducible representations of the spatial rotation group SO(exp 3). These expansions are considered in more detail in the special case of axial symmetry.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: rippling muscle disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions rippling muscle disease rippling muscle disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Rippling muscle disease is a condition in which the muscles ...

  16. Contractures and muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Walters, R Jon

    2016-08-01

    Contractures are one of a handful of signs in muscle disease, besides weakness and its distribution, whose presence can help guide us diagnostically, a welcome star on the horizon. Contractures are associated with several myopathies, some with important cardiac manifestations, and consequently are important to recognise; their presence may also provide us with a potential satisfying 'penny dropping' diagnostic moment. PMID:26867558

  17. Sculpturing new muscle phenotypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babij, P.; Booth, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the pattern of muscle activity are followed by new patterns of protein synthesis, both in the contractile elements and in the enzymes of energy metabolism. Although the signal transducers have not been identified, techniques of molecular biology have clearly shown that the adaptive responses are the regulated consequence of differential gene expression.

  18. [Different properties of pyruvate kinase from rabbit and hare muscles].

    PubMed

    Strumilo, S; Tylicki, A

    2015-01-01

    Some catalytic and kinetic properties of pyruvate kinase (PK, EC 2.7.1.40) isolated from the heart and skeletal muscles of rabbits and hares with a 9-16-fold purification were studied. The initial specific activity of the enzyme in hare heart homogenates was 66% and in skeletal muscles 25% as high as in respective rabbit tissues. Temperature optimums and thermostability of PK from hare tissues were higher as compared with those in rabbits. From the comparison of K(M) (S0.5) values it follows that hare skeletal muscle PK exhibits a highest affinity to phosphoenol pyruvate, but lowest to ADP, as compared with rabbit skeletal muscle PK. Moreover, PK from both hare tissues exhibits a positive kinetic cooperativity (Hill coefficient > 1.35) of the phosphoenol pyruvate and ADP binding sites. In contrast to PK from rabbit tissues, the enzyme from the hare heart and muscles PK is presented by its allosteric isoform which might by advantageous under extreme conditions of the hare's habitation. PMID:26027383

  19. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Thomas J.; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. Active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition. PMID:26396254

  20. Multi-frequency bioimpedance in human muscle assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Else Marie; Sørensen, Emma Rudbæk; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2015-01-01

    Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a well-known and tested method for body mass and muscular health assessment. Multi-frequency BIA (mfBIA) equipment now makes it possible to assess a particular muscle as a whole, as well as looking at a muscle at the fiber level. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mfBIA can be used to assess the anatomical, physiological, and metabolic state of skeletal muscles. mfBIA measurements focusing on impedance, resistance, reactance, phase angle, center frequency, membrane capacitance, and both extracellular and intracellular resistance were carried out. Eight healthy human control subjects and three selected cases were examined to demonstrate the extent to which this method may be used clinically, and in relation to training in sport. The electrode setup is shown to affect the mfBIA parameters recorded. Our recommendation is the use of noble metal electrodes in connection with a conductance paste to accommodate the typical BIA frequencies, and to facilitate accurate impedance and resistance measurements. The use of mfBIA parameters, often in conjunction with each other, can be used to reveal indications of contralateral muscle loss, extracellular fluid differences, contracted state, and cell transport/metabolic activity, which relate to muscle performance. Our findings indicate that mfBIA provides a noninvasive, easily measurable and very precise momentary assessment of skeletal muscles. PMID:25896978

  1. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  2. Effects of Active Individual Muscle Stretching on Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kouichi; Kodama, Takayuki; Mukaino, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of active individual muscle stretching (AID) on muscle function. [Subjects] We used the right legs of 40 healthy male students. [Methods] Subjects were divided into an AID group, which performed stretching, and a control group, which did not. We examined and compared muscle function before and after stretching in the AID and control groups using a goniometer and Cybex equipment. [Results] A significant increase in flexibility and a significant decrease in muscle strength output were observed in the AID group after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that AID induces an increase in flexibility and a temporary decrease in muscle output strength. PMID:24707080

  3. Effective properties of a fly ash geopolymer: Synergistic application of X-ray synchrotron tomography, nanoindentation, and homogenization models

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumanta; Yang, Pu; Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Mertens, James C. E.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2015-09-02

    Microstructural and micromechanical investigation of a fly ash-based geopolymer using: (i) synchrotron x-ray tomography (XRT) to determine the volume fraction and tortuosity of pores that are influential in fluid transport, (ii) mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) to capture the volume fraction of smaller pores, (iii) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with multi-label thresholding to identify and characterize the solid phases in the microstructure, and (iv) nanoindentation to determine the component phase elastic properties using statistical deconvolution, is reported in this paper. The phase volume fractions and elastic properties are used in multi-step mean field homogenization (Mori- Tanaka and double inclusion) models to determine the homogenized macroscale elastic modulus of the composite. The homogenized elastic moduli are in good agreement with the flexural elastic modulus determined on macroscale paste beams. As a result, the combined use of microstructural and micromechanical characterization tools at multiple scales provides valuable information towards the material design of fly ash geopolymers.

  4. Simulation and Modeling of Homogeneous, Compressed Turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Teh

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression has been simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were carried out on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second -order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one -dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. It was found that the ratio of the turbulence time scale to the mean-flow time scale is an important parameter in these flows. When this ratio is large, the flow is immediately affected by the mean strain in a manner similar to that predicted by rapid distortion theory. When this ratio is small, the flow retains the character of decaying isotropic turbulence initially; only after the strain has been applied for a long period does the flow accumulate a significant reflection of the effect of mean strain. In these flows, the Kolmogorov length scale decreases rapidly with increasing total strain, due to the density increase that accompanies compression. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point-closure, two-equation turbulence models. The two-equation models perform well only when the compression rate is small compared to the eddy turn-over rate. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  5. Homogeneous and heterogenized iridium water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-10-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst for the oxidative splitting of water into molecular oxygen, protons and electrons is of key importance for producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis. We are facing the problem by means of a rational approach aimed at understanding how catalytic performance may be optimized by the knowledge of the reaction mechanism of water oxidation and the fate of the catalytic site under the inevitably harsh oxidative conditions. For the purposes of our study we selected iridium water oxidation catalysts, exhibiting remarkable performance (TOF > 5 s-1 and TON > 20000). In particular, we recently focused our attention on [Cp*Ir(N,O)X] (N,O = 2-pyridincarboxylate; X = Cl or NO3) and [IrCl(Hedta)]Na water oxidation catalysts. The former exhibited a remarkable TOF whereas the latter showed a very high TON. Furthermore, [IrCl(Hedta)]Na was heterogenized onto TiO2 taking advantage of the presence of a dandling -COOH functionality. The heterogenized catalyst maintained approximately the same catalytic activity of the homogeneous analogous with the advantage that could be reused many times. Mechanistic studies were performed in order to shed some light on the rate-determining step and the transformation of catalysts when exposed to "oxidative stress". It was found that the last oxidative step, preceding oxygen liberation, is the rate-determining step when a small excess of sacrificial oxidant is used. In addition, several intermediates of the oxidative transformation of the catalyst were intercepted and characterized by NMR, X-Ray diffractometry and ESI-MS.

  6. Nerve-muscle interactions during flight muscle development in Drosophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, J. J.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    During Drosophila pupal metamorphosis, the motoneurons and muscles differentiate synchronously, providing an opportunity for extensive intercellular regulation during synapse formation. We examined the existence of such interactions by developmentally delaying or permanently eliminating synaptic partners during the formation of indirect flight muscles. When we experimentally delayed muscle development, we found that although adult-specific primary motoneuron branching still occurred, the higher order (synaptic) branching was suspended until the delayed muscle fibers reached a favourable developmental state. In reciprocal experiments we found that denervation caused a decrease in the myoblast pool. Furthermore, the formation of certain muscle fibers (dorsoventral muscles) was specifically blocked. Exceptions were the adult muscles that use larval muscle fibers as myoblast fusion targets (dorsal longitudinal muscles). However, when these muscles were experimentally compelled to develop without their larval precursors, they showed an absolute dependence on the motoneurons for their formation. These data show that the size of the myoblast pool and early events in fiber formation depend on the presence of the nerve, and that, conversely, peripheral arbor development and synaptogenesis is closely synchronized with the developmental state of the muscle.

  7. Muscle oxygen saturation heterogeneity among leg muscles during ramp exercise.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Murase, Norio; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether O(2) saturation in several leg muscles changes as exercise intensity increases. Twelve healthy young males performed 20 W/min ramp bicycle exercise until exhaustion. Pulmonary O(2) uptake (VO(2)) was monitored continuously during the experiments to determine peak oxygen uptake. Muscle O(2) saturation (SmO(2)) was also monitored continuously at the belly of the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, gastrocnemius medialis, and tibialis anterior by near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy. Although the VL muscle mainly contributes during cycling exercise, deoxygenation was enhanced not only in the VL muscle but also in the other thigh muscles and lower leg muscles with increased exercise intensity. Furthermore, SmO(2) response during ramp cycling exercise differed considerably between leg muscles. PMID:22879044

  8. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  9. Muscle microvasculature's structural and functional specializations facilitate muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Yvo H A M; Barrett, Eugene J

    2016-03-15

    We review the evolving findings from studies that examine the relationship between the structural and functional properties of skeletal muscle's vasculature and muscle metabolism. Unique aspects of the organization of the muscle microvasculature are highlighted. We discuss the role of vasomotion at the microscopic level and of flowmotion at the tissue level as modulators of perfusion distribution in muscle. We then consider in some detail how insulin and exercise each modulate muscle perfusion at both the microvascular and whole tissue level. The central role of the vascular endothelial cell in modulating both perfusion and transendothelial insulin and nutrient transport is also reviewed. The relationship between muscle metabolic insulin resistance and the vascular action of insulin in muscle continues to indicate an important role for the microvasculature as a target for insulin action and that impairing insulin's microvascular action significantly affects body glucose metabolism. PMID:26714849

  10. Impact of muscle wasting on survival in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kalafateli, Maria; Konstantakis, Christos; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos; Triantos, Christos

    2015-06-28

    Muscle wasting is defined as the progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass. Muscle depletion is a common feature of chronic liver disease found in approximately 40% of patients with cirrhosis. Its etiology is multifactorial subsequent to liver failure and its prevalence increases along with disease severity. Cross-sectional analytic morphometry using computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging are considered by consensus the gold standards to assess muscle size in cirrhosis for research purposes because they are not biased by fluid accumulation. Several studies have assessed the impact of muscle wasting on overall survival of patients in the waiting list for liver transplantation and there is a general agreement that decreased muscle size assessed by CT scan is an independent predictor for mortality in cirrhosis. It has been proposed that the addition of cross-sectional muscle area into the Model for End-stage Liver Disease can increase its prognostic performance. Nevertheless, the use of CT scan in assessing muscle size is inappropriate for routine clinical practice and an alternative cost-effective, easy to use and accurate tool should be developed. In conclusion, muscle wasting has a detrimental impact on survival of patients with cirrhosis and, thus, it remains to be elucidated if nutritional interventions and exercise could improve muscle wasting and, subsequently, survival in this setting. PMID:26139982

  11. A non-asymptotic homogenization theory for periodic electromagnetic structures

    PubMed Central

    Tsukerman, Igor; Markel, Vadim A.

    2014-01-01

    Homogenization of electromagnetic periodic composites is treated as a two-scale problem and solved by approximating the fields on both scales with eigenmodes that satisfy Maxwell's equations and boundary conditions as accurately as possible. Built into this homogenization methodology is an error indicator whose value characterizes the accuracy of homogenization. The proposed theory allows one to define not only bulk, but also position-dependent material parameters (e.g. in proximity to a physical boundary) and to quantify the trade-off between the accuracy of homogenization and its range of applicability to various illumination conditions. PMID:25104912

  12. Operator Algebra Quantum Homogeneous Spaces of Universal Gauge Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanta, Snigdhayan; Mathai, Varghese

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we quantize universal gauge groups such as SU(∞), as well as their homogeneous spaces, in the σ- C*-algebra setting. More precisely, we propose concise definitions of σ- C*-quantum groups and σ- C*-quantum homogeneous spaces and explain these concepts here. At the same time, we put these definitions in the mathematical context of countably compactly generated spaces as well as C*-compact quantum groups and homogeneous spaces. We also study the representable K-theory of these spaces and compute these groups for the quantum homogeneous spaces associated to the quantum version of the universal gauge group SU(∞).

  13. Muscle changes with eccentric exercise: Implications on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Parazynski, Scott; Aratow, Michael; Friden, Jan

    1989-01-01

    Recent investigations of fluid pressure, morpholo gy, and enzyme activities of skeletal muscle exercised eccentrically or concentrically in normal human subjects are reviewed. Intramuscular pressures were measured before, during, and after submaximal exercise and correlated with subjective muscle soreness, fiber size, water content, and blood indices of muscle enzymes. High intensity eccentric exercise is characterized by post exercise pain, elevated intramuscular pressures, and swelling of both type 1 and 2 fibers as compared to concentric exercise. Thus, long periods of unaccustomed, high level eccentric contraction may cause muscle injury, fiber swelling, fluid accumulation, elevated intramuscular pressure, and delayed muscle soreness. Training regimens of progressively increasing eccentric exercise, however, cause less soreness and are extremely efficacious in increasing muscle mass and strength. It is proposed that on Earth, postural muscles are uniquely adapted to low levels of prolonged eccentric contraction that are absent during weightlessness. The almost complete absence of eccentric exercise in space may be an important contributor to muscle atrophy and therefore equipment should be designed to integrate eccentric contractions into exercise protocols for long-term spaceflight.

  14. Muscle-specific vascular endothelial growth factor deletion induces muscle capillary rarefaction creating muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Jeffrey S; Lantier, Louise; Hasenour, Clinton M; James, Freyja D; Bracy, Deanna P; Wasserman, David H

    2013-02-01

    Muscle insulin resistance is associated with a reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) action and muscle capillary density. We tested the hypothesis that muscle capillary rarefaction critically contributes to the etiology of muscle insulin resistance in chow-fed mice with skeletal and cardiac muscle VEGF deletion (mVEGF(-/-)) and wild-type littermates (mVEGF(+/+)) on a C57BL/6 background. The mVEGF(-/-) mice had an ~60% and ~50% decrease in capillaries in skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively. The mVEGF(-/-) mice had augmented fasting glucose turnover. Insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disappearance was blunted in mVEGF(-/-) mice. The reduced peripheral glucose utilization during insulin stimulation was due to diminished in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscle insulin action and signaling. The decreased insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was independent of defects in insulin action at the myocyte, suggesting that the impairment in insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was due to poor muscle perfusion. The deletion of VEGF in cardiac muscle did not affect cardiac output. These studies emphasize the importance for novel therapeutic approaches that target the vasculature in the treatment of insulin-resistant muscle. PMID:23002035

  15. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; de Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles confined within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogenous isotropic turbulent velocity field. Particles can freely move horizontally as fluid tracers but are vertically confined around a given horizontal plane via a simple linear restoring force. The present model may be considered as the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy or other mechanisms, are capable to maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer somewhere below the free surface of oceans or lakes. In the model varying the strength of the restoring force can control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. Whenever some confinement is present, particle trajectories deviate from fluid tracers and experience an effectively compressible velocity field. We report a quantification of this effective compressibility as well as a quantification of preferential concentration of tracer particles in terms of the correlation dimension. We found that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale, that maximizes the clustering of the particles. This work is part of the research programmes 11PR2841 and FP112 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The work was partially funded by ERC Grant No 339032.

  16. Metamaterials: supra-classical dynamic homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2015-12-01

    Metamaterials are artificial composite structures designed for controlling waves or fields, and exhibit interaction phenomena that are unexpected on the basis of their chemical constituents. These phenomena are encoded in effective material parameters that can be electronic, magnetic, acoustic, or elastic, and must adequately represent the wave interaction behavior in the composite within desired frequency ranges. In some cases—for example, the low frequency regime—there exist various efficient ways by which effective material parameters for wave propagation in metamaterials may be found. However, the general problem of predicting frequency-dependent dynamic effective constants has remained unsolved. Here, we obtain novel mathematical expressions for the effective parameters of two-dimensional metamaterial systems valid at higher frequencies and wavelengths than previously possible. By way of an example, random configurations of cylindrical scatterers are considered, in various physical contexts: sound waves in a compressible fluid, anti-plane elastic waves, and electromagnetic waves. Our results point towards a paradigm shift in our understanding of these effective properties, and metamaterial designs with functionalities beyond the low-frequency regime are now open for innovation. Dedicated with gratitude to the memory of Prof Yves C Angel.

  17. Control approach development for variable recruitment artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Tyler E.; Chapman, Edward M.; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This study characterizes hybrid control approaches for the variable recruitment of fluidic artificial muscles with double acting (antagonistic) actuation. Fluidic artificial muscle actuators have been explored by researchers due to their natural compliance, high force-to-weight ratio, and low cost of fabrication. Previous studies have attempted to improve system efficiency of the actuators through variable recruitment, i.e. using discrete changes in the number of active actuators. While current variable recruitment research utilizes manual valve switching, this paper details the current development of an online variable recruitment control scheme. By continuously controlling applied pressure and discretely controlling the number of active actuators, operation in the lowest possible recruitment state is ensured and working fluid consumption is minimized. Results provide insight into switching control scheme effects on working fluids, fabrication material choices, actuator modeling, and controller development decisions.

  18. New transducers for measuring muscle length in unrestrained animals.

    PubMed

    Weytjens, J L; Viberg, D A; Caputi, A A; Kallesøe, K; Hoffer, J A

    1992-12-01

    Muscle length in unrestrained, chronically implanted animals is conventionally measured with gauges consisting of a compliant silicone rubber tube filled with either hypertonic saline or mercury, the measurement principle being a continuous change in the electrical resistance of the fluid column inside the tubing with stretch. These gauges have two major disadvantages: (1) changes in resistance that are not related to changes in length, such as those produced by changes in temperature or osmotic dilution of the hypertonic saline, cause the measurements to drift, and (2) there is no direct and accurate way to calibrate the measurements. In this communication two new types of muscle length gauge are described that eliminate both problems. Both types make use of the principle of sonomicrometry, i.e., the measurement of distances with pulsed ultrasound. Both types have been successfully used to measure the length of the medial gastrocnemius muscle in chronically implanted cats during treadmill locomotion. PMID:1294854

  19. Effects of muscle injury severity on localized bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Nescolarde, L; Yanguas, J; Lukaski, H; Alomar, X; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Rodas, G

    2015-01-01

    Muscle injuries in the lower limb are common among professional football players. Classification is made according to severity and is diagnosed with radiological assessment as: grade I (minor strain or minor injury), grade II (partial rupture, moderate injury) and grade III (complete rupture, severe injury). Tetrapolar localized bioimpedance analysis (BIA) at 50 kHz made with a phase-sensitive analyzer was used to assess damage to the integrity of muscle structures and the fluid accumulation 24 h after injury in 21 injuries in the quadriceps, hamstring and calf, and was diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of change in BIA variables as indicators of fluid [resistance (R)] and cell structure integrity [reactance (Xc) and phase angle (PA)] according to the severity of the MRI-defined injury. The % difference compared to the non-injured contralateral muscle also measured 24-h after injury of R, Xc and PA were respectively: grade I (n = 11; -10.4, -17.5 and -9.0%), grade II (n = 8; -18.4, -32.9 and -16.6%) and grade III (n = 2; -14.1, -52.9 and -43.1%), showing a greater significant decrease in Xc (p < 0.001). The greatest relative changes were in grade III injuries. However, decreases in R, that indicate fluid distribution, were not proportional to the severity of the injury. Disruption of the muscle structure, demonstrated by the localized determination of Xc, increased with the severity of muscle injury. The most significant changes 24 h after injury was the sizeable decrease in Xc that indicates a pattern of disrupted soft tissue structure, proportional to the severity of the injury. PMID:25500910

  20. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  1. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  2. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  3. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  4. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  5. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  6. Amniotic fluid (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid surrounds the growing fetus in the womb and protects the fetus from injury and temperature changes. ... of fetal movement and permits musculoskeletal development. The amniotic fluid can be withdrawn in a procedure called amniocentsis ...

  7. Electric fluid pump

    DOEpatents

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  8. Amniotic fluid (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid surrounds the growing fetus in the womb and protects the fetus from injury and temperature changes. It ... fetal movement and permits musculoskeletal development. The amniotic fluid can be withdrawn in a procedure called amniocentsis ...

  9. Fluid and Electrolyte Balance

    MedlinePlus

    ... They are in your blood, urine and body fluids. Maintaining the right balance of electrolytes helps your ... them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink. Levels of electrolytes in your body ...

  10. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  11. Near-critical point phenomena in fluids (19-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beysens, D.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the effects of gravity is essential if the behavior of fluids is to be predicted in spacecraft and orbital stations, and, more generally, to give a better understanding of the hydrodynamics in these systems. An understanding is sought of the behavior of fluids in space. What should emerge from the International Microgravity Lab (IML-1) mission is a better understanding of the kinetics of growth in off-critical conditions, in both liquid mixtures and pure fluids. This complex phenomenon is the object of intensive study in physics and materials sciences area. It is also expected that the IML-1 flight will procure key results to provide a better understanding of how a pure fluid can be homogenized without gravity induced convections, and to what extent the 'Piston Effect' is effective in thermalizing the compressible fluids.

  12. Linear response and hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

    PubMed

    Dufty, James; Baskaran, Aparna; Brey, J Javier

    2008-03-01

    A formal derivation of linear hydrodynamics for a granular fluid is given. The linear response to small spatial perturbations of a homogeneous reference state is studied in detail, using methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. A transport matrix for macroscopic excitations in the fluid is defined in terms of the response functions. An expansion in the wave vector to second order allows identification of all phenomenological susceptibilities and transport coefficients through Navier-Stokes order in terms of appropriate time correlation functions. The transport coefficients in this representation are the generalization to granular fluids of the familiar Helfand and Green-Kubo relations for normal fluids. The analysis applies to a variety of collision rules. Important differences in both the analysis and results from those for normal fluids are identified and discussed. A scaling limit is described corresponding to the conditions under which idealized inelastic hard sphere models can apply. Further details and interpretation are provided in the paper following this one, by specialization to the case of smooth, inelastic hard spheres with constant coefficient of restitution. PMID:18517373

  13. Limitations to fluid replacement during exercise.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Leiper, J B

    1999-04-01

    Fluid replacement during exercise is essential for endurance exercise performance and reducing the risk of heat illness. Fluids supply water, which ameliorates dehydration, and also substrate for the working muscles. Absorption of water and nutrients occurs in the upper part of the small intestine, and replacement may be limited by the rate at which fluid is emptied from the stomach or absorbed in the intestine. Gastric emptying of liquids is influenced primarily by the volume of fluid in the stomach and by its energy density. Increasing the volume will speed emptying, but increasing the nutrient content will slow emptying. Osmolality, temperature, and pH of drinks, as well as exercise intensity, are of minor importance. Intestinal water absorption is a passive process: water follows osmotic gradients but will also follow the active absorption of nutrients, especially glucose, which is actively co-transported with sodium. Water transport is maximised by the presence in the intestine of hypotonic solutions of glucose and sodium. Hypertonic solutions promote net water secretion into the intestinal lumen, resulting in a temporary net loss of water from the body. The amount of fluid ingested by athletes is normally much less than can be tolerated, therefore issues such as palatability and practising drinking during training are important. PMID:10198143

  14. Skeletal muscle adaptations and muscle genomics of performance horses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, José-Luis L; Hill, Emmeline W

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscles in horses are characterised by specific adaptations, which are the result of the natural evolution of the horse as a grazing animal, centuries of selective breeding and the adaptability of this tissue in response to training. These adaptations include an increased muscle mass relative to body weight, a great locomotor efficiency based upon an admirable muscle-tendon architectural design and an adaptable fibre-type composition with intrinsic shortening velocities greater than would be predicted from an animal of comparable body size. Furthermore, equine skeletal muscles have a high mitochondrial volume that permits a higher whole animal aerobic capacity, as well as large intramuscular stores of energy substrates (glycogen in particular). Finally, high buffer and lactate transport capacities preserve muscles against fatigue during anaerobic exercise. Many of these adaptations can improve with training. The publication of the equine genome sequence in 2009 has provided a major advance towards an improved understanding of equine muscle physiology. Equine muscle genomics studies have revealed a number of genes associated with elite physical performance and have also identified changes in structural and metabolic genes following exercise and training. Genes involved in muscle growth, muscle contraction and specific metabolic pathways have been found to be functionally relevant for the early performance evaluation of elite athletic horses. The candidate genes discussed in this review are important for a healthy individual to improve performance. However, muscle performance limiting conditions are widespread in horses and many of these conditions are also genetically influenced. PMID:26831154

  15. A Lagrangian PDF Model for the Scalar Dissipation in Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.

    1996-11-01

    The scalar dissipation is a key quantity in the description of turbulent mixing. The spectral relaxation model (SRM) was developed to account for the effect of the evolution of the scalar spectrum on the mean scalar dissipation < ɛ_φ >, and it successfully predicts the observed (DNS, grid turbulence) dependence on Re, Sc (>= 1), and the initial scalar spectrum without recourse to fitting parameters. In this work, we present a Lagrangian PDF version (LSRM) for the PDF of ɛ_φ conditioned on the turbulent vortex stretching history of Kolmogorov-scale fluid particles. In homogeneous turbulence, the LSRM is coupled to a Lagrangian PDF model for the turbulent dissipation (ɛ) which strongly influences the statistics of ɛ_φ. Closure of scalar molecular dissipation term (< Γ nabla^2 φ | φ, ɛ^*_φ, ɛ^* >) is carried out using the Fokker-Planck model that was developed earlier for the joint scalar, scalar gradient PDF following fluid particles with the identical vortex stretching histories. Model predictions for inert scalar mixing in homogeneous turbulence with and without a uniform mean scalar gradient are compared to DNS data. In particular, the effect of the mean scalar gradient on the correlation between ɛ_φ and ɛ (i.e. local anisotropy) is examined, as well as the effect of the initial scalar spectrum and small-scale random vortex stretching on non-Gaussian behavior of the scalar PDF.

  16. An Experimental Investigation of Foam Flow in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Porous Media, SUPRI TR-112

    SciTech Connect

    Apaydin, Osman G.; Bertin, Henri; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

    1999-08-09

    Foam is used to reduce the high mobility of gas-drive fluids and improve the contact between oil and these injected fluids. We require a better understanding of the effect of surfactant concentration on foam flow in porous media. Besides this, the literature on foam flow and transport in heterogeneous systems is sparse although the field situation is primarily heterogeneous and multidimensional. In this study, foam flow experiments were conducted first in homogeneous sand packs to investigate the effect of surfactant concentration on foam flow and then a heterogeneous experimental setup was prepared to observe heterogeneity and multidimensional flow effects on foam propagation. The homogeneous core experiments were conducted in a cylindrical aluminum core holder that was packed with a uniform Ottawa sand. Sand permeability is about 7.0 Darcy. The experiments were interpreted in terms of evolution of in-situ water saturation as a function of time by the usage of CT scanner, cumulative water, and pressure drop across the core. At very low surfactant concentration, no significant benefit was observed. But when stable foam generation started sweep efficiency (water recovery), breakthrough time, and pressure drop increased as surfactant concentration increased.

  17. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects. PMID:26721248

  18. Piriformis muscle syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuncewicz, Elzbieta; Gajewska, Ewa; Sobieska, Magdalena; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2006-01-01

    Sciatica is characterized by radiating pain from the sacro-lumbar region to the buttocks and down to the lower limb. The causes of sciatica usually relate to degenerative changes in the spine and lesions to the intervertebral discs. Secondary symptomatic sciatica may by caused by metastases to the vertebra, tuberculosis of the spine, tumors located inside the vertebral channel, or entrapment of the sciatic nerve in the piriformis muscle. The piriformis syndrome is primarily caused by fall injury, but other causes are possible, including pyomyositis, dystonia musculorum deformans, and fibrosis after deep injections. Secondary causes like irritation of the sacroiliac joint or lump near the sciatic notch have been described. In the general practice the so-called posttraumatic piriformis muscle syndrome is common. The right treatment can be started following a thorough investigation into the cause of symptoms. PMID:17385355

  19. Mechanotransduction in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical signals are critical to the development and maintenance of skeletal muscle, but the mechanisms that convert these shape changes to biochemical signals is not known. When a deformation is imposed on a muscle, changes in cellular and molecular conformations link the mechanical forces with biochemical signals, and the close integration of mechanical signals with electrical, metabolic, and hormonal signaling may disguise the aspect of the response that is specific to the mechanical forces. The mechanically induced conformational change may directly activate downstream signaling and may trigger messenger systems to activate signaling indirectly. Major effectors of mechanotransduction include the ubiquitous mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP) and phosphatidylinositol-3’ kinase (PI-3K), which have well described receptor dependent cascades, but the chain of events leading from mechanical stimulation to biochemical cascade is not clear. This review will discuss the mechanics of biological deformation, loading of cellular and molecular structures, and some of the principal signaling mechanisms associated with mechanotransduction. PMID:17127292

  20. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  1. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  2. Hyperammonemia results in reduced muscle function independent of muscle mass.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, John; Davuluri, Gangarao; Hill, Elizabeth Ann; Moyer, Michelle; Runkana, Ashok; Prayson, Richard; van Lunteren, Erik; Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism of the nearly universal decreased muscle strength in cirrhosis is not known. We evaluated whether hyperammonemia in cirrhosis causes contractile dysfunction independent of reduced skeletal muscle mass. Maximum grip strength and muscle fatigue response were determined in cirrhotic patients and controls. Blood and muscle ammonia concentrations and grip strength normalized to lean body mass were measured in the portacaval anastomosis (PCA) and sham-operated pair-fed control rats (n = 5 each). Ex vivo contractile studies in the soleus muscle from a separate group of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 7) were performed. Skeletal muscle force of contraction, rate of force development, and rate of relaxation were measured. Muscles were also subjected to a series of pulse trains at a range of stimulation frequencies from 20 to 110 Hz. Cirrhotic patients had lower maximum grip strength and greater muscle fatigue than control subjects. PCA rats had a 52.7 ± 13% lower normalized grip strength compared with control rats, and grip strength correlated with the blood and muscle ammonia concentrations (r(2) = 0.82). In ex vivo muscle preparations following a single pulse, the maximal force, rate of force development, and rate of relaxation were 12.1 ± 3.5 g vs. 6.2 ± 2.1 g; 398.2 ± 100.4 g/s vs. 163.8 ± 97.4 g/s; -101.2 ± 22.2 g/s vs. -33.6 ± 22.3 g/s in ammonia-treated compared with control muscle preparation, respectively (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Tetanic force, rate of force development, and rate of relaxation were depressed across a range of stimulation from 20 to 110 Hz. These data provide the first direct evidence that hyperammonemia impairs skeletal muscle strength and increased muscle fatigue and identifies a potential therapeutic target in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26635319

  3. [Myokines - muscle tissue hormones].

    PubMed

    Stránská, Zuzana; Svačina, Štěpán

    2015-04-01

    Physical inactivity is demonstrably related to the manifestation of chronic diseases which significantly modify the quality and prognosis of life in a negative way. The benefits of exercise are surely mediated by many pathophysiological mechanisms interrelated in varying degrees, which have not yet been fully examined in their complexity. In the late 20th century it was positively proven that a working striated muscle really regulates the metabolic and physiological response in the other organs. These involve several hundred substances with autocrine, paracrine and endocrine effects. These proteins and peptides, if released into the blood stream, substantially affect the metabolism of distant organs. They were classified as "myokines" (cytokines produced by myocytes). The identified myokines include e.g. IL4, IL6, IL7, IL15, myostatin, LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor), BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor), FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2), FGF21, FSTL1 (follistatin-related protein 1), irisin, EPO (erythropoetin) and BAIBA (β-aminoisobutyric acid). Myokines have first of all an immunoregulatory role in the human body. Another important effect of myokines is, coincidentally also in the interaction with adipose tissue, the regulation of energy homeostasis. They also affect the growth of muscle fibres and their regeneration, stimulate angiogenesis, they are involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism and have a proven effect on lipids. Considering their diverse function, myokines present a prospective therapeutic goal in the treatment of disorders of muscle growth and regeneration as well as obesity. Another recent research moves toward uncovering of the "myokine resistance" as a result of long-term muscle inactivity and its association with chronic subclinical inflammation. PMID:25894270

  4. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  5. Muscle paralysis in thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Fraz Anwar; Sheikh, Aisha

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a condition characterised by muscle paralysis due to hypokalaemia usually secondary to thyrotoxicosis. We report a case of a 31-year-old man with no known comorbidities who presented to a tertiary healthcare unit with a 1-month history of difficulty in breathing, palpitations, weight loss and hoarseness of voice. On examination, his thyroid gland was palpable and fine hand tremors were present. An initial provisional diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was made. Three months after initial presentation, the patient presented in emergency with severe muscle pain and inability to stand. Laboratory results revealed hypokalaemia. All the symptoms reverted over the next few hours on administration of intravenous potassium. A diagnosis of TTP was established. After initial presentation, the patient was treated with carbimazole and propranolol. Once he was euthyroid, radioactive iodine ablation therapy (15 mCi) was carried out as definitive therapy, after which the patient's symptoms resolved; he is currently doing fine on levothyroxine replacement and there has been no recurrence of muscle paralysis. PMID:26025973

  6. Aqueous drilling fluids containing fluid loss additives

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoliwalla, D.F.; Villa, J.L.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes an aqueous clay containing drilling fluid having present in an amount sufficient to reduce fluid loss of the drilling fluid, a copolymer of (1) from about 80% to about 98% by weight of acrylic acid and (2) from about 2% to about 20% by weight of itaconic acid. The copolymer has a weight average molecular weight of between about 50,000 to about 1,000,000, being in its free acid or partially or completely neutralized salt form and being at least water dispersible.

  7. Feeding premature infants banked human milk homogenized by ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Rayol, M R; Martinez, F E; Jorge, S M; Gonçalves, A L; Desai, I D

    1993-12-01

    Premature neonates fed ultrasonically homogenized human milk had better weight gain and triceps skin-fold thickness than did a control group given untreated human milk (p < 0.01) and also had lower fat loss during tube feeding (p < 0.01). Ultrasonic homogenization of human milk appears to minimize loss of fat and thus allows better growth of premature infants. PMID:8229535

  8. Sensitivity of liquid clouds to homogenous freezing parameterizations

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Ross J; Murray, Benjamin J; Dobbie, Steven J; Koop, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Water droplets in some clouds can supercool to temperatures where homogeneous ice nucleation becomes the dominant freezing mechanism. In many cloud resolving and mesoscale models, it is assumed that homogeneous ice nucleation in water droplets only occurs below some threshold temperature typically set at −40°C. However, laboratory measurements show that there is a finite rate of nucleation at warmer temperatures. In this study we use a parcel model with detailed microphysics to show that cloud properties can be sensitive to homogeneous ice nucleation as warm as −30°C. Thus, homogeneous ice nucleation may be more important for cloud development, precipitation rates, and key cloud radiative parameters than is often assumed. Furthermore, we show that cloud development is particularly sensitive to the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate. In order to better constrain the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation laboratory measurements are needed at both high (>−35°C) and low (<−38°C) temperatures. Key Points Homogeneous freezing may be significant as warm as −30°C Homogeneous freezing should not be represented by a threshold approximation There is a need for an improved parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation PMID:26074652

  9. Modeling for cardiac excitation propagation based on the Nernst-Planck equation and homogenization.

    PubMed

    Okada, Jun-ichi; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2013-06-01

    The bidomain model is a commonly used mathematical model of the electrical properties of the cardiac muscle that takes into account the anisotropy of both the intracellular and extracellular spaces. However, the equations contain self-contradiction such that the update of ion concentrations does not consider intracellular or extracellular ion movements due to the gradient of electric potential and the membrane charge as capacitive currents in spite of the fact that those currents are taken into account in forming Kirchhoff's first law. To overcome this problem, we start with the Nernst-Planck equation, the ionic conservation law, and the electroneutrality condition at the cellular level, and by introducing a homogenization method and assuming uniformity of variables at the microscopic scale, we derive rational bidomain equations at the macroscopic level. PMID:23848709

  10. Modeling for cardiac excitation propagation based on the Nernst-Planck equation and homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Jun-ichi; Sugiura, Seiryo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    2013-06-01

    The bidomain model is a commonly used mathematical model of the electrical properties of the cardiac muscle that takes into account the anisotropy of both the intracellular and extracellular spaces. However, the equations contain self-contradiction such that the update of ion concentrations does not consider intracellular or extracellular ion movements due to the gradient of electric potential and the membrane charge as capacitive currents in spite of the fact that those currents are taken into account in forming Kirchhoff's first law. To overcome this problem, we start with the Nernst-Planck equation, the ionic conservation law, and the electroneutrality condition at the cellular level, and by introducing a homogenization method and assuming uniformity of variables at the microscopic scale, we derive rational bidomain equations at the macroscopic level.

  11. Surface activity of Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces: Theoretical and experimental aspects.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel Angel; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2016-07-01

    Since de Gennes coined in 1992 the term Janus particle (JP), there has been a continued effort to develop this field. The purpose of this review is to present the most relevant theoretical and experimental results obtained so far on the surface activity of amphiphilic JPs at fluid interfaces. The surface activity of JPs at fluid-fluid interfaces can be experimentally determined using two different methods: the classical Langmuir balance or the pendant drop tensiometry. The second method requires much less amount of sample than the first one, but it has also some experimental limitations. In all cases collected here the JPs exhibited a higher surface or interfacial activity than the corresponding homogeneous particles. This reveals the significant advantage of JPs for the stabilization of emulsions and foams. PMID:26094083

  12. Dynamic skeletal muscle stimulation and its potential in bone adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Y-X.; Lam, H.; Ferreri, S.; Rubin, C.

    2016-01-01

    To identify mechanotransductive signals for combating musculoskeletal deterioration, it is essential to determine the components and mechanisms critical to the anabolic processes of musculoskeletal tissues. It is hypothesized that the interaction between bone and muscle may depend on fluid exchange in these tissues by mechanical loading. It has been shown that intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia. Optimized MS signals, i.e., low-intensity and high frequency, may be critical in maintaining bone mass and mitigating muscle atrophy. The objectives for this review are to discuss the potential for MS to induce ImP and strains on bone, to regulate bone adaptation, and to identify optimized stimulation frequency in the loading regimen. The potential for MS to regulate blood and fluid flow will also be discussed. The results suggest that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics with minimal mechanical strain in bone. The response was shown to be dependent on loading frequency, serving as a critical mediator in mitigating bone loss. A specific regimen of dynamic MS may be optimized in vivo to attenuate disuse osteopenia and serve as a biomechanical intervention in the clinical setting. PMID:20190376

  13. Simulation of homogeneous condensation of small polyatomic systems in high pressure supersonic nozzle flows using Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Levin, Deborah A

    2011-03-28

    In the present work, we have simulated the homogeneous condensation of carbon dioxide and ethanol using the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook based approach. In an earlier work of Gallagher-Rogers et al. [J. Thermophys. Heat Transfer 22, 695 (2008)], it was found that it was not possible to simulate condensation experiments of Wegener et al. [Phys. Fluids 15, 1869 (1972)] using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Therefore, in this work, we have used the statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approach, which was found to be numerically more efficient than direct simulation Monte Carlo method in our previous studies [Kumar et al., AIAA J. 48, 1531 (2010)], to model homogeneous condensation of two small polyatomic systems, carbon dioxide and ethanol. A new weighting scheme is developed in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook framework to reduce the computational load associated with the study of homogeneous condensation flows. The solutions obtained by the use of the new scheme are compared with those obtained by the baseline Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook condensation model (without the species weighting scheme) for the condensing flow of carbon dioxide in the stagnation pressure range of 1-5 bars. Use of the new weighting scheme in the present work makes the simulation of homogeneous condensation of ethanol possible. We obtain good agreement between our simulated predictions for homogeneous condensation of ethanol and experiments in terms of the point of condensation onset and the distribution of mass fraction of ethanol condensed along the nozzle centerline. PMID:21456688

  14. Nonlinear Boltzmann equation for the homogeneous isotropic case: Some improvements to deterministic methods and applications to relaxation towards local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asinari, P.

    2011-03-01

    Boltzmann equation is one the most powerful paradigms for explaining transport phenomena in fluids. Since early fifties, it received a lot of attention due to aerodynamic requirements for high altitude vehicles, vacuum technology requirements and nowadays, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMs). Because of the intrinsic mathematical complexity of the problem, Boltzmann himself started his work by considering first the case when the distribution function does not depend on space (homogeneous case), but only on time and the magnitude of the molecular velocity (isotropic collisional integral). The interest with regards to the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation goes beyond simple dilute gases. In the so-called econophysics, a Boltzmann type model is sometimes introduced for studying the distribution of wealth in a simple market. Another recent application of the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation is given by opinion formation modeling in quantitative sociology, also called socio-dynamics or sociophysics. The present work [1] aims to improve the deterministic method for solving homogenous isotropic Boltzmann equation proposed by Aristov [2] by two ideas: (a) the homogeneous isotropic problem is reformulated first in terms of particle kinetic energy (this allows one to ensure exact particle number and energy conservation during microscopic collisions) and (b) a DVM-like correction (where DVM stands for Discrete Velocity Model) is adopted for improving the relaxation rates (this allows one to satisfy exactly the conservation laws at macroscopic level, which is particularly important for describing the late dynamics in the relaxation towards the equilibrium).

  15. Simulation of homogeneous condensation of small polyatomic systems in high pressure supersonic nozzle flows using Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Levin, Deborah A.

    2011-03-01

    In the present work, we have simulated the homogeneous condensation of carbon dioxide and ethanol using the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook based approach. In an earlier work of Gallagher-Rogers et al. [J. Thermophys. Heat Transfer 22, 695 (2008)], it was found that it was not possible to simulate condensation experiments of Wegener et al. [Phys. Fluids 15, 1869 (1972)] using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Therefore, in this work, we have used the statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approach, which was found to be numerically more efficient than direct simulation Monte Carlo method in our previous studies [Kumar et al., AIAA J. 48, 1531 (2010)], to model homogeneous condensation of two small polyatomic systems, carbon dioxide and ethanol. A new weighting scheme is developed in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook framework to reduce the computational load associated with the study of homogeneous condensation flows. The solutions obtained by the use of the new scheme are compared with those obtained by the baseline Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook condensation model (without the species weighting scheme) for the condensing flow of carbon dioxide in the stagnation pressure range of 1-5 bars. Use of the new weighting scheme in the present work makes the simulation of homogeneous condensation of ethanol possible. We obtain good agreement between our simulated predictions for homogeneous condensation of ethanol and experiments in terms of the point of condensation onset and the distribution of mass fraction of ethanol condensed along the nozzle centerline.

  16. Turbulent Diffusion in Non-Homogeneous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, M.; Redondo, J. M.; Mahjoub, O. B.; Sekula, E.

    2012-04-01

    Many experimental studies have been devoted to the understanding of non-homogeneous turbulent dynamics. Activity in this area intensified when the basic Kolmogorov self-similar theory was extended to two-dimensional or quasi 2D turbulent flows such as those appearing in the environment, that seem to control mixing [1,2]. The statistical description and the dynamics of these geophysical flows depend strongly on the distribution of long lived organized (coherent) structures. These flows show a complex topology, but may be subdivided in terms of strongly elliptical domains (high vorticity regions), strong hyperbolic domains (deformation cells with high energy condensations) and the background turbulent field of moderate elliptic and hyperbolic characteristics. It is of fundamental importance to investigate the different influence of these topological diverse regions. Relevant geometrical information of different areas is also given by the maximum fractal dimension, which is related to the energy spectrum of the flow. Using all the available information it is possible to investigate the spatial variability of the horizontal eddy diffusivity K(x,y). This information would be very important when trying to model numerically the behaviour in time of the oil spills [3,4] There is a strong dependence of horizontal eddy diffusivities with the Wave Reynolds number as well as with the wind stress measured as the friction velocity from wind profiles measured at the coastline. Natural sea surface oily slicks of diverse origin (plankton, algae or natural emissions and seeps of oil) form complicated structures in the sea surface due to the effects of both multiscale turbulence and Langmuir circulation. It is then possible to use the topological and scaling analysis to discriminate the different physical sea surface processes. We can relate higher orden moments of the Lagrangian velocity to effective diffusivity in spite of the need to calibrate the different regions determining the

  17. Transgenic expression and purification of myosin isoforms using the Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle system

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, James T.; Melkani, Girish C.; Huxford, Tom; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2011-01-01

    Biophysical and structural studies on muscle myosin rely upon milligram quantities of extremely pure material. However, many biologically interesting myosin isoforms are expressed at levels that are too low for direct purification from primary tissues. Efforts aimed at recombinant expression of functional striated muscle myosin isoforms in bacterial or insect cell culture have largely met with failure, although high level expression in muscle cell culture has recently been achieved at significant expense. We report a novel method for the use of strains of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster genetically engineered to produce histidine-tagged recombinant muscle myosin isoforms. This method takes advantage of the single muscle myosin heavy chain gene within the Drosophila genome, the high level of expression of accessible myosin in the thoracic indirect flight muscles, the ability to knock out endogenous expression of myosin in this tissue and the relatively low cost of fruit fly colony production and maintenance. We illustrate this method by expressing and purifying a recombinant histidine-tagged variant of embryonic body wall skeletal muscle myosin II from an engineered fly strain. The recombinant protein shows the expected ATPase activity and is of sufficient purity and homogeneity for crystallization. This system may prove useful for the expression and isolation of mutant myosins associated with skeletal muscle diseases and cardiomyopathies for their biochemical and structural characterization. PMID:22178692

  18. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  19. Brownian motion of particles in nematic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xuxia; Nayani, Karthik; Park, Jung; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2011-03-01

    We studied the brownian motion of both charged and neutral polystyrene particles in two nematic fluids, a thermotropic liquid crystal, E7, and a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal, Sunset Yellow FCF (SSY). Homogeneous planar alignment of E7 was easliy achieved by using rubbed polyimide film coated on the glass. For SSY planar mondomain, we used the capillary method recently developed in our lab. By tracking a single particle, the direction dependent diffussion coefficients and Stokes drag were measured in the nematic phase and isotropic phase for both systems.

  20. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  1. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  2. Stable isotope study of fluid inclusions in fluorite from Idaho: implications for continental climates during the Eocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R., II; Rye, R.O.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic studies of fluid inclusions from meteoric water-dominated epithermal ore deposits offer a unique opportunity to study paleoclimates because the fluids can provide direct samples of ancient waters. Fluorite-hosted fluid inclusions from the Eocene (51-50 Ma) epithermal deposits of the Bayhorse mining district, have low salinities and low to moderate homogenization temperatures indicating meteoric origins for the fluids. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data on inclusion fluids are almost identical to those of modern meteoric waters in the area. The equivalence of the isotope composition of the Eocene inclusion fluids and modern meteoric waters indicates that the Eocene climatic conditions were similar to those today. -from Authors

  3. Muscle-specific microRNAs in skeletal muscle development.

    PubMed

    Horak, Martin; Novak, Jan; Bienertova-Vasku, Julie

    2016-02-01

    Proper muscle function constitutes a precondition for good heath and an active lifestyle during an individual's lifespan and any deviations from normal skeletal muscle development and its functions may lead to numerous health conditions including e.g. myopathies and increased mortality. It is thus not surprising that there is an increasing need for understanding skeletal muscle developmental processes and the associated molecular pathways, especially as such information could find further uses in therapy. The understanding of complex skeletal muscle developmental networks was broadened with the discovery of microRNA (miRNA) molecules. MicroRNAs are evolutionary conserved small non-coding RNAs capable of negatively regulating gene expression on a post-transcriptional level by means of miRNA-mRNA interaction. Several miRNAs expressed exclusively in muscle have been labeled myomiRs. MyomiRs represent an integral part of skeletal muscle development, i.e. playing a significant role during skeletal muscle proliferation, differentiation and regeneration. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of current knowledge regarding the involvement of myomiRs in the individual phases of myogenesis and other aspects of skeletal muscle biology, along with an up-to-date list of myomiR target genes and their functions in skeletal muscle and miRNA-related therapeutic approaches and future prospects. PMID:26708096

  4. Muscle function and hydrodynamics limit power and speed in swimming frogs.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Christofer J; Richards, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the muscle force-velocity relationship and its derived n-shaped power-velocity curve offer important insights into muscular limits of performance. Given the power is maximal at 1/3 V(max), geometric scaling of muscle force coupled with fluid drag force implies that this optimal muscle-shortening velocity for power cannot be maintained across the natural body-size range. Instead, muscle velocity may decrease with increasing body size, conferring a similar n-shaped power curve with body size. Here we examine swimming speed and muscle function in the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. Swimming speed shows an n-shaped scaling relationship, peaking at 47.35 g. Further, in vitro muscle function of the ankle extensor plantaris longus also shows an optimal body mass for muscle power output (47.27 g), reflecting that of swimming speed. These findings suggest that in drag-based aquatic systems, muscle-environment interactions vary with body size, limiting both the muscle's potential to produce power and the swimming speed. PMID:24177194

  5. Characterizing the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its geometry properties on its behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan Joshua; Xie, Sheng Quan; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we explore the basic static and dynamic behavior of a hydraulically actuated Peano muscle and how its geometry affects key static and dynamic performance metrics. The Peano muscle, or pouch motor is a fluid powered artificial muscle. Similar to McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs), it has the ability to generate the high forces of biological muscles with the low threshold pressure of pleated PAMs, but in a slim, easily distributed form. We found that Peano muscles have similar characteristics to other PAMs, but produce lower free-strains. A test rig capable of measuring high-speed flow rates with a Venturi tube revealed that their efficiency peaks at about 40% during highly dynamic movements. Peano muscles with more tubes and of a greater size do not move faster. Also, their muscle tubes should have an aspect ratio of at least 1:3 and channel width greater than 20% to maximize performance. These findings suggest that finite element modeling be used to optimize more complex Peano muscle geometries.

  6. Rippling muscle disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Schara, Ulrike; Vorgerd, Matthias; Popovic, Nikola; Schoser, Benedikt G H; Ricker, Kenneth; Mortier, Wilhelm

    2002-07-01

    Rippling muscle disease is a rare autosomal dominant disorder first described in 1975. Recently, it could be classified as a caveolinopathy; in European families, mutations in the caveolin-3 gene were revealed as causing this disease. Although clinical symptoms were almost all described in adulthood, we are now reporting clinical data of seven children with rippling muscle disease owing to mutations in the caveolin-3 gene. Initial symptoms were frequent falls, inability to walk on heels, tiptoe walking with pain and a warm-up phenomenon, calf hypertrophy, and an elevated serum creatine kinase level. Percussion-/pressure-induced rapid contractions, painful muscle mounding, and rippling could be observed even in early childhood. The diagnosis can be confirmed by molecular genetic analysis. Muscle biopsy must be considered in patients without muscle weakness or mechanical hyperirritability to differentiate between rippling muscle disease and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C. PMID:12269726

  7. Evolution of flow properties in homogeneously altered limestone specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinsmeister, L.; Dautriat, J.; Dimanov, A.; Raphanel, J.; Bornert, M.; Gland, N.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers is a way to limit the anthropogenic part of the greenhouse effect. The injection of supercritical CO2 in aquifer leads to geochemical reactions with the host rock, resulting for instance in dissolution and precipitation processes. These phenomena impact the flow properties of the porous network. To study this impact, we make use of thermally activated retarded acid. This treatment allows us to realize an homogeneous alteration. The materiel is an oolitic limestone from the Lavoux quarry in the Paris basin. We analyse the evolution of flow properties using porosity and permeability measurements in connection with the micro-structural evolution, studied with mercury porosimetry, NMR, medical scanner, laser diffraction, SEM and thin section analyses. A particular attention has been paid to the permeability evolution and the distribution of fines. Intact samples show a bimodal porosity distribution, with a micro-porosity ranging from 0.5µm to 3µm, a macro-porosity ranging from 10µm to 100µm, and a total porosity exceeding 20%. Permeability is about 100mD. Porosity increases by 0.4% per alteration cycle together with the proportion of micro pore throats and the size of the macro pore throat, as evidenced by mercury porosimetry. The permeability is measured using a differential pressure sensor before and after alteration, back and forth in the axis direction of the plug. The results show that while the alteration in general results in an increase of the permeability, some complex non monotoneous behaviour can be observed. We infer that fines are mobilized in the porous network, clogging some pore throats. We also analyse the outgoing fluids after alteration with laser diffraction. A familly of particles ranging from 3µm to 10µm is detected, suggesting that bigger fines remain stuck in the porosity. These larger particles can be observed using comparative µ-CT imaging. Thin sections and SEM analyses do not show any evidence of

  8. Forearm Muscle Oxygenation Decreases During Low Levels of Brief, Isometric Contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy Gita; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, Alan R.; Rempel, D. M.; Hargens, Murthy G. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Regional muscle pain syndromes can be caused by repeated and sustained exertion of a specific muscle. Such exertion may elevate local tissue fluid pressure, reduce blood flow and tissue oxygenation (TO2), and cause fatigue, pain and functional deficits of the Involved muscle. Low levels (less than 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)) of prolonged static contraction of the upper extremity are common In many occupational settings and May cause fatigue. The purpose of our Investigation was to determine whether TO2 decreases significantly at low levels of static contraction of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB).

  9. Idiopathic lactic acidemia with developmental delay and type 1 muscle fiber atrophy: report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Iso, A; Murakami, N; Yoneyama, H; Hanaoka, S; Kurokawa, T; Nonaka, I

    1993-01-01

    Two infants with generalized muscle hypotonia with mild muscle weakness and markedly delayed developmental milestones, had high lactate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from early infancy. Biochemical and morphologic studies of biopsied muscles disclosed no abnormality except for type 1 fiber atrophy, which was quite different from patients with central nervous involvement with type 2 fiber atrophy. In both patients, the disease was not progressive and lactate levels gradually decreased. Although no metabolic defect was found, these patients probably shared common pathogenetic mechanism. PMID:8279656

  10. Interactions between internal forces, body stiffness, and fluid environment in a neuromechanical model of lamprey swimming

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Eric D.; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Williams, Thelma L.; Cohen, Avis H.; Fauci, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal movements result from a complex balance of many different forces. Muscles produce force to move the body; the body has inertial, elastic, and damping properties that may aid or oppose the muscle force; and the environment produces reaction forces back on the body. The actual motion is an emergent property of these interactions. To examine the roles of body stiffness, muscle activation, and fluid environment for swimming animals, a computational model of a lamprey was developed. The model uses an immersed boundary framework that fully couples the Navier–Stokes equations of fluid dynamics with an actuated, elastic body model. This is the first model at a Reynolds number appropriate for a swimming fish that captures the complete fluid-structure interaction, in which the body deforms according to both internal muscular forces and external fluid forces. Results indicate that identical muscle activation patterns can produce different kinematics depending on body stiffness, and the optimal value of stiffness for maximum acceleration is different from that for maximum steady swimming speed. Additionally, negative muscle work, observed in many fishes, emerges at higher tail beat frequencies without sensory input and may contribute to energy efficiency. Swimming fishes that can tune their body stiffness by appropriately timed muscle contractions may therefore be able to optimize the passive dynamics of their bodies to maximize peak acceleration or swimming speed. PMID:21037110

  11. Titin domains progressively unfolded by force are homogenously distributed along the molecule.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Pasquale; Mártonfalvi, Zsolt; Naftz, Katalin; Kőszegi, Dorina; Kellermayer, Miklós

    2015-07-21

    Titin is a giant filamentous protein of the muscle sarcomere in which stretch induces the unfolding of its globular domains. However, the mechanisms of how domains are progressively selected for unfolding and which domains eventually unfold have for long been elusive. Based on force-clamp optical tweezers experiments we report here that, in a paradoxical violation of mechanically driven activation kinetics, neither the global domain unfolding rate, nor the folded-state lifetime distributions of full-length titin are sensitive to force. This paradox is reconciled by a gradient of mechanical stability so that domains are gradually selected for unfolding as the magnitude of the force field increases. Atomic force microscopic screening of extended titin molecules revealed that the unfolded domains are distributed homogenously along the entire length of titin, and this homogeneity is maintained with increasing overstretch. Although the unfolding of domains with progressively increasing mechanical stability makes titin a variable viscosity damper, the spatially randomized variation of domain stability ensures that the induced structural changes are not localized but are distributed along the molecule's length. Titin may thereby provide complex safety mechanims for protecting the sarcomere against structural disintegration under excessive mechanical conditions. PMID:26200869

  12. Genetic homogeneity in the commercial pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis revealed by COI barcoding gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, S. S. A.; Terossi, M.; Costa, R. C.; Mantelatto, F. L.

    2015-12-01

    The pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis is one of the most commercially exploited species in Brazil's South and Southeastern regions. Specific information about the status of its genetic variation is necessary to promote more effective management procedures. The genetic variation of the population of F. paulensis was investigated in five localities along southern and southeastern coast of Brazil. Sampling was performed with a commercial fishing boat. Total genomic DNA was extracted from abdominal muscle tissues and was used to DNA amplification by PCR. The COI gene was used as a DNA barcoding marker. The 570 bp COI gene sequences were obtained from all 45 individuals. The haplotype network showed no genetic variability among the population stocks, which was confirmed by Molecular Variance Analysis. The final alignment showed that inside species there is haplotype sharing among the sampled localities, since one haplotype is shared by 38 individuals belonging to all the five sampled regions, with no biogeographic pattern. This result is reasonable since there are no geographical barriers or habitat disjunction that might serve as a barrier to gene flow among the sampled localities. Possible reasons and consequences of the genetic homogeneity found are discussed. The results complement ecological studies concerning the offseason: since it is a single stock, the same protection strategy can be applied. However, the genetic homogeneity found in this study combined with the intensive fishery effort and the species biology can result in severe consequences for the F. paulensis.

  13. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid mechanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  14. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow–induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs. PMID:25360054

  15. Pattern and process of biotic homogenization in the New Pangaea.

    PubMed

    Baiser, Benjamin; Olden, Julian D; Record, Sydne; Lockwood, Julie L; McKinney, Michael L

    2012-12-01

    Human activities have reorganized the earth's biota resulting in spatially disparate locales becoming more or less similar in species composition over time through the processes of biotic homogenization and biotic differentiation, respectively. Despite mounting evidence suggesting that this process may be widespread in both aquatic and terrestrial systems, past studies have predominantly focused on single taxonomic groups at a single spatial scale. Furthermore, change in pairwise similarity is itself dependent on two distinct processes, spatial turnover in species composition and changes in gradients of species richness. Most past research has failed to disentangle the effect of these two mechanisms on homogenization patterns. Here, we use recent statistical advances and collate a global database of homogenization studies (20 studies, 50 datasets) to provide the first global investigation of the homogenization process across major faunal and floral groups and elucidate the relative role of changes in species richness and turnover. We found evidence of homogenization (change in similarity ranging from -0.02 to 0.09) across nearly all taxonomic groups, spatial extent and grain sizes. Partitioning of change in pairwise similarity shows that overall change in community similarity is driven by changes in species richness. Our results show that biotic homogenization is truly a global phenomenon and put into question many of the ecological mechanisms invoked in previous studies to explain patterns of homogenization. PMID:23055062

  16. Homogenization and improvement in energy dissipation of nonlinear composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Luv; Sivakumar, Srinivasan M.; Vedantam, S.

    2016-04-01

    Due to their high strength to weight and stiffness to weight ratio, there is a huge shift towards the composite materials from the conventional metals, but composites have poor damage resistance in the transverse direction. Undergoing impact loads, they can fail in wide variety of modes which severely reduces the structural integrity of the component. This paper deals with the homogenization of glass-fibers and epoxy composite with a material introduced as an inelastic inclusion. This nonlinearity is being modelled by kinematic hardening procedure and homogenization is done by one of the mean field homogenization technique known as Mori-Tanaka method. The homogenization process consider two phases, one is the matrix and another is the inelastic inclusion, thus glass-fibers and epoxy are two phases which can be considered as one phase and act as a matrix while homogenizing non-linear composite. Homogenization results have been compared to the matrix at volume fraction zero of the inelastic inclusions and to the inelastic material at volume fraction one. After homogenization, increase of the energy dissipation into the composite due to addition of inelastic material and effects onto the same by changing the properties of the matrix material have been discussed.

  17. Reduction of pantethine in rabbit ocular lens homogenate.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D H; Szulc, M E

    1997-02-01

    In several animal models, preliminary studies have indicated that pantethine may inhibit cataract formation. Therefore, preclinical trials need to be conducted to study the pharmacology of pantethine in the ocular lens and to establish its efficacy. Since pantethine, which is a disulfide, can undergo a variety of chemical modifications such as reduction and formation of mixed disulfides, a detailed study was first conducted to determine the stability of pantethine in rabbit lens homogenate. A knowledge of the stability of pantethine in lens homogenate was necessary to establish if pantethine could be metabolized in the time it takes to harvest and homogenize a lens. The results of this study will be used to establish a protocol for harvesting and homogenizing lens samples. Pantethine (100 microM) is completely reduced to pantetheine in rabbit lens homogenate in about 16 min. About 1.5% of the pantethine added to lens homogenate forms a mixed disulfide with lens proteins, and the remainder is found in the supernatant. The supernatant pantethine concentration decreases exponentially as a function of time, and the terminal half-life for this process is 3.3 min. The free supernatant pantetheine concentration increases in pseudo first order manner as a function of time with a rate constant of 4.3 min. Pantethinase activity is not significant, because the free supernatant pantetheine concentration did not decrease. The exact mechanism of pantethine reduction in rabbit lens homogenate remains to be determined. PMID:9127277

  18. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... cleans the skin around the insertion site. Numbing medicine (anesthetic) is injected into the skin. A needle is placed through the skin and muscles of the chest wall into the space around the lungs, called the pleural space. As ...

  19. Modeling of the energy savings of variable recruitment McKibben muscle bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Michael A.; Chipka, Jordan B.; Bryant, Matthew J.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2015-03-01

    McKibben artificial muscles are often utilized in mobile robotic applications that require compliant and light weight actuation capable of producing large forces. In order to increase the endurance of these mobile robotic platforms, actuation efficiency must be addressed. Since pneumatic systems are rarely more than 30% efficient due to the compressibility of the working fluid, the McKibben muscles are hydraulically powered. Additionally, these McKibben artificial muscles utilize an inelastic bladder to reduce the energy losses associated with elastic energy storage in the usual rubber tube bladders. The largest energy losses in traditional valve-controlled hydraulic systems are found in the valving implementation to match the required loads. This is performed by throttling, which results in large pressure drops over the control valves and significant fluid power being wasted as heat. This paper discusses how these throttling losses are reduced by grouping multiple artificial muscles to form a muscle bundle where, like in skeletal muscle, more elements that make up the muscle bundle are recruited to match the load. This greatly lessens the pressure drops by effectively changing the actuator area, leading to much higher efficiencies over a broader operation envelope. Simulations of several different loading scenarios are discussed that reveal the benefits of such an actuation scheme.

  20. Tolerance following organophophate poisoning of tracheal muscle. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.M.; Dwyer, T.M.

    1987-07-21

    The effects of subacute exposure to the organophosphate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (diisoprophylfluorophosphate, soman, sarin, and VX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors, the contractile responses, and the electrophysiological properties of swine tracheal smooth muscle were studied. Subacute organophosphate treatment decreased the number of muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle homogenates and in the surface membrane of isolated cells by 50-77%. DFP was the most potent, followed by sarin, VX, and soman. The organophosphates induced a change in the coupling of the receptor to the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, which resulted in a decrease in the number of high-affinity receptors available for agonist-induced actions. The sensitivity of the muscle to acetylcholine and bethanechol was largely unchanged by any of the organophosphates. It is concluded that tolerance development is a complex process and involves: changes in receptor number and coupling of these receptors to intra-cellular processes; changes in the sensitivity of the ganglia to cholinergic agonists; and changes in the membrane processes and channels controlling membrane potential. Surprisingly, the response of the muscle to agonists is not greatly affected even though 70% of the receptors are lost from the cell surface.

  1. Toward a mechanistic understanding and prediction of biotic homogenization.

    PubMed

    Olden, Julian D; Poff, N LeRoy

    2003-10-01

    The widespread replacement of native species with cosmopolitan, nonnative species is homogenizing the global fauna and flora. While the empirical study of biotic homogenization is substantial and growing, theoretical aspects have yet to be explored. Consequently, the breadth of possible ecological mechanisms that can shape current and future patterns and rates of homogenization remain largely unknown. Here, we develop a conceptual model that describes 14 potential scenarios by which species invasions and/or extinctions can lead to various trajectories of biotic homogenization (increased community similarity) or differentiation (decreased community similarity); we then use a simulation approach to explore the model's predictions. We found changes in community similarity to vary with the type and number of nonnative and native species, the historical degree of similarity among the communities, and, to a lesser degree, the richness of the recipient communities. Homogenization is greatest when similar species invade communities, causing either no extinction or differential extinction of native species. The model predictions are consistent with current empirical data for fish, bird, and plant communities and therefore may represent the dominant mechanisms of contemporary homogenization. We present a unifying model illustrating how the balance between invading and extinct species dictates the outcome of biotic homogenization. We conclude by discussing a number of critical but largely unrecognized issues that bear on the empirical study of biotic homogenization, including the importance of spatial scale, temporal scale, and data resolution. We argue that the study of biotic homogenization needs to be placed in a more mechanistic and predictive framework in order for studies to provide adequate guidance in conservation efforts to maintain regional distinctness of the global biota. PMID:14582007

  2. Muscle dysmorphia: current insights.

    PubMed

    Tod, David; Edwards, Christian; Cranswick, Ieuan

    2016-01-01

    Since 1997, there has been increasing research focusing on muscle dysmorphia, a condition underpinned by people's beliefs that they have insufficient muscularity, in both the Western and non-Western medical and scientific communities. Much of this empirical interest has surveyed nonclinical samples, and there is limited understanding of people with the condition beyond knowledge about their characteristics. Much of the existing knowledge about people with the condition is unsurprising and inherent in the definition of the disorder, such as dissatisfaction with muscularity and adherence to muscle-building activities. Only recently have investigators started to explore questions beyond these limited tautological findings that may give rise to substantial knowledge advances, such as the examination of masculine and feminine norms. There is limited understanding of additional topics such as etiology, prevalence, nosology, prognosis, and treatment. Further, the evidence is largely based on a small number of unstandardized case reports and descriptive studies (involving small samples), which are largely confined to Western (North American, British, and Australian) males. Although much research has been undertaken since the term "muscle dysmorphia" entered the psychiatric lexicon in 1997, there remains tremendous scope for knowledge advancement. A primary task in the short term is for investigators to examine the extent to which the condition exists among well-defined populations to help determine the justification for research funding relative to other public health issues. A greater variety of research questions and designs may contribute to a broader and more robust knowledge base than currently exists. Future work will help clinicians assist a group of people whose quality of life and health are placed at risk by their muscular preoccupation. PMID:27536165

  3. Muscle dysmorphia: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Tod, David; Edwards, Christian; Cranswick, Ieuan

    2016-01-01

    Since 1997, there has been increasing research focusing on muscle dysmorphia, a condition underpinned by people’s beliefs that they have insufficient muscularity, in both the Western and non-Western medical and scientific communities. Much of this empirical interest has surveyed nonclinical samples, and there is limited understanding of people with the condition beyond knowledge about their characteristics. Much of the existing knowledge about people with the condition is unsurprising and inherent in the definition of the disorder, such as dissatisfaction with muscularity and adherence to muscle-building activities. Only recently have investigators started to explore questions beyond these limited tautological findings that may give rise to substantial knowledge advances, such as the examination of masculine and feminine norms. There is limited understanding of additional topics such as etiology, prevalence, nosology, prognosis, and treatment. Further, the evidence is largely based on a small number of unstandardized case reports and descriptive studies (involving small samples), which are largely confined to Western (North American, British, and Australian) males. Although much research has been undertaken since the term “muscle dysmorphia” entered the psychiatric lexicon in 1997, there remains tremendous scope for knowledge advancement. A primary task in the short term is for investigators to examine the extent to which the condition exists among well-defined populations to help determine the justification for research funding relative to other public health issues. A greater variety of research questions and designs may contribute to a broader and more robust knowledge base than currently exists. Future work will help clinicians assist a group of people whose quality of life and health are placed at risk by their muscular preoccupation. PMID:27536165

  4. Smooth Muscle Strips for Intestinal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Walthers, Christopher M.; Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M.; Dunn, James C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Functionally contracting smooth muscle is an essential part of the engineered intestine that has not been replicated in vitro. The purpose of this study is to produce contracting smooth muscle in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle organization. We employed intact smooth muscle strips and compared them to dissociated smooth muscle cells in culture for 14 days. Cells isolated by enzymatic digestion quickly lost maturity markers for smooth muscle cells and contained few enteric neural and glial cells. Cultured smooth muscle strips exhibited periodic contraction and maintained neural and glial markers. Smooth muscle strips cultured for 14 days also exhibited regular fluctuation of intracellular calcium, whereas cultured smooth muscle cells did not. After implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds, smooth muscle strip constructs expressed high levels of smooth muscle maturity markers as well as enteric neural and glial cells. Intact smooth muscle strips may be a useful component for engineered intestinal smooth muscle. PMID:25486279

  5. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  6. Enhancement of skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, R; Heintz, C

    1994-09-01

    We have studied the effect of adding extra satellite cells or soluble factors from crushed muscle on regeneration of minced fragments from rat tibialis muscle. The muscle mince was wrapped in an artificial epimysium to prevent adhesions and cell immigration from adjacent muscles. Regeneration was quantitatively assessed by electrophoretic determination of the muscle-specific form of creatine kinase. Control minces exhibited three periods of change in creatine kinase activity during a 7-week regeneration period. Activity fell rapidly during the first week, then rose gradually from 1-3 weeks and increased more rapidly from 3-7 weeks. To augment the original complement of myogenic cells, satellite cells were isolated from the contralateral muscle, purified by density gradient centrifugation, and expanded in culture for 3 days before adding to the muscle mince. The added cells resulted in a 3-fold enhancement of creatine kinase activity throughout the regeneration period. Soluble muscle extract incorporated into a collagen matrix also stimulated regeneration when added to muscle mince. The extract accelerated the rate of creatine kinase increase during the 1-3 week period beyond that observed in the control or cell augmented mince, suggesting that factors in the extract may facilitate revascularization or reinnervation. The specific activity of creatine kinase was increased in regenerates augmented with both cells and extract, indicating that the effects enhance primarily myogenic processes. PMID:7803846

  7. An electrooptical muscle contraction sensor.

    PubMed

    Chianura, Alessio; Giardini, Mario E

    2010-07-01

    An electrooptical sensor for the detection of muscle contraction is described. Infrared light is injected into the muscle, the backscattering is observed, and the contraction is detected by measuring the change, that occurs during muscle contraction, between the light scattered in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the muscle cells. With respect to electromyography and to optical absorption-based sensors, our device has the advantage of lower invasiveness, of lower sensitivity to electromagnetic noise and to movement artifacts, and of being able to distinguish between isometric and isotonic contractions. PMID:20490943

  8. Muscle coordination: the discussion continues

    PubMed

    Prilutsky

    2000-01-01

    In this response, the major criticisms of the target article are addressed. Terminology from the target article that may have caused some confusion is clarified. In particular, the tasks that have the basic features of muscle coordination, as identified in the target article, have been limited in scope. A new metabolic optimization criterion suggested by Alexander (2000) is examined for its ability to predict muscle coordination in walking. Issues concerning the validation of muscle force predictions, the rules of muscle coordination, and the role of directional constraints in coordination of two-joint muscles are discussed. It is shown in particular that even in one-joint systems, the forces predicted by the criterion of Crowninshield and Brand (1981) depend upon the muscle moment arms and the physiological cross-sectional areas in much more complex ways than either previously assumed in the target article, or incorrectly derived by Herzog and Ait-Haddou (2000). It is concluded that the criterion of Crowninshield and Brand qualitatively predicts the basic coordination features of the major one- and two-joint muscles in a number of highly skilled, repetitive motor tasks performed by humans under predictable conditions and little demands on stability and accuracy. A possible functional significance of such muscle coordination may be the minimization of perceived effort, muscle fatigue, and/or energy expenditure. PMID:10675817

  9. Free Flap Functional Muscle Transfers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ryan M; Ruch, David S

    2016-08-01

    Free functional muscle transfers remain a powerful reconstructive tool to restore upper extremity function when other options such as tendon or nerve transfers are not available. This reconstructive technique is commonly used for patients following trauma, ischemic contractures, and brachial plexopathies. Variable outcomes have been reported following free functional muscle transfers that are related to motor nerve availability and reinnervation. This article highlights considerations around donor motor nerve selection, dissection, and use of the gracilis muscle, and the surgical approach to performing a free functional muscle transfer to restore elbow flexion and/or digit flexion. PMID:27387083

  10. Muscle Stimulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Goddard Space Flight Center contract, Electrologic of America was able to refine the process of densely packing circuitry on personal computer boards, providing significant contributions to the closed-loop systems for the Remote Manipulator System Simulator. The microcircuitry work was then applied to the StimMaster FES Ergometer, an exercise device used to stimulate muscles suffering from paralysis. The electrical stimulation equipment was developed exclusively for V-Care Health Systems, Inc. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  11. A mathematical model of peritoneal fluid absorption in tissue.

    PubMed

    Stachowska-Pietka, Joanna; Waniewski, Jacek; Flessner, Michael F; Lindholm, Bengt

    2005-01-01

    To investigate how water flow and interstitial pressure change in tissue during a peritoneal dwell with isotonic fluid, we developed a mathematical model of water transport in the tissue. Transport through muscle alone (M) and through muscle with intact skin (MS) were considered for the rat abdominal wall, using various parameters for muscle and skin. Based on the concept of distributed capillary and lymphatic systems, two main transport barriers were taken into account. capillary membrane and interstitium. We calculated the tissue hydrostatic pressure profiles and compared them with experimental data. The theoretic steady-state pressure distribution for model M is in good agreement with the experimental data. In model MS, the theoretic distribution diverges from the data in the subcutaneous layer. The transient times for fluid flow in the tissue for both model simulations are rather long (40 minutes in model M and 95 minutes in model MS) and depend on intraperitoneal pressure. The fraction of fluid absorbed from the tissue by the lymphatics increases with time from 10% to 97% of fluid flow from the peritoneal cavity. PMID:16686276

  12. Heterogenization of Homogeneous Catalysts: the Effect of the Support

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, W.L.; Ott, K.C.; Hall, K.A.; de Rege, F.M.; Morita, D.K.; Tumas, W.; Brown, G.H.; Broene, R.D.

    1999-06-29

    We have studied the influence of placing a soluble, homogeneous catalyst onto a solid support. We determined that such a 'heterogenized' homogeneous catalyst can have improved activity and selectivity for the asymmetric hydrogenation of enamides to amino acid derivatives. The route of heterogenization of RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} cations occurs via electrostatic interactions with anions that are capable of strong hydrogen bonding to silica surfaces. This is a novel approach to supported catalysis. Supported RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} is a recyclable, non-leaching catalyst in non-polar media. This is one of the few heterogenized catalysts that exhibits improved catalytic performance as compared to its homogeneous analog.

  13. A Locally-Exact Homogenization Approach for Periodic Heterogeneous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drago, Anthony S.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2008-02-15

    Elements of the homogenization theory are utilized to develop a new micromechanics approach for unit cells of periodic heterogeneous materials based on locally-exact elasticity solutions. Closed-form expressions for the homogenized moduli of unidirectionally-reinforced heterogeneous materials are obtained in terms of Hill's strain concentration matrices valid under arbitrary combined loading, which yield the homogenized Hooke's law. Results for simple unit cells with off-set fibers, which require the use of periodic boundary conditions, are compared with corresponding finite-element results demonstrating excellent correlation.

  14. Evaluation of atomic homogeneity in mixed oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, H.; Tajiri, H.; Koizumi, M.

    1982-04-01

    Atomic homogeneities of UC 2-PuO 2 and ThO 2-UO 2 fuels fabricated by the mechanical blending were evaluated, using an X-ray diffraction method which has been developed to investigate the homogeneity in a binary metal powder compact. The X-ray diffraction line profile obtained on the plane (620) of specimen was converted to the composition distribution, after removing Kα 2 line profile and instrumental broadening function. Effective penetration curve obtained from the composition distribution and subsequently Matano interface was determined, and finally atomic homogeneity was evaluated.

  15. Hydrogen storage materials and method of making by dry homogenation

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Craig M.; Zidan, Ragaiy A.

    2002-01-01

    Dry homogenized metal hydrides, in particular aluminum hydride compounds, as a material for reversible hydrogen storage is provided. The reversible hydrogen storage material comprises a dry homogenized material having transition metal catalytic sites on a metal aluminum hydride compound, or mixtures of metal aluminum hydride compounds. A method of making such reversible hydrogen storage materials by dry doping is also provided and comprises the steps of dry homogenizing metal hydrides by mechanical mixing, such as be crushing or ball milling a powder, of a metal aluminum hydride with a transition metal catalyst. In another aspect of the invention, a method of powering a vehicle apparatus with the reversible hydrogen storage material is provided.

  16. George E. Brown memorial lecture. Role of atrial peptides in body fluid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ballermann, B J; Brenner, B M

    1986-05-01

    Extracts of mammalian atria, but not ventricles, induce marked diuresis, natriuresis, and reduction in blood pressure when infused systemically in rats and dogs. These extracts also inhibit aldosterone biosynthesis and renal renin release. Natriuretic peptides, 21 amino acids and longer, have been isolated from atria of rodents and man, and share a nearly homologous amino acid sequence at the carboxyterminus. Natriuretic activity resides in a 17-amino acid ring formed by a disulfide bridge, and the C-terminal Phe-Arg appears necessary for full biological potency. The deoxyribonucleic acid-encoding atrial natriuretic peptides have been cloned and the gene structure elucidated. Reduction of the diuretic and natriuretic responses to an acute volume load by right atrial appendectomy first suggested a role for atrial peptides in the physiological response to plasma volume expansion. Subsequently, release of peptides with natriuretic and spasmolytic properties from isolated heart preparations in response to right atrial distension was demonstrated by bioassay and radioimmunoassay. The presence of these peptides in normal rat and human plasma in concentrations of 20-100 pM, and the findings of increased levels in response to acute and chronic plasma volume expansion, rapid atrial tachyarrhythmias, systemic hypertension, congestive heart failure, and renal insufficiency imply that they play an important role in body fluid homeostasis. The mechanisms by which atrial peptides increase renal salt and water excretion are as yet unclear. Renal vascular effects have been consistently demonstrated, and limited evidence for direct actions on tubule ion transport has also been reported recently. In vitro, these peptides cause precontracted vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle to relax, mediated by a direct action on smooth muscle cells. Specific receptors for these peptides have been characterized in crude membranes prepared from whole kidney homogenates and adrenal glomerulosa

  17. Monitoring of seismoelectric signal in homogeneous sand as a function of water saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sénéchal, P.; Barrière, J.; Bordes, C.

    2010-12-01

    The seismo-electromagnetic method consists to measure the electrical field induced by seismic wave propagation. The electrokinetic coupling between seismic waves and electrical fields is sensitive to the pore fluid properties and fluid flow permeability which are significant hydrogeological properties. The role of water content on electrokinetic coupling is generally studied for low frequency phenomena (electrofiltration) but is unknown for seismoelectric effect. Indeed the role of water-content is very important for hydrologic and reservoir geophysical applications. Then, we propose to monitor seismoelectric signals as a function of water saturation in homogeneous unconsolidated sand (99% silica). Experimental data are obtained in the laboratory with a specifically experimental device including acoustic source (0- 20 Khz), 10 accelerometers (0.0001-17 Khz), 9 dipoles, 6 soil moisture sensors placed in a container full of sand (107 cm x 34 cm x 35 cm). Three cycles of imbibition-drainage are operated in a water saturation range from 0% to 95%. Injection and pumping of water are operated through three piezometers located in the container. The water content is measured continuously during the monitoring, porosity and permeability of medium and fluid conductivity are also determined. We present the characteristics of seismo-electric signal as a function of water content and we analyse the transfert function from seismic to seismoelectric energy.

  18. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  19. Applications of supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses supercritical fluids in industrial and near-to-industry applications. Supercritical fluids are flexible tools for processing materials. Supercritical fluids have been applied to mass-transfer processes, phase-transition processes, reactive systems, materials-related processes, and nanostructured materials. Some applications are already at industrial capacity, whereas others remain under development. In addition to extraction, application areas include impregnation and cleaning, multistage countercurrent separation, particle formation, coating, and reactive systems such as hydrogenation, biomass gasification, and supercritical water oxidation. Polymers are modified with supercritical fluids, and colloids and emulsions as well as nanostructured materials exhibit interesting phenomena when in contact with supercritical fluids that can be industrially exploited. For these applications to succeed, the properties of supercritical fluids in combination with the materials processed must be clearly determined and fundamental knowledge of the complex behavior must be made readily available. PMID:22432584

  20. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.