Science.gov

Sample records for muscle mechanical characteristics

  1. Mechanical analysis of Drosophila indirect flight and jump muscles

    PubMed Central

    Swank, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic advantages of Drosophila make it a very appealing choice for investigating muscle development, muscle physiology and muscle protein structure and function. To take full advantage of this model organism, it has been vital to develop isolated Drosophila muscle preparations that can be mechanically evaluated. We describe techniques to isolate, prepare and mechanically analyze skinned muscle fibers from two Drosophila muscle types, the indirect flight muscle and the jump muscle. The function of the indirect flight muscle is similar to vertebrate cardiac muscle, to generate power in an oscillatory manner. The indirect flight muscle is ideal for evaluating the influence of protein mutations on muscle and cross-bridge stiffness, oscillatory power, and deriving cross-bridge rate constants. Jump muscle physiology and structure are more similar to skeletal vertebrate muscle than indirect flight muscle, and it is ideal for measuring maximum shortening velocity, force-velocity characteristics and steady-state power generation. PMID:22079350

  2. Mechanical analysis of Drosophila indirect flight and jump muscles.

    PubMed

    Swank, Douglas M

    2012-01-01

    The genetic advantages of Drosophila make it a very appealing choice for investigating muscle development, muscle physiology and muscle protein structure and function. To take full advantage of this model organism, it has been vital to develop isolated Drosophila muscle preparations that can be mechanically evaluated. We describe techniques to isolate, prepare and mechanically analyze skinned muscle fibers from two Drosophila muscle types, the indirect flight muscle and the jump muscle. The function of the indirect flight muscle is similar to vertebrate cardiac muscle, to generate power in an oscillatory manner. The indirect flight muscle is ideal for evaluating the influence of protein mutations on muscle and cross-bridge stiffness, oscillatory power, and deriving cross-bridge rate constants. Jump muscle physiology and structure are more similar to skeletal vertebrate muscle than indirect flight muscle, and it is ideal for measuring maximum shortening velocity, force-velocity characteristics and steady-state power generation. PMID:22079350

  3. Fluid mechanics of muscle vibrations.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, D T; Cole, N M

    1988-01-01

    The pressure field produced by an isometrically contracting frog gastrocnemius muscle is described by the fluid mechanics equations for a vibrating sphere. The equations predict a pressure amplitude that is proportional to the lateral acceleration of the muscle, inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the muscle, and cosinusoidally related to the major axis of lateral movement. The predictions are confirmed by experiments that measure the pressure amplitude distribution and by photographs of muscle movement during contraction. The lateral movement of muscle has the appearance of an oscillating system response to a step function input--the oscillation may be at the resonant frequency of the muscle and therefore may provide a means to measure muscle stiffness without actually touching the muscle. PMID:3260803

  4. Mechanics of Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM; see Table 1 for a list of abbreviations) is a heterogeneous biomaterial comprised of cells and extracellular matrix. By surrounding tubes of endothelial cells, VSM forms a regulated network, the vasculature, through which oxygenated blood supplies specialized organs, permitting the development of large multicellular organisms. VSM cells, the engine of the vasculature, house a set of regulated nanomotors that permit rapid stress-development, sustained stress-maintenance and vessel constriction. Viscoelastic materials within, surrounding and attached to VSM cells, comprised largely of polymeric proteins with complex mechanical characteristics, assist the engine with countering loads imposed by the heart pump, and with control of relengthening after constriction. The complexity of this smart material can be reduced by classical mechanical studies combined with circuit modeling using spring and dashpot elements. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of VSM requires a more complete understanding of the mechanics and regulation of its biochemical parts, and ultimately, an understanding of how these parts work together to form the machinery of the vascular tree. Current molecular studies provide detailed mechanical data about single polymeric molecules, revealing viscoelasticity and plasticity at the protein domain level, the unique biological slip-catch bond, and a regulated two-step actomyosin power stroke. At the tissue level, new insight into acutely dynamic stress-strain behavior reveals smooth muscle to exhibit adaptive plasticity. At its core, physiology aims to describe the complex interactions of molecular systems, clarifying structure-function relationships and regulation of biological machines. The intent of this review is to provide a comprehensive presentation of one biomachine, VSM. PMID:26756629

  5. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  6. Compensatory Hypertrophy of Skeletal Muscle: Contractile Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ianuzzo, C. D.; Chen, V.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using rats that demonstrates contractile characteristics of normal and hypertrophied muscle. Compensatory hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle is induced by surgical removal of the synergistic gastrocnemium muscle. Includes methods for determination of contractile properties of normal and hypertrophied muscle and…

  7. Multiple Sclerosis Affects Skeletal Muscle Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wens, Inez; Dalgas, Ulrik; Vandenabeele, Frank; Krekels, Maartje; Grevendonk, Lotte; Eijnde, Bert O.

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) on skeletal muscle characteristics, such as muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA), fiber type proportion, muscle strength and whole muscle mass, remains conflicting. Methods In this cross sectional study, body composition and muscle strength of the quadriceps were assessed in 34 MS (EDSS: 2.5±0.19) patients and 18 matched healthy controls (HC). Hereafter a muscle biopsy (m.vastus lateralis) was taken. Results Compared to HC, mean muscle fiber CSA of all fibers, as well as CSA of type I, II and IIa fibers were smaller and muscle strength of the quadriceps was lower in MS patients. Whole body composition was comparable between groups. However, compared to HC, the biopsied leg tended to have a higher fat percentage (p = 0.1) and a lower lean mass (p = 0.06) in MS patients. Conclusion MS seems to negatively influence skeletal muscle fiber CSA, muscle strength and muscle mass of the lower limbs of mildly affected MS patients. This emphasises the need for rehabilitation programs focusing on muscle preservation of the lower limb. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01845896 PMID:25264868

  8. Calcium Sensitization Mechanisms in Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Perrino, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    An increase in intracellular Ca2+ is the primary trigger of contraction of gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscles. However, increasing the Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofilaments by elevating myosin light chain phosphorylation also plays an essential role. Inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase activity with protein kinase C-potentiated phosphatase inhibitor protein-17 kDa (CPI-17) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation is considered to be the primary mechanism underlying myofilament Ca2+ sensitization. The relative importance of Ca2+ sensitization mechanisms to the diverse patterns of GI motility is likely related to the varied functional roles of GI smooth muscles. Increases in CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in response to agonist stimulation regulate myosin light chain phosphatase activity in phasic, tonic, and sphincteric GI smooth muscles. Recent evidence suggests that MYPT1 phosphorylation may also contribute to force generation by reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms responsible for maintaining constitutive CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in GI smooth muscles are still largely unknown. The characteristics of the cell-types comprising the neuroeffector junction lead to fundamental differences between the effects of exogenous agonists and endogenous neurotransmitters on Ca2+ sensitization mechanisms. The contribution of various cell-types within the tunica muscularis to the motor responses of GI organs to neurotransmission must be considered when determining the mechanisms by which Ca2+ sensitization pathways are activated. The signaling pathways regulating Ca2+ sensitization may provide novel therapeutic strategies for controlling GI motility. This article will provide an overview of the current understanding of the biochemical basis for the regulation of Ca2+ sensitization, while also discussing the functional importance to different smooth muscles of the GI tract. PMID:26701920

  9. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation. PMID:15532311

  10. Biologic-free mechanically induced muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cezar, Christine A; Roche, Ellen T; Vandenburgh, Herman H; Duda, Georg N; Walsh, Conor J; Mooney, David J

    2016-02-01

    Severe skeletal muscle injuries are common and can lead to extensive fibrosis, scarring, and loss of function. Clinically, no therapeutic intervention exists that allows for a full functional restoration. As a result, both drug and cellular therapies are being widely investigated for treatment of muscle injury. Because muscle is known to respond to mechanical loading, we investigated instead whether a material system capable of massage-like compressions could promote regeneration. Magnetic actuation of biphasic ferrogel scaffolds implanted at the site of muscle injury resulted in uniform cyclic compressions that led to reduced fibrous capsule formation around the implant, as well as reduced fibrosis and inflammation in the injured muscle. In contrast, no significant effect of ferrogel actuation on muscle vascularization or perfusion was found. Strikingly, ferrogel-driven mechanical compressions led to enhanced muscle regeneration and a ∼threefold increase in maximum contractile force of the treated muscle at 2 wk compared with no-treatment controls. Although this study focuses on the repair of severely injured skeletal muscle, magnetically stimulated bioagent-free ferrogels may find broad utility in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26811474

  11. Biologic-free mechanically induced muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cezar, Christine A.; Roche, Ellen T.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Duda, Georg N.; Walsh, Conor J.; Mooney, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Severe skeletal muscle injuries are common and can lead to extensive fibrosis, scarring, and loss of function. Clinically, no therapeutic intervention exists that allows for a full functional restoration. As a result, both drug and cellular therapies are being widely investigated for treatment of muscle injury. Because muscle is known to respond to mechanical loading, we investigated instead whether a material system capable of massage-like compressions could promote regeneration. Magnetic actuation of biphasic ferrogel scaffolds implanted at the site of muscle injury resulted in uniform cyclic compressions that led to reduced fibrous capsule formation around the implant, as well as reduced fibrosis and inflammation in the injured muscle. In contrast, no significant effect of ferrogel actuation on muscle vascularization or perfusion was found. Strikingly, ferrogel-driven mechanical compressions led to enhanced muscle regeneration and a ∼threefold increase in maximum contractile force of the treated muscle at 2 wk compared with no-treatment controls. Although this study focuses on the repair of severely injured skeletal muscle, magnetically stimulated bioagent-free ferrogels may find broad utility in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26811474

  12. Motor Unit Characteristics after Targeted Muscle Reinnervation

    PubMed Central

    Kapelner, Tamás; Jiang, Ning; Holobar, Aleš; Vujaklija, Ivan; Roche, Aidan D.; Farina, Dario; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to redirect nerves originally controlling muscles of the amputated limb into remaining muscles above the amputation, to treat phantom limb pain and facilitate prosthetic control. While this procedure effectively establishes robust prosthetic control, there is little knowledge on the behavior and characteristics of the reinnervated motor units. In this study we compared the m. pectoralis of five TMR patients to nine able-bodied controls with respect to motor unit action potential (MUAP) characteristics. We recorded and decomposed high-density surface EMG signals into individual spike trains of motor unit action potentials. In the TMR patients the MUAP surface area normalized to the electrode grid surface (0.25 ± 0.17 and 0.81 ± 0.46, p < 0.001) and the MUAP duration (10.92 ± 3.89 ms and 14.03 ± 3.91 ms, p < 0.01) were smaller for the TMR group than for the controls. The mean MUAP amplitude (0.19 ± 0.11 mV and 0.14 ± 0.06 mV, p = 0.07) was not significantly different between the two groups. Finally, we observed that MUAP surface representation in TMR generally overlapped, and the surface occupied by motor units corresponding to only one motor task was on average smaller than 12% of the electrode surface. These results suggest that smaller MUAP surface areas in TMR patients do not necessarily facilitate prosthetic control due to a high degree of overlap between these areas, and a neural information—based control could lead to improved performance. Based on the results we also infer that the size of the motor units after reinnervation is influenced by the size of the innervating motor neuron. PMID:26901631

  13. Motor Unit Characteristics after Targeted Muscle Reinnervation.

    PubMed

    Kapelner, Tamás; Jiang, Ning; Holobar, Aleš; Vujaklija, Ivan; Roche, Aidan D; Farina, Dario; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2016-01-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to redirect nerves originally controlling muscles of the amputated limb into remaining muscles above the amputation, to treat phantom limb pain and facilitate prosthetic control. While this procedure effectively establishes robust prosthetic control, there is little knowledge on the behavior and characteristics of the reinnervated motor units. In this study we compared the m. pectoralis of five TMR patients to nine able-bodied controls with respect to motor unit action potential (MUAP) characteristics. We recorded and decomposed high-density surface EMG signals into individual spike trains of motor unit action potentials. In the TMR patients the MUAP surface area normalized to the electrode grid surface (0.25 ± 0.17 and 0.81 ± 0.46, p < 0.001) and the MUAP duration (10.92 ± 3.89 ms and 14.03 ± 3.91 ms, p < 0.01) were smaller for the TMR group than for the controls. The mean MUAP amplitude (0.19 ± 0.11 mV and 0.14 ± 0.06 mV, p = 0.07) was not significantly different between the two groups. Finally, we observed that MUAP surface representation in TMR generally overlapped, and the surface occupied by motor units corresponding to only one motor task was on average smaller than 12% of the electrode surface. These results suggest that smaller MUAP surface areas in TMR patients do not necessarily facilitate prosthetic control due to a high degree of overlap between these areas, and a neural information-based control could lead to improved performance. Based on the results we also infer that the size of the motor units after reinnervation is influenced by the size of the innervating motor neuron. PMID:26901631

  14. Electrical stimulation characteristics of denervated orbicularis oculi muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Keyong; Jin, Cheng; Wang, Yiting; Geng, Liang; Sun, Yajing; Tian, Hongchang

    2015-08-01

    This research is to study the electrical stimulation characteristics of orbicularis oculi muscle and the characteristics of the mechanical contraction. We observed the stimulus current diffusion regularity and its relationship with mechanical contraction in the orbicularis oculi muscle using an electrode gathering line. Under different stimulus intensities of 2 or 4 mA, the closer the recording electrodes were to the stimulating electrode, the larger was the amplitude. When the recording electrode and stimulating electrode distance increased, the amplitude declined linearly with decreasing function. In addition, current conduction across the muscle fiber was studied. Under different stimulus intensities of 2 or 4 mA, it was found that the closer the recording electrodes were to the stimulating electrode, the larger was the amplitude. When the recording electrode and stimulating electrode distance increased, the amplitude declined linearly with decreasing function. The transverse current reached a maximum 4 mA range, and increasing the current intensity did not increase the propagation range. Under different stimulation intensities, the larger the stimulus intensity, the greater is the potential change and the faster is the attenuation. Longitudinal current, even in the range of 6 mm, can still record electrical activity. While a transverse current diffuser has a maximum range of 4 mm, increasing the current intensity does not increase the propagation range. PMID:25724806

  15. Smooth muscle cell calcium activation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is controlled by the Ca2+ and Rho kinase signalling pathways. While the SMC Rho kinase system seems to be reasonably constant, there is enormous variation with regard to the mechanisms responsible for generating Ca2+ signals. One way of dealing with this diversity is to consider how this system has been adapted to control different SMC functions. Phasic SMCs (vas deferens, uterus and bladder) rely on membrane depolarization to drive Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. This depolarization can be induced by neurotransmitters or through the operation of a membrane oscillator. Many tonic SMCs (vascular, airway and corpus cavernosum) are driven by a cytosolic Ca2+ oscillator that generates periodic pulses of Ca2+. A similar oscillator is present in pacemaker cells such as the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and atypical SMCs that control other tonic SMCs (gastrointestinal, urethra, ureter). The changes in membrane potential induced by these cytosolic oscillators does not drive contraction directly but it functions to couple together individual oscillators to provide the synchronization that is a characteristic feature of many tonic SMCs. PMID:18787034

  16. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara; Sato, Ken; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of muscle plasticity with exercise.

    PubMed

    Hoppeler, Hans; Baum, Oliver; Lurman, Glenn; Mueller, Matthias

    2011-07-01

    The skeletal muscle phenotype is subject to considerable malleability depending on use. Low-intensity endurance type exercise leads to qualitative changes of muscle tissue characterized mainly by an increase in structures supporting oxygen delivery and consumption. High-load strength-type exercise leads to growth of muscle fibers dominated by an increase in contractile proteins. In low-intensity exercise, stress-induced signaling leads to transcriptional upregulation of a multitude of genes with Ca(2+) signaling and the energy status of the muscle cells sensed through AMPK being major input determinants. Several parallel signaling pathways converge on the transcriptional co-activator PGC-1α, perceived as being the coordinator of much of the transcriptional and posttranscriptional processes. High-load training is dominated by a translational upregulation controlled by mTOR mainly influenced by an insulin/growth factor-dependent signaling cascade as well as mechanical and nutritional cues. Exercise-induced muscle growth is further supported by DNA recruitment through activation and incorporation of satellite cells. Crucial nodes of strength and endurance exercise signaling networks are shared making these training modes interdependent. Robustness of exercise-related signaling is the consequence of signaling being multiple parallel with feed-back and feed-forward control over single and multiple signaling levels. We currently have a good descriptive understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling muscle phenotypic plasticity. We lack understanding of the precise interactions among partners of signaling networks and accordingly models to predict signaling outcome of entire networks. A major current challenge is to verify and apply available knowledge gained in model systems to predict human phenotypic plasticity. PMID:23733647

  18. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry: discrimination of pathophysiological regions in traumatized skeletal muscle by characteristic peptide signatures.

    PubMed

    Klein, Oliver; Strohschein, Kristin; Nebrich, Grit; Oetjen, Janina; Trede, Dennis; Thiele, Herbert; Alexandrov, Theodore; Giavalisco, Patrick; Duda, Georg N; von Roth, Philipp; Geissler, Sven; Klose, Joachim; Winkler, Tobias

    2014-10-01

    Due to formation of fibrosis and the loss of contractile muscle tissue, severe muscle injuries often result in insufficient healing marked by a significant reduction of muscle force and motor activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that the local transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells into an injured skeletal muscle of the rat improves the functional outcome of the healing process. Since, due to the lack of sufficient markers, the accurate discrimination of pathophysiological regions in injured skeletal muscle is inadequate, underlying mechanisms of the beneficial effects of mesenchymal stromal cell transplantation on primary trauma and trauma adjacent muscle area remain elusive. For discrimination of these pathophysiological regions, formalin-fixed injured skeletal muscle tissue was analyzed by MALDI imaging MS. By using two computational evaluation strategies, a supervised approach (ClinProTools) and unsupervised segmentation (SCiLS Lab), characteristic m/z species could be assigned to primary trauma and trauma adjacent muscle regions. Using "bottom-up" MS for protein identification and validation of results by immunohistochemistry, we could identify two proteins, skeletal muscle alpha actin and carbonic anhydrase III, which discriminate between the secondary damage on adjacent tissue and the primary traumatized muscle area. Our results underscore the high potential of MALDI imaging MS to describe the spatial characteristics of pathophysiological changes in muscle. PMID:25056804

  19. Mechanisms of protein balance in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Anthony, T G

    2016-07-01

    Increased global demand for adequate protein nutrition against a backdrop of climate change and concern for animal agriculture sustainability necessitates new and more efficient approaches to livestock growth and production. Anabolic growth is achieved when rates of new synthesis exceed turnover, producing a positive net protein balance. Conversely, deterioration or atrophy of lean mass is a consequence of a net negative protein balance. During early life and periods of growth, muscle mass is driven by increases in protein synthesis at the level of mRNA translation. Throughout life, muscle mass is further influenced by degradative processes such as autophagy and the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. Multiple signal transduction networks guide and coordinate these processes alongside quality control mechanisms to maintain protein homeostasis (proteostasis). Genetics, hormones, and environmental stimuli each influence proteostasis control, altering capacity and/or efficiency of muscle growth. An overview of recent findings and current methods to assess muscle protein balance and proteostasis is presented. Current efforts to identify novel control points have the potential through selective breeding design or development of hormetic strategies to better promote growth and health span during environmental stress. PMID:27345321

  20. Force and power generating mechanism(s) in active muscle as revealed from temperature perturbation studies.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W

    2010-10-01

    The basic characteristics of the process of force and power generation in active muscle that have emerged from temperature studies are examined. This is done by reviewing complementary findings from temperature-dependence studies and rapid temperature-jump (T-jump) experiments and from intact and skinned fast mammalian muscle fibres. In isometric muscle, a small T-jump leads to a characteristic rise in force showing that crossbridge force generation is endothermic (heat absorbed) and associated with increased entropy (disorder). The sensitivity of the T-jump force generation to added inorganic phosphate (Pi) indicates that a T-jump enhances an early step in the actomyosin (crossbridge) ATPase cycle before Pi-release. During muscle lengthening when steady force is increased, the T-jump force generation is inhibited. Conversely, during shortening when steady force is decreased, the T-jump force generation is enhanced in a velocity-dependent manner, showing that T-jump force generation is strain sensitive. Within the temperature range of ∼5–35◦C, the temperature dependence of steady active force is sigmoidal both in isometric and in shortening muscle. However, in shortening muscle, the endothermic character of force generation becomes more pronounced with increased velocity and this can, at least partly, account for the marked increase with warming of the mechanical power output of active muscle. PMID:20660565

  1. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  2. Cluster analysis application identifies muscle characteristics of importance for beef tenderness

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An important controversy in the relationship between beef tenderness and muscle characteristics including biochemical traits exists among meat researchers. The aim of this study is to explain variability in meat tenderness using muscle characteristics and biochemical traits available in the Integrated and Functional Biology of Beef (BIF-Beef) database. The BIF-Beef data warehouse contains characteristic measurements from animal, muscle, carcass, and meat quality derived from numerous experiments. We created three classes for tenderness (high, medium, and low) based on trained taste panel tenderness scores of all meat samples consumed (4,366 observations from 40 different experiments). For each tenderness class, the corresponding means for the mechanical characteristics, muscle fibre type, collagen content, and biochemical traits which may influence tenderness of the muscles were calculated. Results Our results indicated that lower shear force values were associated with more tender meat. In addition, muscles in the highest tenderness cluster had the lowest total and insoluble collagen contents, the highest mitochondrial enzyme activity (isocitrate dehydrogenase), the highest proportion of slow oxidative muscle fibres, the lowest proportion of fast-glycolytic muscle fibres, and the lowest average muscle fibre cross-sectional area. Results were confirmed by correlation analyses, and differences between muscle types in terms of biochemical characteristics and tenderness score were evidenced by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). When the cluster analysis was repeated using only muscle samples from m. Longissimus thoracis (LT), the results were similar; only contrasting previous results by maintaining a relatively constant fibre-type composition between all three tenderness classes. Conclusion Our results show that increased meat tenderness is related to lower shear forces, lower insoluble collagen and total collagen content, lower cross-sectional area of

  3. Mechanisms of nascent fiber formation during avian skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, K. M.; Schultz, E.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined two putative mechanisms of new fiber formation in postnatal skeletal muscle, namely longitudinal fragmentation of existing fibers and de novo formation. The relative contributions of these two mechanisms to fiber formation in hypertrophying anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle were assessed by quantitative analysis of their nuclear populations. Muscle hypertrophy was induced by wing-weighting for 1 week. All nuclei formed during the weighting period were labeled by continuous infusion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analog, and embryonic-like fibers were identified using an antibody to ventricular-like embryonic (V-EMB) myosin. The number of BrdU-labeled and unlabeled nuclei in V-EMB-positive fibers were counted. Wing-weighting resulted in significant muscle enlargement and the appearance of many V-EMB+ fibers. The majority of V-EMB+ fibers were completely independent of mature fibers and had a nuclear density characteristics of developing fibers. Furthermore, nearly 100% of the nuclei in independent V-EMB+ fibers were labeled. These findings strongly suggest that most V-EMB+ fibers were nascent fibers formed de novo during the weighting period by satellite cell activation and fusion. Nascent fibers were found primarily in the space between fascicles where they formed a complex anastomosing network of fibers running at angles to one another. Although wing-weighting induced an increase in the number of branched fibers, there was no evidence that V-EMB+ fibers were formed by longitudinal fragmentation. The location of newly formed fibers in wing-weighted and regenerating ALD muscle was compared to determine whether satellite cells in the ALD muscle were unusual in that, if stimulated to divide, they would form fibers in the inter- and intrafascicular space. In contrast to wing-weighted muscle, nascent fibers were always found closely associated with necrotic fibers. These results suggest that wing-weighting is not simply another

  4. Relationships between muscle characteristics and meat quality traits of young Charolais bulls.

    PubMed

    Renand, G; Picard, B; Touraille, C; Berge, P; Lepetit, J

    2001-09-01

    Charolais bull calves (106) were used to study the variability in meat quality attributes in relation to the variability in muscle characteristics in the Longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle. The variability in traits was adjusted either to constant age or constant weight at slaughter and thus originated only from differences between animals born, reared and fattened in the same location. The following meat quality attributes were measured: the strength of the myofibrillar resistance to a 20% compression strain measured on the raw meat 2, 7 and 21 days post mortem; and taste panel scores of tenderness (initial and overall), flavour and juiciness of steaks grilled to a 55°C core temperature 6 or 15 days post-mortem. The following muscle characteristics were measured 24 h after slaughter: pH, dry matter, protein, lipid, heme iron and collagen contents, collagen solubility, LDH and ICDH activity, the proportion of slow twitch myosin heavy chain, the mean muscle fibre area and the mean sarcomere length. One fourth to one third of the variability of 2 day mechanical strength and 15 day tenderness or flavour scores were related to the variability in muscle characteristics. Tenderness and strength measurements were predominantly related to the muscle fibre area, collagen characteristics and energetic metabolic activity. Dry matter content was the principal muscle characteristic related to flavour. PMID:22062505

  5. Fast Motion of Plants through mechanical instability: Mechanics without Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiaohang; Chen, Zi; Zheng, Huang; Chen, Wenzhe

    2012-02-01

    Plants are not well known for fast motions, yet some plants such as the Venus flytrap can move in a fraction of a second to capture insects, even though they do not have nerves or muscles. This type of rapid motion has intrigued scientists for centuries. Darwin did a first systematic study on the trap closure mechanism, and considered the plant as ``one of the most wonderful in the world". Thereafter, several physical mechanisms have been proposed, such as the rapid loss of turgor pressure, an irreversible acid-induced wall loosening mechanism, and the snap-through model by mechanical instability, but with no unanimous agreement among researchers. Here we propose a coupled mechanical bistable mechanism that explains the rapid closure of the Venus flytrap in a comprehensive manner, consistent with a series of experimental observations. Such bistabile behaviors are theoretically modeled and validated with table-top experiments. Based on the principles learnt from the Venus flytrap, we are also able to manufacture a preliminary ``flytrap robot''. Hence, it is promising to design smart bio-mimetic materials and devices with snapping mechanisms as sensors, actuators, artificial muscles and biomedical devices.

  6. The Effect of Mechanical Vibration Stimulation of Perception Subthreshold on the Muscle Force and Muscle Reaction Time of Lower Leg

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huigyun; Kwak, Kiyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical vibration stimulation on the muscle force and muscle reaction time of lower leg according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A vibration stimulation with perception threshold intensity was applied on the Achilles tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. EMG measurement and analysis system were used to analyze the change of muscle force and muscle reaction time according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A root-mean-square (RMS) value was extracted using analysis software and Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) and Premotor Time (PMT) were analyzed. The measurement results showed that perception threshold was different from application sites of vibration frequency. Also, the muscle force and muscle reaction time showed difference according to the presence of vibration, frequency, and intensity. This result means that the vibration stimulation causes the change on the muscle force and muscle reaction time and affects the muscles of lower leg by the characteristics of vibration stimulation. PMID:27382244

  7. Diffusion characteristics of ethylene glycol in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luís M; Carvalho, Maria Inês; Nogueira, Elisabete M; Tuchin, Valery V

    2015-05-01

    Part of the optical clearing study in biological tissues concerns the determination of the diffusion characteristics of water and optical clearing agents in the subject tissue. Such information is sufficient to characterize the time dependence of the optical clearing mechanisms—tissue dehydration and refractive index (RI) matching. We have used a simple method based on collimated optical transmittance measurements made from muscle samples under treatment with aqueous solutions containing different concentrations of ethylene glycol (EG), to determine the diffusion time values of water and EG in skeletal muscle. By representing the estimated mean diffusion time values from each treatment as a function of agent concentration in solution, we could identify the real diffusion times for water and agent. These values allowed for the calculation of the correspondent diffusion coefficients for those fluids. With these results, we have demonstrated that the dehydration mechanism is the one that dominates optical clearing in the first minute of treatment, while the RI matching takes over the optical clearing operations after that and remains for a longer time of treatment up to about 10 min, as we could see for EG and thin tissue samples of 0.5 mm. PMID:25525766

  8. Mechanically induced alterations in cultured skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Hatfaludy, S.; Karlisch, P.; Shansky, J.

    1991-01-01

    Model systems are available for mechanically stimulating cultured skeletal muscle cells by passive tensile forces which simulate those found in vivo. When applied to embryonic muscle cells in vitro these forces induce tissue organogenesis, metabolic adaptations, and muscle cell growth. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cell growth correlates with stretch-induced increases in the efflux of prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2(alpha) in a time and frequency dependent manner. These prostaglandins act as mechanical 'second messengers' regulating skeletal muscle protein turnover rates. Since they also effect bone remodelling in response to tissue loading and unloading, secreted prostaglandins may serve as paracrine growth factors, coordinating the growth rates of muscle and bone in response to external mechanical forces. Cell culture model systems will supplement other models in understanding mechanical transduction processes at the molecular level.

  9. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Muscle Aging and Sarcopenia and Effects of Electrical Stimulation in Seniors

    PubMed Central

    Barberi, Laura; Scicchitano, Bianca Maria

    2015-01-01

    The prolongation of skeletal muscle strength in aging and neuromuscular disease has been the objective of numerous studies employing a variety of approaches. It is generally accepted that cumulative failure to repair damage related to an overall decrease in anabolic processes is a primary cause of functional impairment in muscle. The functional performance of skeletal muscle tissues declines during post- natal life and it is compromised in different diseases, due to an alteration in muscle fiber composition and an overall decrease in muscle integrity as fibrotic invasions replace functional contractile tissue. Characteristics of skeletal muscle aging and diseases include a conspicuous reduction in myofiber plasticity (due to the progressive loss of muscle mass and in particular of the most powerful fast fibers), alteration in muscle-specific transcriptional mechanisms, and muscle atrophy. An early decrease in protein synthetic rates is followed by a later increase in protein degradation, to affect biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters of muscle fibers during the aging process. Alterations in regenerative pathways also compromise the functionality of muscle tissues. In this review we will give an overview of the work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging and sarcopenia and the effects of electrical stimulation in seniors.. PMID:26913161

  10. Hindlimb muscle anatomical mechanical advantage differs among joints and stride phases in basilisk lizards.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Philip J; Hare-Drubka, Meredith

    2015-08-01

    The vertebrate musculoskeletal system is composed of skeletal levers powered by muscles. Effective mechanical advantage (EMA) and muscle properties influence organismal performance at various tasks. Anatomical mechanical advantage (AMA) is a proxy for EMA that facilitates the study of preserved specimens when many muscles or many species are of interest. AMA is the quotient of in-lever to out-lever length, and quantifies the force-velocity trade-off of a lever, where high AMAs translate into high force, low velocity levers. We studied AMAs, physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs), fiber lengths, and fiber widths for 20 hindlimb muscles of the lizard Basiliscus vittatus, moving the hip, knee, and ankle during both the stance and swing phases of the stride. We tested the hypotheses that muscles moving proximal limb joints, and those active during stance, would have characteristics that maximize force. We also tested whether adults had more force-optimized levers than juveniles to compensate for higher body mass. We found no differences between adults and juveniles, but found differences among joints and between stride phases. AMAs were lowest and PCSAs highest for the knee, and PCSA was higher for stance than swing muscles. Fiber width decreased distally, but did not differ between stride phases. Fiber length of stance muscles decreased distally and was highest for swing muscles of the knee. Our findings show that different muscle and lever characteristics allow the knee to be both force- and velocity-optimized, indicating its important role in locomotion. PMID:26013100

  11. Knee muscle strength in multiple sclerosis: relationship with gait characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Güner, Senem; Hagharı, Sema; Inanıcı, Fatma; Alsancak, Serap; Aytekın, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationship between isokinetic knee muscle strength and kinematic, kinetic and spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine MS patients (mean age 31.5±6.5) were investigated in this study. The isokinetic knee muscle strength and gait parameters of MS patients with moderate and severe disability, as determined by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS): EDSS=1–4.5 (n=22, moderate disability) and EDSS>4.5 (n=7, severe disability) were measured. [Results] Isokinetic knee muscle strength, kinematic, kinetic and spatiotemporal gait parameters differed between moderate (EDSS=1–4.5, n=22) and severe disability (EDSS>4.5, n=7). The correlation between each of gait speed, stride length, total range of knee joint movement and the four strength parameters (minimum and maximum quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths) were significant for the MS group as a whole. Within subgroups, the correlation between minimum hamstring strength and total range of knee movement was significant only in group EDSS>4.5; minimum hamstring correlated with peak knee extensor moment in group EDSS=1–4.5, but at a reduced level of significance. [Conclusion] The present study revealed significant correlations between gait characteristics and isokinetic strength parameters of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles. Our study suggests that rehabilitation protocols for MS patients should include a critical strength training programme particularly for the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. PMID:25931736

  12. Mechanical properties and fiber type composition of chronically inactive muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Monti, R. J.; Vallance, K. A.; Kim, J. A.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    A role for neuromuscular activity in the maintenance of skeletal muscle properties has been well established. However, the role of activity-independent factors is more difficult to evaluate. We have used the spinal cord isolation model to study the effects of chronic inactivity on the mechanical properties of the hindlimb musculature in cats and rats. This model maintains the connectivity between the motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate, but the muscle unit is electrically "silent". Consequently, the measured muscle properties are activity-independent and thus the advantage of using this model is that it provides a baseline level (zero activity) from which regulatory factors that affect muscle cell homeostasis can be defined. In the present paper, we will present a brief review of our findings using the spinal cord isolation model related to muscle mechanical and fiber type properties.

  13. Sarcopenia: characteristics, mechanisms and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Narici, Marco V; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Sarcopenia reflects a progressive withdrawal of anabolism and an increased catabolism, along with a reduced muscle regeneration capacity. Muscle force and power decline more than muscle dimensions: older muscle is intrinsically weak. Sarcopenic obesity (SO) among the elderly corroborates to the loss of muscle mass increasing the risk of metabolic syndrome development. Recent studies on the musculoskeletal adaptations with ageing and key papers on the mechanisms of muscle wasting, its functional repercussions and on SO are included. Neuropathic, hormonal, immunological, nutritional and physical activity factors contribute to sarcopenia. Selective fast fibre atrophy, loss of motor units and an increase in hybrid fibres are typical findings of ageing. Satellite cell number decreases reducing muscle regeneration capacity. SO promotes further muscle wasting and increases risk of metabolic syndrome development. The proportion of fast to slow fibres seems maintained in old age. In elderly humans, nuclear domain is maintained constant. Basal protein synthesis and breakdown show little changes in old age. Instead, blunting of the anabolic response to feeding and exercise and of the antiproteolytic effect of insulin is observed. Further understanding of the mechanisms of sarcopenia requires disentangling of the effects of ageing alone from those of disuse and disease. The causes of the greater anabolic resistance to feeding and exercise of elderly women need elucidating. The enhancement of muscle regeneration via satellite cell activation via the MAPK/notch molecular pathways seems particularly promising. PMID:20200012

  14. Individual muscle contributions to circular turning mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jessica D; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2015-04-13

    Turning is an activity of daily living that involves both the acceleration of the body center-of-mass (COM) towards the center of curvature and rotation of the pelvis towards the new heading. The purpose of this study was to understand which muscles contribute to turning using experimentation, musculoskeletal modeling and simulation. Ten healthy adults consented to walk around a 1-m radius circular path at their self-selected walking speed and then along a straight line at the same speed. Forward dynamics simulations of the individual subjects during the turning and straight-line walking tasks were generated to identify the contributions of individual muscle groups to the body mediolateral and anterior-posterior COM acceleration impulse and to the pelvis angular acceleration impulse. The stance leg gluteus medius and ankle plantarflexor muscles and the swing leg adductor muscles were the primary contributors to redirect the body's COM relative to straight-line walking. In some cases, contributions to mediolateral COM acceleration were modulated through changes in leg orientation rather than through changes in muscle force. While modulation of the muscle contributions generally occurred in both the inner and outer legs, greater changes were observed during inner single-leg support than during outer single-leg support. Total pelvis angular acceleration was minimal during the single-support phase, but the swing leg muscles contributed significantly to balancing the internal and external rotation of the pelvis. The understanding of which muscles contribute to turning the body during walking may help guide the development of more effective locomotor therapies for those with movement impairments. PMID:25700608

  15. Unravelling the mechanisms regulating muscle mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hood, David A; Tryon, Liam D; Carter, Heather N; Kim, Yuho; Chen, Chris C W

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle is a tissue with a low mitochondrial content under basal conditions, but it is responsive to acute increases in contractile activity patterns (i.e. exercise) which initiate the signalling of a compensatory response, leading to the biogenesis of mitochondria and improved organelle function. Exercise also promotes the degradation of poorly functioning mitochondria (i.e. mitophagy), thereby accelerating mitochondrial turnover, and preserving a pool of healthy organelles. In contrast, muscle disuse, as well as the aging process, are associated with reduced mitochondrial quality and quantity in muscle. This has strong negative implications for whole-body metabolic health and the preservation of muscle mass. A number of traditional, as well as novel regulatory pathways exist in muscle that control both biogenesis and mitophagy. Interestingly, although the ablation of single regulatory transcription factors within these pathways often leads to a reduction in the basal mitochondrial content of muscle, this can invariably be overcome with exercise, signifying that exercise activates a multitude of pathways which can respond to restore mitochondrial health. This knowledge, along with growing realization that pharmacological agents can also promote mitochondrial health independently of exercise, leads to an optimistic outlook in which the maintenance of mitochondrial and whole-body metabolic health can be achieved by taking advantage of the broad benefits of exercise, along with the potential specificity of drug action. PMID:27470593

  16. A characteristic analysis of the fluidic muscle cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Soo; Bae, Sang-Kyu; Hong, Sung-In

    2005-12-01

    The fluidic muscle cylinder consists of an air bellows tube, flanges and lock nuts. It's features are softness of material and motion, simplicity of structure, low production cost and high power efficiency. Recently, unlikely the pneumatic cylinder, the fluidic muscle cylinder without air leakage, stick slip, friction, and seal was developed as a new concept actuator. It has the characteristics such as light weight, low price, high response, durable design, long life, high power, high contraction, which is innovative product fulfilling RT(Robot Technology) which is one of the nation-leading next generation strategy technologies 6T as well as cleanness technology. The application fields of the fluidic muscle cylinder are so various like fatigue tester, brake, accelerator, high technology testing device such as driving simulator, precise position, velocity, intelligent servo actuator under special environment such as load controlling system, and intelligent robot. In this study, we carried out the finite element modeling and analysis about the main design variables such as contraction ration and force, diameter increment of fluidic muscle cylinder. On the basis of finite element analysis, the prototype of fluidic muscle cylinder was manufactured and tested. Finally, we compared the results between the test and the finite element analysis.

  17. Biomechanical characteristics of human ankle-joint muscles.

    PubMed

    Aruin, A S; Zatsiorsky, V M

    1984-01-01

    Equivalent biomechanical characteristics of human ankle-joint muscles have been determined by impact and vibration tests. The estimate of the stiffness and damping coefficients has yielded, respectively, (2.67 +/- 0.48) X 10(4) N X m-1 and (811.58 +/- 201.3) N X s X m-1 by impact actions, n = 126; (1.49 +/- 0.35) X 10(4) N X m-1 and (430.1 +/- 36.1) N X s X m-1 -by vibration actions, n = 7. The characteristics of the ankle-joint muscles of subjects representing different kinds of sports have proved to be different. PMID:6540667

  18. Anatomic Characteristics of Pronator Quadratus Muscle: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the anatomic characteristics of the pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle and the entry zone (EZ) of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) to this muscle by means of cadaver dissection. Methods We examined the PQ muscle and AIN in 20 forearms from 10 fresh cadavers. After identifying the PQ muscle and the EZ of the AIN, we measured the distances from the midpoint (MidP) of the PQ muscle and EZ to the vertical line passing the tip of the ulnar styloid process (MidP_X and EZ_X, respectively) and to the medial border of the ulna (MidP_Y and EZ_Y, respectively). Forearm length (FL) and wrist width (WW) were also measured, and the ratios of MidP and EZ to FL and of MidP and EZ to WW were calculated. Results The MidP was found to be 3.0 cm proximal to the ulnar styloid process or distal 13% of the FL and 2.0 cm lateral to the medial border of the ulna or ulnar 40% side of the WW, which was similar to the location of EZ. The results reveal a more distal site than was reported in previous studies. Conclusion We suggest that the proper site for needle insertion and motor point block of the PQ muscle is 3 cm proximal to the ulnar styloid process or distal 13% of the FL and 2 cm lateral to the medial border of the ulna or ulnar 40% side of the WW. PMID:27446787

  19. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Relaxed Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic “peanut” shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed. PMID:24686292

  20. Short-range mechanical properties of skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    Striated muscles are disproportionately stiff for small movements. This facet of their behavior can be demonstrated by measuring the force produced when the muscle is stretched more than about 1% of its initial length. When this is done, it can be seen that force rises rapidly during the initial phases of the movement and much less rapidly during the latter stages of the stretch. Experiments performed using chemically permeabilized skeletal and cardiac muscles show that the initial stiffness of the preparations increases in proportion with isometric force as the free Ca²(+) concentration in the bathing solution is raised from a minimal to a saturating value. This is strong evidence that the short-range mechanical properties of activated muscle result from stretching myosin cross-bridges that are attached between the thick and thin filaments. Relaxed intact muscles also exhibit short-range mechanical properties but the molecular mechanisms underlying this behavior are less clear. This chapter summarizes some of the interesting features of short-range mechanical properties in different types of muscle preparation, describes some of the likely underlying mechanisms and discusses the potential physiological significance of the behavior. PMID:20824529

  1. Primary skeletal muscle cells cultured on gelatin bead microcarriers develop structural and biochemical features characteristic of adult skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kubis, Hans-Peter; Scheibe, Renate J; Decker, Brigitte; Hufendiek, Karsten; Hanke, Nina; Gros, Gerolf; Meissner, Joachim D

    2016-04-01

    A primary skeletal muscle cell culture, in which myoblasts derived from newborn rabbit hindlimb muscles grow on gelatin bead microcarriers in suspension and differentiate into myotubes, has been established previously. In the course of differentiation and beginning spontaneous contractions, these multinucleated myotubes do not detach from their support. Here, we describe the development of the primary myotubes with respect to their ultrastructural differentiation. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that myotubes not only grow around the surface of one carrier bead but also attach themselves to neighboring carriers, forming bridges between carriers. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrates highly ordered myofibrils, T-tubules, and sarcoplasmic reticulum. The functionality of the contractile apparatus is evidenced by contractile activity that occurs spontaneously or can be elicited by electrostimulation. Creatine kinase activity increases steadily until day 20 of culture. Regarding the expression of isoforms of myosin heavy chains (MHC), we could demonstrate that from day 16 on, no non-adult MHC isoform mRNAs are present. Instead, on day 28 the myotubes express predominantly adult fast MHCIId/x mRNA and protein. This MHC pattern resembles that of fast muscles of adult rabbits. In contrast, primary myotubes grown on matrigel-covered culture dishes express substantial amounts of non-adult MHC protein even on day 21. To conclude, primary myotubes grown on microcarriers in their later stages exhibit many features of adult skeletal muscle and characteristics of fast type II fibers. Thus, the culture represents an excellent model of adult fast skeletal muscle, for example, when investigating molecular mechanisms of fast-to-slow fiber-type transformation. PMID:26610066

  2. Mutations in CAV3 cause mechanical hyperirritability of skeletal muscle in rippling muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Betz, R C; Schoser, B G; Kasper, D; Ricker, K; Ramírez, A; Stein, V; Torbergsen, T; Lee, Y A; Nöthen, M M; Wienker, T F; Malin, J P; Propping, P; Reis, A; Mortier, W; Jentsch, T J; Vorgerd, M; Kubisch, C

    2001-07-01

    Hereditary rippling muscle disease (RMD) is an autosomal dominant human disorder characterized by mechanically triggered contractions of skeletal muscle. Genome-wide linkage analysis has identified an RMD locus on chromosome 3p25. We found missense mutations in positional candidate CAV3 (encoding caveolin 3; ref. 5) in all five families analyzed. Mutations in CAV3 have also been described in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C; refs. 6,7), demonstrating the allelism of dystrophic and non-dystrophic muscle diseases. PMID:11431690

  3. Robotic Powered Transfer Mechanism modeling on Human Muscle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio

    It is considered in engineering that one power source can operate one joint. However, support movement mechanism of living organism is multi joint movement mechanism. Considerably different from mechanical movement mechanism, two pairs of uni-articular muscles and a pair of bi-articular muscles are involved in it. In leg, movements observed in short run including leg idling, heel contact and toeing are operated by bi-articular muscles of the thigh showing strong legs to support body weight. Pursuit of versatility in welfare robot brings its comparison with conventional machinery or industrial robot to the fore. Request for safety and technology allowing elderly people to operate the robot is getting stronger in the society. The robot must be safe when it is used together with other welfare equipment and simpler system avoiding difficult operation has to be constructed. Appearance of recent care and assistance robot is getting similar to human arm in comparison with industrial robot. Being easily able to imagine from industrial robot, mid-heavyweight articulated robot to support 60-70kgf combined with large output motor and reduction gears is next to impossible to be installed in the bath room. This research indicated that upper limb arm and lower limb thigh of human and animals are holding coalitional muscles and movement of uni-artcular muscle and bi-articular muscle conjure the image of new actuators.

  4. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  5. Designed biomaterials to mimic the mechanical properties of muscles.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shanshan; Dudek, Daniel M; Cao, Yi; Balamurali, M M; Gosline, John; Li, Hongbin

    2010-05-01

    The passive elasticity of muscle is largely governed by the I-band part of the giant muscle protein titin, a complex molecular spring composed of a series of individually folded immunoglobulin-like domains as well as largely unstructured unique sequences. These mechanical elements have distinct mechanical properties, and when combined, they provide the desired passive elastic properties of muscle, which are a unique combination of strength, extensibility and resilience. Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies demonstrated that the macroscopic behaviour of titin in intact myofibrils can be reconstituted by combining the mechanical properties of these mechanical elements measured at the single-molecule level. Here we report artificial elastomeric proteins that mimic the molecular architecture of titin through the combination of well-characterized protein domains GB1 and resilin. We show that these artificial elastomeric proteins can be photochemically crosslinked and cast into solid biomaterials. These biomaterials behave as rubber-like materials showing high resilience at low strain and as shock-absorber-like materials at high strain by effectively dissipating energy. These properties are comparable to the passive elastic properties of muscles within the physiological range of sarcomere length and so these materials represent a new muscle-mimetic biomaterial. The mechanical properties of these biomaterials can be fine-tuned by adjusting the composition of the elastomeric proteins, providing the opportunity to develop biomaterials that are mimetic of different types of muscles. We anticipate that these biomaterials will find applications in tissue engineering as scaffold and matrix for artificial muscles. PMID:20445626

  6. Muscle wasting in disease: molecular mechanisms and promising therapies.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shenhav; Nathan, James A; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2015-01-01

    Atrophy occurs in specific muscles with inactivity (for example, during plaster cast immobilization) or denervation (for example, in patients with spinal cord injuries). Muscle wasting occurs systemically in older people (a condition known as sarcopenia); as a physiological response to fasting or malnutrition; and in many diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, cancer-associated cachexia, diabetes, renal failure, cardiac failure, Cushing syndrome, sepsis, burns and trauma. The rapid loss of muscle mass and strength primarily results from excessive protein breakdown, which is often accompanied by reduced protein synthesis. This loss of muscle function can lead to reduced quality of life, increased morbidity and mortality. Exercise is the only accepted approach to prevent or slow atrophy. However, several promising therapeutic agents are in development, and major advances in our understanding of the cellular mechanisms that regulate the protein balance in muscle include the identification of several cytokines, particularly myostatin, and a common transcriptional programme that promotes muscle wasting. Here, we discuss these new insights and the rationally designed therapies that are emerging to combat muscle wasting. PMID:25549588

  7. Benefits of detailed models of muscle activation and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, S. L.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent biophysical and physiological studies identified some of the detailed mechanisms involved in excitation-contraction coupling, muscle contraction, and deactivation. Mathematical models incorporating these mechanisms allow independent estimates of key parameters, direct interplay between basic muscle research and the study of motor control, and realistic model behaviors, some of which are not accessible to previous, simpler, models. The existence of previously unmodeled behaviors has important implications for strategies of motor control and identification of neural signals. New developments in the analysis of differential equations make the more detailed models feasible for simulation in realistic experimental situations.

  8. Mechanisms of muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan H; Mitch, William E

    2014-09-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), loss of cellular proteins increases the risks of morbidity and mortality. Persistence of muscle protein catabolism in CKD results in striking losses of muscle proteins as whole-body protein turnover is great; even small but persistent imbalances between protein synthesis and degradation cause substantial protein loss. No reliable methods to prevent CKD-induced muscle wasting currently exist, but mechanisms that control cellular protein turnover have been identified, suggesting that therapeutic strategies will be developed to suppress or block protein loss. Catabolic pathways that cause protein wasting include activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), caspase-3, lysosomes and myostatin (a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth). These pathways can be initiated by complications associated with CKD, such as metabolic acidosis, defective insulin signalling, inflammation, increased angiotensin II levels, abnormal appetite regulation and impaired microRNA responses. Inflammation stimulates cellular signalling pathways that activate myostatin, which accelerates UPS-mediated catabolism. Blocking this pathway can prevent loss of muscle proteins. Myostatin inhibition could yield new therapeutic directions for blocking muscle protein wasting in CKD or disorders associated with its complications. PMID:24981816

  9. Caecilian jaw-closing mechanics: integrating two muscle systems.

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Haas, Alexander; Summers, Adam P

    2008-12-01

    Caecilians (Lissamphibia: Gymnophiona) are unique among vertebrates in having two sets of jaw-closing muscles, one on either side of the jaw joint. Using data from high-resolution X-ray radiation computed tomography scans, we modelled the effect of these two muscle groups (mm. levatores mandibulae and m. interhyoideus posterior) on bite force over a range of gape angles, employing a simplified lever arm mechanism that takes into account muscle cross-sectional area and fibre angle. Measurements of lever arm lengths, muscle fibre orientations and physiological cross-sectional area of cranial muscles were available from three caecilian species: Ichthyophis cf. kohtaoensis; Siphonops annulatus; and Typhlonectes natans. The maximal gape of caecilians is restricted by a critical gape angle above which the mm. levatores mandibulae will open the jaw and destabilize the mandibular joint. The presence of destabilizing forces in the caecilian jaw mechanism may be compensated for by a mandibular joint in that the fossa is wrapped around the condyle to resist dislocation. The caecilian skull is streptostylic; the quadrate-squamosal complex moves with respect to the rest of the skull. This increases the leverage of the jaw-closing muscles. We also demonstrate that the unusual jaw joint requires streptostyly because there is a dorsolateral movement of the quadrate-squamosal complex when the jaw closes. The combination of the two jaw-closing systems results in high bite forces over a wide range of gape angles, an important advantage for generalist feeders such as caecilians. The relative sizes and leverage mechanics of the two closing systems allow one to exert more force when the other has a poor mechanical advantage. This effect is seen in all three species we examined. In the aquatic T. natans, with its less well-roofed skull, there is a larger contribution of the mm. levatores mandibulae to total bite force than in the terrestrial I. cf. kohtaoensis and S. annulatus. PMID

  10. Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction and the Basis for Pharmacologic Treatment of Smooth Muscle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brozovich, F.V.; Nicholson, C.J.; Degen, C.V.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Aggarwal, M.

    2016-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell directly drives the contraction of the vascular wall and hence regulates the size of the blood vessel lumen. We review here the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which agonists, therapeutics, and diseases regulate contractility of the vascular smooth muscle cell and we place this within the context of whole body function. We also discuss the implications for personalized medicine and highlight specific potential target molecules that may provide opportunities for the future development of new therapeutics to regulate vascular function. PMID:27037223

  11. Mechanical properties of the rabbit iris smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Kazutsuna; Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Usui, Shiro; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka

    2003-02-01

    The study focuses on obtaining the visco-elastic properties of the iris sphincter and dilator muscles. Two kinds of experiments were performed: the isometric contraction experiment and the isotonic quick release experiment. The length-tension relationship was obtained from the former experiment. This relationship clarified the contribution of each muscle in determining the statics of the pupil. The viscous and serial elastic properties were obtained from the latter experiment. The viscosity could be expressed by the expanded Hill's equation as a function of velocity and contractile tension. We argue that serial elasticity is independent of contractile tension. These properties provide insights into the pupillary mechanism. PMID:12536003

  12. Maternal and Paternal Genomes Differentially Affect Myofibre Characteristics and Muscle Weights of Bovine Fetuses at Midgestation

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ruidong; Ghanipoor-Samami, Mani; Johns, William H.; Eindorf, Tanja; Rutley, David L.; Kruk, Zbigniew A.; Fitzsimmons, Carolyn J.; Thomsen, Dana A.; Roberts, Claire T.; Burns, Brian M.; Anderson, Gail I.; Greenwood, Paul L.; Hiendleder, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Postnatal myofibre characteristics and muscle mass are largely determined during fetal development and may be significantly affected by epigenetic parent-of-origin effects. However, data on such effects in prenatal muscle development that could help understand unexplained variation in postnatal muscle traits are lacking. In a bovine model we studied effects of distinct maternal and paternal genomes, fetal sex, and non-genetic maternal effects on fetal myofibre characteristics and muscle mass. Data from 73 fetuses (Day153, 54% term) of four genetic groups with purebred and reciprocal cross Angus and Brahman genetics were analyzed using general linear models. Parental genomes explained the greatest proportion of variation in myofibre size of Musculus semitendinosus (80–96%) and in absolute and relative weights of M. supraspinatus, M. longissimus dorsi, M. quadriceps femoris and M. semimembranosus (82–89% and 56–93%, respectively). Paternal genome in interaction with maternal genome (P<0.05) explained most genetic variation in cross sectional area (CSA) of fast myotubes (68%), while maternal genome alone explained most genetic variation in CSA of fast myofibres (93%, P<0.01). Furthermore, maternal genome independently (M. semimembranosus, 88%, P<0.0001) or in combination (M. supraspinatus, 82%; M. longissimus dorsi, 93%; M. quadriceps femoris, 86%) with nested maternal weight effect (5–6%, P<0.05), was the predominant source of variation for absolute muscle weights. Effects of paternal genome on muscle mass decreased from thoracic to pelvic limb and accounted for all (M. supraspinatus, 97%, P<0.0001) or most (M. longissimus dorsi, 69%, P<0.0001; M. quadriceps femoris, 54%, P<0.001) genetic variation in relative weights. An interaction between maternal and paternal genomes (P<0.01) and effects of maternal weight (P<0.05) on expression of H19, a master regulator of an imprinted gene network, and negative correlations between H19 expression and fetal muscle mass

  13. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  14. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  15. Molecules, muscles, and machines: Universal performance characteristics of motors

    PubMed Central

    Marden, James H.; Allen, Lee R.

    2002-01-01

    Animal- and human-made motors vary widely in size and shape, are constructed of vastly different materials, use different mechanisms, and produce an enormous range of mass-specific power. Despite these differences, there is remarkable consistency in the maximum net force produced by broad classes of animal- and human-made motors. Motors that use force production to accomplish steady translational motion of a load (myosin, kinesin, dynein, and RNA polymerase molecules, muscle cells, whole muscles, winches, linear actuators, and rockets) have maximal force outputs that scale as the two-thirds power of mass, i.e., with cross-sectional area. Motors that use cyclical motion to generate force and are more subject to multiaxial stress and vibration have maximal force outputs that scale as a single isometric function of motor mass with mass-specific net force output averaging 57 N⋅kg−1 (SD = 14). Examples of this class of motors includes flying birds, bats, and insects, swimming fish, various taxa of running animals, piston engines, electric motors, and all types of jets. Dependence of force production and stress resistance on cross-sectional area is well known, but the isometric scaling and common upper limit of mass-specific force production by cyclical motion motors has not been recognized previously and is not explained by an existing body of theory. Remarkably, this finding indicates that most of the motors used by humans and animals for transportation have a common upper limit of mass-specific net force output that is independent of materials and mechanisms. PMID:11917097

  16. Molecules, muscles, and machines: universal performance characteristics of motors.

    PubMed

    Marden, James H; Allen, Lee R

    2002-04-01

    Animal- and human-made motors vary widely in size and shape, are constructed of vastly different materials, use different mechanisms, and produce an enormous range of mass-specific power. Despite these differences, there is remarkable consistency in the maximum net force produced by broad classes of animal- and human-made motors. Motors that use force production to accomplish steady translational motion of a load (myosin, kinesin, dynein, and RNA polymerase molecules, muscle cells, whole muscles, winches, linear actuators, and rockets) have maximal force outputs that scale as the two-thirds power of mass, i.e., with cross-sectional area. Motors that use cyclical motion to generate force and are more subject to multiaxial stress and vibration have maximal force outputs that scale as a single isometric function of motor mass with mass-specific net force output averaging 57 N x kg(-1) (SD = 14). Examples of this class of motors includes flying birds, bats, and insects, swimming fish, various taxa of running animals, piston engines, electric motors, and all types of jets. Dependence of force production and stress resistance on cross-sectional area is well known, but the isometric scaling and common upper limit of mass-specific force production by cyclical motion motors has not been recognized previously and is not explained by an existing body of theory. Remarkably, this finding indicates that most of the motors used by humans and animals for transportation have a common upper limit of mass-specific net force output that is independent of materials and mechanisms. PMID:11917097

  17. Phenomenological consequences of sectioning and bathing on passive muscle mechanics of the New Zealand white rabbit tibialis anterior

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Adam C.; Kaufman, Kenton R.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue provides support and mobility of the musculoskeletal system. Numerical modeling of muscle tissue aids in understanding disease pathophysiology, however, the effectiveness is dependent on accurately accounting for various tissue phenomena. Muscle modeling is made difficult due to the multitude of constituents that contribute to elastic and viscous mechanisms. Often, deterministic single fiber or fiber bundle studies are undertaken to examine these contributions. However, examination of whole, intact and structurally altered tissue and comparison to findings at the myofibril scale can help elucidate tissue mechanics. Stress relaxation tests at 10% strain were performed on 28 New Zealand White rabbits tibialis anterior muscles for whole, intact muscle and sub-sectioned muscle samples. Additionally, to aid in examining viscous effects sub groups were tested with and without a phosphate buffered saline bath. The steady-state elastic modulus was not significantly different between groups. Interestingly, sectioning did result in a negative Poisson’s ratio. Additionally, sectioning resulted in altering the viscous tissue response as the time to reach steady-state was significantly faster than whole muscle samples (p < 0.05), as well as the linear relaxation rate from 0 to 0.1 (p < 0.01), 1 to 10 (p < 0.05), and 10 to 100 seconds (p < 0.05). Bathing tissue resulted in a significantly greater amount of percent stress relaxation for whole muscle (p < 0.01). These findings provide new insight into the differing mechanical characteristics of whole and sectioned muscle tissue. PMID:23127626

  18. Mechanisms underlying ICU muscle wasting and effects of passive mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Critically ill ICU patients commonly develop severe muscle wasting and impaired muscle function, leading to delayed recovery, with subsequent increased morbidity and financial costs, and decreased quality of life for survivors. Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is a frequently observed neuromuscular disorder in ICU patients. Sepsis, systemic corticosteroid hormone treatment and post-synaptic neuromuscular blockade have been forwarded as the dominating triggering factors. Recent experimental results from our group using a unique experimental rat ICU model show that the mechanical silencing associated with CIM is the primary triggering factor. This study aims to unravel the mechanisms underlying CIM, and to evaluate the effects of a specific intervention aiming at reducing mechanical silencing in sedated and mechanically ventilated ICU patients. Methods Muscle gene/protein expression, post-translational modifications (PTMs), muscle membrane excitability, muscle mass measurements, and contractile properties at the single muscle fiber level were explored in seven deeply sedated and mechanically ventilated ICU patients (not exposed to systemic corticosteroid hormone treatment, post-synaptic neuromuscular blockade or sepsis) subjected to unilateral passive mechanical loading for 10 hours per day (2.5 hours, four times) for 9 ± 1 days. Results These patients developed a phenotype considered pathognomonic of CIM; that is, severe muscle wasting and a preferential myosin loss (P < 0.001). In addition, myosin PTMs specific to the ICU condition were observed in parallel with an increased sarcolemmal expression and cytoplasmic translocation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Passive mechanical loading for 9 ± 1 days resulted in a 35% higher specific force (P < 0.001) compared with the unloaded leg, although it was not sufficient to prevent the loss of muscle mass. Conclusion Mechanical silencing is suggested to be a primary mechanism underlying CIM; that is

  19. Intramuscular Connective Tissue Differences in Spastic and Control Muscle: A Mechanical and Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Marije; Smeulders, Mark J.; Kreulen, Michiel; Huijing, Peter A.; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) of the spastic type is a neurological disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks. Secondary to the spasticity, muscle adaptation is presumed to contribute to limitations in the passive range of joint motion. However, the mechanisms underlying these limitations are unknown. Using biopsies, we compared mechanical as well as histological properties of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) from CP patients (n = 29) and healthy controls (n = 10). The sarcomere slack length (mean 2.5 µm, SEM 0.05) and slope of the normalized sarcomere length-tension characteristics of spastic fascicle segments and single myofibre segments were not different from those of control muscle. Fibre type distribution also showed no significant differences. Fibre size was significantly smaller (1933 µm2, SEM 190) in spastic muscle than in controls (2572 µm2, SEM 322). However, our statistical analyses indicate that the latter difference is likely to be explained by age, rather than by the affliction. Quantities of endomysial and perimysial networks within biopsies of control and spastic muscle were unchanged with one exception: a significant thickening of the tertiary perimysium (3-fold), i.e. the connective tissue reinforcement of neurovascular tissues penetrating the muscle. Note that this thickening in tertiary perimysium was shown in the majority of CP patients, however a small number of patients (n = 4 out of 23) did not have this feature. These results are taken as indications that enhanced myofascial loads on FCU is one among several factors contributing in a major way to the aetiology of limitation of movement at the wrist in CP and the characteristic wrist position of such patients. PMID:24977410

  20. Improved Mechanism for Capturing Muscle Power for Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Dennis R.; Melvin, David B.; Byrne, Mark T.; Magovern, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is now understood that trained skeletal muscle can generate enough steady-state power to provide significant circulatory support, there are currently no means by which to tap this endogenous energy source to aid the failing heart. To that end, an implantable muscle energy converter (MEC) has been constructed and its function has been improved to optimize durability, anatomic fit, and mechanical efficiency. Bench tests show that MEC transmission losses average less than 10% of total work input and that about 85% of this muscle power is successfully transferred to the working fluid of the pump. Results from canine implant trials confirm excellent biocompatibility and demonstrate that contractile work of the latissimus dorsi muscle—measured to 290 mJ/stroke in one dog—can be transmitted within the body at levels consistent with cardiac assist requirements. These findings suggest that muscle-powered cardiac assist devices are feasible and that efforts to further develop this technology are warranted. PMID:16143010

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Muscle Fiber Composition Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the selective and debilitating atrophy of specific skeletal muscle fiber types that accompanies sustained conditions of microgravity. Since little is currently known about the regulation of fiber-specific gene expression programs in mammalian muscle, elucidation of the basic mechanisms of fiber diversification is a necessary prerequisite to the generation of therapeutic strategies for attenuation of muscle atrophy on earth or in space. Vertebrate skeletal muscle development involves the fusion of undifferentiated mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers, with a concomitant activation of muscle-specific genes encoding proteins that form the force-generating contractile apparatus. The regulatory circuitry controlling skeletal muscle gene expression has been well studied in a number of vertebrate animal systems. The goal of this project has been to achieve a similar level of understanding of the mechanisms underlying the further specification of muscles into different fiber types, and the role played by innervation and physical activity in the maintenance and adaptation of different fiber phenotypes into adulthood. Our recent research on the genetic basis of fiber specificity has focused on the emergence of mature fiber types and have implicated a group of transcriptional regulatory proteins, known as E proteins, in the control of fiber specificity. The restriction of E proteins to selected muscle fiber types is an attractive hypothetical mechanism for the generation of muscle fiber-specific patterns of gene expression. To date our results support a model wherein different E proteins are selectively expressed in muscle cells to determine fiber-restricted gene expression. These studies are a first step to define the molecular mechanisms responsible for the shifts in fiber type under conditions of microgravity, and to determine the potential importance of E proteins as

  2. Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle Fibers of SOD1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagahisa, Hiroshi; Okabe, Kazuma; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) knockout (KO) mice are known as an aging model in some aspects, but the damage and regeneration process of each fiber type have not been sufficiently studied. In this study, we investigated the damage and satellite cell state of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice (6 months old) using immunohistochemical staining and real-time RT-PCR. The proportion of central nuclei-containing Type IIx/b fibers in the deep and superficial portions of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly higher in SOD1 KO than control mice. The number of satellite cells per muscle fiber decreased in all muscle fiber types in the deep portion of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of Pax7 and myogenin, which are expressed in satellite cells in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation states, significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of SOD1 KO mice. Furthermore, mRNA of myosin heavy chain-embryonic, which is expressed in the early phase of muscle regeneration, significantly increased in SOD1 KO mice. It was suggested that muscle is damaged by reactive oxygen species produced in the mitochondrial intermembrane space in Type IIxb fibers, accelerating the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells through growth factors in SOD1 KO mice. PMID:26798428

  3. Histochemical characteristics of bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles in man.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, D; Sirca, A

    1993-04-01

    The histochemical profiles of the bulbospongiosus (BS) and ischiocavernosus (IC) muscles were investigated on autopsy samples obtained from 13 men aged 18 to 33. Adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) reactions were used for differentiation of muscle fibres into type 1 (slow twitch, tonic), and type 2 (fast twitch, phasic) and subtypes 2A, 2B, 2C. The activity of oxidative and glycolytic enzymes was also assayed. Because the percentage and diameters of both fibre types varied considerably in different areas of the same muscle, two methods of counting were applied and at least two fields of each sample were evaluated. The mean percentage of type 1 fibres in BS muscles was 34.8% and 23.2%, that in IC muscles 49.7% and 39.7%. The mean diameter of type 1 fibres was 31.0 microns (BS) and 26.2 microns (IC), that of type 2 fibres ranged from 30.0 microns (BS) to 36.6 microns (IC). The comparison of BS and IC muscles with other nonskeletal voluntary muscles revealed that BS and IC muscles are similar to the striated sphincters, particularly with regard to the numerical distribution of fibre types and fibre diameters. PMID:7683849

  4. Muscle fiber characteristics, satellite cells and soccer performance in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Thomas I; Mandroukas, Athanasios; Vamvakoudis, Efstratios; Kotoglou, Kostas; Ekblom, Björn; Mandroukas, Konstantinos

    2014-09-01

    This study is aimed to examine the muscle fiber type, composition and satellite cells in young male soccer players and to correlate them to cardiorespiratory indices and muscle strength. The participants formed three Groups: Group A (n = 13), 11.2 ± 0.4yrs, Group B (n=10), 13.1 ± 0.5yrs and Group C (n = 9), 15.2 ± 0.6yrs. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. Peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings were recorded and VO2max was measured on the treadmill. Group C had lower type I percentage distribution compared to A by 21.3% (p < 0.01), while the type IIA relative percentage was higher by 18.1% and 18.4% than in Groups A and B (p < 0.05). Groups B and C had higher cross-sectional area (CSA) values in all fiber types than in Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). The number of satellite cells did not differ between the groups. Groups B and C had higher peak torque at all angular velocities and absolute VO2max in terms of ml·min(-1) than Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). It is concluded that the increased percentage of type IIA muscle fibers noticed in Group C in comparison to the Groups A and B should be mainly attributed to the different workload exercise and training programs. The alteration of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms composition even in children is an important mechanism for skeletal muscle characteristics. Finally, CSA, isokinetic muscle strength and VO2max values seems to be expressed according to age. Key PointsFifteen years old soccer players have higher IIA percentage distribution than the younger players by approximately 18%.The age and the training status play a crucial role in muscle fibers co-expression.Specific training in young athletes seems to alter significantly the muscular metabolic profile. PMID:25177173

  5. Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Satellite Cells and Soccer Performance in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Thomas I.; Mandroukas, Athanasios; Vamvakoudis, Efstratios; Kotoglou, Kostas; Ekblom, Björn; Mandroukas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to examine the muscle fiber type, composition and satellite cells in young male soccer players and to correlate them to cardiorespiratory indices and muscle strength. The participants formed three Groups: Group A (n = 13), 11.2 ± 0.4yrs, Group B (n=10), 13.1 ± 0.5yrs and Group C (n = 9), 15.2 ± 0.6yrs. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. Peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings were recorded and VO2max was measured on the treadmill. Group C had lower type I percentage distribution compared to A by 21.3% (p < 0.01), while the type IIA relative percentage was higher by 18.1% and 18.4% than in Groups A and B (p < 0.05). Groups B and C had higher cross-sectional area (CSA) values in all fiber types than in Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). The number of satellite cells did not differ between the groups. Groups B and C had higher peak torque at all angular velocities and absolute VO2max in terms of ml·min-1 than Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). It is concluded that the increased percentage of type IIA muscle fibers noticed in Group C in comparison to the Groups A and B should be mainly attributed to the different workload exercise and training programs. The alteration of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms composition even in children is an important mechanism for skeletal muscle characteristics. Finally, CSA, isokinetic muscle strength and VO2max values seems to be expressed according to age. Key Points Fifteen years old soccer players have higher IIA percentage distribution than the younger players by approximately 18%. The age and the training status play a crucial role in muscle fibers co-expression. Specific training in young athletes seems to alter significantly the muscular metabolic profile. PMID:25177173

  6. On Using Model Populations to Determine Mechanical Properties of Skeletal Muscle. Application to Concentric Contraction Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sierra, M; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B; Muñoz, M J; Rodríguez, J F; Grasa, J

    2015-10-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, the experimental evaluation of the material properties is crucial for the development of computational models that closely reproduce real organ systems. When simulations of muscle tissue are concerned, stress/strain relations for both passive and active behavior are required. These experimental relations usually exhibit certain variability. In this study, a set of material parameters involved in a 3D skeletal muscle model are determined by using a system biology approach in which the parameters are randomly varied leading to a population of models. Using a set of experimental results from an animal model, a subset of the entire population of models was selected. This reduced population predicted the mechanical response within the window of experimental observations. Hence, a range of model parameters, instead of a single set of them, was determined. Rat Tibialis Anterior muscle was selected for this study. Muscles ([Formula: see text]) were activated through the sciatic nerve and during contraction the tissue pulled a weight fixed to the distal tendon (concentric contraction). Three different weights 1, 2 and 3 N were used and the time course of muscle stretch was analyzed obtaining values of (mean [Formula: see text] standard deviation): [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] respectively. A paired two-sided sign rank test showed significant differences between the muscle response for the three weights ([Formula: see text]). This study shows that the Monte Carlo method could be used for determine muscle characteristic parameters considering the variability of the experimental population. PMID:25691399

  7. Cell death induced by mechanical compression on engineered muscle results from a gradual physiological mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yabin; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Baaijens, Frank P; Oomens, Cees W J

    2016-05-01

    Deep tissue injury (DTI), a type of pressure ulcer, arises in the muscle layers adjacent to bony prominences due to sustained mechanical loading. DTI presents a serious problem in the clinic, as it is often not visible until reaching an advanced stage. One of the causes can be direct mechanical deformation of the muscle tissue and cell. The mechanism of cell death induced by mechanical compression was studied using bio-artificial skeletal muscle tissues. Compression was applied by placing weights on top of the constructs. The morphological changes of the cytoskeleton and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) under compression were investigated. Moreover, inhibitors for each of the three major MAPK groups, p38, ERK, and JNK, were applied separately to look at their roles in the compression caused apoptosis and necrosis. The present study for the first time showed that direct mechanical compression activates MAPK phosphorylation. Compression also leads to a gradual destruction of the cytoskeleton. The percentage apoptosis is strongly reduced by p38 and JNK inhibitors down to the level of the unloaded group. This phenomenon could be observed up to 24h after initiation of compression. Therefore, cell death in bio-artificial muscle tissue caused by mechanical compression is primarily caused by a physiological mechanism, rather than through a physical mechanism which kills the cell directly. These findings reveal insight of muscle cell death under mechanical compression. Moreover, the result indicates a potential clinical solution to prevent DTI by pre-treating with p38 or/and JNK inhibitors. PMID:26961799

  8. Divergent impact of Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency on repair mechanisms in healthy muscle versus Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Liang, Feng; Divangahi, Maziar; Qureshi, Salman T; Petrof, Basil J

    2016-05-01

    Injury to skeletal muscle, whether acute or chronic, triggers macrophage-mediated innate immunity in a manner which can be either beneficial or harmful for subsequent repair. Endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) are released by damaged tissues and might play an important role in activating the innate immune system following muscle injury. To test this hypothesis, we compared macrophage behaviour and muscle repair mechanisms in mice lacking TLR2 under conditions of either acute (cardiotoxin-induced) or chronic (mdx mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; DMD) muscle damage. In previously healthy muscle subjected to acute damage, TLR2 deficiency reduced macrophage numbers in the muscle post-injury but did not alter the expression pattern of the prototypical macrophage polarization markers iNOS and CD206. In addition, there was abnormal persistence of necrotic fibres and impaired regeneration in TLR2-/- muscles after acute injury. In contrast, TLR2 ablation in chronically diseased muscles of mdx mice not only resulted in significantly reduced macrophage numbers but additionally modified their phenotype by shifting from inflammatory (iNOS(pos) CD206(neg) ) to more anti-inflammatory (iNOS(neg) CD206(pos) ) characteristics. This decrease in macrophage-mediated inflammation was associated with ameliorated muscle histopathology and improved force-generating capacity of the dystrophic muscle. Our results suggest that the role of TLR2 in macrophage function and skeletal muscle repair depends greatly upon the muscle injury context, and raise the possibility that inhibition of TLR2 could serve as a useful therapeutic measure in DMD. PMID:26800321

  9. Computer keyswitch force-displacement characteristics affect muscle activity patterns during index finger tapping.

    PubMed

    Lee, David L; Kuo, Po-Ling; Jindrich, Devin L; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the effect of computer keyboard keyswitch design on muscle activity patterns during finger tapping. In a repeated-measures laboratory experiment, six participants tapped with their index fingers on five isolated keyswitch designs with varying force-displacement characteristics that provided pairwise comparisons for the design factors of (1) activation force (0.31 N vs. 0.59 N; 0.55 N vs. 0.93 N), (2) key travel (2.5mm vs. 3.5mm), and (3) shape of the force-displacement curve as realized through buckling-spring vs. rubber-dome switch designs. A load cell underneath the keyswitch measured vertical fingertip forces, and intramuscular fine wire EMG electrodes measured muscle activity patterns of two intrinsic (first lumbricalis, first dorsal interossei) and three extrinsic (flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, and extensor digitorum communis) index finger muscles. The amplitude of muscle activity for the first dorsal interossei increased 25.9% with larger activation forces, but not for the extrinsic muscles. The amplitude of muscle activity for the first lumbricalis and the duration of muscle activities for the first dorsal interossei and both extrinsic flexor muscles decreased up to 40.4% with longer key travel. The amplitude of muscle activity in the first dorsal interossei increased 36.6% and the duration of muscle activity for all muscles, except flexor digitorum profundus, decreased up to 49.1% with the buckling-spring design relative to the rubber-dome design. These findings suggest that simply changing the force-displacement characteristics of a keyswitch changes the dynamic loading of the muscles, especially in the intrinsic muscles, during keyboard work. PMID:18515146

  10. Relation of systemic and local muscle exercise capacity to skeletal muscle characteristics in men with congestive heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, B. M.; Simonini, A.; Sahgal, P.; Wells, L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    patients. None of the skeletal muscle characteristics examined correlated with exercise capacity in control subjects. CONCLUSIONS. These results indicate that congestive heart failure is associated with changes in the characteristics of skeletal muscle and local as well as systemic exercise performance. There are fewer slow twitch fibers, smaller fast twitch fibers and lower succinate dehydrogenase activity. The latter finding suggests that mitochondrial content of muscle is reduced in heart failure and that impaired aerobic-oxidative capacity may play a role in the limitation of systemic exercise capacity.

  11. Mechanisms Stimulating Muscle Wasting in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Roles of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and Myostatin

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sandhya S.; Mitch, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Catabolic conditions including chronic kidney disease (CKD), cancer, and diabetes cause muscle atrophy. The loss of muscle mass worsens the burden of disease because it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To avoid these problems or to develop treatment strategies, the mechanisms leading to muscle wasting must be identified. Specific mechanisms uncovered in CKD generally occur in other catabolic conditions. These include stimulation of protein degradation in muscle arising from activation of caspase-3 and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). These proteases act in a coordinated fashion with caspase-3 initially cleaving the complex structure of proteins in muscle yielding fragments that are substrates which are degraded by the UPS. Fortunately, the UPS exhibits remarkable specificity for proteins to be degraded because it is the major intracellular proteolytic system. Without a high level of specificity cellular functions would be disrupted. The specificity is accomplished by complex reactions that depend on recognition of a protein substrate by specific E3 ubiquitin ligases. In muscle, the specific ligases are Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 and their expression has characteristics of a biomarker of accelerated muscle proteolysis. Specific complications of CKD (metabolic acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and angiotensin II) activate caspase-3 and the UPS through mechanisms that include glucocorticoids and impaired insulin or IGF-1 signaling. Mediators activate myostatin which functions as a negative growth factor in muscle. In models of cancer or CKD, strategies that block myostatin prevent muscle wasting suggesting that therapies which block myostatin could prevent muscle wasting in catabolic conditions. PMID:23292175

  12. Spatiotemporal characteristics of muscle patterns for ball catching

    PubMed Central

    D'Andola, M.; Cesqui, B.; Portone, A.; Fernandez, L.; Lacquaniti, F.; d'Avella, A.

    2013-01-01

    What sources of information and what control strategies the central nervous system (CNS) uses to perform movements that require accurate sensorimotor coordination, such as catching a flying ball, is still debated. Here we analyzed the EMG waveforms recorded from 16 shoulder and elbow muscles in six subjects during catching of balls projected frontally from a distance of 6 m and arriving at two different heights and with three different flight times (550, 650, 750 ms). We found that a large fraction of the variation in the muscle patterns was captured by two time-varying muscle synergies, coordinated recruitment of groups of muscles with specific activation waveforms, modulated in amplitude and shifted in time according to the ball's arrival height and flight duration. One synergy was recruited with a short and fixed delay from launch time. Remarkably, a second synergy was recruited at a fixed time before impact, suggesting that it is timed according to an accurate time-to-contact estimation. These results suggest that the control of interceptive movements relies on a combination of reactive and predictive processes through the intermittent recruitment of time-varying muscle synergies. Knowledge of the dynamic effect of gravity and drag on the ball may be then implicitly incorporated in a direct mapping of visual information into a small number of synergy recruitment parameters. PMID:23966939

  13. Mechanisms of muscle gene regulation in the electric organ of Sternopygus macrurus

    PubMed Central

    Güth, Robert; Pinch, Matthew; Unguez, Graciela A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Animals perform a remarkable diversity of movements through the coordinated mechanical contraction of skeletal muscle. This capacity for a wide range of movements is due to the presence of muscle cells with a very plastic phenotype that display many different biochemical, physiological and morphological properties. What factors influence the maintenance and plasticity of differentiated muscle fibers is a fundamental question in muscle biology. We have exploited the remarkable potential of skeletal muscle cells of the gymnotiform electric fish Sternopygus macrurus to trans-differentiate into electrocytes, the non-contractile electrogenic cells of the electric organ (EO), to investigate the mechanisms that regulate the skeletal muscle phenotype. In S. macrurus, mature electrocytes possess a phenotype that is intermediate between muscle and non-muscle cells. How some genes coding for muscle-specific proteins are downregulated while others are maintained, and novel genes are upregulated, is an intriguing problem in the control of skeletal muscle and EO phenotype. To date, the intracellular and extracellular factors that generate and maintain distinct patterns of gene expression in muscle and EO have not been defined. Expression studies in S. macrurus have started to shed light on the role that transcriptional and post-transcriptional events play in regulating specific muscle protein systems and the muscle phenotype of the EO. In addition, these findings also represent an important step toward identifying mechanisms that affect the maintenance and plasticity of the muscle cell phenotype for the evolution of highly specialized non-contractile tissues. PMID:23761472

  14. Do Stretch Durations Affect Muscle Mechanical and Neurophysiological Properties?

    PubMed

    Opplert, J; Genty, J-B; Babault, N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether stretching durations influence acute changes of mechanical and neurophysiological properties of plantar flexor muscles. Plantar flexors of 10 active males were stretched in passive conditions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Different durations of static stretching were tested in 5 randomly ordered experimental trials (1, 2, 3, 4 and 10×30-s). Fascicle stiffness index, evoked contractile properties and spinal excitability (Hmax/Mmax) were examined before (PRE), immediately after (POST0) and 5 min after (POST5) stretching. No stretch duration effect was recorded for any variable. Moreover, whatever the stretching duration, stiffness index, peak twitch torque and rate of force development were significantly lower at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Electromechanical delay was longer at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Whatever the stretch duration, no significant changes of Hmax/Mmax ratio were recorded. In conclusion, 30 s of static stretching to maximum tolerated discomfort is sufficient enough to alter mechanical properties of plantar flexor muscles, but 10×30 s does not significantly affect these properties further. Stretching does not impair spinal excitability. PMID:27191211

  15. Physiologic, metabolic, and muscle fiber type characteristics of musculus uvulae in sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and in snorers.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Côté, C; Simoneau, J A; Gélinas, Y; St Pierre, S; Leclerc, J; Ferland, R; Marc, I

    1995-01-01

    Upper airway dilator muscles play an important role in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). The mechanical and structural characteristics of these muscles remain unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the physiologic, metabolic, and fiber type characteristics of one upper airway dilator muscle (musculus uvulae, MU) in 11 SAHS and in seven nonapneic snorers. The different analyses were done on MU obtained during uvulo-palato-pharyngoplasty. Snorers and SAHS differed only in their apnea + hypopnea indices (11.5 +/- 5.9 and 34.2 +/- 14.6/h, respectively, mean +/- SD). Absolute twitch and tetanic tension production of MU was significantly greater in SAHS than in snorers while the fatigability index was similar in the two groups. Protein content and anaerobic enzyme activities of MU were significantly greater in SAHS than in snorers; no difference was observed for aerobic enzyme activities. The total muscle fiber cross-sectional area of MU was significantly higher in SAHS (2.2 +/- 0.9 mm2) than in snorers (1.1 +/- 0.7 mm2). The surface occupied by type IIA muscle fibers of MU was larger in SAHS (2.00 +/- 0.96) than in snorers (0.84 +/- 0.63 mm2). We conclude that the capacity for tension production and the anaerobic metabolic activity of MU are greater in SAHS than in snorers. PMID:7814616

  16. Comparison of mechanical energy expenditure of joint moments and muscle forces during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Petrova, L N; Raitsin, L M

    1996-04-01

    The mechanical energy expenditures (MEEs) of two human lower extremity models with different sources of mechanical energy - (1) muscles and (2) joint moments - were compared theoretically. Sources of mechanical energy producing movement of Model 1 were eight muscle, three of which were two-joint muscles. Sources of mechanical energy producing movement of Model 2 were net moments at its joints. These sources of mechanical energy were substituted by 11 one-joint muscles, with the assumption that antagonistic muscles did not produce force. Because of this assumption, summed MEE of all joint moments and all one-joint muscles of Model 2 were the same. It was shown that during the same movement the model with two-joint muscles could spend less mechanical energy than the model without two-joint muscles. This economy of mechanical energy realized by two-joint muscles was possible if (i) signs of the muscle powers which were produced by the two-joint muscle at both joints were opposite, (ii) moments produced by that muscle at each of the two joints had the same direction as the net joint moments at these joints, and (iii) muscles crossing these two joints from the opposite side did not produce force. Realization of these three conditions during human locomotion was checked experimentally. Electrical activity of eight lower extremity muscles of ten subjects was measured during treadmill walking and running. Based on this information, the periods where the muscles produce force were estimated. Moments and their power at joints of the lower extremity of two subjects performing walking and running were calculated using kinematics and ground reaction force measurements, and an inverse dynamics approach. It was shown that MEE of models with different sources of mechanical energy appeared to be different during certain periods of the swing phase. However, the magnitude of this difference was probably relatively small. PMID:8964770

  17. Electrical and mechanical properties of longitudinal and circular muscles of the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Kuriyama, H

    1975-01-01

    The membrane potential of the electrically quiescent circular muscle fibre is higher than that of the spontaneously active longitudinal muscle fibre. The length constant of circular muscle fibres is longer than that of the longitudinal muscle. The electrical activity of the longitudinal muscle membrane is enhanced by caffeine and PGE1 is suppressed for the circular muscle. Isotonic K Krebssolution generates a large tonic response of the contracture of longitudinal muscle tissue, but in circular muscle it is small. Following an inward current pulse, a large rebound contraction of the circular muscle was generated during K-INDUCED CONTRACTURE BUT IT WAS SMALL IN THE LONGITUDINAL MUSCLE TISSUE. Caffeine suppressed the K-induced contracture of both tissues but enhanced the rebound contraction of the circular muscel. Verapamil and lanthanum suppressed the mechanical responses of both muscle tissues but rebound contraction evoked in isotonic K Krebs solution was of longer duration in circular muscle tissue than in longitudinal muscle tissues. It is postulated that both muscle tissues possess different electrical and mechanical properties, and that these differences are not caused by nervous activity. PMID:1226008

  18. Electrophysiologic and clinico-pathologic characteristics of statin-induced muscle injury

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrazaq, Mohammed; Hamdan, Farqad; Al-Tameemi, Waseem

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, we aimed at evaluation of electrophysiological and histopathalogical characteristics of statin-induced muscle injury as well as clinical features of patients who develop this condition in terms of frequency and pattern of evolution. Materials and Methods: Forty patients (age 39-74 years) including 25 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 9 with cardiovascular diseases and 6 with hyperlipidemia, who were receiving atrovastatin 40 mg/day for variable period, were studied. Thirty three healthy subjects (age 31-74 years) served as control group. Creatine phosphokinease level, thyroid function, motor unit potential parameters and muscle fiber conduction velocity of biceps brachii and tibialis anterior muscles were measured. Results: Creatine phosphokinase level was elevated in statin users, particularly in those with diabetes mellitus. Less than 50% of statin users experienced symptoms related to muscle injury. Muscle fiber conduction velocity of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly reduced. Statin users with diabetes mellitus showed significant changes in electrophysiological parameters as compared to those with cardiovascular diseases and hyperlipidemia. Muscle biopsies showed muscle fiber variation in size, fibrosis and mild inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical evaluation of muscle biopsies showed positive expression of Bcl-2 and one patient showed positive P53 immunohistochemical expression with elevated level of creatine phosphokinase. Conclusion: Atorvastatin increased average creatine kinase, statins produce mild muscle injury even in asymptomatic subjects. Diabetic statin users were more prone to develop muscle injury than others. Muscle fiber conduction velocity evaluation is recommended as a simple and reliable test to diagnose statin-induced myopathy instead of invasive muscle biopsy. PMID:26557961

  19. A mechanism for altered flexibility in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, S P; Simonsen, E B; Aagaard, P; Sørensen, H; Kjaer, M

    1996-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of a long-term stretching regimen on the tissue properties and stretch tolerance of human skeletal muscle. 2. Resistance to stretch was measured as torque (in N m) offered by the hamstring muscle group during passive knee extension while electromyographic (EMG) activity, knee joint angle and velocity were continuously monitored during a standardized stretch manoeuvre. Seven healthy subjects were tested before and after a 3 week training period using two separate protocols. Protocol 1 consisted of a slow stretch at 0.087 rad s-1 to a predetermined angle followed by a 90 s holding phase. Subjects were brought to the same angle before and after the training period. Protocol 2 was a similar stretch, but continued to the point of pain. 3. During protocol 1 the torque rose during the stretch and then declined during the holding phase. EMG activity was small and did not change significantly during the protocol. No significant differences in stiffness, energy and peak torque about the knee joint were seen as a result of the training. During protocol 2 the angle to which the knee could be extended was significantly increased as a result of the training. This was accompanied by a comparable increase in peak torque and energy. EMG activity was small and not affected by training. 4. It is concluded that reflex EMG activity does not limit the range of movement during slow stretches and that the increased range of motion achieved from training is a consequence of increased stretch tolerance on the part of the subject rather than a change in the mechanical or viscoelastic properties of the muscle. PMID:8951730

  20. MEAT SCIENCE AND MUSCLE BIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM--mechanism of growth hormone stimulation of skeletal muscle growth in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Ge, X

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone, also called somatotropin (ST), is a polypeptide hormone produced by the anterior pituitary. The major functions of GH include stimulating bone and skeletal muscle growth, lipolysis, milk production, and expression of the IGF-I gene in the liver. Based on these functions, recombinant bovine ST (bST) and recombinant porcine ST (pST) have been used to improve milk production in dairy cows and lean tissue growth in pigs, respectively. However, despite these applications, the mechanisms of action of GH are not fully understood. Indeed, there has been a lot of controversy over the role of liver-derived circulating IGF-I and locally produced IGF-I in mediating the growth-stimulatory effect of GH during the last 15 yr. It is in this context that we have conducted studies to further understand how GH stimulates skeletal muscle growth in cattle. Our results do not support a role of skeletal muscle-derived IGF-I in GH-stimulated skeletal muscle growth in cattle. Our results indicate that GH stimulates skeletal muscle growth in cattle, in part, by stimulating protein synthesis in muscle through a GH receptor-mediated, IGF-I-independent mechanism. In this review, besides discussing these results, we also argue that liver-derived circulating IGF-I should be still considered as the major mechanism that mediates the growth-stimulatory effect of GH on skeletal muscle in cattle and other domestic animals. PMID:24166991

  1. Unconventional processive mechanics of non-muscle myosin IIB.

    PubMed

    Norstrom, Melanie F; Smithback, Philip A; Rock, Ronald S

    2010-08-20

    Proper tension maintenance in the cytoskeleton is essential for regulated cell polarity, cell motility, and division. Non-muscle myosin IIB (NMIIB) generates tension along actin filaments in many cell types, including neuronal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Using a three-bead optical trapping assay, we recorded NMIIB interactions with actin filaments to determine if a NMIIB dimer cycles along an actin filament in a processive manner. Our results show that NMIIB is the first myosin II to exhibit evidence of processive stepping behavior. Analysis of these data reveals a forward displacement of 5.4 nm and, surprisingly, frequent backward steps of -5.9 nm. Processive stepping along the long pitch helix of actin may provide a mechanism for disassembly of fascin-actin bundles. Forward steps and detachment are weakly force-dependent at all forces, consistent with rate-limiting and force-dependent ADP release. However, backward steps are nearly force-independent. Our data support a model in which NMIIB can readily move in both directions at stall, which may be important for a general regulator of cytoskeleton tension. PMID:20511646

  2. Insertional Characteristics of the Peroneus Tertius Tendon: Revisiting the Anatomy of an Underestimated Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ercikti, Nurcan; Apaydin, Nihal; Kocabiyik, Necdet; Yazar, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to describe the morphologic characteristics of the peroneus tertius (PT) tendon, evaluate the variations in its insertion point, investigate the interconnections with the tendons of the extensor digitorum longus, and discuss whether these insertion differences of the muscle tension might have an effect on fracture formation. The length and width of the PT tendon and the width at its midpoint were measured in 44 lower extremities. The data obtained were compared statistically. The PT was found to occur in 2 types according to the number of tendons: type 1, a single tendon without a slip; and type 2, 2 tendons with a slip. It has been suggested that the PT tendon could contribute to avulsion fractures of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal bone. Therefore, to understand the mechanism of Jones fracture, knowledge of the PT tendon would be beneficial to determine the insertion points. PMID:26860045

  3. Mechanisms of BDNF regulation in asthmatic airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin produced by airway smooth muscle (ASM), enhances inflammation effects on airway contractility, supporting the idea that locally produced growth factors influence airway diseases such as asthma. We endeavored to dissect intrinsic mechanisms regulating endogenous, as well as inflammation (TNF-α)-induced BDNF secretion in ASM of nonasthmatic vs. asthmatic humans. We focused on specific Ca(2+) regulation- and inflammation-related signaling cascades and quantified BDNF secretion. We find that TNF-α enhances BDNF release by ASM cells, via several mechanisms relevant to asthma, including transient receptor potential channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 (but not TRPC1), ERK 1/2, PI3K, PLC, and PKC cascades, Rho kinase, and transcription factors cAMP response element binding protein and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Basal BDNF expression and secretion are elevated in asthmatic ASM and increase further with TNF-α exposure, involving many of these regulatory mechanisms. We conclude that airway BDNF secretion is regulated at multiple levels, providing a basis for autocrine effects of BDNF under conditions of inflammation and disease, with potential downstream influences on contractility and remodeling. PMID:27317689

  4. Crossbridge mechanism(s) examined by temperature perturbation studies on muscle.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W; Coupland, M E

    2010-01-01

    An overall view of the contractile process that has emerged from -temperature-studies on active muscle is outlined. In isometric muscle, a small rapid temperature-jump (T-jump) enhances an early, pre-phosphate release, step in the acto-myosin (crossbridge) ATPase cycle and induces a characteristic rise in force indicating that crossbridge force generation is endothermic (force rises when heat is absorbed). Sigmoidal temperature dependence of steady force is largely due to the endothermic nature of force generation. During shortening, when muscle force is decreased, the T-jump force generation is enhanced; conversely, when a muscle is lengthening and its force increased, the T-jump force generation is inhibited. Taking T-jump force generation as a signature of the crossbridge - ATPase cycle, the results suggest that during lengthening the ATPase cycle is truncated before endothermic force generation, whereas during shortening this step and the ATPase cycle, are accelerated; this readily provides a molecular basis for the Fenn effect. PMID:20824530

  5. Tinnitus: Characteristics, Causes, Mechanisms, and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Won; Kim, Tae You; Lim, Jun Seong; Shin, Kyoung Sik

    2009-01-01

    Tinnitus-the perception of sound in the absence of an actual external sound-represents a symptom of an underlying condition rather than a single disease. Several theories have been proposed to explain the mechanisms underlying tinnitus. Tinnitus generators are theoretically located in the auditory pathway, and such generators and various mechanisms occurring in the peripheral auditory system have been explained in terms of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions, edge theory, and discordant theory. Those present in the central auditory system have been explained in terms of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the auditory plasticity theory, the crosstalk theory, the somatosensory system, and the limbic and autonomic nervous systems. Treatments for tinnitus include pharmacotherapy, cognitive and behavioral therapy, sound therapy, music therapy, tinnitus retraining therapy, massage and stretching, and electrical suppression. This paper reviews the characteristics, causes, mechanisms, and treatments of tinnitus. PMID:19513328

  6. Forward Dynamics Simulations Provide insight into Muscle Mechanical Work during Human Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Neptune, Richard R.; McGowan, Craig P.; Kautz, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Complex musculoskeletal models and computer simulations can provide critical insight into muscle mechanical work output during locomotion. Simulations provide both a consistent mechanical solution that can be interrogated at multiple levels (muscle fiber, musculotendon, net joint moment and whole body work) and an ideal framework to identify limitations with different estimates of muscle work and the resulting implications for metabolic cost and efficiency. PMID:19955870

  7. Temperature gradients drive mechanical energy gradients in the flight muscle of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    George, N T; Sponberg, S; Daniel, T L

    2012-02-01

    A temperature gradient throughout the dominant flight muscle (dorsolongitudinal muscle, DLM(1)) of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta, together with temperature-dependent muscle contractile rates, demonstrates that significant spatial variation in power production is possible within a single muscle. Using in situ work-loop analyses under varying muscle temperatures and phases of activation, we show that regional differences in muscle temperature will induce a spatial gradient in the mechanical power output throughout the DLM(1). Indeed, we note that this power gradient spans from positive to negative values across the predicted temperature range. Warm ventral subunits produce positive power at their in vivo operating temperatures, and therefore act as motors. Concurrently, as muscle temperature decreases dorsally, the subunits produce approximately zero mechanical power output, acting as an elastic energy storage source, and negative power output, behaving as a damper. Adjusting the phase of activation further influences the temperature sensitivity of power output, significantly affecting the mechanical power output gradient that is expressed. Additionally, the separate subregions of the DLM(1) did not appear to employ significant physiological compensation for the temperature-induced differences in power output. Thus, although the components of a muscle are commonly thought to operate uniformly, a significant within-muscle temperature gradient has the potential to induce a mechanical power gradient, whereby subunits within a muscle operate with separate and distinct functional roles. PMID:22246256

  8. Mechanical Signal Transduction in Countermeasures to Muscle Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidball, James G.; Chu, Amy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that modifications in muscle use result in changes in the expression and activity of calpains and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Although muscle unloading for 10 days produced no change in the concentrations of calpain 1 or 2 and no change in calpain activation, muscle reloading produced a 90% increase in calpain 2 concentration. We developed an in vitro model to test our hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. Talin was selected because it is a well-characterized calpain substrate and it is codistributed with calpain in muscle cells. We found that intermittant loading during hindlimb suspension that is sufficient to prevent muscle mass loss that occurs during muscle unloading is also sufficient to prevent the decrease in NOS expression that normally occurs during hindlimb unloading. These findings indicate that therapeutics directed toward regulating the calpain/calpastatin system may be beneficial in preventing muscle mass loss in muscle injury, unloading and disease.

  9. Effect of spaceflight on skeletal muscle: Mechanical properties and myosin isoform content of a slow muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Baker, Michael J.; Herrick, Robert E.; Tao, Ming; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined changes in contractile, biochemical, and histochemical properties of slow antigravity skeletal muscle after a 6-day spaceflight mission. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: flight and ground-based control. Approximately 3 h after the landing, in situ contractile measurements were made on the soleus muscles of the flight animals. The control animals were studied 24 h later. The contractile measurements included force-velocity relationship, force-frequency relationship, and fatigability. Biochemical measurements focused on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myosin light chain profiles. Adenosinetriphosphatase histochemistry was performed to identify cross-sectional area of slow and fast muscle fibers and to determine the percent fiber type distribution. The force-velocity relationships of the flight muscles were altered such that maximal isometric tension P(sub o) was decreased by 24% and maximal shortening velocity was increased by 14% (P less than 0.05). The force-frequency relationship of the flight muscles was shifted to the right of the control muscles. At the end of the 2-min fatigue test, the flight muscles generated only 34% of P(sub o), whereas the control muscles generated 64% of P(sub o). The flight muscles exhibited de novo expression of the type IIx MHC isoform as well as a slight decrease in the slow type I and fast type IIa MHC isoforms. Histochemical analyses of flight muscles demonstrated a small increase in the percentage of fast type II fibers and a greater atrophy of the slow type I fibers. The results demonstrate that contractile properties of slow antigravity skeletal muscle are sensitive to the microgravity environment and that changes begin to occur within the 1st wk. These changes were at least, in part, associated with changes in the amount and type of contractile protein expressed.

  10. Muscle as a molecular machine for protecting joints and bones by absorbing mechanical impacts.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Rudenko, Oleg; Aglyamov, Salavat; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2014-07-01

    We hypothesize that dissipation of mechanical energy of external impact to absorb mechanical shock is a fundamental function of skeletal muscle in addition to its primary function to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy. In physical systems, the common mechanism for absorbing mechanical shock is achieved with the use of both elastic and viscous elements and we hypothesize that the viscosity of the skeletal muscle is a variable parameter which can be voluntarily controlled by changing the tension of the contracting muscle. We further hypothesize that an ability of muscle to absorb shock has been an important factor in biological evolution, allowing the life to move from the ocean to land, from hydrodynamic to aerodynamic environment with dramatically different loading conditions for musculoskeletal system. The ability of muscle to redistribute the energy of mechanical shock in time and space and unload skeletal joints is of key importance in physical activities. We developed a mathematical model explaining the absorption of mechanical shock energy due to the increased viscosity of contracting skeletal muscles. The developed model, based on the classical theory of sliding filaments, demonstrates that the increased muscle viscosity is a result of the time delay (or phase shift) between the mechanical impact and the attachment/detachment of myosin heads to binding sites on the actin filaments. The increase in the contracted muscle's viscosity is time dependent. Since the forward and backward rate constants for binding the myosin heads to the actin filaments are on the order of 100s(-1), the viscosity of the contracted muscle starts to significantly increase with an impact time greater than 0.01s. The impact time is one of the key parameters in generating destructive stress in the colliding objects. In order to successfully dampen a short high power impact, muscles must first slow it down to engage the molecular mechanism of muscle viscosity. Muscle carries

  11. Morphological, Electrophysiological, and Metabolic Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle in People with End-Stage Renal Disease: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anuradha; Garland, S. Jayne; House, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Fatigue is one of the most frequent debilitating symptoms reported by people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on haemodialysis (HD) therapy. A wide range of underlying abnormalities, including skeletal muscle weakness, have been implicated as causes of this fatigue. Skeletal muscle weakness is well established in this population, and such muscle weakness is amenable to physical therapy treatment. The purpose of this review was to identify morphological, electrophysiological, and metabolic characteristics of skeletal muscles in people with ESRD/HD that may cause skeletal muscle weakness. Method: Electronic databases were searched for relevant literature from inception to March 2010. Inclusion criteria were English language; adult subjects with ESRD/HD; and the use of muscle biopsy, electromyography, and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (31P-NMRS) techniques to evaluate muscle characteristics. Results: In total, 38 studies were included. All studies of morphological characteristics reported type II fibre atrophy. Electrophysiological characteristics included both neuropathic and myopathic skeletal muscle changes. Studies of metabolic characteristics revealed higher cytosolic inorganic phosphate levels and reduced effective muscle mass. Conclusion: The results indicate an array of changes in the morphological, electrophysiological, and metabolic characteristics of skeletal muscle structure in people with ESRD/HD that may lead to muscle weakness. PMID:22654242

  12. Mechanical Action of the Intercostal Muscles on the Ribs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Troyer, Andre; Kelly, Suzanne; Zin, Walter A.

    1983-04-01

    The external and internal interosseous intercostal muscles were separately stimulated at end-expiratory lung volume in anesthetized dogs. These muscles were all found to elevate the ribs into which they insert. By attaching weights to the ribs, it was determined that the nonlinear compliance of the ribs was responsible for this phenomenon.

  13. In vivo ultrasound imaging of the popliteus muscle: investigation of functional characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Soda, Naoki; Fujihashi, Yuichiro; Aoki, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to use ultrasound imaging equipment for in vivo observation of the popliteus muscle thickness during rest and exercise to examine its functional characteristics and to establish a training method for this muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 30 healthy adults (15 men and 15 women). The measurement tasks, consisting of isometric knee flexion and extension and internal rotation of the lower leg were performed in an arbitrary order. The popliteus muscle thickness was measured using an ultrasound. [Results] The popliteus muscle thickness significantly increased in the internal rotation in 27 subjects (90%), whereas, it remained unchanged in the remaining three subjects (10%). [Conclusion] This study differed from most of the previous studies because it involved in vivo observation of the popliteus muscle. We found that ultrasound was an effective method for the measurement of popliteus muscle thickness. The results suggest that internal rotation of the lower leg is the most effective exercise for working the popliteus muscle. PMID:27134397

  14. The mechanism of low-frequency sound production in muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Frangioni, J V; Kwan-Gett, T S; Dobrunz, L E; McMahon, T A

    1987-01-01

    Frog gastrocnemius muscles stimulated isometrically in a saline bath at 20 degrees C were found to produce a single ringing sound event beginning just before the tension record began to rise. The sound event was substantially over by the time the isometric tension began to fall. Results from studies correlating the spatial pattern of the sound, the amplitude and frequency of the sound as a function of the muscle length, and the response of both the passive and active muscle to a transverse pluck were found to be consistent with the conclusion that the sounds in these muscles are caused primarily by transverse resonant vibrations. As the muscle develops force, its lack of cylindrical symmetry gives rise to lateral motions, which are most likely the initiators of the bending vibrations detected as sound. PMID:3496125

  15. Ca2+-Dependent Regulations and Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: From Electro-Mechanical Coupling to Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in almost all cellular processes and ensures the functionality of an organism. In skeletal muscle fibers, Ca2+ is critically involved in the innervation of skeletal muscle fibers that results in the exertion of an action potential along the muscle fiber membrane, the prerequisite for skeletal muscle contraction. Furthermore and among others, Ca2+ regulates also intracellular processes, such as myosin-actin cross bridging, protein synthesis, protein degradation and fiber type shifting by the control of Ca2+-sensitive proteases and transcription factors, as well as mitochondrial adaptations, plasticity and respiration. These data highlight the overwhelming significance of Ca2+ ions for the integrity of skeletal muscle tissue. In this review, we address the major functions of Ca2+ ions in adult muscle but also highlight recent findings of critical Ca2+-dependent mechanisms essential for skeletal muscle-regulation and maintenance. PMID:25569087

  16. Independent Passive Mechanical Behavior of Bovine Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Chaudhuri, Zia; Demer, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, while all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. We sought evidence of potential independent action by examining passive mechanical coupling between EOM compartments. Methods. Putative compartments of each of the six whole bovine anatomical EOMs were separately clamped to a physiologically controlled, dual channel microtensile load cell (5-mN force resolution) driven by independent, high-speed, linear motors having 20-nm position resolution. One channel at a time was extended or retracted by 3 to 5 mm, with the other channel stationary. Fiducials distributed on the EOM global surface enabled optical tracking of local deformation. Loading rates of 5 to 100 mm/sec were applied to explore speeds from slow vergence to saccades. Control loadings employed transversely loaded EOM and isotropic latex. Results. All EOM bellies and tendons exhibited substantial compartmental independence when loaded in the physiologic direction, both between OL and GL, and for arbitrary transverse parsings of EOM width ranging from 60%:40% to 80%:20%. Intercompartmental force coupling in the physiologic direction was less than or equal to 10% in all six EOMS even for saccadic loading rates. Coupling was much higher for nonphysiologic transverse EOM loading and isotropic latex. Optical tracking demonstrated independent strain distribution between EOM compartments. Conclusions. Substantial mechanical independence exists among physiologically loaded fiber bundles in bovine EOMs and tendons, providing biomechanical support for the proposal that differential compartmental function in horizontal rectus EOMs contributes to novel torsional and vertical actions. PMID:23188730

  17. Shifts in a single muscle's control potential of body dynamics are determined by mechanical feedback

    PubMed Central

    Sponberg, Simon; Libby, Thomas; Mullens, Chris H.; Full, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Muscles are multi-functional structures that interface neural and mechanical systems. Muscle work depends on a large multi-dimensional space of stimulus (neural) and strain (mechanical) parameters. In our companion paper, we rewrote activation to individual muscles in intact, behaving cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis L.), revealing a specific muscle's potential to control body dynamics in different behaviours. Here, we use those results to provide the biologically relevant parameters for in situ work measurements. We test four hypotheses about how muscle function changes to provide mechanisms for the observed control responses. Under isometric conditions, a graded increase in muscle stress underlies its linear actuation during standing behaviours. Despite typically absorbing energy, this muscle can recruit two separate periods of positive work when controlling running. This functional change arises from mechanical feedback filtering a linear increase in neural activation into nonlinear work output. Changing activation phase again led to positive work recruitment, but at different times, consistent with the muscle's ability to also produce a turn. Changes in muscle work required considering the natural sequence of strides and separating swing and stance contributions of work. Both in vivo control potentials and in situ work loops were necessary to discover the neuromechanical coupling enabling control. PMID:21502130

  18. Adaptation of muscle coordination to altered task mechanics during steady-state cycling.

    PubMed

    Neptune, R R; Herzog, W

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this work was to increase our understanding of how motor patterns are produced during movement tasks by quantifying adaptations in muscle coordination in response to altered task mechanics. We used pedaling as our movement paradigm because it is a constrained cyclical movement that allows for a controlled investigation of test conditions such as movement speed and effort. Altered task mechanics were introduced using an elliptical chainring. The kinematics of the crank were changed from a relatively constant angular velocity using a circular chainring to a widely varying angular velocity using an elliptical chainring. Kinetic, kinematic and muscle activity data were collected from eight competitive cyclists using three different chainrings--one circular and two different orientations of an elliptical chainring. We tested the hypotheses that muscle coordination patterns (EMG timing and magnitude), specifically the regions of active muscle force production, would shift towards regions in the crank cycle in which the crank angular velocity, and hence muscle contraction speeds, were favorable to produce muscle power as defined by the skeletal muscle power-velocity relationship. The results showed that our hypothesis with regards to timing was not supported. Although there were statistically significant shifts in muscle timing, the shifts were minor in absolute terms and appeared to be the result of the muscles accounting for the activation dynamics associated with muscle force development (i.e. the delay in muscle force rise and decay). But, significant changes in the magnitude of muscle EMG during regions of slow crank angular velocity for the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris were observed. Thus, the nervous system used adaptations to the muscle EMG magnitude, rather than the timing, to adapt to the altered task mechanics. The results also suggested that cyclists might work on the descending limb of the power-velocity relationship when pedaling at

  19. Mechanical performance of artificial pneumatic muscles to power an ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2006-01-01

    We developed a powered ankle-foot orthosis that uses artificial pneumatic muscles to produce active plantar flexor torque. The purpose of this study was to quantify the mechanical performance of the orthosis during human walking. Three subjects walked at a range of speeds wearing ankle-foot orthoses with either one or two artificial muscles working in parallel. The orthosis produced similar total peak plantar flexor torque and network across speeds independent of the number of muscles used. The orthosis generated approximately 57% of the peak ankle plantar flexor torque during stance and performed approximately 70% of the positive plantar flexor work done during normal walking. Artificial muscle bandwidth and force-length properties were the two primary factors limiting torque production. The lack of peak force and work differences between single and double muscle conditions can be explained by force-length properties. Subjects altered their ankle kinematics between conditions resulting in changes in artificial muscle length. In the double muscle condition greater plantar flexion yielded shorter artificial muscles lengths and decreased muscle forces. This finding emphasizes the importance of human testing in the design and development of robotic exoskeleton devices for assisting human movement. The results of this study outline the mechanical performance limitations of an ankle-foot orthosis powered by artificial pneumatic muscles. This orthosis could be valuable for gait rehabilitation and for studies investigating neuromechanical control of human walking. PMID:16023126

  20. The effect of intramuscular fat on skeletal muscle mechanics: implications for the elderly and obese.

    PubMed

    Rahemi, Hadi; Nigam, Nilima; Wakeling, James M

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal muscle accumulates intramuscular fat through age and obesity. Muscle quality, a measure of muscle strength per unit size, decreases in these conditions. It is not clear how fat influences this loss in performance. Changes to structural parameters (e.g. fibre pennation and connective tissue properties) affect the muscle quality. This study investigated the mechanisms that lead to deterioration in muscle performance due to changes in intramuscular fat, pennation and aponeurosis stiffness. A finite-element model of the human gastrocnemius was developed as a fibre-reinforced composite biomaterial containing contractile fibres within the base material. The base-material properties were modified to include intramuscular fat in five different ways. All these models with fat generated lower fibre stress and muscle quality than their lean counterparts. This effect is due to the higher stiffness of the tissue in the fatty models. The fibre deformations influence their interactions with the aponeuroses, and these change with fatty inclusions. Muscles with more compliant aponeuroses generated lower forces. The muscle quality was further reduced for muscles with lower pennation. This study shows that whole-muscle force is dependent on its base-material properties and changes to the base material due to fatty inclusions result in reductions to force and muscle quality. PMID:26156300

  1. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Ylinen, Jari; Korniloff, Katariina; Weir, Adam; Häkkinen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD) during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability. PMID:26828215

  2. Meat Science and Muscle Biology Symposium: developmental programming in cattle: consequences for growth, efficiency, carcass, muscle, and beef quality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D L; Cafe, L M; Greenwood, P L

    2013-03-01

    This paper reviews results of studies on effects of fetal programming and maternal nutrition during pregnancy on growth, efficiency, carcass, muscle, and meat quality characteristics of cattle. It includes results from our Australian Beef Cooperative Research Centre studies on factors such as chronic severe nutritional restriction from approximately d 80 of pregnancy to parturition and/or throughout lactation used to create early-life growth differences in the offspring of cows within pasture-based systems and the effect of these treatments on production characteristics to 30 mo of age. Fetal programming and related maternal effects are most pronounced and explain substantial amounts of variation for growth-related production characteristics such as BW, feed intake, carcass weight, muscle weights, meat yield, and fat and bone weights at any given age but are less evident when assessed at the same BW and carcass weight. Some effects of maternal and early-life factors in our studies were evident for efficiency traits but fewer affected beef quality characteristics at 30 mo of age, explaining only small amounts of variation in these traits. It is difficult to uncouple maternal nutritional effects specific to prenatal life from those that carry over to the postnatal period until weaning, particularly the effects of maternal nutrition during pregnancy on subsequent lactational performance. Hence, experimental design considerations for studying fetal programming effects on offspring during later life are discussed in relation to minimizing or removing prenatal and postnatal confounding effects. The relative contribution of fetal programming to the profitability of beef production systems is also briefly discussed. In this regard, the importance of health and survival of cows and calves, the capacity of cows to rebreed in a timely manner, and the efficiency with which feed and other resources are used cannot be overemphasized in relation to economics, welfare, and the

  3. Anatomic and physiological characteristics of the ferret lateral rectus muscle and abducens nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Keith N; McClung, J Ross; Goldberg, Stephen J; Shall, Mary S

    2007-11-01

    The ferret has become a popular model for physiological and neurodevelopmental research in the visual system. We believed it important, therefore, to study extraocular whole muscle as well as single motor unit physiology in the ferret. Using extracellular stimulation, 62 individual motor units in the ferret abducens nucleus were evaluated for their contractile characteristics. Of these motor units, 56 innervated the lateral rectus (LR) muscle alone, while 6 were split between the LR and retractor bulbi (RB) muscle slips. In addition to individual motor units, the whole LR muscle was evaluated for twitch, tetanic peak force, and fatigue. The abducens nucleus motor units showed a twitch contraction time of 15.4 ms, a mean twitch tension of 30.2 mg, and an average fusion frequency of 154 Hz. Single-unit fatigue index averaged 0.634. Whole muscle twitch contraction time was 16.7 ms with a mean twitch tension of 3.32 g. The average fatigue index of whole muscle was 0.408. The abducens nucleus was examined with horseradish peroxidase conjugated with the subunit B of cholera toxin histochemistry and found to contain an average of 183 motoneurons. Samples of LR were found to contain an average of 4,687 fibers, indicating an LR innervation ratio of 25.6:1. Compared with cat and squirrel monkeys, the ferret LR motor units contract more slowly yet more powerfully. The functional visual requirements of the ferret may explain these fundamental differences. PMID:17717110

  4. How Hinge Positioning in Cross-Country Ski Bindings Affect Exercise Efficiency, Cycle Characteristics and Muscle Coordination during Submaximal Roller Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Conor M.; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Ettema, Gertjan; Federolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to 1) test if the hinge position in the binding of skating skis has an effect on gross efficiency or cycle characteristics and 2) investigate whether hinge positioning affects synergistic components of the muscle activation in six lower leg muscles. Eleven male skiers performed three 4-min sessions at moderate intensity while cross-country ski-skating and using a klapskate binding. Three different positions were tested for the binding’s hinge, ranging from the front of the first distal phalange to the metatarsal-phalangeal joint. Gross efficiency and cycle characteristics were determined, and the electromyographic (EMG) signals of six lower limb muscles were collected. EMG signals were wavelet transformed, normalized, joined into a multi-dimensional vector, and submitted to a principle component analysis (PCA). Our results did not reveal any changes to gross efficiency or cycle characteristics when altering the hinge position. However, our EMG analysis found small but significant effects of hinge positioning on muscle coordinative patterns (P < 0.05). The changed patterns in muscle activation are in alignment with previously described mechanisms that explain the effects of hinge positioning in speed-skating klapskates. Finally, the within-subject results of the EMG analysis suggested that in addition to the between-subject effects, further forms of muscle coordination patterns appear to be employed by some, but not all participants. PMID:27203597

  5. Biochemistry of postmortem muscle - lessons on mechanisms of meat tenderization.

    PubMed

    Huff Lonergan, Elisabeth; Zhang, Wangang; Lonergan, Steven M

    2010-09-01

    It is certain that meat tenderness is a highly valued consumer trait and thus definition of the multiple processes that influence meat tenderness will provide clues toward improving meat quality and value. The natural process by which meat becomes tender is complex. Tenderness development is dependent on the architecture and the integrity of the skeletal muscle cell and on events that modify those proteins and their interaction. Specifically protein degradation and protein oxidation have been identified as processes that modify proteins as well as the tenderness of meat. The intracellular environment is a major factor that controls these events. Ultimately, the interplay between these events determines the rate and extent of tenderization. Given the intricacy of the structure of the muscle cell, coupled with the complexity of the regulation of protein modification and the ever-changing intracellular environment it is not surprising that this area of research is a very dynamic field. Just as the overall integrity and function of muscle cells does not depend on a single protein, but rather on the coordinated interaction of several proteins, the structural weakening of muscle cells during postmortem aging also must not depend on the degradation of a single myofibrillar or other cytoskeletal protein. The proteins mentioned in this review are located in different regions of the muscle cell, and most have been implicated in some manner as being important in maintaining the structure and function of the muscle cell. Oxidation of myosin heavy chain, a predominant protein in the myofibril, is known to promote aggregation and toughening of meat. Degradation of proteins such as desmin, filamin, dystrophin, and talin (all located at the periphery of the Z-line) may disrupt the lateral register and integrity of the myofibril themselves as well as the attachments of the peripheral layer of myofibril to the sarcolemma. Degradation of the proteins within the myofibril that are

  6. Chemical composition characteristics of the longissimus and semimembranosus muscles for pigs from New Zealand and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Purchas, R W; Morel, P C H; Janz, J A M; Wilkinson, B H P

    2009-03-01

    A range of composition characteristics of the longissimus (LL) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles were compared between pigs raised in intensive and extensive production systems in New Zealand (NZ), and pigs raised in an intensive system in Indonesia for supply to the Singapore market (n=8/group). Ultimate pH was slightly higher for the Singaporean LL muscles (P<0.05), while LL muscle of the NZ extensive group was redder (higher a(∗) values) and contained more fat (P<0.05). Muscle iron levels were highest for the NZ extensive group and lowest for a lighter group within the Singapore pigs (P<0.05). Differences in fatty acid concentrations, which were also measured in a sample of the belly cut, could largely be attributed to the effects of diet, with higher levels of alpha linolenic acid for the NZ extensive group (P<0.05) due to linseed in the diet, and much higher levels of linoleic acid and the P:S ratio for the Singapore group (P<0.05). Some statistically significant differences in amino acid concentrations were shown between muscles and groups, but they were not large. With respect to compounds with potential bioactive properties, coenzyme Q10, and taurine levels were higher in pork from NZ pigs, and carnosine levels were highest for the NZ intensive group (P<0.05). The LL muscle contained more coenzyme Q10 and taurine, but less carnosine than the SM muscle (P<0.001). It is concluded that some of these composition differences in the pork from the muscles and groups compared may be of commercial importance, but several are likely to have been due to dietary or weight differences. PMID:20416593

  7. Mechanical ventilation and sepsis induce skeletal muscle catabolism in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced rates of skeletal muscle accretion are a prominent feature of the metabolic response to sepsis in infants and children. Septic neonates often require medical support with mechanical ventilation (MV). The combined effects of MV and sepsis in muscle have not been examined in neonates, in whom ...

  8. Mechanical ventilation alone, and in the presence sepsis, induces peripheral skeletal muscle catabolism in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced rates of skeletal muscle accretion are a prominent feature of the metabolic response to sepsis in infants and children. Septic neonates often require medical support with mechanical ventilation (MV). The combined effects of MV and sepsis in muscle have not been examined in neonates, in whom ...

  9. Mechanical ventilation induces myokine expression and catabolism in peripheral skeletal muscle in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endotoxin (LPS)-induced sepsis increases circulating cytokines which have been associated with skeletal muscle catabolism. During critical illness, it has been postulated that muscle wasting associated with mechanical ventilation (MV) occurs due to inactivity. We hypothesize that MV and sepsis promo...

  10. Mechanisms by which acellular biologic scaffolds promote functional skeletal muscle restoration.

    PubMed

    Badylak, Stephen F; Dziki, Jenna L; Sicari, Brian M; Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Boninger, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    Acellular biologic scaffolds derived from extracellular matrix have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies as a regenerative medicine approach for volumetric muscle loss treatment. The present manuscript provides a review of previous studies supporting the use of extracellular matrix derived biologic scaffolds for the promotion of functional skeletal muscle tissue formation that is contractile and innervated. The manuscript also identifies key mechanisms that have been associated with ECM-mediated skeletal muscle repair, and provides hypotheses as to why there have been variable outcomes, ranging from successful to unsatisfactory, associated with ECM bioscaffold implantation in the skeletal muscle injury microenvironment. PMID:27376561

  11. Regulation of mTOR by mechanically induced signaling events in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Troy Alan; Sukhija, Kunal Balu; Chien, Shu

    2006-07-01

    Mechanical stimuli play a major role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass contributes significantly to disease prevention and the quality of life. Although a link between mechanical stimuli and the regulation of muscle mass has been recognized for decades, the mechanisms involved in converting mechanical information into the molecular events that control this process have not been defined. Nevertheless, significant advancements are being made in this field, and it has recently been established that signaling through a rapamycin-sensitive pathway is necessary for mechanically induced growth of skeletal muscle. Since rapamycin is a highly specific inhibitor of a protein kinase called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), many investigators have concluded that mTOR signaling is necessary for the mechanically induced growth of skeletal muscle. In this review, we have summarized the current knowledge regarding how mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling, discussed the newly discovered role of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this pathway, and considered the potential roles of PLD and PA in the mechanical regulation of skeletal muscle mass. PMID:16855395

  12. The mechanical properties of Drosophila jump muscle expressing wild-type and embryonic Myosin isoforms.

    PubMed

    Eldred, Catherine C; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Koppes, Ryan A; Yang, Chaoxing; Corr, David T; Swank, Douglas M

    2010-04-01

    Transgenic Drosophila are highly useful for structure-function studies of muscle proteins. However, our ability to mechanically analyze transgenically expressed mutant proteins in Drosophila muscles has been limited to the skinned indirect flight muscle preparation. We have developed a new muscle preparation using the Drosophila tergal depressor of the trochanter (TDT or jump) muscle that increases our experimental repertoire to include maximum shortening velocity (V(slack)), force-velocity curves and steady-state power generation; experiments not possible using indirect flight muscle fibers. When transgenically expressing its wild-type myosin isoform (Tr-WT) the TDT is equivalent to a very fast vertebrate muscle. TDT has a V(slack) equal to 6.1 +/- 0.3 ML/s at 15 degrees C, a steep tension-pCa curve, isometric tension of 37 +/- 3 mN/mm(2), and maximum power production at 26% of isometric tension. Transgenically expressing an embryonic myosin isoform in the TDT muscle increased isometric tension 1.4-fold, but decreased V(slack) 50% resulting in no significant difference in maximum power production compared to Tr-WT. Drosophila expressing embryonic myosin jumped <50% as far as Tr-WT that, along with comparisons to frog jump muscle studies, suggests fast muscle shortening velocity is relatively more important than high tension generation for Drosophila jumping. PMID:20371321

  13. Tetanic contraction induces enhancement of fatigability and sarcomeric damage in atrophic skeletal muscle and its underlying molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2013-11-01

    Muscle unloading due to long-term exposure of weightlessness or simulated weightlessness causes atrophy, loss of functional capacity, impaired locomotor coordination, and decreased resistance to fatigue in the antigravity muscles of the lower limbs. Besides reducing astronauts' mobility in space and on returning to a gravity environment, the molecular mechanisms for the adaptation of skeletal muscle to unloading also play an important medical role in conditions such as disuse and paralysis. The tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate the effects of weightlessness on skeletal muscles and to induce muscle unloading in the rat hindlimb. Our series studies have shown that the maximum of twitch tension and the twitch duration decreased significantly in the atrophic soleus muscles, the maximal tension of high-frequency tetanic contraction was significantly reduced in 2-week unloaded soleus muscles, however, the fatigability of high-frequency tetanic contraction increased after one week of unloading. The maximal isometric tension of intermittent tetanic contraction at optimal stimulating frequency did not alter in 1- and 2-week unloaded soleus, but significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus. The 1-week unloaded soleus, but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL), was more susceptible to fatigue during intermittent tetanic contraction than the synchronous controls. The changes in K+ channel characteristics may increase the fatigability during high-frequency tetanic contraction in atrophic soleus muscles. High fatigability of intermittent tetanic contraction may be involved in enhanced activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) and switching from slow to fast isoform of myosin heavy chain, tropomyosin, troponin I and T subunit in atrophic soleus muscles. Unloaded soleus muscle also showed a decreased protein level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and the reduction in nNOS-derived NO increased frequency of calcium sparks and elevated

  14. Mechanical load induces sarcoplasmic wounding and FGF release in differentiated human skeletal muscle cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The transduction mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for converting a mechanical load into a skeletal muscle growth response are unclear. In this study we have used a mechanically active tissue culture model of differentiated human skeletal muscle cells to investigate the relationship between mechanical load, sarcolemma wounding, fibroblast growth factor release, and skeletal muscle cell growth. Using the Flexcell Strain Unit we demonstrate that as mechanical load increases, so too does the amount of sarcolemma wounding. A similar relationship was also observed between the level of mechanical load inflicted on the cells and the amount of bFGF (FGF2) released into the surrounding medium. In addition, we demonstrate that the muscle cell growth response induced by chronic mechanical loading in culture can be inhibited by the presence of an antibody capable of neutralizing the biological activity of FGF. This study provides direct evidence that mechanically induced, sarcolemma wound-mediated FGF release is an important autocrine mechanism for transducing the stimulus of mechanical load into a skeletal muscle growth response.

  15. Bone and skeletal muscle: Key players in mechanotransduction and potential overlapping mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A; Robling, Alexander G

    2015-11-01

    The development and maintenance of skeletal muscle and bone mass is critical for movement, health and issues associated with the quality of life. Skeletal muscle and bone mass are regulated by a variety of factors that include changes in mechanical loading. Moreover, bone mass is, in large part, regulated by muscle-derived mechanical forces and thus by changes in muscle mass/strength. A thorough understanding of the cellular mechanism(s) responsible for mechanotransduction in bone and skeletal muscle is essential for the development of effective exercise and pharmaceutical strategies aimed at increasing, and/or preventing the loss of, mass in these tissues. Thus, in this review we will attempt to summarize the current evidence for the major molecular mechanisms involved in mechanotransduction in skeletal muscle and bone. By examining the differences and similarities in mechanotransduction between these two tissues, it is hoped that this review will stimulate new insights and ideas for future research and promote collaboration between bone and muscle biologists.(1). PMID:26453495

  16. Muscle Regeneration with Intermuscular Adipose Tissue (IMAT) Accumulation Is Modulated by Mechanical Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Brioche, Thomas; Jublanc, Elodie; Bertrand-Gaday, Christelle; Candau, Robin; Dechesne, Claude A.; Dani, Christian; Bonnieu, Anne; Py, Guillaume; Chopard, Angèle

    2015-01-01

    Sports trauma are able to induce muscle injury with fibrosis and accumulation of intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), which affect muscle function. This study was designed to investigate whether hypoactivity would influence IMAT accumulation in regenerating mouse skeletal muscle using the glycerol model of muscle regeneration. The animals were immediately hindlimb unloaded for 21 days after glycerol injection into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Muscle fiber and adipocyte cross-sectional area (CSA) and IMAT accumulation were determined by histomorphometric analysis. Adipogenesis during regenerative processes was examined using RT-qPCR and Western blot quantification. Twenty-one days of hindlimb unloading resulted in decreases of 38% and 50.6% in the muscle weight/body weight ratio and CSA, respectively, in soleus muscle. Glycerol injection into TA induced IMAT accumulation, reaching 3% of control normal-loading muscle area. This IMAT accumulation was largely inhibited in unloading conditions (0.09%) and concomitant with a marked reduction in perilipin and FABP4 protein content, two key markers of mature adipocytes. Induction of PPARγ and C/EBPα mRNA, two markers of adipogenesis, was also decreased. Furthermore, the protein expression of PDGFRα, a cell surface marker of fibro/adipogenic progenitors, was much lower in regenerating TA from the unloaded group. Exposure of regenerating muscle to hypoactivity severely reduces IMAT development and accumulation. These results provide new insight into the mechanisms regulating IMAT development in skeletal muscle and highlight the importance of taking into account the level of mechanical constraint imposed on skeletal muscle during the regeneration processes. PMID:26629696

  17. Fatigue mechanisms in patients with cancer: effects of tumor necrosis factor and exercise on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St Pierre, B. A.; Kasper, C. E.; Lindsey, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue is a common adverse effect of cancer and its therapy. However, the specific mechanisms underlying cancer fatigue are unclear. One physiologic mechanism may involve changes in skeletal muscle protein stores or metabolite concentration. A reduction in skeletal muscle protein stores may result from endogenous tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or from TNF administered as antineoplastic therapy. This muscle wasting would require patients to exert an unusually high amount of effort to generate adequate contractile force during exercise performance or during extended periods of sitting or standing. This additional effort could result in the onset of fatigue. Additionally, cancer fatigue may develop or become exacerbated during exercise as a consequence of changes in the concentration of skeletal muscle metabolites. These biochemical alterations may interfere with force that is produced by the muscle contractile proteins. These physiologic changes may play a role in the decision to include exercise in the rehabilitation plans of patients with cancer. They also may affect ideas about fatigue.

  18. Histochemical and morphometric characteristics of the normal human vastus medialis longus and vastus medialis obliquus muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Travnik, L; Pernus, F; Erzen, I

    1995-01-01

    The histochemical and morphometric characteristics of the vastus medialis longus and vastus medialis obliquus muscles were studied and compared with data on vastus lateralis. Cross-sections of autopsied muscles from 9 healthy men, aged 18-44 y, who had died suddenly were analysed. Data were obtained on proportions, cross-sectional diameter, and on atrophy and hypertrophy factors, of type 1, 2a, 2b, and 2c fibres. The analysis showed that the anatomical differences and the different functional demands placed on vastus medialis longus and vastus medialis obliquus are also expressed in different proportions and sizes of fibre types in the two muscles. The proportion of type 1 fibres was significantly higher (P < 0.01), and the proportion of 2b fibres was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in vastus medialis longus than in vastus medialis obliquus. The diameters of type 1 and type 2a fibres were significantly smaller (P < 0.01) in vastus medialis longus than in vastus medialis obliquus, although the differences were small. Within muscles a nonrandom arrangement of fibre types existed with the deeper portions of the muscles having more type 1 fibres than the more superficial portions. The histochemical and morphometric characteristics of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis obliquus show great similarity, reflecting the common function of both muscles which is taking part in transverse knee stability. Estimates of the limits of normality of the proportion, diameter, atrophy and hypertrophy factors of type 1, 2a, 2b, and 2c fibres might be useful in obtaining information on how different physiological and pathological conditions influence the proportion and size of different fibre types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7592003

  19. Growth and muscle development characteristics of purebred Angus and Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M B; West, R L; Hentges, J F

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-eight purebred bulls (10 to 17 mo of age) were used to determine the effects of breed (Angus or Brahman) and slaughter weight (60, 80, 90 or 100% of the average mature dam's weight for the respective breed) on growth and muscle development characteristics. Angus bulls grazed summer forage after weaning whereas Brahman bulls were fed to simulate gains achieved on forage by Angus. Bulls were then placed in a confinement feedlot for finishing to their appropriate slaughter weight (293, 369, 411, and 469 kg for Angus and 307, 427, 464 and 520 kg for Brahman). No major differences due to breed were found for predicted carcass composition. The LD muscle from Brahman bulls contained more total DNA (2.27 v. 1.19 g), more total protein (768.22 v. 593.59 g) and generally less total lipid (70.56 v. 101.26 g) when expressed on a total muscle (wet tissue) basis. The percentages and areas for all three muscle fiber types were not affected by breed. As carcass weight increased, muscle weights, total protein, lipid, protein:DNA and muscle fiber size for the three fiber types increased. Total DNA content increased only up to the 90% weight group and then leveled off. The percentage of alpha R fibers decreased while the percentage of alpha W fibers increased with increasing carcass weight. These data suggest that slaughtering animals based on a percentage of their dam's mature weight seems to be a practical method for making comparisons of animals on an equivalent compositional basis. Moreover, it appears that histochemical and biochemical evaluations of skeletal muscle can successfully identify what point in the growth cycle an animal is in. PMID:3732867

  20. Characteristics of corticospinal projections to the intrinsic hand muscles in skilled harpists.

    PubMed

    Buick, Alison R; Kennedy, Niamh C; Carson, Richard G

    2016-01-26

    The process of learning to play a musical instrument necessarily alters the functional organisation of the cortical motor areas that are involved in generating the required movements. In the case of the harp, the demands placed on the motor system are quite specific. During performance, all digits with the sole exception of the little finger are used to pluck the strings. With a view to elucidating the impact of having acquired this highly specialised musical skill on the characteristics of corticospinal projections to the intrinsic hand muscles, focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to elicit motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in three muscles (of the left hand): abductor pollicis brevis (APB); first dorsal interosseous (FDI); and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) in seven harpists. Seven non-musicians served as controls. With respect to the FDI muscle-which moves the index finger, the harpists exhibited reliably larger MEP amplitudes than those in the control group. In contrast, MEPs evoked in the ADM muscle-which activates the little finger, were smaller in the harpists than in the non-musicians. The locations on the scalp over which magnetic stimulation elicited discriminable responses in ADM also differed between the harpists and the non-musicians. This specific pattern of variation in the excitability of corticospinal projections to these intrinsic hand muscles exhibited by harpists is in accordance with the idiosyncratic functional demands that are imposed in playing this instrument. PMID:26673887

  1. Skeletal muscle characteristics in 2 year-old race-trained thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Sewell, D A; Harris, R C; Marlin, D J

    1994-05-01

    Skeletal muscle samples were obtained by needle biopsy from two depths of the m. gluteus medius of 50, young race-trained thoroughbred racehorses. Histochemical and biochemical characteristics of the muscle samples were analysed. Fibres were classified as type I, type IIa or type IIb on the basis of the pH dependent lability of the myosin ATPase reaction. The activities of citrate synthase (CS) and glycogen phosphorylase (Phos) were determined. Muscle fibre composition varied markedly between deep and superficial muscle samples and this was reflected in differences in the activities of citrate synthase (CS) and phosphorylase (Phos). CS activity was greater in samples taken from a depth of 90 mm (deep) than those taken from a depth of 40 mm (superficial: 122 +/- 19 compared with 88 +/- 16 mumol/g dry muscle/min at 25 degrees C). Phos activity was greater in superficial samples (137 +/- 20) compared with deep samples (117 +/- 21). Regression analysis was used to estimate the enzyme activities in the different fibre types. No significant correlations were observed between histochemical and biochemical measures and subsequent racing performance. PMID:7915652

  2. Creatine Loading, Resistance Exercise Performance, and Muscle Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Scott W.; Dudley, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether creatine (CR) monohydrate loading would alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with placebo loading in resistance-trained athletes. Overall, CR loading did not provide an ergogenic benefit for the unilateral dynamic knee extension…

  3. Comparison of Muscle Fiber and Meat Quality Characteristics in Different Japanese Quail Lines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. M.; Hwang, S.; Lee, K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the growth performance, fiber characteristics of the pectoralis major muscle, and meat quality characteristics in the heavy weight (HW) and random bred control (RBC) quail lines and genders. The HW male exhibited more than two times greater body (245.7 vs 96.1 g, p<0.05) and pectoralis major muscle (PMW; 37.1 vs 11.1 g, p<0.05) weights compared to the RBC female. This growth performance in the HW line was associated with a greater muscle fiber area (1,502 vs 663.0 μm2, p<0.001) compared to the RBC line. Greater muscle mass of the HW male was accompanied by a higher percentage of type IIB fiber compared to the HW female (64.0% vs 51.0%, p<0.05). However, muscle fiber hyperplasia (increase in fiber number) has had a somewhat limited effect on PMW between the two lines. On the other hand, the HW line harboring a higher proportion of type IIB fiber showed rapid pH decline at the early postmortem period (6.23 vs 6.41, p<0.05) and lighter meat surface (53.5 vs 47.3, p<0.05) compared to the RBC line harboring a lower proportion of type IIB fiber. There were no significant differences observed in the measurement of water-holding capacity including drip loss (2.74% vs 3.07%, p>0.05) and cooking loss (21.9% vs 20.4%, p>0.05) between the HW and RBC lines. Therefore, the HW quail line developed by selection from the RBC quail, was slightly different in the meat quality characteristics compared to the RBC line, and a marked difference was found in growth performance between the two quail lines. PMID:27383804

  4. Mild heat stress enhances differentiation and proliferation of Japanese quail myoblasts and enhances slow muscle fiber characteristics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y M; Chen, P R; Shin, S; Zhang, J; Hwang, S; Lee, K

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of mild heat stress on muscle fiber hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth in quail primary myogenic cells to better understand the mechanisms leading to increased skeletal muscle development in avian embryos incubated at a higher temperature. Compared to control cultures maintained at 37°C, incubation at 39°C enhanced myotube length (P < 0.01) and diameter (P < 0.001) at 3 days after differentiation (D3). This enlargement of the myotubes incubated at 39°C can be explained by differences in the fusion index (56.7 vs. 46.2%, P < 0.05) and nuclei number per myotube (18.1 vs. 10.8, P < 0.001) compared to the control cells at D3. Additionally, a higher density of myotubes at D3 in cultures exposed to a higher temperature were related to higher levels of Pax-7 (P < 0.05) compared to the control cells incubated continuously at 37°C. These results indicated a higher proliferative capacity in cells exposed to mild heat stress compared to the control cells. On the other hand, mild heat stress enhanced protein levels of slow myosin heavy chain isoform (P < 0.01) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (P < 0.01) compared to the control cells at D3. These discrepancies in protein expression indicated maintenance of slow muscle fiber type characteristics in myotubes incubated at 39°C. Our results suggest that mild heat stress plays a significant role in myogenic mechanisms related to muscle mass and development. PMID:27038421

  5. Relative contributions of neural mechanisms versus muscle mechanics in promoting finger extension deficits following stroke.

    PubMed

    Kamper, D G; Harvey, R L; Suresh, S; Rymer, W Z

    2003-09-01

    The origins of impaired finger and hand function were examined in 10 stroke survivors with chronic spastic hemiparesis, with the intent of assessing whether mechanical restraint or altered neurophysiological control mechanisms are responsible for the well-known impairment of finger extension. Simultaneous extension of all four metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of the impaired hand was either externally imposed using a rotary actuator or attempted voluntarily by the subject. Trials were conducted both before and after administration of a local anesthetic, blocking the median and ulnar nerves at the elbow. The anesthetic was administered to reduce the activity of the muscles flexing the MCP joints, in order to distinguish mechanical from neuronal resistance to imposed MCP rotation. We found that the nerve blockade resulted in a reduction in velocity-dependent torque (P = 0.01), thereby indicating significant joint impedance due to spasticity. Blockade also produced a posture-dependent reduction in static torque in declaratively relaxed subjects (P = 0.04), suggesting some tonic flexor activity for specific hand postures. No change in either extensor isometric (P = 0.33) or isokinetic (0.53) torque was apparent, but 3 of the 10 subjects did exhibit substantial (>10 degrees ) improvement in voluntary MCP extension following the blockade. This improvement seemed largely due to a decrease in inappropriate flexor activity during the movement, rather than an increase in extensor activity. We argue that persistent and inappropriate flexor activation plays a role in limiting voluntary finger extension, and that this activation is potentially a reflection of altered supraspinal control of key spinal pathways. In all cases, this inappropriate activation was compounded by weakness, apparent in both the extensor and flexor muscles. PMID:12929190

  6. Mechanical Characterization and Shape Optimization of Fascicle-Like 3D Skeletal Muscle Tissues Contracted with Electrical and Optical Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Neal, Devin; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Bashir, Rashid; Chan, Vincent; Asada, Haruhiko Harry

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we present a quantitative approach to construct effective 3D muscle tissues through shape optimization and load impedance matching with electrical and optical stimulation. We have constructed long, thin, fascicle-like skeletal muscle tissue and optimized its form factor through mechanical characterization. A new apparatus was designed and built, which allowed us to measure force-displacement characteristics with diverse load stiffnesses. We have found that (1) there is an optimal form factor that maximizes the muscle stress, (2) the energy transmitted to the load can be maximized with matched load stiffness, and (3) optical stimulation using channelrhodopsin2 in the muscle tissue can generate a twitch force as large as its electrical counterpart for well-developed muscle tissue. Using our tissue construct method, we found that an optimal initial diameter of 500 μm outperformed tissues using 250 μm by more than 60% and tissues using 760 μm by 105%. Using optimal load stiffness, our tissues have generated 12 pJ of energy per twitch at a peak generated stress of 1.28 kPa. Additionally, the difference in optically stimulated twitch performance versus electrically stimulated is a function of how well the overall tissue performs, with average or better performing strips having less than 10% difference. The unique mechanical characterization method used is generalizable to diverse load conditions and will be used to match load impedance to muscle tissue impedance for a wide variety of applications. PMID:25714129

  7. An integrated muscle mechanic-fluid dynamic model of lamprey swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; Tytell, Eric; Fauci, Lisa

    2009-11-01

    In an effort towards a detailed understanding of the generation and control of vertebrate locomotion, including the role of the CPG and its interactions with reflexive feedback, muscle mechanics, and external fluid dynamics, we study a simple vertebrate, the lamprey. Lamprey body undulations are a result of a wave of neural activation that passes from head to tail, causing a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are mediated by passive structural forces. We present recent results from a model that fully couples a viscous, incompressible fluid with nonlinear muscle mechanics. We measure the dependence of the phase lag between activation wave and mechanical wave as a function of model parameters, such as body stiffness and muscle strength. Simulation results are compared to experiments utilizing both real and synthetic lamprey.

  8. Mechanisms Regulating Neuromuscular Junction Development and Function and Causes of Muscle Wasting.

    PubMed

    Tintignac, Lionel A; Brenner, Hans-Rudolf; Rüegg, Markus A

    2015-07-01

    The neuromuscular junction is the chemical synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibers. It is designed to reliably convert the action potential from the presynaptic motor neuron into the contraction of the postsynaptic muscle fiber. Diseases that affect the neuromuscular junction may cause failure of this conversion and result in loss of ambulation and respiration. The loss of motor input also causes muscle wasting as muscle mass is constantly adapted to contractile needs by the balancing of protein synthesis and protein degradation. Finally, neuromuscular activity and muscle mass have a major impact on metabolic properties of the organisms. This review discusses the mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction, the consequences of and the mechanisms involved in its dysfunction, and its role in maintaining muscle mass during aging. As life expectancy is increasing, loss of muscle mass during aging, called sarcopenia, has emerged as a field of high medical need. Interestingly, aging is also accompanied by structural changes at the neuromuscular junction, suggesting that the mechanisms involved in neuromuscular junction maintenance might be disturbed during aging. In addition, there is now evidence that behavioral paradigms and signaling pathways that are involved in longevity also affect neuromuscular junction stability and sarcopenia. PMID:26109340

  9. Gamma-sarcoglycan is required for the response of archvillin to mechanical stimulation in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Smith, Tara C.; Liu, Min; Luna, Elizabeth J.; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of gamma-sarcoglycan (γ-SG) induces muscle degeneration and signaling defects in response to mechanical load, and its absence is common to both Duchenne and limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Growing evidence suggests that aberrant signaling contributes to the disease pathology; however, the mechanisms of γ-SG-mediated mechanical signaling are poorly understood. To uncover γ-SG signaling pathway components, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and identified the muscle-specific protein archvillin as a γ-SG and dystrophin interacting protein. Archvillin protein and message levels were significantly upregulated at the sarcolemma of murine γ-SG-null (gsg−/−) muscle but delocalized in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscle. Similar elevation of archvillin protein was observed in human quadriceps muscle lacking γ-SG. Reintroduction of γ-SG in gsg−/− muscle by rAAV injection restored archvillin levels to that of control C57 muscle. In situ eccentric contraction of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from C57 mice caused ERK1/2 phosphorylation, nuclear activation of P-ERK1/2 and stimulus-dependent archvillin association with P-ERK1/2. In contrast, TA muscles from gsg−/− and mdx mice exhibited heightened P-ERK1/2 and increased nuclear P-ERK1/2 localization following eccentric contractions, but the archvillin–P-ERK1/2 association was completely ablated. These results position archvillin as a mechanically sensitive component of the dystrophin complex and demonstrate that signaling defects caused by loss of γ-SG occur both at the sarcolemma and in the nucleus. PMID:25605665

  10. Molecular mechanisms and therapeutics of the deficit in specific force in ageing skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Delbono, Osvaldo

    2002-01-01

    The age-related impairment in muscle force is only partially explained by the loss of muscle mass. The loss both in specific and absolute forces contributes to the muscle weakness measured in the elderly and in animal models of ageing. Successful interventions aimed at preventing age-associated functional deficits will require a better insight into the mechanisms underlying the decline in muscle-specific force. The present review article is focused on recent evidence supporting excitation-contraction uncoupling as a key factor underlying fast and slow muscle fiber impairment with ageing. The molecular, functional and structural factors supporting this theory and counteracting measures such as insulin-like growth factor 1 transgenic overexpression are discussed. PMID:12237563

  11. Use of flow, electrical, and mechanical stimulation to promote engineering of striated muscles

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Swathi; Madden, Lauran; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering involves design of high-fidelity tissue substitutes for predictive experimental assays in vitro and cell-based regenerative therapies in vivo. Design of striated muscle tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, has been particularly challenging due to a high metabolic demand and complex cellular organization and electromechanical function of the native tissues. Successful engineering of highly functional striated muscles may thus require creation of biomimetic culture conditions involving medium perfusion, electrical and mechanical stimulation. When optimized, these external cues are expected to synergistically and dynamically activate important intracellular signaling pathways leading to accelerated muscle growth and development. This review will discuss the use of different types of tissue culture bioreactors aimed at providing conditions for enhanced structural and functional maturation of engineered striated muscles. PMID:24366526

  12. Mechanisms of Muscle Denervation in Aging: Insights from a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kevin H.J

    2015-01-01

    Muscle denervation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is thought to be a contributing factor in age-related muscle weakness. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that modulate NMJ innervation is a key to developing therapies to combat age-related muscle weakness affecting the elderly. Two mouse models, one lacking the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene and another harboring the transgenic mutant human SOD1 gene, display progressive changes at the NMJ, including muscle endplate fragmentation, nerve terminal sprouting, and denervation. These changes at the NMJ share many of the common features observed in the NMJs of aged mice. In this review, research findings demonstrating the effects of PGC-1α, IGF-1, GDNF, MyoD, myogenin, and miR-206 on NMJ innervation patterns in the G93A SOD1 mice will be highlighted in the context of age-related muscle denervation. PMID:26425392

  13. Gene expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat papillary muscle. Rapid induction by mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Jarygin, C; Hänze, J; Lang, R E

    1994-06-13

    The effect of mechanical stretch on protein synthesis and the expression of the gene for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was examined in electrically paced, isolated papillary muscles from rat heart. Incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into protein increased only in stretched but not in unloaded muscles. Five hours of stretching increased ANP mRNA levels more than threefold as compared to freshly excised papillary muscles. A drastic fall in ANP mRNA levels was observed in unloaded muscles over this time. These data indicate that papillary muscles similar to other ventricular tissue are capable of activating ANP gene expression in response to increased load. The effect occurs in vitro and does not depend on circulating or nervous factors. The unexpected rapid induction of ANP gene expression in such a particular structure of the heart raises the possibility of local actions of ventricular ANP. PMID:8013631

  14. Effect of sex on growth, technological and organoleptic characteristics of the Muscovy duck breast muscle.

    PubMed

    Baeza, E; Salichon, M R; Marche, G; Juin, H

    1998-07-01

    1. The aim of our study was to analyse the consequences of sexual dimorphism on muscular growth and on technological and organoleptic characteristics of breast muscle. Ten males and 10 females of the R51 line (Grimaud) were weighed every fortnight, from 1-d-old to 15 weeks of age, and then slaughtered. Four muscles, Sartorius (SART), Anterior and Posterior latissimus dorsi (ALD, PLD), Pectoralis major (PM) were removed and weighed. The activities of 3 enzymes (citrate synthase, beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase) which indicate muscular metabolic activity were assayed. pH value, colour and juice loss of breast muscle were measured on ducks slaughtered between 8 and 15 weeks of age. Sensory analysis, (tastes) was also carried out. 2. At 15 weeks of age, males weighed 4573 g and females 2879 g. Muscle weight and muscular glycolytic activity increased regularly with age. Females showed earlier muscular growth. Sexual dimorphism had a significant effect on muscular growth from 6 weeks of age for ALD, 8 weeks of age for PLD and SART and 10 weeks of age for PM. 3. With age, breasts became redder and darker. The post-mortem fall of pH and juice loss after 24 h of storage at 4 degrees C increased. Females displayed more precocious muscular maturity. The changes in organoleptic characteristics showed a decrease in tenderness, juiciness and mellowness and an increase in flavour and stringiness with age. At any given age, female breast muscles appeared less tender, less juicy and less mellow but had a more intense flavour and seemed more stringy than those of males. PMID:9693821

  15. Thunniform swimming: muscle dynamics and mechanical power production of aerobic fibres in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares).

    PubMed

    Shadwick, Robert E; Syme, Douglas A

    2008-05-01

    We studied the mechanical properties of deep red aerobic muscle of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), using both in vivo and in vitro methods. In fish swimming in a water tunnel at 1-3 L s(-1) (where L is fork length), muscle length changes were recorded by sonomicrometry, and activation timing was quantified by electromyography. In some fish a tendon buckle was also implanted on the caudal tendon to measure instantaneous muscle forces transmitted to the tail. Between measurement sites at 0.45 to 0.65 L, the wave of muscle shortening progressed along the body at a relatively high velocity of 1.7 L per tail beat period, and a significant phase shift (31+/-4 degrees ) occurred between muscle shortening and local midline curvature, both suggesting red muscle power is directed posteriorly, rather than causing local body bending, which is a hallmark of thunniform swimming. Muscle activation at 0.53 L was initiated at about 50 degrees of the tail beat period and ceased at about 160 degrees , where 90 degrees is peak muscle length and 180 degrees is minimum length. Strain amplitude in the deep red fibres at 0.5 L was +/-5.4%, double that predicted from midline curvature analysis. Work and power production were measured in isolated bundles of red fibres from 0.5 L by the work loop technique. Power was maximal at 3-4 Hz and fell to less than 50% of maximum after 6 Hz. Based on the timing of activation, muscle strain, tail beat frequencies and forces in the caudal tendon while swimming, we conclude that yellowfin tuna, like skipjack, use their red muscles under conditions that produce near-maximal power output while swimming. Interestingly, the red muscles of yellowfin tuna are slower than those of skipjack, which corresponds with the slower tail beat frequencies and cruising speeds in yellowfin. PMID:18456888

  16. Skeletal muscle atrophy: Potential therapeutic agents and their mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Vikas; Gupta, Sanjeev; Dabur, Rajesh; Injeti, Elisha; Mittal, Ashwani

    2015-09-01

    Over the last two decades, new insights into the etiology of skeletal muscle wasting/atrophy under diverse clinical settings including denervation, AIDS, cancer, diabetes, and chronic heart failure have been reported in the literature. However, the treatment of skeletal muscle wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. About nineteen potential drugs that can regulate loss of muscle mass have been reported in the literature. This paper reviews the mechanisms of action of all these drugs by broadly classifying them into six different categories. Mechanistic data of these drugs illustrate that they regulate skeletal muscle loss either by down-regulating myostatin, cyclooxygenase2, pro-inflammatory cytokines mediated catabolic wasting or by up-regulating cyclic AMP, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor1, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/protein kinase B(Akt) mediated anabolic pathways. So far, five major proteolytic systems that regulate loss of muscle mass have been identified, but the majority of these drugs control only two or three proteolytic systems. In addition to their beneficial effect on restoring the muscle loss, many of these drugs show some level of toxicity and unwanted side effects such as dizziness, hypertension, and constipation. Therefore, further research is needed to understand and develop treatment strategies for muscle wasting. For successful management of skeletal muscle wasting either therapeutic agent which regulates all five known proteolytic systems or new molecular targets/proteolytic systems must be identified. PMID:26048279

  17. Fatty Infiltration of Skeletal Muscle: Mechanisms and Comparisons with Bone Marrow Adiposity.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Mark W; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Frechette, Danielle M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle and bone share common embryological origins from mesodermal cell populations and also display common growth trajectories early in life. Moreover, muscle and bone are both mechanoresponsive tissues, and the mass and strength of both tissues decline with age. The decline in muscle and bone strength that occurs with aging is accompanied in both cases by an accumulation of adipose tissue. In bone, adipocyte (AC) accumulation occurs in the marrow cavities of long bones and is known to increase with estrogen deficiency, mechanical unloading, and exposure to glucocorticoids. The factors leading to accumulation of intra- and intermuscular fat (myosteatosis) are less well understood, but recent evidence indicates that increases in intramuscular fat are associated with disuse, altered leptin signaling, sex steroid deficiency, and glucocorticoid treatment, factors that are also implicated in bone marrow adipogenesis. Importantly, accumulation of ACs in skeletal muscle and accumulation of intramyocellular lipid are linked to loss of muscle strength, reduced insulin sensitivity, and increased mortality among the elderly. Resistance exercise and whole body vibration can prevent fatty infiltration in skeletal muscle and also improve muscle strength. Therapeutic strategies to prevent myosteatosis may improve muscle function and reduce fall risk in the elderly, potentially impacting the incidence of bone fracture. PMID:27379021

  18. Mechanisms underlying impaired GLUT-4 translocation in glycogen-supercompensated muscles of exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Kawanaka, K; Nolte, L A; Han, D H; Hansen, P A; Holloszy, J O

    2000-12-01

    Exercise training induces an increase in GLUT-4 in muscle. We previously found that feeding rats a high-carbohydrate diet after exercise, with muscle glycogen supercompensation, results in a decrease in insulin responsiveness so severe that it masks the effect of a training-induced twofold increase in GLUT-4 on insulin-stimulated muscle glucose transport. One purpose of this study was to determine whether insulin signaling is impaired. Maximally insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase activity was not significantly reduced, whereas protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation was approximately 50% lower (P < 0.01) in muscles of chow-fed, than in those of fasted, exercise-trained rats. Our second purpose was to determine whether contraction-stimulated glucose transport is also impaired. The stimulation of glucose transport and the increase in cell surface GLUT-4 induced by contractions were both decreased by approximately 65% in glycogen-supercompensated muscles of trained rats. The contraction-stimulated increase in AMP kinase activity, which has been implicated in the activation of glucose transport by contractions, was approximately 80% lower in the muscles of the fed compared with the fasted rats 18 h after exercise. These results show that both the insulin- and contraction-stimulated pathways for muscle glucose transport activation are impaired in glycogen-supercompensated muscles and provide insight regarding possible mechanisms. PMID:11093919

  19. Fatty Infiltration of Skeletal Muscle: Mechanisms and Comparisons with Bone Marrow Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Mark W.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Frechette, Danielle M.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle and bone share common embryological origins from mesodermal cell populations and also display common growth trajectories early in life. Moreover, muscle and bone are both mechanoresponsive tissues, and the mass and strength of both tissues decline with age. The decline in muscle and bone strength that occurs with aging is accompanied in both cases by an accumulation of adipose tissue. In bone, adipocyte (AC) accumulation occurs in the marrow cavities of long bones and is known to increase with estrogen deficiency, mechanical unloading, and exposure to glucocorticoids. The factors leading to accumulation of intra- and intermuscular fat (myosteatosis) are less well understood, but recent evidence indicates that increases in intramuscular fat are associated with disuse, altered leptin signaling, sex steroid deficiency, and glucocorticoid treatment, factors that are also implicated in bone marrow adipogenesis. Importantly, accumulation of ACs in skeletal muscle and accumulation of intramyocellular lipid are linked to loss of muscle strength, reduced insulin sensitivity, and increased mortality among the elderly. Resistance exercise and whole body vibration can prevent fatty infiltration in skeletal muscle and also improve muscle strength. Therapeutic strategies to prevent myosteatosis may improve muscle function and reduce fall risk in the elderly, potentially impacting the incidence of bone fracture. PMID:27379021

  20. Mechanical Characteristics of Composite Knitted Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Takanori Shomura, Yuzo; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    We used metal wires and fibers to fabricate a composite knitted stent and then compare the mechanical characteristics of this stent with those of a pure metallic stent of the same construction in order to develop a stent that offers a comparable degree of expandability as metallic stents but can be used for highly curved lesions that cannot be treated using metallic stents. We fabricated two types of composite knitted stent (N-Z stents), using nitinol wire with a diameter of 0.12 mm and polypara-phenylene-benzobisoxazole (PBO) multifilament fiber (Zyron AS; Toyobo, Osaka, Japan). Stents were knitted into a cylindrical shape using the same textile pattern as a Strecker stent. Two loop lengths (L) of nitinol wire were used in the N-Z stents: L = 1.84 mm (N-Z stent L = 1.84) and L = 2.08 mm (N-Z stent L = 2.08). For the sake of comparison, we fabricated a metallic stent of nitinol using the same textile pattern (N-N stent L = 1.92). We applied a radial compression force diametrically to each stent and applied a bending force diametrically at the free end of a stent with one end fixed in order to evaluate the relationship between stent elasticity and load values. In addition, we macroscopically evaluated the generation of kinks when the stent was bent 180{sup o}. The radial compressive force when the stent diameter was reduced by 53% was 6.44 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 1.84, 6.14 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 4.96 N in the case of N-N stent L = 1.92 mm. The composite stent had a radial compressive force higher than that of a metallic stent. The restoring force to longitudinal direction at a 90{sup o} bending angle was 0.005 N for N-Z stent L = 1.84, 0.003 N for N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 0.034 N for N-N stent L = 1.92. The restoring force of the composite stent was significantly lower. Finally, the composite stent generated no definitive kinks at a bending angle of 180{sup o}, regardless of loop length. However, the N-N stent clearly produced kinks, causing

  1. Evaluation of Meat Color and Physiochemical Characteristics in Forequarter Muscles of Holstein Steers.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Sil; Seong, Pil-Nam; Jeong, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    The beef forequarter muscle comprises approximately 52% of carcass weight. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physiochemical characteristics and meat color from forequarter muscle of Holstein steers. Fifteen forequarter muscles were trimmed of external connective tissue and fat. An experimental group of eight Holstein steers was assessed using meat color, water-holding capacity, drip loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force value at the same quality grade. The M. omotransversarius (0.45 kg) had the highest (p<0.05) lightness (L*) value, whereas the M. teres major (0.4 kg) and M. triceps brachii (caput laterale) (0.52 kg) had the lowest (p<0.05) values. The M. semispanitus capitus (1.48 kg), which is a neck muscle, had the highest values for both redness (a*) and yellowness (b*), whereas the lowest (p<0.05) values were for the M. teres major. The M. omotransversarius, M. latissimus dorsi (1.68 kg), and M. rhomboideus (1.2 kg) were ranked high (p<0.05) in water-holding capacity. The drip loss value was the highest for the M. longissimus dorsi thoracis (p<0.05; 1.86 kg), while the M. infraspinatus (2.28 kg), M. supraspinatus (1.38 kg), M. brachiocephalicus (1.01 kg), and M. pectoralis superficialis (1.18 kg) had the lowest (p<0.05). The Warner-Bratzler shear force value indicated that the M. pectoralis profundus (3.39 kg), M. omotransversarius, and M. brachiocephalicus were the toughest (p<0.05), whereas the M. subscapularis (0.86 kg), M. longissimus dorsi thoracis, M. teres major, and M. infraspinatus were the most tender cuts (p<0.05). Here, muscle type explained most of the variability in the forequarter physiochemical characteristics. Thus, our findings suggest that these muscle profile data will allow for more informed decisions when selecting individual muscles to produce value-added products from Holstein steers. PMID:26761893

  2. Evaluation of Meat Color and Physiochemical Characteristics in Forequarter Muscles of Holstein Steers

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung Sil

    2015-01-01

    The beef forequarter muscle comprises approximately 52% of carcass weight. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physiochemical characteristics and meat color from forequarter muscle of Holstein steers. Fifteen forequarter muscles were trimmed of external connective tissue and fat. An experimental group of eight Holstein steers was assessed using meat color, water-holding capacity, drip loss, and Warner–Bratzler shear force value at the same quality grade. The M. omotransversarius (0.45 kg) had the highest (p<0.05) lightness (L*) value, whereas the M. teres major (0.4 kg) and M. triceps brachii (caput laterale) (0.52 kg) had the lowest (p<0.05) values. The M. semispanitus capitus (1.48 kg), which is a neck muscle, had the highest values for both redness (a*) and yellowness (b*), whereas the lowest (p<0.05) values were for the M. teres major. The M. omotransversarius, M. latissimus dorsi (1.68 kg), and M. rhomboideus (1.2 kg) were ranked high (p<0.05) in water-holding capacity. The drip loss value was the highest for the M. longissimus dorsi thoracis (p<0.05; 1.86 kg), while the M. infraspinatus (2.28 kg), M. supraspinatus (1.38 kg), M. brachiocephalicus (1.01 kg), and M. pectoralis superficialis (1.18 kg) had the lowest (p<0.05). The Warner–Bratzler shear force value indicated that the M. pectoralis profundus (3.39 kg), M. omotransversarius, and M. brachiocephalicus were the toughest (p<0.05), whereas the M. subscapularis (0.86 kg), M. longissimus dorsi thoracis, M. teres major, and M. infraspinatus were the most tender cuts (p<0.05). Here, muscle type explained most of the variability in the forequarter physiochemical characteristics. Thus, our findings suggest that these muscle profile data will allow for more informed decisions when selecting individual muscles to produce value-added products from Holstein steers. PMID:26761893

  3. Dysferlin function in skeletal muscle: Possible pathological mechanisms and therapeutical targets in dysferlinopathies.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Ana M; González-Jamett, Arlek M; Cea, Luis A; Bevilacqua, Jorge A; Caviedes, Pablo

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene are linked to a group of muscular dystrophies known as dysferlinopathies. These myopathies are characterized by progressive atrophy. Studies in muscle tissue from dysferlinopathy patients or dysferlin-deficient mice point out its importance in membrane repair. However, expression of dysferlin homologous proteins that restore sarcolemma repair function in dysferlinopathy animal models fail to arrest muscle wasting, therefore suggesting that dysferlin plays other critical roles in muscle function. In the present review, we discuss dysferlin functions in the skeletal muscle, as well as pathological mechanisms related to dysferlin mutations. Particular focus is presented related the effect of dysferlin on cell membrane related function, which affect its repair, vesicle trafficking, as well as Ca(2+) homeostasis. Such mechanisms could provide accessible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:27349407

  4. Description of Peripheral Muscle Strength Measurement and Correlates of Muscle Weakness in Patients Receiving Prolonged Mechanical Ventilatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Chlan, Linda L.; Tracy, Mary Fran; Guttormson, Jill; Savik, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Background Intensive Care Unit Acquired Weakness (ICUAW) is a frequent complication of critical illness due to immobility and prolonged mechanical ventilatory support. Objectives To describe daily peripheral muscle strength measurement in ventilated patients and explore relationships among factors that influence ICUAW. Methods Peripheral muscle strength of 120 ventilated ICU patients (mean age 59.8 ± 15.1; 51% female; APACHE III 61.3 ± 20.7; ICU stay 10.6 ± 8.6 days) was measured daily using a standardized hand grip dynamometry protocol. Three grip measurements for each hand were recorded in pounds-force; the mean of these three assessments was used in the analysis. Correlates of ICUAW were analyzed with mixed models to explore their relationship to grip strength (age, gender, illness severity, length of ventilatory support, medications). Results Median baseline grip strength was variable yet diminished (7.7; 0-102) with either a pattern of diminishing grip strength or maintenance of the baseline low grip strength over time. Controlling for days on protocol, female gender [β = −10.4(2.5); p = <.001], age [= −.24(.08); p = .004], and days receiving ventilatory support [= −.34(.12); p = .005] explained a significant amount of variance in grip strength over time. Conclusions Patients receiving prolonged periods of mechanical ventilatory support in this sample show marked decrements in grip strength measured by hand dynamometry, a marker for peripheral muscle strength. Hand dynamometry is a reliable method to measure muscle strength in cooperative ICU patients and can be used in future research to ultimately develop interventions to prevent ICUAW. PMID:26523017

  5. Biceps femoris and semitendinosus—teammates or competitors? New insights into hamstring injury mechanisms in male football players: a muscle functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Schuermans, Joke; Van Tiggelen, Damien; Danneels, Lieven; Witvrouw, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background The hamstring injury mechanism was assessed by investigating the exercise-related metabolic activity characteristics of the hamstring muscles using a muscle functional MRI (mfMRI) protocol. Methods 27 healthy male football players and 27 football players with a history of hamstring injuries (recovered and playing fully) underwent standardised mfMR Imaging. The mfMRI protocol consisted of a resting scan, a strenuous bilateral eccentric hamstring exercise and a postexercise scan. The exercise-related T2 increase or the signal intensity shift between both scans was used to detect differences in metabolic activation characteristics (1) between the different hamstring muscle bellies and (2) between the injury group and the control group. Results A more symmetrical muscle recruitment pattern corresponding to a less economic hamstring muscle activation was demonstrated in the formerly injured group (p<0.05). The injured group also demonstrated a significantly lower strength endurance capacity during the eccentric hamstring exercise. Conclusions These findings suggest that the vulnerability of the hamstring muscles to football-related injury is related to the complexity and close coherence in the synergistic muscle recruitment of the biceps femoris and the semitendinosus. Discrete differences in neuromuscular coordination and activity distribution, with the biceps femoris partly having to compensate for the lack of endurance capacity of the semitendinosus, probably increase the hamstring injury risk. PMID:25388959

  6. Load characteristics of mechanical pectoral fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Kato, Naomi; Suzumori, Koichi

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes the use of a three-motor driven mechanical pectoral fin as a new device for maneuvering and stabilizing an underwater vehicle. The mechanical pectoral fin consists of three servomotors generating feathering, rowing, and flapping motions. The load properties are analyzed experimentally. The mechanical pectoral fin can generate a control load in three dimensions. The effect of flexibility of the fin on the load is also investigated experimentally.

  7. Disparity of dietary effects on collagen characteristics and toughness between two beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Archile-Contreras, A C; Mandell, I B; Purslow, P P

    2010-10-01

    Manipulation of growth rate and/or diet has been shown to affect protein turnover and may be used to improve beef quality. This trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of average daily gain (ADG) and diet on animal performance, collagen characteristics and beef quality of two different muscles; longissimus dorsi (LD) and semitendinosus (ST). Seventy six Hereford and Angus steers were assigned to three dietary management regimens for finishing: high grain diet based on corn (n=28), alfalfa pasture (n=22) and grass pasture (n=26). Average daily gains were greater (P<0.001) in Herefords vs. Angus and for corn- vs. pasture finished cattle. Overall, total collagen content was greater (P<0.001) and the percentage of total collagen that was heat soluble was lower (P<0.0001) for ST than for LD muscle. The lowest (P<0.05) values for both total and heat soluble collagens were found in animals finished on corn. WBSF values for LD were greater (P<0.01) in grass-fed vs. alfalfa- and grain-finished cattle while there was no difference in WBSF values for ST between grass- and corn-fed animals. No correlation between ADG and WBSF was observed for any muscle. ADG was not correlated with collagen solubility in ST, but was correlated (P<0.05) with collagen solubility in LD. A key finding is that growth rate affected heat soluble collagen in the two muscles to a different extent. In conclusion, this study shows that different feeding strategies may not influence the tenderness of all muscles in a similar way. PMID:20646835

  8. A case of MELAS associated with histochemical findings of muscles characteristic of MERRF.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidefumi; Ono, Michio; Kojima, Yasuhiro; Kanda, Masutaro; Shibasaki, Hiroshi; Oki, Mituaki; Nakano, Satoshi

    2016-03-30

    We here report a 39-year-old woman of short stature with sensorineural deafness, who suddenly developed status epilepticus. T2-weighed image of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a high signal lesion in the left temporal area, the distribution of which was not compatible with any particular arterial supply. Lactate and pyruvate were elevated in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. As the mitochondrial gene analysis revealed the m.3243A>G mutation, diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) was made. In the histochemical study of a biopsied muscle, the intramuscular blood vessels reacted strongly with SDH (SSV), but the SSV was negative for cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the findings characteristic of myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF). This is the first case of MELAS in which the muscle histochemistry showed positive SSV unassociated with increased COX. PMID:26960269

  9. A Novel Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterase, GDE5, Controls Skeletal Muscle Development via a Non-enzymatic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Yuri; Ohshima, Noriyasu; Yoshizawa, Ikumi; Kamei, Yasutomi; Mariggiò, Stefania; Okamoto, Keiko; Maeda, Masahiro; Nogusa, Yoshihito; Fujioka, Yuichiro; Izumi, Takashi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Wada, Masanobu; Kato, Norihisa; Corda, Daniela; Yanaka, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases (GP-PDEs) have been identified recently and shown to be implicated in several physiological functions. This study isolated a novel GP-PDE, GDE5, and showed that GDE5 selectively hydrolyzes glycerophosphocholine (GroPCho) and controls skeletal muscle development. We show that GDE5 expression was reduced in atrophied skeletal muscles in mice and that decreasing GDE5 abundance promoted myoblastic differentiation, suggesting that decreased GDE5 expression has a counter-regulatory effect on the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy. Forced expression of full-length GDE5 in cultured myoblasts suppressed myogenic differentiation. Unexpectedly, a truncated GDE5 construct (GDE5ΔC471), which contained a GP-PDE sequence identified in other GP-PDEs but lacked GroPCho phosphodiesterase activity, showed a similar inhibitory effect. Furthermore, transgenic mice specifically expressing GDE5ΔC471 in skeletal muscle showed less skeletal muscle mass, especially type II fiber-rich muscle. These results indicate that GDE5 negatively regulates skeletal muscle development even without GroPCho phosphodiesterase activity, providing novel insight into the biological significance of mammalian GP-PDE function in a non-enzymatic mechanism. PMID:20576599

  10. Fear responses and postmortem muscle characteristics of turkeys of two genetic lines.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, M A; Lee, H C; Kang, I; Swanson, J C

    2015-09-01

    Commercial turkey production has increased greatly in recent decades. Along with increased production, problems with turkey meat quality have also increased. Research with other species has demonstrated that differences in meat quality exist among pigs and cattle differing in characteristics such as fearfulness. However, associations between fear responses and postmortem (PM) muscle characteristics related to the meat quality of turkeys have not been examined. This study evaluated the test-retest repeatability of responses of male commercial (COMM) and randombred (RB) turkeys in an open field (OF) test, which is used to assess fear and activity levels of poultry. Another objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between behavioral OF responses and PM breast muscle characteristics (pH and R-value) that are related to meat quality. Thirdly, this study evaluated differences in pH and R-value between the turkey lines. Male COMM and RB turkeys were each housed in groups in 4 pens. Turkeys were individually tested in an OF (2.74×2.74 m, divided into 81 squares) at 1, 4, and 11 wk (COMM N=27; RB N=33). Turkeys were then grouped into clusters based on a cluster analysis of OF behavior. Turkeys were processed and meat quality characteristics were evaluated at 15-17 wk for COMM and 20-21 wk for RB turkeys. Results were analyzed using a mixed model (SAS 9.4). Breast muscle pH and R-value did not differ between genetic lines, and there were no differences in pH and R-value among clusters within genetic lines. These findings suggest that OF responses measured during rearing are not related to PM breast muscle pH and R-value, which ultimately affect meat quality. Further research is needed to assess whether other types of fear responses are associated with meat quality and whether differences in R-value between genetic lines are associated with differences in other meat quality characteristics. PMID:26195807

  11. The role of skeletal-muscle-based thermogenic mechanisms in vertebrate endothermy.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Leslie A; Bal, Naresh C; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-11-01

    Thermogenesis is one of the most important homeostatic mechanisms that evolved during vertebrate evolution. Despite its importance for the survival of the organism, the mechanistic details behind various thermogenic processes remain incompletely understood. Although heat production from muscle has long been recognized as a thermogenic mechanism, whether muscle can produce heat independently of contraction remains controversial. Studies in birds and mammals suggest that skeletal muscle can be an important site of non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) and can be recruited during cold adaptation, although unequivocal evidence is lacking. Much research on thermogenesis during the last two decades has been focused on brown adipose tissue (BAT). These studies clearly implicate BAT as an important site of NST in mammals, in particular in newborns and rodents. However, BAT is either absent, as in birds and pigs, or is only a minor component, as in adult large mammals including humans, bringing into question the BAT-centric view of thermogenesis. This review focuses on the evolution and emergence of various thermogenic mechanisms in vertebrates from fish to man. A careful analysis of the existing data reveals that muscle was the earliest facultative thermogenic organ to emerge in vertebrates, long before the appearance of BAT in eutherian mammals. Additionally, these studies suggest that muscle-based thermogenesis is the dominant mechanism of heat production in many species including birds, marsupials, and certain mammals where BAT-mediated thermogenesis is absent or limited. We discuss the relevance of our recent findings showing that uncoupling of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) by sarcolipin (SLN), resulting in futile cycling and increased heat production, could be the basis for NST in skeletal muscle. The overall goal of this review is to highlight the role of skeletal muscle as a thermogenic organ and provide a balanced view of thermogenesis in

  12. The role of skeletal-muscle-based thermogenic mechanisms in vertebrate endothermy

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Leslie A.; Bal, Naresh C.; Periasamy, Muthu

    2016-01-01

    Thermogenesis is one of the most important homeostatic mechanisms that evolved during vertebrate evolution. Despite its importance for the survival of the organism, the mechanistic details behind various thermogenic processes remain incompletely understood. Although heat production from muscle has long been recognized as a thermogenic mechanism, whether muscle can produce heat independently of contraction remains controversial. Studies in birds and mammals suggest that skeletal muscle can be an important site of non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) and can be recruited during cold adaptation, although unequivocal evidence is lacking. Much research on thermogenesis during the last two decades has been focused on brown adipose tissue (BAT). These studies clearly implicate BAT as an important site of NST in mammals, in particular in newborns and rodents. However, BAT is either absent, as in birds and pigs, or is only a minor component, as in adult large mammals including humans, bringing into question the BAT-centric view of thermogenesis. This review focuses on the evolution and emergence of various thermogenic mechanisms in vertebrates from fish to man. A careful analysis of the existing data reveals that muscle was the earliest facultative thermogenic organ to emerge in vertebrates, long before the appearance of BAT in eutherian mammals. Additionally, these studies suggest that muscle-based thermogenesis is the dominant mechanism of heat production in many species including birds, marsupials, and certain mammals where BAT-mediated thermogenesis is absent or limited. We discuss the relevance of our recent findings showing that uncoupling of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) by sarcolipin (SLN), resulting in futile cycling and increased heat production, could be the basis for NST in skeletal muscle. The overall goal of this review is to highlight the role of skeletal muscle as a thermogenic organ and provide a balanced view of thermogenesis in vertebrates

  13. Concept, Characteristics and Defending Mechanism of Worms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yong; Luo, Jiaqing; Xiao, Bin; Wei, Guiyi

    Worms are a common phenomenon in today's Internet and cause tens of billions of dollars in damages to businesses around the world each year. This article first presents various concepts related to worms, and then classifies the existing worms into four types- Internet worms, P2P worms, email worms and IM (Instant Messaging) worms, based on the space in which a worm finds a victim target. The Internet worm is the focus of this article. We identify the characteristics of Internet worms in terms of their target finding strategy, propagation method and anti-detection capability. Then, we explore state-of-the-art worm detection and worm containment schemes. This article also briefly presents the characteristics, defense methods and related research work of P2P worms, email worms and IM worms. Nowadays, defense against worms remains largely an open problem. In the end of this article, we outline some future directions on the worm research.

  14. Mechanical Impedance of the Non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External–Internal direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc.) capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0–30 Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0–1 Hz) was determined as 4.9 ± 0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8 ± 0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance shows that the estimated values for the stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different. PMID:26697424

  15. Physical characteristics as predictors of quadriceps muscle isometric strength: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hamzat, T K

    2001-09-01

    This one-group experimental study was carried out to investigate the relationship between isometric strength of quadriceps femoris muscle group and physical characteristics of subjects namely: age; weight; and height. Prediction equations were also derived for quadriceps isometric strength from these physical characteristics. Fifty volunteer, right-legged healthy normal male subjects participated in the study. They were aged between 19 and 27 years. The subjects had no previous history of neuromuscular and skeletal injuries to the lower limbs. Their ages, height and weight were measured in years, centimeters and kilograms, respectively. Quadriceps isometric strength was measured using an adapted cable tensiometer (ACT) and recorded in kilogramforce (kgf). Pearson's product correlation co-efficient (r) was used to study the relationship between quadriceps strength and each of age, height and weight. Linear and multiple regression analyses were also carried out. The result showed a high and positive Pearson's moment correlation coefficient (r) between quadriceps isometric strength and each of weight and height. A positive but low correlation (r) was also found between age and quadriceps isometric strength. Prediction equations were also derived from the linear and regression analyses. The study concluded that there was linear relationship between the physical characteristics and quadriceps isometric strength. It was recommended that the prediction equation be employed to estimate quadriceps strength while setting muscle strengthening goals in the clinics during medical rehabilitation for patients within the age range used in this study. PMID:14510124

  16. Respiratory muscle dysfunction: a multicausal entity in the critically ill patient undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Magda C; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Salazar C, Blanca C

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction, particularly of the diaphragm, may play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to difficulty in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. The limited mobility of critically ill patients, and of the diaphragm in particular when prolonged mechanical ventilation support is required, promotes the early onset of respiratory muscle dysfunction, but this can also be caused or exacerbated by other factors that are common in these patients, such as sepsis, malnutrition, advanced age, duration and type of ventilation, and use of certain medications, such as steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In this review we will study in depth this multicausal origin, in which a common mechanism is altered protein metabolism, according to the findings reported in various models. The understanding of this multicausality produced by the same pathophysiological mechanism could facilitate the management and monitoring of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:23669061

  17. Molecular mechanisms of increased vascular smooth muscle contraction in SHR

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.V.; Aqel, M.B.; Butters, C.; McEldoon, J.; Bhalla, R.C.

    1986-03-01

    The isometric tension development and /sup 45/Ca influx in response to NE and methoxamine stimulation were significantly (P < .05) increased in SHR caudal arteries as compared to WKY. Estimation of /sup 3/H-prazosin binding to the membranes isolated from caudal artery of WKY and SHR showed a single class of high affinity binding sites with Kd values: SHR, 128 +/- 14 pM; WKY, 141 +/- 19 pM and the Bmax values; SHR, 108 +/- 14 fmoles/mg protein; WKY, 113 +/- 21 fmoles/mg protein. Nifedipine inhibition of caudal artery contractions in response to NE stimulation was significantly greater (P < .05) in SHR as compared to WKY. On the other hand, there were no differences between WKY and SHR caudal artery rings either in the isometric tension development, /sup 45/Ca influx or nifedipine inhibition in response to K/sup +/-depolarization. Their results indicate that the increased vascular smooth muscle contraction in SHR in response to NE-stimulation may be due to increased Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through the receptor operated Ca/sup 2 +/ channels.

  18. Mechanism of glycogen supercompensation in rat skeletal muscle cultures.

    PubMed

    Mamedova, Liaman K; Shneyvays, Vladimir; Katz, Abram; Shainberg, Asher

    2003-08-01

    A model to study glycogen supercompensation (the significant increase in glycogen content above basal level) in primary rat skeletal muscle culture was established. Glycogen was completely depleted in differentiated myotubes by 2 h of electrical stimulation or exposure to hypoxia during incubation in medium devoid of glucose. Thereafter, cells were incubated in medium containing glucose, and glycogen supercompensation was clearly observed in treated myotubes after 72 h. Peak glycogen levels were obtained after 120 h, averaging 2.5 and 4 fold above control values in the stimulated- and hypoxia-treated cells, respectively. Glycogen synthase activity increased and phosphorylase activity decreased continuously during 120 h of recovery in the treated cells. Rates of 2-deoxyglucose uptake were significantly elevated in the treated cells at 96 and 120 h, averaging 1.4-2 fold above control values. Glycogenin content increased slightly in the treated cells after 48 h (1.2 fold vs. control) and then increased considerably, achieving peak values after 120 h (2 fold vs. control). The results demonstrate two phases of glycogen supercompensation: the first phase depends primarily on activation of glycogen synthase and inactivation of phosphorylase; the second phase includes increases in glucose uptake and glycogenin level. PMID:12962138

  19. Gravitational force modulates muscle activity during mechanical oscillation of the tibia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Shields, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical oscillation (vibration) is an osteogenic stimulus for bone in animal models and may hold promise as an anti-osteoporosis measure in humans with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the level of reflex induced muscle contractions associated with various loads (g force) during limb segment oscillation is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine whether certain gravitational loads (g forces) at a fixed oscillation frequency (30 Hz) increases muscle reflex activity in individuals with and without SCI. Nine healthy subjects and two individuals with SCI sat with their hip and knee joints at 90° and the foot secured on an oscillation platform. Vertical mechanical oscillations were introduced at 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 3 and 5g force for 20 seconds at 30 Hz. Non-SCI subjects received the oscillation with and without a 5% MVC background contraction. Peak soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) EMG were normalized to M-max. Soleus and TA EMG were < 2.5% of M-max in both SCI and non-SCI subjects. The greatest EMG occurred at the highest acceleration (5g). Low magnitude mechanical oscillation, shown to enhance bone anabolism in animal models, did not elicit high levels of reflex muscle activity in individuals with and without SCI. These findings support the g force modulated background muscle activity during fixed frequency vibration. The magnitude of muscle activity was low and likely does not influence the load during fixed frequency oscillation of the tibia. PMID:21708472

  20. Effects of aging on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller-Delp, Judy; Spier, Scott A.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Lesniewski, Lisa A.; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Humphrey, J. D.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise capacity and skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise are reduced with advancing age. This reduction in blood flow capacity may be related to increased reactivity of skeletal muscle resistance vessels to vasoconstrictor stimuli. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that aging results in increased vasoconstrictor responses of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles. First-order (1A) arterioles (90-220 microm) from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of young (4 mo) and aged (24 mo) Fischer-344 rats were isolated, cannulated, and pressurized via hydrostatic reservoirs. Vasoconstriction in response to increases in norepinephrine (NE; 1 x 10(-9)-1 x 10(-4) M) and KCl (20-100 mM) concentrations and increases in intraluminal pressure (10-130 cmH(2)O) were evaluated in the absence of flow. Responses to NE and KCl were similar in both soleus and gastrocnemius muscle arterioles from young and aged rats. In contrast, active myogenic responses to changes in intraluminal pressure were diminished in soleus and gastrocnemius arterioles from aged rats. To assess whether alterations in the mechanical properties of resistance arterioles underlie altered myogenic responsiveness, passive diameter responses to pressure and mechanical stiffness were evaluated. There was no effect of age on the structural behavior (passive pressure-diameter relationship) or stiffness of arterioles from either the soleus or gastrocnemius muscles. These results suggest that aging does not result in a nonspecific decrease in vasoconstrictor responsiveness of skeletal muscle arterioles. Rather, aging-induced adaptations of vasoreactivity of resistance arterioles appear to be limited to mechanisms that are uniquely involved in the signaling of the myogenic response.

  1. Expression of muscle anabolic and metabolic factors in mechanically loaded MLO-Y4 osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Juffer, Petra; Jaspers, Richard T; Lips, Paul; Bakker, Astrid D; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2012-02-15

    Lack of physical activity results in muscle atrophy and bone loss, which can be counteracted by mechanical loading. Similar molecular signaling pathways are involved in the adaptation of muscle and bone mass to mechanical loading. Whether anabolic and metabolic factors regulating muscle mass, i.e., insulin-like growth factor-I isoforms (IGF-I Ea), mechano growth factor (MGF), myostatin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), are also produced by osteocytes in bone in response to mechanical loading is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) modulates the mRNA and/or protein levels of muscle anabolic and metabolic factors in MLO-Y4 osteocytes. Unloaded MLO-Y4 osteocytes expressed mRNA of VEGF, HGF, IGF-I Ea, and MGF, but not myostatin. PFF increased mRNA levels of IGF-I Ea (2.1-fold) and MGF (2.0-fold) at a peak shear stress rate of 44Pa/s, but not at 22Pa/s. PFF at 22 Pa/s increased VEGF mRNA levels (1.8- to 2.5-fold) and VEGF protein release (2.0- to 2.9-fold). Inhibition of nitric oxide production decreased (2.0-fold) PFF-induced VEGF protein release. PFF at 22 Pa/s decreased HGF mRNA levels (1.5-fold) but increased HGF protein release (2.3-fold). PFF-induced HGF protein release was nitric oxide dependent. Our data show that mechanically loaded MLO-Y4 osteocytes differentially express anabolic and metabolic factors involved in the adaptive response of muscle to mechanical loading (i.e., IGF-I Ea, MGF, VEGF, and HGF). Similarly to muscle fibers, mechanical loading enhanced expression levels of these growth factors in MLO-Y4 osteocytes. Although in MLO-Y4 osteocytes expression levels of IGF-I Ea and MGF of myostatin were very low or absent, it is known that the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts is strongly affected by them. The abundant expression levels of these factors in muscle cells, in combination with low expression in MLO-Y4 osteocytes, provide a

  2. Effects of Mechanical Overloading on the Properties of Soleus Muscle Fibers, with or without Damage in MDX and Wild Type Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Takashi; Oke, Yoshihiko; Nakai, Naoya; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Effects of mechanical overloading on the characteristics of regenerating or not-regenerating soleus muscle fibers were studied. The muscle fibers of mdx mice were characterized by the localization of myonuclei. Muscle damage was also induced in wild type (WT) mice by injection of cardiotoxin (CTX) into soleus muscle. Overloading was applied for 14 days to the left soleus muscle in mdx and intact and CTX-injected WT mice by removing the distal tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. The contralateral muscle served as the normal control. These animals were then allowed ambulation recovery in the cage. Central myonuclei were noted in many fibers of mdx and CTX-injected mice with or without overloading. In general, the fibers with central nuclei were considered as regenerating fibers. The fibers with more central nuclei were increased in mdx mice, but the fibers with more peripheral nuclei were increased in CTX-injected WT mice by overloading. The muscle satellite cells, neuromuscular junctions (NMJ), and myonuclei were stained. Most of the properties, such as number of myonuclei and satellite cells, size of NMJ, and fiber length, were not influenced by mechanical overloading in all mice. Approximately 0.6% branched fibers were seen in the intact soleus of mdx mice, although these fibers were not detected in WT mice. However, the percentage of these fibers was increased by overloading especially in mdx mice (~50% vs. ~2.5% in WT). In CTX-injected WT mice, these fibers were ~15% with or without overloading. The fiber cross sectional area in normal WT, but not in mdx and CTX-injected WT mice, was increased by overloading (p<0.05). These results suggested that the functional overload induced muscle damage in mdx mice, but promoted the regeneration in CTX-injected WT mice.

  3. Mechanisms of accelerated proteolysis in rat soleus muscle atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Kirby, Christopher; Rosenberg, Sara; Tome, Margaret; Chase, Peter

    1991-01-01

    A hypothesis proposed by Tischler and coworkers (Henriksen et al., 1986; Tischler et al., 1990) concerning the mechanisms of atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation was tested using rat soleus muscle from animals subjected to hindlimb suspension and denervation of muscles. The procedure included (1) measuring protein degradation in isolated muscles and testing the effects of lysosome inhibitors, (2) analyzing the lysosome permeability and autophagocytosis, (3) testing the effects of altering calcium-dependent proteolysis, and (4) evaluating in vivo the effects of various agents to determine the physiological significance of the hypothesis. The results obtained suggest that there are major differences between the mechanisms of atrophies caused by unweighting and denervation, though slower protein synthesis is an important feature common for both.

  4. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) are also reviewed. PMID:26468456

  5. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents: possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) are also reviewed. PMID:26468456

  6. Cellular mechanism underlying the facilitation of contractile response of vas deferens smooth muscle by sodium orthovanadate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Wang, Zhe; Ruan, Ye-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Liang

    2012-07-01

    In the earlier study, sodium orthovanadate (SOV) has been reported to be a powerful inhibitor of (Na(+), K(+)) adenosine triphosphatase, exhibit widespread actions on the renal and cardiovascular systems, induces smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting the phosphorylation of the protein tyrosine phosphatases. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the cellular mechanisms by which SOV facilitated contractile response of vas deferens smooth muscle and its potential therapeutic advantage. Exogenous application of ATP and NA-caused contraction was strengthened by pretreatment with SOV. This facilitation was inhibited not by bath with the inhibitor of P2 receptor, PPADS, or the inhibitor of α1 receptor, Prazosin, but by bath with the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Genistein. SOV induced a sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) of smooth muscle cells, which was abolished by 100 μM Genistein or Ca(2+)-free solution. The facilitation of SOV could also be inhibited by the selective inhibitors of TRP channel, 2-APB and non-selective cation channel, Gd(3+), Ni(+). The in vivo study showed that peritoneal injection of SOV in dystrophic mice (mdx mice) enhanced the contraction of vas deferens smooth muscle stimulated by electrical field stimulation, ATP, noradrenaline, or KCl. The above results suggest that SOV facilitates the concentration of vas deferens smooth muscle through the tyrosine phosphorylation activated the non-selective cation channels, which has potential use in the therapy for muscle dysfunction. PMID:22476902

  7. Burrowing by small polychaetes - mechanics, behavior and muscle structure of Capitella sp.

    PubMed

    Grill, Susann; Dorgan, Kelly M

    2015-05-15

    Worms of different sizes extend burrows through muddy sediments by fracture, applying dorso-ventral forces that are amplified at the crack tip. Smaller worms displace sediments less than larger worms and therefore are limited in how much force they can apply to burrow walls. We hypothesized that small worms would exhibit a transition in burrowing mechanics, specifically a lower limit in body size for the ability to burrow by fracture, corresponding with an ontogenetic transition in muscle morphology. Kinematics of burrowing in a mud analog, external morphology and muscle arrangement were examined in juveniles and adults of the small polychaete Capitella sp. We found that it moves by peristalsis, and no obvious differences were observed among worms of different sizes; even very small juveniles were able to burrow through a clear mud analog by fracture. Interestingly, we found that in addition to longitudinal and circular muscles needed for peristaltic movements, left- and right-handed helical muscles wrap around the thorax of worms of all sizes. We suggest that in small worms helical muscles may function to supplement forces generated by longitudinal muscles and to maintain hydrostatic pressure, enabling higher forces to be exerted on the crack wall. Further research is needed, however, to determine whether surficial sediments inhabited by small worms fail by fracture or plastically deform under forces of the magnitudes applied by Capitella sp. PMID:25827841

  8. Hill's equation of muscle performance and its hidden insight on molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Seow, Chun Y

    2013-12-01

    Muscles shorten faster against light loads than they do against heavy loads. The hyperbolic equation first used by A.V. Hill over seven decades ago to illustrate the relationship between shortening velocity and load is still the predominant method used to characterize muscle performance, even though it has been regarded as purely empirical and lacking precision in predicting velocities at high and low loads. Popularity of the Hill equation has been sustained perhaps because of historical reasons, but its simplicity is certainly attractive. The descriptive nature of the equation does not diminish its role as a useful tool in our quest to understand animal locomotion and optimal design of muscle-powered devices like bicycles. In this Review, an analysis is presented to illustrate the connection between the historic Hill equation and the kinetics of myosin cross-bridge cycle based on the latest findings on myosin motor interaction with actin filaments within the structural confines of a sarcomere. In light of the new data and perspective, some previous studies of force-velocity relations of muscle are revisited to further our understanding of muscle mechanics and the underlying biochemical events, specifically how extracellular and intracellular environment, protein isoform expression, and posttranslational modification of contractile and regulatory proteins change the interaction between myosin and actin that in turn alter muscle force, shortening velocity, and the relationship between them. PMID:24277600

  9. Biological characteristics of tracheal smooth muscle cells regulated by NK-1R in asthmatic rat with airway remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bing; Liu, Yali; Yue, Xiaozhe; Li, Yinping; Shang, Yunxiao

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the biological characteristic changes of infant rat tracheal smooth muscle cells in asthma airway remodeling and the impact of NK-1R on the mechanism. Ovalbumin (OVA) was used to excited juvenile SD rats by 8 w. Immunofluorescence, MTT assay, transwell chambers, real time quantitative PCR, Western blot and other methods were used to observe the proliferation, migration, synthesis and secretion changes of infant airway remodeling in rat tracheal smooth muscle cell and the Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R) expression. 1. NK-1R mRNA, protein expression of airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) of each asthma group were higher than that of the control group, especially the asthma 8 w group had highest expression (P<0.01). 2. The average A value of 8 w asthma group measured by MTT method were significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05), WIN62577 10-8 mol/L group had the strongest inhibition of ASMC proliferation (P<0.01). 3. The number of cell migration in the asthma group significantly increased than that in the control group. The number of migrating cells in the NK-1R antagonist group significantly reduced compared with the asthma 8 w group (P<0.05). 4. The average gray value of type III collagen in each asthma group were higher than that of the control group, and the asthma 8 w group had the highest (P<0.01). After NK-1R blocking, the average gray value of type III collagen was significantly lower (P<0.05). ASMC proliferation, migration, synthesis and secretion function increased in the airway remodeling group, and NK-1R played an important role. PMID:26628953

  10. Regulatory Mechanism of Muscle Disuse Atrophy in Adult Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    lowered levels of spermatid formation. Hormonal changes due to testes atrophy must be considered in future experiments where related effects may modify muscle, bone or other tissue changes. Also, some new assessments of past results (published by many researchers) may warrant revised interpretations. The blood pressure studies and the testicular function results were presented and reviewed during an invited lecture at the University of Bordeaux II during the Animals in Space Symposium in March 1993. In summary, each of these three projects complied with the objectives of the proposal and serve to demonstrate the utility of animal models in preparations and interpretations of space flight results. All funding has been expended in accordance with the approved budget.

  11. A neuro-mechanical model of a single leg joint highlighting the basic physiological role of fast and slow muscle fibres of an insect muscle system.

    PubMed

    Toth, Tibor Istvan; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    In legged animals, the muscle system has a dual function: to produce forces and torques necessary to move the limbs in a systematic way, and to maintain the body in a static position. These two functions are performed by the contribution of specialized motor units, i.e. motoneurons driving sets of specialized muscle fibres. With reference to their overall contraction and metabolic properties they are called fast and slow muscle fibres and can be found ubiquitously in skeletal muscles. Both fibre types are active during stepping, but only the slow ones maintain the posture of the body. From these findings, the general hypothesis on a functional segregation between both fibre types and their neuronal control has arisen. Earlier muscle models did not fully take this aspect into account. They either focused on certain aspects of muscular function or were developed to describe specific behaviours only. By contrast, our neuro-mechanical model is more general as it allows functionally to differentiate between static and dynamic aspects of movement control. It does so by including both muscle fibre types and separate motoneuron drives. Our model helps to gain a deeper insight into how the nervous system might combine neuronal control of locomotion and posture. It predicts that (1) positioning the leg at a specific retraction angle in steady state is most likely due to the extent of recruitment of slow muscle fibres and not to the force developed in the individual fibres of the antagonistic muscles; (2) the fast muscle fibres of antagonistic muscles contract alternately during stepping, while co-contraction of the slow muscle fibres takes place during steady state; (3) there are several possible ways of transition between movement and steady state of the leg achieved by varying the time course of recruitment of the fibres in the participating muscles. PMID:24244298

  12. A Neuro-Mechanical Model of a Single Leg Joint Highlighting the Basic Physiological Role of Fast and Slow Muscle Fibres of an Insect Muscle System

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Tibor Istvan; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    In legged animals, the muscle system has a dual function: to produce forces and torques necessary to move the limbs in a systematic way, and to maintain the body in a static position. These two functions are performed by the contribution of specialized motor units, i.e. motoneurons driving sets of specialized muscle fibres. With reference to their overall contraction and metabolic properties they are called fast and slow muscle fibres and can be found ubiquitously in skeletal muscles. Both fibre types are active during stepping, but only the slow ones maintain the posture of the body. From these findings, the general hypothesis on a functional segregation between both fibre types and their neuronal control has arisen. Earlier muscle models did not fully take this aspect into account. They either focused on certain aspects of muscular function or were developed to describe specific behaviours only. By contrast, our neuro-mechanical model is more general as it allows functionally to differentiate between static and dynamic aspects of movement control. It does so by including both muscle fibre types and separate motoneuron drives. Our model helps to gain a deeper insight into how the nervous system might combine neuronal control of locomotion and posture. It predicts that (1) positioning the leg at a specific retraction angle in steady state is most likely due to the extent of recruitment of slow muscle fibres and not to the force developed in the individual fibres of the antagonistic muscles; (2) the fast muscle fibres of antagonistic muscles contract alternately during stepping, while co-contraction of the slow muscle fibres takes place during steady state; (3) there are several possible ways of transition between movement and steady state of the leg achieved by varying the time course of recruitment of the fibres in the participating muscles. PMID:24244298

  13. Inspiratory muscle training to enhance recovery from mechanical ventilation: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Bernie M; Leditschke, I Anne; Neeman, Teresa; Boots, Robert; Paratz, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients who have been mechanically ventilated, inspiratory muscles remain weak and fatigable following ventilatory weaning, which may contribute to dyspnoea and limited functional recovery. Inspiratory muscle training may improve inspiratory muscle strength and endurance following weaning, potentially improving dyspnoea and quality of life in this patient group. Methods We conducted a randomised trial with assessor-blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. Following 48 hours of successful weaning, 70 participants (mechanically ventilated ≥7 days) were randomised to receive inspiratory muscle training once daily 5 days/week for 2 weeks in addition to usual care, or usual care (control). Primary endpoints were inspiratory muscle strength and fatigue resistance index (FRI) 2 weeks following enrolment. Secondary endpoints included dyspnoea, physical function and quality of life, post-intensive care length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Results 34 participants were randomly allocated to the training group and 36 to control. The training group demonstrated greater improvements in inspiratory strength (training: 17%, control: 6%, mean difference: 11%, p=0.02). There were no statistically significant differences in FRI (0.03 vs 0.02, p=0.81), physical function (0.25 vs 0.25, p=0.97) or dyspnoea (−0.5 vs 0.2, p=0.22). Improvement in quality of life was greater in the training group (14% vs 2%, mean difference 12%, p=0.03). In-hospital mortality was higher in the training group (4 vs 0, 12% vs 0%, p=0.051). Conclusions Inspiratory muscle training following successful weaning increases inspiratory muscle strength and quality of life, but we cannot confidently rule out an associated increased risk of in-hospital mortality. Trial registration number ACTRN12610001089022, results. PMID:27257003

  14. Mechanism of IL-1 induced inhibition of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cooney, R N; Maish, G O; Gilpin, T; Shumate, M L; Lang, C H; Vary, T C

    1999-04-01

    Chronic interleukin (IL)-1 administration is associated with negative nitrogen balance and the loss of lean body mass. To elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) by which IL-1 modulates protein metabolism in muscle, we investigated the effects of chronic (6 day) IL-1alpha infusion on protein synthesis in Individual muscles (gastrocnemius, soleus, heart) compared with saline-infused control rats. IL-1 significantly decreased muscle weight, protein content, and the rate of protein synthesis in gastrocnemius (fast-twitch muscle). IL-1 had no effect on these parameters in the heart, whereas only the rate of protein synthesis was reduced in soleus (slow-twitch muscle). The reduction in gastrocnemius protein synthesis was not the result of a decrease in total RNA content, but was associated with a diminished translational efficiency. The diminished translational efficiency correlated with a 40% reduction in the epsilon-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (elF2Bepsilon) in gastrocnemius from IL-1 -treated animals. However, the content of the alpha-subunit of elF2 (elF2alpha) was unaffected. In contrast, the elF2alpha content in heart was increased by IL-1, although elF2Bepsilon levels were unchanged. Reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis were not associated with a concomitant reduction in circulating or tissue content of insulin-like growth factor I. In summary, the IL-1-induced decrease in gastrocnemius protein synthesis appears to be regulated at the level of RNA translation via a reduction in elF2Bepsilon. These findings support a regulatory role for IL-1 as a mediator of muscle protein synthesis and the alterations in body composition observed in catabolic states where this cytokine is overexpressed. PMID:10220298

  15. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy. PMID:27468462

  16. Fish Swimming: Patternsin the Mechanical Energy Generation, Transmission and Dissipation from Muscle Activation to Body Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Yu, Y. L.; Tong, B. G.

    2011-09-01

    The power consumption of the undulatory fish swimming is produced by active muscles. The mechanical energy generated by stimulated muscles is dissipated partly by the passive tissues of fish while it is being transmitted to the fluid medium. Furthermore, the effective energy, propelling fish movement, is a part of that delivered by the fish body. The process depends on the interactions of the active muscles, the passive tissues, and the water surrounding the fish body. In the previous works, the body-fluid interactions have been investigated widely, but it is rarely considered how the mechanical energy generates, transmits and dissipates in fish swimming. This paper addresses the regular patterns of energy transfer process from muscle activation to body movement for a cruising lamprey (LAMPREY), a kind of anguilliform swimmer. It is necessary to propose a global modelling of the kinematic chain, which is composed of active muscle force-moment model, fish-body dynamic model and hydrodynamic model in order. The present results show that there are traveling energy waves along the fish body from anterior to posterior, accompanied with energy storing and dissipating due to the viscoelastic property of internal tissues. This study is a preliminary research on the framework of kinematic chain coordination performance in fish swimming.

  17. Molecular Investigations into the Mechanics of a Muscle Anchoring Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bodmer, Nicholas K.; Theisen, Kelly E.; Dima, Ruxandra I.

    2015-01-01

    The titin-telethonin complex, essential for anchoring filaments in the Z-disk of the sarcomere, is composed of immunoglobulin domains. Surprisingly, atomic force microscopy experiments showed that it resists forces much higher than the typical immunoglobulin domain and that the force distribution is unusually broad. To investigate the origin of this behavior, we developed a multiscale simulation approach, combining minimalist and atomistic models (SOP-AT). By following the mechanical response of the complex on experimental timescales, we found that the mechanical stability of titin-telethonin is modulated primarily by the strength of contacts between telethonin and the two titin chains, and secondarily by the timescales of conformational excursions inside telethonin and the pulled titin domains. Importantly, the conformational transitions executed by telethonin in simulations support its proposed role in mechanosensing. Our SOP-AT computational approach thus provides a powerful tool for the exploration of the link between conformational diversity and the broadness of the mechanical response, which can be applied to other multidomain complexes. PMID:25954889

  18. Changes in structural and metabolic muscle characteristics following exercise-based interventions in patients with COPD: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    De Brandt, Jana; Spruit, Martijn A; Derave, Wim; Hansen, Dominique; Vanfleteren, Lowie E G W; Burtin, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Patients with COPD suffer from lower-limb muscle dysfunction characterized by lower muscle oxidative capacity and muscle mass. Exercise-based training is expected to attenuate lower-limb intramuscular characteristics, but a detailed systematic approach to review the available evidence has not been performed yet. PUBMED and PEDro databases were searched. Twenty-five studies that implemented an exercise-based training program (aerobic and/or resistance training, high intensity interval training, electrical or magnetic stimulation) and reported muscle biopsy data of patients with COPD were critically appraised. The coverage of results includes changes in muscle structure, muscle protein turnover regulation, mitochondrial enzyme activity, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and inflammation after exercise-based training interventions. Study design and training modalities varied among studies, which partly explains the observed heterogeneous response in muscle characteristics. Gaps in the current knowledge are identified and recommendations for future research are made to enhance our knowledge on exercise training effects in patients with COPD. PMID:26901573

  19. Partial Reductions in Mechanical Loading Yield Proportional Changes in Bone Density, Bone Architecture, and Muscle Mass

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, Rachel; Spatz, Jordan; Cloutier, Alison; Palme, Rupert; Christiansen, Blaine A; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2014-01-01

    Although the musculoskeletal system is known to be sensitive to changes in its mechanical environment, the relationship between functional adaptation and below-normal mechanical stimuli is not well defined. We investigated bone and muscle adaptation to a range of reduced loading using the partial weight suspension (PWS) system, in which a two-point harness is used to offload a tunable amount of body weight while maintaining quadrupedal locomotion. Skeletally mature female C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to partial weight bearing at 20%, 40%, 70%, or 100% of body weight for 21 days. A hindlimb unloaded (HLU) group was included for comparison in addition to age-matched controls in normal housing. Gait kinematics was measured across the full range of weight bearing, and some minor alterations in gait from PWS were identified. With PWS, bone and muscle changes were generally proportional to the degree of unloading. Specifically, total body and hindlimb bone mineral density, calf muscle mass, trabecular bone volume of the distal femur, and cortical area of the femur midshaft were all linearly related to the degree of unloading. Even a load reduction to 70% of normal weight bearing was associated with significant bone deterioration and muscle atrophy. Weight bearing at 20% did not lead to better bone outcomes than HLU despite less muscle atrophy and presumably greater mechanical stimulus, requiring further investigation. These data confirm that the PWS model is highly effective in applying controllable, reduced, long-term loading that produces predictable, discrete adaptive changes in muscle and bone of the hindlimb. PMID:23165526

  20. The relationships between muscle, external, internal and joint mechanical work during normal walking

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kotaro; Neptune, Richard R.; Kautz, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Muscle mechanical work is an important biomechanical quantity in human movement analyses and has been estimated using different quantities including external, internal and joint work. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between these traditionally used estimates of mechanical work in human walking and to assess whether they can be used as accurate estimates of musculotendon and/or muscle fiber work. A muscle-actuated forward dynamics walking simulation was generated to quantify each of the mechanical work measures. Total joint work (i.e. the time integral of absolute joint power over a full gait cycle) was found to underestimate total musculotendon work due to agonist–antagonist co-contractions, despite the effect of biarticular muscle work and passive joint work, which acted to decrease the underestimation. We did find that when the net passive joint work over the gait cycle is negligible, net joint work (i.e. the time integral of net joint power) was comparable to the net musculotendon work (and net muscle fiber work because net tendon work is zero over a complete gait cycle). Thus, during walking conditions when passive joint work is negligible, net joint work may be used as an estimate of net muscle work. Neither total external nor total internal work (nor their sum) provided a reasonable estimate of total musculotendon work. We conclude that joint work is limited in its ability to estimate musculotendon work, and that external and internal work should not be used as an estimation of musculotendon work. PMID:19218526

  1. Characteristics of saxitoxin binding to the sodium channel of sarcolemma isolated from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Barchi, R L; Weigele, J B

    1979-01-01

    1. The characteristics of saxitoxin (STX) binding to the mammalian Na channel have been studied in purified sarcolemma isolated from rat skeletal muscle. 2. STX binds specifically to isolated sarcolemma with a Kd of 1.43 x 10(-9) M and Bmax of 7-8 p-mole STX bound/mg membrane protein at 0 degrees C in the presence of 140 mM-NaCl. In rat muscle homogenate under the same conditions the corresponding values are Kd = 1.53 x 10(-9) M and Bmax = 0.15-0.20 p-mole/mg protein (18-20 p-mole/g wet wt.). Membrane purification produced a fortyfold increase in STX binding site concentration per milligram protein. Calculated binding site density in isolated sarcolemma was about 30 sites/micron 2 of membrane surface. 3. Denervation (10-14 days) results in a 43% reduction in the density of high-affinity STX binding sites in purified sarcolemma, but the Kd for this class of sites is not changed. 4. In sarcolemma, the apparent Kd for STX binding is dependent on temperature pH and ionic strength. The Q10 for Kd between 0 and 40 degrees C is 1.3. Protonation of a group having a pK of 6.0 markedly raises Kd without affecting Bmax. Apparent Kd increases eightfold when ionic strength is raised from 20 to 600 mM. 5. Dissociation and association rate constants for STX binding are temperature dependent with Q10 of 2.6 and 1.9 respectively between 0 and 20 degrees C. 6. STX binding is competitively inhibited by monovalent and divalent cations under conditions of constant total ionic strength. An affinity sequence of Tl+ greater than Li+ greater than Na+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+ is seen for the monovalent cation-binding site. 7. The STX binding site is relatively stable to heat and to enzymic degradation. A specific modifier of carboxyl residues inactivates subsequent STX binding. This process can be prevented by the presence of STX during the reaction. 8. Characteristics of the STX binding site in isolated sarcolemma are compared to those reported for other isolated

  2. Compensatory mechanisms during walking in response to muscle weakness in spinal muscular atrophy, type III.

    PubMed

    Matjacić, Zlatko; Olensek, Andrej; Krajnik, Janez; Eymard, Bruno; Zupan, Anton; Praznikar, Ales

    2008-05-01

    Our knowledge on altered neurological control of walking due to weakness of various muscle groups of the lower extremities is limited. The aim of this study was to assess kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic (EMG) walking patterns in a functionally homogeneous group of seven subjects with spinal muscular atrophy, type III (SMA group) and compare them with normal data obtained from nine healthy subjects (CONTROL group) in order to identify characteristic compensatory changes. Muscle strength at the ankle and knee joints was assessed using isokinetic dynamometry to determine variability in muscle strength: this was found to be similar in the two groups. Kinematic, kinetic and EMG patterns were assessed during walking in the SMA and CONTROL groups. The results showed changes in the activity of ankle plantarflexors and associated control of the center of pressure during loading response and midstance, which facilitated minimization of the external flexion moment acting on the knee and hip in the SMA group. Additionally, we identified distinct and consistent changes in the control of hip rotators that act to rapidly extend the hip early in stance phase and in the control of contralateral hip abductors that act delay weight shift onto the leg entering the stance phase. From these results we can conclude that the most important muscle groups compensating for reduced strength in knee and hip muscles are the ankle plantarflexors, hip rotators and hip abductors. This finding would have direct application in rehabilitation treatment programs. PMID:17980600

  3. Analysis of frequency characteristics and sensitivity of compliant mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanzeng; Dai, Jiansheng; Li, Aimin; Sun, Zhaopeng; Feng, Shizhe; Cao, Guohua

    2016-03-01

    Based on a modified pseudo-rigid-body model, the frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the large-deformation compliant mechanism are studied. Firstly, the pseudo-rigid-body model under the static and kinetic conditions is modified to enable the modified pseudo-rigid-body model to be more suitable for the dynamic analysis of the compliant mechanism. Subsequently, based on the modified pseudo-rigid-body model, the dynamic equations of the ordinary compliant four-bar mechanism are established using the analytical mechanics. Finally, in combination with the finite element analysis software ANSYS, the frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the compliant mechanism are analyzed by taking the compliant parallel-guiding mechanism and the compliant bistable mechanism as examples. From the simulation results, the dynamic characteristics of compliant mechanism are relatively sensitive to the structure size, section parameter, and characteristic parameter of material on mechanisms. The results could provide great theoretical significance and application values for the structural optimization of compliant mechanisms, the improvement of their dynamic properties and the expansion of their application range.

  4. Modeling Implantable Passive Mechanisms for Modifying the Transmission of Forces and Movements Between Muscle and Tendons.

    PubMed

    Homayouni, Taymaz; Underwood, Kelsey N; Beyer, Kamin C; Martin, Elon R; Allan, Christopher H; Balasubramanian, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    This paper explores the development of biomechanical models for evaluating a new class of passive mechanical implants for orthopedic surgery. The proposed implants take the form of passive engineered mechanisms, and will be used to improve the functional attachment of muscles to tendons and bone by modifying the transmission of forces and movement inside the body. Specifically, we present how two types of implantable mechanisms may be modeled in the open-source biomechanical software OpenSim. The first implant, which is proposed for hand tendon-transfer surgery, differentially distributes the forces and movement from one muscle across multiple tendons. The second implant, which is proposed for knee-replacement surgery, scales up the forces applied to the knee joint by the quadriceps muscle. This paper's key innovation is that such mechanisms have never been considered before in biomechanical simulation modeling and in surgery. When compared with joint function enabled by the current surgical practice of using sutures to make the attachment, biomechanical simulations show that the surgery with 1) the differential mechanism (tendon network) implant improves the fingers' ability to passively adapt to an object's shape significantly during grasping tasks (2.74× as measured by the extent of finger flexion) for the same muscle force, and 2) the force-scaling implant increases knee-joint torque by 84% for the same muscle force. The critical significance of this study is to provide a methodology for the design and inclusion of the implants into biomechanical models and validating the improvement in joint function they enable when compared with current surgical practice. PMID:25850081

  5. Mechanisms of intrinsic tone in ferret vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, J; Morgan, K G

    1992-01-01

    1. Circular strips from ferret aorta were used to investigate the mechanism of the intrinsic basal tone. 2. Determinations of stiffness using small sinusoidal length changes showed an abolition of both stiffness and force with cooling, but the temperature dependence of the change in active stiffness did not parallel that of force. At temperatures below 22 degrees C there appeared to be a relatively large population of attached, non-force-generating cross-bridges, indicating that separate mechanisms are involved in regulating cross-bridge attachment and the force per cross-bridge. 3. Active intrinsic tone was not affected by removal of extracellular Ca2+ or removal of endothelium. 4. Intracellular ionized Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) as measured with the photoprotein aequorin, did not significantly change when intrinsic tone was abolished by cooling. 5. Myosin light chain phosphorylation, as measured by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, significantly decreased on cooling, but the temperature dependence of phosphorylation did not parallel that of force. The change in phosphorylation in the absence of a change in [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a constitutively active Ca(2+)-independent form of myosin light chain kinase. 6. Maximal concentrations of staurosporine inhibited but did not eliminate intrinsic tone. 7. Changes in myosin light chain kinase and protein kinase C activities may explain part but not all of the intrinsic tone. PMID:1593466

  6. Mechanisms Of Residual Force Enhancement In Skeletal Muscle: Insights From Experiments And Mathematical Models.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stuart G; Campbell, Kenneth S

    2011-12-01

    A skeletal muscle that is stretched while contracting will produce more force at steady state than if it is stretched passively and then stimulated to contract. This phenomenon is known as residual force enhancement and has been widely studied since its description more than sixty years ago. The idea that the mechanical properties of a muscle are governed not just by its present length but also by its length at earlier time points has far reaching implications since muscles stretch and shorten routinely in normal use. In this review, we present the experimental and theoretical advances that have been made toward understanding the mechanisms that underlie residual force enhancement. In the past ten years, experiments and models have focused on essentially three candidate mechanisms for residual force enhancement: (half-) sarcomere inhomogeneity, activity of so-called 'passive' mechanical elements in the sarcomere (titin), and the intrinsic properties of myosin crossbridges. Evidence, both computational and experimental, is accumulating for each of these mechanisms such that a final description of the phenomenon seems attainable in the near future. We conclude that computational models that incorporate more than one putative mechanism may ultimately facilitate reconciliation of the growing number of ideas and experimental data in this field. PMID:22180761

  7. Dynamic mechanical assessment of muscle hyperalgesia in humans: The dynamic algometer

    PubMed Central

    Finocchietti, Sara; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is often associated with a nonhomogeneous distribution of mechanical hyperalgesia. Consequently, new methods able to detect this distribution are needed. OBJECTIVE: To develop and test a new method for assessing muscle hyperalgesia with high temporal and spatial resolution that provides complementary information compared with information obtained by traditional static pressure algometry. METHODS: The dynamic pressure algometer was tested bilaterally on the tibialis anterior muscle in 15 healthy subjects and compared with static pressure algometry. The device consisted of a wheel that was rolled over the muscle tissue with a fixed velocity and different predefined forces. The pain threshold force was determined and pain intensity to a fixed-force stimulation was continuously rated on a visual analogue scale while the wheel was rolling over the muscle. The pressure pain sensitivity was evaluated before, during, and after muscle pain and hyperalgesia induced unilaterally by either injection of hypertonic saline (0.5 mL, 6%) into the tibialis anterior or eccentric exercise evoking delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient was >0.88 for the dynamic thresholds; thus, the method was reliable. Compared with baseline, both techniques detected hyperalgesia at the saline injection site and during DOMS (P<0.05). The dynamic algometer also detected the widespread, patchy distribution of sensitive loci during DOMS, which was difficult to evaluate using static pressure algometry. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The present study showed that dynamic pressure algometry is a reliable tool for evaluating muscle hyperalgesia (threshold and pain rating) with high temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied as a simple clinical bed-side test and as a quantitative tool in pharmacological profiling studies. PMID:25664539

  8. Time course analysis of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm contractile muscle dysfunction in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Corpeno, R; Dworkin, B; Cacciani, N; Salah, H; Bergman, H-M; Ravara, B; Vitadello, M; Gorza, L; Gustafson, A-M; Hedström, Y; Petersson, J; Feng, H-Z; Jin, J-P; Iwamoto, H; Yagi, N; Artemenko, K; Bergquist, J; Larsson, L

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) plays a key role in triggering the impaired diaphragm muscle function and the concomitant delayed weaning from the respirator in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To date, experimental and clinical studies have primarily focused on early effects on the diaphragm by CMV, or at specific time points. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impaired diaphragm muscle function in response to mechanical ventilation, we have performed time-resolved analyses between 6 h and 14 days using an experimental rat ICU model allowing detailed studies of the diaphragm in response to long-term CMV. A rapid and early decline in maximum muscle fibre force and preceding muscle fibre atrophy was observed in the diaphragm in response to CMV, resulting in an 85% reduction in residual diaphragm fibre function after 9–14 days of CMV. A modest loss of contractile proteins was observed and linked to an early activation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, myosin:actin ratios were not affected and the transcriptional regulation of myosin isoforms did not show any dramatic changes during the observation period. Furthermore, small angle X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that myosin can bind to actin in an ATP-dependent manner even after 9–14 days of exposure to CMV. Thus, quantitative changes in muscle fibre size and contractile proteins are not the dominating factors underlying the dramatic decline in diaphragm muscle function in response to CMV, in contrast to earlier observations in limb muscles. The observed early loss of subsarcolemmal neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, onset of oxidative stress, intracellular lipid accumulation and post-translational protein modifications strongly argue for significant qualitative changes in contractile proteins causing the severely impaired residual function in diaphragm fibres after long-term mechanical ventilation. For the first time, the present study

  9. A shared mechanism of muscle wasting in cancer and Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Mielcarek, Michal; Isalan, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle loss and dysfunction in aging and chronic diseases is one of the major causes of mortality in patients, and is relevant for a wide variety of diseases such as neurodegeneration and cancer. Muscle loss is accompanied by changes in gene expression and metabolism that lead to contractile impairment and likely affect whole-body metabolism and function. The changes may be caused by inactivity, inflammation, age-related factors or unbalanced nutrition. Although links with skeletal muscle loss have been found in diseases with disparate aetiologies, for example both in Huntington's disease (HD) and cancer cachexia, the outcome is a similar impairment and mortality. This short commentary aims to summarize recent achievements in the identification of common mechanisms leading to the skeletal muscle wasting syndrome seen in diseases as different as cancer and HD. The latter is the most common hereditary neurodegenerative disorder and muscle wasting is an important component of its pathology. In addition, possible therapeutic strategies for anti-cachectic treatment will be also discussed in the light of their translation into possible therapeutic approaches for HD. PMID:26668061

  10. Potential mechanisms underlying the role of chronic inflammation in age-related muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Jo, Edward; Lee, Sang-Rok; Park, Bong-Sup; Kim, Jeong-Su

    2012-10-01

    Sarcopenia, an age-related condition characterized by progressive skeletal muscle degeneration, might exist as one of the primary clinical conditions underlying severe functional impairment as well as increased risk of co-morbidities in the elderly. Although the etiology of sarcopenia remains multifaceted, age-related chronic inflammation has been strongly implicated in muscle wasting and related sequelae during advanced age. Recent evidence suggests that aberrant, unresolved alterations in regular inflammatory processes during advanced age might ultimately operate as the link that drives skeletal muscle to become more degenerative and dysfunctional in nature. Such negative atrophic muscular outcomes might result from inflammation-induced disruption of central mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle morphology and remodeling. In addition, recent findings demonstrate an adverse confluence between sarcopenia and excessive adiposity (i.e. sarcopenic obesity), as the co-existence of such adverse alterations in body composition may exacerbate systemic inflammation and muscle wasting in the elderly. The following evidence-based review serves to examine sarcopenia from a mechanistic perspective with emphasis on chronic inflammation. PMID:22717404

  11. Improving postural control by applying mechanical noise to ankle muscle tendons.

    PubMed

    Borel, Liliane; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith

    2016-08-01

    The application of subthreshold mechanical vibrations with random frequencies (white mechanical noise) to ankle muscle tendons is known to increase muscle proprioceptive information and to improve the detection of ankle movements. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of this mechanical noise on postural control, its possible modulation according to the sensory strategies used for postural control, and the consequences of increasing postural difficulty. The upright stance of 20 healthy young participants tested with their eyes closed was analyzed during the application of four different levels of noise and compared to that in the absence of noise (control) in three conditions: static, static on foam, and dynamic (sinusoidal translation). The quiet standing condition was conducted with the eyes open and closed to determine the subjects' visual dependency to maintain postural stability. Postural performance was assessed using posturographic and motion analysis evaluations. The results in the static condition showed that the spectral power density of body sway significantly decreased with an optimal level of noise and that the higher the spectral power density without noise, the greater the noise effect, irrespective of visual dependency. Finally, noise application was ineffective in the foam and dynamic conditions. We conclude that the application of mechanical noise to ankle muscle tendons is a means to improve quiet standing only. These results suggest that mechanical noise stimulation may be more effective in more impaired populations. PMID:27021075

  12. Muscle mechanical work requirements during normal walking: the energetic cost of raising the body's center-of-mass is significant.

    PubMed

    Neptune, R R; Zajac, F E; Kautz, S A

    2004-06-01

    Inverted pendulum models of walking predict that little muscle work is required for the exchange of body potential and kinetic energy in single-limb support. External power during walking (product of the measured ground reaction force and body center-of-mass (COM) velocity) is often analyzed to deduce net work output or mechanical energetic cost by muscles. Based on external power analyses and inverted pendulum theory, it has been suggested that a primary mechanical energetic cost may be associated with the mechanical work required to redirect the COM motion at the step-to-step transition. However, these models do not capture the multi-muscle, multi-segmental properties of walking, co-excitation of muscles to coordinate segmental energetic flow, and simultaneous production of positive and negative muscle work. In this study, a muscle-actuated forward dynamic simulation of walking was used to assess whether: (1). potential and kinetic energy of the body are exchanged with little muscle work; (2). external mechanical power can estimate the mechanical energetic cost for muscles; and (3.) the net work output and the mechanical energetic cost for muscles occurs mostly in double support. We found that the net work output by muscles cannot be estimated from external power and was the highest when the COM moved upward in early single-limb support even though kinetic and potential energy were exchanged, and muscle mechanical (and most likely metabolic) energetic cost is dominated not only by the need to redirect the COM in double support but also by the need to raise the COM in single support. PMID:15111069

  13. Architectural Analysis of Human Abdominal Wall Muscles: Implications for Mechanical Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephen H. M.; Ward, Samuel R.; Cook, Mark S.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Cadaveric analysis of human abdominal muscle architecture. Objective To quantify the architectural properties of rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO) and transverse abdominis (TrA), and model mechanical function in light of these new data. Summary of Background Data Knowledge of muscle architecture provides the structural basis for predicting muscle function. Abdominal muscles greatly affect spine loading, stability, injury prevention and rehabilitation; however, their architectural properties are unknown. Methods Abdominal muscles from eleven elderly human cadavers were removed intact, separated into regions and micro-dissected for quantification of physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), fascicle length and sarcomere length. From these data, sarcomere operating length ranges were calculated. Results IO had the largest PCSA and RA the smallest, and would thus generate the largest and smallest isometric forces, respectively. RA had the longest fascicle length, followed by EO, and would thus be capable of generating force over the widest range of lengths. Measured sarcomere lengths, in the post-mortem neutral spine posture, were significantly longer in RA and EO (3.29±0.07 and 3.18±0.11 μm) compared to IO and TrA (2.61±0.06 and 2.58±0.05 μm) (p < 0.0001). Biomechanical modeling predicted that RA, EO and TrA act at optimal force-generating length in the mid-range of lumbar spine flexion, where IO can generate approximately 90% of its maximum force. Conclusions These data provide clinically relevant insights into the ability of the abdominal wall muscles to generate force and change length throughout the lumbar spine range of motion. This will impact the understanding of potential postures in which the force-generating and spine stabilizing ability of these muscles become compromised, which can guide exercise/rehabilitation development and prescription. Future work should explore the mechanical interactions among

  14. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle mitigates glucocorticoid induced decreases in prostaglandin synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, Joseph A.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) induces a decline in protein synthesis and protein content of tissue cultured, avian skeletal muscle cells, and this atrophy is attenuated by repetitive mechanical stretch. Since the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin mitigated this stretch attenuation of muscle atrophy, the role of prostaglandins as growth modulators in these processes was examined. Dex at 10(exp -8) M reduced PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production 55 percent - 65 percent and PGE(sub 2) production 84 - 90 percent after 24 - 72 h of incubation in static cultures. Repetitive 10 percent stretch-relaxations of the non-Dex treated cultures increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux 41 percent at 24 h and 276 percent at 72 h and increased PGE(sub 2) production 51 percent at 24 h and 236 percent at 72 h. Mechanical stimulation of Dex treated cultures increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production 162 percent after 24 h, thus returning PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux to the level of non-Dex treated cultures. At 72 h, stretch increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux 65 percent in Dex treated cultures, but PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production was 45-84 percent less than non-Dex treated cultures. Mechanical stimulation of Dex treated cultures increased PGE(sub 2) production at 24 h, but not at 72 h. Dex reduced prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) activity in the muscle cultures by 70 percent after 8 - 24 h of incubation, and mechanical stimulation increased PGHS activity of the Dex treated cultures by 98 percent. It is concluded that repetitive mechanical stimulation attenuates the catabolic effects of Dex on cultured skeletal muscle cells in part by reversing the Dex-induced declines in PGHS activity and prostaglandin production.

  15. Single-motor-unit discharge characteristics in human lumbar multifidus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lothe, Lise R.; Raven, Tim J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The underlying neurophysiology of postural control of the lower back in humans is poorly understood. We have characterized motor unit (MU) discharge activity in the deep lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle in nine healthy subjects (20–40 yr, 3 females). Bilateral fine wire electrodes were implanted at L4 spinal level using ultrasound guidance. EMG was recorded during spontaneous sitting and standing and during voluntary force production. Individual MUs were analyzed with regard to instantaneous discharge rate, interspike interval variability, alternation of activity between MUs, and cross correlation between concurrently active MUs quantified by the common drive coefficient (CDC). Significant effects of sitting vs. standing were seen on median discharge rate and interspike interval variability. Median discharge rate in 71 units was 5.4 and 6.9 pulses/s during spontaneous sitting and standing and 7.4 pulses/s during voluntary force production. Several MUs fired doublets. CDC analysis of 87 MU pairs showed a significantly higher common drive in spontaneous than in voluntary activity and significant differences between unilateral and bilateral pairs, although not when spontaneously active in standing. In spite of common drive, MUs were recruited from inactivity to tonic discharge lasting for several minutes without changes in discharge rate in already active MUs, and several instances were documented where activity was rotated between MUs. We argue that this behavior is indicative of self-sustained discharge in LM motoneurons, establishing intrinsic motoneuron properties as a central mechanism for postural control of deep back muscles. PMID:26084900

  16. Muscle activation characteristics of the front leg during baseball swings with timing correction for sudden velocity decrease.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  17. Muscle Activation Characteristics of the Front Leg During Baseball Swings with Timing Correction for Sudden Velocity Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  18. Spring or string: does tendon elastic action influence wing muscle mechanics in bat flight?

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Cheney, Jorn A; Roberts, Thomas J; Waldman, J Rhea S; Swartz, Sharon M

    2015-10-01

    Tendon springs influence locomotor movements in many terrestrial animals, but their roles in locomotion through fluids as well as in small-bodied mammals are less clear. We measured muscle, tendon and joint mechanics in an elbow extensor of a small fruit bat during ascending flight. At the end of downstroke, the tendon was stretched by elbow flexion as the wing was folded. At the end of upstroke, elastic energy was recovered via tendon recoil and extended the elbow, contributing to unfurling the wing for downstroke. Compared with a hypothetical 'string-like' system lacking series elastic compliance, the tendon spring conferred a 22.5% decrease in muscle fascicle strain magnitude. Our findings demonstrate tendon elastic action in a small flying mammal and expand our understanding of the occurrence and action of series elastic actuator mechanisms in fluid-based locomotion. PMID:26423848

  19. Relationship between respiratory mechanics and postinspiratory muscle activity during muscarinic challenge in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Romero, P V; Lopez-Aguilar, J; Zin, W A

    1996-12-01

    In six spontaneously breathing New Zealand rabbits (weight 2.36 +/- 0.29 kg) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (35 mg/kg i.v.) airflow, tidal volume, and tracheal and esophageal pressures were measured. These allowed the determination of breathing pattern parameters, respiratory system and lung resistances, elastances, and time constants, total postinspiratory muscle pressure and its timing parameters. The measurements were performed: (a) under control conditions; (b) after increasing concentrations of aerosolized methacholine (8, 16, 32, and 64 mg/ml); and (c) after aerosolized atropine (1 mg/ml). Methacholine progressively increased intrinsic mechanical load (resistance and elastance) of the respiratory system. Total postinspiratory muscle pressure (Pmus,0) increased in relation to the increase in elastic load. The duration of postinspiratory activity increased mainly because of the decrease in expiratory time. In conclusion, increase in inspiratory activity during expiration is due to two independent mechanisms controlling the amplitude and the relative duration. PMID:9017847

  20. Viscoelasticity of living materials: mechanics and chemistry of muscle as an active macromolecular system.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong

    2008-06-01

    At the molecular and cellular level, mechanics and chemistry are two aspects of the same macromolecular system. We present a bottom-up approach to such systems based on Kramers' diffusion theory of chemical reactions, the theory of polymer dynamics, and the recently developed models for molecular motors. Using muscle as an example, we develop a viscoelastic theory of muscle in terms of an simple equation for single motor protein movement. Both A.V. Hill's contractile component and A.F. Huxley's equation of sliding-filament motion are shown to be special cases of the general viscoelastic theory of the active material. Some disparity between the mechanical and the chemical views of cross-bridges and motor proteins are noted, and a duality between force and energy in discrete states and transitions of macromolecular systems is discussed. PMID:18589499

  1. Mechanism of voltage-dependent gating in skeletal muscle chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Fahlke, C; Rosenbohm, A; Mitrovic, N; George, A L; Rüdel, R

    1996-01-01

    Voltage-dependent gating was investigated in a recombinant human skeletal muscle Cl- channel, hCIC-1, heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Gating was found to be mediated by two qualitatively distinct processes. One gating step operates on a microsecond time scale and involves the rapid rearrangement of two identical intramembranous voltage sensors, each consisting of a single titratable residue. The second process occurs on a millisecond time scale and is due to a blocking-unblocking reaction mediated by a cytoplasmic gate that interacts with the ion pore of the channel. These results illustrate a rather simple structural basis for voltage sensing that has evolved in skeletal muscle Cl- channels and provides evidence for the existence of a cytoplasmic gating mechanism in an anion channel analogous to the "ball and chain" mechanism of voltage-gated cation channels. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:8842208

  2. Mechanics without Muscles: Fast Motion of the Venus flytrap and Bio-inspired Robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi; Guo, Qiaohang; Zheng, Huang; Li, Wei; Ding, Yiting; Su, Guiping; Lin, Junjie; Liu, Yuxin; Chen, Wenzhe; Taber, Larry

    2013-03-01

    The rapid motion of plants has intrigued scientists for centuries. Plants have neither nerves nor muscles, yet the Venus flytrap can move in a fraction of a second to capture insects. Darwin did a first systematic study on the trap closure mechanism, and called this plant ``one of the most wonderful in the world''. Several physical mechanisms have since been proposed, such as the rapid loss of turgor pressure, an irreversible acid-induced wall loosening mechanism, and tsnap-through instability, but no unanimous agreement is reached. We propose a coupled mechanical bistable mechanism that explains the rapid closure of the Venus flytrap, consistent with experimental observations. Such bistable behaviors are theoretically modeled and validated with experiments. Biomimetic flytrap robots are also fabricated according to the learnt principles. It is thus promising to design smart bio-mimetic materials and devices with snapping mechanisms as sensors, actuators, artificial muscles and biomedical devices. Zi Chen and Qiaohang Guo contributed equally. We thank National Science Foundation of China (No. 11102040), American Academy of Mechanics Founder's Award and Society in Science-Branco Weiss fellowship.

  3. The effect of fast and slow motor unit activation on whole-muscle mechanical performance: the size principle may not pose a mechanical paradox

    PubMed Central

    Holt, N. C.; Wakeling, J. M.; Biewener, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The output of skeletal muscle can be varied by selectively recruiting different motor units. However, our knowledge of muscle function is largely derived from muscle in which all motor units are activated. This discrepancy may limit our understanding of in vivo muscle function. Hence, this study aimed to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle with different motor unit activation. We determined the isometric properties and isotonic force–velocity relationship of rat plantaris muscles in situ with all of the muscle active, 30% of the muscle containing predominately slower motor units active or 20% of the muscle containing predominately faster motor units active. There was a significant effect of active motor unit type on isometric force rise time (p < 0.001) and the force–velocity relationship (p < 0.001). Surprisingly, force rise time was longer and maximum shortening velocity higher when all motor units were active than when either fast or slow motor units were selectively activated. We propose this is due to the greater relative effects of factors such as series compliance and muscle resistance to shortening during sub-maximal contractions. The findings presented here suggest that recruitment according to the size principle, where slow motor units are activated first and faster ones recruited as demand increases, may not pose a mechanical paradox, as has been previously suggested. PMID:24695429

  4. A Magnetic Resonance-Compatible Loading Device for Dynamically Imaging Shortening and Lengthening Muscle Contraction Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Silder, Amy; Westphal, Christopher J.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and test a magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible device to induce either shortening or lengthening muscle contractions for use during dynamic MR imaging. The proposed device guides the knee through cyclic flexion-extension, while either elastic or inertial loads are imposed on the hamstrings. Ten subjects were tested in a motion capture laboratory to evaluate the repeatability of limb motion and imposed loads. Image data were subsequently obtained for all ten subjects using cine phase contrast imaging. Subjects achieved ~30 deg of knee joint motion, with individual subjects remaining within ~1 deg of their average motion across 56 repeated cycles. The maximum hamstring activity and loading occurred when the knee was flexed for the elastic loading condition (shortening contraction), and extended for the inertial loading condition (lengthening contraction). Repeat MR image acquisitions of the same loading condition resulted in similar tissue velocities, while spatial variations in velocity data were clearly different between loading conditions. The proposed device can enable dynamic imaging of the muscle under different types of loads, which has the potential to improve our understanding of basic muscle mechanics, identify potential causes of muscle injury, and provide a basis for quantitatively assessing injury effects at the tissue level. Slight modifications to the device design and/or subject positioning could allow for imaging of the quadriceps or the knee. PMID:24353749

  5. Mechanical Vibrations Reduce the Intervertebral Disc Swelling and Muscle Atrophy from Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holguin, Nilsson; Muir, Jesse; Evans, Harlan J.; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Clinton; Wagshul, Mark; Judex, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Loss of functional weight bearing, such as experienced during space flight or bed rest (BR), distorts intervertebral disc (IVD) and muscle morphology. IVDs are avascular structures consisting of cells that may derive their nutrition and waste removal from the load induced fluid flow into and out of the disc. A diurnal cycle is produced by forces related to weight bearing and muscular activity, and comprised of a supine and erect posture over a 24 hr period. A diurnal cycle will include a disc volume change of approx. 10-13%. However, in space there are little or no diurnal changes because of the microgravity, which removes the gravitational load and compressive forces to the back muscles. The BR model and the etiology of the disc swelling and muscle atrophy could provide insight into those subjects confined to bed for chronic disease/injury and aging. We hypothesize that extremely low-magnitude, high frequency mechanical vibrations will abate the disc degeneration and muscle loss associated with long-term BR.

  6. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men. PMID:27044854

  7. Carcass Performance, Muscle Fiber, Meat Quality, and Sensory Quality Characteristics of Crossbred Pigs with Different Live Weights

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hee Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In order to attain heavier live weight without impairing pork or sensory quality characteristics, carcass performance, muscle fiber, pork quality, and sensory quality characteristics were compared among the heavy weight (HW, average live weight of 130.5 kg), medium weight (MW, average weight of 111.1 kg), and light weight (LW, average weight of 96.3 kg) pigs at time of slaughter. The loin eye area was 1.47 times greater in the HW group compared to the LW group (64.0 and 43.5 cm2, p<0.001), while carcass percent was similar between the HW and MW groups (p>0.05). This greater performance by the HW group compared to the LW group can be explained by a greater total number (1,436 vs. 1,188, ×103, p<0.001) and larger area (4,452 vs. 3,716 μm2, p<0.001) of muscle fibers. No significant differences were observed in muscle pH45 min, lightness, drip loss, and shear force among the groups (p>0.05), and higher live weights did not influence sensory quality attributes, including tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. Therefore, these findings indicate that increased live weights in this study did not influence the technological and sensory quality characteristics. Moreover, muscles with a higher number of medium or large size fibers tend to exhibit good carcass performance without impairing meat and sensory quality characteristics. PMID:27433110

  8. Carcass Performance, Muscle Fiber, Meat Quality, and Sensory Quality Characteristics of Crossbred Pigs with Different Live Weights.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Min; Oh, Hee Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In order to attain heavier live weight without impairing pork or sensory quality characteristics, carcass performance, muscle fiber, pork quality, and sensory quality characteristics were compared among the heavy weight (HW, average live weight of 130.5 kg), medium weight (MW, average weight of 111.1 kg), and light weight (LW, average weight of 96.3 kg) pigs at time of slaughter. The loin eye area was 1.47 times greater in the HW group compared to the LW group (64.0 and 43.5 cm(2), p<0.001), while carcass percent was similar between the HW and MW groups (p>0.05). This greater performance by the HW group compared to the LW group can be explained by a greater total number (1,436 vs. 1,188, ×10(3), p<0.001) and larger area (4,452 vs. 3,716 μm(2), p<0.001) of muscle fibers. No significant differences were observed in muscle pH45 min, lightness, drip loss, and shear force among the groups (p>0.05), and higher live weights did not influence sensory quality attributes, including tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. Therefore, these findings indicate that increased live weights in this study did not influence the technological and sensory quality characteristics. Moreover, muscles with a higher number of medium or large size fibers tend to exhibit good carcass performance without impairing meat and sensory quality characteristics. PMID:27433110

  9. Impact of the hydrodyne process on tenderness, microbial load, and sensory characteristics of pork longissimus muscle.

    PubMed

    Moeller, S; Wulf, D; Meeker, D; Ndife, M; Sundararajan, N; Solomon, M B

    1999-08-01

    Paired, boneless pork loin muscles were obtained from 76 market hogs to evaluate tenderness, meat quality characteristics, sensory attributes, and microbial characterization of pork muscle exposed to the Hydrodyne Process (H) compared with untreated control (C) loin. A subset of 16 paired loins was randomly selected for use in sensory evaluation and microbial characterization. Loins were vacuum packaged and immersed in a heat shrink tank prior to the H treatment. The Hydrodyne treatment exposed the loin to the pressure equivalent of a 150-g explosive, generating a pressure distribution of approximately 703 kg/cm2 at the surface of the samples. Meat quality assessments taken following treatment included subjective color, firmness/wetness, marbling scores (1 to 5 scale), Minolta reflectance and color readings, drip loss, and lipid content. The P-value for statistical significance for main effects and interactions was set at <.05 in all analyses. Administration of H resulted in a 17% improvement in Warner-Bratzler shear force (2.69 vs. 3.24 kg), with the shear force similar at two end-point cooking times (11 and 16 min) corresponding to approximately 75 and 83 degrees C, respectively. No differences between H and C were observed for color score, firmness score, Minolta L, Minolta Y, or drip loss on uncooked samples. The H loins had lower marbling scores (P<.05) and intramuscular lipid (P<.05) content than the paired C loin. Sensory evaluation on the randomly selected (n = 16) paired loins samples showed no improvement in Warner-Bratzler shear force. Sensory panelists were also unable to detect a difference between H and C loins for both initial and sustained tenderness scores. No differences between H and C loins were found for pork flavor, off-flavor, cohesiveness, or number of chews before swallowing, but H loins had a significantly lower juiciness score and more cooking loss than C loins. Microbial analysis results showed no differences in coliform bacteria counts

  10. Resistive switching characteristics and mechanisms in silicon oxide memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Wu, Xiaohan; Chen, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yanzhen; Xue, Fei; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic unipolar SiOx-based resistance random access memories (ReRAM) characterization, switching mechanisms, and applications have been investigated. Device structures, material compositions, and electrical characteristics are identified that enable ReRAM cells with high ON/OFF ratio, low static power consumption, low switching power, and high readout-margin using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS)-compatible SiOx-based materials. These ideas are combined with the use of horizontal and vertical device structure designs, composition optimization, electrical control, and external factors to help understand resistive switching (RS) mechanisms. Measured temperature effects, pulse response, and carrier transport behaviors lead to compact models of RS mechanisms and energy band diagrams in order to aid the development of computer-aided design for ultralarge-v scale integration. This chapter presents a comprehensive investigation of SiOx-based RS characteristics and mechanisms for the post-CMOS device era.

  11. Effect of selection for improved body weight and composition on muscle and meat characteristics in Muscovy duck.

    PubMed

    Baeza, E; Dessay, C; Wacrenier, N; Marche, G; Listrat, A

    2002-09-01

    1. For 25 years, the Muscovy duck has been selected for greater body weight at slaughter age, higher meat yield and lower fat content. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of such selection on the biochemical and technological characteristics of duck meat. 2. A line which has been maintained without any selection since 1975 (control line) and a heavy line now commercialised (selected line) were reared under the same conditions. We compared growth performances, dressing and dissection yields and biochemical and technological characteristics of duck meat at 8, 10 and 12 weeks of age. 3. Our results showed that an indirect effect of selection was to increase the duck growth rate. At a given age, muscle weights and yields as well as carcase fat content were higher for selected ducks. In the selected line, muscle fibres were larger and the collagen content in muscles lower. 4. The Sartorius muscle in ducks from the selected line exhibited a higher percentage in numbers of white type IIb fibres to the detriment of red type IIa fibres. Its glycolytic enzyme activity was higher and its oxidative enzyme activity lower. 5. In breast muscle, selection decreased the rate of post-mortem decline in pH value, increased protein and mineral contents and decreased moisture. It did not affect fibre type, colour, haem pigment and lipid contents, collagen solubility or drip loss. 6. In conclusion, the effects of Muscovy duck selection on meat quality were relatively moderate. PMID:12365513

  12. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Du, Juan; Chen, Rongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS. Methods Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB) and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP). All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35–60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV) and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment. Results For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml) and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg), lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml) and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml) in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7) and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9) in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1). Conclusion Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury. PMID:26745868

  13. Passive and active mechanical properties of the superficial and deep digital flexor muscles in the forelimbs of anesthetized Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Swanstrom, Michael D; Zarucco, Laura; Stover, Susan M; Hubbard, Mont; Hawkins, David A; Driessen, Bernd; Steffey, Eugene P

    2005-03-01

    The superficial (SDF) and deep digital flexor (DDF) muscles are critical for equine forelimb locomotion. Knowledge of their mechanical properties will enhance our understanding of limb biomechanics. Muscle contractile properties derived from architectural-based algorithms may overestimate real forces and underestimate shortening capacity because of simplistic assumptions regarding muscle architecture. Therefore, passive and active (=total - passive) force-length properties of the SDF and DDF muscles were measured directly in vivo. Muscles from the right forelimbs of four Thoroughbred horses were evaluated during general anesthesia. Limbs were fixed to an external frame with the muscle attached to a linear actuator and load cell. Each muscle was stretched from an unloaded state to a range of prefixed lengths, then stimulated while held at that length. The total force did not exceed 4000 N, the limit for the clamping device. The SDF and DDF muscles produced 716+/-192 and 1577+/-203 N maximum active isometric force (F(max)), had ascending force-length ranges (R(asc)) of 5.1+/-0.2 and 9.1+/-0.4 cm, and had passive stiffnesses of 1186+/-104 and 1132+/-51 N/cm, respectively. The values measured for F(max) were much smaller than predicted based on conservative estimates of muscle specific tension and muscle physiological cross-sectional area. R(asc) were much larger than predicted based on muscle fiber length estimates. These data suggest that accurate prediction of the active mechanical behavior of architecturally complex muscles such as the equine DDF and SDF requires more sophisticated algorithms. PMID:15652557

  14. Downstream mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Lynch, Gordon S; McConell, Glenn K

    2010-12-01

    There is evidence that nitric oxide (NO) is required for the normal increases in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction, but the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We examined whether NO regulates glucose uptake during skeletal muscle contractions via cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent pathways. Isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from mice were stimulated to contract ex vivo, and potential NO signaling pathways were blocked by the addition of inhibitors to the incubation medium. Contraction increased (P < 0.05) NO synthase (NOS) activity (∼40%) and dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence (a marker of oxidant levels; ∼95%), which was prevented with a NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and antioxidants [nonspecific antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC); thiol-reducing agent, DTT], respectively. L-NMMA and NAC both attenuated glucose uptake during contraction by ∼50% (P < 0.05), and their effects were not additive. Neither the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, which prevents the formation of cGMP, the cGMP-dependent protein (PKG) inhibitor Rp-8-bromo-β-phenyl-1,N2-ethenoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate sodium salt nor white light, which breaks S-nitrosylated bonds, affects glucose uptake during contraction; however, DTT attenuated (P < 0.05) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake (by 70%). NOS inhibition and antioxidant treatment reduced contraction-stimulated increases in protein S-glutathionylation and tyrosine nitration (P < 0.05), without affecting AMPK or p38 MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, we provide evidence to suggest that NOS-derived oxidants regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contractions via a cGMP/PKG-, AMPK-, and p38 MAPK-independent pathway. In addition, it appears that NO and ROS may regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction through a similar pathway. PMID:20943856

  15. Mechanical studies on the retractor bulbi muscle and its motor units in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Lennerstrand, Gunnar

    1974-01-01

    1. For a description of some of the mechanical properties of the retractor bulbi muscle in the cat, the isometric tension development was studied in one of the four slips of the muscle and in single retractor bulbi motor units. 2. The motor units and the muscle were activated by stimulating their motoneurones of origin in the abducens nucleus. 3. All twenty-eight motor units studied were of the same fast, twitch type, which fatigued quickly. Similarities between the motor units and the muscle with regard to isometric tension development strongly suggest that the retractor bulbi is composed exclusively of this type of motor unit. 4. On an average the motor unit had a twitch rise time of 9·2 msec and a half-decay time of 11·4 msec. The twitch tension was 36·7 mg. At stimulation with 175 pulses/sec or above the tetanus fused. The maximal tetanic tension developed was 440 mg and the maximal rate of tension rise was 24·5 g/sec. To prolonged tetanic stimulation most of the units fatigued completely within 10-15 sec. 5. In a slip of the muslce similar values were obtained for contraction time, half-decay time, fusion frequency and fatigability. Tetanic tension reached 11·7 g and the maximal speed of tetanic contraction was 255 g/sec. 6. As in other extrinsic eye muscles a linear relation was found between length and tension in the activated retractor bulbi. An increase in activation induced a parallel shift in the curves to higher tension values but the slopes of the curves remained unchanged. The average slope value was 1·7 g/mm. PMID:4818515

  16. Skeletal muscle atrophy: disease-induced mechanisms may mask disuse atrophy.

    PubMed

    Malavaki, C J; Sakkas, G K; Mitrou, G I; Kalyva, A; Stefanidis, I; Myburgh, K H; Karatzaferi, C

    2015-12-01

    Disuse atrophy is the loss of skeletal muscle mass due to inactivity or lower than 'normal' use. It is not only a furtive component of the 'modern' sedentary lifestyle but also a part of numerous pathologies, where muscle loss is linked to disease specific and/or other toxicity factors, eventually leading to wasting (cachexia). Whether disuse-or-disease induced, muscle loss leads to weakness and metabolic comorbidities with a high societal and financial cost. This review discusses the intricate network of interacting signalling pathways including Atrogin-1/MAFbx, IGF1-Akt, myostatin, glucocorticoids, NF-kB, MAPKs and caspases that seem to regulate disuse atrophy but also share common activation patterns in other states of muscle loss such as sarcopenia or cachexia. Reactive oxygen species are also important regulators of cell signalling pathways that can accelerate proteolysis and depress protein synthesis. Exercise is an effective countermeasure and antioxidants may show some benefit. We discuss how the experimental model used can crucially affect the outcome and hence our understanding of atrophy. Timing of sampling is crucial as some signalling mechanisms reach their peak early during the atrophy process to rapidly decline thereafter, while other present high levels even weeks and months after study initiation. The importance of such differences lays in future consideration of appropriate treatment targets. Apart from attempting to correct defective genes or negate their effects, technological advances in new rational ways should aim to regulate specific gene expression at precise time points for the treatment of muscle atrophy in therapeutic protocols depending on the origin of atrophy induction. PMID:26728748

  17. Large-scale Models Reveal the Two-component Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jarosch, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive explanation of striated muscle mechanics and contraction on the basis of filament rotations. Helical proteins, particularly the coiled-coils of tropomyosin, myosin and α-actinin, shorten their H-bonds cooperatively and produce torque and filament rotations when the Coulombic net-charge repulsion of their highly charged side-chains is diminished by interaction with ions. The classical “two-component model” of active muscle differentiated a “contractile component” which stretches the “series elastic component” during force production. The contractile components are the helically shaped thin filaments of muscle that shorten the sarcomeres by clockwise drilling into the myosin cross-bridges with torque decrease (= force-deficit). Muscle stretch means drawing out the thin filament helices off the cross-bridges under passive counterclockwise rotation with torque increase (= stretch activation). Since each thin filament is anchored by four elastic α-actinin Z-filaments (provided with force-regulating sites for Ca2+ binding), the thin filament rotations change the torsional twist of the four Z-filaments as the “series elastic components”. Large scale models simulate the changes of structure and force in the Z-band by the different Z-filament twisting stages A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Stage D corresponds to the isometric state. The basic phenomena of muscle physiology, i. e. latency relaxation, Fenn-effect, the force-velocity relation, the length-tension relation, unexplained energy, shortening heat, the Huxley-Simmons phases, etc. are explained and interpreted with the help of the model experiments. PMID:19330099

  18. [Regulation of vasomotor tone of small skeletal muscle veins by intrinsic mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Szénási, Annamária; Dörnyei, Gabriella; Rácz, Anita; Debreczeni, Béla; Koller, Ákos

    2016-05-22

    In many developed countries the prevalence of venous disorders and its consequences are higher than that of arterial diseases. Thus it is very important to understand the exact physiological and pathophysiological function of small veins and their control mechanisms. Small veins and venules have an important role in the regulation of capillary fluid exchange, as well as return of the venous blood into the heart. However, there is only limited knowledge available regarding the role of local mechanisms controlling the vasomotor tone and diameter of small veins. In the last decade the authors focused on the elucidation of these mechanisms in isolated skeletal muscle venules of rats. Their results suggest that the tone of small veins is controlled by the integration of several mechanisms, activated by the intraluminal pressure and flow/wall shear stress, in addition to numerous local mediators synthesized and released from the smooth muscle and endothelium. These mechanisms are involved - in a complex manner - in the control of postcapillary resistance, thus regulation of tissue blood supply, venous return and consequently in the modulation of the cardiac output, as well. PMID:27177786

  19. Neuro-mechanics of muscle coordination during recumbent pedaling in post-acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, C; Ambrosini, E; Schmid, M; Monticone, M; Pedrocchi, A; Ferrigno, G; D'Alessio, T; Conforto, S; Ferrante, S

    2015-01-01

    Motor impairment after stroke has been hypothesized to be related, among others, to impairments in the modular control of movement. In this study we analyzed muscle coordination and pedal forces during a recumbent pedaling exercise from a sample of post-acute stroke patients (n=5) and a population of age-matched healthy individuals (n=4). Healthy subjects and the less impaired patients showed a shared modular organization of pedaling based on 4 similar muscle synergies. The most impaired patient, characterized by a Motricity Index of 52/100, showed a reduced complexity (only 2 muscle synergies for the affected side). Differences between healthy subjects and post-stroke patients in the execution of the task were identified in terms of unbalance in mechanical work production, which well corresponded to the level of impairment. This pedaling unbalance could be traced back to different activation strategies of the 4 identified modules. Investigation on a more representative sample will provide a full characterization of the neuro-mechanics of pedaling after stroke, helping our understandings of the disruption of motor coordination at central level after stroke and of the most effective solutions for functional recovery. PMID:26736246

  20. Cancer cachexia causes skeletal muscle damage via transient receptor potential vanilloid 2‐independent mechanisms, unlike muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Ohtake, Hitomi; Kamauchi, Shinya; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Muscle wasting during cancer cachexia contributes to patient morbidity. Cachexia‐induced muscle damage may be understood by comparing its symptoms with those of other skeletal muscle diseases, but currently available data are limited. Methods We modelled cancer cachexia in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma/colon adenocarcinoma and compared the associated muscle damage with that in a murine muscular dystrophy model (mdx mice). We measured biochemical and immunochemical parameters: amounts/localization of cytoskeletal proteins and/or Ca2+ signalling proteins related to muscle function and abnormality. We analysed intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and compared results between the two models. Involvement of Ca2+‐permeable channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) was examined by inoculating Lewis lung carcinoma cells into transgenic mice expressing dominant‐negative TRPV2. Results Tumourigenesis caused loss of body and skeletal muscle weight and reduced muscle force and locomotor activity. Similar to mdx mice, cachexia muscles exhibited myolysis, reduced sarcolemmal sialic acid content, and enhanced lysosomal exocytosis and sarcolemmal localization of phosphorylated Ca2+/CaMKII. Abnormal autophagy and degradation of dystrophin also occurred. Unlike mdx muscles, cachexia muscles did not exhibit regeneration markers (centrally nucleated fibres), and levels of autophagic proteolytic pathway markers increased. While a slight accumulation of TRPV2 was observed in cachexia muscles, Ca2+ influx via TRPV2 was not elevated in cachexia‐associated myotubes, and the course of cachexia pathology was not ameliorated by dominant‐negative inhibition of TRPV2. Conclusions Thus, cancer cachexia may induce muscle damage through TRPV2‐independent mechanisms distinct from those in muscular dystrophy; this may help treat patients with tumour‐induced muscle wasting. PMID:27239414

  1. A post-transcriptional mechanism regulates calpastatin expression in bovine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nattrass, G S; Cafe, L M; McIntyre, B L; Gardner, G E; McGilchrist, P; Robinson, D L; Wang, Y H; Pethick, D W; Greenwood, P L

    2014-02-01

    the abundance of an alternative polyadenylated variant of the CAST transcript, terminated at the proximal polyadenylation site, provides a unique insight into the potential involvement of a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism which may influence protein expression levels in bovine skeletal muscle. PMID:24664555

  2. Mechanical shear and tensile characteristics of selected biomass stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical characteristics (stress and energy of tensile and shear modes) of selected biomass stems, such as big bluestem, bromegrass, and Barlow wheat were determined. A high capacity MTI-100K universal testing machine attached with standard tensile clamps and designed fabricated double-shear devic...

  3. HEF-19-induced relaxation of colonic smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Lu-Lu; Fu, Shou-Ting

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relaxant effect of chromane HEF-19 on colonic smooth muscles isolated from rabbits, and the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: The relaxant effect and action mechanisms of HEF-19 were investigated using descending colon smooth muscle of the rabbits. Preparations 1 cm long were mounted in 15-mL tissue baths containing Tyrode’s solution, maintained at 37 ± 0.5 °C and aerated with a mixture of 5% CO2 in oxygen (Carbogen). The tension and amplitude of the smooth muscle strips were recorded after adding HEF-19 (10-6, 10-5 and 10-4 mol/L). After cumulative administration of four antispasmodic agents, including acetylcholine chloride (Ach) (10-4 mol/L), histamine (10-4 mol/L), high-K+ (60 mmol/L) and BaCl2 (8.2 mmol/L), HEF-19 (3 × 10-7-3 × 10-4 mol/L) was added to investigate the relaxant effect of HEF-19. CaCl2 (10-4-2.5 × 10-3 mol/L) was added cumulatively to the smooth muscle preparations pretreated with and without HEF-19 (1 × 10-6 or 3 × 10-6 mol/L) and verapamil (1 × 10-7 mol/L) to study the mechanisms involved. Finally, phasic contraction was induced with ACh (15 × 10-6 mol/L), and CaCl2 (4 × 10-3 mol/L) was added to the smooth muscle preparations pretreated with and without HEF-19 (3 × 10-6 mol/L or 1 × 10-5 mol/L) and verapamil (1 × 10-7 mol/L) in calcium-free medium to further study the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS: HEF-19 (1 × 10-6, 1 × 10-5 and 1 × 10-4 mol/L) suppressed spontaneous contraction of rabbit colonic smooth muscles. HEF-19 (3 × 10-7-3 × 10-4 mol/L) relaxed in a concentration-dependent manner colonic smooth muscle preparations pre-contracted with BaCl2, high-K+ solution, Ach or histamine with respective EC50 values of 5.15 ± 0.05, 5.12 ± 0.08, 5.58 ± 0.16 and 5.25 ± 0.24, thus showing a spasmolytic activity. HEF-19 (1 × 10-6 mol/L and 3 × 10-6 mol/L) shifted the concentration-response curves of CaCl2 to the right and depressed the maximum response to CaCl2. The two components contracted by Ach were

  4. The relaxant effect of Nigella sativa on smooth muscles, its possible mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Keyhanmanesh, Rana; Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossien

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) is a spice plant which has been traditionally used for culinary and medicinal purposes. Different therapeutic properties including the beneficial effects on asthma and dyspnea, digestive and gynecology disorders have been described for the seeds of N. sativa. There is evidence of the relaxant effects of this plant and some of its constituents on different types of smooth muscle including rabbit aorta, rabbit jejunum and trachea. The relaxant effect of N. sativa could be of therapeutic importance such as bronchodilation in asthma, vasodilation in hypertension and therapeutic effect on digestive or urogenital disorders. Therefore in the present article, the relaxant effects of N. sativa and its constituents on smooth muscles and its possible mechanisms as well as clinical application of this effect were reviewed. PMID:25859297

  5. The Inhibitory Mechanism of Gentamicin on Electrical Field Stimulation Response in Rat Bladder Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Min, Chang Ho; Wang, YiYi; Bae, Jinhyung; Han, Jung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To see the inhibitory mechanism of gentamicin in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) using the rat bladder smooth muscle, atropine or guanethidine was treated but had no effect. Methylsergide, a non-selective 5-HT1, 5-HT2 receptor antagonist was also treated but had on effect. Kinase inhibitors, such as chelerythrine (PKC inhibitor), ML-9 (MLCK inhibitor), or Y27632 (rho kinase inhibitor) were pretreated before gentamicin treatment, but did not have effect. For U73122, a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor however, the inhibitory effect to gentamicin was significantly attenuated in all frequencies given by the EFS. Therefore gentamicin induced inhibitory effect on EFS response in rat bladder smooth muscle was not mediated by the activation of adrenergic, cholinergic, or serotonergic receptor. The inhibition of gentamicin might be mediated through the PLC dependent pathway, but not through the PKC, MLCK or rho kinase dependent pathway. PMID:26330761

  6. Parvalbumin characteristics in the sonic muscle of a freshwater ornamental grunting toadfish (Allenbatrachus grunniens).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuo-Hsun; Hsieh, Fu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Yun; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Shiea, Jentaie; Mok, Hin-Kiu

    2013-04-01

    The grunting toadfish, Allenbatrachus grunniens, is an ornamental fish in freshwater aquariums, and it has the ability to produce sounds. The sonic muscle of the toadfish is the fastest vertebrate muscle ever measured, and the rates of Ca(2+) transport and cross-bridge dissociation are also the fastest. Parvalbumins (PAs) are Ca(2+)-binding proteins that help in muscle relaxation in vertebrates. Several PA isoforms have been identified in variable ratios in different muscle types. Both male and female grunting toadfish have intrinsic sonic muscles attached to their swim bladders, but no significant difference in morphology between male and female sonic muscles has been observed. In this study, we used SDS-PAGE and western blotting to characterize the total PA expression and to identify the PAs from the sonic muscle and the white body muscle of A. grunniens. Although the total PA concentrations were similar in sonic and white muscles, there were differences in the isoform percentages. Two and four PA isoforms were identified from sonic muscle and white muscle, respectively. The estimated sizes of PA1, PA2, and PA3 in the sonic muscle of the grunting toadfish were 10, 10.5, and 10.5 kDa, respectively, and the isoelectric points of PA1, PA2, and PA3 in the grunting toadfish were 4.77, 4.58, and 4.42, respectively. In the sonic muscle, the primary PA isoform was PA1, which comprised more than 94 % of total PA, whereas PA2 comprised only 5 % of the total PA content. In contrast, in white muscle, the primary isoform was PA2, which comprised 58 % of the total PA. Both PA1 (with PA1a) and PA3 represented approximately 20 % of the total PA in white muscle. These results indicate that there is no positive correlation between a high PA content and the speed of muscle relaxation; however, PA1 might have the greatest effect on the relaxation of the grunting toadfish's sonic muscle. PMID:22744796

  7. Effect of Cattle Breed on Meat Quality, Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Lipid Oxidation and Fatty Acids in China

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiangxue; Meng, Qingxiang; Cui, Zhenliang; Ren, Liping

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to compare meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics, lipid oxidation and fatty acids of Limousin (LIM), Simmtental (SIM), Luxi (LX), Qinchuan (QC) and Jinnan (JN) offered the same diet in China. After finishing, eight bulls from each breed were randomly selected for slaughter at 18.5 months old. Longissimus dorsi (ld) muscle was taken from the carcass for meat quality evaluations. Breed had little effect on most of meat and fat color parameters except for Hue and b* in which QC had lower values. LIM showed higher pH (24 h) and better water holding capacity than other breeds. LIM showed the lowest dry matter content but the highest crude protein. LX and LIM had higher percentage and density of red muscle fiber than other breeds. Lipid oxidations were significantly lower in LIM than in QC, with the LX, SIM and JN having the intermediate values. Compared to other four breeds, QC provided the highest values of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-6 fatty acids and n-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, LIM scored better on most of meat quality characteristics; however, local breeds such as LX and QC also had better muscle fiber characteristics and better fatty acids composition. PMID:25049633

  8. Effects of age and sex on neuromuscular-mechanical determinants of muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Delahunt, Eamonn; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Lowery, Madeleine; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to concurrently assess the effect of age on neuromuscular and mechanical properties in 24 young (23.6 ± 3.7 years) and 20 older (66.5 ± 3.8 years) healthy males and females. Maximal strength of knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF), contractile rate of torque development (RTD) and neural activation of agonist-antagonist muscles (surface EMG) were examined during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Tissue stiffness (i.e. musculo-articular stiffness (MAS) and muscle stiffness (MS)) was examined via the free-oscillation technique, whereas muscle architecture (MA) of the vastus lateralis and subcutaneous fat were measured by ultrasonography. Males exhibited a greater age-related decline for KE (47.4 %) and KF (53.1 %) MVIC, and RTD (60.4 %) when compared to females (32.9, 42.6 and 34.0 %, respectively). Neural activation of agonist muscles during KE MVIC falls markedly with ageing; however, no age and sex effects were observed in the antagonist co-activation. MAS and MS were lower in elderly compared with young participants and in females compared with males. Regarding MA, main effects for age (young 23.0 ± 3.3 vs older 19.5 ± 2.0 mm) and sex (males 22.4 ± 3.5 vs females 20.4 ± 2.7 mm) were detected in muscle thickness. For fascicle length, there was an effect of age (young 104.6 ± 8.8 vs older 89.8 ± 10.5 mm), while for pennation angle, there was an effect of sex (males 13.3 ± 2.4 vs females 11.5 ± 1.7°). These findings suggest that both neuromuscular and mechanical declines are important contributors to the age-related loss of muscle strength/function but with some peculiar sex-related differences. PMID:27189591

  9. Mechanical Stretch-Induced Activation of ROS/RNS Signaling in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher W.; Prosser, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Mechanical activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) occurs in striated muscle and affects Ca2+ signaling and contractile function. ROS/RNS signaling is tightly controlled, spatially compartmentalized, and source specific. Recent Advances: Here, we review the evidence that within the contracting myocyte, the trans-membrane protein NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) is the primary source of ROS generated during contraction. We also review a newly characterized signaling cascade in cardiac and skeletal muscle in which the microtubule network acts as a mechanotransduction element that activates Nox2-dependent ROS generation during mechanical stretch, a pathway termed X-ROS signaling. Critical Issues: In the heart, X-ROS acts locally and affects the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors) and tunes Ca2+ signaling during physiological behavior, but excessive X-ROS can promote Ca2+-dependent arrhythmias in pathology. In skeletal muscle, X-ROS sensitizes Ca2+-permeable sarcolemmal “transient receptor potential” channels, a pathway that is critical for sustaining SR load during repetitive contractions, but when in excess, it is maladaptive in diseases such as Duchenne Musclar dystrophy. Future Directions: New advances in ROS/RNS detection as well as molecular manipulation of signaling pathways will provide critical new mechanistic insights into the details of X-ROS signaling. These efforts will undoubtedly reveal new avenues for therapeutic intervention in the numerous diseases of striated muscle in which altered mechanoactivation of ROS/RNS production has been identified. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 929–936. PMID:23971496

  10. Mechanical and neural stretch responses of the human soleus muscle at different walking speeds

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Neil J; Ishikawa, Masaki; Grey, Michael J; af Klint, Richard; Komi, Paavo V; Avela, Janne; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Voigt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    During human walking, a sudden trip may elicit a Ia afferent fibre mediated short latency stretch reflex. The aim of this study was to investigate soleus (SOL) muscle mechanical behaviour in response to dorsiflexion perturbations, and to relate this behaviour to short latency stretch reflex responses. Twelve healthy subjects walked on a treadmill with the left leg attached to an actuator capable of rapidly dorsiflexing the ankle joint. Ultrasound was used to measure fascicle lengths in SOL during walking, and surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record muscle activation. Dorsiflexion perturbations of 6 deg were applied during mid-stance at walking speeds of 3, 4 and 5 km h−1. At each walking speed, perturbations were delivered at three different velocities (slow: ∼170 deg s−1, mid: ∼230 deg s−1, fast: ∼280 deg s−1). At 5 km h−1, fascicle stretch amplitude was 34–40% smaller and fascicle stretch velocity 22–28% slower than at 3 km h−1 in response to a constant amplitude perturbation, whilst stretch reflex amplitudes were unchanged. Changes in fascicle stretch parameters can be attributed to an increase in muscle stiffness at faster walking speeds. As stretch velocity is a potent stimulus to muscle spindles, a decrease in the velocity of fascicle stretch at faster walking speeds would be expected to decrease spindle afferent feedback and thus stretch reflex amplitudes, which did not occur. It is therefore postulated that other mechanisms, such as altered fusimotor drive, reduced pre-synaptic inhibition and/or increased descending excitatory input, acted to maintain motoneurone output as walking speed increased, preventing a decrease in short latency reflex amplitudes. PMID:19451207

  11. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle increases prostaglandin F2(alpha) synthesis and cyclooxygenase activity by a pertussis toxin sensitive mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Shansky, Janet; Solerssi, Rosa; Chromiak, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of differentiated skeletal muscle in tissue culture increases the production of prostaglandin F(sub 2(alpha)), an anabolic stimulator of myofiber growth. Within 4 h of initiating mechanical activity, the activity of cyclooxygenase, a regulatory enzyme in prostaglandin synthesis, was increased 82% (P is less than .005), and this increase was maintained for at least 24 h. Kinetic analysis of the stretch-activated cyclooxygenase indicated a two to three-fold decrease in the enzyme's K(sub m) with no change in V(sub max). The stretch-induced increase in enzymatic activity was not inhibited by cycloheximide, was independent of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin-insensitive), but was prevented by the G protein inhibitor pertussis toxin. Pertussis toxin also inhibited the stretch-induced increases in PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production, and cell growth. It is concluded that stretch of skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of the anabolic modulator PGF(sub 2(alpha)) by a G protein-dependent process which involves activation of cyclooxygenase by a posttranslational mechanism.

  12. Use of a fiber glass optical system to measure the contractile characteristics of a single isolated muscle cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chulung; Yin, Shizhuo; Li, Jiang; Yu, Francis T. S.; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Zhang, Xueqian; Lei, Xiaoxiao; Wu, Zhongkong

    1998-05-01

    Cell is the basic structural and fundamental unit of all organisms; the smallest structure capable of performing all the activities vital to life. One goal of current research interest is to learn how the muscle varies the strength of its contraction in response to electric stimuli. A wide variety of techniques have been developed to monitor the mechanical response of isolated cardiac myocytes. Some success has been reported either with the use of intact rat myocytes supported by suction micropipettes or in guinea pig myocytes adhering to glass beams. However, the usual measuring techniques exhibit destructive contact performance on live cells. They could not solve the problem, since the cell may die during or after the time-consuming attachment process at the beginning of each experiment. In contrast, a novel optical system, which consists of a microglass tube with an inner diameter the same size of a real cardiac cell, is proposed to simulate real cell's twitch process. the physical parameters of synthetic cell are well known. By comparing the dynamics of the real cell with that of the simulated cell, the twitch characteristics of the real cell can be measured.

  13. Clinical and Radiologic Characteristics of Inferior Rectus Muscle Sheath Entrapment in Orbital Blowout Fracture.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Abbas; Tavakoli, Mehdi; Khosravifard, Keivan; Yazdani, Shahin

    2015-10-01

    Blowout fracture is a common condition in the oculoplastics clinic. One of the indications for its repair is entrapment of the inferior rectus muscle within the fracture site. Herein, the authors present 3 patients of inferior rectus muscle sheath entrapment without entrapment of the muscle itself. The outcome of treatment was excellent in all patients. The aim of this report is to present the special clinical and radiologic findings in such patients. PMID:26413961

  14. Effect of Mechanical Stresses on Characteristics of Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of compressive mechanical stresses on chip solid tantalum capacitors is investigated by monitoring characteristics of different part types under axial and hydrostatic stresses. Depending on part types, an exponential increase of leakage currents was observed when stresses exceeded 10 MPa to 40 MPa. For the first time, reversible variations of leakage currents (up to two orders of magnitude) with stress have been demonstrated. Mechanical stresses did not cause significant changes of AC characteristics of the capacitors, whereas breakdown voltages measured during the surge current testing decreased substantially indicating an increased probability of failures of stressed capacitors in low impedance applications. Variations of leakage currents are explained by a combination of two mechanisms: stress-induced scintillations and stress-induced generation of electron traps in the tantalum pentoxide dielectric.

  15. Comparison of growth characteristics between skeletal muscle satellite cell lines from diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-hao; Tan, Xungang; Jiao, Shuang; Zhang, Pei-jun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. According to myosatellite cell lines (MSCs) established in vitro from diploid and triploid flounder, we compared the characters of growth and differentiation of their MSCs. The results would be useful for learning the muscle development mechanism in teleosts. Materials and Methods. The skeletal muscle cells from the diploid and triploid olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus were isolated and cultured in vitro, respectively, and the cells were characterized at the morphology and molecular level; meanwhile, the performance of these cells’ proliferation and differentiation were analyzed. Results. Two new skeletal muscle cell lines (POMSCS(2n) and POMSCS(3n)) from diploid and triploid flounder have been respectively subcultured for 67 times and 66 times. The cultured cells were mostly spindle-like mononuclear cells. They have normal flounder diploid karyotype (2n=48t) and triploid karyotype (3n=72t), respectively. Muscle satellite cell gene marker (pax7b) and myogenic cell protein marker (Desmin) were all expressed in cells of two cell lines. Both of the cells could differentiate into the large polynucleated muscle fibre cells, and immunofluorescence reactions of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) were positive. There were more cells of POMSCS(3n) to differentiate into the muscle fibre cells than that of POMSCS(2n). However, POMSCS(2n) cells proliferated more rapidly than those of POMSCS(3n) (P < 0.05). The significant fluorescent signals were observed in both POMSCS(2n) and POMSCS(3n) cells after transfected with pEGFP-N3 reporter plasmid. Conclusions. The two cell lines have been established and characterized as MSCs. We suppose that it might be the differentiation capacity, rather than the proliferation activity of MSCs to play a key role in the better growth of triploid ones than diploid. Both cell lines will become the ideal tools to learn the mechanism of fish MSCs proliferation, differentiation and regeneration during muscle development in the future. PMID

  16. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle generates lipid-related second messengers by phospholipase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Shansky, J.; Karlisch, P.; Solerssi, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of cultured avian skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of prostaglandins (PG) E2 and F2 alpha which regulate protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. These stretch-induced PG increases are reduced in low extracellular calcium medium and by specific phospholipase inhibitors. Mechanical stimulation increases the breakdown rate of 3H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipids, releasing free 3H-arachidonic acid, the rate-limiting precursor of PG synthesis. Mechanical stimulation also increases 3H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation and intracellular levels of inositol phosphates from myo-[2-3H]inositol labelled phospholipids. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC), and phospholipase D (PLD) are all activated by stretch. The stretch-induced increases in PG production, 3H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipid breakdown, and 3H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation occur independently of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin insensitive) whereas the formation of inositol phosphates from myo-[2-3H]inositol labelled phospholipids is dependent on cellular electrical activity. These results indicate that mechanical stimulation increases the lipid-related second messengers arachidonic acid, diacylglycerol, and PG through activation of specific phospholipases such as PLA2 and PLD, but not by activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC.

  17. Interdependence of Muscle Atrophy and Bone Loss Induced by Mechanical Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane A.; Lang, Charles H.; Zhang, Yue; Paul, Emmanuel M.; Laufenberg, Lacee J.; Lewis, Gregory S.; Donahue, Henry J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical unloading induces muscle atrophy and bone loss; however, the time course and interdependence of these effects is not well defined. We subjected 4-month-old C57BL/6J mice to hindlimb suspension (HLS) for three weeks, sacrificing 12-16 mice on day (D) 0, 7, 14, and 21. Lean mass was 7-9% lower for HLS vs. control from D7-21. Absolute mass of the gastrocnemius (gastroc) decreased 8% by D7, and was maximally decreased 16% by D14 of HLS. mRNA levels of Atrogin-1 in the gastroc and quad were increased 99% and 122%, respectively, at D7 of HLS. Similar increases in MuRF1 mRNA levels occurred at D7. Both atrogenes returned to baseline by D14. Protein synthesis in gastroc and quad was reduced 30% from D7-14 of HLS, returning to baseline by D21. HLS decreased phosphorylation of SK61, a substrate of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), on D7-21, while 4E-BP1 was not lower until D21. Cortical thickness of the femur and tibia did not decrease until D14 of HLS. Cortical bone of controls did not change over time. HLS mice had lower distal femur bone volume fraction (−22%) by D14; however, the effects of HLS were eliminated by D21 due to the decline of trabecular bone mass of controls. Femur strength was decreased approximately 13% by D14 of HLS, with no change in tibia mechanical properties at any time point. This investigation reveals that muscle atrophy precedes bone loss during unloading and may contribute to subsequent skeletal deficits. Countermeasures that preserve muscle may reduce bone loss induced by mechanical unloading or prolonged disuse. Trabecular bone loss with age, similar to that which occurs in mature astronauts, is superimposed on unloading. Preservation of muscle mass, cortical structure, and bone strength during the experiment suggests muscle may have a greater effect on cortical than trabecular bone. PMID:24127218

  18. Multiscale models of skeletal muscle reveal the complex effects of muscular dystrophy on tissue mechanics and damage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Kelley M.; Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been increasingly used to study the tissue-level constitutive properties of muscle microstructure; however, these models were not created to study or incorporate the influence of disease-associated modifications in muscle. The purpose of this paper was to develop a novel multiscale muscle modelling framework to elucidate the relationship between microstructural disease adaptations and modifications in both mechanical properties of muscle and strain in the cell membrane. We used an agent-based model to randomly generate new muscle fibre geometries and mapped them into a finite-element model representing a cross section of a muscle fascicle. The framework enabled us to explore variability in the shape and arrangement of fibres, as well as to incorporate disease-related changes. We applied this method to reveal the trade-offs between mechanical properties and damage susceptibility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a fatal genetic disease caused by a lack of the transmembrane protein dystrophin, leading to muscle wasting and death due to cardiac or pulmonary complications. The most prevalent microstructural variations in DMD include: lack of transmembrane proteins, fibrosis, fatty infiltration and variation in fibre cross-sectional area. A parameter analysis of these variations and case study of DMD revealed that the nature of fibrosis and density of transmembrane proteins strongly affected the stiffness of the muscle and susceptibility to membrane damage. PMID:25844152

  19. Shoulder Rotator Muscle Dynamometry Characteristics: Side Asymmetry and Correlations with Ball-Throwing Speed in Adolescent Handball Players

    PubMed Central

    Pontaga, Inese; Zidens, Janis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to: 1) compare shoulder external/internal rotator muscles’ peak torques and average power values and their ratios in the dominant and non-dominant arm; 2) determine correlations between shoulder rotator muscles’ peak torques, average power and ball-throwing speed in handball players. Fourteen 14 to 15-year-old male athletes with injury-free shoulders participated in the study (body height: 176 ± 7 cm, body mass 63 ± 9 kg). The tests were carried out by an isokinetic dynamometer system in the shoulder internal and external rotation movements at angular velocities of 60°/s, 90°/s and 240°/s during concentric contractions. The eccentric external– concentric internal rotator muscle contractions were performed at the velocity of 90°/s. The player threw a ball at maximal speed keeping both feet on the floor. The speed was recorded with reflected light rays. Training in handball does not cause significant side asymmetry in shoulder external/internal rotator muscle peak torques or the average power ratio. Positive correlations between isokinetic characteristics of the shoulder internal and external rotator muscles and ball-throwing speed were determined. The power produced by internal rotator muscles during concentric contractions after eccentric contractions of external rotator muscles was significantly greater in the dominant than in the non-dominant arm. Thus, it may be concluded that the shoulder eccentric external/concentric internal rotator muscle power ratio is significantly greater than this ratio in the concentric contractions of these muscles. PMID:25414738

  20. Tendon action of two-joint muscles: transfer of mechanical energy between joints during jumping, landing, and running.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Zatsiorsky, V M

    1994-01-01

    The amount of mechanical energy transferred by two-joint muscles between leg joints during squat vertical jumps, during landings after jumping down from a height of 0.5 m, and during jogging were evaluated experimentally. The experiments were conducted on five healthy subjects (body height, 1.68-1.86 m; and mass, 64-82 kg). The coordinates of the markers on the body and the ground reactions were recorded by optical methods and a force platform, respectively. By solving the inverse problem of dynamics for the two-dimensional, four-link model of a leg with eight muscles, the power developed by the joint (net muscular) moments and the power developed by each muscle were determined. The energy transferred by two-joint muscles from and to each joint was determined as a result of the time integration of the difference between the power developed at the joint by the joint moment, and the total power of the muscles serving a given joint. It was shown that during a squat vertical jump and in the push-off phase during running, the two-joint muscles (rectus femoris and gastrocnemius) transfer mechanical energy from the proximal joints of the leg to the distal ones. At landing and in the shock-absorbing phase during running, the two-joint muscles transfer energy from the distal to proximal joints. The maximum amount of energy transferred from the proximal joints to distal ones was equal to 178.6 +/- 45.7 J (97.1 +/- 27.2% of the work done by the joint moment at the hip joint) at the squat vertical jump. The maximum amount of energy transferred from the distal to proximal joints was equal to 18.6 +/- 4.2 J (38.5 +/- 36.4% of work done by the joint moment at the ankle joint) at landing. The conclusion was made that the one-joint muscles of the proximal links compensate for the deficiency in work production of the distal one-joint muscles by the distribution of mechanical energy between joints through the two-joint muscles. During the push-off phase, the muscles of the proximal

  1. Mechanical properties and imaging characteristics of remanufactured intravascular ultrasound catheters.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Haager, P; Mintz, G; Klues, H

    2000-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as a routine device in interventional cardiology is handicapped by its high price. 19 factory-made, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters which consist of sterilized, used phased-array IVUS transducers inserted into a new catheter shaft were compared with 23 new IVUS catheters. 3 mechanical and 4 imaging characteristics were assessed on a 5 point scale (1 = unacceptable, 5 = excellent). Mechanical as well as imaging properties of 'remanufactured' IVUS catheter were comparable to new catheters with excellent ratings for each of the evaluated characteristics in 38 to 94% of 'remanufactured' catheters and 50 to 96% of new catheters. The initial failure rate for 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters was 31.6% vs. 4.3% for new catheters (P < 0.05). Overall failure rate was 47.3% for "remanufactured" catheters vs. 8.7% for new catheters (P < 0.05). The failure was due to an electronic connecting problem occurring during mechanical stress to the IVUS catheter. In conclusion, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters offer mechanical and imaging characteristics which are comparable to new catheters. Improvements in the 'remanufacturing' process to resolve the high rate of electronic connecting problems may make this a promising approach to substantially lower the price of IVUS catheters. PMID:10832621

  2. Gut microbiota can transfer fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles of skeletal muscle from pigs to germ-free mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Honglin; Diao, Hui; Xiao, Yi; Li, Wenxia; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Luo, Yuheng; Zeng, Benhua; Wei, Hong; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes changes in microbiota composition, and an altered gut microbiota can transfer obesity-associated phenotypes from donors to recipients. Obese Rongchang pigs (RP) exhibited distinct fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles in their muscle compared with lean Yorkshire pigs (YP). However, whether RP have a different gut microbiota than YP and whether there is a relationship between the microbiota and muscle properties are poorly understood. The present study was conducted to test whether the muscle properties can be transferred from pigs to germ-free (GF) mice. High-throughput pyrosequencing confirms the presence of distinct core microbiota between pig breeds, with alterations in taxonomic distribution and modulations in β diversity. RP displayed a significant higher Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and apparent genera differences compared with YP. Transplanting the porcine microbiota into GF mice replicated the phenotypes of the donors. RP and their GF mouse recipients exhibited a higher body fat mass, a higher slow-contracting fiber proportion, a decreased fiber size and fast IIb fiber percentage, and enhanced lipogenesis in the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, the gut microbiota composition of colonized mice shared high similarity with their donor pigs. Taken together, the gut microbiota of obese pigs intrinsically influences skeletal muscle development and the lipid metabolic profiles. PMID:27545196

  3. Gut microbiota can transfer fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles of skeletal muscle from pigs to germ-free mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Honglin; Diao, Hui; Xiao, Yi; Li, Wenxia; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Luo, Yuheng; Zeng, Benhua; Wei, Hong; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes changes in microbiota composition, and an altered gut microbiota can transfer obesity-associated phenotypes from donors to recipients. Obese Rongchang pigs (RP) exhibited distinct fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles in their muscle compared with lean Yorkshire pigs (YP). However, whether RP have a different gut microbiota than YP and whether there is a relationship between the microbiota and muscle properties are poorly understood. The present study was conducted to test whether the muscle properties can be transferred from pigs to germ-free (GF) mice. High-throughput pyrosequencing confirms the presence of distinct core microbiota between pig breeds, with alterations in taxonomic distribution and modulations in β diversity. RP displayed a significant higher Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and apparent genera differences compared with YP. Transplanting the porcine microbiota into GF mice replicated the phenotypes of the donors. RP and their GF mouse recipients exhibited a higher body fat mass, a higher slow-contracting fiber proportion, a decreased fiber size and fast IIb fiber percentage, and enhanced lipogenesis in the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, the gut microbiota composition of colonized mice shared high similarity with their donor pigs. Taken together, the gut microbiota of obese pigs intrinsically influences skeletal muscle development and the lipid metabolic profiles. PMID:27545196

  4. T-cadherin promotes vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation via a GSK3β-inactivation dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Frismantiene, Agne; Dasen, Boris; Pfaff, Dennis; Erne, Paul; Resink, Therese J; Philippova, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Participation of the cadherin superfamily of adhesion molecules in smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype modulation is poorly understood. Immunohistochemical analyses of arterial lesions indirectly suggest upregulated expression of atypical glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored T-cadherin on vascular SMCs as a molecular indicator of the dedifferentiated/proliferative phenotype. This study investigated the role of T-cadherin in SMC phenotypic modulation. Morphological, molecular and functional SMC-signature characteristics of rat, porcine and human arterial SMCs stably transduced with respect to T-cadherin upregulation (Tcad+) or T-cadherin-deficiency (shTcad) were compared with their respective control transductants (E-SMCs or shC-SMCs). Tcad+-SMCs displayed several characteristics of the dedifferentiated phenotype including loss of spindle morphology, reduced/disorganized stress fiber formation, decay of SMC-differentiation markers (smooth muscle α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, h-caldesmon), gain of SMC-dedifferentiation marker calmodulin, reduced levels of myocardin, nuclear-to-cytoplasmic redistribution of the myocardin related transcription factors MRTFA/B and increased proliferative and migratory capacities. T-cadherin depletion enforced features of the differentiated SMC phenotype. PI3K/Akt is a major signal pathway utilized by T-cadherin in SMCs and we investigated mTORC1/S6K1 and GSK3β axes as mediators of T-cadherin-induced dedifferentiation. Inhibition of mTORC1/S6K1 signalling by rapamycin suppressed proliferation in both E-SMCs and Tcad+-SMCs but failed to restore expression of contractile protein markers in Tcad+-SMCs. Ectopic adenoviral-mediated co-expression of constitutively active GSK3β mutant S9A in Tcad+-SMCs restored the morphological and molecular marker characteristics of differentiated SMCs and normalized rate of proliferation to that in control SMCs. In conclusion our study demonstrates that T-cadherin promotes acquisition of the

  5. Kinematic characteristics of myositis ossificans of the semimembranosus muscle in a dog.

    PubMed

    Vilar, José Manuel; Ramirez, Gustavo; Spinella, Giuseppe; Martinez, Alfonso

    2010-03-01

    A 6-year-old Doberman pinscher dog was presented with myositis ossificans of the semimembranosus muscle. Linear, temporal, and angular kinematic patterns were recorded and compared with those of sound dogs of the same breed. The results indicate that the specific gait compensations occurring with this disease may aid in the diagnosis of myositis ossificans of the caudal thigh muscles. PMID:20514253

  6. Characteristics of the Localization of Connexin 43 in Satellite Cells during Skeletal Muscle Regeneration In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ishido, Minenori; Kasuga, Norikatsu

    2015-04-28

    For myogenesis, new myotubes are formed by the fusion of differentiated myoblasts. In the sequence of events for myotube formation, intercellular communication through gap junctions composed of connexin 43 (Cx43) plays critical roles in regulating the alignment and fusion of myoblasts in advances of myotube formation in vitro. On the other hand, the relationship between the expression patterns of Cx43 and the process of myotube formation in satellite cells during muscle regeneration in vivo remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the relationship between Cx43 and satellite cells in muscle regeneration in vivo. The expression of Cx43 was detected in skeletal muscles on day 1 post-muscle injury, but not in control muscles. Interestingly, the expression of Cx43 was not localized on the inside of the basement membrane of myofibers in the regenerating muscles. Moreover, although the clusters of differentiated satellite cells, which represent a more advanced stage of myotube formation, were observed on the inside of the basement membrane of myofibers in regenerating muscles, the expression of Cx43 was not localized in the clusters of these satellite cells. Therefore, in the present study, it was suggested that Cx43 may not directly contribute to muscle regeneration via satellite cells. PMID:26019374

  7. Mechanism of action of barium ion on rat aortic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T R; Dineen, D X; Petrak, R

    1984-03-01

    The mechanism of action of barium ion on the aortic smooth muscle of the normal rat was investigated using in vitro calcium-depleted aortic strips. Aortic strips were depleted of calcium by repeated exposure to norepinephrine in a calcium-free bathing solution. Although calcium depletion abrogated the response of strips to catecholamines and depolarizing agents, the response to barium chloride remained quantitatively intact. The calcium influx blocker D 600 prevented the contractile response to barium but not to catecholamines, whereas phentolamine prevented the response to catecholamines but not barium. The strip response to barium was depressed by a twofold increase in extracellular magnesium concentration whether the strip was intact or calcium depleted. Although increased concentrations of calcium in the extracellular medium inhibited the contractile response to potassium ion, increases in barium merely potentiated the potassium contracture. These findings indicate that barium produces its contractile effect on vascular smooth muscle by a direct intracellular interaction with the contractile or regulatory proteins. Barium enters these cells via calcium influx channels and is probably not sequestered in a physiologically releasable pool. Unlike calcium, barium does not stabilize the smooth muscle sarcolemma when present in high concentration. PMID:6703038

  8. Steroids augment relengthening of contracted airway smooth muscle: potential additional mechanism of benefit in asthma.

    PubMed

    Lakser, O J; Dowell, M L; Hoyte, F L; Chen, B; Lavoie, T L; Ferreira, C; Pinto, L H; Dulin, N O; Kogut, P; Churchill, J; Mitchell, R W; Solway, J

    2008-11-01

    Breathing (especially deep breathing) antagonises development and persistence of airflow obstruction during bronchoconstrictor stimulation. Force fluctuations imposed on contracted airway smooth muscle (ASM) in vitro result in its relengthening, a phenomenon called force fluctuation-induced relengthening (FFIR). Because breathing imposes similar force fluctuations on contracted ASM within intact lungs, FFIR represents a likely mechanism by which breathing antagonises bronchoconstriction. While this bronchoprotective effect appears to be impaired in asthma, corticosteroid treatment can restore the ability of deep breaths to reverse artificially induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects. It has previously been demonstrated that FFIR is physiologically regulated through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. While the beneficial effects of corticosteroids have been attributed to suppression of airway inflammation, the current authors hypothesised that alternatively they might exert their action directly on ASM by augmenting FFIR as a result of inhibiting p38 MAPK signalling. This possibility was tested in the present study by measuring relengthening in contracted canine tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) strips. The results indicate that dexamethasone treatment significantly augmented FFIR of contracted canine TSM. Canine tracheal ASM cells treated with dexamethasone demonstrated increased MAPK phosphatase-1 expression and decreased p38 MAPK activity, as reflected in reduced phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK downstream target, heat shock protein 27. These results suggest that corticosteroids may exert part of their therapeutic effect through direct action on airway smooth muscle, by decreasing p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and thus increasing force fluctuation-induced relengthening. PMID:18768574

  9. Interstitial Outburst of Angiogenic Factors During Skeletal Muscle Regeneration After Acute Mechanical Trauma.

    PubMed

    Ceafalan, Laura Cristina; Manole, Emilia; Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Codrici, Elena; Mihai, Simona; Gonzalez, Aldebarani; Popescu, Bogdan Ovidiu

    2015-11-01

    Angiogenesis is a key event during tissue regeneration, but the intimate mechanisms controlling this process are still largely unclear. Therefore, the cellular and molecular interplay along normal tissue regeneration should be carefully unveiled. To this matter, we investigated by xMAP assay the dynamics of some angiogenic factors known to be involved in tissue repair, such as follistatin (FST), Placental Growth Factor-2 (PLGF-2), epidermal growth factor (EGF), betacellulin (BTC), and amphiregulin (AREG) using an animal model that mimics acute muscle contusion injuries. In situ immunofluorescence was used for the evaluation and tissue distribution of their cellular sources. Tissue levels of explored factors increased significantly during degeneration and inflammatory stage of regeneration, peaking first week postinjury. However, except for PLGF-2 and EGF, their levels remained significantly elevated after the inflammatory process started to fade. Serum levels were significantly increased only after 24 h for AREG and EGF. Though, for all factors except FST, the levels in injured samples did not correlate with serum or contralateral tissue levels, excluding the systemic influence. We found significant correlations between the levels of EGF and AREG, BTC, FST and FST and AREG in injured samples. Interstitial cells expressing these factors were highlighted by in situ immunolabeling and their number correlated with measured levels dynamics. Our study provides evidence of a dynamic level variation along the regeneration process and a potential interplay between selected angiogenic factors. They are synthesized, at least partially, by cell populations residing in skeletal muscle interstitium during regeneration after acute muscle trauma. PMID:26260512

  10. Muscle proteomics reveals novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Sara; Capitanio, Daniele; Vasso, Michele; Braghetta, Paola; Scotton, Chiara; Bonaldo, Paolo; Lochmüller, Hanns; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in the collagen VI genes cause the Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), with severe phenotype, and Bethlem myopathy (BM) with mild to moderate phenotype. Both, UCMD and BM patients show dystrophic features with degeneration/regeneration and replacement of muscle with fat and fibrous connective tissue. At molecular level, UCMD patients show autophagic impairment and increased PTP opening; these features are less severe in BM. To elucidate the biochemical mechanisms adopted by the muscle to adapt to collagen VI deficiency in BM and UCMD patients, a proteome analysis was carried out on human muscle biopsies. Qualitative and quantitative differences were assessed by 2D-DIGE coupled to MALDI-ToF/ToF MS. Proteomics results, coupled with immunoblotting, indicate changes in UPR, hexosamine pathway, and amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting an association of ER stress, metabolic dysregulation, autophagic impairment, and alteration in mechanotransduction signaling. Overall, these results indicate that despite the common downregulation of hexosamine pathway in UCMD and BM, in BM the protein quality control system is sustained by a metabolic adaptation supporting energy requirements for the maintenance of autophagy, counteracting ER misfolded protein overload. In UCMD, this multilayered system may be disrupted and worsened by the metabolic rewiring, which leads to lipotoxicity. PMID:25211533

  11. The effects of respiratory muscle training on respiratory mechanics and energy cost.

    PubMed

    Held, Heather E; Pendergast, David R

    2014-08-15

    Resistance respiratory muscle training (RRMT) increases respiratory muscle strength and can increase swimming endurance time by as much as 85%. The purpose of this study was to examine potential mechanisms by which RRMT improves exercise endurance. Eight healthy adult male scuba divers underwent experiments in a hyperbaric chamber at sea level (1 atmosphere absolute (ATA)), 2.7 ATA and 4.6 ATA, both dry and fully submersed. Subjects rested, exercised, and rested while mimicking their own exercise breathing (ISEV). Airway resistance (R(aw)), exhaled nitric oxide output (V˙(NO)), and respiratory duty cycle (T(I)/T(Tot)) were determined before and after four weeks of RRMT. RRMT decreased T(I)/T(Tot) (-10% at rest at 1 ATA), V˙(O2) (-17% at 2.7 ATA during submersed exercise), V˙(E) (-6% at 2.7 ATA during submersed exercise), and R(aw) (-34% inspiratory at 4.6 ATA submersed, -38% expiratory at 2.7 ATA dry), independent of changes in V˙(NO). Most importantly, respiratory muscle efficiency increased (+83% at 2.7 ATA submersed). PMID:24816143

  12. Muscle mechanical properties of adult and older rats submitted to exercise after immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Fábio Yoshikazu; Camargo, Regina Celi Trindade; Job, Aldo Eloizo; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Koike, Tatiana Emy; Camargo Filho, José Carlos Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the effects of immobilization, free remobilization and remobilization by physical exercise about mechanical properties of skeletal muscle of rats of two age groups. Methods 56 Wistar rats divided into two groups according to age, an adult group (five months) and an older group (15 months). These groups were subdivided in: control, immobilized, free remobilized and remobilized by physical exercise. The pelvic limb of rats was immobilized for seven days. The exercise protocol consisted of five swimming sessions, once per day and 25 minutes per session. The gastrocnemius muscle was subjected to tensile tests, and evaluated the properties: load at the maximum limit, stretching at the maximum limit and stiffness. Results The immobilization reduced the values of load at the maximum limit and the remobilization protocols were not sufficient to restore control levels in adult group and older rats. The stretching at the maximum limit differs only in the older group. Conclusions The immobilization reduces the muscle's ability to bear loads and exercise protocol tends to restore the default at control values in adult and older rats. The age factor only interfered in the stretching at the maximum limit, inducing a reduction of this property in the post-immobilization. Level of Evidence II, Investigating the Results of Treatment. PMID:24453606

  13. Mechanisms of the nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in vascular smooth muscles of the rabbit and pig.

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, T; Kuriyama, H; Ueno, H

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nitroglycerine (NG) on the mechanical responses of small pieces of intact and skinned smooth muscles of the mesenteric artery, were investigated, as were the Ca fluxes of isolated smooth muscle cells of the coronary artery. NG (10(-6)-10(-5) M) inhibited both phasic and tonic components of the K-induced contraction; however, the tonic component was more sensitive to NG. The minimum concentration of NG required to decrease significantly the tonic response evoked by 39 mM-external K was 10(-8) M. NG (10(-5) M) reduced the number of oscillatory contractions evoked by 10(-5) M-noradrenaline (NAd). After complete removal of stored Ca, the addition of Ca did not produce contraction in polarized muscle (5.9 mM-external K), yet depolarized muscles (128 mM-external K) did contract. Addition of NG (10(-5) M) with Ca produced no change in the resting tone in polarized muscles but inhibited the contraction in depolarized muscles. After application of NG (10(-5) M), caffeine or NAd consistently produced smaller contraction in both polarized and depolarized muscles in Ca-free solution. NG (10(-5) M) inhibited the Na-free contraction evoked by prolonged treatment with Na-free solution. Contractions evoked by repetitive applications of 10(-5) M-NAd or 10 mM-caffeine persisted longer in Na-free, Ca-free (EGTA) solution than those observed in Ca-free Krebs solution, but when NG was added to the Na-free, Ca-free (EGTA) solution, the contractions ceased more rapidly than in the absence of NG. In chemically skinned muscles, 10(-5) M-NG had no effect on the pCa-tension relationship. The absolute amplitude of Ca-induced contraction was also not affected by 10(-5) M-NG. In these muscles, when the amount of stored Ca was estimated from the amplitude of the caffeine-induced contraction, Ca accumulation into and release from store sites were unaffected by 10(-5) M-NG. The effects of 10(-5) M-NG on the accumulation and efflux of 45Ca in isolated cell suspensions prepared from

  14. Whiplash evokes descending muscle recruitment and sympathetic responses characteristic of startle

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Daniel WH; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Whiplash injuries are the most common injuries following rear-end collisions. During a rear-end collision, the human muscle response consists of both a postural and a startle response that may exacerbate injury. However, most previous studies only assessed the presence of startle using data collected from the neck muscles and head/neck kinematics. The startle response also evokes a descending pattern of muscle recruitment and changes in autonomic activity. Here we examined the recruitment of axial and appendicular muscles along with autonomic responses to confirm whether these other features of a startle response were present during the first exposure to a whiplash perturbation. Ten subjects experienced a single whiplash perturbation while recording electromyography, electrocardiogram, and electrodermal responses. All subjects exhibited a descending pattern of muscle recruitment, and increasing heart rate and electrodermal responses following the collision. Our results provide further support that the startle response is a component of the response to whiplash collisions. PMID:24932015

  15. Chemical composition, quality and histochemical characteristics of individual dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) muscles.

    PubMed

    Kadim, I T; Al-Karousi, A; Mahgoub, O; Al-Marzooqi, W; Khalaf, S K; Al-Maqbali, R S; Al-Sinani, S S H; Raiymbek, G

    2013-03-01

    This study characterized the chemical composition, quality and histological traits of six muscles from 10 dromedary carcasses. There were significant differences in moisture, fat, protein, mineral, saturated and unsaturated fatty acid contents between muscles. The longissimus thoracis (LT) had the highest cooking loss (33.5%) and triceps brachii (TB) the lowest (29.2%). The shear force value of semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM) and biceps femoris (BF) were significantly higher than infraspinatus (IS), TB and LT. The LT had significantly higher values for L*, a*, b* than ST. The SM had the lowest MFI (65.3), while IS had the highest value (75.8). The ST significantly had the highest and lowest proportions of Type I and Type IIA muscle fibers, respectively than other muscles. This study indicated that composition, quality, and histochemical parameters varied among camel muscles and the knowledge of this variation allows for better marketing and processing of camel meat. PMID:23273465

  16. Unconstrained muscle-tendon workloops indicate resonance tuning as a mechanism for elastic limb behavior during terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Benjamin D.; Sawicki, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    In terrestrial locomotion, there is a missing link between observed spring-like limb mechanics and the physiological systems driving their emergence. Previous modeling and experimental studies of bouncing gait (e.g., walking, running, hopping) identified muscle-tendon interactions that cycle large amounts of energy in series tendon as a source of elastic limb behavior. The neural, biomechanical, and environmental origins of these tuned mechanics, however, have remained elusive. To examine the dynamic interplay between these factors, we developed an experimental platform comprised of a feedback-controlled servo-motor coupled to a biological muscle-tendon. Our novel motor controller mimicked in vivo inertial/gravitational loading experienced by muscles during terrestrial locomotion, and rhythmic patterns of muscle activation were applied via stimulation of intact nerve. This approach was based on classical workloop studies, but avoided predetermined patterns of muscle strain and activation—constraints not imposed during real-world locomotion. Our unconstrained approach to position control allowed observation of emergent muscle-tendon mechanics resulting from dynamic interaction of neural control, active muscle, and system material/inertial properties. This study demonstrated that, despite the complex nonlinear nature of musculotendon systems, cyclic muscle contractions at the passive natural frequency of the underlying biomechanical system yielded maximal forces and fractions of mechanical work recovered from previously stored elastic energy in series-compliant tissues. By matching movement frequency to the natural frequency of the passive biomechanical system (i.e., resonance tuning), muscle-tendon interactions resulting in spring-like behavior emerged naturally, without closed-loop neural control. This conceptual framework may explain the basis for elastic limb behavior during terrestrial locomotion. PMID:26460038

  17. Unconstrained muscle-tendon workloops indicate resonance tuning as a mechanism for elastic limb behavior during terrestrial locomotion.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2015-10-27

    In terrestrial locomotion, there is a missing link between observed spring-like limb mechanics and the physiological systems driving their emergence. Previous modeling and experimental studies of bouncing gait (e.g., walking, running, hopping) identified muscle-tendon interactions that cycle large amounts of energy in series tendon as a source of elastic limb behavior. The neural, biomechanical, and environmental origins of these tuned mechanics, however, have remained elusive. To examine the dynamic interplay between these factors, we developed an experimental platform comprised of a feedback-controlled servo-motor coupled to a biological muscle-tendon. Our novel motor controller mimicked in vivo inertial/gravitational loading experienced by muscles during terrestrial locomotion, and rhythmic patterns of muscle activation were applied via stimulation of intact nerve. This approach was based on classical workloop studies, but avoided predetermined patterns of muscle strain and activation-constraints not imposed during real-world locomotion. Our unconstrained approach to position control allowed observation of emergent muscle-tendon mechanics resulting from dynamic interaction of neural control, active muscle, and system material/inertial properties. This study demonstrated that, despite the complex nonlinear nature of musculotendon systems, cyclic muscle contractions at the passive natural frequency of the underlying biomechanical system yielded maximal forces and fractions of mechanical work recovered from previously stored elastic energy in series-compliant tissues. By matching movement frequency to the natural frequency of the passive biomechanical system (i.e., resonance tuning), muscle-tendon interactions resulting in spring-like behavior emerged naturally, without closed-loop neural control. This conceptual framework may explain the basis for elastic limb behavior during terrestrial locomotion. PMID:26460038

  18. The Influence of Prior Hamstring Injury on Lengthening Muscle Tissue Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Silder, Amy; Reeder, Scott B.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2010-01-01

    Hamstring strain injuries often occur near the proximal musculotendon junction (MTJ) of the biceps femoris. Post-injury remodeling can involve scar tissue formation, which may alter contraction mechanics and influence re-injury risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the affect of prior hamstring strain injury on muscle tissue displacements and strains during active lengthening contractions. Eleven healthy and eight subjects with prior biceps femoris injuries were tested. All previously injured subjects had since returned to sport and exhibited evidence of residual scarring along the proximal aponeurosis. Subjects performed cyclic knee flexion-extension on an MRI-compatible device using elastic and inertial loads, which induced active shortening and lengthening contractions, respectively. CINE phase-contrast imaging was used to measure tissue velocities within the biceps femoris during these tasks. Numerical integration of the velocity information was used to estimate two-dimensional tissue displacement and strain fields during muscle lengthening. The largest tissue motion was observed along the distal MTJ, with the active lengthening muscle exhibiting significantly greater and more homogeneous tissue displacements. First principal strains magnitudes were largest along the proximal MTJ for both loading conditions. The previously injured subjects exhibited less tissue motion and significantly greater strains near the proximal MTJ. We conclude that localized regions of high tissue strains during active lengthening contractions may predispose the proximal biceps femoris to injury. Furthermore, post-injury remodeling may alter the in-series stiffness seen by muscle tissue and contribute to the relatively larger localized tissue strains near the proximal MTJ, as was observed in this study. PMID:20472238

  19. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle generates lipid-related second messengers by phospholipase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Shansky, Janet; Karlisch, Patricia; Solerssi, Rosa Lopez

    1991-01-01

    Repetitive mechanical stimulation of cultured avian skeletal muscle increases the synthesis of prostaglandins E2 and F2(alpha) which regulate protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. Mechnical stimulation significantly increases the breakdown rate of (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipids, releasing free (3)H-arachidonic acid, and the rate-limiting precursor of prostaglandin synthesis. Mechanical stimulation also significantly increases (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation and intracellular levels of inositol phosphates from myo-2-(3)H inositol labelled phospholipids. Phospholipase A2, phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC), and phospholipase D (PLD) are activated by stretch. The lipase inhibitors bromophenacylbromide and RHC80267 together reduce stretch-induced prostaglandin production by 73-83 percent. The stretch-induced increases in prostaglandin production, (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled phospholipid breakdown, and (3)H-arachidonic acid labelled diacylglycerol formation occur independently of cellular electrical activity (tetrodotoxin insensitive) whereas the formation of inositol phosphates from myo-2-(3)H inositol labelled phospholipids are dependent on cellular electrical activity. These results indicate that mechanical stimulation increases the lipid-related second messengers arachidonic acid, diacylglycerol, and prostaglandins through activation of specific phospholipases such as PLA2 and PLD, but not by activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC.

  20. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley’s mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm2 (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm2. Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer. PMID:26069527

  1. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley's mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm(2) (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm(2). Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer. PMID:26069527

  2. Quantified Mechanical Properties of the Deltoid Muscle Using the Shear Wave Elastography: Potential Implications for Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Sukegawa, Koji; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Sperling, John W.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    The deltoid muscle plays a critical role in the biomechanics of shoulders undergoing reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). However, both pre- and postoperative assessment of the deltoid muscle quality still remains challenging. The purposes of this study were to establish a novel methodology of shear wave elastography (SWE) to quantify the mechanical properties of the deltoid muscle, and to investigate the reliability of this technique using cadaveric shoulders for the purpose of RSA. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were obtained. The deltoid muscles were divided into 5 segments (A1, A2, M, P1 and P2) according to the muscle fiber orientation and SWE values were measured for each segment. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). To measure the response of muscle tension during RSA, the humeral shaft was osteotomized and subsequently elongated by an external fixator (intact to 15 mm elongation). SWE of the deltoid muscle was measured under each stretch condition. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of SWE measurements for all regions showed 0.761–0.963 and 0.718–0.947 for ICC(2,1). Especially, SWE measurements for segments A2 and M presented satisfactory repeatability. Elongated deltoid muscles by the external fixator showed a progressive increase in passive stiffness for all muscular segments. Especially, SWE outcomes of segments A2 and M reliably showed an exponential growth upon stretching (R2 = 0.558 and 0.593). Segmental measurements using SWE could be reliably and feasibly used to quantitatively assess the mechanical properties of the deltoid muscle, especially in the anterior and middle portions. This novel technique based on the anatomical features may provide helpful information of the deltoid muscle properties during treatment of RSA. PMID:27152934

  3. Electrophysiological characteristics of IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Muscle afferent neurons that express transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) are responsible for muscle pain associated with tissue acidosis. We have previously found that TRPV1 of isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors plays an important role in the acid-induced hyperalgesic priming and the development of chronic hyperalgesia in a mouse model of fibromyalgia. To understand the electrophysiological properties of the TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording to study the acid responsiveness and action potential (AP) configuration of capsaicin-sensitive neurons innervating to gastrocnemius muscle. Here we showed that IB4-negative TRPV1-expressing muscle afferent neurons are heterogeneous in terms of cell size, resting membrane potential, AP configuration, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistance, and acid-induced current (Iacid), as well as capsaicin-induced current (Icap). TRPV1-expressing neurons were all acid-sensitive and could be divided into two acid-sensitive groups depending on an acid-induced sustained current (type I) or an acid-induced biphasic ASIC3-like current (type II). Type I TRPV1-expressing neurons were distinguishable from type II TRPV1-expressing neurons in AP overshoot, after-hyperpolarization duration, and all Iacid parameters, but not in AP threshold, TTX-resistance, resting membrane potential, and Icap parameters. These differential biophysical properties of TRPV1-expressing neurons might partially annotate their different roles involved in the development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain. PMID:27493509

  4. Timing matters: tuning the mechanics of a muscle-tendon unit by adjusting stimulation phase during cyclic contractions.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Robertson, Benjamin D; Azizi, Emanuel; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of research on the mechanics and energetics of terrestrial locomotion has demonstrated that elastic elements acting in series with contracting muscle are critical components of sustained, stable and efficient gait. Far fewer studies have examined how the nervous system modulates muscle-tendon interaction dynamics to optimize 'tuning' or meet varying locomotor demands. To explore the fundamental neuromechanical rules that govern the interactions between series elastic elements (SEEs) and contractile elements (CEs) within a compliant muscle-tendon unit (MTU), we used a novel work loop approach that included implanted sonomicrometry crystals along muscle fascicles. This enabled us to decouple CE and SEE length trajectories when cyclic strain patterns were applied to an isolated plantaris MTU from the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus). Using this approach, we demonstrate that the onset timing of muscle stimulation (i.e. stimulation phase) that involves a symmetrical MTU stretch-shorten cycle during active force production results in net zero mechanical power output, and maximal decoupling of CE and MTU length trajectories. We found it difficult to 'tune' the muscle-tendon system for strut-like isometric force production by adjusting stimulation phase only, as the zero power output condition involved significant positive and negative mechanical work by the CE. A simple neural mechanism - adjusting muscle stimulation phase - could shift an MTU from performing net zero to net positive (energy producing) or net negative (energy absorbing) mechanical work under conditions of changing locomotor demand. Finally, we show that modifications to the classical work loop paradigm better represent in vivo muscle-tendon function during locomotion. PMID:26232413

  5. Mechanical power and work of cat soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles during locomotion: possible functional significance of muscle design and force patterns.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Allinger, T L

    1996-04-01

    Electrical activity, forces, power and work of the soleus (SO), the gastrocnemius (GA) and the plantaris (PL) muscles were measured during locomotion in the cat in order to study the functional role of these ankle extensor muscles. Forces and electrical activity (EMG) of the three muscles were measured using home-made force transducers and bipolar, indwelling wire electrodes, respectively, for walking and trotting at speeds of 0.4 to 1.8 m s-1 on a motor-driven treadmill. Video records and a geometrical model of the cat hindlimb were used for calculating the rates of change in lengths of the SO, GA and PL muscles. The instantaneous maximum possible force that can be produced by a muscle at a given fibre length and the rate of change in fibre length (termed contractile abilities) were estimated for each muscle throughout the step cycle. Fibre lengths of the SO, GA and PL were calculated using a planar, geometrical muscle model, measured muscle forces and kinematics, and morphological measurements from the animal after it had been killed. Mechanical power and work of SO, GA and PL were calculated for 144 step cycles. The contribution of the positive work done by the ankle extensor muscles of one hindlimb to the increase of the total mechanical energy of the body (estimated from values in the literature) increased from 4-11% at speeds of locomotion of 0.4 and 0.8 m s-1 to 7-16% at speeds of 1.2 m s-1 and above. The relative contributions of the negative and positive work to the total negative and positive work done by the three ankle extensor muscles increased for GA, decreased for SO and remained about the same for PL, with increasing speeds of locomotion. At speeds of 0.4-0.8 m s-1, the positive work normalized to muscle mass was 7.5-11.0 J kg-1, 1.9-3.0 J kg-1 and 5.3-8.4 J kg-1 for SO, GA and PL, respectively. At speeds of 1.2-1.8 m s-1, the corresponding values were 9.8-16.7 J kg-1, 6.0-10.7 J kg-1 and 13.4-25.0 J kg-1. Peak forces of GA and PL increased and peak

  6. The impact of altered task mechanics on timing and duration of eccentric bi-articular muscle contractions during cycling.

    PubMed

    Connick, Mark J; Li, François-Xavier

    2013-02-01

    In order to understand muscle adaptations to altered task mechanics during cycling, this study investigated the impact of altered seat height and cadence on timing and duration of gastrocnemius (GAST), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL) eccentric contractions and muscle activation patterns, and cycling economy. Ten male cyclists completed 9 × 5 min of cycling at 3 seat heights and 3 cadences. Three-dimensional leg kinematics and muscle activation patterns were recorded to estimate timing of eccentric muscle contractions. Onset, offset and duration of eccentric contractions and, onset, offset and duration of muscle activation were calculated, along with cycling economy. Duration of GAST and VL eccentric contractions decreased with increasing seat height due to earlier offset of eccentric muscle contractions. Duration of BF eccentric contractions significantly increased with seat height due to a later eccentric contraction offset. Offset of GAST and BF muscle activation occurred earlier with increasing cadence. Cycling economy was significantly affected by cadence but not seat height. The results suggest that as a consequence of altered seat height, proprioceptive feedback is used to fine-tune the timing of bi-articular eccentric muscle contractions. These results may have implications for seat height self-selection. PMID:23010605

  7. The effects of different size gold nanoparticles on mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells under mechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Tri Minh

    Nanotechnology is an emerging and promising frontier for medicine and biomedical research due to its potential for applications such as drug delivery, imaging enhancement, and cancer treatment. While these materials may possess significant possibilities, the effects of these particles in the body and how the particles affect the cells is not fully understood. In this study, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) will be exposed to 5 and 20 nm diameter citrate AuNPs under mechanical conditions. The cytotoxicity properties of these particles will be investigated using LDH and MTT assays. Atomic force microscopy will be used to study how the size of the nanoparticles affect the mechanical properties of the VSMCs. Immunofluorescence staining for alpha actin will also be performed to enhance understanding of the phenotypic shift. The LDH and MTT cytotoxicity assay results demonstrated that neither 5 nor 20 nm diameter nanoparticles are cytotoxic to the cells. However, the mechanical properties and cell morphology of the VSMCs was altered. Under static conditions, both AuNP treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells. The size of the nanoparticles had a softening effect on elastic modulus of the cell and sign of a synthetic phenotype was observed. The VSMCs subjected to mechanical stretching exhibited higher elastic modulus compared to the static experimental groups. Again, both AuNPs treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells and signs of more synthetic phenotype was seen. However, the size of the nanoparticles did not have any influence on cell's elastic modulus unlike the static treated cells. The mechanical testing condition provided a better look at how these particles would affect the cells in vivo. While the nanoparticles are not cytotoxic to the VSMCs, they are altering the mechanical properties and phenotype of the cell.

  8. Adaptive functional specialisation of architectural design and fibre type characteristics in agonist shoulder flexor muscles of the llama, Lama glama.

    PubMed

    Graziotti, Guillermo H; Chamizo, Verónica E; Ríos, Clara; Acevedo, Luz M; Rodríguez-Menéndez, J M; Victorica, C; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2012-08-01

    Like other camelids, llamas (Lama glama) have the natural ability to pace (moving ipsilateral limbs in near synchronicity). But unlike the Old World camelids (bactrian and dromedary camels), they are well adapted for pacing at slower or moderate speeds in high-altitude habitats, having been described as good climbers and used as pack animals for centuries. In order to gain insight into skeletal muscle design and to ascertain its relationship with the llama's characteristic locomotor behaviour, this study examined the correspondence between architecture and fibre types in two agonist muscles involved in shoulder flexion (M. teres major - TM and M. deltoideus, pars scapularis - DS and pars acromialis - DA). Architectural properties were found to be correlated with fibre-type characteristics both in DS (long fibres, low pinnation angle, fast-glycolytic fibre phenotype with abundant IIB fibres, small fibre size, reduced number of capillaries per fibre and low oxidative capacity) and in DA (short fibres, high pinnation angle, slow-oxidative fibre phenotype with numerous type I fibres, very sparse IIB fibres, and larger fibre size, abundant capillaries and high oxidative capacity). This correlation suggests a clear division of labour within the M. deltoideus of the llama, DS being involved in rapid flexion of the shoulder joint during the swing phase of the gait, and DA in joint stabilisation during the stance phase. However, the architectural design of the TM muscle (longer fibres and lower fibre pinnation angle) was not strictly matched with its fibre-type characteristics (very similar to those of the postural DA muscle). This unusual design suggests a dual function of the TM muscle both in active flexion of the shoulder and in passive support of the limb during the stance phase, pulling the forelimb to the trunk. This functional specialisation seems to be well suited to a quadruped species that needs to increase ipsilateral stability of the limb during the support

  9. Adaptive functional specialisation of architectural design and fibre type characteristics in agonist shoulder flexor muscles of the llama, Lama glama

    PubMed Central

    Graziotti, Guillermo H; Chamizo, Verónica E; Ríos, Clara; Acevedo, Luz M; Rodríguez-Menéndez, J M; Victorica, C; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2012-01-01

    Like other camelids, llamas (Lama glama) have the natural ability to pace (moving ipsilateral limbs in near synchronicity). But unlike the Old World camelids (bactrian and dromedary camels), they are well adapted for pacing at slower or moderate speeds in high-altitude habitats, having been described as good climbers and used as pack animals for centuries. In order to gain insight into skeletal muscle design and to ascertain its relationship with the llama’s characteristic locomotor behaviour, this study examined the correspondence between architecture and fibre types in two agonist muscles involved in shoulder flexion (M. teres major – TM and M. deltoideus, pars scapularis – DS and pars acromialis – DA). Architectural properties were found to be correlated with fibre-type characteristics both in DS (long fibres, low pinnation angle, fast-glycolytic fibre phenotype with abundant IIB fibres, small fibre size, reduced number of capillaries per fibre and low oxidative capacity) and in DA (short fibres, high pinnation angle, slow-oxidative fibre phenotype with numerous type I fibres, very sparse IIB fibres, and larger fibre size, abundant capillaries and high oxidative capacity). This correlation suggests a clear division of labour within the M. deltoideus of the llama, DS being involved in rapid flexion of the shoulder joint during the swing phase of the gait, and DA in joint stabilisation during the stance phase. However, the architectural design of the TM muscle (longer fibres and lower fibre pinnation angle) was not strictly matched with its fibre-type characteristics (very similar to those of the postural DA muscle). This unusual design suggests a dual function of the TM muscle both in active flexion of the shoulder and in passive support of the limb during the stance phase, pulling the forelimb to the trunk. This functional specialisation seems to be well suited to a quadruped species that needs to increase ipsilateral stability of the limb during the

  10. Exploratory factor analysis for differentiating sensory and mechanical variables related to muscle-tendon unit elongation

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, Mauro H.; Magalhães, Fabrício A.; Peixoto, Gustavo H. C.; Pereira, Beatriz M.; Andrade, André G. P.; Menzel, Hans-Joachim K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Stretching exercises are able to promote adaptations in the muscle-tendon unit (MTU), which can be tested through physiological and biomechanical variables. Identifying the key variables in MTU adaptations is crucial to improvements in training. Objective To perform an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) involving the variables often used to evaluate the response of the MTU to stretching exercises. Method Maximum joint range of motion (ROMMAX), ROM at first sensation of stretching (FSTROM), peak torque (torqueMAX), passive stiffness, normalized stiffness, passive energy, and normalized energy were investigated in 36 participants during passive knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer. Stiffness and energy values were normalized by the muscle cross-sectional area and their passive mode assured by monitoring the EMG activity. Results EFA revealed two major factors that explained 89.68% of the total variance: 53.13% was explained by the variables torqueMAX, passive stiffness, normalized stiffness, passive energy, and normalized energy, whereas the remaining 36.55% was explained by the variables ROMMAX and FSTROM. Conclusion This result supports the literature wherein two main hypotheses (mechanical and sensory theories) have been suggested to describe the adaptations of the MTU to stretching exercises. Contrary to some studies, in the present investigation torqueMAX was significantly correlated with the variables of the mechanical theory rather than those of the sensory theory. Therefore, a new approach was proposed to explain the behavior of the torqueMAX during stretching exercises. PMID:27437715

  11. Possible mechanisms underlying statin-induced skeletal muscle toxicity in L6 fibroblasts and in rats.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Mai; Takaguri, Akira; Kano, Seiichiro; Kaneta, Shigeru; Ichihara, Kazuo; Satoh, Kumi

    2009-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are safe and well-tolerated therapeutic drugs. However, they occasionally induce myotoxicity such as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Here, we investigated the mechanism of statin-induced myotoxicity in L6 fibroblasts and in rats in vivo. L6 fibroblasts were differentiated and then treated with pravastatin, simvastatin, or fluvastatin for 72 h. Hydrophobic simvastatin and fluvastatin decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner via apoptosis characterized by typical nuclear fragmentation and condensation and caspase-3 activation. Both hydrophobic statins transferred RhoA localization from the cell membrane to the cytosol. These changes induced by both hydrophobic statins were completely abolished by the co-application of geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP). Y27632, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, mimicked the hydrophobic statin-induced apoptosis. Hydrophilic pravastatin did not affect the viability of the cells. Fluvastatin was continuously infused (2.08 mg/kg at an infusion rate of 0.5 mL/h) into the right internal jugular vein of the rats in vivo for 72 h. Fluvastatin infusion significantly elevated the plasma CPK level and transferred RhoA localization in the skeletal muscle from the cell membrane to the cytosol. In conclusion, RhoA dysfunction due to loss of lipid modification with GGPP is involved in the mechanisms of statin-induced skeletal muscle toxicity. PMID:19129682

  12. Mechanisms underlying reduced maximum shortening velocity during fatigue of intact, single fibres of mouse muscle

    PubMed Central

    Westerblad, Håkan; Dahlstedt, Anders J; Lännergren, Jan

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism behind the reduction in shortening velocity in skeletal muscle fatigue is unclear. In the present study we have measured the maximum shortening velocity (V0) with slack tests during fatigue produced by repeated, 350 ms tetani in intact, single muscle fibres from the mouse. We have focused on two possible mechanisms behind the reduction in V0: reduced tetanic Ca2+ and accumulation of ADP. During fatigue V0 initially declined slowly, reaching 90 % of the control after about forty tetani. The rate of decline then increased and V0 fell to 70 % of the control in an additional twenty tetani. The reduction in isometric force followed a similar pattern. Exposing unfatigued fibres to 10 μM dantrolene, which reduces tetanic Ca2+, lowered force by about 35 % but had no effect on V0. In order to see if ADP might increase rapidly during ongoing contractions, we used a protocol with a tetanus of longer duration bracketed by standard-duration tetani. V0 in these three tetani were not significantly different in control, whereas V0 was markedly lower in the longer tetanus during fatigue and in unfatigued fibres where the creatine kinase reaction was inhibited by 10 μM dinitrofluorobenzene. We conclude that the reduction in V0 during fatigue is mainly due to a transient accumulation of ADP, which develops during contractions in fibres with impaired phosphocreatine energy buffering. PMID:9625883

  13. X-ray diffraction studies of the contractile mechanism in single muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Vincenzo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Reconditi, Massimo; Linari, Marco; Lucii, Leonardo; Stewart, Alex; Sun, Yin-Biao; Boesecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Irving, Tom; Irving, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of muscle contraction was investigated in intact muscle fibres by X-ray diffraction. Changes in the intensities of the axial X-ray reflections produced by imposing rapid changes in fibre length establish the average conformation of the myosin heads during active isometric contraction, and show that the heads tilt during the elastic response to a change in fibre length and during the elementary force generating process: the working stroke. X-ray interference between the two arrays of myosin heads in each filament allows the axial motions of the heads following a sudden drop in force from the isometric level to be measured in situ with unprecedented precision. At low load, the average working stroke is 12 nm, which is consistent with crystallographic studies. The working stroke is smaller and slower at a higher load. The compliance of the actin and myosin filaments was also determined from the change in the axial spacings of the X-ray reflections following a force step, and shown to be responsible for most of the sarcomere compliance. The mechanical properties of the sarcomere depend on both the motor actions of the myosin heads and the compliance of the myosin and actin filaments. PMID:15647164

  14. Dual mechanism of action of nicorandil on rabbit corpus cavernosal smooth muscle tone.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, G C; Kolasa, T; Sullivan, J P; Brioni, J D

    2001-08-01

    The potential of ATP-sensitive potassium channel openers (KCOs) for the treatment of male erectile dysfunction has recently been suggested based on positive clinical outcomes following intra-cavernosal administration of pinacidil. Agents that increase the levels of cGMP via elevation of nitric oxide (NO) nitroglycerin, for example, are also effective in improving erectile function preclinically and clinically. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects and mechanism of the action of nicorandil on rabbit corpus cavernosum. The in vitro regulation of smooth muscle tone was assessed in isolated cavernosal tissues pre-contracted with phenylephrine. Nicorandil, but not its major metabolite, relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted cavernosum smooth muscle with an EC(50) of 15 microM. The effects of nicorandil were only partially reversed by the K(ATP) channel blocker glyburide (10 microM) or by a soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazole [4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 3 microM). However, a combination of ODQ and glyburide completely blocked the relaxant effects of nicorandil. The results of the present study indicate that nicorandil can relax rabbit cavernosal tissue in vitro via a mechanism that involves activation of K(ATP) channels and stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase. PMID:11494082

  15. A circuit mechanism for the propagation of waves of muscle contraction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fushiki, Akira; Zwart, Maarten F; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Fetter, Richard D; Cardona, Albert; Nose, Akinao

    2016-01-01

    Animals move by adaptively coordinating the sequential activation of muscles. The circuit mechanisms underlying coordinated locomotion are poorly understood. Here, we report on a novel circuit for the propagation of waves of muscle contraction, using the peristaltic locomotion of Drosophila larvae as a model system. We found an intersegmental chain of synaptically connected neurons, alternating excitatory and inhibitory, necessary for wave propagation and active in phase with the wave. The excitatory neurons (A27h) are premotor and necessary only for forward locomotion, and are modulated by stretch receptors and descending inputs. The inhibitory neurons (GDL) are necessary for both forward and backward locomotion, suggestive of different yet coupled central pattern generators, and its inhibition is necessary for wave propagation. The circuit structure and functional imaging indicated that the commands to contract one segment promote the relaxation of the next segment, revealing a mechanism for wave propagation in peristaltic locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13253.001 PMID:26880545

  16. Mechanical sensitivity of muscle afferents in a nerve treated with colchicine.

    PubMed

    Proske, U; Luff, A R

    1998-04-01

    The experiments reported here demonstrate that the mechanical sensitivity of peripheral nerve fibres typically seen after injury can be induced without overtly injuring the nerve, but by simply applying colchicine topically to the nerve. In cats anaesthetised with pentobarbitone sodium, the medial gastrocnemius nerve was exposed and 10 mM colchicine applied topically for 15 min. The animals recovered from the operation normally and showed no subsequent motor deficit. Six days later animals were re-anaesthetised, a laminectomy carried out and responses recorded in single afferents at the level of the dorsal root. It was found that many afferents, particularly those with conduction velocities in the group II-III range, had become sensitive to local mechanical stimulation of the nerve in the region treated with colchicine and showed slowly adapting responses to stretch of the nerve. Many of the smaller fibres exhibited spontaneous activity. Mechanically sensitive afferents exhibited impulse conduction blocks at the colchicine-treated site. Some afferents, which appeared to conduct impulses normally through the treated region, were associated with muscle receptors having normal response properties. However, other muscle receptors were clearly abnormal and were insensitive to muscle stretch or contraction or exhibited only phasic responses. When the nerve was cut proximal to the colchicine-treated site, some, but not all, spontaneous activity was abolished. It was subsequently shown using a collision technique that the activity in some axons had its origin in the cell body in the dorsal root ganglion. In one experiment, it was shown that after nerve section proximal to the colchicine-treated region three of five axons switched their activity from a peripheral to a central origin. It is postulated that colchicine disrupts fast axonal transport of mechanically sensitive or voltage-sensitive ion channels, from the cell body to the peripheral terminals of the axons, leading

  17. Effects of pethidine and nalorphine on the mechanical and electrical activities of mammalian isolated ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Grundy, H F; Tritthart, H

    1972-09-01

    1. The strength of the isometric mechanical contraction of electricallydriven ventricular muscle has been recorded simultaneously with the resting and action potentials; the effects of pethidine and of nalorphine on these parameters have been studied.2. When lower concentrations of pethidine (0.22-6.5 mug/ml) were perfused, isometric peak tension was decreased in parallel with the maximum upstroke velocity of the action potential; these actions are considered to result from membrane stabilization. At higher concentrations (11.8-109 mug/ml) pethidine usually produced, in addition, a progressive decrease in the resting and action potentials associated with marked irregularities in, or even abolition of, the mechanical response. It is suggested that these effects of the higher doses might be due to a depression of ATPase activity in the myocardial membrane.3. Compared with pethidine, nalorphine had similar, but weaker, actions. PMID:4263795

  18. Oxidative Stress-Mediated Skeletal Muscle Degeneration: Molecules, Mechanisms, and Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min Hee; Ow, Jin Rong; Yang, Nai-Di

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a loss of balance between the production of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism and the mechanisms that clear these species to maintain cellular redox homeostasis. Increased oxidative stress has been associated with muscular dystrophy, and many studies have proposed mechanisms that bridge these two pathological conditions at the molecular level. In this review, the evidence indicating a causal role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various muscular dystrophies is revisited. In particular, the mediation of cellular redox status in dystrophic muscle by NF-κB pathway, autophagy, telomere shortening, and epigenetic regulation are discussed. Lastly, the current stance of targeting these pathways using antioxidant therapies in preclinical and clinical trials is examined. PMID:26798425

  19. Yes-Associated Protein is up-regulated by mechanical overload and is sufficient to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Craig A; Dietz, Jason M; Jacobs, Brittany L; McNally, Rachel M; You, Jae-Sung; Hornberger, Troy A

    2015-06-01

    Mechanically-induced skeletal muscle growth is regulated by mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Yes-Associated Protein (YAP) is a mechanically-sensitive, and growth-related, transcriptional co-activator that can regulate mTORC1. Here we show that, in skeletal muscle, mechanical overload promotes an increase in YAP expression; however, the time course of YAP expression is markedly different from that of mTORC1 activation. We also show that the overexpression of YAP induces hypertrophy via an mTORC1-independent mechanism. Finally, we provide preliminary evidence of possible mediators of YAP-induced hypertrophy (e.g. increased MyoD and c-Myc expression, and decreased Smad2/3 activity and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) expression). PMID:25959868

  20. Exercise-induced muscle damage and potential mechanisms for the repeated bout effect.

    PubMed

    McHugh, M P; Connolly, D A; Eston, R G; Gleim, G W

    1999-03-01

    Unfamiliar, predominantly eccentric exercise, frequently results in muscle damage. A repeated bout of similar eccentric exercise results in less damage and is referred to as the 'repeated bout effect'. Despite numerous studies that have clearly demonstrated the repeated bout effect, there is little consensus as to the actual mechanism. In general, the adaptation has been attributed to neural, connective tissue or cellular adaptations. Other possible mechanisms include, adaptation in excitation-contraction coupling or adaptation in the inflammatory response. The 'neural theory' predicts that the initial damage is a result of high stress on a relatively small number of active fast-twitch fibres. For the repeated bout, an increase in motor unit activation and/or a shift to slow-twitch fibre activation distributes the contractile stress over a larger number of active fibres. Although eccentric training results in marked increases in motor unit activation, specific adaptations to a single bout of eccentric exercise have not been examined. The 'connective tissue theory' predicts that muscle damage occurs when the noncontractile connective tissue elements are disrupted and myofibrillar integrity is lost. Indirect evidence suggests that remodelling of the intermediate filaments and/or increased intramuscular connective tissue are responsible for the repeated bout effect. The 'cellular theory' predicts that muscle damage is the result of irreversible sarcomere strain during eccentric contractions. Sarcomere lengths are thought to be highly non-uniform during eccentric contractions, with some sarcomeres stretched beyond myofilament overlap. Loss of contractile integrity results in sarcomere strain and is seen as the initial stage of damage. Some data suggest that an increase in the number of sarcomeres connected in series, following an initial bout, reduces sarcomere strain during a repeated bout and limits the subsequent damage. It is unlikely that one theory can explain

  1. Icaritin requires Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling to counteract skeletal muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Zong-Kang; LI, Jie; LIU, Jin; GUO, Baosheng; LEUNG, Albert; ZHANG, Ge; ZHANG, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Counteracting muscle atrophy induced by mechanical unloading/inactivity is of great clinical need and challenge. A therapeutic agent that could counteract muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading in safety is desired. This study showed that natural product Icaritin (ICT) could increase the phosphorylation level of Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) at p110 catalytic subunit and promote PI3K/Akt signaling markers in C2C12 cells. This study further showed that the high dose ICT treatment could significantly attenuate the decreases in the phosphorylation level of PI3K at p110 catalytic subunit and its downstream markers related to protein synthesis, and inhibit the increases in protein degradation markers at mRNA and protein levels in rat soleus muscle following 28-day hindlimb unloading. In addition, the decreases in soleus muscle mass, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, twitch force, specific force, contraction time and half relaxation time could be significantly attenuated by the high dose ICT treatment. The low dose ICT treatment could moderately attenuate the above changes induced by unloading. Wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of PI3K at p110 catalytic subunit, could abolish the above effects of ICT in vitro and in vivo, indicating that PI3K/Akt signaling could be required by ICT to counteract skeletal muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading. PMID:26831566

  2. Sepsis and inflammatory insults downregulate IGFBP-5, but not IGFBP-4, in skeletal muscle via a TNF-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lang, Charles H; Krawiec, Brian J; Huber, Danuta; McCoy, Jennifer M; Frost, Robert A

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether catabolic stimuli that induce muscle atrophy alter the muscle mRNA abundance of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-4 and -5, and if so determine the physiological mechanism for such a change. Catabolic insults produced by endotoxin (LPS) and sepsis decreased IGFBP-5 mRNA time- and dose-dependently in gastrocnemius muscle. This reduction did not result from muscle disuse because hindlimb immobilization increased IGFBP-5. Continuous infusion of a nonlethal dose of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) decreased IGFBP-5 mRNA 70%, whereas pretreatment of septic rats with a neutralizing TNF binding protein completely prevented the reduction in muscle IGFBP-5. The addition of LPS or TNF-alpha to cultured C(2)C(12) myoblasts also decreased IGFBP-5 expression. Although exogenously administered growth hormone (GH) increased IGFBP-5 mRNA 2-fold in muscle from control rats, muscle from septic animals was GH resistant and no such elevation was detected. In contrast, exogenous administration of IGF-I as part of a binary complex composed of IGF-I/IGFBP-3 produced comparable increases in IGFBP-5 mRNA in both control and septic muscle. Concomitant determinations of IGF-I mRNA content revealed a positive linear relationship between IGF-I and IGFBP-5 mRNA in the same muscle in response to LPS, sepsis, TNF-alpha, and GH treatment. Although dexamethasone decreased muscle IGFBP-5, pretreatment of rats with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 did not prevent the sepsis-induced decrease in IGFBP-5 mRNA. In contrast, muscle IGFBP-4 mRNA abundance was not significantly altered by LPS, sepsis, or hindlimb immobilization. In summary, these data demonstrate that various inflammatory insults decrease muscle IGFBP-5 mRNA, without altering IGFBP-4, by a TNF-dependent glucocorticoid-independent mechanism. Finally, IGF-I appears to be a dominant positive regulator of IGFBP-5 gene expression in muscle under both

  3. Mechanisms of the Ba2+-induced contraction in smooth muscle cells of the rabbit mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Satoh, S; Kubota, Y; Itoh, T; Kuriyama, H

    1987-02-01

    The mechanism of the Ba2+-induced contraction was investigated using intact and saponin-treated skinned smooth muscle (skinned muscle) strips of the rabbit mesenteric artery. After depletion of Ca2+ stored in the caffeine-sensitive site, greater than 0.65 mM Ba2+ evoked contraction in muscle strips depolarized with 128 mM K+ in Ca2+-free solution in a dose-dependent fashion, and the ED50 values for Ca2+ and Ba2+ were 0.5 mM and 1.2 mM in intact muscle strips, respectively. Nisoldipine (10 nM) blocked the contraction evoked by high K+ or 10 microM norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of 2.6 mM Ba2+, but did not block the contraction evoked in the presence of 2.6 mM Ca2+. These results may indicate that Ba2+ permeates the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel. In skinned muscle strips, the ED50 values for Ca2+ and Ba2+ were 0.34 and 90 microM, respectively, as estimated from the pCa- and pBa-tension relationships. Calmodulin enhanced and trifluoperazine inhibited the Ba2+- and Ca2+-induced contractions. After the application of Ba2+ or Ca2+ with ATP gamma S in rigor solution, myosin light chain (MLC) was irreversibly thiophosphorylated, as estimated from the Ba2+- or Ca2+-independent contraction. Furthermore, both divalent cations phosphorylated MLC, as measured using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, to the extent expected from the amplitudes of the contraction evoked by these cations. Thus, Ba2+ is capable of activating the contractile proteins as Ca2+ does. The amount of Ca2+ or Ba2+ stored in cells was estimated from the caffeine response evoked in Ca2+-free solution in intact and skinned muscle strips. After the application of 0.3 microM Ca2+ or 0.1 mM Ba2+ for 60 s to skinned muscle strips after the depletion of Ca2+ stored in cells, caffeine produced a contraction only upon pretreatment with Ca2+ but not with Ba2+. When Ba2+ was applied successively just after the application of Ca2+, the subsequently evoked caffeine-induced contraction was much smaller than that

  4. Effects of muscle fatigue on gait characteristics under single and dual-task conditions in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Muscle fatigue and dual-task walking (e.g., concurrent performance of a cognitive interference (CI) while walking) represent major fall risk factors in young and older adults. Thus, the objectives of this study were to examine the effects of muscle fatigue on gait characteristics under single and dual-task conditions in young and older adults and to determine the impact of muscle fatigue on dual-task costs while walking. Methods Thirty-two young (24.3 ± 1.4 yrs, n = 16) and old (71.9 ± 5.5 yrs, n = 16) healthy active adults participated in this study. Fatigue of the knee extensors/flexors was induced by isokinetic contractions. Subjects were tested pre and post fatigue, as well as after a 5 min rest. Tests included the assessment of gait velocity, stride length, and stride length variability during single (walking), and dual (CI+walking) task walking on an instrumented walkway. Dual-task costs while walking were additionally computed. Results Fatigue resulted in significant decreases in single-task gait velocity and stride length in young adults, and in significant increases in dual-task gait velocity and stride length in older adults. Further, muscle fatigue did not affect dual-task costs during walking in young and older adults. Performance in the CI-task was improved in both age groups post-fatigue. Conclusions Strategic and/or physiologic rationale may account for the observed differences in young and older adults. In terms of strategic rationale, older adults may walk faster with longer strides in order to overcome the feeling of fatigue-induced physical discomfort as quickly as possible. Alternatively, older adults may have learned how to compensate for age-related and/or fatigue-induced muscle deficits during walking by increasing muscle power of synergistic muscle groups (e.g., hip flexors). Further, a practice and/or learning effect may have occurred from pre to post testing. Physiologic rationale may comprise motor unit remodeling in old age

  5. The effect on mechanical pain threshold over human muscles by oral administration of granisetron and diclofenac-sodium.

    PubMed

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Kopp, Sigvard; Ernberg, Malin

    2005-02-01

    Previous studies indicate that plasma levels of serotonin (5-HT) and intramuscular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) participate in determining the mechanical pain threshold and tolerance level to pressure applied on the skin over healthy muscles. Other studies reported gender differences regarding responses to noxious stimuli. The present study aimed to determine whether the mechanical pain threshold of healthy muscles is influenced by oral administration of 5-HT3 or PGE2-inhibitors and if there are any gender differences in this respect. Ten healthy female subjects and 10 age-matched healthy male subjects participated in the study, which was randomized and double blind with crossover design. Granisetron (5-HT3-antagonist), diclofenac-sodium (PGE2-antagonist) and placebo were administered for 3 days. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was recorded bilaterally with an algometer over certain orofacial, trunk, and limb muscles before and after administration of the antagonists. The PPT over all muscles combined increased after administration of granisetron. There was no change after administration of placebo. The difference between granisetron and placebo was significant for the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles. Diclofenac-sodium did not influence the PPT and there was no difference compared to placebo. Although the basal PPT values were lower in females, the PPT response to granisetron differed significantly between genders only in the tibialis anterior muscle. In conclusion, the results of this study showed that oral administration of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron increased the PPT over healthy trunk and limb muscles but not over orofacial muscles, and that the response in the limb muscles was greater in males. PMID:15661432

  6. Influence of vibration on mechanical power and electromyogram activity in human arm flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Cardinale, M; Tsarpela, O

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vibration on the mechanical properties of arm flexors. A group of 12 international level boxers, all members of the Italian national team, voluntarily participated in the experiment: all were engaged in regular boxing training. At the beginning of the study they were tested whilst performing forearm flexion with an extra load equal to 5% of the subjects' body mass. Following this. one arm was given the experimental treatment (E; mechanical vibration) and the other was the control (no treatment). The E treatment consisted of five repetitions lasting 1-min each of mechanical vibration applied during arm flexion in isometric conditions with 1 min rest between them. Further tests were performed 5 min immediately after the treatment on both limbs. The results showed statistically significant enhancement of the average power in the arm treated with vibrations. The root mean square electromyogram (EMGrms) had not changed following the treatment but, when divided by mechanical power, (P) as an index of neural efficiency, it showed statistically significant increases. It was concluded that mechanical vibrations enhanced muscle P and decreased the related EMG/P relationship in elite athletes. Moreover, the analysis of EMGrms recorded before the treatment and during the treatment itself showed an enormous increase in neural activity during vibration up to more than twice the baseline values. This would indicate that this type of treatment is able to stimulate the neuromuscular system more than other treatments used to improve neuromuscular properties. PMID:10090628

  7. Mechanism of cadmium-induced contraction in ileal longitudinal muscle of guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Asai, F.; Nishimura, M.; Satoh, E.; Urakawa, N.

    1982-01-01

    1 The mechanism of cadmium (Cd2+)-induced contraction was studied in isolated ileal longitudinal muscle of guinea-pig. 2 CdCl2 (1x10(-8) to 1x10-4M)) caused a transient contraction which subsided within approximately 6 min of application. The contraction was reproducible and dependent on the concentration. The dose-response curve was bell-shaped. A maximal response was observed at concentrations of 5x10(-6) to 1x10(-5) M. 3 The contractile effect was inhibited to some degree at 20 degree C or by tetrodotoxin (0.1 microgram/ml), hyoscine (o.1 microgram/ml), but completely inhibited by Ca2+ -removal from the medium. 4 Cd2+ increased the output of [14C]-acetylcholine biosynthesized from [14C] by the preparation depending on the concentration. The increase terminated within the first 6 min and was reduced by tetrodotoxin (0.1 microgram/ml) or by removal of Ca2+ from the medium. 5 Both the contractile and transmitter releasing effects of Cd2+ were dependent on the concentration of external Ca2+. Strontium ions were able to replace Ca2+ -induced transmitter release. 6 It is suggested that Cd2+ contracts ileal longitudinal muscle through a release of cholinergic transmitter from the parasympathetic nerve terminals, which is dependent on external Ca2+. It also has a smaller hyoscine-resistant contractile effect, presumably due to a direct action on smooth muscle cells. PMID:7066605

  8. A single intake of capsiate improves mechanical performance and bioenergetics efficiency in contracting mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kazuya, Yashiro; Tonson, Anne; Pecchi, Emilie; Dalmasso, Christiane; Vilmen, Christophe; Fur, Yann Le; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David; Giannesini, Benoît

    2014-05-15

    Capsiate is known to increase whole body oxygen consumption possibly via the activation of uncoupling processes, but its effect at the skeletal muscle level remains poorly documented and conflicting. To clarify this issue, gastrocnemius muscle function and energetics were investigated in mice 2 h after a single intake of either vehicle (control) or purified capsiate (at 10 or 100 mg/kg body wt) through a multidisciplinary approach combining in vivo and in vitro measurements. Mechanical performance and energy pathway fluxes were assessed strictly noninvasively during a standardized electrostimulation-induced exercise, using an original device implementing 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mitochondrial respiration was evaluated in isolated saponin-permeabilized fibers. Compared with control, both capsiate doses produced quantitatively similar effects at the energy metabolism level, including an about twofold decrease of the mitochondrial respiration sensitivity for ADP. Interestingly, they did not alter either oxidative phosphorylation or uncoupling protein 3 gene expression at rest. During 6 min of maximal repeated isometric contractions, both doses reduced the amount of ATP produced from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation but increased the relative contribution of oxidative phosphorylation to total energy turnover (+28 and +21% in the 10- and 100-mg groups, respectively). ATP cost of twitch force generation was further reduced in the 10- (-35%) and 100-mg (-45%) groups. Besides, the highest capsiate dose also increased the twitch force-generating capacity. These data present capsiate as a helpful candidate to enhance both muscle performance and oxidative phosphorylation during exercise, which could constitute a nutritional approach for improving health and preventing obesity and associated metabolic disorders. PMID:24644244

  9. Mechanism of action of calcium antagonists on myocardial and smooth muscle membranes.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, S

    1986-01-01

    Although calcium channel blockers vary considerably in their chemical structure and pharmacologic profile, the widely accepted mechanism of their action is an inhibition of Ca2+ influx - via voltage-activated slow channels - into smooth and cardiac muscle. Other ways of Ca2+ entry, such as passive diffusion and Na+/Ca2+ and K+/Ca2+ exchange, are not affected by these compounds. However, various blockers exert a slightly different inhibitory action on the slow channels, which indicates that various binding sites in the cell membranes, or even in intracellular sites, may be involved. Potential sites of action of calcium channel blockers in the myocardium include: the slow calcium channels; Na+/Ca2+ channels; mitochondria; sarcoplasmic reticulum; myofilaments; and calcium efflux. However, experimental evidence has been given for only the first site, and the third and fourth sites are still controversial. In the vascular smooth muscles, calcium channel blockers could possibly block the potential-dependent or receptor-operated channels, or bind to calmodulin. Again, only the first site of action has been experimentally proven. An important feature of calcium channel blockers is their different affinities for various tissues. For instance, cinnarizine and its difluorinated derivative flunarizine are 1000 times more effective in blocking slow channels in vascular smooth muscles than those in the myocardium. Even within the same system, such as the cardiovascular system, differences in tissue specificity are encountered. Thus, while nimodipine acts preferentially on cerebral vessels, diltiazem has more affinity for the coronary vasculature. Tissue specificity is exhibited even for different myocardial structures; thus, while verapamil affects the nodal and conductive tissues in the myocardium (hence its use as an antiarrhythmic agent), nifedipine is almost devoid of such activity. Organ selectivity of calcium channel blockers is one of the attractive features of this group

  10. The pCa-tension and force-velocity characteristics of skinned fibres isolated from fish fast and slow muscles

    PubMed Central

    Altringham, J. D.; Johnston, I. A.

    1982-01-01

    1. Single fast fibres and small bundles of two to six slow fibres were dissected from the myotomal muscles of the cod, Gadus morhua, and the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula. Fibres were chemically skinned with the non-ionic detergent Brij 58. 2. The isometric tension properties were investigated. Maximal isometric tensions (mean ± S.E. of mean) were 18·65±1·18 (n = 11) and 8·34±0·98 (n = 13) N cm-2 for cod fast and slow fibres, and 18·34±0·88 (n = 28) and 8·24±0·39 (n = 12) N cm-2 for dogfish fast and slow fibres respectively. The values are comparable to those observed in mammalian and amphibian skinned fibres. The lower tensions generated by the slow fibres cannot be fully explained on the basis of their lower myofibrillar fractional volume. 3. In common with previous studies, a steep sigmoid relationship between pCa and tension was observed. The threshold for tension generation was around pCa 7·2. Half-maximal pCas were 6·08 and 6·42 for cod fast and slow muscle, and 6·41 and 6·50 for dogfish fast and slow fibres respectively. Cod fibres were maximally activated at around pCa 5·18, and dogfish fibres at pCa 5·62. 4. Contraction-induced residual tensions were observed in cod fast fibres after return to relaxing solution. This phenomenon is a feature common to many skinned fibre studies, but the mechanism behind it has yet to be resolved. 5. The force-velocity characteristics of fast and slow fibres have been investigated (at 8 °C). 6. Points below 0·6 P0 on the P-V curves could be fitted to a linear form of the Hill equation. Extrapolated Vmaxs were calculated as follows: cod fast fibre Vmax = 1·01 muscle length sec-1 (Lsec-1) (a = 0·21 P0; b = 0·21 Lsec-1). Slow fibre = 0·53 Lsec-1 (a = 0·28P0; b = 0·21 Lsec-1). Dogfish fast fibre Vmax = 2·34 Lsec-1 (a = 0·06 P0; b = 0·14 Lsec-1). Slow fibre = 0·67 Lsec-1 (a = 0·19 P0; b = 0·13 Lsec-1). 7. Contraction velocity in cod slow fibres decreased continuously to produce markedly non

  11. Characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum from slowly glycolysing and from rapidly glycolysing pig skeletal muscle post mortem

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, David B.; Berman, Mervyn C.; Kench, James E.

    1977-01-01

    The composition and function of fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum from pig skeletal muscle was examined in the period immediately post mortem. Muscle was defined as being either slowly glycolysing or rapidly glycolysing on the basis of colour, pH and concentrations of glycogen and lactate. The microsomal fraction was separated on a discontinuous gradient of 35, 40 and 45% (w/v) sucrose into heavy and intermediate fractions which sedimented to the interfaces, and a light fraction which remained on the surface of the 35%-sucrose layer. The sarcoplasmic reticulum from rapidly glycolysing muscle had a lower buoyant density than had that from slowly glycolysing muscle. This was reflected in the consistent lack of material in the heavy fraction and a greater proportion in the light fraction. The latter material had significantly lower ratios (w/w) of protein to phospholipid (2.3:1 versus 3.8:1) and of protein to cholesterol (10.4:1 versus 15.6:1). There were no gross differences in phospholipid content or in fatty acid composition of individual phospholipid classes in the membranes from the two types of muscle. Analysis of membrane proteins by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis showed that ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) was a major component of each fraction and that its contribution to the total protein content of the membrane was greater in rapidly glycolysing muscle, suggesting a loss of non-ATPase proteins. The two fractions of sarcoplasmic reticulum prepared from rapidly glycolysing muscle had approximately one-third the normal activities of Ca2+ binding and Ca2+ uptake in the presence of ATP and one-half the passive Ca2+-binding capacity in the absence of ATP of the fractions from slowly glycolysing muscle. However, the (Ca2++Mg2+)-stimulated ATPase activities were similar. Efflux from actively loaded vesicles, after the addition of EDTA, consisted of a rapid and a slow phase. Vesicles from rapidly glycolysing muscle lost 60% of

  12. Two independent mechanical events in the interaction cycle of skeletal muscle myosin with actin.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, M; Canepari, M; Cacciafesta, P; Lombardi, V; Cicchi, R; Maffei, M; Pavone, F S; Bottinelli, R

    2006-01-01

    During skeletal muscle contraction, regular arrays of actin and myosin filaments slide past each other driven by the cyclic ATP-dependent interaction of the motor protein myosin II (the cross-bridge) with actin. The rate of the cross-bridge cycle and its load-dependence, defining shortening velocity and energy consumption at the molecular level, vary widely among different isoforms of myosin II. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have addressed this question by applying a single-molecule approach to rapidly ( approximately 300 mus) and precisely ( approximately 0.1 nm) detect acto-myosin interactions of two myosin isoforms having large differences in shortening velocity. We show that skeletal myosin propels actin filaments, performing its conformational change (working stroke) in two steps. The first step ( approximately 3.4-5.2 nm) occurs immediately after myosin binding and is followed by a smaller step ( approximately 1.0-1.3 nm), which occurs much faster in the fast myosin isoform than in the slow one, independently of ATP concentration. On the other hand, the rate of the second phase of the working stroke, from development of the latter step to dissociation of the acto-myosin complex, is very similar in the two isoforms and depends linearly on ATP concentration. The finding of a second mechanical event in the working stroke of skeletal muscle myosin provides the molecular basis for a simple model of actomyosin interaction. This model can account for the variation, in different fiber types, of the rate of the cross-bridge cycle and provides a common scheme for the chemo-mechanical transduction within the myosin family. PMID:16371472

  13. Mechanical characteristics of filament-wound pressure vessel (burst pressure)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iida, H.; Uemura, M.

    1987-01-01

    The finite element method is used to analyze the mechanical characteristics of a pressurized filament-wound (FW) pressure vessel, and to predict its burst pressure. The analysis takes into account the bending moment, the stretch-bend coupling effect, nonlinear stress-strain relations, and finite deflection. The analysis is based on two initial failure criteria for laminae, and two ultimate fracture criteria for laminated structures. The numerical results, obtained by applying the load incremental method to the isotensoid CFRP pressure vessel used in the launching of the Zikiken satellite, are in good agreement with the experimental burst pressure and fracture behaviors.

  14. Mechanisms of tolerance to sodium nitroprusside in rat cultured aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Papapetropoulos, A.; Go, C. Y.; Murad, F.; Catravas, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. While exposure of smooth muscle cells to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) leads to the development of tolerance to soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activation, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon in intact cells remain unclear. In the present study, possible mechanisms of tolerance were investigated in a cell culture model where sGC activity was estimated from the accumulation of cyclic GMP in response to 10 microM SNP over a 15 min period in the presence of a phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor. 2. Pretreatment of rat aortic smooth muscle cells with 10-500 microM SNP led to a dose-dependent downregulation of cyclic GMP accumulation upon subsequent SNP stimulation. This effect was evident as early as 2 h following incubation with 10 microM SNP, reached a plateau at 4 h and was blocked by co-incubation with 30 microM oxyhaemoglobin. 3. Pretreatment of smooth muscle cells with the PDE inhibitor, zaprinast, resulted in downregulation of the SNP-induced cyclic GMP accumulation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, that was first evident after 12 h. Moreover, while the zaprinast-induced downregulation of cyclic GMP accumulation was completely inhibited by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, tolerance to SNP was partially reversed by H89. 4. beta 1 sGC steady state mRNA levels of S-nitroso N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP)- or 8Br-cyclic GMP-pretreated cells were unchanged, as indicated by Northern blot analysis. However, Western blot analysis revealed that alpha 1 protein levels were decreased in zaprinast, but not in SNP, SNAP or 8Br-cyclic GMP pretreated cells. 5. While thiol depletion did not prevent the development of tolerance, pretreatment of cells with SNP in the presence of reducing agents partially or completely restored the ability of cells to respond to SNP. 6. We conclude that tolerance to SNP results from two distinct mechanisms: an early onset, NO-mediated event that is reversed by reducing agents and a more delayed, PKA-sensitive process

  15. Measurement of high-resolution mechanical contraction of cardiac muscle by induced eddy current.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jae; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kang, Seung-Jin; Kim, Kyeung-Nam; Khang, Seonah; Koo, Hye Ran; Gi, Sunok; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2014-01-01

    There are many types of devices which help to manage a personal health conditions such as heartbeat chest belt, pedometer and smart watch. And the most common device has the relationship with heart rate or ECG data. However, users have to attach some electrode or fasten the belt on the bare skin to measure bio-signal information. Therefore, most of people want more convenient and short-ready-time and no-need to attach electrode. In this paper, we proposed the high-resolution measuring system of mechanical activity of cardiac muscle and thereby measure heartbeat. The principle of the proposed measuring method is that the alternating current generate alternating magnetic field around coil. This primary magnetic field induces eddy current which makes magnetic field against primary coil in the nearby objects. To measure high-resolution changes of the induced secondary magnetic fields, we used digital Phase-locked loop(PLL) circuit which provides more high-resolution traces of frequency changes than the previous studies based on digital frequency counter method. As a result of our preliminary experiment, peak-peak intervals of the proposed method showed high correlation with R-R intervals of clinical ECG signals(r=0.9249). Also, from signal traces of the proposed method, we might make a conjecture that the contraction of atrium or ventricle is reflected by changing conductivity of cardiac muscle which is beating ceaselessly. PMID:25571434

  16. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Phenotypic Switch in Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Scirocco, Annunziata; Matarrese, Paola; Carabotti, Marilia; Ascione, Barbara; Malorni, Walter; Severi, Carola

    2016-02-01

    As a general rule, smooth muscle cells (SMC) are able to switch from a contractile phenotype to a less mature synthetic phenotype. This switch is accompanied by a loss of differentiation with decreased expression of contractile markers, increased proliferation as well as the synthesis and the release of several signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotaxis-associated molecules, and growth factors. This SMC phenotypic plasticity has extensively been investigated in vascular diseases, but interest is also emerging in the field of gastroenterology. It has in fact been postulated that altered microenvironmental conditions, including the composition of microbiota, could trigger the remodeling of the enteric SMC, with phenotype changes and consequent alterations of contraction and impairment of gut motility. Several molecular actors participate in this phenotype remodeling. These include extracellular molecules such as cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins, as well as intracellular proteins, for example, transcription factors. Epigenetic control mechanisms and miRNA have also been suggested to participate. In this review key roles and actors of smooth muscle phenotypic switch, mainly in GI tissue, are described and discussed in the light of literature data available so far. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 295-302, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26206426

  17. [Secretory Function of Skeletal Muscles: Producing Mechanisms and Myokines Physiological Effects].

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Kabachkova, A V; Zakharova, A N; Lalaeva, G S; Kironenko, T A; Dyakova, E Yu; Orlov, S N

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle cells secrete a variety of hormones and cytokines, which are referred to as myokines. Different modes of exercise are the main factor of myokines producing. The myokines expression level is increased in an exponential fashon proportional to the length of exercise and the amount of muscle mass engaged in the exercise. These myokines are described to communicate with cells in an autocrine/ paracrine manner. Thus it ensures the maintenance of homeostasis and adaptarion to physical stress. This myokines role is provided by a vriety of effects. It is assumed that exercise increases myokines transcription via signaling systems that are activated in response to a decrease in the partial pressure of oxygen, increasing the concentration of [Ca²⁺] i and AMP. Significant prospects have the myokines investigation of the role in the different disorders correction. So now accumulated enough data for myokines consideration as a single functional system, which plays an important role in the adaptation mechanisms to the habitual exrcise. PMID:27530041

  18. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  19. Molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting in cancer and ageing: cachexia versus sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Argilés, Josep M; Busquets, Sílvia; Felipe, Antonio; López-Soriano, Francisco J

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize and evaluate the different mechanisms and catabolic mediators involved in cancer cachexia and ageing sarcopenia since they may represent targets for future promising clinical investigations. Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by a marked weight loss, anorexia, asthenia and anemia. In fact, many patients who die with advanced cancer suffer from cachexia. The degree of cachexia is inversely correlated with the survival time of the patient and it always implies a poor prognosis. Unfortunately, at the clinical level, cachexia is not treated until the patient suffers from a considerable weight loss and wasting. At this point, the cachectic syndrome is almost irreversible. The cachectic state is often associated with the presence and growth of the tumour and leads to a malnutrition status due to the induction of anorexia. In recent years, age-related diseases and disabilities have become of major health interest and importance. This holds particularly for muscle wasting, also known as sarcopenia, that decreases the quality of life of the geriatric population, increasing morbidity and decreasing life expectancy. The cachectic factors (associated with both depletion of fat stores and muscular tissue) can be divided into two categories: of tumour origin and humoural factors. In conclusion, more research should be devoted to the understanding of muscle wasting mediators, both in cancer and ageing, in particular the identification of common mediators may prove as a good therapeutic strategies for both prevention and treatment of wasting both in disease and during healthy ageing. PMID:15743680

  20. Structural changes in isometrically contracting insect flight muscle trapped following a mechanical perturbation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C; Perz-Edwards, Robert J; Tregear, Richard T; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E; Reedy, Michael K; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    The application of rapidly applied length steps to actively contracting muscle is a classic method for synchronizing the response of myosin cross-bridges so that the average response of the ensemble can be measured. Alternatively, electron tomography (ET) is a technique that can report the structure of the individual members of the ensemble. We probed the structure of active myosin motors (cross-bridges) by applying 0.5% changes in length (either a stretch or a release) within 2 ms to isometrically contracting insect flight muscle (IFM) fibers followed after 5-6 ms by rapid freezing against a liquid helium cooled copper mirror. ET of freeze-substituted fibers, embedded and thin-sectioned, provides 3-D cross-bridge images, sorted by multivariate data analysis into ~40 classes, distinct in average structure, population size and lattice distribution. Individual actin subunits are resolved facilitating quasi-atomic modeling of each class average to determine its binding strength (weak or strong) to actin. ~98% of strong-binding acto-myosin attachments present after a length perturbation are confined to "target zones" of only two actin subunits located exactly midway between successive troponin complexes along each long-pitch helical repeat of actin. Significant changes in the types, distribution and structure of actin-myosin attachments occurred in a manner consistent with the mechanical transients. Most dramatic is near disappearance, after either length perturbation, of a class of weak-binding cross-bridges, attached within the target zone, that are highly likely to be precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. These weak-binding cross-bridges were originally observed in isometrically contracting IFM. Their disappearance following a quick stretch or release can be explained by a recent kinetic model for muscle contraction, as behaviour consistent with their identification as precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. The results provide a detailed model for

  1. Structural Changes in Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Trapped following a Mechanical Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Perz-Edwards, Robert J.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The application of rapidly applied length steps to actively contracting muscle is a classic method for synchronizing the response of myosin cross-bridges so that the average response of the ensemble can be measured. Alternatively, electron tomography (ET) is a technique that can report the structure of the individual members of the ensemble. We probed the structure of active myosin motors (cross-bridges) by applying 0.5% changes in length (either a stretch or a release) within 2 ms to isometrically contracting insect flight muscle (IFM) fibers followed after 5–6 ms by rapid freezing against a liquid helium cooled copper mirror. ET of freeze-substituted fibers, embedded and thin-sectioned, provides 3-D cross-bridge images, sorted by multivariate data analysis into ∼40 classes, distinct in average structure, population size and lattice distribution. Individual actin subunits are resolved facilitating quasi-atomic modeling of each class average to determine its binding strength (weak or strong) to actin. ∼98% of strong-binding acto-myosin attachments present after a length perturbation are confined to “target zones” of only two actin subunits located exactly midway between successive troponin complexes along each long-pitch helical repeat of actin. Significant changes in the types, distribution and structure of actin-myosin attachments occurred in a manner consistent with the mechanical transients. Most dramatic is near disappearance, after either length perturbation, of a class of weak-binding cross-bridges, attached within the target zone, that are highly likely to be precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. These weak-binding cross-bridges were originally observed in isometrically contracting IFM. Their disappearance following a quick stretch or release can be explained by a recent kinetic model for muscle contraction, as behaviour consistent with their identification as precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. The results provide a detailed model

  2. Glucocorticoid-induced skeletal muscle atrophy in vitro is attenuated by mechanical stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, J. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Glucocorticoids induce rapid atrophy of fast skeletal myofibers in vivo, and either weight lifting or endurance exercise reduces this atrophy by unknown mechanisms. We examined the effects of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) on protein turnover in tissue-cultured avian fast skeletal myofibers and determined whether repetitive mechanical stretch altered the myofiber response to Dex. In static cultures after 3-5 days, 10(-8) M Dex decreased total protein content 42-74%, total protein synthesis rates 38-56%, mean myofiber diameter 35%, myosin heavy chain (MHC) content 86%, MHC synthesis rate 44%, and fibronectin synthesis rate 29%. Repetitive 10% stretch-relaxations of the cultured myofibers for 60 s every 5 min for 3-4 days prevented 52% of the Dex-induced decrease in protein content, 42% of the decrease in total protein synthesis rate, 77% of the decrease in MHC content, 42% of the decrease in MHC synthesis rate, and 67% of the decrease in fibronectin synthesis rate. This in vitro model system will complement in vivo studies in understanding the mechanism by which mechanical activity and glucocorticoids interact to regulate skeletal muscle growth.

  3. The effect of cadence on timing of muscle activation and mechanical output in cycling: on the activation dynamics hypothesis.

    PubMed

    McGhie, David; Ettema, Gertjan

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the activation dynamics hypothesis, which states that, in cycling, the pattern between muscle activity and crank position shifts in regard to its angle in the crank cycle with increasing cadence to maintain invariant positioning of the mechanical output. We measured surface EMG of six muscles, and by means of force measurements at the crank and inverse dynamics calculated hip, knee, and ankle joint dynamics during cycling at five cadences (60-100 rpm) at 75% of maximal power in trained cyclists. The joint dynamics (net muscle moment and power) showed a consistent positive phase shift with increasing cadence. The phase shift in muscle activation patterns was highly variable amongst subjects and was, on average, close to zero. Our results are in contradiction with the activation dynamics hypothesis. PMID:20594872

  4. Evaluation of Mechanical Modal Characteristics Using Optical Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John; Adamovsky, Grigory; Flanagan, Patrick; Weiland, Ken

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of embedded fiber optic sensors to changes in modal characteristics of plates is discussed. In order to determine the feasibility of embedded fiber Bragg gratings for the detection of modal shapes and modal frequencies, a comparison of holographically imaged modes and the detected dynamic strain from embedded fiber optic Bragg gratings is made. Time averaged optical holography is used for the detection of mechanical defects, or damage, in various aerospace components. The damage is detected by measuring an alteration in structural dynamics, which is visually apparent when using time-averaged holography. These shifts in the mode shapes, both in frequency of the resonance and spatial location of vibration nodes, are caused by changes in parameters that affect the structure's mechanical impedance, such as stiffness, mass and damping, resulting from cracks or holes. It is anticipated that embedded fiber optic sensor arrays may also be able to detect component damage by sensing these changes in modal characteristics. This work is designed to give an initial indication to the feasibility of damage detection through the monitoring of modal frequencies and mode shapes with fiber optic sensors.

  5. Mechanical parameters and flight phase characteristics in aquatic plyometric jumping.

    PubMed

    Louder, Talin J; Searle, Cade J; Bressel, Eadric

    2016-09-01

    Plyometric jumping is a commonly prescribed method of training focused on the development of reactive strength and high-velocity concentric power. Literature suggests that aquatic plyometric training may be a low-impact, effective supplement to land-based training. The purpose of the present study was to quantify acute, biomechanical characteristics of the take-off and flight phase for plyometric movements performed in the water. Kinetic force platform data from 12 young, male adults were collected for counter-movement jumps performed on land and in water at two different immersion depths. The specificity of jumps between environmental conditions was assessed using kinetic measures, temporal characteristics, and an assessment of the statistical relationship between take-off velocity and time in the air. Greater peak mechanical power was observed for jumps performed in the water, and was influenced by immersion depth. Additionally, the data suggest that, in the water, the statistical relationship between take-off velocity and time in air is quadratic. Results highlight the potential application of aquatic plyometric training as a cross-training tool for improving mechanical power and suggest that water immersion depth and fluid drag play key roles in the specificity of the take-off phase for jumping movements performed in the water. PMID:27125295

  6. Linking transient storage parameters to exchange mechanisms and reach characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morén, Ida; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2015-04-01

    A traditional way of investigating transient storage zones in streams and rivers comprises the performance of tracer tests. The information gained from the tests however, is in many ways limited by the geomorphological and hydraulic local conditions under which the test was performed. Consequently, there is a need for more general information about how reach characteristics and combined exchange mechanisms affect transient storage retention that can be expressed by scaling factors between physical, measurable parameters and the integrated total retention in a reach. A large number of tracer tests have been performed in a wide variety of reaches around the world and in this project we are taking advantage of already collected data as well as new tracer test performed within the study, to quantitatively evaluate how different geomorphic and hydraulic conditions affect the retention of solutes in rivers. By advancing existing physically based models on the local-scale with the combinations of exchange mechanisms we theoretically describe the relative magnitude of exchange mechanisms, and combinations of these, under specific hydraulic conditions and show how exchange parameters associated with different mechanisms are correlated physically. Both hyporheic transient storage zones (HTS) and surface transient storage zones (STS) are considered. Combined vertical exchange with the HTS can be evaluated by superimposing the velocity fields associated with stream features of different size described mathematically by harmonic functions, while exchange with other zones can be treated as independent and after evaluating the relative importance of the associated exchange parameters it can be added to the vertical exchange to obtain the total integrated retention. Based on the tracer tests, each tested reach is characterised in terms of its geomorphologic and hydraulic features and related statistically to reach-scale parameters evaluated from the tests with a longitudinal

  7. Mechanics of slope walking in the cat: quantification of muscle load, length change, and ankle extensor EMG patterns.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Robert J; Smith, D Webb; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2006-03-01

    Unexpected changes in flexor-extensor muscle activation synergies during slope walking in the cat have been explained previously by 1) a reorganization of circuitry in the central pattern generator or 2) altered muscle and cutaneous afferent inputs to motoneurons that modulate their activity. The aim of this study was to quantify muscle length changes, muscle loads, and ground reaction forces during downslope, level, and upslope walking in the cat. These mechanical variables are related to feedback from muscle length and force, and paw pad cutaneous afferents, and differences in these variables between the slope walking conditions could provide additional insight into possible mechanisms of the muscle control. Kinematics, ground reaction forces, and EMG were recorded while cats walked on a walkway in three conditions: downslope (-26.6 deg), level (0 deg), and upslope (26.6 deg). The resultant joint moments were calculated using inverse dynamics analysis; length and velocity of major hindlimb muscle-tendon units (MTUs) were calculated using a geometric model and calculated joint angles. It was found that during stance in downslope walking, the MTU stretch of ankle and knee extensors and MTU peak stretch velocities of ankle extensors were significantly greater than those in level or upslope conditions, whereas forces applied to the paw pad and peaks of ankle and hip extensor moments were significantly smaller. The opposite was true for upslope walking. It was suggested that these differences between upslope and downslope walking might affect motion-dependent feedback, resulting in muscle activity changes recorded here or reported in the literature. PMID:16207777

  8. Mechanical stimuli of skeletal muscle: implications on mTOR/p70s6k and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, Nelo Eidy; Lancha, Antonio Herbert

    2008-02-01

    The skeletal muscle is a tissue with adaptive properties which are essential to the survival of many species. When mechanically stimulated it is liable to undergo remodeling, namely, changes in its mass/volume resulting mainly from myofibrillar protein accumulation. The mTOR pathway (mammalian target of rapamycin) via its effector p70s6k (ribosomal protein kinase S6) has been reported to be of importance to the control of skeletal muscle mass, particularly under mechanical stimulation. However, not all mechanical stimuli are capable of activating this pathway, and among those who are, there are differences in the activation magnitude. Likewise, not all skeletal muscle fibers respond to the same extent to mechanical stimulation. Such evidences suggest specific mechanical stimuli through appropriate cellular signaling to be responsible for the final physiological response, namely, the accumulation of myofibrillar protein. Lately, after the mTOR signaling pathway has been acknowledged as of importance for remodeling, the interest for the mechanical/chemical mediators capable of activating it has increased. Apart from the already known MGF (mechano growth factor), some other mediators such as phosphatidic acid (PA) have been identified. This review article comprises and discusses relevant information on the mechano-chemical transduction of the pathway mTOR, with special emphasis on the muscle protein synthesis. PMID:17940791

  9. Long-term mechanical behaviour of skeletal muscle tissue in semi-confined compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Böl, Markus; Leichsenring, Kay; Ernst, Michael; Ehret, Alexander E

    2016-10-01

    In this study, porcine skeletal muscle tissue was tested until 112 hours post mortem using a semi-confined compression device that induces fascicles to enter one of the states of compression (mode I), tension (mode II), or constant length (mode III). Based on the authors׳ previous studies (Böl et al., 2014, 2015a), the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the tissue was analysed, with a special focus on the testing time post mortem. The results suggest that the tissue exhibits significant anisotropic behaviour during the first hours of post mortem but that this anisotropy becomes insignificant at later time points. Interestingly, the compressibility of the tissue is more or less unaffected by the testing time. These results are discussed especially with respect to tissue microstructure. PMID:27367943

  10. Regulatory mechanism of human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic transformation induced by NELIN.

    PubMed

    Pei, Changan; Qin, Shiyong; Wang, Minghai; Zhang, Shuguang

    2015-11-01

    Vascular disorders, including hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis, arise from dysregulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation, which can be controlled by regulatory factors. The present study investigated the regulatory mechanism of the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs by NELIN in order to evaluate its potential as a preventive and therapeutic of vascular disorders. An in vitro model of NELIN‑overexpressing VSMCs was prepared by transfection with a lentiviral (LV) vector (NELIN‑VSMCs) and NELIN was slienced using an a lentiviral vector with small interfering (si)RNA in another group (LV‑NELIN‑siRNA‑VSMCs). The effects of NELIN overexpression or knockdown on the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs were observed, and its regulatory mechanism was studied. Compared with the control group, cells in the NELIN‑VSMCs group presented a contractile phenotype with a significant increase of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, smooth muscle (SM)α‑actin and total Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) protein expression. The intra‑nuclear translocation of SMα‑actin‑serum response factor (SMα‑actin‑SRF) occurred in these cells simultaneously. Following exposure to Rho kinsase inhibitor Y‑27632, SRF and SMα‑actin expression decreased. However, cells in the LV‑NELIN‑siRNA‑VSMCs group presented a synthetic phenotype, and the expression of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, SMα‑actin protein and total RhoA protein was decreased. The occurrence of SRF extra‑nuclear translocation was observed. In conclusion, the present study suggested that NELIN was able to activate regulatory factors of SMα‑actin, RhoA and SRF successively in human VSMCs cultured in vitro. Furthermore, NELIN‑induced phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs was regulated via the RhoA/SRF signaling pathway. The results of the present study provide a foundation for the use of NELIN in preventive and therapeutic treatment of vascular remodeling

  11. Refuting The Polemic Against the Extraocular Muscle Pulleys: Jampel and Shi’s Platygean View of Extraocular Muscle Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Late in the 20th Century, it was recognized that connective tissue structures in the orbit influence the paths of the extraocular muscles, and constitute their functional origins. Targeted investigations of these connective tissue “pulleys” led to the formulation of the active pulley hypothesis, which proposes that pulling directions of the rectus extraocular muscles are actively controlled via connective tissues. Purpose This review rebuts a series of criticisms of the active pulley hypothesis published by Jampel, and Jampel and Shi, in which these authors have disputed the existence and function of the pulleys. Methods The current paper reviews published evidence for the existence of orbital pulleys, the active pulley hypothesis, and physiologic tests of the active pulley hypothesis. Magnetic resonance imaging in a living subject, and histological examination of a human cadaver directly illustrate the relationship of pulleys to extraocular muscles. Results Strong scientific evidence is cited that supports the existence of orbital pulleys, and their role in ocular motility. The criticisms of have ignored mathematical truisms and strong scientific evidence. Conclusions Actively controlled orbital pulleys play a fundamental role in ocular motility. Pulleys profoundly influence the neural commands required to control eye movements and binocular alignment. Familiarity with the anatomy and physiology of the pulleys is requisite for a rational approach to diagnosing and treating strabismus using emerging methods. Conversely, approaches that deny or ignore the pulleys risk the sorts of errors that arise in geography and navigation from incorrect assumptions such as those of a flat (“platygean”) earth. PMID:17022164

  12. Relationship of muscle exudate protein characteristics to broiler breast meat quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of muscle exudate measured as drip loss is often used as an indicator of poultry meat quality. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between meat quality and the amount, protein content, and protein profile of drip liquid in broiler breast fillets. Fifty-six broi...

  13. Comparison of palatability characteristics of beef gluteus medius and triceps brachii muscles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate triceps brachii steaks as a substitute for gluteus medius steaks in foodservice and retail applications, including the impact of aging time and USDA quality grade on the palatability of both muscles. Top sirloin butts (n = 600) and shoulder clod arm ...

  14. Mechanical stretch regulates TRPC expression and calcium entry in human myometrial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, A; Mahn, K; Poston, L; Songu-Mize, E; Tribe, R M

    2007-03-01

    Stretch is known to stimulate myometrial hyperplasia and hypertrophy in early pregnancy and uterine contraction at term. We propose that transduction of the stretch signal involves alteration of intracellular calcium signalling, including changes in transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) isoform expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of prolonged mechanical (tonic) stretch in vitro on human myometrial smooth muscle cell calcium signalling and TRPC expression. Cells were cultured from myometrial biopsies, obtained from women undergoing elective Caesarean section at term, grown on Flexiplates and subjected to 25% tonic mechanical stretch for 1, 4 and 14 h. Time-matched control cells were not stretched. Mechanical stretch (14 h) increased basal calcium entry and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced calcium/Mn(2+) entry (P < 0.05) in Fura-2 loaded cells. The calcium selectivity of CPA-thapsigarin induced inward currents, measured by patch clamp electrophysiology, was also increased in stretched cells compared with control cells (P < 0.05). Real time PCR and Western blot data demonstrated that TRPC3 and TRPC4 mRNA and TRPC3 protein expression were increased by stretch (P < 0.05), respectively. These data support the hypothesis that uterine stretch modulates uterine growth and contractility in pregnancy via alterations in calcium signalling. PMID:17208928

  15. Mechanical analysis of avian feet: multiarticular muscles in grasping and perching

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Spencer B.; Sustaita, Diego; Odhner, Lael U.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    The grasping capability of birds' feet is a hallmark of their evolution, but the mechanics of avian foot function are not well understood. Two evolutionary trends that contribute to the mechanical complexity of the avian foot are the variation in the relative lengths of the phalanges and the subdivision and variation of the digital flexor musculature observed among taxa. We modelled the grasping behaviour of a simplified bird foot in response to the downward and upward forces imparted by carrying and perching tasks, respectively. Specifically, we compared the performance of various foot geometries performing these tasks when actuated by distally inserted flexors only, versus by both distally inserted and proximally inserted flexors. Our analysis demonstrates that most species possess relative phalanx lengths that are conducive to grasps actuated only by a single distally inserted tendon per digit. Furthermore, proximally inserted flexors are often required during perching, but the distally inserted flexors are sufficient when grasping and carrying objects. These results are reflected in differences in the relative development of proximally and distally inserted digital flexor musculature among ‘perching’ and ‘grasping’ taxa. Thus, our results shed light on the relative roles of variation in phalanx length and digit flexor muscle distribution in an integrative, mechanical context. PMID:26064598

  16. Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure Characteristics of Directionally Solidified TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Kun; Man, Jianfeng; Yang, Jianzhong; Han, Fusheng

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical behavior and microstructure characteristics of three high Mn austenitic steels prepared by directional solidification at withdrawal rates of 60, 120, and 240 μm s-1 were investigated and compared with common TWIP steel with equiaxed grains. For each steel, the Hollomon analysis, differential C-J analysis, and modified C-J analysis as an alternative method to describe the work-hardening behavior were studied. The directionally solidified samples (DS samples) exhibited higher mechanical properties along the axis, five stages (A, B, C, D, and E) divided on the plot of stain hardening rate vs true strain, and a more stable and uniform deformation feature with larger strain-hardening coefficients when the true strain is over 0.25, in comparison with the common TWIP steel. The modified C-J analysis was found to be the best one for revealing the strain-hardening behavior characterized by several different stages with a definite work-hardening exponent n. In the case of DS samples, the dendrite spacings increase but the morphology becomes simple when decreasing the withdrawal rate. The larger volume fraction of twins and prevalent activation of twin systems, together with the fragmentations of the original grains in a sample solidified at a withdrawal rate of 120 μm s-1, lead to the best mechanical behavior in a medium-to-large strain range.

  17. Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure Characteristics of Directionally Solidified TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Kun; Man, Jianfeng; Yang, Jianzhong; Han, Fusheng

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior and microstructure characteristics of three high Mn austenitic steels prepared by directional solidification at withdrawal rates of 60, 120, and 240 μm s-1 were investigated and compared with common TWIP steel with equiaxed grains. For each steel, the Hollomon analysis, differential C-J analysis, and modified C-J analysis as an alternative method to describe the work-hardening behavior were studied. The directionally solidified samples (DS samples) exhibited higher mechanical properties along the axis, five stages (A, B, C, D, and E) divided on the plot of stain hardening rate vs true strain, and a more stable and uniform deformation feature with larger strain-hardening coefficients when the true strain is over 0.25, in comparison with the common TWIP steel. The modified C-J analysis was found to be the best one for revealing the strain-hardening behavior characterized by several different stages with a definite work-hardening exponent n. In the case of DS samples, the dendrite spacings increase but the morphology becomes simple when decreasing the withdrawal rate. The larger volume fraction of twins and prevalent activation of twin systems, together with the fragmentations of the original grains in a sample solidified at a withdrawal rate of 120 μm s-1, lead to the best mechanical behavior in a medium-to-large strain range.

  18. The role of phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, T A; Chu, W K; Mak, Y W; Hsiung, J W; Huang, S A; Chien, S

    2006-03-21

    Signaling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to be necessary for mechanical load-induced growth of skeletal muscle. The mechanisms involved in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling are not known, but several studies indicate that a unique [phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)- and nutrient-independent] mechanism is involved. In this study, we have demonstrated that a regulatory pathway for mTOR signaling that involves phospholipase D (PLD) and the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) plays a critical role in the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling. First, an elevation in PA concentration was sufficient for the activation of mTOR signaling. Second, the isozymes of PLD (PLD1 and PLD2) are localized to the z-band in skeletal muscle (a critical site of mechanical force transmission). Third, mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle with intermittent passive stretch ex vivo induced PLD activation, PA accumulation, and mTOR signaling. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of PLD blocked the mechanically induced increase in PA and the activation of mTOR signaling. Combined, these results indicate that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling through a PLD-dependent increase in PA. Furthermore, we showed that mTOR signaling was partially resistant to rapamycin in muscles subjected to mechanical stimulation. Because rapamycin and PA compete for binding to the FRB domain on mTOR, these results suggest that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling through an enhanced binding of PA to the FRB domain on mTOR. PMID:16537399

  19. Influence of blade tenderization, moisture enhancement and pancreatin enzyme treatment on the processing characteristics and tenderness of beef semitendinosus muscle.

    PubMed

    Pietrasik, Z; Aalhus, J L; Gibson, L L; Shand, P J

    2010-03-01

    The combined effect of blade tenderization (BT), moisture enhancement and enzymatic tenderization on drip loss, cook loss, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and sensory characteristics of beef semitendinosus (ST) steaks from cattle under 30 months of age was investigated. Injection with phosphate/chloride solution improved tenderness and juiciness of ST muscles (P<0.01). No additional improvement in tenderness was observed with incorporation of a pancreatin enzyme preparation into the moisture enhancement solution (P>0.1). Injection of pancreatin alone tended to improve overall tenderness (P=0.09) and did not adversely affect other palatability attributes. Blade tenderization of ST muscles improved tenderness, as indicated by lower WBSF and increased sensory tenderness scores than for control samples, without decreasing flavour and juiciness. The results suggest that moisture enhancement and blade tenderization can be effectively utilized to reduce the variability in and improve both tenderness and palatability of ST muscles. Pancreatin was not particularly effective at the 0.02% level used. PMID:20374818

  20. The structure of Ca(2+) release units in arthropod body muscle indicates an indirect mechanism for excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed Central

    Takekura, Hiroaki; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2002-01-01

    The relative disposition of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and L-type Ca(2+) channels was examined in body muscles from three arthropods. In all muscles the disposition of ryanodine receptors in the junctional gap between apposed SR and T tubule elements is highly ordered. By contrast, the junctional membrane of the T tubule is occupied by distinctive large particles that are clustered within the small junctional domain, but show no order in their arrangement. We propose that the large particles of the junctional T tubules represent L-type Ca(2+) channels involved in excitation-contraction (e-c) coupling, based on their similarity in size and location with the L-type Ca(2+) channels or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The random arrangement of DHPRs in arthropod body muscles indicates that there is no close link between them and RyRs. This matches the architecture of vertebrate cardiac muscle and is in keeping with the similarity in e-c coupling mechanisms in cardiac and invertebrate striated muscles. PMID:12414707

  1. Quercetin Inhibits Peripheral and Spinal Cord Nociceptive Mechanisms to Reduce Intense Acute Swimming-Induced Muscle Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Sergio M; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Bussmann, Allan J C; Vignoli, Josiane A; Camilios-Neto, Doumit; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the flavonoid quercetin (3,3´,4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in a mice model of intense acute swimming-induced muscle pain, which resembles delayed onset muscle soreness. Quercetin intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment dose-dependently reduced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia. Quercetin inhibited myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D- glucosaminidase (NAG) activities, cytokine production, oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and gp91phox mRNA expression and muscle injury (creatinine kinase [CK] blood levels and myoblast determination protein [MyoD] mRNA expression) as well as inhibited NFκB activation and induced Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA expression in the soleus muscle. Beyond inhibiting those peripheral effects, quercetin also inhibited spinal cord cytokine production, oxidative stress and glial cells activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP] and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 [Iba-1] mRNA expression). Concluding, the present data demonstrate that quercetin is a potential molecule for the treatment of muscle pain conditions related to unaccustomed exercise. PMID:27583449

  2. Thin-fibre receptors responding to mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimulation in the skeletal muscle of the dog

    PubMed Central

    Kumazawa, T.; Mizumura, K.

    1977-01-01

    1. Unitary activities of muscular thin fibre afferents, which were not sensitive to muscle stretching, were recorded from the nerve of the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the dog. Responses to mechanical stimulation, intra-arterial injection and local application of chemical solutions, and thermal stimulation of the surface of the muscle were studied. It was observed that polymodal receptors which responded to all types of stimulation existed in the thin fibre afferents of the muscle. 2. The receptive area of these units tested by mechanical stimulation was spot-like and appeared to be located not only on the surface but in the midst of the muscle. 3. The mechanical response varied among these units with respect to the threshold and the pattern of discharges. 4. In these units, NaCl, KCl, and bradykinin consistently evoked responses, with differences in the latencies and discharge patterns, while solutions of histamine, acetylcholine and sodium citrate caused responses less consistently and less effectively. In the stretch receptors, chemical stimulation applied in the same way as tested in the thin fibre afferents produced quite different features in their responses. 5. Heating the receptive area of the muscle surface caused responses in twenty-five out of thirty-six units, which were sensitive both to mechanical and to chemical stimulations. The threshold varied from 38·0 to 48·3 °C, with a mean of 43·1 °C for C fibre units and 41 °C for A-δ fibre units. 6. The responses to heating were consistently obtained in the units responding to the surface application of chemical solutions. However, the above response was never obtained in the units which did not respond to surface chemical stimulation but responded to intra-arterial injection. These results suggest a large population of polymodal receptors in the muscular thin fibre afferents. PMID:599419

  3. O2 on ganymede: Spectral characteristics and plasma formation mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; Johnson, R.E.; Spencer, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Weak absorption features in the visible reflectance spectrum of Jupiter's satellite Ganymede have been correlated to those observed in the spectrum of molecular oxygen. We examine the spectral characteristics of these absorption features in all phases of O2 and conclude that the molecular oxygen is most likely present at densities similar to the liquid or solid ??-phase. The contribution of O2 to spectral features observed on Ganymede in the near-infrared wavelength region affects the previous estimates of photon pathlength in ice. The concentration of the visible absorption features on the trailing hemisphere of Ganymede suggests an origin due to bombardment by magneto-spheric ions. We derive an approximate O2 formation rate from this mechanism and consider the state of O2 within the surface.

  4. Mechanical durability and combustion characteristics of pellets from biomass blends.

    PubMed

    Gil, M V; Oulego, P; Casal, M D; Pevida, C; Pis, J J; Rubiera, F

    2010-11-01

    Biofuel pellets were prepared from biomass (pine, chestnut and eucalyptus sawdust, cellulose residue, coffee husks and grape waste) and from blends of biomass with two coals (bituminous and semianthracite). Their mechanical properties and combustion behaviour were studied by means of an abrasion index and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively, in order to select the best raw materials available in the area of study for pellet production. Chestnut and pine sawdust pellets exhibited the highest durability, whereas grape waste and coffee husks pellets were the least durable. Blends of pine sawdust with 10-30% chestnut sawdust were the best for pellet production. Blends of cellulose residue and coals (<20%) with chestnut and pine sawdusts did not decrease pellet durability. The biomass/biomass blends presented combustion profiles similar to those of the individual raw materials. The addition of coal to the biomass in low amounts did not affect the thermal characteristics of the blends. PMID:20605093

  5. Mechanical properties and energy absorption characteristics of a polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H.; Neuschwanger, C.L.; Henderson, C.; Skala, D.M.

    1997-03-01

    Tension, compression and impact properties of a polyurethane encapsulant foam have been measured as a function of foam density. Significant differences in the behavior of the foam were observed depending on the mode of testing. Over the range of densities examined, both the modulus and the elastic collapse stress of the foam exhibited power-law dependencies with respect to density. The power-law relationship for the modulus was the same for both tension and compression testing and is explained in terms of the elastic compliance of the cellular structure of the foam using a simple geometric model. Euler buckling is used to rationalize the density dependence of the collapse stress. Neither tension nor compression testing yielded realistic measurements of energy absorption (toughness). In the former case, the energy absorption characteristics of the foam were severely limited due to the inherent lack of tensile ductility. In the latter case, the absence of a failure mechanism led to arbitrary measures of energy absorption that were not indicative of true material properties. Only impact testing revealed an intrinsic limitation in the toughness characteristics of the material with respect to foam density. The results suggest that dynamic testing should be used when assessing the shock mitigating qualities of a foam.

  6. Spaceflight and hind limb unloading induce similar changes in electrical impedance characteristics of mouse gastrocnemius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sung, M.; Li, J.; Spieker, A.J.; Spatz, J.; Ellman, R.; Ferguson, V.L.; Bateman, T.A.; Rosen, G.D.; Bouxsein, M.; Rutkove, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the potential of electrical impedance myography (EIM) to serve as a marker of muscle fiber atrophy and secondarily as an indicator of bone deterioration by assessing the effects of spaceflight or hind limb unloading. Methods In the first experiment, 6 mice were flown aboard the space shuttle (STS-135) for 13 days and 8 earthbound mice served as controls. In the second experiment, 14 mice underwent hind limb unloading (HLU) for 13 days; 13 additional mice served as controls. EIM measurements were made on ex vivo gastrocnemius muscle. Quantitative microscopy and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurements of the hindlimb were also performed. Results Reductions in the multifrequency phase-slope parameter were observed for both the space flight and HLU cohorts compared to their respective controls. For ground control and spaceflight groups, the values were 24.7±1.3°/MHz and 14.1±1.6°/MHz, respectively (p=0.0013); for control and HLU groups, the values were 23.9±1.6°/MHz and 19.0±1.0°/MHz, respectively (p=0.014). This parameter also correlated with muscle fiber size (ρ=0.65, p=0.011) for spaceflight and hind limb aBMD (ρ=0.65, p=0.0063) for both groups. Conclusions These data support the concept that EIM may serve as a useful tool for assessment of muscle disuse secondary to immobilization or microgravity. PMID:24292610

  7. Metabolic characteristics of the deltoid muscle in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gea, J G; Pasto, M; Carmona, M A; Orozco-Levi, M; Palomeque, J; Broquetas, J

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse key enzyme activities of the deltoid muscle (DM) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. The activities of one oxidative enzyme (citrate synthase (CS)), two glycolytic enzymes (lacatate dehydrogenase (LD); and phosphofructokinase (PFK)) and one enzyme related to the use of energy stores (creatine kinase (CK)) were determined in the DM of 10 patients with COPD and nine controls. Exercise capacity (cycloergometry) and the handgrip strength were also evaluated. Although exercise capacity was markedly reduced in COPD (57 +/- 20% predicted), their handgrip strength was relatively preserved (77 +/- 19% pred). The activity of LD was higher in the COPD patients (263.9 +/- 68.2 versus 184.4 +/- 46.5 mmol x min(-1) x g(-1), p<0.01), with a similar trend for CS (67.3 +/- 33.3 versus 46.0 +/- 17.4 mmol x min(-1) x g(-1), p = 0.07). Interestingly, the activity of the latter enzyme was significantly higher than controls if only severe COPD patients were considered (81.8 +/- 31.2 mmol x min(-1) x g(-1), p < 0.01). PFK and CK activities were similar for controls and COPD. Chronic obstructive patients show a preserved or even increased (severe disease) oxidative capacity in their deltoid muscle. This coexists with a greater capacity in the anaerobic part of the glycolysis. These findings are different to those previously observed in muscles of the lower limbs. PMID:11488330

  8. Characteristics of Body Composition and Muscle Strength of North Korean Refugees during South Korean Stay

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun Wook; Koh, Eun Sil; Kim, Si Eun; Kim, Seok Joong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of body composition and muscle strength of North Korean refugees (NKRs) according to their duration of stay in South Korea. Methods NKRs who volunteered and were living in South Korea, aged 20 to 75 years were recruited. Body compositions were analyzed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Muscle strength was measured with the hand grip test. Demographic and migration information was obtained with a questionnaire. Results A total of 158 volunteers were recruited at a mean age of 48.3±11.4 years. The mean time from when they escaped from North Korea and arrived in South Korea was 5.8±4.3 years. Height, weight, and body surface area were significantly smaller in all NKRs compared to South Korean controls, except for women aged over 50 years. In females of younger ages (<50 years), NKRs with more than a 4-year stay in South Korea had a higher weight and fat mass than that of those who had a shorter stay (less than 4 years) in South Korea. All NKRs had a weaker grip strength than that of the age-matched controls from South Korea. Conclusion The NKRs showed relatively smaller physiques and weaker muscle strength than that of the South Korean controls. In younger female NKRs, shorter South Korean stay group showed small body weight and fat mass than that of longer South Korean stay group. Specific health support programs might be needed. PMID:26485471

  9. The action of caffeine on the activation of the contractile mechanism in straited muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Lüttgau, H C; Oetliker, H

    1968-01-01

    1. The effect of caffeine on the initiation of isometric tension in isolated twitch muscle fibres of the frog was recorded with a mechano-electrical transducer.2. In Ringer solution as well as in solutions containing 95 mM-K(2)SO(4), caffeine (6-10 mM) caused reversible contractures. Tension of maximal potassium contractures was reached with a half-time of 2-4 sec.3. Caffeine caused a shift to lower potassium concentrations of the S-shaped curve which relates peak tension to log. [K](o) or membrane potential. In subthreshold concentrations of caffeine (1.5 mM) the potassium concentration at which half of maximal tension was reached shifted from 30 to 16 mM-K (-39 to -53 mV).4. In the ;steady state' the ability of fibres to develop tension is related to log. [K](o) or membrane potential by an S-shaped curve whose half value shifted from 28 to 45 mM-K (-41 to -29 mV) when 1.5 mM caffeine was applied.5. Fibres were most sensitive to caffeine at membrane potentials between -50 and -20 mV.6. The mechanical activity caused by caffeine was ;stabilized' by an increase in [Ca](o) or [Mg](o) resembling the stabilizing action of these ions on potassium contractures or on the sodium permeability of excitable membranes.7. Tetracaine in low concentrations (0.04-0.1 mM) increased the threshold for mechanical activation and shortened the plateau of potassium contractures. Higher concentrations (1-2 mM) suppressed mechanical activity completely.8. Tetracaine, 0.04 mM, was sufficient to suppress tension caused by a 100 times stronger concentration of caffeine. With higher concentrations of caffeine the inhibitory action of tetracaine could be reversed.9. Fibres which were immersed in subthreshold concentrations of caffeine either in Ringer solution or in a solution with 95 mM-K(2)SO(4) developed a strong contracture after a sudden drop in temperature from 20 to 1-3 degrees C.10. The fast activation of the whole cross-section of the muscle fibre caused by caffeine and its dependence

  10. Children and adults minimise activated muscle volume by selecting gait parameters that balance gross mechanical power and work demands

    PubMed Central

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Usherwood, James R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Terrestrial locomotion on legs is energetically expensive. Compared with cycling, or with locomotion in swimming or flying animals, walking and running are highly uneconomical. Legged gaits that minimise mechanical work have previously been identified and broadly match walking and running at appropriate speeds. Furthermore, the ‘cost of muscle force’ approaches are effective in relating locomotion kinetics to metabolic cost. However, few accounts have been made for why animals deviate from either work-minimising or muscle-force-minimising strategies. Also, there is no current mechanistic account for the scaling of locomotion kinetics with animal size and speed. Here, we report measurements of ground reaction forces in walking children and adult humans, and their stance durations during running. We find that many aspects of gait kinetics and kinematics scale with speed and size in a manner that is consistent with minimising muscle activation required for the more demanding between mechanical work and power: spreading the duration of muscle action reduces activation requirements for power, at the cost of greater work demands. Mechanical work is relatively more demanding for larger bipeds – adult humans – accounting for their symmetrical M-shaped vertical force traces in walking, and relatively brief stance durations in running compared with smaller bipeds – children. The gaits of small children, and the greater deviation of their mechanics from work-minimising strategies, may be understood as appropriate for their scale, not merely as immature, incompletely developed and energetically sub-optimal versions of adult gaits. PMID:26400978

  11. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A. L.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (−24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the

  12. Mechanisms of inhibitory effects of cerivastatin on rat vascular smooth muscle cell growth.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Akihiko; Tsuchiya, Hiromi; Ohnuma, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Daimon, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism(s) of an inhibitory effect of cerivastatin on cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth. After being starved, cultured VSMCs were stimulated by 5% fetal bovine serum with either various concentrations of cerivastatin or 10-4 M of mevalonate. Cerivastatin dose-dependently decreased the values of [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cell numbers and the level of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2. It also suppressed the level of proliferative cell nuclear antigen in a dose-dependent manner. These reductions were abolished by the addition of mevalonate. Similarly, the level of phosphorylated p38 was also decreased by cerivastatin. In contrast, cerivastatin dose-dependently activated the phosphorylation of both c-jun NH2-terminal protein kinase and activating transcription factor-2, and these activations were abolished by the addition of mevalonate. The levels of phosphorylated Akt and p70 S6 kinase as well as those of Bcl-2 were dose-dependently reduced by cerivastatin, and these reductions were abolished by the addition of mevalonate. Cerivastatin could dose-dependently elevate the levels of CPP32/caspase-3 activity and cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments in VSMCs without causing cytotoxicity. These results indicate that cerivastatin suppresses cell survival and activates the apoptotic cellular signaling in VSMCs, suggesting that it could be effective for preventing the progression of restenosis after angioplasty. PMID:12131557

  13. Mechanical coupling of smooth muscle cells using local and global stimulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Craig; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses can directly alter many cellular processes, including signal transduction, growth, differentiation, and survival. These stresses, generated primarily by myosin activity within the cytoskeleton, regulate both cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions. We report studies of mechanical cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions using patterned arrays of flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microposts combined with application of global stretch or local chemical stimulation. Bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells are patterned onto micropost arrays to create multicellular structures to probe intercellular coupling. Global stimulation is applied by building the micropost arrays on a flexible membrane that can be stretched while allowing simultaneous observation of cell traction forces. Results for triangle wave stretches of single cells show increasing traction forces with increasing strain, and immediate weakening of traction forces as strain is decreased. ``Spritzing,'' a laminar flow technique, is used to expose a single cell within a construct to a drug treatment while cell traction forces are recorded via the microposts. Results will be described showing the response of cells to external stimulation both directly and through intercellular coupling.

  14. Characteristics and mechanisms of acrylate polymer damage to maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Mao, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qin; Liao, Zongwen; He, Zhenli

    2016-07-01

    Superabsorbent acrylate polymers (SAPs) have been widely used to maintain soil moisture in agricultural management, but they may cause damage to plants, and the mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, seed germination, soil pot culture, hydroponic experiments, and SAPs degradation were conducted to investigate damage characteristics and mechanisms associated with SAPs application. The Results showed that SAPs inhibited maize growth and altered root morphology (irregular and loose arrangement of cells and breakage of cortex parenchyma), and the inhibitory effects were enhanced at higher SAPs rates. After 1h SAP hydrogels treatment, root malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly increased, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) content were significantly decreased. Hydroponics experiment indicated that root and shoot growth was inhibited at 2.5mgL(-1) acrylic acid (AA), and the inhibition was enhanced with increasing AA rates. This effect was exacerbated by the presence of Na(+) at a high concentration in the hydrogels. Release and degradation of AA were enhanced at higher soil moisture levels. A complete degradation of AA occurred between 15 and 20 days after incubation (DAI), but it took longer for Na(+) concentration to decrease to a safe level. These results indicate that high concentration of both AA and Na(+) present in the SAPs inhibits plant growth. The finding of this study may provide a guideline for appropriate application of SAPs in agriculture. PMID:27057990

  15. Characteristics and Possible Functions of Mitochondrial Ca2+ Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Thomas E.; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria produce around 92% of the ATP used in the typical animal cell by oxidative phosphorylation using energy from their electrochemical proton gradient. Intramitochondrial free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m) has been found to be an important component of control of the rate of this ATP production. In addition, [Ca2+]m also controls the opening of a large pore in the inner mitochondrial membrane, the permeability transition pore (PTP), which plays a role in mitochondrial control of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Therefore, [Ca2+]m can control whether the cell has sufficient ATP to fulfill its functions and survive or is condemned to death. Ca2+ is also one of the most important second messengers within the cytosol, signaling changes in cellular response through Ca2+ pulses or transients. Mitochondria can also sequester Ca2+ from these transients so as to modify the shape of Ca2+ signaling transients or control their location within the cell. All of this is controlled by the action of four or five mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mechanisms and the PTP. The characteristics of these mechanisms of Ca2+ transport and a discussion of how they might function are described in this paper. PMID:19161975

  16. Physiological mechanisms of action of incretin and insulin in regulating skeletal muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Haitham; Phillips, Bethan; Smith, Kenneth; Wilkinson, Daniel; Atherton, Philip J; Idris, Iskandar

    2014-01-01

    Type II diabetes (T2D) is a progressive condition affecting approximately 350 million adults worldwide. Whilst skeletal muscle insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction are recognised causes of T2D, progressive loss of lean muscle mass (reducing surface area for glucose disposal area) in tandem with ageing-related adiposity (i.e. sarcopenic obesity) also plays an important role in driving hyperglycaemia progression. The anabolic effects of nutrition on the muscle are driven by the uptake of amino acids, into skeletal muscle protein, and insulin plays a crucial role in regulating this. Meanwhile glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) and glucose- dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) are incretin hormones released from the gut into the bloodstream in response to macronutrients, and have an established role in enhancing insulin secretion. Intriguingly, endocrine functions of incretins were recently shown to extend beyond classical insulinotropic effects, with GLP-1/GIP receptors being found in extra-pancreatic cells i.e., skeletal muscle and peripheral (muscle) microvasculature. Since, incretins have been shown to modulate blood flow and muscle glucose uptake in an insulin-independent manner, incretins may play a role in regulating nutrient-mediated modulation of muscle metabolism and microvascular tone, independently of their insulinotropic effects. In this review we will discuss the role of skeletal muscle in glucose homeostasis, disturbances related to insulin resistance, regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism, muscle microvascular abnormalities and disturbances of protein (PRO) metabolism seen in old age and T2D. We will also discuss the emerging non-insulinotropic role of GLP-1 in modulating skeletal muscle metabolism and microvascular blood flow. PMID:25323297

  17. Remarks on Muscle Contraction Mechanism II. Isometric Tension Transient and Isotonic Velocity Transient

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Toshio; Takai, Nobukatsu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Mitsui and Ohshima (2008) criticized the power-stroke model for muscle contraction and proposed a new model. In the new model, about 41% of the myosin heads are bound to actin filaments, and each bound head forms a complex MA3 with three actin molecules A1, A2 and A3 forming the crossbridge. The complex translates along the actin filament cooperating with each other. The new model well explained the experimental data on the steady filament sliding. As an extension of the study, the isometric tension transient and isotonic velocity transient are investigated. Statistical ensemble of crossbridges is introduced, and variation of the binding probability of myosin head to A1 is considered. When the binding probability to A1 is zero, the Hill-type force-velocity relation is resulted in. When the binding probability to A1 becomes finite, the deviation from the Hill-type force-velocity relation takes place, as observed by Edman (1988). The characteristics of the isometric tension transient observed by Ford, Huxley and Simmons (1977) and of the isotonic velocity transient observed by Civan and Podolsky (1966) are theoretically reproduced. Ratios of the extensibility are estimated as 0.22 for the crossbridge, 0.26 for the myosin filament and 0.52 for the actin filament, in consistency with the values determined by X-ray diffraction by Wakabayashi et al. (1994). PMID:21673917

  18. Mechanical and structural properties underlying contraction of skeletal muscle fibers after partial 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, S; Tsaturyan, A; Bershitskaya, O; Mashanov, G; Brown, P; Webb, M; Ferenczi, M A

    1996-01-01

    We show prolonged contraction of permeabilized muscle fibers of the frog during which structural order, as judged from low-angle x-ray diffraction, was preserved by means of partial cross-linking of the fibers using the zero-length cross-linker 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide. Ten to twenty percent of the myosin cross-bridges were cross-linked, allowing the remaining 80-90% to cycle and generate force. These fibers displayed a well-preserved sarcomeric order and mechanical characteristics similar to those of intact muscle fibers. The intensity of the brightest meridional reflection at 14.5 nm, resulting from the projection of cross-bridges evenly spaced along the myofilament length, decreased by 60% as a relaxed fiber was deprived of ATP and entered the rigor state. Upon activation of a rigorized fiber by the addition of ATP, the intensity of this reflection returned to 97% of the relaxed value, suggesting that the overall orientation of cross-bridges in the active muscle was more perpendicular to the filament axis than in rigor. Following a small-amplitude length step applied to the active fibers, the reflection intensity decreased for both releases and stretches. In rigor, however, a small stretch increased the amplitude of the reflection by 35%. These findings show the close link between cross-bridge orientation and tension changes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:8874020

  19. Force-Velocity and Power Characteristics of Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers after Hindlimb Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, K. S.; Blaser, C. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of 1, 2, and 3 wk of Hindlimb Suspension (HS) on force-velocity and power characteristics of single rat soleus fibers were determined. After 1, 2, or 3 wk of HS, small fiber bundles were isolated, placed in skinning solution, and stored at -20 C until studied. Single fibers were isolated and placed between a motor arm and force transducer, functional properties were studied, and fiber protein content was subsequently analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Additional fibers were isolated from soleus of control and after 1 and 3 wk of HS, and fiber type distribution and myosin light chain stoichiometry were determined from SDS-PAGE analysis. After 1 wk of HS, percent type I fibers declined from 82 to 74%, whereas hybrid fibers increased from 10 to 18%. Percent fast type 11 fibers increased from 8% in control and 1 wk of HS to 26% by 3 wk of HS. Most fibers showed an increased unloaded maximal shortening velocity (V(sub 0)), but myosin heavy chain remained entirely slow type I. The mechanism for increased V(sub 0) is unknown. There was a progressive decrease in fiber diameter (14, 30, and 38%) and peak force (38, 56, and 63%) after 1, 2, and 3 wk of HS, respectively. One week of HS resulted in a shift of the force-velocity curve, and between 2 and 3 wk of HS the curve shifted further such that V(sub 0) was higher than control at all relative loads less than 45% peak isometric force. Peak absolute power output of soleus fibers progressively decreased through 2 wk of HS but showed no further change at 3 wk. The results suggest that between 2 and 3 wk the HS-induced alterations in the force-velocity relationship act to maintain the power output of single soleus fibers despite a continued reduction in fiber force.

  20. Force-velocity and power characteristics of rat soleus muscle fibers after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, K. S.; Blaser, C. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of 1, 2, and 3 wk of hindlimb suspension (HS) on force-velocity and power characteristics of single rat soleus fibers were determined. After 1, 2, or 3 wk of HA, small fiber bundles were isolated, placed in skinning solution, and stored at -20 C until studied. Single fibers were isolated and placed between a motor arm and force transducer, functional properties were studied, and fiber protein content was subsequently analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Additional fibers were isolated from soleus of control after 1 and 3 wk of HS, and fiber type distribution and myosin light chain stoichiometry were determined from SDS-PAGE analysis. After 1 wk of HS, percent type I fibers declined from 82 to 74%, whereas hybrid fibers increased from 10 to 18%. Percent fast type II fibers increased from 8% in control and 1 wk of HS to 26% by 3 wk of HS. Most fibers showed an increased unloaded maximal shortening velocity (V sub O)), but myosin heavy chain remained entirely slow type I. The mechanism for increased V(sub O) is unknown. There was a progressive decrease in fiber diameter and peak force after 1, 2, and 3 wk of HS, respectively. One week of HS resulted in a shift of the force-velocity curve, and between 2 and 3 wk of HS the curve shifted further such that V(sub O) was higher than control at all relative loads less than 45% peak isometric force. Peak absolute power output of soleus fibers progressively decreased through 2 wk of HS but showed no further change at 3 wk. The results suggest that between 2 and 3 wk the HS-induced alterations in the force-velocity relationship act to maintain the power output of single soleus fibers despite a continued reduction in fiber force.

  1. The influence of different floor stiffness on mechanical efficiency of leg extensor muscle.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Saggini, R; Viru, A

    1997-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of skeletal muscle is influenced by internal factors (e.g. re-use of elastic energy) and/or external conditions (e.g. floor compliance, shoe structure etc.). These factors have an effect on muscular work economy-this was investigated in the present study. Eight subjects were tested during three different series of jumps. Each series consisted of rhythmical vertical jumps performed at desired frequency and height for 1 min. The first (1) series was executed on the laboratory floor without rebound condition (subjects were asked to maintain 1 s period in an isometric condition before concentric work was performed), the second (II) and the third (III) series were performed in rebound conditions respectively on a laboratory floor (hard surface) and on a special panel possessing high compliance (a special foam rubber panel with stiffness of 14.4 kN/m). Expired air was collected during the test and recovery for determination of energy expenditure. Mechanical work was calculated from the vertical displacement of the body during the jumps. The results indicated that the net efficiency in the jumps without prestretch of the leg extensor muscles (series I) was the lowest (19.4%). In contrast, the net efficiency observed in rebound jumps (series II and III) was respectively 30.8% and 33.1%, demonstrating that the reuse of elastic energy (Wel) plays an important role for muscular work efficiency. However, the contribution of Wel to the total work performed was different p < 0.05, Student's t-test) in jumps on the special panel (41%) compared to the normal surface (37%), even if the total amount of stored elastic energy was the same in both conditions. The different efficiency observed between series II and III was attributed to the compliance of the surface on which the tests were executed. It was suggested that man could change his neuromuscular pattern to adapt muscular behaviour for matching the damped properties shown by the high compliance surface

  2. Work capacity and metabolic and morphologic characteristics of the human quadriceps muscle in response to unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, H. E.; Dudley, G. A.; Hather, B.; Tesch, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The response of skeletal muscle to unweighting was studied in six healthy males who were subjected to four weeks of lowerlimb suspension. They performed three bouts of 30 consecutive maximal concentric knee extensions, before unloading and the day after (POST 1), 4 days after (POST 2) and 7 weeks after (REC) resumed weight-bearing. Peak torque of each contraction was recorded and work was calculated as the mean of the average peak torque for the three bouts and fatigability was measured as the decline in average peak torque over bouts. Needle biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis of each limb before and at POST 1. Muscle fibre type composition and area, capillarity and the enzyme activities of citrate synthase (CS) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) were subsequently analysed. Mean average peak torque for the three bouts at POST1, POST2 and REC was reduced (P < 0.05) by 17, 13 and 7%, respectively. Fatigability was greater (P < 0.05) at POST2 than before unloading. Type I, IIA and IIB percentage, Type I and II area and capillaries per fibre of Type I and II did not change (P > 0.05) in response to unloading. The activity of CS, but not PFK, decreased (P < 0.05) after unloading. The weight-bearing limb showed no changes in the variables measured. The results of this study suggest that this human lowerlimb suspension model produces substantial impairments of work and oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle. The performance decrements are most likely induced by lack of weight-bearing.

  3. Upper extremity muscle tone and response of tidal volume during manually assisted breathing for patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Yokoi, Yuka; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine, in patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation, if the response of tidal volume during manually assisted breathing is dependent upon both upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity of manually assisted breathing. [Subjects] We recruited 13 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, and assessed their upper extremity muscle tone using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS). The subjects were assigned to either the low MAS group (MAS≤2, n=7) or the high MAS group (MAS≥3, n=6). [Methods] The manually assisted breathing technique was applied at a pressure of 2 kgf and 4 kgf. A split-plot ANOVA was performed to compare the tidal volume of each pressure during manually assisted breathing between the low and the high MAS groups. [Results] Statistical analysis showed there were main effects of the upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity of the manually assisted breathing technique. There was no interaction between these factors. [Conclusion] Our findings reveal that the tidal volume during the manually assisted breathing technique for patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation depends upon the patient’s upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity. PMID:26357431

  4. Season-long increases in perceived muscle soreness in professional rugby league players: role of player position, match characteristics and playing surface.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Ben D; Twist, Craig; Haigh, Julian D; Brewer, Clive; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2016-06-01

    Rugby League (RL) is a high-impact collision sport characterised by repeated sprints and numerous high-speed impacts and consequently players often report immediate and prolonged muscle soreness in the days after a match. We examined muscle soreness after matches during a full season to understand the extent to which match characteristics influence soreness. Thirty-one elite Super League players provided daily measures of muscle soreness after each of the 26 competitive fixtures of the 2012 season. Playing position, phase of the season, playing surface and match characteristics were recorded from each match. Muscle soreness peaked at day 1 and was still apparent at day 4 post-game with no attenuation in the magnitude of muscle soreness over the course of the season. Neither playing position, phase of season or playing surface had any effects on the extent of muscle soreness. Playing time and total number of collisions were significantly correlated with higher ratings of muscle soreness, especially in the forwards. These data indicate the absence "contact adaptations" in elite rugby players with soreness present throughout the entire season. Strategies must now be implemented to deal with the physical and psychological consequences of prolonged feeling of pain. PMID:26368285

  5. mRNA expression characteristics are different in irreversibly atrophic intrinsic muscles of the forepaw compared with reversibly atrophic biceps in a rat model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-Xin; Chen, Liang; Ding, Fei; Chen, Le-Zi; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    In obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP), irreversible muscle atrophy occurs much faster in intrinsic muscles of the hand than in the biceps. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, mRNA expression profiles of denervated intrinsic muscles of the forepaw (IMF) and denervated biceps were determined by microarray using the rat model of OBPP where atrophy of IMF is irreversible while atrophy of biceps is reversible. Relative to contralateral control, 446 dysregulated mRNAs were detected in denervated IMF and mapped to 51 KEGG pathways, and 830 dysregulated mRNAs were detected in denervated biceps and mapped to 52 KEGG pathways. In denervated IMF, 10 of the pathways were related to muscle regulation; six with down-regulated and one with up-regulated mRNAs. The remaining three pathways had both up- and down-regulated mRNAs. In denervated biceps, 13 of the pathways were related to muscle regulation, six with up-regulated and seven with down-regulated mRNAs. Five of the pathways with up-regulated mRNAs were related to regrowth and differentiation of muscle cells. Among the 23 pathways with dysregulated mRNAs, 13 were involved in regulation of neuromuscular junctions. Our results demonstrated that mRNAs expression characteristics in irreversibly atrophic denervated IMF were different from those in reversibly atrophic denervated biceps; dysregulated mRNAs in IMF were associated with inactive pathways of muscle regulation, and in biceps they were associated with active pathways of regrowth and differentiation. Lack of self-repair potential in IMF may be a major reason why atrophy of IMF becomes irreversible much faster than atrophy of biceps after denervation. PMID:26902607

  6. Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, Richard G

    2005-11-30

    This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Brnsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with

  7. beta. -Adrenoceptors in human tracheal smooth muscle: characteristics of binding and relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    van Koppen, C.J.; Hermanussen, M.W.; Verrijp, K.N.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J.F.; Beld, A.J.; Lammers, J.W.J.; van Ginneken, C.A.M.

    1987-06-29

    Specific binding of (/sup 125/I)-(-)-cyanopindolol to human tracheal smooth muscle membranes was saturable, stereo-selective and of high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5.3 +/- 0.9 pmol/l and R/sub T/ = 78 +/- 7 fmol/g tissue). The ..beta../sub 1/-selective antagonists atenolol and LK 203-030 inhibited specific (/sup 125/I)-(-)-cyanopindolol binding according to a one binding site model with low affinity in nearly all subjects, pointing to a homogeneous BETA/sub 2/-adrenoceptor population. In one subject using LK 203-030 a small ..beta../sub 1/-adrenoceptor subpopulation could be demonstrated. The beta-mimetics isoprenaline, fenoterol, salbutamol and terbutaline recognized high and low affinity agonist binding sites. Isoprenaline's pK/sub H/- and pK/sub L/-values for the high and low affinity sites were 8.0 +/- 0.2 and 5.9 +/- 0.3 respectively. In functional experiments isoprenaline relaxed tracheal smooth muscle strips having intrinsic tone with a pD/sub 2/-value of 6.63 +/- 0.19. 32 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Insights into the skeletal muscle characteristics of three southern African antelope species

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Tertius Abraham

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Skeletal muscle fibre type, cross-sectional area (CSA), maximum enzyme capacities and fibre oxidative capacities were investigated in three southern African antelope species. Muscle samples from blesbok (Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi), mountain reedbuck (Redunca fulvorufula) and greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) were collected post mortem from the Vastus lateralis and analysed for myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content, citrate synthase (CS), 3-hydroxyacyl Co A dehydrogenase (3-HAD), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Histochemistry and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine relative fibre oxidative capacity, fibre type and cross-sectional area (CSA). Type IIX fibres were the most abundant fibre type in all three species, ranging from 43 to 57%. Kudu had less type IIX fibres than mountain reedbuck and blesbok (P<0.05), values confirmed by their respective MHC isoform content. Blesbok had the smallest fibres, followed by mountain reedbuck and finally kudu (P<0.001). Overall, all three species had high oxidative and glycolytic capacities, but species differences were found. Kudu had the lowest CS activity, followed by blesbok and mountain reedbuck, but the highest PFK, LDH and CK activities. This study confirmed large variation in oxidative capacities within a single fibre type, as well as overlap between the fibre types with no distinct differences between the three species. The fibre type profile of each species is discussed and confirms some of their physical attributes and capabilities. PMID:25326514

  9. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  10. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  11. Mechanism of contractile action of barium ion on rat aortic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, A B; Aloamaka, C P

    1987-12-01

    The mechanism of Ba2+-induced contraction has been examined in helical strips of Ca2+-depleted, 60 mM K+-depolarized rat aortae. The concentration-response curves to Ca2+ or Ba2+ were significantly potentiated by exposure to 3 X 10(-8) M Bay K 8644 (a Ca2+ channel agonist) in the order Ca2+ greater than Ba2+, suggesting an action of Ba2+ ions through potential-sensitive membrane Ca2+ channels. Exposure of strips to background concentration of Ca2+ (0.05 mM) enhanced the contractile responses to Ba2+, whereas background exposure to Ba2+ (0.1 mM) attenuated Ca2+ responses. Repeated stimulation with Ba2+ resulted in tachyphylaxis, contrary to the result when Ca2+ was used. The results suggest that Ba2+ ions enter rat aortic smooth muscle cells through Ca2+ channels and mobilize a noradrenaline-insensitive intracellular Ca2+ pool. Ba2+ may also cause a desensitization of some intracellular process. PMID:3449201

  12. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  13. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness as a Mechanism for Increased Aortic Stiffness with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongyu; Zhu, Yi; Sun, Zhe; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P.; Gansner, Meredith; Depre, Christophe; Resuello, Ranillo R.G.; Natividad, Filipinas F.; Hunter, William C.; Genin, Guy M.; Elson, Elliot L.; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Increased aortic stiffness, an important feature of many vascular diseases, e.g., aging, hypertension, atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms, is assumed due to changes in extracellular matrix (ECM). Objective We tested the hypothesis that the mechanisms also involve intrinsic stiffening of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods and Results Stiffness was measured in vitro both by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in a reconstituted tissue model, using VSMCs from aorta of young versus old male monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, n=7/group), where aortic stiffness increases by 200 % in vivo. The apparent elastic modulus was increased (P<0.05) in old VSMCs (41.7±0.5 kPa) versus young (12.8±0.3 kPa), but not after disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D. Stiffness of the VSMCs in the reconstituted tissue model was also higher (P<0.05) in old (23.3±3.0 kPa) than in young (13.7±2.4 kPa). Conclusions These data support the novel concept, not appreciated previously, that increased vascular stiffness with aging is due not only to changes in ECM, but also to intrinsic changes in VSMCs. PMID:20634486

  14. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Saita, Y; Koizumi, T; Yazawa, H; Morita, T; Takenaka, T; Honda, K

    1997-06-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). 2. [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. 3. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. 4. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. 5. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. 6. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  15. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Yuji; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Yazawa, Hidenori; Morita, Takashi; Takenaka, Toichi; Honda, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  16. Mechanical strain induces specific changes in the synthesis and organization of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, R T; Yamamoto, C; Feng, Y; Potter-Perigo, S; Briggs, W H; Landschulz, K T; Turi, T G; Thompson, J F; Libby, P; Wight, T N

    2001-04-27

    In the mechanically active environment of the artery, cells sense mechanical stimuli and regulate extracellular matrix structure. In this study, we explored the changes in synthesis of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells in response to precisely controlled mechanical strains. Strain increased mRNA for versican (3.2-fold), biglycan (2.0-fold), and perlecan (2.0-fold), whereas decorin mRNA levels decreased to a third of control levels. Strain also increased versican, biglycan, and perlecan core proteins, with a concomitant decrease in decorin core protein. Deformation did not alter the hydrodynamic size of proteoglycans as evidenced by molecular sieve chromatography but increased sulfate incorporation in both chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (p < 0.05 for both). Using DNA microarrays, we also identified the gene for the hyaluronan-linking protein TSG6 as mechanically induced in smooth muscle cells. Northern analysis confirmed a 4.0-fold increase in steady state mRNA for TSG6 following deformation. Size exclusion chromatography under associative conditions showed that versican-hyaluronan aggregation was enhanced following deformation. These data demonstrate that mechanical deformation increases specific vascular smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis and aggregation, indicating a highly coordinated extracellular matrix response to biomechanical stimulation. PMID:11278699

  17. Mechanical characteristics of antibiotic-laden bone cement.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michael S; Spencer, Robert F; Cunningham, James L; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Miles, Anthony W; Learmonth, Ian D

    2002-12-01

    We studied the mechanical characteristics of cement-antibiotic combinations in vitro. Palacos R was tested without antibiotics, with gentamicin alone and with gentamicin plus vancomycin or flucloxacillin. Palacos LV was studied only with gentamicin added. CMW 1 was studied with gentamicin added, with gentamicin plus vancomycin, and with gentamicin plus flucloxacillin. We performed four-point bending tests on beams of cement to establish bending strength and modulus, and compared the values to ISO standards. Density was also assessed. Palacos R was the strongest of the cements (bending strength 80 MPa). Palacos formulations (apart from Palacos LV) had a higher density and bending modulus than CMW 1. Statistical comparison of various cements with plain Palacos R showed lower density in 4 of the mixtures, and lower bending strength and modulus in 6 of the mixtures. Palacos R/gentamicin plus vancomycin and CMW 1/gentamicin plus vancomycin had bending strength slightly above minimum ISO standards, suggesting that the addition of vancomycin during cement mixing may compromise the outcome in revision surgery for sepsis. PMID:12553520

  18. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells mitigates glucocorticoid-induced decreases in prostaglandin production and prostaglandin synthase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, J. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1994-01-01

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) induces a decline in protein synthesis and protein content in tissue cultured, avian skeletal muscle cells, and this atrophy is attenuated by repetitive mechanical stretch. Since the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin mitigated this stretch attenuation of muscle atrophy, the effects of Dex and mechanical stretch on prostaglandin production and prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) activity were examined. In static cultures, 10(-8) M Dex reduced PGF2 alpha production 55-65% and PGE2 production 84-90% after 24-72 h of incubation. Repetitive 10% stretch-relaxations of non-Dex-treated cultures increased PGF2 alpha efflux 41% at 24 h and 276% at 72 h, and increased PGE2 production 51% at 24 h and 236% at 72 h. Mechanical stimulation of Dex-treated cultures increased PGF2 alpha production 162% after 24 h, returning PGF2 alpha efflux to the level of non-Dex-treated cultures. At 72 h, stretch increased PGF2 alpha efflux 65% in Dex-treated cultures. Mechanical stimulation of Dex-treated cultures also increased PGE2 production at 24 h, but not at 72 h. Dex reduced PGHS activity in the muscle cultures by 70% after 8-24 h of incubation, and mechanical stimulation of the Dex-treated cultures increased PGHS activity by 98% after 24 h. Repetitive mechanical stimulation attenuates the catabolic effects of Dex on cultured skeletal muscle cells in part by mitigating the Dex-induced declines in PGHS activity and prostaglandin production.

  19. Influence of complete spinal cord injury on skeletal muscle mechanics within the first 6 months of injury.

    PubMed

    Castro, M J; Apple, D F; Rogers, S; Dudley, G A

    2000-01-01

    In this study we examined the influence of complete spinal cord injury (SCI) on the mechanical characteristics of skeletal muscle in vivo within 6 months of the injury. Surface electrical stimulation (ES) was applied to the left m. quadriceps femoris of patients at 6, 11 and 24 weeks after injury. Surface ES was also applied to seven able-bodied controls (AB) at two time points 18 weeks apart. ES consisted of 2 bouts of 20, 1-s isometric contractions with 2 s and 2 min of rest between contractions and bouts, respectively. The time from 20-80% of peak torque (rise time) and the half relaxation time (1/2 RT) were determined for the first and for the last few contractions. Force loss over repeat contractions was greater in SCI than AB (27% vs 95%; P = 0.0001), and did not change over the 18-week period. Rise time did not change over repeat contractions, was not different between groups, and nor did it change over the 18-week period (range: 150-172 ms). 1/2 RT showed several group differences. Overall, 1/2 RT was longer at the beginning of ES in SCI than AB [mean (SE) 133 (15) ms vs 90 (6) ms, P = 0.037]. Slowing of relaxation time with force loss over repeat contractions was found in SCI at 24 weeks after injury [167 (18) ms, P = 0.016], but not at 6 [128 (14) ms] or 11 [145 (12) ms] weeks after injury. AB, in contrast, showed prolonged relaxation times, with force loss at both time points [115 (10) ms and 113 (11) ms; P = 0.0001]. The results indicate that SCI alters the relaxation but not contractile properties of mixed skeletal muscle within the first 24 weeks of injury. Altered calcium handling and contraction-induced fiber injury are suggested to explain the slower relaxation time per se, and the prolonged relaxation with force loss observed after SCI. PMID:10552277

  20. Limited effects of hyperlipidemia on the arterial smooth muscle response to mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Glagov, S; Grande, J P; Xu, C P; Giddens, D P; Zarins, C K

    1989-01-01

    Arteries respond to long-term changes in flow rate by alterations in caliber that tend to restore wall shear stress to normal baseline levels. Changes in radius, pressure, or geometric configuration elicit changes in structure and composition of the media in keeping with the altered level and distribution of tensile stresses. Similar stabilizing adaptations occur in the presence of conditions that induce the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, but the ultimate effectiveness of these reactions is variable. Several recent experiments provide information on the possible effects of hyperlipidemia on the smooth muscle cell (SMC) response to normal or increased levels of mechanical stress: (a) Normolipemic serum increases collagen synthesis by SMCs grown on purified elastin membranes compared to synthesis in serum-free medium, but synthesis is not further enhanced by cyclic stretching of the cells. Collagen production increase is less marked in hyperlipemic serum, but cyclic stretching raises synthesis to a degree comparable to that noted for serum-free medium. (b) The increase in artery diameter in response to increased flow rate and the elaboration of media components in relation to the increase in diameter are not hampered by hyperlipidemia. (c) The compensatory enlargement of arteries in response to plaque formation is not prevented by hyperlipidemia even in the presence of hypertension. (d) The healing of a transmural necrotizing injury of the media is, however, retarded and incomplete in the presence of hyperlipidemia. These findings indicate that hyperlipidemia per se does not necessarily interfere with the SMC response to mechanical stimuli. The usual adaptive reactions remain intact.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2478833

  1. Characteristics of myosin profile in human vastus lateralis muscle in relation to training background.

    PubMed

    Zawadowska, B; Majerczak, J; Semik, D; Karasinski, J; Kolodziejski, L; Kilarski, W M; Duda, K; Zoladz, J A

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg) of different training background were investigated and classified into three groups according to their physical activity and sport discipline: untrained students (group A), national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B, 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training) and sprint-power athletes (group C, 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training). Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase and SDH activities, immunohistochemically for fast and slow myosin, and electrophoretically followed by Western immunoblotting for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. Significant differences (P<0.05) regarding composition of muscle fibre types and myosin heavy chains were found only between groups A (41.7+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 40.8+/-4.0% of MyHCIIA and 17.5+/-4.0% of MyHCIIX) and B (64.3+/-0.8% of MyHCI, 34.0+/-1.4% of MyHCIIA and 1.7+/-1.4% of MyHCIIX) and groups A and C (59.6+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 37.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIA and 3.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIX). Unexpectedly, endurance athletes (group B) such as long-distance runners, cyclists and cross country skiers, did not differ from the athletes representing short term, high power output sports (group C) such as ice hockey, karate, ski-jumping, volleyball, soccer and modern dance. Furthermore, the relative amount of the fastest MyHCIIX isoform in vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in the athletes from group C than in students (group A). We conclude that the myosin profile in the athletes belonging to group C was unfavourable for their sport disciplines. This could be the reason why those athletes did not reach international level despite of several years of training. PMID:15493580

  2. High Intensity Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis: Effects on Muscle Contractile Characteristics and Exercise Capacity, a Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, Frank; Grevendonk, Lotte; Verboven, Kenneth; Hansen, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-to-moderate intensity exercise improves muscle contractile properties and endurance capacity in multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of high intensity exercise remains unknown. Methods Thirty-four MS patients were randomized into a sedentary control group (SED, n = 11) and 2 exercise groups that performed 12 weeks of a high intensity interval (HITR, n = 12) or high intensity continuous cardiovascular training (HCTR, n = 11), both in combination with resistance training. M.vastus lateralis fiber cross sectional area (CSA) and proportion, knee-flexor/extensor strength, body composition, maximal endurance capacity and self-reported physical activity levels were assessed before and after 12 weeks. Results Compared to SED, 12 weeks of high intensity exercise increased mean fiber CSA (HITR: +21±7%, HCTR: +23±5%). Furthermore, fiber type I CSA increased in HCTR (+29±6%), whereas type II (+23±7%) and IIa (+23±6%,) CSA increased in HITR. Muscle strength improved in HITR and HCTR (between +13±7% and +45±20%) and body fat percentage tended to decrease (HITR: -3.9±2.0% and HCTR: -2.5±1.2%). Furthermore, endurance capacity (Wmax +21±4%, time to exhaustion +24±5%, VO2max +17±5%) and lean tissue mass (+1.4±0.5%) only increased in HITR. Finally self-reported physical activity levels increased 73±19% and 86±27% in HCTR and HITR, respectively. Conclusion High intensity cardiovascular exercise combined with resistance training was safe, well tolerated and improved muscle contractile characteristics and endurance capacity in MS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01845896 PMID:26418222

  3. Electrophysiological and Mechanical Characteristics in Human Ileal Motility: Recordings of Slow Waves Conductions and Contractions, In vitro.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Moon, Sang Hui; Choe, Eun Kyung; Yu, Sung A; Park, Sung-Hye; Park, Kyu Joo

    2015-11-01

    Little human tissue data are available for slow waves and migrating motor complexes, which are the main components of small bowel motility. We investigated the electrophysiological and mechanical characteristics of human ileal motility, in vitro. Ileum was obtained from patients undergoing bowel resection. Electrophysiological microelectrode recordings for membrane potential changes and mechanical tension recordings for contraction from smooth muscle strips and ileal segments were performed. Drugs affecting the enteric nervous system were applied to measure the changes in activity. Slow waves were detected with a frequency of 9~10/min. There were no cross-sectional differences in resting membrane potential (RMP), amplitude or frequency between outer and inner circular muscle (CM), suggesting that electrical activities could be effectively transmitted from outer to inner CM. The presence of the interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC) at the linia septa was verified by immunohistochemistry. Contractions of strips and segments occurred at a frequency of 3~4/min and 1~2/min, respectively. The frequency, amplitude and area under the curve were similar between CM and LM. In segments, contractions of CM were associated with LM, but propagation varied with antegrade and retrograde directions. Atropine, N(W)-oxide-L-arginine, and sodium nitroprusside exhibited different effects on RMP and contractions. There were no cross-sectional differences with regard to the characteristics of slow waves in CM. The frequency of contractions in smooth muscle strips and ileal segments was lower than slow waves. The directions of propagation were diverse, indicating both mixing and transport functions of the ileum. PMID:26557020

  4. Reduced mechanical efficiency in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but normal peak VO2 with small muscle mass exercise.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Russell S; Leek, Bryan T; Gavin, Timothy P; Haseler, Luke J; Mudaliar, Sundar R D; Henry, Robert; Mathieu-Costello, Odile; Wagner, Peter D

    2004-01-01

    We studied six patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (FEV1 = 1.1 +/- 0.2 L, 32% of predicted) and six age- and activity level-matched control subjects while performing both maximal bicycle exercise and single leg knee-extensor exercise. Arterial and femoral venous blood sampling, thermodilution blood flow measurements, and needle biopsies allowed the assessment of muscle oxygen supply, utilization, and structure. Maximal work rates and single leg VO2max (control subjects = 0.63 +/- 0.1; patients with COPD = 0.37 +/- 0.1 L/minute) were significantly greater in the control group during bicycle exercise. During knee-extensor exercise this difference in VO2max disappeared, whereas maximal work capacity was reduced (flywheel resistance: control subjects = 923 +/- 198; patients with COPD = 612 +/- 81 g) revealing a significantly reduced mechanical efficiency (work per unit oxygen consumed) with COPD. The patients had an elevated number of less efficient type II muscle fibers, whereas muscle fiber cross-sectional areas, capillarity, and mitochondrial volume density were not different between the groups. Therefore, although metabolic capacity per se is unchanged, fiber type differences associated with COPD may account for the reduced muscular mechanical efficiency that becomes clearly apparent during knee-extensor exercise, when muscle function is no longer overshadowed by the decrement in lung function. PMID:14500263

  5. Effects of trimebutine maleate (TM-906) on electrical and mechanical activities of smooth muscles of the guinea-pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, K; Kimoto, Y

    1984-07-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate (TM-906) on electrical and mechanical activities of smooth muscles of the guinea-pig stomach were investigated using a microelectrode and isometric tension recording methods. TM-906 (2 X 10(-5) M) depolarized the membrane of smooth muscles in the antrum to about 10 mV. From the current-voltage relationship and changes in membrane potentials in various [K]0, the TM-906-induced depolarization is considered to be mainly due to a decrease in the K-conductance. TM-906 increased the amplitude of the first spike potential and regularized the rhythm of slow waves. These excitatory effects are presumably due to the K-channel-blocking action during the repolarizing phase of the spikes and to the depolarization. TM-906 reduced the amplitudes of mechanical activities and slow waves. These inhibitory effects are presumably due to the inhibition of Ca-release from storage sites and to the block of Ca-influx. The biphasic effects are possibly due to the local anesthetic properties. TM-906 modified neither the membrane potential nor the membrane conductance of circular muscles in the fundus. This may mean that the circular muscles in the fundus lack the K-channel sensitive to TM-906. PMID:6482091

  6. Prediction of fish body's passive visco-elastic properties and related muscle mechanical performance in vivo during steady swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, YongLiang; Tong, BingGang

    2014-01-01

    For attaining the optimized locomotory performance of swimming fishes, both the passive visco-elastic properties of the fish body and the mechanical behavior of the active muscles should coordinate with the fish body's undulatory motion pattern. However, it is difficult to directly measure the visco-elastic constitutive relation and the muscular mechanical performance in vivo. In the present paper, a new approach based on the continuous beam model for steady swimming fish is proposed to predict the fish body's visco-elastic properties and the related muscle mechanical behavior in vivo. Given the lateral travelling-wave-like movement as the input condition, the required muscle force and the energy consumption are functions of the fish body's visco-elastic parameters, i.e. the Young's modulus E and the viscosity coefficient µ in the Kelvin model. After investigating the variations of the propagating speed of the required muscle force with the fish body's visco-elastic parameters, we analyze the impacts of the visco-elastic properties on the energy efficiencies, including the energy utilization ratios of each element of the kinematic chain in fish swimming and the overall efficiency. Under the constraints of reasonable wave speed of muscle activation and the physiological feasibility, the optimal design of the passive visco-elastic properties can be predicted aiming at maximizing the overall efficiency. The analysis is based on the small-amplitude steady swimming of the carangiform swimmer, with typical Reynolds number varying from 2.5×104 to 2.5×105, and the present results show that the non-dimensional Young's modulus is 112±34, and the non-dimensional viscosity coefficient is 13 approximately. In the present estimated ranges, the overall efficiency of the swimming fish is insensitive to the viscosity, and its magnitude is about 0.11±0.02, in the predicted range given by previous study.

  7. The influence of ageing on the force-velocity-power characteristics of human elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Valour, D; Ochala, J; Ballay, Y; Pousson, M

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of ageing on the maximal power (P(max)) of the elbow flexor muscles and to determine the impact of velocity on the loss of power in older people. Sixteen elderly subjects (7 men and 9 women, age range 61-78 years) and 17 young subjects (11 men and 6 women, age range 18-27 years) participated in this study. Maximal elbow flexions were performed against increasing inertia. The maximal force (F(max)), maximal shortening velocity (V(max)), P(max), dynamic constants (a, b and a/F(max)), optimal force (F(opt)), optimal velocity (V(opt)) and V(opt)/V(max) were determined from Hill's equation. Myoelectrical activity (EMG) of the biceps and triceps muscles was quantified as an root mean square (RMS) value. F(max), V(max), P(max), F(opt), and V(opt) were significantly lower in elderly than in young subjects (28, 31, 45, 24 and 28% lower, respectively; p<0.05), whereas a/F(max) and V(opt)/V(max) were not different between the two age groups. In women, the greater decrease in P(max) appears to be more dependent on V(opt) than F(opt). In addition, V(max) decreased with age in women but not in men. The absence of significant differences between age groups in normalised RMS values indicates that P(max) and V(max) loss with increasing age could result more from changes in the properties of contractile element than from changes in muscular activity. PMID:12670625

  8. Quality Characteristics and Composition of the Longissimus Muscle from Entire and Castrate Elk in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Kwan-Woo; Park, Seong-Bok; Kim, Myung-Jick; Yim, Dong-Gyun

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the research was to determine the chemical composition as well as the physicochemical properties of the longissimus muscle from Korean entire and castrate elk. Twelve elk stags were raised and fed on concentrate with ad libitum hay. All animals were equally divided into castrated and non-castrated (entire) males, and slaughtered at 5 year of age. It was found that entire elk, in comparison with castrate elk, had higher content of moisture and lower content of fat (p<0.05). Compared with entire males, the castrates had lower pH and shear force values (p<0.05). However, castrates had higher L*, a*, and b* values compared with entires (p<0.05). An analysis of the fatty acid profile revealed that the muscles of entire and castrate elk had the most abundant concentrations of the following fatty acids: palmitic acid (C16:0) of the saturated fatty acid, and oleic acid (C18:1n-9) of the unsaturated fatty acid. The entire elk contains higher proportions of linoleic acid (C18:3n6), eicosenoic acid (C20:1n9), and arachidonic acid (C20:4n6) (p<0.05). Cholesterol content in elk was not affected by castration. The predominant free amino acid was glutamic acid related to umami taste. It is apparent that the castrate animals carried higher content of histidine, isoleucine, and leucine than those of the entire group (p<0.05). In this study, it was concluded that venison quality of elk is affected by castration and these results can provide fundamental information for venison production. PMID:26954142

  9. Quality Characteristics and Composition of the Longissimus Muscle from Entire and Castrate Elk in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Kwan-Woo; Park, Seong-Bok; Kim, Myung-Jick; Yim, Dong-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research was to determine the chemical composition as well as the physicochemical properties of the longissimus muscle from Korean entire and castrate elk. Twelve elk stags were raised and fed on concentrate with ad libitum hay. All animals were equally divided into castrated and non-castrated (entire) males, and slaughtered at 5 year of age. It was found that entire elk, in comparison with castrate elk, had higher content of moisture and lower content of fat (p<0.05). Compared with entire males, the castrates had lower pH and shear force values (p<0.05). However, castrates had higher L*, a*, and b* values compared with entires (p<0.05). An analysis of the fatty acid profile revealed that the muscles of entire and castrate elk had the most abundant concentrations of the following fatty acids: palmitic acid (C16:0) of the saturated fatty acid, and oleic acid (C18:1n-9) of the unsaturated fatty acid. The entire elk contains higher proportions of linoleic acid (C18:3n6), eicosenoic acid (C20:1n9), and arachidonic acid (C20:4n6) (p<0.05). Cholesterol content in elk was not affected by castration. The predominant free amino acid was glutamic acid related to umami taste. It is apparent that the castrate animals carried higher content of histidine, isoleucine, and leucine than those of the entire group (p<0.05). In this study, it was concluded that venison quality of elk is affected by castration and these results can provide fundamental information for venison production. PMID:26954142

  10. Early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition and ontogenetic changes in muscle growth mechanisms of rainbow trout: short- and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Alami-Durante, Hélène; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Duval, Carine; Maunas, Patrick; Girod-David, Virginia; Médale, Françoise

    2014-09-14

    As the understanding of the nutritional regulation of muscle growth mechanisms in fish is fragmentary, the present study aimed to (1) characterise ontogenetic changes in muscle growth-related genes in parallel to changes in muscle cellularity; (2) determine whether an early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition affects the muscle growth mechanisms of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) alevins; and (3) determine whether this early feeding of a high-fat (HF) diet to alevins had a long-term effect on muscle growth processes in juveniles fed a commercial diet. Developmental regulation of hyperplasia and hypertrophy was evidenced at the molecular (expression of myogenic regulatory factors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and myosin heavy chains (MHC)) and cellular (number and diameter of white muscle fibres) levels. An early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition stimulated the body growth of alevins but led to a fatty phenotype, with accumulation of lipids in the anterior part, and less caudal muscle when compared at similar body weights, due to a decrease in both the white muscle hyperplasia and maximum hypertrophy of white muscle fibres. These HF diet-induced cellular changes were preceded by a very rapid down-regulation of the expression of fast-MHC. The present study also demonstrated that early dietary composition had a long-term effect on the subsequent muscle growth processes of juveniles fed a commercial diet for 3 months. When compared at similar body weights, initially HF diet-fed juveniles indeed had a lower mean diameter of white muscle fibres, a smaller number of large white muscle fibres, and lower expression levels of MyoD1 and myogenin. These findings demonstrated the strong effect of early feed composition on the muscle growth mechanisms of trout alevins and juveniles. PMID:24949706

  11. Gender Differences in Skeletal Muscle Substrate Metabolism – Molecular Mechanisms and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Kiens, Bente

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that substrate metabolism is subject to gender-specific regulation, and the aim of this review is to outline the available evidence of molecular gender differences in glucose and lipid metabolism of skeletal muscle. Female sex has been suggested to have a favorable effect on glucose homeostasis, and the available evidence from hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamp studies is summarized to delineate whether there is a gender difference in whole-body insulin sensitivity and in particular insulin-stimulated glucose uptake of skeletal muscle. Whether an eventual higher insulin sensitivity of female skeletal muscle can be related to gender-specific regulation of molecular metabolism will be topic for discussion. Gender differences in muscle fiber type distribution and substrate availability to and in skeletal muscle are highly relevant for substrate metabolism in men and women. In particular, the molecular machinery for glucose and fatty acid oxidative and storage capacities in skeletal muscle and its implications for substrate utilization during metabolic situations of daily living are discussed, emphasizing their relevance for substrate choice in the fed and fasted state, and during periods of physical activity and recovery. Together, handling of carbohydrate and lipids and regulation of their utilization in skeletal muscle have implications for whole-body glucose homeostasis in men and women. 17-β estradiol is the most important female sex hormone, and the identification of estradiol receptors in skeletal muscle has opened for a role in regulation of substrate metabolism. Also, higher levels of circulating adipokines as adiponectin and leptin in women and their implications for muscle metabolism will be considered. PMID:25431568

  12. Role of the middle ear muscle apparatus in mechanisms of speech signal discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, B. S.; Bazarov, V. G.; Sachenko, S. V.

    1980-01-01

    A method of impedance reflexometry was used to examine 101 students with hearing impairment in order to clarify the interrelation between speech discrimination and the state of the middle ear muscles. Ability to discriminate speech signals depends to some extent on the functional state of intraaural muscles. Speech discrimination was greatly impaired in the absence of stapedial muscle acoustic reflex, in the presence of low thresholds of stimulation and in very small values of reflex amplitude increase. Discrimination was not impeded in positive AR, high values of relative thresholds and normal increase of reflex amplitude in response to speech signals with augmenting intensity.

  13. Design and simulative experiment of an innovative trailing edge morphing mechanism driven by artificial muscles embedded in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongda; Liu, Long; Xiao, Tianhang; Ang, Haisong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, conceptual design of a tailing edge morphing mechanism developed based on a new kind of artificial muscle embedded in skin, named Driving Skin, is proposed. To demonstrate the feasibility of this conceptual design, an experiment using ordinary fishing lines to simulate the function of artificial muscles was designed and carried out. Some measures were designed to ensure measurement accuracy. The experiment result shows that the contraction ratio and force required by the morphing mechanism can be satisfied by the new artificial muscles, and a relationship between contraction ratios and morphing angles can be found. To demonstrate the practical application feasibility of this conceptual design, a wing section using ordinary ropes to simulate the function of the Driving Skin mechanism was designed and fabricated. The demonstration wing section, extremely light in weight and capable of changing thickness, performs well, with a -30^\\circ /+30^\\circ morphing angle achieved. The trailing edge morphing mechanism is efficient in re-contouring the wing profile.

  14. Multiprotein complex formation at the beta myosin heavy chain distal muscle CAT element correlates with slow muscle expression but not mechanical overload responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Vyas, D R; McCarthy, J J; Tsika, G L; Tsika, R W

    2001-01-12

    To examine the role of the beta-myosin heavy chain (betaMyHC) distal muscle CAT (MCAT) element in muscle fiber type-specific expression and mechanical overload (MOV) responsiveness, we conducted transgenic and in vitro experiments. In adult transgenic mice, mutation of the distal MCAT element led to significant reductions in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) specific activity measured in control soleus and plantaris muscles when compared with wild type transgene beta293WT but did not abolish MOV-induced CAT specific activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed the formation of a specific low migrating nuclear protein complex (LMC) at the betaMyHC MCAT element that was highly enriched only when using either MOV plantaris or control soleus nuclear extract. Scanning mutagenesis of the betaMyHC distal MCAT element revealed that only the nucleotides comprising the core MCAT element were essential for LMC formation. The proteins within the LMC when using either MOV plantaris or control soleus nuclear extracts were antigenically related to nominal transcription enhancer factor 1 (NTEF-1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and Max. Only in vitro translated TEF-1 protein bound to the distal MCAT element, suggesting that this multiprotein complex is tethered to the DNA via TEF-1. Protein-protein interaction assays revealed interactions between nominal TEF-1, PARP, and Max. Our studies show that for transgene beta293 the distal MCAT element is not required for MOV responsiveness but suggest that a multiprotein complex likely comprised of nominal TEF-1, PARP, and Max forms at this element to contribute to basal slow fiber expression. PMID:11010974

  15. Regulatory mechanisms and the role of calcium and potassium channels controlling supercontractile crop muscles in adult Phormia regina.

    PubMed

    Solari, Paolo; Stoffolano, John G; Fitzpatrick, Joanna; Gelperin, Alan; Thomson, Alan; Talani, Giuseppe; Sanna, Enrico; Liscia, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Bioassays and electrophysiological recordings were conducted in the adult blowfly Phormia regina to provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms governing the crop filling and emptying processes of the supercontractile crop muscles. The cibarial pump drives ingestion. Simultaneous multisite extracellular recordings show that crop lobe (P5) distension during ingestion of a 4.7 μl sugar meal does not require muscle activity by any of the other pumps of the system. Conversely, pumping of fluids toward the anterior of the crop system during crop emptying is brought about by active muscle contraction, in the form of a highly coordinated peristaltic wave starting from P5 and progressively propagating to P6, P4 and P3 pumps, with P5 contracting with a frequency about 3.4 times higher than the other pumps. The crop contraction rate is also modulated by hemolymph-borne factors such as sugars, through ligand recognition at a presumptive receptor site rather than by an osmotic effect, as assessed by both behavioural and electrophysiological experiments. In this respect, sugars of equal osmolarity produce different effects, glucose being inhibitory and mannose ineffective for crop muscles, while trehalose enhances crop activity. Finally, voltage and current clamp experiments show that the muscle action potentials (mAPs) at the P4 pump are sustained by a serotonin-sensitive calcium conductance. Serotonin enhances calcium entry into the muscle cells and this could lead, as an indirect modulatory effect, to activation of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) conductance (IK(Ca)), which sustains the following mAP repolarization phase in such a way that further mAPs can be generated early and the frequency consequently increased. PMID:23834826

  16. Model of β-Sheet of Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein of Locusta migratoria Displays Characteristic Topology

    PubMed Central

    Kizilbash, Nadeem A; Hai, Abdul; Alruwaili, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    The β-sheet of muscle fatty acid binding protein of Locusta migratoria (Lm-FABP) was modeled by employing 2-D NMR data and the Rigid Body Assembly method. The model shows the β-sheet to comprise ten β-strands arranged anti-parallel to each other. There is a β-bulge between Ser 13 and Gln 14 which is a difference from the published structure of β-sheet of bovine heart Fatty Acid Binding Protein. Also, a hydrophobic patch consisting of Ile 45, Phe 51, Phe 64 and Phe 66 is present on the surface which is characteristic of most Fatty Acid Binding Proteins. A “gap” is present between βD and βE that provides evidence for the presence of a portal or opening between the polypeptide chains which allows ligand fatty acids to enter the protein cavity and bind to the protein. PMID:24497726

  17. The influence of stimulation frequency on force-velocity characteristics of in situ rat medial gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    de Haan, A

    1998-01-01

    Force (and power)-velocity characteristics were determined at different stimulation frequencies in th situ rat muscle with nerve stimulation at 36 degrees C. In isometric contractions (duration, 150 ms), maximal force is generated at approximately 120 Hz. In contrast, in the high velocity (250 mm s-1) shortening contractions, frequencies of approximately 400 Hz were needed to obtain maximal dynamic force, while 120 Hz elicited only approximately 26% of the maximum. At the highest velocity measured, power production was significantly different (P < 0.05) among frequencies of 80, 120, 200 and 400 Hz, suggesting that maximal shortening velocity should be assessed using very high stimulation frequencies. However, the results further indicate that lower frequencies may be adequate in exercise studies that investigate fatigue and changes in power output during series of repetitive contractions. PMID:9483421

  18. Characteristics of microstrip muscle-loaded single-arm Archimedean spiral antennas as investigated by FDTD numerical computations.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Svein; Rolfsnes, Hans Olav; Stauffer, Paul R

    2005-02-01

    The radiation characteristics and mode of operation of single-arm, groundplane backed, Archimedean spiral antennas are investigated by means of conformal finite difference time domain numerical analysis. It is shown that this antenna type may be categorized as a well-matched, broadband, circularly polarized traveling wave structure that can be fed directly by nonbalanced coaxial networks. The study further concentrates on relevant design and description features parameterized in terms of measures like radiation efficiency, sensing depth, directivity, and axial ratio of complementary polarizations. We document that an antenna of only 30-mm transverse size produces circularly polarized waves in a two-octave frequency span (2-8 GHz) with acceptable radiation efficiency (76%-94%) when loaded by muscle-like tissue. PMID:15709670

  19. Effects of variation in porcine MYOD1 gene on muscle fiber characteristics, lean meat production, and meat quality traits.

    PubMed

    Lee, E A; Kim, J M; Lim, K S; Ryu, Y C; Jeon, W M; Hong, K C

    2012-09-01

    Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the porcine MYOD1 gene were used for association analysis and haplotype construction to evaluate the effects of their substitution. Four hundred and three pigs of Yorkshire and Berkshire breeds were used. The mRNA expression levels of MYOD1 were examined. The g.489C>T and g.1264C>A SNPs were significantly associated with several muscle fiber characteristics, the loin eye area, and lightness. Particularly, animals having hetero-genotypes of both sites showed good performance both in lean meat production and meat quality traits. The results of haplotype substitution were similar to the associations of individual SNPs. Moreover, the 2 SNPs had significant effects on mRNA expression. Therefore, the g.489C>T and g.1264C>A SNPs in MYOD1 may be meaningful DNA markers that can be used for improving important porcine economic traits. PMID:22554470

  20. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  1. Transfer of mechanical energy between ankle and knee joints by gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles during cat locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Leonard, T

    1996-04-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to define and estimate the direction and amount of the energy transfer between the knee and ankle through gastrocnemius (GA) and plantaris (PL) muscles during cat locomotion, and (2) to test the assumption that the force and activity patterns of soleus (SO), GA, and PL are mechanically and physiologically advantageous for providing the transfer of energy between these joints. The direction, amount and rate of the energy transfer through a two-joint muscle were defined using a theoretical analysis of movements in two adjacent joints spanned by the two-joint muscle. The energy transferred between the ankle and the knee was calculated using the time integration of the difference between the power developed by the moments of SO, GA, and PL at the ankle joint and the total power of these muscles. The total power of SO, GA, and PL muscles, and the power of their movements about the ankle and knee, were obtained using the experimentally determined muscle forces, the rates of change in muscle length, and the angular velocities at the knee and ankle which were calculated from the kinematics and the geometry of the cat hindlimb. Muscular forces and hindlimb kinematics of the cats were recorded during normal walking and trotting on a treadmill at speeds of 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.5, and 1.8 ms-1 using 'E'-shaped tendon transducers and high-speed video, respectively. It was found that during the early phase of support, there was a transfer of mechanical energy from the ankle to the knee through GA and PL. During the late phase of support, mechanical energy was transferred from the knee to the ankle. The amount of energy transferred increased with increasing speeds of locomotion. The energy transferred from the ankle to the knee was 3-60 mJ (7-22% of the negative work done by the moments of SO, GA, and PL at the ankle), and the energy transferred from the knee to the ankle was 10-67 mJ (7-14% of the positive work done by the moments of SO, GA, and

  2. Relationship between pork quality and characteristics of muscle fibers classified by the distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gap-Don; Ryu, Youn-Chul; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Yang, Han-Sul; Joo, Seon-Tea

    2013-11-01

    A total of six fiber types, including four pure types (type I, IIA, IIX, and IIB) and two hybrid types (type IIAX and IIXB), were classified according to the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms by immunohistochemistry with MHC specific monoclonal antibodies. The comparison of the muscle fiber characteristics and pork quality between pork quality groups (DFD: dark, firm, and dry; PSE: pale, soft, and exudative; RFN: reddish pink, firm, and nonexudative; and RSE: reddish pink, soft, and exudative) classified by muscle pH, drip loss, and lightness was conducted and the relationship of myofiber characteristics to pork quality was investigated. The DFD group had the highest value of IIAX fiber density (P<0.05). The DFD group also showed the greatest fiber relative area of type I, IIA, and IIAX (P<0.05) whereas there were no significant differences in area composition for types I, IIA, and IIAX among the other groups including PSE, RFN, and RSE (P>0.05). The DFD group had the highest cross-sectional area (CSA) in types I, IIA, and IIX among the groups. The increase in density of type IIAX was related with the higher pH and the lower hue and drip loss. An increase in the fiber number composition of hybrid type IIXB increased the lightness and cooking loss and decreased sarcoplasmic protein solubility (SPS). Regarding fiber relative area, pure type I and IIA and hybrid type IIAX were greater in the DFD group and had lower lightness and drip loss. Hybrid type IIAX influences the desirability of the pork due to its association with low lightness and high pH and water-holding capacity (WHC). In contrast, type IIXB was related to poor quality pork, including pale color, low WHC in cooked meat, and low SPS. PMID:23989883

  3. Comparison of palatability characteristics of beef gluteus medius and triceps brachii muscles.

    PubMed

    King, D A; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate triceps brachii steaks as a substitute for gluteus medius steaks in foodservice and retail applications, including the effect of aging time and USDA quality grade on the palatability of both muscles. Top sirloin butts (n = 600) and shoulder clod arm roasts (n = 600) representing US Choice and US Select quality grades were selected at 48 h postmortem and aged for 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, or 42 d. Steaks were evaluated using a trained sensory panel, slice shear force, sarcomere length, and Western blotting of desmin measurements. Sarcomere length was measured only on steaks at 14 and 42 d. Triceps brachii and gluteus medius steaks were similar in tenderness rating at 7 and 14 d, but triceps brachii steaks aged longer were more tender (P < 0.05) than were gluteus medius steaks. Triceps brachii steaks reached ultimate tenderness values by 21 d. Gluteus medius steak tenderness ratings improved through 35 d, and at 42 d were similar to those given to triceps brachii steaks at 21 d. Sarcomere lengths were longer (P < 0.05) in triceps brachii than in gluteus medius (2.09 and 1.58 mum, respectively). Significant increases in desmin degradation were detected through 42 d in both muscles (30.9, 46.3, 50.6, 51.0, 57.6, and 64.1% at d 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 for gluteus medius and 28.9, 40.8, 49.3, 59.2, 61.8, and 71.9% at d 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 for triceps brachii). At 14 d, gluteus medius had more (P < 0.05) desmin degraded than triceps brachii, but by 28 d, desmin degradation was greater (P < 0.05) in triceps brachii. Quality grade had minimal effects on palatability traits. Desmin degradation contributed to gluteus medius tenderness variation (r = 0.36) across all aging times, but not at individual aging times. Sarcomere length contributed to variation in slice shear force values of gluteus medius at 14 and 42 d (r = -0.59 and -0.48, respectively). Sarcomere length contributed to triceps brachii tenderness variation at 14 d

  4. Possible mechanism for changes in glycogen metabolism in unloaded soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism has been shown to be affected in a number of ways by different models of hypokinesia. In vivo glycogen levels in the soleus muscle are known to be increased by short-term denervation and harness suspension. In addition, exposure to 7 days of hypogravity also caused a dramatic increase in glycogen concentration in this muscle. The biochemical alterations caused by unloading that may bring about these increases in glycogen storage in the soleus were sought.

  5. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    ) participated in two sessions at a minimum interval of 1 wk. Microdialysis was done to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to measure masseter muscle blood flow. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth clenching task (50% of MVCF) or a control session (no clenching). Pain intensity was measured throughout the experiment. Substance levels and blood flow were unaltered at all time points between sessions, and between genders in each session. Pain intensity was significantly higher after clenching in the clenching session compared to the same time point in the control session. In (IV), 15 patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated in one session and the methodology described above was used. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT and significantly lower blood flows than healthy controls. No significant differences for any substance at any time point were observed between groups. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity. Qu-ATEBS, the 7-item evidence-based quality assessment tool, is reliable, exhibits face-validity, and has excellent discriminative validity. Tooth clenching was associated with pain, fatigue, and short-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, but not with proprioceptive allodynia. It seems that tooth clenching is not directly related to delayed onset muscle soreness. In healthy subjects and in patients with M-TMD, levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate were unaltered after tooth clenching. But 5-HT levels were significantly higher and blood flows significantly lower in M-TMD patients than in healthy controls at all time points. These two factors may facilitate the release, and enhance the effects, of other algesic substances that may cause pain. PMID:23631112

  6. Human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon mechanics and energetics during maximum acceleration sprinting.

    PubMed

    Lai, Adrian; Schache, Anthony G; Brown, Nicholas A T; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-08-01

    Tendon elastic strain energy is the dominant contributor to muscle-tendon work during steady-state running. Does this behaviour also occur for sprint accelerations? We used experimental data and computational modelling to quantify muscle fascicle work and tendon elastic strain energy for the human ankle plantar flexors (specifically soleus and medial gastrocnemius) for multiple foot contacts of a maximal sprint as well as for running at a steady-state speed. Positive work done by the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles decreased incrementally throughout the maximal sprint and both muscles performed more work for the first foot contact of the maximal sprint (FC1) compared with steady-state running at 5 m s(-1) (SS5). However, the differences in tendon strain energy for both muscles were negligible throughout the maximal sprint and when comparing FC1 to SS5. Consequently, the contribution of muscle fascicle work to stored tendon elastic strain energy was greater for FC1 compared with subsequent foot contacts of the maximal sprint and compared with SS5. We conclude that tendon elastic strain energy in the ankle plantar flexors is just as vital at the start of a maximal sprint as it is at the end, and as it is for running at a constant speed. PMID:27581481

  7. G protein-coupled receptor 56 regulates mechanical overload-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    White, James P; Wrann, Christiane D; Rao, Rajesh R; Nair, Sreekumaran K; Jedrychowski, Mark P; You, Jae-Sung; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Gygi, Steven P; Ruas, Jorge L; Hornberger, Troy A; Wu, Zhidan; Glass, David J; Piao, Xianhua; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha 4 (PGC-1α4) is a protein isoform derived by alternative splicing of the PGC1α mRNA and has been shown to promote muscle hypertrophy. We show here that G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) is a transcriptional target of PGC-1α4 and is induced in humans by resistance exercise. Furthermore, the anabolic effects of PGC-1α4 in cultured murine muscle cells are dependent on GPR56 signaling, because knockdown of GPR56 attenuates PGC-1α4-induced muscle hypertrophy in vitro. Forced expression of GPR56 results in myotube hypertrophy through the expression of insulin-like growth factor 1, which is dependent on Gα12/13 signaling. A murine model of overload-induced muscle hypertrophy is associated with increased expression of both GPR56 and its ligand collagen type III, whereas genetic ablation of GPR56 expression attenuates overload-induced muscle hypertrophy and associated anabolic signaling. These data illustrate a signaling pathway through GPR56 which regulates muscle hypertrophy associated with resistance/loading-type exercise. PMID:25336758

  8. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Francesco; Tirone, Mario; Bellini, Elisa; Campana, Lara; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions. PMID:26098633

  9. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Conti, Valentina; Gandaglia, Anna; Galli, Francesco; Tirone, Mario; Bellini, Elisa; Campana, Lara; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions. PMID:26098633

  10. EUK-134 ameliorates nNOSμ translocation and skeletal muscle fiber atrophy during short-term mechanical unloading

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Mary; Hord, Jeff M.; Lee, Yang; Joshi, Kumar; Botchlett, Rachel E.; Ramirez, Angelo; Martinez, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced mechanical loading during bedrest, spaceflight, and casting, causes rapid morphological changes in skeletal muscle: fiber atrophy and reduction of slow-twitch fibers. An emerging signaling event in response to unloading is the translocation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma to the cytosol. We used EUK-134, a cell-permeable mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase, to test the role of redox signaling in nNOSμ translocation and muscle fiber atrophy as a result of short-term (54 h) hindlimb unloading. Fischer-344 rats were divided into ambulatory control, hindlimb-unloaded (HU), and hindlimb-unloaded + EUK-134 (HU-EUK) groups. EUK-134 mitigated the unloading-induced phenotype, including muscle fiber atrophy and muscle fiber-type shift from slow to fast. nNOSμ immunolocalization at the sarcolemma of the soleus was reduced with HU, while nNOSμ protein content in the cytosol increased with unloading. Translocation of nNOS from the sarcolemma to cytosol was virtually abolished by EUK-134. EUK-134 also mitigated dephosphorylation at Thr-32 of FoxO3a during HU. Hindlimb unloading elevated oxidative stress (4-hydroxynonenal) and increased sarcolemmal localization of Nox2 subunits gp91phox (Nox2) and p47phox, effects normalized by EUK-134. Thus, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that oxidative stress triggers nNOSμ translocation from the sarcolemma and FoxO3a dephosphorylation as an early event during mechanical unloading. Thus, redox signaling may serve as a biological switch for nNOS to initiate morphological changes in skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:24477538

  11. Heat-rekindling in UVB-irradiated skin above NGF-sensitized muscle: experimental models of prolonged mechanical hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Silvia Lo; Finocchietti, Sara; Gazerani, Parisa; Petersen, Lars J; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Experimental models of prolonged pain hypersensitivity in humans are desirable for screening novel analgesic compounds. In this study, heat stimuli were applied in ultraviolet-B (UVB)-irradiated skin and in the UVB-irradiated skin combined with nerve growth factor (NGF)-injected muscle to investigate 1) whether the evoked mechanical hypersensitivity by UVB irradiation would be prolonged or enhanced following heat rekindling, and 2) whether the combination between cutaneous and muscle hypersensitivity may influence the rekindling effects. Skin sensitization was induced in 25 volunteers by UVB irradiation in areas above the upper-trapezius muscle, low-back or forearm. Muscle sensitization was induced in the low back by bilateral injections of NGF. The area of cutaneous hyperalgesia was evaluated 3 days after the irradiation by mechanical pin-prick stimulation whereas the areas of allodynia were evaluated 1, 2 and 3 days after irradiation by von Frey hair assessments. Cutaneous heat stimulation (40°C for 5 min) was performed on the 3(rd) day to investigate its effect on the areas of cutaneous allodynia and hyperalgesia. Findings revealed that 1) allodynia and hyperalgesia developed following UVB irradiation, 2) heat stimulation of the UVB-irradiated skin enlarged both hyperalgesic and allodynic areas (P < 0.01), and 3) muscle sensitization did not influence the effect of UVB on allodynia or the response to heat rekindling. These data suggest that heat rekindling applied to an UVB-sensitized skin can maintain or facilitate allodynia and hyperalgesia for a longer period offering a suitable model for testing analgesic compounds when sufficient duration of time is needed for investigation of drug efficacy. PMID:25349637

  12. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K.; Carter, Michael S.; Alcala, Diego B.; Brown, Avery E.; Chattin, Amy M.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Walsh, Michael P.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Baker, Josh E.

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot–labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto–myosin and MLCK–myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting “stuck” on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle. PMID:26415568

  13. Mechanisms of action of hydrogen sulfide in relaxation of mouse distal colonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dhaese, Ingeborg; Van Colen, Inge; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2010-02-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) has been suggested as a gaseous neuromodulator in mammals. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of H(2)S on contractility in mouse distal colon. The effect of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; H(2)S donor) on prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha))-contracted circular muscle strips of mouse distal colon was investigated. In addition, tension and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](cyt)) in the mouse distal colon strips were measured simultaneously in the presence of NaHS. NaHS caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the pre-contracted mouse distal colon strips. The NaHS-induced relaxation was not influenced by the K(+) channels blockers glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, barium chloride and 4-aminopyridine. The relaxation by NaHS was also not influenced by the nitric oxide inhibitor L-NAME, by the soluble guanylate cyclase respectively adenylate cyclase inhibitors ODQ and SQ 22536, by the nerve blockers capsazepine, omega-conotoxin and tetrodotoxin or by several channel and receptor blockers (ouabain, nifedipine, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, ryanodine and thapsigargin). The initiation of the NaHS-induced relaxation was accompanied by an increase in [Ca(2+)](cyt), but once the relaxation was maximal and sustained, no change in [Ca(2+)](cyt) was measured. This calcium desensitization is not related to the best known calcium desensitizing mechanism as the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor calyculin-A and the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 had no influence. We conclude that NaHS caused concentration-dependent relaxations in mouse distal colon not involving the major known K(+) channels and without a change in [Ca(2+)](cyt). This calcium desensitization is not related to inhibition of Rho-kinase or activation of MLCP. PMID:19919833

  14. The Signaling Mechanism of Contraction Induced by ATP and UTP in Feline Esophageal Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tae Hoon; Jung, Hyunwoo; Cho, Eun Jeong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-01-01

    P2 receptors are membrane-bound receptors for extracellular nucleotides such as ATP and UTP. P2 receptors have been classified as ligand-gated ion channels or P2X receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Recently, purinergic signaling has begun to attract attention as a potential therapeutic target for a variety of diseases especially associated with gastroenterology. This study determined the ATP and UTP-induced receptor signaling mechanism in feline esophageal contraction. Contraction of dispersed feline esophageal smooth muscle cells was measured by scanning micrometry. Phosphorylation of MLC20 was determined by western blot analysis. ATP and UTP elicited maximum esophageal contraction at 30 s and 10 μM concentration. Contraction of dispersed cells treated with 10 μM ATP was inhibited by nifedipine. However, contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP, 0.1 μM UTP and 10 μM UTP was decreased by U73122, chelerythrine, ML-9, PTX and GDPβS. Contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP and UTP was inhibited by Gαi3 or Gαq antibodies and by PLCβ1 or PLCβ3 antibodies. Phosphorylated MLC20 was increased by ATP and UTP treatment. In conclusion, esophageal contraction induced by ATP and UTP was preferentially mediated by P2Y receptors coupled to Gαi3 and G q proteins, which activate PLCβ1 and PLCβ3. Subsequently, increased intracellular Ca2+ and activated PKC triggered stimulation of MLC kinase and inhibition of MLC phosphatase. Finally, increased pMLC20 generated esophageal contraction. PMID:26013385

  15. Action Direction of Muscle Synergies in Three-Dimensional Force Space

    PubMed Central

    Hagio, Shota; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Redundancy in the musculoskeletal system was supposed to be simplified by muscle synergies, which modularly organize muscles. To clarify the underlying mechanisms of motor control using muscle synergies, it is important to examine the spatiotemporal contribution of muscle synergies in the task space. In this study, we quantified the mechanical contribution of muscle synergies as considering spatiotemporal correlation between the activation of muscle synergies and endpoint force fluctuations. Subjects performed isometric force generation in the three-dimensional force space. The muscle-weighting vectors of muscle synergies and their activation traces across different trials were extracted from electromyogram data using decomposing technique. We then estimated mechanical contribution of muscle synergies across each trial based on cross-correlation analysis. The contributing vectors were averaged for all trials, and the averaging was defined as action direction (AD) of muscle synergies. As a result, we extracted approximately five muscle synergies. The ADs of muscle synergies mainly depended on the anatomical functions of their weighting muscles. Furthermore, the AD of each muscle indicated the synchronous activation of muscles, which composed of the same muscle synergy. These results provide the spatiotemporal characteristics of muscle synergies as neural basis. PMID:26618156

  16. A new approach for the validation of skeletal muscle modelling using MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böl, Markus; Sturmat, Maike; Weichert, Christine; Kober, Cornelia

    2011-05-01

    Active and passive experiments on skeletal muscles are in general arranged on isolated muscles or by consideration of the whole muscle packages, such as the arm or the leg. Both methods exhibit advantages and disadvantages. By applying experiments on isolated muscles it turns out that no information about the surrounding tissues are considered what leads to insufficient specifications of the isolated muscle. Especially, the muscle shape and the fibre directions of an embedded muscle are completely different to that of the same isolated muscle. An explicit advantage, in contrast, is the possibility to study the mechanical characteristics in an unique, isolated way. On the other hand, by applying experiments on muscle packages the aforementioned pros and cons reverse. In such situation, the whole surrounding tissue is considered in the mechanical characteristics of the muscle which are much more difficult to identify. However, an embedded muscle reflects a much more realistic situation as in isolated condition. Thus, in the proposed work to our knowledge, we, for the first time, suggest a technique that allows to study characteristics of single skeletal muscles inside a muscle package without any computation of the tissue around the muscle of interest. In doing so, we use magnetic resonance imaging data of an upper arm during contraction. By applying a three-dimensional continuum constitutive muscle model we are able to study the biceps brachii inside the upper arm and validate the modelling approach by optical experiments.

  17. Differential isoform expression and selective muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Sanna; Penttilä, Sini; Somervuo, Panu; Keto, Joni; Auvinen, Petri; Vihola, Anna; Huovinen, Sami; Pelin, Katarina; Raheem, Olayinka; Salenius, Juha; Suominen, Tiina; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-10-01

    Despite the expression of the mutated gene in all muscles, selective muscles are involved in genetic muscular dystrophies. Different muscular dystrophies show characteristic patterns of fatty degenerative changes by muscle imaging, even to the extent that the patterns have been used for diagnostic purposes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining the selective involvement of muscles are not known. To test the hypothesis that different muscles may express variable amounts of different isoforms of muscle genes, we applied a custom-designed exon microarray containing probes for 57 muscle-specific genes to assay the transcriptional profiles in sets of human adult lower limb skeletal muscles. Quantitative real-time PCR and whole transcriptome sequencing were used to further analyze the results. Our results demonstrate significant variations in isoform and gene expression levels in anatomically different muscles. Comparison of the known patterns of selective involvement of certain muscles in two autosomal dominant titinopathies and one autosomal dominant myosinopathy, with the isoform and gene expression results, shows a correlation between the specific muscles involved and significant differences in the level of expression of the affected gene and exons in these same muscles compared with some other selected muscles. Our results suggest that differential expression levels of muscle genes and isoforms are one determinant in the selectivity of muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies. PMID:26269091

  18. Cytokine expression and secretion by skeletal muscle cells: regulatory mechanisms and exercise effects.

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan M; Della Gatta, Paul; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Nieman, David C

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are important mediators of various aspects of health and disease, including appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. Over the past decade or so, considerable attention has focused on the potential for regular exercise to counteract a range of disease states by modulating cytokine production. Exercise stimulates moderate to large increases in the circulating concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL- 10, IL-1 receptor antagonist, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and smaller increases in tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-1β, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, IL-12p35/p40 and IL-15. Although many of these cytokines are also expressed in skeletal muscle, not all are released from skeletal muscle into the circulation during exercise. Conversely, some cytokines that are present in the circulation are not expressed in skeletal muscle after exercise. The reasons for these discrepant cytokine responses to exercise are unclear. In this review, we address these uncertainties by summarizing the capacity of skeletal muscle cells to produce cytokines, analyzing other potential cellular sources of circulating cytokines during exercise, and discussing the soluble factors and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cytokine synthesis (e.g., RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins, soluble receptors). PMID:25826432

  19. Mechanical regulation of cardiac muscle by coupling calcium kinetics with cross-bridge cycling: a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Landesberg, A; Sideman, S

    1994-08-01

    This study describes the regulation of mechanical activity in the intact cardiac muscle, the effects of the free calcium transients and the mechanical constraints, and emphasizes the central role of the troponin complex in regulating muscle activity. A "loose coupling" between calcium binding to troponin and cross-bridge cycling is stipulated, allowing the existence of cross bridges in the strong conformation without having bound calcium on the neighboring troponin. The model includes two feedback mechanisms: 1) a positive feedback, or cooperativity, in which the cycling cross bridges affect the affinity of troponin for calcium, and 2) a negative mechanical feedback, where the filament-sliding velocity affects cross-bridge cycling. The model simulates the reported experimental force-length and force-velocity relationships at different levels of activation. The dependence of the shortening velocity on calcium concentration, sarcomere length, internal load, and rate of cross-bridge cycling is described analytically in agreement with reported data. Furthermore, the model provides an analytic solution for Hill's equation of the force-velocity relationship and for the phenomena of unloaded shortening velocity and force deficit. The model-calculated changes in free calcium in various mechanical conditions are in good agreement with the available experimental results. PMID:8067434

  20. Chemically- and mechanically-mediated influences on the transport and mechanical characteristics of rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Min, K.-B.; Rutqvist, J.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-02-01

    A model is presented to represent changes in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rock that result from coupled mechanical and chemical effects. The specific influence is the elevation of dissolution rates on contacting asperities, which results in a stress- and temperature-dependent permanent closure. A model representing this pressure-dissolution-like behavior is adapted to define the threshold and resulting response in terms of fundamental thermodynamic properties of a contacting fracture. These relations are incorporated in a stress-stiffening model of fracture closure to define the stress- and temperature-dependency of aperture loss and behavior during stress and temperature cycling. These models compare well with laboratory and field experiments, representing both decoupled isobaric and isothermal responses. The model was applied to explore the impact of these responses on heated structures in rock. The result showed a reduction in ultimate induced stresses over the case where chemical effects were not incorporated, with permanent reduction in final stresses after cooling to ambient conditions. Similarly, permeabilities may be lower than they were in the case where chemical effects were not considered, with a net reduction apparent even after cooling to ambient temperature. These heretofore-neglected effects may have a correspondingly significant impact on the performance of heated structures in rock, such as repositories for the containment of radioactive wastes.

  1. Measuring the mechanical efficiency of a working cardiac muscle sample at body temperature using a flow-through calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Taberner, Andrew J; Johnston, Callum M; Pham, Toan; June-Chiew Han; Ruddy, Bryan P; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a new `work-loop calorimeter' that is capable of measuring, simultaneously, the work-done and heat production of isolated cardiac muscle samples at body temperature. Through the innovative use of thermoelectric modules as temperature sensors, the development of a low-noise fluid-flow system, and implementation of precise temperature control, the heat resolution of this device is 10 nW, an improvement by a factor of ten over previous designs. These advances have allowed us to conduct the first flow-through measurements of work output and heat dissipation from cardiac tissue at body temperature. The mechanical efficiency is found to vary with peak stress, and reaches a peak value of approximately 15 %, a figure similar to that observed in cardiac muscle at lower temperatures. PMID:26738140

  2. Improvement of mechanical characteristics and performances with Ni diffusion mechanism throughout Bi-2223 superconducting matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarıtekin, N. K.; Bilge, H.; Kahraman, M. F.; Zalaoǧlu, Y.; Pakdil, M.; Doǧruer, M.; Yıldırım, G.; Oz, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study is interested in the role of diffusion annealing temperature (650-850°C) on the mechanical characteristics and performance of pure and Ni diffused Bi-2223 superconducting materials by means of standard compression tests and Vickers hardness measurements at performed different applied loads in the range of 0.245-2.940N and theoretical calculations. Based on the experimental findings, the mechanical performances improve with increasing annealing temperature up to 700 °C beyond which they degrade drastically due to the increased artificial disorders, cracks and irregular grain orientation distribution. In other words, the penetration of excess Ni inclusions accelerates both the dislocation movement and especially the cracks and voids propagation as a result of the decrement in the Griffith critical crack length. Further, it is to be mentioned here that all the sample exhibit typical indentation size effect (ISE) behavior. In this respect, both the plastic (irreversible) and elastic (reversible) deformations have dominant role on the superconducting structures as a result of the enhancement in the elastic recovery. At the same time elastic modulus, yield strength and fracture toughness parameters are theoretically extracted from the microhardness values. Moreover, the elastic modulus parameters are compared with the experimental values. It is found that the differentiation between the comparison results enhances hastily with the increment in the applied indentation test loads due to the existence of the increased permanent disorders, lattice defects and strains in the stacked layers. Namely, the error level increases away from the actual crystal structure. Additionally, the microhardness values are theoretically analyzed for the change of the mechanical behaviors with the aid of Meyer's law, elastic/plastic deformation and Hays-Kendall approaches for the first time.

  3. Shear elastic modulus is a reproducible index reflecting the passive mechanical properties of medial gastrocnemius muscle belly

    PubMed Central

    Ikezoe, Tome; Umegaki, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Nishisita, Satoru; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Passive mechanical properties are important in muscle function because they are related to the muscle extensibility. Recently, the assessment of muscle shear elastic modulus using shear-wave elastographic (SWE) imaging was developed. However, reliability and validity of shear elastic modulus measurements during passive stretching remain undefined. Purpose To investigate the reproducibility and validity of the shear elastic modulus measured by SWE imaging during passive stretching. Material and Methods Ten healthy men volunteered for this study. The shear elastic modulus of medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle belly was measured using ultrasonic SWE imaging during passive dorsiflexion. To assess the intra-session and inter-day reliabilities, the protocol was performed twice by the same investigator with a 5-min rest period between measurement sessions and twice on two different days by the same investigator with a 1–2-week interval between the two sessions. To assess the inter-investigator reliability, the protocol was performed on the same day by two investigators with a 5-min rest between measurement sessions. In addition, B-mode ultrasonography was used to determine the displacement of myotendinous junction (MTJ) of MG during passive ankle dorsiflexion. Results The intra-session, inter-day, and inter-investigator reliabilities of the method was confirmed on the basis of acceptably low coefficient of variations and substantially high intraclass correlation coefficients. In addition, a significant correlation was found between MTJ displacement and shear elastic modulus. Conclusion These results suggested that shear elastic modulus measured using SWE imaging is a reproducible index reflecting the passive mechanical properties. PMID:27170845

  4. Sepsis and development impede muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by different ribosomal mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In muscle, sepsis reduces protein synthesis (MPS) by restraining translation in neonates and adults. Even though protein accretion decreases with development as neonatal MPS rapidly declines by maturation, the changes imposed by development on the sepsis-associated decrease in MPS have not been desc...

  5. Learning Crisis Unit through Post-Crisis: Characteristics and Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chebbi, Hela; Pündrich, Aline Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify the characteristics that a crisis unit should have to achieve effective learning after crisis. Literature has identified many relations between learning organizations and crisis; yet, there is a dearth of research on specific studies about crisis units and their post-crisis learning features. Thus, this paper…

  6. Potential molecular mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species

    PubMed Central

    Debold, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Intense contractile activity causes a dramatic decline in the force and velocity generating capacity of skeletal muscle within a few minutes, a phenomenon that characterizes fatigue. Much of the research effort has focused on how elevated levels of the metabolites of ATP hydrolysis might inhibit the function of the contractile proteins. However, there is now growing evidence that elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), which also accumulate in the myoplasm during fatigue, also play a causative role in this type of fatigue. The most compelling evidence comes from observations demonstrating that pre-treatment of intact muscle with a ROS scavenger can significantly attenuate the development of fatigue. A clear advantage of this line of inquiry is that the molecular targets and protein modifications of some of the ROS scavengers are well-characterized enabling researchers to begin to identify potential regions and even specific amino acid residues modified during fatigue. Combining this knowledge with assessments of contractile properties from the whole muscle level down to the dynamic motions within specific contractile proteins enable the linking of the structural modifications to the functional impacts, using advanced chemical and biophysical techniques. Based on this approach at least two areas are beginning emerge as potentially important sites, the regulatory protein troponin and the actin binding region of myosin. This review highlights some of these recent efforts which have the potential to offer uniquely precise information on the underlying molecular basis of fatigue. This work may also have implications beyond muscle fatigue as ROS/RNS mediated protein modifications are also thought to play a role in the loss of muscle function with aging and in some acute pathologies like cardiac arrest and ischemia. PMID:26388779

  7. Modelling functional effects of muscle geometry.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, B J; Koopman, H F; Grootenboer, H J; Huijing, P A

    1998-04-01

    Muscle architecture is an important aspect of muscle functioning. Hence, geometry and material properties of muscle have great influence on the force-length characteristics of muscle. We compared experimental results for the gastrocnemius medialis muscle (GM) of the rat to model results of simple geometric models such as a planimetric model and three-dimensional versions of this model. The capabilities of such models to adequately calculate muscle geometry and force-length characteristics were investigated. The planimetric model with elastic aponeurosis predicted GM muscle geometry well: maximal differences are 6, 1, 4 and 6% for fiber length, aponeurosis length, fiber angle and aponeurosis angle respectively. A slanted cylinder model with circular fiber cross-section did not predict muscle geometry as well as the planimetric model, whereas the geometry results of a second slanted cylinder model were identical to the planimetric model. It is concluded that the planimetric model is capable of adequately calculating the muscle geometry over the muscle length range studied. However, for modelling of force-length characteristics more complex models are needed, as none of the models yielded results sufficiently close to experimental data. Modelled force-length characteristics showed an overestimation of muscle optimum length by 2 mm with respect to experimental data, and the force at the ascending limb of the length force curve was underestimated. The models presented neglect important aspects such as non-linear geometry of muscle, certain passive material properties and mechanical interactions of fibers. These aspects may be responsible for short-comings in the modelling. It is argued that, considering the inability to adequately model muscle length-force characteristics for an isolated maximally activated (in situ) muscle, it is to be expected that prediction will fail for muscle properties in conditions of complex movement with many interacting factors. Therefore

  8. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Characteristics of Thermally Aged Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Crook, P

    2002-05-30

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) is a candidate material for the external wall of the high level nuclear waste containers for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. In the mill-annealed (MA) condition, Alloy 22 is a single face centered cubic phase. When exposed to temperatures on the order of 600 C and above for times higher than 1 h, this alloy may develop secondary phases that reduce its mechanical toughness and corrosion resistance. The objective of this work was to age Alloy 22 at temperatures between 482 C and 760 C for times between 0.25 h and 6,000 h and to study the mechanical and corrosion performance of the resulting material. Aging was carried out using wrought specimens as well as gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) specimens. Mechanical and corrosion testing was carried out using ASTM standards. Results show-that the higher the aging temperature and the longer the aging time, the lower the impact toughness of the aged material and the lower its corrosion resistance. However, extrapolating both mechanical and corrosion laboratory data predicts that Alloy 22 will remain corrosion resistant and mechanically robust for the projected lifetime of the waste container.

  9. Molecular analyses provide insight into mechanisms underlying sarcopenia and myofibre denervation in old skeletal muscles of mice.

    PubMed

    Barns, Mitchell; Gondro, Cedric; Tellam, Ross L; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Grounds, Miranda D; Shavlakadze, Tea

    2014-08-01

    Molecular mechanisms that are associated with age-related denervation and loss of skeletal muscle mass and function (sarcopenia) are described for female C57Bl/6J mice aged 3, 15, 24, 27 and 29 months (m). Changes in mRNAs and proteins associated with myofibre denervation and protein metabolism in ageing muscles are reported, across the transition from healthy adult myofibres to sarcopenia that occurs between 15 and 24 m. This onset of sarcopenia at 24 m, corresponded with increased expression of genes associated with neuromuscular junction denervation including Chnrg, Chrnd, Ncam1, Runx1, Gadd45a and Myog. Sarcopenia in quadriceps muscles also coincided with increased protein levels for Igf1 receptor, Akt and ribosomal protein S6 (Rps6) with increased phosphorylation of Rps6 (Ser235/236) and elevated Murf1 mRNA and protein, but not Fbxo32: many of these changes are also linked to denervation. Global transcription profiling via microarray analysis confirmed these functional themes and highlighted additional themes that may be a consequence of pathology associated with sarcopenia, including changes in fatty acid metabolism, extracellular matrix structure and protein catabolism. Ageing was also associated with increased global gene expression variance, consistent with decreased control of gene regulation. PMID:24836906

  10. Physico-chemical characteristics of Longissimus lumborum muscle in goats subjected to halal slaughter and anesthesia (halothane) pre-slaughter.

    PubMed

    Sabow, Azad Behnan; Sazili, Awis Qurni; Zulkifli, Idrus; Goh, Yong Meng; Ab Kadir, Mohd Zainal Abidin; Adeyemi, Kazeem Dauda

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of halal slaughter and anesthesia pre-slaughter followed by bleeding on meat quality characteristics of goats. Eleven male Boer cross goats were divided into two groups and subjected to either halal slaughter (HS) or anesthesia with halothane and propofol pre-slaughter (AS). At pre-rigor, HS had significantly lower (P < 0.05) muscle pH and glycogen than AS. However, no significant difference was observed in the pH and glycogen content between the treatments on 1, 3 and 7 days post mortem. The drip loss of HS was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of AS at all aging periods. Treatment had no effect on sarcomere length, myofibrillar fragmentation index and shear force values, loss of thiol groups and degradation of major myofibrillar proteins. It can be concluded that HS did not have deleterious effect on meat quality traits of goat when compared to AS. PMID:26208249

  11. Experimental basis of the hypotheses on the mechanism of skeletal muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Grazi, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Summary With time clever hypotheses may be accepted as “facts” without being supported by solid experimental evidence. In our opinion this happened with muscle contraction where pure suggestions still occupy the scene and delay the progress of the research. Among these suggestions are: 1. the believe that viscosity is irrelevant in the economy of muscle contraction, 2. the concept of the drag stroke, 3. some interpretations of the significance of the Huxley-Simmons manoeuvre, 4. the definition of the load as a force/cross-section without taking into consideration the possible, divergent effects of the infinite mass x acceleration couples. Technical questions are also raised since it is apparent that measuring equipments interfere with the measure itself. PMID:23738252

  12. The relationship between the isotonic mechanical power in jaw-opening and jaw-closing muscles in man.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Shimizu, K; Nakata, S; Watanabe, M

    1991-03-01

    The relationship between isotonic jaw-opening and jaw-closing muscle function was studied using a newly developed apparatus which enables load and velocity to be detected simultaneously. The following results were obtained from 17 male adults (age range 22-32 years) without any occlusal dysfunction. (i) The force-velocity relationship in jaw-opening and jaw-closing muscles was represented by a hyperbolic curve, which fitted well with Hill's equation. (ii) The theoretical maximum force obtained by extrapolation from regression was 32.55 +/- 4.98 kg for jaw opening and 35.74 +/- 4.52 kg for jaw closing. (iii) The theoretical maximum velocity obtained by extrapolation from regression was 456.70 +/- 183.27 mm s-1 for jaw opening and 372.77 +/- 141.67 mm s-1 for jaw closing. (iv) The maximum mechanical power (Pmax) calculated from the product of the force and velocity was 772.20 +/- 182.65 kg.mm s-1 for jaw opening and 708.68 +/- 128.14 kg.mm s-1 for jaw closing. (v) The Pmax exerted by individual subjects was approximately 12-34% of the maximum possible force (Fmax) calculated from the force and velocity, in both jaw opening and jaw closing. There were no statistically significant differences between jaw opening and jaw closing with regard to any isotonic muscle functions. In other words, the results of this study strongly indicated a substantial balance between isotonic jaw-opening and jaw-closing muscle function in the subjects who were investigated. PMID:2037940

  13. Antioxidant administration attenuates mechanical ventilation-induced rat diaphragm muscle atrophy independent of protein kinase B (PKB Akt) signalling.

    PubMed

    McClung, J M; Kavazis, A N; Whidden, M A; DeRuisseau, K C; Falk, D J; Criswell, D S; Powers, S K

    2007-11-15

    Oxidative stress promotes controlled mechanical ventilation (MV)-induced diaphragmatic atrophy. Nonetheless, the signalling pathways responsible for oxidative stress-induced muscle atrophy remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress down-regulates insulin-like growth factor-1-phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase-protein kinase B serine threonine kinase (IGF-1-PI3K-Akt) signalling and activates the forkhead box O (FoxO) class of transcription factors in diaphragm fibres during MV-induced diaphragm inactivity. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of five experimental groups: (1) control (Con), (2) 6 h of MV, (3) 6 h of MV with infusion of the antioxidant Trolox, (4) 18 h of MV, (5) 18 h of MV with Trolox. Following 6 h and 18 h of MV, diaphragmatic Akt activation decreased in parallel with increased nuclear localization and transcriptional activation of FoxO1 and decreased nuclear localization of FoxO3 and FoxO4, culminating in increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, muscle atrophy factor (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1). Interestingly, following 18 h of MV, antioxidant administration was associated with attenuation of MV-induced atrophy in type I, type IIa and type IIb/IIx myofibres. Collectively, these data reveal that the antioxidant Trolox attenuates MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy independent of alterations in Akt regulation of FoxO transcription factors and expression of MAFbx or MuRF-1. Further, these results also indicate that differential regulation of diaphragmatic IGF-1-PI3K-Akt signalling exists during the early and late stages of MV. PMID:17916612

  14. Mechanisms producing coordinated function across the breadth of a large biarticular thigh muscle

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jennifer A.; Ellerby, David J.; Rubenson, Jonas; Marsh, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We examined the hypothesis that structural features of the iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO) in guinea fowl allow this large muscle to maintain equivalent function along its anterior–posterior axis. The ILPO, the largest muscle in the hindlimb of the guinea fowl, is a hip and knee extensor. The fascicles of the ILPO originate across a broad region of the ilium and ischium posterior to the hip. Its long posterior fascicles span the length of the thigh and insert directly on the patellar tendon complex. However, its anterior fascicles are shorter and insert on a narrow aponeurosis that forms a tendinous band along the anterior edge of the muscle and is connected distally to the patellar tendon. The biarticular ILPO is actively lengthened and then actively shortened during stance. The moment arm of the fascicles at the hip increases along the anterior to posterior axis, whereas the moment arm at the knee is constant for all fascicles. Using electromyography and sonomicrometry, we examined the activity and strain of posterior and anterior fascicles of the ILPO. The activation was not significantly different in the anterior and posterior fascicles. Although we found significant differences in active lengthening and shortening strain between the anterior and posterior fascicles, the differences were small. The majority of shortening strain is caused by hip extension and the inverse relationship between hip moment arm and fascicle length along the anterior–posterior axis was found to have a major role in ensuring similar shortening strain. However, because the knee moment arm is the same for all fascicles, knee flexion in early stance was predicted to produce much larger lengthening strains in the short anterior fascicles than our measured values at this location. We propose that active lengthening of the anterior fascicles was lower than predicted because the aponeurotic tendon of insertion of the anterior fascicles was stretched and only a

  15. On the mechanism by which dietary nitrate improves human skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Affourtit, Charles; Bailey, Stephen J; Jones, Andrew M; Smallwood, Miranda J; Winyard, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate is present at high levels in beetroot and celery, and in green leafy vegetables such as spinach and lettuce. Though long believed inert, nitrate can be reduced to nitrite in the human mouth and, further, under hypoxia and/or low pH, to nitric oxide. Dietary nitrate has thus been associated favorably with nitric-oxide-regulated processes including blood flow and energy metabolism. Indeed, the therapeutic potential of dietary nitrate in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome-both aging-related medical disorders-has attracted considerable recent research interest. We and others have shown that dietary nitrate supplementation lowers the oxygen cost of human exercise, as less respiratory activity appears to be required for a set rate of skeletal muscle work. This striking observation predicts that nitrate benefits the energy metabolism of human muscle, increasing the efficiency of either mitochondrial ATP synthesis and/or of cellular ATP-consuming processes. In this mini-review, we evaluate experimental support for the dietary nitrate effects on muscle bioenergetics and we critically discuss the likelihood of nitric oxide as the molecular mediator of such effects. PMID:26283970

  16. On the mechanism by which dietary nitrate improves human skeletal muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Affourtit, Charles; Bailey, Stephen J.; Jones, Andrew M.; Smallwood, Miranda J.; Winyard, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate is present at high levels in beetroot and celery, and in green leafy vegetables such as spinach and lettuce. Though long believed inert, nitrate can be reduced to nitrite in the human mouth and, further, under hypoxia and/or low pH, to nitric oxide. Dietary nitrate has thus been associated favorably with nitric-oxide-regulated processes including blood flow and energy metabolism. Indeed, the therapeutic potential of dietary nitrate in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome—both aging-related medical disorders—has attracted considerable recent research interest. We and others have shown that dietary nitrate supplementation lowers the oxygen cost of human exercise, as less respiratory activity appears to be required for a set rate of skeletal muscle work. This striking observation predicts that nitrate benefits the energy metabolism of human muscle, increasing the efficiency of either mitochondrial ATP synthesis and/or of cellular ATP-consuming processes. In this mini-review, we evaluate experimental support for the dietary nitrate effects on muscle bioenergetics and we critically discuss the likelihood of nitric oxide as the molecular mediator of such effects. PMID:26283970

  17. Influence of 7 days of hindlimb suspension and intermittent weight support on rat muscle mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierotti, David J.; Roy, Roland R.; Flores, Vinicio; Edgerton, Reggie

    1990-01-01

    The effect of intermittent periods of weight support on a decrease in mass of the soleus (Sol) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles atrophied by hindlimb suspension (HS) was investigated in rats subjected to continuous HS for seven days or an HS plus intermittent (10 min every 6 hrs of slow walking on a treadmill) weight support (HS-WS). After 7 d HS, the Sol weight relative to body weight was 21 and 9 percent lower in Hs and HS-WS, respectively, than in control rats. Maximum tetanic tension/muscle mass ratio was significantly lower in HS than in controls; the HS-WS rats had values similar to controls, whereas the maximum tetanic tension/muscle weight was significantly elevated in HS-WS compared to controls. Contraction times were 25 percent faster in the Sol and unchanged in the MG of HS rats, indicating that a low-force short-duration exercise regime results in a significant functional recovery in the 'slow' Sol, whereas the 'fast' MG is less affected.

  18. Muscle activity characterization by laser Doppler Myography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Casaccia, Sara; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria; Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    Electromiography (EMG) is the gold-standard technique used for the evaluation of muscle activity. This technique is used in biomechanics, sport medicine, neurology and rehabilitation therapy and it provides the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. Among the parameters measured with EMG, two very important quantities are: signal amplitude and duration of muscle contraction, muscle fatigue and maximum muscle power. Recently, a new measurement procedure, named Laser Doppler Myography (LDMi), for the non contact assessment of muscle activity has been proposed to measure the vibro-mechanical behaviour of the muscle. The aim of this study is to present the LDMi technique and to evaluate its capacity to measure some characteristic features proper of the muscle. In this paper LDMi is compared with standard superficial EMG (sEMG) requiring the application of sensors on the skin of each patient. sEMG and LDMi signals have been simultaneously acquired and processed to test correlations. Three parameters has been analyzed to compare these techniques: Muscle activation timing, signal amplitude and muscle fatigue. LDMi appears to be a reliable and promising measurement technique allowing the measurements without contact with the patient skin.

  19. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  20. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J.; Talbot, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A trophy of skeletal muscle; muscle a trophy associated with manned space flight; the nature, causes, and mechanisms of muscle atrophy associated with space flight, selected physiological factors, biochemical aspects, and countermeasures are addressed.

  1. Maximal Voluntary Static Force Production Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle in Children 8-11 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Going, Scott B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of maximal voluntary isometric muscle contraction force-time curves among 32 normal, healthy 8- to 11-year-olds performing tasks involving separate muscle groups found that force and maximal rate of force increase were quite reproducible, but time to selected force levels reflected considerable variations. (Author/CB)

  2. Pro-Insulin-Like Growth Factor-II Ameliorates Age-Related Inefficient Regenerative Response by Orchestrating Self-Reinforcement Mechanism of Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shiomi, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2015-08-01

    Sarcopenia, age-related muscle weakness, increases the frequency of falls and fractures in elderly people, which can trigger severe muscle injury. Rapid and successful recovery from muscle injury is essential not to cause further frailty and loss of independence. In fact, we showed insufficient muscle regeneration in aged mice. Although the number of satellite cells, muscle stem cells, decreases with age, the remaining satellite cells maintain the myogenic capacity equivalent to young mice. Transplantation of young green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Tg mice-derived satellite cells into young and aged mice revealed that age-related deterioration of the muscle environment contributes to the decline in regenerative capacity of satellite cells. Thus, extrinsic changes rather than intrinsic changes in satellite cells appear to be a major determinant of inefficient muscle regeneration with age. Comprehensive protein expression analysis identified a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) level in regenerating muscle of aged mice. We found that pro- and big-IGF-II but not mature IGF-II specifically express during muscle regeneration and the expressions are not only delayed but also decreased in absolute quantity with age. Supplementation of pro-IGF-II in aged mice ameliorated the inefficient regenerative response by promoting proliferation of satellite cells, angiogenesis, and suppressing adipogenic differentiation of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α(+) mesenchymal progenitors. We further revealed that pro-IGF-II but not mature IGF-II specifically inhibits the pathological adipogenesis of PDGFRα(+) cells. Together, these results uncovered a distinctive pro-IGF-II-mediated self-reinforcement mechanism of muscle regeneration and suggest that supplementation of pro-IGF-II could be one of the most effective therapeutic approaches for muscle injury in elderly people. PMID:25917344

  3. Eccentric Muscle Contraction and Stretching Evoke Mechanical Hyperalgesia and Modulate CGRP and P2X3 Expression in a Functionally Relevant Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dessem, Dean; Ambalavanar, Ranjinidevi; Evancho, Melena; Moutanni, Aicha; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Bai, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive, movement-based models were used to investigate muscle pain. In rats, the masseter muscle was rapidly stretched or electrically stimulated during forced lengthening to produce eccentric muscle contractions (EC). Both EC and stretching disrupted scattered myofibers and produced intramuscular plasma extravasation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were elevated in the masseter 24h following EC. At 48h, neutrophils increased and ED1 macrophages infiltrated myofibers while ED2 macrophages were abundant at 4d. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evident in the ipsilateral head 4h-4d after a single bout of EC and for 7d following multiple bouts (1 bout/d for 4d). Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA increased in the trigeminal ganglion 24h following EC while immunoreactive CGRP decreased. By 2d, CGRP-muscle afferent numbers equaled naive numbers implying that CGRP is released following EC and replenished within 2d. EC elevated P2X3 mRNA and increased P2X3-muscle afferent neuron number for 12d while electrical stimulation without muscle contraction altered neither CGRP nor P2X3 mRNA levels. Muscle stretching produced hyperalgesia for 2d whereas contraction alone produced no hyperalgesia. Stretching increased CGRP mRNA at 24h but not CGRP-muscle afferent number at 2–12d. In contrast, stretching significantly increased the number of P2X3-muscle afferent neurons for 12d. The sustained, elevated P2X3 expression evoked by EC and stretching may enhance nociceptor responsiveness to ATP released during subsequent myofiber damage. Movement-based actions such as EC and muscle stretching produce unique tissue responses and modulate neuropeptide and nociceptive receptor expression in a manner particularly relevant to repeated muscle damage. PMID:20207080

  4. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  5. An Examination of Muscle Activation and Power Characteristics While Performing the Deadlift Exercise With Straight and Hexagonal Barbells.

    PubMed

    Camara, Kevin D; Coburn, Jared W; Dunnick, Dustin D; Brown, Lee E; Galpin, Andrew J; Costa, Pablo B

    2016-05-01

    Camara, KD, Coburn, JW, Dunnick, DD, Brown, LE, Galpin, AJ, and Costa, PB. An examination of muscle activation and power characteristics while performing the deadlift exercise with straight and hexagonal barbells. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1183-1188, 2016-The deadlift exercise is commonly performed to develop strength and power, and to train the lower-body and erector spinae muscle groups. However, little is known about the acute training effects of a hexagonal barbell vs. a straight barbell when performing deadlifts. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the hexagonal barbell in comparison with the straight barbell by analyzing electromyography (EMG) from the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and erector spinae, as well as peak force, peak power, and peak velocity using a force plate. Twenty men with deadlifting experience volunteered to participate in the study. All participants completed a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test with each barbell on 2 separate occasions. Three repetitions at 65 and 85% 1RM were performed with each barbell on a third visit. The results revealed that there was no significant difference for 1RM values between the straight and hexagonal barbells (mean ± SD in kg = 181.4 ± 27.3 vs. 181.1 ± 27.6, respectively) (p > 0.05). Significantly greater normalized EMG values were found from the vastus lateralis for both the concentric (1.199 ± 0.22) and eccentric (0.879 ± 0.31) phases of the hexagonal-barbell deadlift than those of the straight-barbell deadlift (0.968 ± 0.22 and 0.559 ± 1.26), whereas the straight-barbell deadlift led to significantly greater EMG values from the bicep femoris during the concentric phase (0.835 ± 0.19) and the erector spinae (0.753 ± 0.28) during the eccentric phase than the corresponding values for the hexagonal-barbell deadlift (0.723 ± 0.20 and 0.614 ± 0.21) (p ≤ 0.05). In addition, the hexagonal-barbell deadlift demonstrated significantly greater peak force (2,553.20 ± 371.52 N), peak

  6. Effect of dietary zinc and ractopamine hydrochloride on pork chop muscle fiber type distribution, tenderness, and color characteristics.

    PubMed

    Paulk, C B; Tokach, M D; Nelssen, J L; Burnett, D D; Vaughn, M A; Phelps, K J; Dritz, S S; Derouchey, J M; Goodband, R D; Woodworth, J C; Houser, T A; Haydon, K D; Gonzalez, J M

    2014-05-01

    A total of 320 finishing pigs (PIC 327 × 1050; initially 98 kg) were used to determine the effects of adding Zn to diets containing ractopamine HCl (RAC) on muscle fiber type distribution, fresh chop color, and cooked meat characteristics. Dietary treatments were fed for approximately 35 d and consisted of a corn-soybean meal-based negative control (CON), a positive control diet with 10 mg/kg of RAC (RAC+), and the RAC+ diet plus 75, 150, or 225 mg/kg added Zn from either ZnO or Availa-Zn. Loins randomly selected from each treatment (n = 20) were evaluated using contrasts: CON vs. RAC+, interaction of Zn level × source, Zn level linear and quadratic polynomials, and Zn source. There were no Zn source effects or Zn source × level interactions throughout the study (P > 0.10). Pigs fed RAC+ had increased (P < 0.02) percentage type IIX and a tendency for increased (P = 0.10) percent type IIB muscle fibers. Increasing added Zn decreased (linear, P = 0.01) percentage type IIA and tended to increase (P = 0.09) IIX muscle fibers. On d 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 of display, pork chops from pigs fed the RAC+ treatment had greater (P < 0.03) L* values compared to the CON. On d 0 and 3 of display, increasing added Zn tended to decrease (quadratic, P = 0.10) L* values and decreased (quadratic, P < 0.03) L* values on d 1, 2, 4, and 5. Pigs fed RAC+ had decreased (P < 0.05) a* values on d 1 and 4 of display and tended to have decreased (P < 0.10) a* values on d 0 and 2 compared to CON pork chops. Pork chops from the RAC+ treatment had a tendency for increased (P < 0.08) oxymyoglobin percentage compared to CON pork chops on d 1, 2, 4, and 5. On d 0, as dietary Zn increased in RAC+ diets, there was a decrease (linear, P < 0.01) in the formation of pork chop surface oxymyoglobin percentage. Metmyoglobin reducing ability (MRA) of pork chops on d 5 was decreased in the RAC+ group. Chops from pigs fed added Zn had increased (quadratic, P < 0.03) MRA on d 3 and 5 of the display period. There

  7. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  8. Locomotion as an emergent property of muscle contractile dynamics.

    PubMed

    Biewener, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscles share many common, highly conserved features of organization at the molecular and myofilament levels, giving skeletal muscle fibers generally similar and characteristic mechanical and energetic properties; properties well described by classical studies of muscle mechanics and energetics. However, skeletal muscles can differ considerably in architectural design (fiber length, pinnation, and connective tissue organization), as well as fiber type, and how they contract in relation to the timing of neuromotor activation and in vivo length change. The in vivo dynamics of muscle contraction is, therefore, crucial to assessing muscle design and the roles that muscles play in animal movement. Architectural differences in muscle-tendon organization combined with differences in the phase of activation and resulting fiber length changes greatly affect the time-varying force and work that muscles produce, as well as the energetic cost of force generation. Intrinsic force-length and force-velocity properties of muscles, together with their architecture, also play important roles in the control of movement, facilitating rapid adjustments to changing motor demands. Such adjustments complement slower, reflex-mediated neural feedback control of motor recruitment. Understanding how individual fiber forces are integrated to whole-muscle forces, which are transmitted to the skeleton for producing and controlling locomotor movement, is therefore essential for assessing muscle design in relation to the dynamics of movement. PMID:26792341

  9. Control of sarcomere length in skinned muscle fibres of Rana temporaria during mechanical transients.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Y E; Simmons, R M

    1984-05-01

    A new technique is described for high-speed measurement of striation spacing of single skinned muscle fibres. A galvanometer mirror directs helium-neon laser light on to the muscle fibre at a variable angle. Light diffracted by the cross-striations is collected by a position-sensitive photodetector. The incident angle necessary to centre the diffracted light beam on to the photodetector is related to sarcomere length. The instrument was tested by comparison with measurements obtained with a compound microscope. Discrepancies of several nanometers per half sarcomere were observed between these two methods. When the incident angle of the laser beam was varied sinusoidally about its mean position the magnitude of the discrepancy was reduced. During steady passive shortening of the muscle fibres the output of the diffraction instrument often displayed pauses and brief periods of rapid shortening. These irregularities were eliminated by averaging the sarcomere length output over a range of illumination angles by oscillating the incident angle of the laser beam. The results suggest that at the spatial resolution of several nanometers per half sarcomere, volume diffraction effects can cause the apparent sarcomere length measured from the angle of coherent light diffraction to differ from the mean striation spacing. With incident-angle oscillation the time and spatial resolution of the equipment were satisfactory for the sarcomere length signal to be fed back to a length controller for a 'sarcomere length clamp'. In active contractions, stiffness was closely related to steady developed tension at sub-saturating calcium concentrations. Skinned fibres are less stiff than intact fibres at a given level of developed tension. PMID:6611404

  10. Modelling mechanical characteristics of microbial biofilms by network theory

    PubMed Central

    Ehret, Alexander E.; Böl, Markus

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we present a constitutive model to describe the mechanical behaviour of microbial biofilms based on classical approaches in the continuum theory of polymer networks. Although the model is particularly developed for the well-studied biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, it could easily be adapted to other biofilms. The basic assumption behind the model is that the network of extracellular polymeric substances can be described as a superposition of worm-like chain networks, each connected by transient junctions of a certain lifetime. Several models that were applied to biofilms previously are included in the presented approach as special cases, and for small shear strains, the governing equations are those of four parallel Maxwell elements. Rheological data given in the literature are very adequately captured by the proposed model, and the simulated response for a series of compression tests at large strains is in good qualitative agreement with reported experimental behaviour. PMID:23034354

  11. Comparison of thermo-mechanical characteristics of textile composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.; Ibekwe, S.; Mensah, P.F.; Chehl, S.S.

    1997-07-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) technique holds the promise of a cost-effective means of production of composite parts. When compared to the traditional hand lay-up, autoclave cure or compression molding, it can produce a near-net shape of the part from a preform that is produced from an automatic textile process. As use and demand for composite parts increase in aerospace, automobile, and many consumer goods, it becomes expedient that the structural merits of this method be explicitly defined. This study therefore systematically compares the mechanical, and thermal properties of textile composite panels fabricated by RTM technique and the hand lay-up autoclave cure method respectively. The observable differences in the properties of the two differently fabricated materials was not significant. In fact the resulting difference in fiber density ratio could have caused this.

  12. Contribution to the mechanics of worm-like motion systems and artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Steigenberger, J

    2003-08-01

    In this paper the author presents a mathematical model of a device that can be seen as a segment of an artificial worm (following the paradigm "earthworm") and as an artificial muscle as well. Confining considerations to statics, the model shows up as an ordinary parameter-dependent boundary value problem. It is tackled numerically in various particular forms by means of Maple and thus gives a good view of the segment's behavior during inflation and under longitudinal load. Segments of maximal volume present a useful preliminary stage of the investigations. PMID:14586816

  13. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 and Adiponectin and Associations with Muscle Deficits, Disease Characteristics, and Treatments in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Joshua F.; Von Feldt, Joan Marie; Mostoufi-Moab, Sogol; Kim, Woojin; Taratuta, Elena; Leonard, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with low muscle mass and density. The objective of our study was to evaluate associations between 2 serum biomarkers [insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and adiponectin] and skeletal muscle in RA. Methods Whole-body dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measures of the appendicular lean mass index (ALMI; kg/m2) and total fat mass index (kg/m2), as well as the peripheral quantitative computed tomography measures of the lower leg muscle and fat cross-sectional area (CSA; cm2) and muscle density (an index of fat infiltration) were obtained from 50 participants with RA, ages 18–70 years. Multivariable linear regression analyses evaluated associations between body composition and levels of adiponectin and IGF-1, adjusted for age, sex, and adiposity. Results Greater age was associated with higher adiponectin (p = 0.06) and lower IGF-1 (p = 0.004). Eight subjects had IGF-1 levels below the reference range for their age and sex. These subjects had significantly lower ALMI and muscle CSA in multivariable models. Lower IGF-1 levels were associated with greater clinical disease activity and severity, as well as low ALMI, muscle CSA, and muscle density (defined as 1 SD below normative mean). After adjusting for age and sex, greater adiponectin levels were associated with lower BMI (p = 0.02) as well as lower ALMI, and lower muscle CSA, independent of adiposity (p < 0.05). Only greater Health Assessment Questionnaire scores were significantly associated with lower adiponectin levels. Conclusion Low IGF-1 and greater adiponectin levels are associated with lower muscle mass in RA. Lower IGF-1 levels were seen in subjects with greater disease activity and severity. PMID:26329340

  14. Apoptosis: a mechanism contributing to remodeling of skeletal muscle in response to hindlimb unweighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. L.; Linderman, J. K.; Roy, R. R.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Mukku, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The role of apoptosis in the elimination of myonuclei during hindlimb unloading-induced atrophy and the inhibition of apoptosis in the prevention of muscle atrophy were examined. The number of nuclei demonstrating double-stranded DNA fragmentation seen by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TDT) histochemical staining, an indicator of apoptosis, was significantly increased after 14 days of suspension. Double staining with TDT and antilaminin immunohistochemistry revealed that some TDT-positive nuclei were within the fiber lamina and were most likely myonuclei. The number of fibers containing morphologically abnormal nuclei was also significantly greater in suspended compared with control rats. Combined treatment with growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I (GH/ IGF-I) and resistance exercise attenuated the increase in TDT-positive nuclei (approximately 26%, P > 0.05) and significantly decreased the number of fibers with morphologically abnormal nuclei. The data suggest that 1) "programmed nuclear death" contributes to the elimination of myonuclei and/or satellite cells from atrophying fibers, and 2) GH/IGF-I administration plus muscle loading ameliorates the apoptosis associated with hindlimb unloading.

  15. Technologies and mechanisms for safety control of ready-to-eat muscle foods: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiang; Xiong, Youling L

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) muscle foods refer to a general category of meat and poultry products that are fully cooked and consumable without reheating. These products, including whole and sliced pork, beef, turkey, chicken, and variety of meats, in the forms of ham, roast, rolls, sausage, and frankfurter, are widely available in the delicatessen section of retail stores or various food service outlets. However, difficulties in avoidance of contamination by foodborne pathogens, notably Listeria monocytogenes, during product postlethality repackaging render RTE meats labile to outbreaks. Accordingly, the USDA-FSIS has established processing guidelines and regulations, which are constantly updated, to minimize foodborne pathogens in RTE products. Technologies that complement good manufacturing practice have been developed to control RTE meat safety. Among them, various antimicrobial product formulations, postpackaging pasteurization (thermal and nonthermal), and antimicrobial packaging are being used. Through these efforts, outbreaks linked to RTE meat consumption have substantially reduced in recent years. However, the pervasive and virulent nature of L. monocytogenes and the possible presence of other cold-tolerant pathogens entail continuing developments of new intervention technologies. This review updates existing and emerging physical and chemical methods and their mode of action to inactivate or inhibit threatening microorganisms in RTE muscle foods. PMID:24754253

  16. Exploiting elasticity: Modeling the influence of neural control on mechanics and energetics of ankle muscle-tendons during human hopping.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Benjamin D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2014-07-21

    We present a simplified Hill-type model of the human triceps surae-Achilles tendon complex working on a gravitational-inertial load during cyclic contractions (i.e. vertical hopping). Our goal was to determine the role that neural control plays in governing muscle, or contractile element (CE), and tendon, or series elastic element (SEE), mechanics and energetics within a compliant muscle-tendon unit (MTU). We constructed a 2D parameter space consisting of many combinations of stimulation frequency and magnitude (i.e. neural control strategies). We compared the performance of each control strategy by evaluating peak force and average positive mechanical power output for the system (MTU) and its respective components (CE, SEE), force-length (F-L) and -velocity (F-V) operating point of the CE during active force production, average metabolic rate for the CE, and both MTU and CE apparent efficiency. Our results suggest that frequency of stimulation plays a primary role in governing whole-MTU mechanics. These include the phasing of both activation and peak force relative to minimum MTU length, average positive power, and apparent efficiency. Stimulation amplitude was primarily responsible for governing average metabolic rate and within MTU mechanics, including peak force generation and elastic energy storage and return in the SEE. Frequency and amplitude of stimulation both played integral roles in determining CE F-L operating point, with both higher frequency and amplitude generally corresponding to lower CE strains, reduced injury risk, and elimination of the need for passive force generation in the CE parallel elastic element (PEE). PMID:24641822

  17. Hydrogen storage characteristics of mechanically alloyed amorphous metals

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.; Curtin, W.A.; Schultz, L.

    1988-09-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a series of mechanically alloyed (MA) amorphous Ni/sub 1//sub --//sub x/Zr/sub x/ alloys are studied, using both gas phase and electrochemical techniques, and are compared to H storage of rapidly quenched (RQ) amorphous Ni/sub 1-//sub x/Zr/sub x/. In the MA alloys, hydrogen resides in the Ni/sub 4-//sub n/Zr/sub n/ (n = 4,3,2) tetrahedral interstitial sites, with a maximum hydrogen-to-metal ratio of 1.9(/sup 4//sub n/)x/sup n/(1-x)/sup 4-//sup n/. These features are identical to those of the RQ alloys and indicate that the topological and chemical order of the MA and RQ materials are essentially the same. However, the typical binding energy of hydrogen in a Ni/sub 4-//sub n/Zr/sub n/ site, E/sub n/, is shifted in the MA alloys relative to the RQ alloys and the distribution of binding energies centered on E/sub n/ is significantly broader in the MA samples. Thus, the MA and RQ alloys are not identical and sample annealing does not alter this subtle distinction. The sensitivity of H storage to the presence of chemical order in binary alloys are analyzed theoretically and the data is found to be most consistent with little or no chemical order (random alloys).

  18. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of Ni–Cr thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Petley, Vijay; Sathishkumar, S.; Thulasi Raman, K.H.; Rao, G.Mohan; Chandrasekhar, U.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Ni–Cr thin films of varied composition deposited by DC magnetron co-sputtering. • Thin film with Ni–Cr: 80–20 at% composition exhibits most distinct behavior. • The films were tensile tested and exhibited no cracking till the substrate yielding. - Abstract: Ni–Cr alloy thin films have been deposited using magnetron co-sputtering technique at room temperature. Crystal structure was evaluated using GIXRD. Ni–Cr solid solution upto 40 at% of Cr exhibited fcc solid solution of Cr in Ni and beyond that it exhibited bcc solid solution of Ni in Cr. X-ray diffraction analysis shows formation of (1 1 1) fiber texture in fcc and (2 2 0) fiber texture in bcc Ni–Cr thin films. Electron microscopy in both in-plane and transverse direction of the film surface revealed the presence of columnar microstructure for films having Cr upto 40 at%. Mechanical properties of the films are evaluated using nanoindentation. The modulus values increased with increase of Cr at% till the film is fcc. With further increase in Cr at% the modulus values decreased. Ni–Cr film with 20 at% Ni exhibits reduction in modulus and is correlated to the poor crystallization of the film as reflected in XRD analysis. The Ni–Cr thin film with 80 at% Ni and 20 at% Cr exhibited the most distinct columnar structure with highest electrical resistivity, indentation hardness and elastic modulus.

  19. Charge Transfer Characteristics and Initiation Mechanisms of Long Delayed Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Cummer, S. A.; Lyons, W. A.; Nelson, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Simultaneous measurements of high altitude optical emissions and the magnetic field produced by sprite-associated lightning discharges enable a close examination of the link between low altitude lightning process and high altitude sprite process. In this work, we report results of the coordinated analysis of high speed (1000--10000 frames per second) sprite video and wideband (0.1 Hz to 30 kHz) magnetic field measurements made simultaneously at the Yucca Ridge Field Station and Duke University during the June through August 2005 campaign period. During the observation period, the high speed camera detected 83 sprite events in 67 TLE sequences, which are caused by the same number of +CGs. 46% of these sprite events are delayed more than 10 ms after the lightning return stroke. With the estimated lightning source current moment waveform, we computed the continuing current amplitude and total charge transfer characteristics of the long delayed sprites (>10 ms delay). Our calculation shows the total charge moment change of the long delayed sprites can vary from several hundred C km to more than ten thousand C km. All the long delayed sprites are related with intense continuing current bigger than 2 kA. This continuing current provides about 50% to 90% of the total charge transfer. However, a bigger continuing current does not necessarily mean a shorter time delay. This indicates that other processes also involved in the sprite initiation for long delayed sprites. In our observations, the sferic burst, a high frequency noise caused by intra-cloud activity, is always accompanied by a slow intensification in the lightning source current before the time of sprite initiation. Thus we used the lightning source current as an input and employed a 2-D FDTD model to numerically simulate the electric field at different altitudes and compare it with the breakdown field. Including the effect of the electron mobility dependence on electric field, the simulation results showed that

  20. Endotoxin-induced skeletal muscle wasting is prevented by angiotensin-(1-7) through a p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Olguín, Hugo; Di Capua, Gabriella; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy induced during sepsis syndrome produced by endotoxin in the form of LPS (lipopolysaccharide), is a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass, an increase in MHC (myosin heavy chain) degradation, and an increase in the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 (muscle-specific RING-finger protein 1), two ubiquitin E3 ligases belonging to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Ang-(1-7) [Angiotensin-(1-7)], through its Mas receptor, has beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. We evaluated in vivo the role of Ang-(1-7) and Mas receptor on the muscle wasting induced by LPS injection into C57BL/10J mice. In vitro studies were performed in murine C2C12 myotubes and isolated myofibres from EDL (extensor digitorum longus) muscle. In addition, the participation of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in the Ang-(1-7) effect on the LPS-induced muscle atrophy was evaluated. Our results show that Ang-(1-7) prevents the decrease in the diameter of myofibres and myotubes, the decrease in muscle strength, the diminution in MHC levels and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expression, all of which are induced by LPS. These effects were reversed by using A779, a Mas antagonist. Ang-(1-7) exerts these anti-atrophic effects at least in part by inhibiting the LPS-dependent activation of p38 MAPK both in vitro and in vivo. We have demonstrated for the first time that Ang-(1-7) counteracts the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by endotoxin through a mechanism dependent on the Mas receptor that involves a decrease in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The present study indicates that Ang-(1-7) is a novel molecule with a potential therapeutic use to improve muscle wasting during endotoxin-induced sepsis syndrome. PMID:25989282

  1. Alteration of excitation-contraction coupling mechanism in extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse and potential efficacy of taurine

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Annamaria; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Cetrone, Michela; Camerino, Claudia; Simonetti, Simonetta; Papadia, Francesco; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2001-01-01

    No clear data is available about functional alterations in the calcium-dependent excitation-contraction (e-c) coupling mechanism of dystrophin-deficient muscle of mdx mice. By means of the intracellular microelectrode ‘point' voltage clamp method, we measured the voltage threshold for contraction (mechanical threshold; MT) in intact extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres of dystrophic mdx mouse of two different ages: 8–12 weeks, during the active regeneration of hind limb muscles, and 6–8 months, when regeneration is complete. The EDL muscle fibres of 8–12-week-old wildtype animals had a more negative rheobase voltage (potential of equilibrium for contraction- and relaxation-related calcium movements) with respect to control mice of 6–8 months. However, at both ages, the EDL muscle fibres of mdx mice contracted at more negative potentials with respect to age-matched controls and had markedly slower time constants to reach the rheobase. The in vitro application of 60 mM taurine, whose normally high intracellular muscle levels play a role in e-c coupling, was without effect on 6–8-month-old wildtype EDL muscle, while it significantly ameliorated the MT of mdx mouse. HPLC determination of taurine content at 6–8 months showed a significant 140% rise of plasma taurine levels and a clear trend toward a decrease in amino acid levels in hind limb muscles, brain and heart, suggesting a tissue difficulty in retaining appropriate levels of the amino acid. The data is consistent with a permanent alteration of e-c coupling in mdx EDL muscle fibres. The alteration could be related to the proposed increase in intracellular calcium, and can be ameliorated by taurine, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of the amino acid. PMID:11226135

  2. Role of the muscle belly and tendon of soleus, gastrocnemius, and plantaris in mechanical energy absorption and generation during cat locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Leonard, T R; Allinger, T L

    1996-04-01

    The functional significance of tendons, and the differences in tendon properties among synergistic muscles, is not well established for normal locomotion. Previous studies have suggested that tendons may store mechanical energy during the early phase of support, and then release this energy during the late phase of support. The storage and release of mechanical energy by tendons may modify the velocity of shortening and elongation and the power produced by the muscle belly and the fibers, and may influence the metabolic cost of locomotion. The aims of this study were (1) to estimate the amount of negative and positive work done by the tendon and the muscle belly of the cat soleus (SO), gastrocnemius (GA), and plantaris (PL), and (2) to determine the relative contribution of the elastic energy stored in the tendons to the total mechanical work done by these three muscles during walking and trotting. Forces of SO, GA, and PL muscles were measured using standard force transducers in three cats walking and trotting at speeds of 0.4-1.8 ms-1 on a motor-driven treadmill. Video records and a geometrical model of the cat hindlimb were used for calculating length of the muscle-tendon complexes of SO, GA, and PL during locomotion. Instantaneous lengths of the tendons of SO, GA, and PL during a step cycle were estimated from the stress-strain properties, the effective lengths, the cross-sectional areas, and the instantaneous forces of the tendons. Stress-strain properties for the tendons were obtained experimentally from one animal. The length of the belly was defined as the difference between the muscle-tendon complex length and the tendon length. Mechanical power of the tendon and the muscle belly was calculated as the product of the measured muscle force and the calculated rates of change in tendon and muscle belly lengths, respectively. Mechanical power and work of the tendons and bellies of SO, GA, and PL were calculated for 144 step cycles. During a step cycle, peak

  3. Stretch shortening cycle fatigue: interactions among joint stiffness, reflex, and muscle mechanical performance in the drop jump [corrected].

    PubMed

    Horita, T; Komi, P V; Nicol, C; Kyröläinen, H

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of strenuous stretch-shortening cycle exercise on the relationship between reflex and stiffness regulation during the drop jump. Ten healthy male subjects performed submaximal stretch-shortening cycle exercise on a special sledge apparatus. Exhaustion occurred on average within 3 min. A drop jump test from a 50-cm height was performed immediately before and after the sledge exercise, as well as 2 h, 2 days and 4 days later. The fatigue exercise showed relatively high blood lactate concentrations 12.5 (SD 2.6) mmol.l-1 and a 2-day delayed increase of serum cretaine kinase concentration. In drop jumps, the short latency M1 component of the vastus lateralis muscle electromyogra