Science.gov

Sample records for musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene

  1. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  2. Musculoaponeurotic Area of the Hip and Clinicophotographic Scaling System

    PubMed Central

    Mena-Chávez, J. Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Background: With the evolution of body contouring, few innovative alternatives have been developed for cosmetic treatment in the hip area. Methods: A multicenter controlled study was conducted, including a prior review of the literature regarding the hip area. Dissections were performed on 4 male cadavers, outlining the “musculoaponeurotic area of the hip.” The area was subdivided into anterior and posterior surfaces. A clinical study was conducted in 79 patients, obtaining a scale by using the most prominent points on the sides of both thighs as the main reference. With the lines marked on photographs and the measurements, a “clinicophotographic scaling system” was designed. Results: The anterior surface corresponds to the tensor fasciae latae and its tendon as well as to the aponeurosis of the gluteus medius. The posterior surface corresponds with the iliotibial tract and the tendon insertions of the gluteus maximus. The average dimensions of the cadaver “musculoaponeurotic area of the hip” are as follows: length, 17.5 cm, and width, 11.5 cm. Using the “clinicophotographic scaling system,” the dimensions are as follows: length, 14.9 cm, and width, 10.3 cm. Conclusions: The “musculoaponeurotic area of the hip” was defined involving muscles, tendons, aponeurosis, fascia, subcutaneous cellular tissue, and skin. The borders were established using important anatomical points that determine the length and width of the area. The “clinicophotographic scaling system” was used to clinically calculate the length and width of the area. By examination and palpation, the borders and dimensions of this area could be determined. PMID:26180724

  3. A Novel Technique of Supra Superficial Musculoaponeurotic System Hyaluronic Acid Injection for Lower Face Lifting

    PubMed Central

    Sahawatwong, Sinijchaya; Sirithanabadeekul, Punyaphat; Patanajareet, Vasiyapha; Wattanakrai, Penpun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various methods attempting to correct sagging of the lower face focus mainly on manipulation of the superficial musculoaponeurotic System. Each technique has its own limitation. The authors propose a relatively simple, conservative method utilizing hyaluronic acid injection just above the superficial musculoaponeurotic System. Objective: To address a novel hyaluronic injection technique to lift the lower face. Methods: Details of the injection techniques are described. The Position of the hyaluronic acid injected and the effect of hyaluronic acid on the superficial musculoaponeurotic System were confirmed by ultrasonography in one of the cases. Results: Sonogram images demonstrated the location of the injected hyaluronic acid and pressure effect of hyaluronic acid on the superficial musculoaponeurotic System, confirming the ability to manipulate the superficial musculoaponeurotic System by this injection technique. The lifting result of this Single injection technique was immediately visible and maintained for at least 26 weeks. Conclusion: This is a less invasive, reproducible method that provides a sustained face lifting result. The authors propose the term “supraSMAS lift” for this novel injection technique. PMID:27047633

  4. Fibrosarcoma of maxilla: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Sandhya; Nayak, Sushruth K; Nayak, Prachi; Sahu, Sourabh

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a malignant tumor of fibroblasts. At one time, it was considered one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas. However, the diagnosis of fibrosarcoma is made much less frequently today because of the recognition and separate classification of other spindle cell lesions that have similar microscopic features. Of all the fibrosarcomas occurring in humans, only 0.05% occur in the head and neck region. Here, we present a case of 22-year-old female patient with the swelling on the left anterior aspect of the face. Histopathologically, the lesion was diagnosed as fibrosarcoma and immunohistochemically, the lesional cells showed positivity for vimentin. PMID:27194883

  5. Recurrent congenital fibrosarcoma with heart metastases.

    PubMed

    Lohi, Olli; Vornanen, Martine; Kähkönen, Marketta; Vettenranta, Kim; Parto, Katriina; Arola, Mikko

    2012-07-01

    Congenital fibrosarcomas are malignant tumors that arise in soft tissues. In infants this unique tumor does not commonly metastasize, even though there may be local recurrences. We report here a boy who had congenital fibrosarcoma in his right foot, which was completely excised at the age of 3 days. Four months later, a solitary encapsulated metastasis emerged in thoracic chest wall, which was operated. During adjuvant chemotherapy he developed histologically confirmed fibrosarcoma metastases in the heart. After extended treatment with cyclophosphamide/topotecan and gemcitabine/docetaxel, the heart tumors disappeared and he has been in complete remission for 3 years. PMID:22217490

  6. Fibrosarcoma of the Gingiva: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Kafil; Hasan, Syed Abrar; Sherwani, Rana K; Ahmad, Murad

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a malignant tumor of the fibroblasts, which is liable to recur and metastasize, most frequently in the lungs. Although fibrosarcomas are rare, they can occur anywhere in the body. The most common sites are in the retroperitoneum, thigh, knee, and distal extremities. It is very uncommon in the head and neck region and comprises only about 1% of all the malignancies in humans. Almost 23% are seen in the oral cavity. The prognosis for fibrosarcomas is poor with a five-year survival rate of 20–35%. The common modality of treatment is radical surgery. We report a rare presentation of gingival fibrosarcoma in a young female, who presented with a painless lump. PMID:27403246

  7. Andreas Vesalius' 500th Anniversary: Initiation of the Superficial Facial System and Superficial Musculoaponeurotic System Concepts.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Romy J; Hage, J Joris

    2016-02-01

    Because of their relevance for liposuction and rhytidectomies, respectively, the superficial fascial system (SFS) and superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) have been thoroughly studied over the past decennia. Although it is well known that the SMAS concept was introduced by Tessier in 1974, it remains unknown who first properly described the stratum membranosum of the SFS. In light of the 500th birthday of Andreas Vesalius (1515-1564), we searched his 1543 masterwork De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem and related work for references to these structures. We found ample reference to both structures as the membrana carnosa (or fleshy membrane) in his works and concluded that Vesalius recognized the extension, nature, and functions of the stratum membranosum of the SFS, as well as its more musculous differentiation as the SMAS in the head and neck area, and the dartos in the perineogenital area. In doing so, Vesalius recorded most details of the SFS and SMAS concepts avant la lettre. PMID:26761152

  8. c-K-ras overexpression is characteristic for metastases derived from a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Algarra, I; Perez, M; Serrano, M J; Garrido, F; Gaforio, J J

    We investigated the relationship between the activation of the c-myc and c-K-ras proto-oncogenes and the acquisition of metastatic potential in a methylcholanthrene-induced BALB/c fibrosarcoma. The murine fibrosarcoma GR9 was originally induced in BALB/c mice following exposure to the carcinogenic chemical 3-methylcholanthrene. To induce spontaneous metastasis, we used two tumor cell clones (B9 and G2) known to differ in their metastatic potential, local tumor growth, H-2 class I expression and sensitivity to natural killer (NK) cells. The metastatic nodes were obtained from the lung, liver and kidney. The results showed: (1) amplification of the c-myc proto-oncogene in original tumor clones as well as in all metastatic nodes; (2) mRNA overexpression without amplification of the K-ras proto-oncogene in the metastatic cells, regardless of their anatomical location; (3) no c-K-ras point mutations at codons 12 and 61, and (4) in general, a statistically significantly reduced in vitro sensitivity of metastatic tumor cells to NK cells as compared with the tumor clones used to induce them (p<0.05). These results therefore suggest that overexpressed c-K-ras mRNA is important during tumor progression, perhaps rendering metastatic tumor cells more resistant to lysis by NK cells. PMID:10729771

  9. Transformation of Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans into a Fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Bouzaidi, Khaled; Sbei, Feten; Maalla, Riadh

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans is a rare cutaneous mesenchymal tumor characterized by a low potential of malignancy with a very low rate of metastasis but an important rate of local recurrence. Its transformation into a fibrosarcoma is exceptional, responsible for a higher metastatic potential. This transformation implies a closer surveillance. Through a case report and literature review, we will try to expose epidemiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic, and outcome particularities of this entity. PMID:26955135

  10. Neurogenic fibrosarcoma following radiation therapy for seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, W.M.; Abbondanzo, S.L.; Chun, B.K.; Manz, H.J.; Maxted, W.C.

    1989-05-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced neurogenic fibrosarcoma that developed in a patient who received radiation therapy for seminoma. The sarcoma developed within the irradiated field after a latency period of nineteen years. Although the occurrence of a secondary neoplasm is unusual, this possibility should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with tumor growth after a long interval following radiation therapy.

  11. A transition in transcriptional activation by the glucocorticoid and retinoic acid receptors at the tumor stage of dermal fibrosarcoma development.

    PubMed Central

    Vivanco, M D; Johnson, R; Galante, P E; Hanahan, D; Yamamoto, K R

    1995-01-01

    In transgenic mice harboring the bovine papillomavirus genome, fibrosarcomas arise along an experimentally accessible pathway in which normal dermal fibroblasts progress through two pre-neoplastic stages, mild and aggressive fibromatosis, followed by a final transition to the tumor stage. We found that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) displays only modest transcriptional regulatory activity in cells derived from the three non-tumor stages, whereas it is highly active in fibrosarcoma cells. Upon inoculation into mice, the aggressive fibromatosis cells progress to tumor cells that have high GR activity; thus, the increased transcriptional regulatory activity of GR correlates with the cellular transition to the tumor stage. The intracellular levels of GR, as well as its hormone-dependent nuclear translocation and specific DNA binding activities, are unaltered throughout the progression. Strikingly, the low GR activity observed in the pre-neoplastic stages cannot be overcome by exogenous GR introduced by co-transfection. Moreover, comparisons of primary embryo fibroblasts and their transformed derivatives revealed a similar pattern--modest GR activity, unresponsive to overexpressed GR protein, in the normal cells was strongly increased in the transformed cells. Likewise, the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) displayed similar differential activity in the fibrosarcoma pathway. Thus, the oncogenic transformation of fibroblasts, and likely other cell types, is accompanied by a striking increase in the activities of transcriptional regulators such as GR and RAR. We suggest that normal primary cells have a heretofore unrecognized capability to limit the magnitude of induction of gene expression. Images PMID:7774580

  12. Keloidal fibromas and fibrosarcomas in the dog.

    PubMed

    Mikaelian, I; Gross, T L

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen dogs (2-12 years of age) presented with one (n = 15) or two (n = 1) cutaneous nodules (n = 16) or a dermal plaque (n = 1). Intact males (n = 9) and neutered males (n = 4) were more affected than were females (n = 3). Histologically, these lesions were characterized by focal dermal and subcutaneous deposition of thick hyalinized collagen fibers intermingled with fibroblasts, and in 13 of 17 lesions, a variable number of CD18-positive cells were interpreted as reactive macrophages. Fibroblasts in three dogs formed intersecting fascicles, interpreted as evidence of malignant transformation. The terms keloidal fibroma and keloidal fibrosarcoma can be applied to these lesions. Excision was curative in five dogs with keloidal fibroma for which follow-up was available. However, because malignant transformation may occur, wide excision of canine keloidal lesions is warranted. PMID:12102210

  13. Ameloblastic Fibrosarcoma Arising in the Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Rachael R.; Bilski, Arthur; Batstone, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (AFS) is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the jaw that usually arises de novo or through a malignant change in the mesenchymal component of a preexisting or recurrent benign fibroma. The majority of AFS cases reported in the literature arise in the mandible. Case Report: A 35-year-old male presented with an asymptomatic left maxillary mass that on imaging was found to be effacing most of his maxillary sinus. He underwent a left maxillectomy with free-flap reconstruction and adjuvant radiotherapy to the tumor bed. Conclusion: Wide local excision remains the treatment of choice for AFS, given the poor survival rates of patients with recurrent disease. However, long-term studies and follow-up are needed to elucidate the role of adjuvant therapies in the primary treatment of AFS. PMID:27303223

  14. Development of the Platysma Muscle and the Superficial Musculoaponeurotic System (Human Specimens at 8–17 Weeks of Development)

    PubMed Central

    De la Cuadra-Blanco, C.; Peces-Peña, M. D.; Carvallo-de Moraes, L. O.; Herrera-Lara, M. E.; Mérida-Velasco, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the description of the different regions of the face of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and its relationship with the superficial mimetic muscles. The purpose of this study is to analyze the development of the platysma muscle and the SMAS in human specimens at 8–17 weeks of development using an optical microscope. Furthermore, we propose to study the relationship of the anlage of the SMAS and the neighbouring superficial mimetic muscles. The facial musculature derives from the mesenchyme of the second arch and migrates towards the different regions of the face while forming premuscular laminae. During the 8th week of development, the cervical, infraorbital, mandibular, and temporal laminae are observed to be on the same plane. The platysma muscle derives from the cervical lamina and its mandibular extension enclosing the lower part of the parotid region and the cheek, while the SMAS derives from the upper region. During the period of development analyzed in this study, we have observed no continuity between the anlage of the SMAS and that of the superficial layer of the temporal fascia and the zygomaticus major muscle. Nor have we observed any structure similar to the SMAS in the labial region. PMID:24396304

  15. Spontaneous Fibrosarcoma in a Djungarian Hamster (Phodopus sungorus)

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hirotaka; Onuma, Mamoru; Ito, Hidetoshi; Shibuya, Hisashi; Sato, Tsuneo

    2008-01-01

    A 1.5-y-old female Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) presented with a large subcutaneous mass surrounding the right shoulder. Radiography revealed dislocation of the right humeral articulation and osteolytic lesions of the right scapula. Histologically, the mass was composed of spindle to stellate cells arranged in fascicles interwoven with delicate collagen fibers, and neoplastic cells infiltrated the bone, skeletal muscle, and subcutaneous tissues. Neoplastic cells stained intensely positive for vimentin and negative for S100 protein, neurofilament, and desmin. A minority of neoplastic cells (10% to 20%) stained moderately for smooth muscle actin. The mass was diagnosed as a fibrosarcoma. Although fibrosarcomas are relatively common in dogs and cats, this is the first report of fibrosarcoma in a domestic Djungarian hamster. PMID:18589873

  16. Oral fibrosarcoma in a black iguana (Ctenosaura pectinata).

    PubMed

    Salinas, Elizabeth Morales; Arriaga, Bertha O Aguilar; Lezama, José Ramírez; Bernal, Adriana Méndez; Garrido, Serafin J López

    2013-06-01

    A case of oral fibrosarcoma in a 13-yr-old male black iguana (Ctenosaura pectinata) is reported here. The iguana exhibited new tissue formation involving a large part of the maxilla and hard palate, which histologically and ultrastructurally corresponded to a primary fibrosarcoma of the oral cavity. Although there are reports of fibrosarcomas in other reptiles, such as snakes and crocodiles, no reports of this neoplasm in the oral cavity of an iguana were reported, which suggests that it is either infrequent or infrequently sampled for histological diagnosis. As an isolated case in an adult iguana living at a conservation center, it is likely that this diagnosis is associated with advanced age. The prognosis is considered unfavorable. PMID:23805579

  17. Proto-oncogenes II.

    PubMed

    Rosen, P

    1988-12-01

    In reviewing recent literature on activated proto-oncogenes including retroviral infection (without oncogene), translocation and inherited childhood cancer, I have come to the conclusion that activated proto-oncogenes are not involved in development of tumors. There is one exception in which a translocated proto-myc leads to transformation. That is the case of the trangenic mouse embryo where faulty development occurs. PMID:3226361

  18. [Congenital Fibrosarcoma of the Left Index Finger - An Unusual Case].

    PubMed

    Mailänder, L; Piza-Katzer, H

    2016-02-01

    Congenital fibrosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal soft tissue tumour, which most commonly develops in the peripheral extremities during infancy. Diagnostic work-up is a challenge for clinicians and pathologists alike, because in many cases the lesion initially resembles a haemangioma on macroscopic inspection. A 4-month-old boy presented with a strongly vascularised tumour of the left index finger, which had been diagnosed as a capillary haemangioma by means of a biopsy performed in another facility. The lesion had been treated with systemic and intralesional cortisone injections. Due to ulceration and the risk of infection, the tumour mass was resected with the index finger being preserved. The histological appearance was inconclusive. PCR revealed a congenital fibrosarcoma. 2 years after surgery, the boy is free from recurrence. PMID:26895521

  19. Electrochemical treatment of mouse and rat fibrosarcomas with direct current

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.K.; McDougall, J.A.; Ahn, C.; Vora, N.

    1997-03-01

    Electrochemical treatment (ECT) of cancer utilizes direct current to produce chemical changes in tumors. ECT has been suggested as an effective alternative local cancer therapy. However, a methodology is not established, and mechanisms are not well studied. In vivo studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of ECT on animal tumor models. Radiation-induced fibrosarcomas were implanted subcutaneously in 157 female C3H/HeJ mice. Larger rat fibrosarcomas were implanted on 34 female Fisher 344 rats. When the spheroidal tumors reached 10 mm in the mice, two to five platinum electrodes were inserted into the tumors at various spacings and orientations. Ten rats in a pilot group were treated when their ellipsoidal tumors were about 25 mm long; electrode insertion was similar to the later part of the mouse study; i.e., two at the base and two at the center. A second group of 24 rats was treated with six or seven electrodes when their tumors were about 20 mm long; all electrodes were inserted at the tumor base. Of the 24 rats, 12 of these were treated once, 10 were treated twice, and 2 were treated thrice. All treated tumors showed necrosis and regression for both mice and rats; however, later tumor recurrence reduced long-term survival. When multiple treatments were implemented, the best 3 month mouse tumor cure rate was 59.3%, and the best 6 month rat tumor cure rate was 75.0%. These preliminary results indicate that ECT is effective on the radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) mouse tumor and rat fibrosarcoma. The effectiveness is dependent on electrode placement and dosage.

  20. Radiation-induced dural fibrosarcoma with unusually short latent period

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, N.R.; Aydin, F.; Leshner, R.T. Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA )

    1993-05-01

    Although rare, the occurrence of radiation-induced intracranial neoplasms of various types is well known. Among these tumors, fibrosarcomas, especially in the region of seila turcica, seem to be the most common type. These tumors characteristically occur after a long latent period, usually several years, following radiation therapy. The authors now report a case of apparently radiation-induced fibrosarcoma with some unusual features in a 10-year-old boy who was treated with radiation for medulloblastoma. He received a total dose of 53.2 Gy radiation delivered at 1.8 per fraction with 6 MV acceleration using the standard craniospinal technique. An MRI at 15 months after the completion of radiotherapy showed a mass over the cerebral convexity, which increased two-fold in size within a period of 4 months. A well circumscribed tumor was removed from the fronto-parietal convexity. The tumor measured 5x4.5x1.5 cm and was attached to the dura with invasion of the overlying bone. Histologically, it displayed the characteristic features of a low-grade fibrosarcoma. The patient remains free of tumor 18 months after the surgery. This case emphasizes the potential risk for the development of a second neoplasm following therapeutic radiation and also documents, to the authors' knowledge, the shortest latent period reported so far between administration of radiotherapy and development of an intracranial tumor.

  1. Rare Undifferentiated Tumour of Thyroid: Primary Thyroid Fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Girgin, Sadullah; Göya, Cemil; Büyükbayram, Hüseyin; Urakçi, Zuhat

    2016-01-01

    Primary thyroid fibrosarcoma cases are very rare. Although it is a known fact that soft tissue sarcomas show slow growth, there have been some cases in literature similar to our case in which there was a fast-growing tumour tissue causing breathing and swallowing difficulties due to painless pressure. For diagnosis, there is no specific clinical or radiological finding. We report a 67-year-old male with a mobile fast-growing mass covering almost all over the neck that appeared 2 months prior to the admission. Laboratory findings showed that the patient was euthyroid. Fine needle aspiration biopsy results are consistent with suspicion of a mesenchymal, histiocytic, epithelial or lymphoid tissue origined malignancy. Patient was taken into surgical operation. The thyroid tissue invaded the main vascular structure, trachea and esophagus. Due to this situation R1 resection was applied. Immunohistopathological examination showed a conventional type of fibrosarcoma. After the surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy had been planned and applied. Patients died before the radiotherapy sessions ended. It should be kept in mind that a rapid growth in thyroid tissue can be thyroid fibrosarcoma, there could be a rapid clinical course and poor prognosis after operation.

  2. Fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi: report of a unique case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Xuan; Yu, Bo; Shi, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Qun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor. To the author’s best knowledge, no previous case of fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi has been reported. Here we reported the first case of fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi. A case of 58-year-old man was presented with a mass with ulcer and infection in the second joint of left middle finger for 2 months, with long standing gouty tophi. The tumor was biopsied and the biopsy showed complete excision of the tumor. With the pathological and immunohistochemical features considered, the diagnosis of fibrosarcoma associated with gouty tophi was made. The clinical findings, pathological characteristics and treatment were described. PMID:26097616

  3. Ameloblastic Fibrosarcoma of the Mandible With Distant Metastases.

    PubMed

    Pourdanesh, Fereydoun; Mohamadi, Mansoureh; Moshref, Mohammad; Soltaninia, Omid

    2015-10-01

    Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma is a mixed odontogenic tumor that can originate de novo or from a transformed ameloblastic fibroma. This report describes the case of a 34-year-old woman with a recurrent, rapidly growing, debilitating lesion. This lesion appeared as a large painful mandibular swelling that filled the oral cavity and extended to the infratemporal fossa. The lesion had been previously misdiagnosed as ameloblastoma. Twenty months after final surgery and postoperative chemotherapy, lung metastases were diagnosed after she reported respiratory signs and symptoms. PMID:26207695

  4. A Role for the Cavin-3/Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Signaling Axis in the Regulation of PMA-Activated Human HT1080 Fibrosarcoma Cell Neoplastic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Toufaily, Chirine; Charfi, Cyndia; Annabi, Bayader; Annabi, Borhane

    2014-01-01

    Caveolae are specialized cell membrane invaginations known to regulate several cancer cell functions and oncogenic signaling pathways. Among other caveolar proteins, they are characterized by the presence of proteins of the cavin family. In this study, we assessed the impact of cavin-1, cavin-2, and cavin-3 on cell migration in a human HT-1080 fibrosarcoma model. We found that all cavin-1, -2 and -3 transcripts were expressed and that treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), which is known to prime cell migration and proliferation, specifically upregulated cavin-3 gene and protein expression. PMA also triggered matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion, but reduced the global cell migration index. Overexpression of recombinant forms of the three cavins demonstrated that only cavin-3 was able to reduce basal cell migration, and this anti-migratory effect was potentiated by PMA. Interestingly, cavin-3 overexpression inhibited PMA-induced MMP-9, while cavin-3 gene silencing led to an increase in MMP-9 gene expression and secretion. Furthermore, recombinant cavin-3 significantly prevented PMA-mediated dephosphorylation of AKT, a crucial regulator in MMP-9 transcription. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that cellular cavin-3 expression may repress MMP-9 transcriptional regulation in part through AKT. We suggest that the balance in cavin-3-to-MMP-9 expression regulates the extent of extracellular matrix degradation, confirming the tumor-suppressive role of cavin-3 in controlling the invasive potential of human fibrosarcoma cells. PMID:25520561

  5. Infantile fibrosarcoma of ethmoid sinus, misdiagnosed as an adenoid in a 5-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Khademi, Bijan; Karimi, Mehran; Shekarkhar, Golsa

    2015-01-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma of head and neck is rare and the presence of this tumor in ethmoid sinus is even more uncommon. To the best of our knowledge, <5 cases have been reported in the last 20 years in the English literature, so far, only one of which has been infantile type in a 15 months old girl. In this case report, we will explain our experience with a rare case of infantile fibrosarcoma originating from ethmoid sinus in a 5-year-old boy who presented with dyspnea and epistaxis. After biopsy, it was diagnosed as fibrosarcoma of sinus origin. PMID:26604519

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of a fibrosarcoma of the thigh: a case report.

    PubMed

    Durin, Luc; Jeanne-Pasquier, Corinne; Bailleul, Patrick; Eboué, Cyril; Aicardi, Stéphanie; Herlicoviez, Michel; Dreyfus, Michel

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare case of fibrosarcoma of the thigh suspected prenatally. At 27 weeks of gestation a voluminous, vascularised mass was discovered at ultrasound on the foetus' left leg, suggestive of haemangioma or a fibrosarcoma. There were no signs of heart failure. A rapid increase in the tumour mass was noted and a caesarean section was carried out at 39 weeks because of abnormal foetal heart rate. Postnatal ultrasound examination was comparable to that carried out prenatally; pathological examination of the mass biopsied and immunohistochemical investigation provided a diagnosis of congenital fibrosarcoma. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery the infant is now in complete remission without amputation. PMID:16968999

  7. Spontaneous generation of germline characteristics in mouse fibrosarcoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhan; Hu, Yao; Jiang, Guoying; Hou, Jun; Liu, Ruilai; Lu, Yuan; Liu, Chunfang

    2012-10-01

    Germline/embryonic-specific genes have been found to be activated in somatic tumors. In this study, we further showed that cells functioning as germline could be present in mouse fibrosarcoma cells (L929 cell line). Early germline-like cells spontaneously appeared in L929 cells and further differentiated into oocyte-like cells. These germline-like cells can, in turn, develop into blastocyst-like structures in vitro and cause teratocarcinomas in vivo, which is consistent with natural germ cells in function. Generation of germline-like cells from somatic tumors might provide a novel way to understand why somatic cancer cells have strong features of embryonic/germline development. It is thought that the germline traits of tumors are associated with the central characteristics of malignancy, such as immortalization, invasion, migration and immune evasion. Therefore, germline-like cells in tumors might provide potential targets to tumor biology, diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Oncogenes and growth control

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, P.; Graf, T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: A Role for Proto-Oncogenes in Differentiation.; The ras Gene Family; Regulation of Human Globin Gene Expression; Regulation of Gene Expression by Steroid Hormones; The Effect of DNA Methylation on DNA-Protein Interactions and on the Regulation of Gene Expression; and Trans-Acting Elements Encoded in Immediate Early Genes of DNA Tumor Viruses.

  9. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  10. [Hypophosphatemic oncogenic osteomalacia].

    PubMed

    Mátyus, J; Szebenyi, B; Rédl, P; Mikita, J; Gáspár, L; Haris, A; Radó, J; Kakuk, G

    2000-12-17

    The first case of oncogen osteomalacia in Hungary is reported, to draw the attention of the medical profession to it and to present the new data about its pathomechanism. Pathological hip fracture caused by hypophosphataemic osteomalacia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting was found in a previously healthy 19 years old sportsman. In spite of daily 1.5 micrograms calcitriol treatment and phosphate supplementation, hypophosphataemia persisted for 13 years and he needed regular indometacin medication for his bone pain. During that time an 1.5 cm gingival tumour was found and radically removed. The serum phosphate level returned to normal in a few hours after the operation (preoperative 0.51, after 2, 4 and 8 hours 0.61, 0.68 and 0.79 mmol/l respectively), and remained normal without calcitriol. The histological examination showed epulis with fibroblast and vascular cell proliferation, which has never been previously reported in connection with oncogenic osteomalacia. The pain resolved after 3 months and the bone density became normal in one year. Oncogenic osteomalacia must be considered in every case presenting with atypical hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Careful dental examination is needed also in the course of search for the underlying tumour. Every tumour-like growth, even the common epulis, has to be operated radically and serum phosphate monitored in the postoperative period in all such cases. PMID:11196239

  11. Targeting a newly established spontaneous feline fibrosarcoma cell line by gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Nande, Rounak; Di Benedetto, Altomare; Aimola, Pierpaolo; De Carlo, Flavia; Carper, Miranda; Claudio, Charlene D; Denvir, Jim; Valluri, Jagan; Duncan, Gary C; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a deadly disease in cats and is significantly more often located at classical vaccine injections sites. More rare forms of spontaneous non-vaccination site (NSV) fibrosarcomas have been described and have been found associated to genetic alterations. Purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of adenoviral gene transfer in NVS fibrosarcoma. We isolated and characterized a NVS fibrosarcoma cell line (Cocca-6A) from a spontaneous fibrosarcoma that occurred in a domestic calico cat. The feline cells were karyotyped and their chromosome number was counted using a Giemsa staining. Adenoviral gene transfer was verified by western blot analysis. Flow cytometry assay and Annexin-V were used to study cell-cycle changes and cell death of transduced cells. Cocca-6A fibrosarcoma cells were morphologically and cytogenetically characterized. Giemsa block staining of metaphase spreads of the Cocca-6A cells showed deletion of one of the E1 chromosomes, where feline p53 maps. Semi-quantitative PCR demonstrated reduction of p53 genomic DNA in the Cocca-6A cells. Adenoviral gene transfer determined a remarkable effect on the viability and growth of the Cocca-6A cells following single transduction with adenoviruses carrying Mda-7/IL-24 or IFN-γ or various combination of RB/p105, Ras-DN, IFN-γ, and Mda-7 gene transfer. Therapy for feline fibrosarcomas is often insufficient for long lasting tumor eradication. More gene transfer studies should be conducted in order to understand if these viral vectors could be applicable regardless the origin (spontaneous vs. vaccine induced) of feline fibrosarcomas. PMID:22666387

  12. Targeting a Newly Established Spontaneous Feline Fibrosarcoma Cell Line by Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nande, Rounak; De Carlo, Flavia; Carper, Miranda; Claudio, Charlene D.; Denvir, Jim; Valluri, Jagan; Duncan, Gary C.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a deadly disease in cats and is significantly more often located at classical vaccine injections sites. More rare forms of spontaneous non-vaccination site (NSV) fibrosarcomas have been described and have been found associated to genetic alterations. Purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of adenoviral gene transfer in NVS fibrosarcoma. We isolated and characterized a NVS fibrosarcoma cell line (Cocca-6A) from a spontaneous fibrosarcoma that occurred in a domestic calico cat. The feline cells were karyotyped and their chromosome number was counted using a Giemsa staining. Adenoviral gene transfer was verified by western blot analysis. Flow cytometry assay and Annexin-V were used to study cell-cycle changes and cell death of transduced cells. Cocca-6A fibrosarcoma cells were morphologically and cytogenetically characterized. Giemsa block staining of metaphase spreads of the Cocca-6A cells showed deletion of one of the E1 chromosomes, where feline p53 maps. Semi-quantitative PCR demonstrated reduction of p53 genomic DNA in the Cocca-6A cells. Adenoviral gene transfer determined a remarkable effect on the viability and growth of the Cocca-6A cells following single transduction with adenoviruses carrying Mda-7/IL-24 or IFN-γ or various combination of RB/p105, Ras-DN, IFN-γ, and Mda-7 gene transfer. Therapy for feline fibrosarcomas is often insufficient for long lasting tumor eradication. More gene transfer studies should be conducted in order to understand if these viral vectors could be applicable regardless the origin (spontaneous vs. vaccine induced) of feline fibrosarcomas. PMID:22666387

  13. Recombinant TIMP-1-GPI inhibits growth of fibrosarcoma and enhances tumor sensitivity to doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Bao, Q; Niess, H; Djafarzadeh, R; Zhao, Y; Schwarz, B; Angele, M K; Jauch, K-W; Nelson, P J; Bruns, C J

    2014-09-01

    Fibrosarcomas show a high incidence of recurrence and general resistance to apoptosis. Limiting tumor regrowth and increasing their sensitivity to chemotherapy and apoptosis represent key issues in developing more effective treatments of these tumors. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) broadly blocks matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and can moderate tumor growth and metastasis. We previously described generation of a recombinant fusion protein linking TIMP-1 to glycosylphophatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (TIMP-1-GPI) that efficiently directs the inhibitor to cell surfaces. In the present report, we examined the effect of TIMP-1-GPI treatment on fibrosarcoma biology. Exogenously applied TIMP-1-GPI efficiently incorporated into surface membranes of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. It inhibited their proliferation, migration, suppressed cancer cell clone formation, and enhanced apoptosis. Doxorubicin, the standard chemotherapeutic drug for fibrosarcoma, was tested alone or in combination with TIMP-1-GPI. In parallel, the influence of treatment on HT1080 side population cells (exhibiting tumor stem cell-like characteristics) was investigated using Hoechst 33342 staining. The sequential combination of TIMP-1-GPI and doxorubicin showed more than additive effects on apoptosis, while TIMP-1-GPI treatment alone effectively decreased "stem-cell like" side population cells of HT1080. TIMP-1-GPI treatment was validated using HT1080 fibrosarcoma murine xenografts. Growing tumors treated with repeated local injections of TIMP-1-GPI showed dramatically inhibited fibrosarcoma growth and reduced angiogenesis. Intraoperative peritumoral application of GPI-anchored TIMP-1 as an adjuvant to surgery may help maintain tumor control by targeting microscopic residual fibrosarcoma cells and increasing their sensitivity to chemotherapy. PMID:23934106

  14. Antiproliferative role of Indigofera aspalathoides on 20 methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sivagnanam Selva; Rao, Mudiganti Ram Krishna; Balasubramanian, Maruthaiveeran Periyasamy

    2012-01-01

    Objective To find out the anticancer effect of Indigofera aspalathoides (I. aspalathoides) on 20-methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma in rats. Methods Fibrosarcoma was induced in Wistar strain male albino rats by 20-methylcholanthrene. Intraperitoneous (i.p.) administration of 250 mg/kg body weight/day of aqueous extract of I. aspalathoides for 30 d effectively suppressed chemically induced tumors. Parameters such as body weight, liver and kidney weight, tumor weight, mean survival time, behavioral changes, blood glucose, blood glycogen and marker enzymes such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), acid phosphatase (ACP) and 5′-nucleiotidase (5′-NT) in serum, liver and kidney and lipid profiles such as total cholesterol, phospholipids, free fatty acids in liver and kidney of control and experimental animals were studied. Results Fibrosarcoma bearing animals were ferocious and anxious. The mean survival time was found to increase after the treatment. The body weights were significantly decreased (P<0.001) in group II fibrosarcoma animals which steadily increased after the treatment with I. aspalathoides. The liver and kidney weights were significantly increased whereas the tumor weights decreased as compared to the weights in untreated fibrosarcoma bearing rats. The blood glucose and the liver and kidney glycogen levels were found to decrease significantly (P<0.001) in group II animals. Elevated activities of marker enzymes were observed in serum, liver and kidney of fibrosarcoma bearing Group II animals which were normalize after I. aspalathoides treatment. In the liver and kidney of Group II animals the total cholesterol increased whereas the phospholipids and free fatty acid levels decreased (P<0.001) which were normalized after treatment. Conclusions The treatment by I. aspalathoides on fibrosarcoma bearing rats has improved the levels of various parameters indicating its antiproliferative and

  15. Congenital Fibrosarcoma and History of Prenatal Exposure to Petroleum Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; López-Hernández, Fernando A.; Trasande, Leonardo; Ferrís-Tortajada, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Congenital fibrosarcoma (CFS) is a rare fibrous tissue malignancy that usually presents in the first few years of life. It is unique among human sarcomas in that it has an excellent prognosis. We describe a temporal clustering of a number of cases of CFS and investigate the possible associated prenatal risk factors. The Pediatric Environmental History, a questionnaire developed in our clinic that is instrumental in determining environmental risk factors for tumor-related disease, was essential in documenting the presence or absence of risk factors considered as human carcinogens. We found a history of exposure to petroleum products in four cases of CFS that occurred at a greater than expected rate in a short time frame–an apparent cancer cluster. We call attention to the possibility that exposure to petroleum products raises the risk of developing CFS. While future studies should focus on systematic investigation of CFS and its underlying mechanisms, this report suggests the need for proactive measures to avoid exposure to solvents and petroleum products during pregnancy. PMID:22945410

  16. PRIMARY FIBROSARCOMA OF THE THYROID GLAND: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Dabelić, Nina; Mateša, Neven; Jukić, Tomislav; Soldić, Željko; Kust, Davor; Prgomet, Angela; Bolanca, Ante; Kusić, Zvonko

    2016-03-01

    Due to progressive dyspnea, a male patient aged 59 underwent medical examination in 2003 in a local hospital. Neck ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of a suspect lesion in the thyroid gland revealed the presence of a malignant neoplasm, i.e. mesenchymal tumor. Immunocytochemistry for epithelial membrane antigen, chromogranin A and leukocyte common antigen (CD45) was negative, while vimentin and S-100 were positive. The patient was referred to a university hospital center, where further oncologic work-up was done. Neck ultrasound revealed a tumor in the left lobe of the thyroid, with extension to the aortic arch. After repeated FNAB, cytologic diagnosis of primary thyroid fibrosarcoma was established. Due to the locally advanced and consequently inoperable disease, primary radiotherapy to the neck region (64 Gy in 32 fractions) was applied, followed by 6 cycles of chemotherapy with doxorubicin. After completion of therapy, computed tomography scan demonstrated significant regression of primary disease, but it was still not amenable to surgical treatment. Thus, the decision of the oncology board was active surveillance of the patient. During 9-year follow up, no signs of progression or activity of the disease were found. PMID:27333734

  17. Principles of Cancer Therapy: Oncogene and Non-oncogene Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ji; Solimini, Nicole L.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a complex collection of distinct genetic diseases united by common hallmarks. Here, we expand upon the classic hallmarks to include the stress phenotypes of tumorigenesis. We describe a conceptual framework of how oncogene and non-oncogene addictions contribute to these hallmarks and how they can be exploited through stress sensitization and stress overload to selectively kill cancer cells. In particular, we present evidence for a large class of non-oncogenes that are essential for cancer cell survival and present attractive drug targets. Finally, we discuss the path ahead to therapeutic discovery and provide theoretical considerations for combining orthogonal cancer therapies. PMID:19269363

  18. Principles of cancer therapy: oncogene and non-oncogene addiction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ji; Solimini, Nicole L; Elledge, Stephen J

    2009-03-01

    Cancer is a complex collection of distinct genetic diseases united by common hallmarks. Here, we expand upon the classic hallmarks to include the stress phenotypes of tumorigenesis. We describe a conceptual framework of how oncogene and non-oncogene addictions contribute to these hallmarks and how they can be exploited through stress sensitization and stress overload to selectively kill cancer cells. In particular, we present evidence for a large class of non-oncogenes that are essential for cancer cell survival and present attractive drug targets. Finally, we discuss the path ahead to therapeutic discovery and provide theoretical considerations for combining orthogonal cancer therapies. PMID:19269363

  19. Primary sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of bone: analysis of a series.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, John B; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Dal Cin, Paola; Bredella, Miriam A; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornicek, Francis J; Deshpande, Vikram; Hornick, Jason L; Nielsen, G Petur

    2014-11-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare, aggressive malignant neoplasm characterized by small nests and linear arrays of epithelioid cells embedded in a dense collagenous matrix. Very few primary SEFs of bone have been reported. Recognition is critical, as the dense extracellular collagenous matrix can be interpreted as osteoid, leading to misdiagnosis as-osteosarcoma. MUC4 and SATB2 are 2 recently characterized immunohistochemical markers for SEF and osteosarcoma, respectively. In reports to date, osteosarcomas are positive for SATB2 and negative for MUC4, whereas soft tissue SEFs have shown the opposite immunohistochemical profile (SATB2-/MUC4+). The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of 8 primary SEFs of bone. The patients presented at a wide range of ages (25 to 73 y; median 52 y). Tumors mostly involved long bones of the extremities, with 3 cases involving the femur, 2 involving the ulna, and 1 involving the humerus. Other sites of involvement included the second rib (1) and the C6 vertebra (1). Follow-up information was available for 7 patients, 3 of whom developed metastases within 2 years of diagnosis. The other 4 patients were free of local recurrence or metastases at 1, 5, 12, and >84 months of follow-up, respectively. Radiographically, the tumors were predominantly lytic and poorly marginated. Histologically, 6 tumors showed pure SEF morphology, and 2 showed hybrid SEF/low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma morphology. Focal dystrophic mineralization was seen in 1 case but was limited to areas of necrosis. None of the tumors showed the lace-like pattern of mineralization typical of osteosarcoma. The majority (6/8) of the tumors strongly expressed MUC4. SATB2 was negative in all but 1 case, which showed variable weak to moderate staining in ∼50% of nuclei. In general, the combination of morphology, MUC4 expression, and the absence of SATB2 expression was highly useful in arriving at the

  20. [Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of the paravertebral column. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Puerta Roldán, Patricia; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Bagué Rossell, Silvia; de Juan Delago, Manel; Molet Teixidó, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare variant of low-grade fibrosarcoma, with specific histological and immunohistochemical features and a poor prognosis. We report a case of SEF of the paravertebral column in a 49-year old male who presented a paraspinal mass with extension into the L4-L5 neural foramen and invasion of the L5 nerve root. Histology of the tumourectomy specimen and its immunohistochemical study led to the diagnosis of SEF. This case was particularly unusual due to its paravertebral column location and, despite its low grade, illustrates the malignant potential of SEF. PMID:23154129

  1. Loss of oncogenic ras expression does not correlate with loss of tumorigenicity in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, R; Anderson, M J; Sato, K Y; Fasching, C L; Der, C J; Stanbridge, E J

    1996-01-01

    ras oncogenes are mutated in at variety of human tumors, which suggests that they play an important role in human carcinogenesis. To determine whether continued oncogenic ras expression is necessary to maintain the malignant phenotype, we studied the human fibrosarcoma cell line, HT1080, which contains one mutated and one wild-type N-ras allele. We isolated a variant of this cell line that no longer contained the mutated copy of the N-ras gene. Loss of mutant N-ras resulted in cells that displayed a less transformed phenotype characterized by a flat morphology, decreased growth rate, organized actin stress fibers, and loss of anchorage-independent growth. The transformed phenotype was restored following reintroduction of mutant N-ras. Although loss of the oncogenic N-ras drastically affected in vitro growth parameters, the variant remained tumorigenic in nude mice indicating that mutated N-ras expression is not necessary for maintenance of the tumorigenic phenotype. We confirmed this latter observation in colon carcinoma cell lines that have lost activated K-ras expression via targeted knockout of the mutant K-ras gene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8692875

  2. Response rate of fibrosarcoma cells to cytotoxic drugs on the expression level correlates to the therapeutic response rate of fibrosarcomas and is mediated by regulation of apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lehnhardt, Marcus; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Kuhnen, Cornelius; Homann, Heinz Herbert; Daigeler, Adrien; Steinau, Hans Ulrich; Roehrs, Sonja; Schnoor, Laura; Steinstraesser, Lars; Mueller, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Background Because of the high resistance rate of fibrosarcomas against cytotoxic agents clinical chemotherapy of these tumors is not established. A better understanding of the diverse modes of tumor cell death following cytotoxic therapies will provide a molecular basis for new chemotherapeutic strategies. In this study we elucidated the response of a fibrosarcoma cell line to clinically used cytostatic agents on the level of gene expression. Methods HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells were exposed to the chemotherapeutic agents doxorubicin, actinomycin D or vincristine. Total RNA was isolated and the gene expression patterns were analyzed by microarray analysis. Expression levels for 46 selected candidate genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Results The analysis of the microarray data resulted in 3.309 (actinomycin D), 1.019 (doxorubicin) and 134 (vincristine) probesets that showed significant expression changes. For the RNA synthesis blocker actinomycin D, 99.4% of all differentially expressed probesets were under-represented. In comparison, probesets down-regulated by doxorubicin comprised only 37.4% of all genes effected by this agent. Closer analysis of the differentially regulated genes revealed that doxorubicin induced cell death of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells mainly by regulating the abundance of factors mediating the mitochondrial (intrinsic) apoptosis pathway. Furthermore doxorubicin influences other pathways and crosstalk to other pathways (including to the death receptor pathway) at multiple levels. We found increased levels of cytochrome c, APAF-1 and members of the STAT-family (STAT1, STAT3), while Bcl-2 expression was decreased. Caspase-1, -3, -6, -8, and -9 were increased indicating that these proteases are key factors in the execution of doxorubicin mediated apoptosis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that chemotherapy regulates the expression of apoptosis-related factors in fibrosarcoma cells. The number and the specific pattern of the genes

  3. Pro‑apoptotic effects of pycnogenol on HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Harati, Kamran; Slodnik, Pawel; Chromik, Ansgar Michael; Behr, Björn; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Kolbenschlag, Jonas; Uhl, Waldemar; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Daigeler, Adrien

    2015-04-01

    Complete surgical resection with clear margins remains the mainstay of therapy for localised fibrosarcomas. Nevertheless, metastatic fibrosarcomas still represent a therapeutic dilemma. Commonly used chemotherapeutic agents like doxorubicin have proven to be effective in <30% of all cases of disseminated fibrosarcoma. Especially elderly patients with cardiac subdisease are not suitable for systemic chemotherapy with doxorubicin. Therefore we tested the apoptotic effects of the well-tolerated pine bark extract pycnogenol and its constituents on human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080). Ten healthy subjects (six females, four males, mean age 24.8 ± 6 years) received a single dose of 300 mg pycnogenol orally. Blood plasma samples were obtained before and 6 h after intake of pycnogenol. HT1080 cells were treated with these plasma samples. Additionally, HT1080 were incubated separately with catechin, epicatechin and taxifolin that are known as the main constituents of pycnogenol. Vital, apoptotic and necrotic cells were quantified using flow cytometric analysis. Gene expression was analyzed by RNA microarray. The results showed that single application of taxifolin, catechin and epicatechin reduced cell viability of HT1080 cells only moderately. A single dose of 300 mg pycnogenol given to 10 healthy adults produced plasma samples that led to significant apoptotic cell death ex vivo whereas pycnogenol-negative serum displayed no apoptotic activity. Microarray analysis revealed remarkable expression changes induced by pycnogenol in a variety of genes, which are involved in different apoptotic pathways of cancer cells [Janus kinase 1 (JAK1), DUSP1, RHOA, laminin γ1 (LAMC1), fibronectin 1 (FN1), catenin α1 (CTNNA1), ITGB1]. In conclusion, metabolised pycnogenol induces apoptosis in human fibrosarcoma cells. Pycnogenol exhibits its pro-apoptotic activity as a mixture and is more effective than its main constituents catechin, epicatechin and taxifolin indicating that the

  4. Canine cutaneous peripheral nerve sheath tumours versus fibrosarcomas can be differentiated by neuroectodermal marker genes in their transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Klopfleisch, R; Meyer, A; Lenze, D; Hummel, M; Gruber, A D

    2013-02-01

    The diagnostic differentiation between canine fibrosarcomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNSTs) is based on histopathological phenotype. Histological differentiation of these tumours can, however, be challenging and there is a lack of immunohistochemical markers to prove their histogenic origin. To identify possible PNST markers and to further characterize their histogenic origin we compared histologically well-defined canine fibrosarcomas and PNSTs by cDNA microarray analysis. Forty-five annotated gene products were significantly differentially expressed between both tumour types. Seven of these gene products, known to be specifically expressed in neuroectodermal tissues, had higher expression levels in PNSTs: FMN2, KIF1B, GLI1, ROBO1, NMUR2, DOK4 and HMG20B. Conversely, eight genes associated with carcinogenesis had higher expression in fibrosarcomas: FHL2, PLAGL1, FNBP1L, BAG2, HK1, CSK and Cox5A. Comparison of the fibrosarcoma and PNST transcriptome therefore identified PNST phenotype-associated genes involved in neuroectodermal differentiation, which may be useful as diagnostic markers. Furthermore, the genes associated with the fibrosarcoma phenotype may serve as markers to differentiate fibrosarcomas from other tumour types. PMID:22818216

  5. Protective effect of Dunaliella salina (Volvocales, Chlorophyta) against experimentally induced fibrosarcoma on wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Raja, Rathinam; Hemaiswarya, Shanmugam; Balasubramanyam, Dakshanamoorthy; Rengasamy, Ramasamy

    2007-01-01

    The beta-carotene-yielding microalga, Dunaliella salina (Dunal) Teod. maintained in De Walne's medium was harvested and lyophilized. Fibrosarcoma was induced in rats by 20-methylcholanthrene. 0.5 g and 1.0 g of lyophilized D. salina powder was administered to the rats orally through carboxy methyl cellulose. Cisplatin was administered along with vitamin E to compare the protective effect of D. salina against fibrosarcoma. Administration of D. salina decreased the levels of cholesterol and lactate dehydrogenase as well as the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, serum aspartate aminotransaminase, serum alanine aminotransferase, when compared to control. A significant reduction in the levels of hepatic and renal RNA and DNA was observed in the sarcoma rats when treated with D. salina powder. Histopathological studies of tumor tissues showed regenerative and regressive changes. beta-carotene globules isolated from the powder of Dunaliella salina confirmed the presence of 9-cis-beta-carotene and all-trans-beta-carotene. PMID:16713216

  6. Etoposide incorporated into camel milk phospholipids liposomes shows increased activity against fibrosarcoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Maswadeh, Hamzah M; Aljarbou, Ahmad N; Alorainy, Mohammed S; Alsharidah, Mansour S; Khan, Masood A

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids were isolated from camel milk and identified by using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Anticancer drug etoposide (ETP) was entrapped in liposomes, prepared from camel milk phospholipids, to determine its activity against fibrosarcoma in a murine model. Fibrosarcoma was induced in mice by injecting benzopyrene (BAP) and tumor-bearing mice were treated with various formulations of etoposide, including etoposide entrapped camel milk phospholipids liposomes (ETP-Cam-liposomes) and etoposide-loaded DPPC-liposomes (ETP-DPPC-liposomes). The tumor-bearing mice treated with ETP-Cam-liposomes showed slow progression of tumors and increased survival compared to free ETP or ETP-DPPC-liposomes. These results suggest that ETP-Cam-liposomes may prove to be a better drug delivery system for anticancer drugs. PMID:25821817

  7. The T-box transcription factor 3 is a promising biomarker and a key regulator of the oncogenic phenotype of a diverse range of sarcoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Willmer, T; Cooper, A; Sims, D; Govender, D; Prince, S

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas represent a complex group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin and their heterogeneity poses a serious diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. There is therefore a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underpinning the pathogenesis of the more than 70 distinguishable sarcoma subtypes. The transcription factor TBX3, a critical developmental regulator, is overexpressed in several cancers of epithelial origin where it contributes to tumorigenesis by different molecular mechanisms. However, the status and role of TBX3 in sarcomas have not been reported. Here we show that a diverse subset of soft tissue and bone sarcoma cell lines and patient-derived sarcoma tissues express high levels of TBX3. We further explore the significance of this overexpression using a small interferring RNA approach and demonstrate that TBX3 promotes the migratory ability of chondrosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and liposarcoma cells but inhibits fibrosarcoma cell migration. This suggested that TBX3 may play a key role in the development of different sarcoma subtypes by functioning as either an oncoprotein or as a brake to prevent tumour progression. To further explore this, TBX3 knockdown and overexpression cell culture models were established using chondrosarcoma and fibrosarcoma cells as representatives of each scenario, and the resulting cells were characterized with regard to key features of tumorigenesis. Results from in vitro and in vivo assays reveal that, while TBX3 promotes substrate-dependent and -independent cell proliferation, migration and tumour formation in chondrosarcoma cells, it discourages fibrosarcoma formation. Our findings provide novel evidence linking TBX3 to cancers of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, we show that TBX3 may be a biomarker for the diagnosis of histologically dynamic sarcoma subtypes and that it impacts directly on their oncogenic phenotype. Indeed, we reveal that TBX3 may exhibit oncogene or tumour suppressor activity in sarcomas, which

  8. Immunomodulatory properties of silver nanoparticles contribute to anticancer strategy for murine fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Biswajit; Pal, Ramkrishna; Ali, Mohammed; Singh, Leichombam Mohindro; Shahidur Rahman, Dewan; Kumar Ghosh, Sujit; Sengupta, Mahuya

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology in nanoparticle-based cancer therapeutics is gaining impetus due to the unique biophysical properties of nanoparticles at the quantum level. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been reported as one type of potent therapeutic nanoparticles. The present study is aimed to determine the effect of AgNPs in arresting the growth of a murine fibrosarcoma by a reductive mechanism. Initially, a bioavailability study showed that mouse serum albumin (MSA)-coated AgNPs have enhanced uptake; therefore, toxicity studies of AgNP-MSA at 10 different doses (1–10 mg/kg b.w.) were performed in LACA mice by measuring the complete blood count, lipid profile and histological parameters. The complete blood count, lipid profile and histological parameter results showed that the doses from 2 to 8 mg (IC50: 6.15 mg/kg b.w.) sequentially increased the count of leukocytes, lymphocytes and granulocytes, whereas the 9- and 10-mg doses showed conclusive toxicity. In an antitumor study, the incidence and size of fibrosarcoma were reduced or delayed when murine fibrosarcoma groups were treated by AgNP-MSA. Transmission electron micrographs showed that considerable uptake of AgNP-MSA by the sentinel immune cells associated with tumor tissue and a morphologically buckled structure of the immune cells containing AgNP-MSA. Because the toxicity studies revealed a relationship between AgNPs and immune function, the protumorigenic cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were also assayed in AgNP-MSA-treated and non-treated fibrosarcoma groups, and these cytokines were found to be downregulated after treatment with AgNP-MSA. PMID:25938978

  9. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic comparison of cultured human fibroblast and fibrosarcoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Difei; Castro, Dan J.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; Saxton, Romaine E.; Zhang, Nancy Y.

    1995-05-01

    Infrared vibration spectroscopy appears to be a more powerful technique for diagnosis than visible or UV spectroscopy. Advantages of IR spectra include: 1) vibrational motion has a smaller tissue absorption coefficient than electronic motion, 2) scattering of infrared radiation has a lower cross section than visible or UV light, (these two facts allow deeper penetration of IR radiation) and 3) vibration spectra provide a better fingerprint of chemical groups present in cells than the unresolved broad electronic spectrum of biological molecules. In the present work, Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy was used to compare cultured human fibroblast and malignant fibrosarcoma cells. Significant differences were observed by comparing the spectra of the normal cells with that of the cancer cells. the PO2 symmetric stretching mode at 1082cm-1 in the cancer cell is reduced in intensity. These observations are similar to those reported previously by Wong et al in comparing the IR spectra of pairs of normal and cancerous cells from the colon and cervix. However, the observed increase in the relative intensity of the symmetric to antisymmetric CH3 bending mode are only found in fibrosarcoma and basal cell carcinoma. The decrease in intensity of the CH2 bending mode relative to that of CH3 mode was observed only for fibrosarcoma cells. This finding with paired human fibroblast and fibrosarcoma cells suggests that fatty acid chains or side chains of protein in the cancer cells are partially degraded leading to more terminal carbon. It is also possible that changes in the environment upon carcinogenesis induces a change in the relative absorption cross sections for the CH3 and CH2 bending vibrations.

  10. Immunomodulatory properties of silver nanoparticles contribute to anticancer strategy for murine fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biswajit; Pal, Ramkrishna; Ali, Mohammed; Singh, Leichombam Mohindro; Shahidur Rahman, Dewan; Kumar Ghosh, Sujit; Sengupta, Mahuya

    2016-03-01

    The use of nanotechnology in nanoparticle-based cancer therapeutics is gaining impetus due to the unique biophysical properties of nanoparticles at the quantum level. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been reported as one type of potent therapeutic nanoparticles. The present study is aimed to determine the effect of AgNPs in arresting the growth of a murine fibrosarcoma by a reductive mechanism. Initially, a bioavailability study showed that mouse serum albumin (MSA)-coated AgNPs have enhanced uptake; therefore, toxicity studies of AgNP-MSA at 10 different doses (1-10 mg/kg b.w.) were performed in LACA mice by measuring the complete blood count, lipid profile and histological parameters. The complete blood count, lipid profile and histological parameter results showed that the doses from 2 to 8 mg (IC50: 6.15 mg/kg b.w.) sequentially increased the count of leukocytes, lymphocytes and granulocytes, whereas the 9- and 10-mg doses showed conclusive toxicity. In an antitumor study, the incidence and size of fibrosarcoma were reduced or delayed when murine fibrosarcoma groups were treated by AgNP-MSA. Transmission electron micrographs showed that considerable uptake of AgNP-MSA by the sentinel immune cells associated with tumor tissue and a morphologically buckled structure of the immune cells containing AgNP-MSA. Because the toxicity studies revealed a relationship between AgNPs and immune function, the protumorigenic cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were also assayed in AgNP-MSA-treated and non-treated fibrosarcoma groups, and these cytokines were found to be downregulated after treatment with AgNP-MSA. PMID:25938978

  11. [A case of advanced prostate fibrosarcoma that reacted well to chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Saito, Tetsuichi; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Kurizaki, Yoshiki; Kato, Haruaki; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    Prostate fibrosarcoma is an extremely rare tumor for which complete excision has been the mainstay of treatment. Although chemotherapy has been attempted in cases with positive surgical margins and/or advanced stage disease, the effectiveness of this therapy has not been established. Herein, we report a case of advanced prostate fibrosarcoma that reacted well to chemotherapy. A 40-year-old man was referred for treatment of a large prostatic tumor with multiple lung, liver, and bone metastases. Needle biopsy of the prostate revealed that the tumor was a high-grade undifferentiated sarcoma. Chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide was administered. After five courses of chemotherapy, the primary prostate tumor decreased markedly, and the lung and liver metastases almost disappeared. Radical cystoprostatectomy and ileal conduit formation were performed. Pathological diagnosis was fibrosarcoma. Another three courses of doxorubicin and ifosfamide therapy were performed, and doxorubicin was replaced by etoposide because the maximum dose of doxorubicin was reached. However, the effectiveness of the second-line therapy was poor, and the tumor progressed again. The patient died of lung metastasis 15 months later. PMID:25293801

  12. Verapamil potentiation of melphalan cytotoxicity and cellular uptake in murine fibrosarcoma and bone marrow.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, B. A.; Clutterbuck, R. D.; Millar, J. L.; McElwain, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Growth delay by melphalan of two fibrosarcomas in CBA mice was prolonged by intraperitoneal (i.p.) verapamil, 10 mg kg-1. Verapamil also increased the area under the blood concentration time curve and the gastrointestinal toxicity of melphalan. Verapamil promoted melphalan cytotoxicity to murine bone marrow both in vivo, by CFU-S assay, and in vitro, by CFU-GM assay. In 1 microgram ml-1 [14C]-melphalan, verapamil (10 micrograms ml-1) increased by 1.5 times the [14C]-melphalan accumulation by murine bone marrow, reversibly and independently of external calcium. Efflux of [14C]-melphalan from murine bone marrow was retarded by verapamil. Verapamil increased [14C]-melphalan uptake by disaggregated fibrosarcoma cells but had no effect on melphalan accumulation and cytotoxicity in human bone marrow. Although verapamil affected melphalan pharmacokinetics, enhancement of cellular melphalan uptake by verapamil in murine fibrosarcoma and bone marrow appeared to account for much of the increase in melphalan cytotoxicity. The lack of potentiation of melphalan by verapamil in human marrow suggests differences in melphalan transport or in verapamil membrane interactions in mouse and man. PMID:4074636

  13. Effects of verapamil and alcohol on blood flow, melphalan uptake and cytotoxicity, in murine fibrosarcomas and human melanoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, B A; Clutterbuck, R D; Millar, J L; McElwain, T J

    1986-05-01

    Verapamil had previously been shown to increase cellular melphalan uptake and cytotoxicity in fibrosarcomas, and increased the area under the blood concentration versus time curve (AUC) for melphalan in CBA mice. Verapamil (10 mg kg-1 i.p.) had no effect on the fractional distribution of cardiac output (FDCO), measured with 86Rb-rubidium chloride, to subcutaneous fibrosarcomas. 14C-Melphalan uptake by FS13 fibrosarcomas was increased 60 min after verapamil (10 mg kg-1 i.p.), but not after lower doses which did not affect the AUC. Flunarizine (5 mg kg-1 i.p.) also had no effect on FDCO to FS13 fibrosarcomas, and tended to increase 14C-melphalan content of blood and the fibrosarcomas and to promote growth delay by melphalan. Alcohol increased FDCO to FS13 fibrosarcomas, maximally at a 1:20 dilution in saline, but had no effect on 14C-melphalan uptake or growth delay. Thus, melphalan cytotoxicity correlated with tumour melphalan uptake, and both followed changes in the AUC for melphalan but not changes in FDCO. In these murine fibrosarcomas melphalan uptake and cytotoxicity were not limited by blood flow. In subcutaneous human melanoma HX46 xenografts, verapamil had no effect on the FDCO, nor on 14C-melphalan uptake, and did not affect blood 14C-melphalan levels, suggesting absence of effects on the AUC and on cellular uptake. Alcohol did not increase the FDCO to HX46 xenografts, providing evidence for a different vascular supply. PMID:3718818

  14. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  15. Oncogenic Brain Metazoan Parasite Infection

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Angela N.; Cress, Marshall C.; Gabor, Oroszi; Ding, Qing-Qing; Miller, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple observations suggest that certain parasitic infections can be oncogenic. Among these, neurocysticercosis is associated with increased risk for gliomas and hematologic malignancies. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with colocalization of a metazoan parasite, possibly cysticercosis, and a WHO grade IV neuroepithelial tumor with exclusively neuronal differentiation by immunohistochemical stains (immunopositive for synaptophysin, neurofilament protein, and Neu-N and not for GFAP, vimentin, or S100). The colocalization and temporal relationship of these two entities suggest a causal relationship. PMID:24151568

  16. (Oncogenic action of ionizing radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons was determined for comparison with the neon ion results. As in past reports we will describe progress in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; (3) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers. 72 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Antitumor effectiveness of different amounts of electrical charge in Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ciria, HC; Quevedo, MS; Cabrales, LB; Bruzón, RP; Salas, MF; Pena, OG; González, TR; López, DS; Flores, JM

    2004-01-01

    Background In vivo studies were conducted to quantify the effectiveness of low-level direct electric current for different amounts of electrical charge and the survival rate in fibrosarcoma Sa-37 and Ehrlich tumors, also the effect of direct electric in Ehrlich tumor was evaluate through the measurements of tumor volume and the peritumoral and tumoral findings. Methods BALB/c male mice, 7–8 week old and 20–22 g weight were used. Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 cell lines, growing in BALB/c mice. Solid and subcutaneous Ehrlich and fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumors, located dorsolaterally in animals, were initiated by the inoculation of 5 × 106 and 1 × 105 viable tumor cells, respectively. For each type of tumor four groups (one control group and three treated groups) consisting of 10 mice randomly divided were formed. When the tumors reached approximately 0.5 cm3, four platinum electrodes were inserted into their bases. The electric charge delivered to the tumors was varied in the range of 5.5 to 110 C/cm3 for a constant time of 45 minutes. An additional experiment was performed in BALB/c male mice bearing Ehrlich tumor to examine from a histolological point of view the effects of direct electric current. A control group and a treated group with 77 C/cm3 (27.0 C in 0.35 cm3) and 10 mA for 45 min were formed. In this experiment when the tumor volumes reached 0.35 cm3, two anodes and two cathodes were inserted into the base perpendicular to the tumor long axis. Results Significant tumor growth delay and survival rate were achieved after electrotherapy and both were dependent on direct electric current intensity, being more marked in fibrosarcoma Sa-37 tumor. Complete regressions for fibrosarcoma Sa-37 and Ehrlich tumors were observed for electrical charges of 80 and 92 C/cm3, respectively. Histopathological and peritumoral findings in Ehrlich tumor revealed in the treated group marked tumor necrosis, vascular congestion, peritumoral neutrophil infiltration, an acute

  18. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, inflammatory fibrosarcoma, and related lesions: an historical review with differential diagnostic considerations.

    PubMed

    Coffin, C M; Dehner, L P; Meis-Kindblom, J M

    1998-05-01

    The concept of the inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) has evolved from an already perplexing pathological process, the inflammatory pseudotumor, which was initially recognized in the lung and regarded as a pseudoneoplasm, although its histological features resembled a spindle cell sarcoma. Despite the pathological findings and their apparent prognostic implications, most affected individuals regardless of the primary site have had favorable clinical outcomes. The designation of inflammatory pseudotumor came to be widely accepted, although these lesions were clearly tumors or masses that may or may not have been pseudoneoplasms. An aberrant or exaggerated response to tissue injury without an established cause has generally been favored as the pathogenesis of the inflammatory pseudotumor or IMT. Once the myofibroblast was identified and its function in tissue repair was established, this cell type was found in a variety of soft tissue lesions from nodular fasciitis to malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The myofibroblast was eventually recognized as the principal cell type in the inflammatory pseudotumor, which provided the opportunity to redesignate this tumor as IMT. Some of the clinical and pathological aspects of the IMT began to suggest the possibility that these lesions are more similar to neoplasms than a postinflammatory process. Another step in the evolution of the inflammatory pseudotumor and IMT occurred with the report of a mesenteric or retroperitoneal tumor with similar pathological features to the latter tumors but with more aggressive behavior to warrant an interpretation of malignancy as an inflammatory fibrosarcoma. The IMT and inflammatory fibrosarcoma appear to have many overlapping clinical and pathological features. These tumors are histogenetically related, and if they are separate entities, they are differentiated more by degrees than absolutes. The therapeutic approach to these tumors should relay primarily on surgical resection. Studies in

  19. Comparison of the chemotactic responsiveness of two fibrosarcoma subpopulations of differing malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Varani, J.; Delikatny, J.; Jain, N.; Ward, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    There are several points of similarity between the processes of cancer metastasis and inflammation. In both, cells circulate in the vasculature, arrest, and cross vessel walls, thereby entering the extravascular tissues. In vitro, leukocytes and some, but not all, tumor cells exhibit chemotaxis. Since the chemotactic response of leukocytes effect their transvascular migration, we propose that chemotactic responsiveness contributes to the ability of circulating tumor cells to localize in extravascular tissues. This study was done to seek a relationship between chemotactic responsiveness of tumor cells and their behavior in vivo. Two subpopulations of cells were isolated from a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma. The two cell lines were compared with regard to their biologic behavior in vivo and their chemotactic responsiveness in vitro. In vivo one subpopulation was highly malignant. An injection of 2.0 x 10(5) cells into the footpad of syngeneic mice led to the development of primary tumors in 87% of the animals and lung metastases in 61% of the animals with primary tumors. This line demonstrated chemotaxis to a factor that behaved similarly in gel filtration and showed immunologic reactivity similar to that of a previously described tumor cell chemotactic factor derived from the fifth component of complement. In contrast, an injection of the same number of cells from the second subpopulation of fibrosarcoma cells led to the development of primary tumors in only 12% of syngeneic mice, and lung metastases did not occur. Neither this subpopulation nor normal embryonic fibroblasts demonstrated chemotactic responsiveness. We postulate that the ability of tumor cells to respond to specific chemotactic stimuli may be one of the many unique properties which distinguish malignant from benign tumor cells. This is the first report documenting the chemotactic responsiveness of non-ascites tumors and fibrosarcomas. PMID:7468766

  20. Targeting Androgen Receptor/Src Complex Impairs the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Fibrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Background Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Experimental Findings: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. Conclusion This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the

  1. Inhibitory effect of delphinidin from Solanum melongena on human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 invasiveness in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nagase, H; Sasaki, K; Kito, H; Haga, A; Sato, T

    1998-04-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effect of eggplant (Solanum melongena var. marunasu) extract on human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cell invasion of reconstituted basement membrane [Matrigel (MG)]. We found that the effective component of the plant extract was delphinidin, a flavonoid pigment contained in the peel. The extract and delphinidin did not affect tumor cell adhesion to MG or haptotactic migration to MG. HT-1080 secretes matrix metalloproteinase(MMP)-2 and MMP-9, which degrade extracellular matrix as part of the invasive process. Delphinidin slightly inhibited the activity of MMPs, which may have been responsible, in part, for the inhibition of tumor cell invasiveness. PMID:9581517

  2. Interleukin-2 and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in a murine fibrosarcoma model.

    PubMed

    Ho, S P; Stebler, B; Ershler, W B

    1991-04-01

    Mice received interleukin-2 (IL-2) either before and after, or just after intravenous inoculation of syngeneic fibrosarcoma cells. Fewer pulmonary tumor colonies were observed in those animals treated with IL-2, and the best results were observed when IL-2 was administered prior to tumor inoculation. When mice were lethally irradiated and reconstituted with tumor-contaminated bone marrow, IL-2 treatment was also associated with fewer tumor lung colonies. IL-2 may prove to be a useful adjuvant therapy, particularly in the setting of autologous bone marrow transplantation when the infused marrow is contaminated with tumor cells. PMID:1873353

  3. Effect of Terminalia catappa on lipid profile in transplanted fibrosarcoma in rats.

    PubMed

    Naitik, Pandya; Prakash, Tigari; Kotresha, Dupadahalli; Rao, Nadendla Rama

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of an antitumor activity of Terminalia catappa on lipid lowering activity in transplanted fibrosarcoma in Wistar albino rats. Methylcholantherene-induced fibrosarcoma was transplanted in rats. After 30(th) day when tumor became palpable, started the treatment of ethanolic extract of Terminalia catappa by orally (250 and 500 mg/kg) for a period of 20 days. The blood sample was collected on 21(st) day, and the liver and the kidney were also removed for studying the lipid profile in serum and the tissues. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) were markedly elevated and high density lipoprotein (HDL) was markedly decreased in the serum of tumor bearing rats. Significant alterations were also observed in the lipid profile of liver and kidney. These changes were significantly reversed in Terminalia catappa (500 mg/kg) treated animals. The reversal of altered lipid levels to normal values in rats with experimentally induced tumor was showed antitumor activity by Terminalia catappa. PMID:22701253

  4. Effect of Terminalia catappa on lipid profile in transplanted fibrosarcoma in rats

    PubMed Central

    Naitik, Pandya; Prakash, Tigari; Kotresha, Dupadahalli; Rao, Nadendla Rama

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of an antitumor activity of Terminalia catappa on lipid lowering activity in transplanted fibrosarcoma in Wistar albino rats. Methylcholantherene–induced fibrosarcoma was transplanted in rats. After 30th day when tumor became palpable, started the treatment of ethanolic extract of Terminalia catappa by orally (250 and 500 mg/kg) for a period of 20 days. The blood sample was collected on 21st day, and the liver and the kidney were also removed for studying the lipid profile in serum and the tissues. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) were markedly elevated and high density lipoprotein (HDL) was markedly decreased in the serum of tumor bearing rats. Significant alterations were also observed in the lipid profile of liver and kidney. These changes were significantly reversed in Terminalia catappa (500 mg/kg) treated animals. The reversal of altered lipid levels to normal values in rats with experimentally induced tumor was showed antitumor activity by Terminalia catappa. PMID:22701253

  5. Paeonol Oxime Inhibits bFGF-Induced Angiogenesis and Reduces VEGF Levels in Fibrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ihn; Jung, Ji Hoon; Lee, Eun-Ok; Zhu, Shudong; Chen, Chang-Yan; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously reported the anti-angiogenic activity of paeonol isolated from Moutan Cortex. In the present study, we investigated the negative effect of paeonol oxime (PO, a paeonol derivative) on basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-mediated angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) (including tumor angiogenesis) and pro-survival activity in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cell line. Methodology/Principal Findings We showed that PO (IC50  = 17.3 µg/ml) significantly inhibited bFGF-induced cell proliferation, which was achieved with higher concentrations of paeonol (IC50 over 200 µg). The treatment with PO blocked bFGF-stimulated migration and in vitro capillary differentiation (tube formation) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, PO was able to disrupt neovascularization in vivo. Interestingly, PO (25 µg/ml) decreased the cell viability of HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells but not that of HUVECs. The treatment with PO at 12.5 µg/ml reduced the levels of phosphorylated AKT and VEGF expression (intracellular and extracelluar) in HT-1080 cells. Consistently, immunefluorescence imaging analysis revealed that PO treatment attenuated AKT phosphorylation in HT-1080 cells. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results suggest that PO inhibits bFGF-induced angiogenesis in HUVECs and decreased the levels of PI3K, phospho-AKT and VEGF in HT-1080 cells. PMID:20808805

  6. Skull sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    XU, JINGJING; WANG, JIAWEI; ZHANG, MINMING; LI, BAIZHOU

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is an unusual variant of fibrosarcoma that was previously considered to be a low-grade tumor with an indolent course. The tumor occurs most commonly in the soft tissue of the limb, trunk, head and neck, and occasionally in the bone and visceral organs. The skull is a rare primary site for SEF, with only 3 cases reported to date. The current study reports a case of SEF occurring in the occipital bone of a 24-year-old man, who lacked neurological symptoms. Imaging revealed a large mass emanating from the occipital bone and involving the superior sagittal sinus, torcular herophili and adjacent brain tissue. Histological and immunohistochemical characteristics confirmed the diagnosis of SEF. The patient experienced local recurrence and distant metastasis at 10 and 15 months, respectively, subsequent to the resection of the primary mass. The current case and review of the literature suggest that skull SEF may behave clinically as an aggressive malignant sarcoma. Radiological findings indicated the biological and histopathological characteristics of the tumor. Thus, its clinical behavior and certain imaging features may suggest this diagnosis. PMID:27123127

  7. Tuftsin Augments Antitumor Efficacy of Liposomized Etoposide against Fibrosarcoma in Swiss Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif; Khan, Aijaz A; Dwivedi, Varun; Ahmad, Manzoor G; Hakeem, Seema; Owais, Mohammad

    2007-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are generally plagued by toxic manifestations at doses necessary for control of various forms of cancer. Incorporating such drugs into liposomes not only reduces toxicity but also enhances the therapeutic index. Some antioxidants and potent immunomodulators have also been shown to impart significant antitumor activity presumably by nonspecific activation of the host immune system. In the present study, we evaluated augmentation of the antitumor activity of etoposide (ETP) by the immunomodulator tuftsin in Swiss albino mice with fibrosarcoma. The efficacies of the free form of ETP, liposomized ETP (Lip-ETP), and tuftsin-bearing liposomized ETP (Tuft-Lip-ETP) formulations were evaluated on the basis of tumor regression, effect on expression level of p53wt and p53mut, and survival of the treated animals. Tuft-Lip-ETP, when administered at a dosage of 10 mg/kg body weight/day for five days, significantly reduced tumor volume, delayed tumor growth, and also up-regulated the expression of p53wt. In contrast, although Lip-ETP delayed tumor growth, it did not decrease tumor size. The results of the present study suggest that tuftsin incorporation in drug-loaded liposomes is a promising treatment strategy for various forms of cancers, including fibrosarcoma. PMID:17622310

  8. Oncogenic Activities of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Münger, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Infectious etiologies for certain human cancers have long been suggested by epidemiological studies and studies with animals. Important support for this concept came from the discovery by Harald zur Hausen’s group that human cervical carcinoma almost universally contains certain “high-risk” human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Over the years, much has been learned about the carcinogenic activities of high-risk HPVs. These studies have revealed that two viral proteins, E6 and E7, that are consistently expressed in HPV-associated carcinomas, are necessary for induction and maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Hence, HPV-associated tumors are unique amongst human solid tumors in that they are universally caused by exposure to the same, molecularly defined oncogenic agents, and the molecular signal transduction pathways subverted by these viral transforming agents are frequently disrupted in other, non-virus associated human cancers. PMID:19540281

  9. No change in mRNA expression of immune-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells challenged with Theileria annulata in Murrah buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Manjit; Kumar, Amod; Bhushan, Bharat; Ghosh, Srikant; Saravanan, B C; Sulabh, Sourabh; Parida, Subhashree; Gaur, Gyanendra Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) act as carrier to Theileria annulata and show less clinical sign of tropical theileriosis as compared to indigenous and exotic cattle. Differential expression of immune-related genes such as major histocompatibility complex, class II, DQ alpha 1 (MHC-DQα), signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA), prion protein (PRNP), Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10), c-musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (cMAF) and V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B (MAFB) genes influence host resistance to this disease in exotic, crossbred and indigenous cattle. In the present study we examined the differential mRNA expression of the abovesaid immune-related genes in response to T. annulata infection in buffaloes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) harvested from blood samples of buffaloes were challenged with ground-up tick supernatant carrying T. annulata sporozoites in vitro. After 48h of in vitro challenge qPCR was employed to measure the relative mRNA expression of MHC-DQα, SIRPA, PRNP, TLR10, cMAF and MAFB genes in infected and control PBMCs. In the current study, the selected genes showed no change in mRNA expression after T.annulata infection which indicates that they have little role in providing host resistance to theileriosis in buffaloes. PMID:26997138

  10. Targeting oncogenic Ras signaling in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Ashley F.; Braun, Benjamin S.

    2012-01-01

    Ras proteins are critical nodes in cellular signaling that integrate inputs from activated cell surface receptors and other stimuli to modulate cell fate through a complex network of effector pathways. Oncogenic RAS mutations are found in ∼ 25% of human cancers and are highly prevalent in hematopoietic malignancies. Because of their structural and biochemical properties, oncogenic Ras proteins are exceedingly difficult targets for rational drug discovery, and no mechanism-based therapies exist for cancers with RAS mutations. This article reviews the properties of normal and oncogenic Ras proteins, the prevalence and likely pathogenic role of NRAS, KRAS, and NF1 mutations in hematopoietic malignancies, relevant animal models of these cancers, and implications for drug discovery. Because hematologic malignancies are experimentally tractable, they are especially valuable platforms for addressing the fundamental question of how to reverse the adverse biochemical output of oncogenic Ras in cancer. PMID:22898602

  11. The radiosensitivity of a murine fibrosarcoma as measured by three cell survival assays.

    PubMed

    Rice, L; Urano, M; Suit, H D

    1980-04-01

    The radiation sensitivity of a weakly immunogenic spontaneous fibrosarcoma of the C3Hf/Sed mouse (designated FSa-II) was assessed by three in vivo cell survival methods: end-point dilution (TD50) assay, lung colony (LC) assay, and agar diffusion chamber (ADC) assay. The hypoxic fraction of this tumour was also determined by the ADC method. Although there was a good agreement of the cell survival data between the ADC and LC methods, the TD50 method yielded a considerably less steep cell survival curve. Beneficial aspects and limitations of each assay are discussed. In addition, the use of the ADC method for the growth of xenogeneic cell lines and a preliminary experiment with human tumour cells in non-immunosuppressed hosts suggest that this method may be a valuable adjunct for studying the growth and therapeutic responses of human tumour cells. PMID:6932931

  12. Unusual case of infantile fibrosarcoma evaluated on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bedmutha, Akshay; Singh, Natasha; Shivdasani, Divya; Gupta, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma (IFS) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma originating from extremities and occasionally from axial soft tissue. The prognosis is good with favorable long-term survival. It is rarely metastasizing tumor, the chances being lesser with IFS originating from extremities. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) as a treatment regime further reduces the chances of local relapse and distant metastasis. The organs commonly affected in metastatic IFS are lungs and lymph nodes. We report an unusual case of an IFS originating from extremity, which received NACT, yet presented with an early metastatic disease involving soft tissues and sparing lungs and lymph nodes, as demonstrated on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. PMID:27385891

  13. Unusual case of infantile fibrosarcoma evaluated on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bedmutha, Akshay; Singh, Natasha; Shivdasani, Divya; Gupta, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma (IFS) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma originating from extremities and occasionally from axial soft tissue. The prognosis is good with favorable long-term survival. It is rarely metastasizing tumor, the chances being lesser with IFS originating from extremities. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) as a treatment regime further reduces the chances of local relapse and distant metastasis. The organs commonly affected in metastatic IFS are lungs and lymph nodes. We report an unusual case of an IFS originating from extremity, which received NACT, yet presented with an early metastatic disease involving soft tissues and sparing lungs and lymph nodes, as demonstrated on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. PMID:27385891

  14. Lameness and pleural effusion associated with an aggressive fibrosarcoma in a horse.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, J S; Geoly, F J; Berry, C R; Breuhaus, B A

    1997-05-01

    An 8-year-old Thoroughbred gelding was admitted for evaluation of chronic lameness of the left scapulohumeral joint of 3 months' duration. Radiography revealed a radiolucent lesion with the proximal portion of the humerus in the area of the metaphysis. Scintigraphy confirmed radiographic findings, with an increased uptake of technetium Tc 99m medronate in the proximal portion of the left humerus. A preliminary diagnosis of humeral fracture was made. Two weeks later, the horse was readmitted for clinical signs of respiratory distress. Radiographic and ultrasonographic evaluation revealed masses within the thoracic and abdominal cavities. The diagnosis was changed to neoplasm with multiple metastases. Because of the unfavorable prognosis, the horse was euthanatized. Necropsy findings confirmed an aggressive neoplasm. Special histochemical stains, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy were required to characterize the neoplasm as an anaplastic fibrosarcoma. Findings in this horse illustrate the importance of considering neoplasia, resulting in bone lesions, as a possible cause of chronic lameness in horses. PMID:9143540

  15. The epsin family of endocytic adaptors promotes fibrosarcoma migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Coon, Brian G; Burgner, John; Camonis, Jacques H; Aguilar, R Claudio

    2010-10-22

    Abnormalities in the process of endocytosis are classically linked to malignant transformation through the deficient down-regulation of signaling receptors. The present study describes a non-classical mechanism that does not require internalization by which endocytic proteins affect cell migration and basement membrane invasion. Specifically, we found that the endocytic adaptor epsin binds and regulates the biological properties of the signaling molecule RalBP1 (Ral-binding protein 1). Epsin interacted with the N terminus of RalBP1 via its characteristic epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain. A combination of siRNA-mediated knock-down and transfection of siRNA-resistant constructs in fibrosarcoma cells demonstrated that impairment of the epsin-RalBP1 interaction led to cell migration and basement membrane invasion defects. We found the ENTH domain was necessary and sufficient to sustain normal cell migration and invasion. Because all the epsin endocytic motifs reside in the C-terminal part of the molecule, these results suggest that this novel regulatory circuit does not require endocytosis. In addition, cells depleted of epsin-RalBP1 complex displayed deficient activation of Rac1 and Arf6 suggesting a signaling function for this novel interaction. Further, overexpression of either epsin or RalBP1 enhanced migration and invasion of fibrosarcoma cells. Collectively, our results indicate that epsin regulates RalBP1 function in Rac1- and Arf6-dependent pathways to ultimately affect cell migration and invasion. We propose that the observed up-regulation of both epsin and RalBP1 in certain cancers contributes to their invasive characteristics. PMID:20709745

  16. The Epsin Family of Endocytic Adaptors Promotes Fibrosarcoma Migration and Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Brian G.; Burgner, John; Camonis, Jacques H.; Aguilar, R. Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in the process of endocytosis are classically linked to malignant transformation through the deficient down-regulation of signaling receptors. The present study describes a non-classical mechanism that does not require internalization by which endocytic proteins affect cell migration and basement membrane invasion. Specifically, we found that the endocytic adaptor epsin binds and regulates the biological properties of the signaling molecule RalBP1 (Ral-binding protein 1). Epsin interacted with the N terminus of RalBP1 via its characteristic epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain. A combination of siRNA-mediated knock-down and transfection of siRNA-resistant constructs in fibrosarcoma cells demonstrated that impairment of the epsin-RalBP1 interaction led to cell migration and basement membrane invasion defects. We found the ENTH domain was necessary and sufficient to sustain normal cell migration and invasion. Because all the epsin endocytic motifs reside in the C-terminal part of the molecule, these results suggest that this novel regulatory circuit does not require endocytosis. In addition, cells depleted of epsin-RalBP1 complex displayed deficient activation of Rac1 and Arf6 suggesting a signaling function for this novel interaction. Further, overexpression of either epsin or RalBP1 enhanced migration and invasion of fibrosarcoma cells. Collectively, our results indicate that epsin regulates RalBP1 function in Rac1- and Arf6-dependent pathways to ultimately affect cell migration and invasion. We propose that the observed up-regulation of both epsin and RalBP1 in certain cancers contributes to their invasive characteristics. PMID:20709745

  17. Elastin peptides regulate HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cell migration and invasion through an Hsp90-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Donet, M; Brassart-Pasco, S; Salesse, S; Maquart, F-X; Brassart, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: The elastin-derived peptides (EDPs) exert protumoural activities by potentiating the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and the plasminogen–plasmin activating system. In the present paper, we studied heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) involvement in this mechanism. Methods: HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cell migration and invasion were studied in artificial wound assay and modified Boyden chamber assay, respectively. Heat-shock protein 90 was studied by western blot and immunofluorescence. Matrix metalloproteinase–2 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) were studied by gelatin±plasminogen zymography and immunofluorescence. Heat-shock protein 90 partners were studied by immunoprecipitation. Messenger RNA expression was studied using real-time PCR. Small interfering RNAs were used to confirm the essential role of Hsp90. Results: We showed that kappa-elastin and VGVAPG elastin hexapeptide stimulated Hsp90, pro-MMP-2 and uPA secretion within 6 h, whereas AGVPGLGVG and GRKRK peptides had no effect. No increase of mRNA level was observed. Heat-shock protein 90-specific inhibitors inhibit EDP-stimulated HT-1080 cell-invasive capacity and restrained EDP-stimulated pro-MMP-2 and uPA secretions. The inhibitory effect was reproduced by using Hsp90-blocking antibody or Hsp90 knockdown by siRNA. Heat-shock protein 90 interacted with and stabilised uPA and pro-MMP-2 in conditioned culture media of HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our results demonstrate that EDPs exert protumoural activities through an Hsp90-dependent mechanism involving pro-MMP-2 and uPA. PMID:24874477

  18. PPARγ1 phosphorylation enhances proliferation and drug resistance in human fibrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Xiaojuan; Shu, Yuxin; Niu, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Haochen; Lu, Yan; Shen, Pingping

    2014-03-10

    Post-translational regulation plays a critical role in the control of cell growth and proliferation. The phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is the most important post-translational modification. The function of PPARγ phosphorylation has been studied extensively in the past. However, the relationship between phosphorylated PPARγ1 and tumors remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of PPARγ1 phosphorylation in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line. Using the nonphosphorylation (Ser84 to alanine, S84A) and phosphorylation (Ser84 to aspartic acid, S84D) mutant of PPARγ1, the results suggested that phosphorylation attenuated PPARγ1 transcriptional activity. Meanwhile, we demonstrated that phosphorylated PPARγ1 promoted HT1080 cell proliferation and this effect was dependent on the regulation of cell cycle arrest. The mRNA levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} descended in PPARγ1{sup S84D} stable HT1080 cell, whereas the expression of p18{sup INK4C} was not changed. Moreover, compared to the PPARγ1{sup S84A}, PPARγ1{sup S84D} up-regulated the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin A. Finally, PPARγ1 phosphorylation reduced sensitivity to agonist rosiglitazone and increased resistance to anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in HT1080 cell. Our findings establish PPARγ1 phosphorylation as a critical event in human fibrosarcoma growth. These findings raise the possibility that chemical compounds that prevent the phosphorylation of PPARγ1 could act as anticancer drugs. - Highlights: • Phosphorylation attenuates PPARγ1 transcriptional activity. • Phosphorylated PPARγ1 promotes HT1080 cells proliferation. • PPARγ1 phosphorylation regulates cell cycle by mediating expression of cell cycle regulators. • PPARγ1 phosphorylation reduces sensitivity to agonist and anticancer drug. • Our findings establish PPARγ1 phosphorylation as a critical event in HT1080

  19. RAS oncogenes: weaving a tumorigenic web

    PubMed Central

    Pylayeva-Gupta, Yuliya; Grabocka, Elda; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    RAS proteins are essential components of signalling pathways that emanate from cell surface receptors. Oncogenic activation of these proteins owing to missense mutations is frequently detected in several types of cancer. A wealth of biochemical and genetic studies indicates that RAS proteins control a complex molecular circuitry that consists of a wide array of interconnecting pathways. In this Review, we describe how RAS oncogenes exploit their extensive signalling reach to affect multiple cellular processes that drive tumorigenesis. PMID:21993244

  20. Oncogene Overdose: Too Much of a Bad Thing for Oncogene-Addicted Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Amit Dipak; Rajan, Soumya S.; Groysman, Matthew J.; Pongtornpipat, Praechompoo; Schatz, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to targeted inhibitors remains a major, and inevitable, obstacle in the treatment of oncogene-addicted cancers. Newer-generation inhibitors may help overcome resistance mutations, and inhibitor combinations can target parallel pathways, but durable benefit to patients remains elusive in most clinical scenarios. Now, recent studies suggest a third approach may be available in some cases—exploitation of oncogene overexpression that may arise to promote resistance. Here, we discuss the importance of maintaining oncogenic signaling at “just-right” levels in cells, with too much signaling, or oncogene overdose, being potentially as detrimental as too little. This is highlighted in particular by recent studies of mutant-BRAF in melanoma and the fusion kinase nucleophosmin–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM–ALK) in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Oncogene overdose may be exploitable to prolong tumor control through intermittent dosing in some cases, and studies of acute lymphoid leukemias suggest that it may be specifically pharmacologically inducible. PMID:26688666

  1. Characterization of a novel fusion gene EML4-NTRK3 in a case of recurrent congenital fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum-Dvir, Sarah; Glade Bender, Julia L.; Church, Alanna J.; Janeway, Katherine A.; Harris, Marian H.; Mansukhani, Mahesh M.; Nagy, Peter L.; Andrews, Stuart J.; Murty, Vundavalli V.; Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela; Connolly, Eileen P.; Kung, Andrew L.; Dela Cruz, Filemon S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe the clinical course of a recurrent case of congenital fibrosarcoma diagnosed in a 9-mo-old boy with a history of hemimelia. Following complete surgical resection of the primary tumor, the patient subsequently presented with bulky bilateral pulmonary metastases 6 mo following surgery. Molecular characterization of the tumor revealed the absence of the prototypical ETV6-NTRK3 translocation. However, tumor characterization incorporating cytogenetic, array comparative genomic hybridization, and RNA sequencing analyses, revealed a somatic t(2;15)(2p21;15q25) translocation resulting in the novel fusion of EML4 with NTRK3. Cloning and expression of EML4-NTRK3 in murine fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells revealed a potent tumorigenic phenotype as assessed in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate that multiple fusion partners targeting NTRK3 can contribute to the development of congenital fibrosarcoma. PMID:27148571

  2. Characterization of a novel fusion gene EML4-NTRK3 in a case of recurrent congenital fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum-Dvir, Sarah; Glade Bender, Julia L; Church, Alanna J; Janeway, Katherine A; Harris, Marian H; Mansukhani, Mahesh M; Nagy, Peter L; Andrews, Stuart J; Murty, Vundavalli V; Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela; Connolly, Eileen P; Kung, Andrew L; Dela Cruz, Filemon S

    2015-10-01

    We describe the clinical course of a recurrent case of congenital fibrosarcoma diagnosed in a 9-mo-old boy with a history of hemimelia. Following complete surgical resection of the primary tumor, the patient subsequently presented with bulky bilateral pulmonary metastases 6 mo following surgery. Molecular characterization of the tumor revealed the absence of the prototypical ETV6-NTRK3 translocation. However, tumor characterization incorporating cytogenetic, array comparative genomic hybridization, and RNA sequencing analyses, revealed a somatic t(2;15)(2p21;15q25) translocation resulting in the novel fusion of EML4 with NTRK3. Cloning and expression of EML4-NTRK3 in murine fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells revealed a potent tumorigenic phenotype as assessed in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate that multiple fusion partners targeting NTRK3 can contribute to the development of congenital fibrosarcoma. PMID:27148571

  3. Epithelial Dysplasia in Ameloblastic Fibrosarcoma Arising from Recurrent Ameloblastic Fibroma in a 26-Year-Old Iranian Man

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenifar, Zhaleh; Behrad, Samira; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 26 Final Diagnosis: Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma Symptoms: Swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Hemimandibulectomy Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Rare disease Background: Ameloblastic fibrosarcoma (AFS) is a rare malignant odontogenic tumor with a mesenchymal component, showing sarcomatous features and epithelial nests resembling ameloblastic fibroma (AF). Case Report: We report a case of AFS showing epithelial dysplasia arising in a recurrent AF in the left mandible after 3 years in a 26-year-old man, which is regarded as an uncommon histopathologic finding in AFS. We also emphasize the comprehensive clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic evaluation, and immunohistochemical staining of this patient. Conclusions: We conclude that it is important to consider malignancy alternations in the epithelial component of AFS, along with that of the mesenchymal component, to provide a proper diagnosis and treatment of recurrent AF. PMID:26289384

  4. The RET oncogene in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Jason D; Zeiger, Martha A

    2015-07-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common form of thyroid cancer, accounting for greater than 80% of cases. Surgical resection, with or without postoperative radioiodine therapy, remains the standard of care for patients with PTC, and the prognosis is generally excellent with appropriate treatment. Despite this, significant numbers of patients will not respond to maximal surgical and medical therapy and ultimately will die from the disease. This mortality reflects an incomplete understanding of the oncogenic mechanisms that initiate, drive, and promote PTC. Nonetheless, significant insights into the pathologic subcellular events underlying PTC have been discovered over the last 2 decades, and this remains an area of significant research interest. Chromosomal rearrangements resulting in the expression of fusion proteins that involve the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene were the first oncogenic events to be identified in PTC. Members of this fusion protein family (the RET/PTC family) appear to play an oncogenic role in approximately 20% of PTCs. Herein, the authors review the current understanding of the clinicopathologic role of RET/PTC fusion proteins in PTC development and progression and the molecular mechanisms by which RET/PTCs exert their oncogenic effects on the thyroid epithelium. PMID:25731779

  5. Epigenetic Pathways of Oncogenic Viruses: Therapeutic Promises.

    PubMed

    El-Araby, Amr M; Fouad, Abdelrahman A; Hanbal, Amr M; Abdelwahab, Sara M; Qassem, Omar M; El-Araby, Moustafa E

    2016-02-01

    Cancerous transformation comprises different events that are both genetic and epigenetic. The ultimate goal for such events is to maintain cell survival and proliferation. This transformation occurs as a consequence of different features such as environmental and genetic factors, as well as some types of infection. Many viral infections are considered to be causative agents of a number of different malignancies. To convert normal cells into cancerous cells, oncogenic viruses must function at the epigenetic level to communicate with their host cells. Oncogenic viruses encode certain epigenetic factors that lead to the immortality and proliferation of infected cells. The epigenetic effectors produced by oncogenic viruses constitute appealing targets to prevent and treat malignant diseases caused by these viruses. In this review, we highlight the importance of epigenetic reprogramming for virus-induced oncogenesis, with special emphasis on viral epigenetic oncoproteins as therapeutic targets. The discovery of molecular components that target epigenetic pathways, especially viral factors, is also discussed. PMID:26754591

  6. Metabolic alterations accompanying oncogene-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Aird, Katherine M; Zhang, Rugang

    2014-01-01

    Senescence is defined as a stable cell growth arrest. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) occurs in normal primary human cells after activation of an oncogene in the absence of other cooperating oncogenic stimuli. OIS is therefore considered a bona fide tumor suppression mechanism in vivo. Indeed, overcoming OIS-associated stable cell growth arrest can lead to tumorigenesis. Although cells that have undergone OIS do not replicate their DNA, they remain metabolically active. A number of recent studies report significant changes in cellular metabolism during OIS, including alterations in nucleotide, glucose, and mitochondrial metabolism and autophagy. These alterations may be necessary for stable senescence-associated cell growth arrest, and overcoming these shifts in metabolism may lead to tumorigenesis. This review highlights what is currently known about alterations in cellular metabolism during OIS and the implication of OIS-associated metabolic changes in cellular transformation and the development of cancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:27308349

  7. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of TRAIL and taurolidine use on human fibrosarcoma xenografts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    HARATI, KAMRAN; EMMELMANN, SABINE; BEHR, BJÖRN; GOERTZ, OLE; HIRSCH, TOBIAS; KAPALSCHINSKI, NICOLAI; KOLBENSCHLAG, JONAS; STRICKER, INGO; TANNAPFEL, ANDREA; LEHNHARDT, MARCUS; DAIGELER, ADRIEN

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosarcomas are rare malignant soft tissue tumours that exhibit a poor response to current therapeutic regimens. Previously, tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and taurolidine were observed to induce apoptosis synergistically in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells in vitro. Consequently, the present study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of TRAIL in combination with taurolidine on the local growth of fibrosarcoma xenografts in vivo. HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells were inoculated subcutaneously into both flanks of 49 athymic nude mice in order to establish tumour xenografts. TRAIL and taurolidine were applied intraperitoneally at various single and cumulative treatment doses. After 12 days, the experiment was terminated and surviving animals were euthanised. Tumour progression was determined during and following treatment. To assess the potential toxic effects of the two compounds, the organs (lung, liver, kidney and heart) of all animals were examined histologically. The results revealed that combined treatment with TRAIL and taurolidine significantly inhibited the growth of HT1080 xenografts, whereas untreated animals had steadily increasing tumours. The most effective combination was TRAIL at 2 µg per application (cumulative dose, 16 µg) and taurolidine at 30/15 mg per application (cumulative dose, 180 mg), reducing the mean size of implanted xenografts to 10.9 mm2 following treatment (vs. 48.9 mm2 in the control group; P=0.0100). Despite distinct tumour mass reduction, the rate of mortality was significantly increased in animals treated with TRAIL and taurolidine in a taurolidine dose-dependent manner; however, histological examinations of relevant organs revealed no evidence of systemic toxicity (mean survival time, 7.9 days in the treated groups vs. 12 days in the control group; P<0.0010). In summary, whilst the combination of TRAIL and taurolidine synergistically inhibited the growth of fibrosarcoma xenografts in vivo, it was

  8. Phase-specific cytotoxicity in vivo of hydroxyurea on murine fibrosarcoma pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Grdina, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects in vivo of hydroxyurea (HU) on murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary tumours were determined. Tumour cells from 13-day-old nodules were made into suspension and separated on the basis of cell size by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine the cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the degree of contamination by normal diploid cells in each of the tumour-cell populations. HU cytotoxicity was tested by administering both a single 1 mg/g i.p. dose into mice that had been injected i.v. 20 min earlier with known numbers of synchronized viable FSa cells, and i.p. doses of 1 mg/g each into mice bearing 13-day-old pulmonary nodules. In the latter experiments, animals were killed 1 h after the last dose, and the tumour nodules were excised and made into a single-cell suspension and elutriated. Known numbers of cells from each fraction were injected into recipient mice to determine survival. In both sets of experiments, cell killing by HU correlated with the percentage of S-phase cells. The treatment of 13-day-old pulmonary nodules with 3 doses of HU also depleted the (G2+M) phase tumour cells and increased the heterogeneity between tumour subpopulations, as determined by FMF analysis. PMID:7073937

  9. Heparin effect on DNA synthesis in a murine fibrosarcoma cell line: influence of anionic density

    SciTech Connect

    Piepkorn, M.W.; Daynes, R.A.

    1983-09-01

    The effects of heparin subfractions on DNA synthesis in a murine cutaneous fibrosarcoma cell line were examined. Porcine mucosal heparin was preparatively fractionated for anionic charge density by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography and for molecular weight by Sephadex G-100 filtration. The cell line was plated from confluent monolayer cultures and grown in medium and fetal bovine serum, with or without a heparin fraction at a final concentration of 10 micrograms/ml. At intervals thereafter, the cells were pulsed with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. A low-charge density heparin fraction stimulated (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation (cpm/mg protein and cpm/cell) during the first 3 days of growth compared to control values without added heparin, whereas a high-charge density heparin fraction had little of this effect (186 +/- 35% of control vs. 101 +/- 14%, respectively; P less than .05). The augmentation of DNA synthesis observed with the low-charge density fraction correlated with increased proportions of cells in S and G2 phases compared with those of the controls, as determined by flow cytofluorometry. Low- and high-molecular-weight heparin fractions did not significantly alter DNA synthesis. Heparin subfractions are thus heterogeneous with respect to their effect on cellular DNA synthesis in this tumor line.

  10. [Establishment and characterization of human ovarian fibrosarcoma cell line and its sensitivity to anticancer agents].

    PubMed

    Kiyozuka, Y; Nishimura, H; Iwanaga, S; Yakushiji, M; Ito, K; Nakano, S; Tamori, N; Adachi, S; Noda, T; Imai, S

    1992-04-01

    We succeeded in establishing a cell line (KEN-3) for subculture from a fibrosarcoma which originated in the ovary in a girl aged 17 years. Its characteristics and sensitivity to anticancer agents are reported in this paper. 1. Characteristics of established cell line. Lined cells consist of multinucleated giant cells mixed among many spindle-shaped cells. They grow in small colonies and have none of the pavement-like arrangement characteristic of epithelial tumor cells. The number of chromosomes ranged from 45 to 128 (mode: pseudo-triploidy region, 65). The doubling time, cellular density and plating efficiency were 76.9 hours, 5.4 x 10(5)/cm2 and 30.2%, respectively. Concerning tumor markers, CEA and sialyl SSEA-1 were only produced in small quantities. Subculture was possible subcutaneously in the nude mouse with no capacity for the production of ascites. 2. Susceptibility to anticancer agents and GP170 expression. The in vitro susceptibility to about 12 types of anticancer agents was investigated with the MTT assay. IC50/PPC was shown to be less than 1 for Adriamycin only. The sensitivity to CDDP (IC50/PPC: 4.8) was low, and no sensitivity was observed at all to DTIC, which is used frequently for mesenchymal tumors. GP170 (mdr-1 products) was positive in established cells in immunohistochemical stain. PMID:1351514

  11. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  12. A case of interscapular fibrosarcoma in a dwarf rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Petterino, Claudio; Modesto, Paola; Strata, Daniela; Vascellari, Marta; Mutinelli, Franco; Ferrari, Angelo; Ratto, Alessandra

    2009-11-01

    A 1-year-old, intact, male dwarf rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was vaccinated against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease in February 1999, and a localized reaction appeared in the same anatomic site within a few days. No regression was observed after subcutaneous antibiotic treatment. The rabbit was kept under observation, and the swelling apparently disappeared in 3 months. The owner then decided to avoid any further subcutaneous drug administration. The referring veterinarian examined the animal on July 2006 for the sudden appearance of a nodular, 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm x 2.0 cm, subcutaneous mass located over the interscapular space. Fine-needle aspiration was performed, and a population of neoplastic spindle cells, rare pleomorphic multinucleated cells, and rare leukocytes were observed. The mass was surgically removed, fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin, and routinely processed for histologic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical diagnostic investigation. The neoplastic tissue exhibited fascicles composed of malignant spindle-shaped cells with elongated to oval hyperchromatic nuclei and scant cytoplasm. Occasional multinucleated cells were also observed. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for vimentin but did not stain for smooth muscle actin, desmin, myoglobin, and cytokeratins (AE1/AE3). Moreover, the histochemical stain for aluminum was positive. The diagnosis was fibrosarcoma based on morphologic and immunohistochemical results. The histologic features of this neoplasm were remarkably similar to feline injection-site sarcoma. PMID:19901300

  13. Mechanistic investigation of toxicity of chromium oxide nanoparticles in murine fibrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Alkahtani, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles (Cr2O3NPs) are widely used in polymers and paints. In the present study, we aimed to determine the toxicity of Cr2O3NPs in murine fibrosarcoma (L929) cells. The cytotoxicity of Cr2O3NPs was measured by MTT and neutral red uptake assays; Cr2O3NPs had significant cytotoxic effects on L929 cells. Enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in L929 cells after exposure to Cr2O3NPs. Cr2O3NPs produced caspase-3, indicating that exposure to Cr2O3NPs induced apoptosis. After exposure to Cr2O3NPs, the cellular glutathione level decreased and lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, and catalase increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By using single-cell gel tests, we also observed increased DNA damage in a Cr2O3NP exposure-duration- and dose-dependent fashion. Cell toxicity and DNA damage may be useful biomarkers for determining the safety of Cr2O3NPs in human and animal health. PMID:27099490

  14. Pycnogenol (PYC) induces apoptosis in human fibrosarcoma (HFS) cells under metal-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeon Sun; Kim, Young Gon

    2011-01-01

    Pycnogenol (PYC), polyphenolic compounds with antioxidant activity, acted as a prooxidant. PYC caused oxidative stress in human fibrosarcoma cells (HFS) when administered following pretreatment with iron chloride. The generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in DNA and resulted in more apoptosis in HFS cells than in the human fibroblastoma (HFB) cells. DNA damage and cellular viability at different PYC concentrations were closely consistent with cell growth, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and assays of two major antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Although the presence of PYC induced total SOD and catalase activities under oxidative stress in dose dependent fashion, more apoptotic cells were induced in HFS cells with increased [8-OHdG] than in HFB cells. The results suggest that PYC selectively induced cell death in HFS cells. This further confirmed that PYC-induced apoptosis is mediated primarily through the activation of caspase-3 apoptotic marker in HFS cells but not in HFB cells. We conclude that PYC would behave as either antioxidant or prooxidant dependant upon the cellular types. PMID:22754951

  15. Glutathione replenishing potential of CeO₂ nanoparticles in human breast and fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Khan, M A Majeed; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2015-09-01

    Recently, cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) has been reported for multi-enzyme mimetic activities like that of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Here, we report glutathione (GSH) replenishing response by CeO2 NPs in human breast (MCF-7) and fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells. CeO2 NPs were found to be mostly cuboidal in shape with average diameter of 25 nm. Effects on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and mitochondrial outer membrane potential (MOMP) suggested CeO2 NPs to be reasonably non-cytotoxic. Data on membrane damage and lipid peroxidation correlated well with the cell viability results suggesting NPs of CeO2 to be biocompatible. Interestingly, CeO2 NPs significantly increased intracellular GSH in cells challenged with oxidants. Replenishment of depleted GSH in oxidatively challenged cells was comparable with the GSH restoring potential of known antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a precursor of GSH. Like NAC, CeO2 NPs significantly replenished depleted GSH in both cell types challenged with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs. Moreover, CeO2 NPs treated cells were significantly protected from cytotoxicity caused by H2O2 and ZnO NPs. Our findings, therefore, suggest CeO2 NPs as a potential antioxidant rather than a toxic material. PMID:25965428

  16. Mechanistic investigation of toxicity of chromium oxide nanoparticles in murine fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Alkahtani, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles (Cr2O3NPs) are widely used in polymers and paints. In the present study, we aimed to determine the toxicity of Cr2O3NPs in murine fibrosarcoma (L929) cells. The cytotoxicity of Cr2O3NPs was measured by MTT and neutral red uptake assays; Cr2O3NPs had significant cytotoxic effects on L929 cells. Enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in L929 cells after exposure to Cr2O3NPs. Cr2O3NPs produced caspase-3, indicating that exposure to Cr2O3NPs induced apoptosis. After exposure to Cr2O3NPs, the cellular glutathione level decreased and lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, and catalase increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By using single-cell gel tests, we also observed increased DNA damage in a Cr2O3NP exposure-duration- and dose-dependent fashion. Cell toxicity and DNA damage may be useful biomarkers for determining the safety of Cr2O3NPs in human and animal health. PMID:27099490

  17. Inhibitory effect of aminoethyl-chitooligosaccharides on invasion of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sugyeong; Ngo, Dai-Nghiep; Kim, Moon-Moo

    2016-07-01

    Chitooligosaccharides (COS) have been reported to show a variety of biological efficacies such as anti-bacterial activity, anti-tumor activity and immune activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of aminoethyl-chitooligosaccharides (AE-COS) synthesized from COS that were substituted hydroxyl groups with aminoethyl group at C-6 position on cell invasion of human fibrosarcoma cells. First of all, the effect of AE-COS on cell viability was observed using MTT assay. The cytotoxicity of AE-COS was increased in a dose dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of AE-COS on the activity and expression level of MMP-2 and MMP-9 related to invasion of cancer cells were examined using gelatin zymography and western blot. It was found that AE-COS above 20μg/ml showed the inhibitory effect on the activity and expression of MMP-9. Furthermore, AE-COS at 20μg/ml reduced the expression level of p50, a part of NF-κB, compared with phorbol-12- myristate-13- acetate (PMA) group. The available data let us hypothesize that AE-COS could provide chemoprevention as an inhibitor against cell invasion associated with metastasis. PMID:27348727

  18. Malignant progression of a mouse fibrosarcoma by host cells reactive to a foreign body (gelatin sponge).

    PubMed Central

    Okada, F.; Hosokawa, M.; Hamada, J. I.; Hasegawa, J.; Kato, M.; Mizutani, M.; Ren, J.; Takeichi, N.; Kobayashi, H.

    1992-01-01

    The QR regressor tumour (QR-32), a fibrosarcoma which is unable to grow progressively in normal syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, was able to grow progressively in 13 out of 22 mice (59%) when it was subcutaneously coimplanted with gelatin sponge. We established four culture tumour lines from the resultant tumours (QRsP tumour lines). These QRsP tumour lines were able to grow progressively in mice even in the absence of gelatin sponge. The ability of QRsP tumour cells to colonise the lungs after intravenous injection and to produce high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) during in vitro cell culture was much greater than that of parent QR-32 cells. These biological characteristics of QR-32 cells and QRsP tumour cells were found to be stable for at least 6 months when they were maintained in culture. We also observed that QR-32 cells were able to grow progressively in five out of 12 (42%) mice after coimplantation with plastic non-adherent peritoneal cells obtained from mice which had been intraperitoneally implanted with gelatin sponge. These host cells reactive to gelatin sponge increased the production of high amounts of PGE2 by QR-32 cells during 48 h coculture. Preliminary in vitro studies implicated the involvement of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical as some of the factors necessary to induce QR-32 cells to produce high amounts of PGE2 and to accelerate tumour progression. PMID:1419599

  19. Recurrent EWSR1-CREB3L1 gene fusions in sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Arbajian, Elsa; Puls, Florian; Magnusson, Linda; Thway, Khin; Fisher, Cyril; Sumathi, Vaiyapuri P; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Nord, Karolin H; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Mertens, Fredrik

    2014-06-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) and low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (LGFMS) are 2 distinct types of sarcoma, with a subset of cases showing overlapping morphologic and immunohistochemical features. LGFMS is characterized by expression of the MUC4 protein, and about 90% of cases display a distinctive FUS-CREB3L2 gene fusion. In addition, SEF is often MUC4 positive, but is genetically less well studied. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies have shown involvement of the FUS gene in the majority of so-called hybrid LGFMS/SEF and in 10% to 25% of sarcomas with pure SEF morphology. In this study, we investigated a series of 10 primary tumors showing pure SEF morphology, 4 cases of LGFMS that at local or distant relapse showed predominant SEF morphology, and 1 primary hybrid LGFMS/SEF. All but 1 case showed diffuse expression for MUC4. Using FISH, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and/or mRNA sequencing in selected cases, we found recurrent EWSR1-CREB3L1 fusion transcripts by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 3/10 pure SEF cases and splits and deletions of the EWSR1 and/or CREB3L1 genes by FISH in 6 additional cases. All 5 cases of LGFMS with progression to SEF morphology or hybrid features had FUS-CREB3L2 fusion transcripts. Our results indicate that EWSR1 and CREB3L1 rearrangements are predominant over FUS and CREB3L2 rearrangements in pure SEF, highlighting that SEF and LGFMS are different tumor types, with different impacts on patient outcome. PMID:24441665

  20. Nano-Scaled Particles of Titanium Dioxide Convert Benign Mouse Fibrosarcoma Cells into Aggressive Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Kunishige; Sato, Yu; Ogawara, Satomi; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Yoshitake, Jun; Yoshimura, Tetsuhiko; Iigo, Masaaki; Fujii, Junichi; Okada, Futoshi

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are prevalent in both commercial and medicinal products; however, the contribution of nanomaterials to carcinogenesis remains unclear. We therefore examined the effects of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) on poorly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 fibrosarcoma cells. We found that mice that were cotransplanted subcutaneously with QR-32 cells and nano-sized TiO2, either uncoated (TiO2−1, hydrophilic) or coated with stearic acid (TiO2−2, hydrophobic), did not form tumors. However, QR-32 cells became tumorigenic after injection into sites previously implanted with TiO2−1, but not TiO2−2, and these developing tumors acquired metastatic phenotypes. No differences were observed either histologically or in inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression between TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 treatments. However, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, generated high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell-free conditions. Although both TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 resulted in intracellular ROS formation, TiO2−2 elicited a stronger response, resulting in cytotoxicity to the QR-32 cells. Moreover, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, led to the development of nuclear interstices and multinucleate cells. Cells that survived the TiO2 toxicity acquired a tumorigenic phenotype. TiO2-induced ROS formation and its related cell injury were inhibited by the addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. These results indicate that nano-sized TiO2 has the potential to convert benign tumor cells into malignant ones through the generation of ROS in the target cells. PMID:19815711

  1. Cyclic-radiation response of murine fibrosarcoma cells grown as pulmonary nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hunter, N.

    1982-10-01

    The radiation age response of murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary nudules in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice was determined. FSa cells were irradiated in vivo either with 10 Gy as 14 day-old lung tumors (i.e., artifical micrometastases) following cell separation and synchronization by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the percent contamination of normal diploid cells in each of the tumor cells populations. Tumor populations containing up to 90% G/sub 1/-, 60% S-, and 75% G/sub 2/+M-phase tumor cells were obtained. Cell clonogenicity, determined using a lung colony assay, ranged from 0.7 to 6% for control FSa cells from the various elutriator fractions. The radiation sensitivity of these separated cell populations varied by a factor of 6, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated as artifical micro or macro-metastases. In each experiment, tumor population most enriched in S-phase cells exhibited the greatest radiation sensitivity. To confirm that these populations were highly enriched in S-phase cells and to demonstrate that they were more radiosensitive than FSa cells in other parts of the cell cycle, the elutriated tumor population were exposed to either suicide labeling by high specific activity tritated thymidine or hydroxyurea. The resultant age response curves were qualitatively similar to those obtained following irradiation and reflected the S-phase sensitivity of FSa cells to these agents.

  2. Cyclic-radiation response of murine fibrosarcoma cells grown as pulmonary nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hunter, N.

    1982-10-01

    The radiation age response of murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary nodules in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice was determined. FSa cells were irradiated in vivo either with 10 Gy as 14 day-old lung tumors (i.e., artificial macrometastases) prior to cell separation or with 5 Gy as single cells trapped in the lungs of recipient mice (i.e., artificial micrometastases) following cell separation and synchronization by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the percent contamination of normal diploid cells in each of the tumor cell populations. Tumor populations containing up to 90% G/sub 1/, 60% S-, and 75% G/sub 2/+M-phase tumor cells were obtained. Cell clonogenicity, determined using a lung colony assay, ranged from 0.7 to 6% for control FSa cells from the various elutriator fractions. The radiation sensitivity of these separated cell populations varied by a factor of 6, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated as artificial micro or macro-metastases. In each experiment, tumor populations most enriched in s-phase cells exhibited the greatest radiation sensitivity. To confirm that these populations were highly enriched in S-phase cells and to demonstrate that they were more radiosensitive than FSa cells in other parts of the cell cycle, the elutriated tumor populations were exposed to either suicide labeling by high specific activity tritiated thymidine or hydroxyurea. The resultant age response curves were qualitatively similar to those obtained following irradiation and reflected the S-phase sensitivity of FSa cells to these agents.

  3. Function of oncogenes in cancer development: a changing paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated oncogenes induce unscheduled proliferation as well as genomic and chromosomal instability. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumour cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that oncogenes are only essential for the proliferation of some specific tumour cell types, but not all. Indeed, the latest studies of the interactions between the oncogene and its target cell have shown that oncogenes contribute to cancer development not only by inducing proliferation but also by developmental reprogramming of the epigenome. This provides the first evidence that tumorigenesis can be initiated by stem cell reprogramming, and uncovers a new role for oncogenes in the origin of cancer. Here we analyse these evidences and propose an updated model of oncogene function that can explain the full range of genotype–phenotype associations found in human cancer. Finally, we discuss how this vision opens new avenues for developing novel anti-cancer interventions. PMID:23632857

  4. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  5. Oncogenes in Cell Survival and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, Jake; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2012-01-01

    The transforming effects of proto-oncogenes such as MYC that mediate unrestrained cell proliferation are countered by “intrinsic tumor suppressor mechanisms” that most often trigger apoptosis. Therefore, cooperating genetic or epigenetic effects to suppress apoptosis (e.g., overexpression of BCL2) are required to enable the dual transforming processes of unbridled cell proliferation and robust suppression of apoptosis. Certain oncogenes such as BCR-ABL are capable of concomitantly mediating the inhibition of apoptosis and driving cell proliferation and therefore are less reliant on cooperating lesions for transformation. Accordingly, direct targeting of BCR-ABL through agents such as imatinib have profound antitumor effects. Other oncoproteins such as MYC rely on the anti-apoptotic effects of cooperating oncoproteins such as BCL2 to facilitate tumorigenesis. In these circumstances, where the primary oncogenic driver (e.g., MYC) cannot yet be therapeutically targeted, inhibition of the activity of the cooperating antiapoptotic protein (e.g., BCL2) can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:23209150

  6. TARGETING ONCOGENIC BRAF IN HUMAN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Pratilas, Christine; Xing, Feng; Solit, David

    2012-01-01

    MAPK pathway activation is a frequent event in human cancer and is often the result of activating mutations in the BRAF and RAS oncogenes. BRAF missense kinase domain mutations, the vast majority of which are V600E, occur in approximately 8% of human tumors. These mutations, which are non-overlapping in distribution with RAS mutations, are observed most frequently in melanoma but also in tumors arising in the colon, thyroid, lung and other sites. Supporting its classification as an oncogene, V600EBRAF stimulates ERK signaling, induces proliferation and is capable of promoting transformation. Given the frequent occurrence of BRAF mutations in human cancer and the continued requirement for BRAF activity in the tumors in which it is mutated, efforts are underway to develop targeted inhibitors of BRAF and its downstream effectors. These agents offer the possibility of greater efficacy and less toxicity than the systemic therapies currently available for tumors driven by activating mutations in the MAPK pathway. Early clinical results with the BRAF-selective inhibitors PLX4032 and GSK2118436 suggest that this strategy will prove successful in a select group of patients whose tumors are driven by oncogenic BRAF. PMID:21818706

  7. Applications of calcium electroporation to effective apoptosis induction in fibrosarcoma cells and stimulation of normal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zielichowska, Anna; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta; Michel, Olga; Kulbacka, Julita

    2016-06-01

    The electroporation (EP) supports various types of anticancer therapies by the selective transport of cytostatics. Increase in intracellular calcium level by EP may be a new approach to fibrosarcoma treatment. Calcium is one of the most important factors of cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death (apoptosis or necrosis). Calcium level balanced by electroporation can cause different effects on normal and pathological cells. The efficiency and safety of electroporation combined with Ca(2+) ions were examined in our study. The two muscle cell lines were used: normal rat skeletal muscle cells - L6 and cancer muscle cells - Wehi-164 (fibrosarcoma). Two CaCl2 concentrations were tested: 0.5 mM and 5 mM combined with EP parameters: 1000 V/cm, 1200 V/cm, and 1500 V/cm. The results show that EP supported by Ca(2+) is cytotoxic for Wehi-164 cells and simultaneously safe for normal muscle cells. The main type of cell death - apoptosis - was confirmed by Tunnel and Annexin V/PI assay. Additionally, sPLA2 pro-tumorigenic influence was proved by immunocytochemistry. Moreover, EP with 0.5 mM of Ca(2+) slightly stimulates the normal muscle cells - L6 to increase proliferation. PMID:26874618

  8. Effects of Toxoplasma gondii and Toxocara canis Antigens on WEHI-164 Fibrosarcoma Growth in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Mansoori, Fataneh; Zabardast, Nozhat; Mahmoodzadeh, Mahdi

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is the main cause of death in developed countries. However, in underdeveloped countries infections and parasitic diseases are the main causes of death. There are raising scientific evidences indicating that parasitic infections induce antitumor activity against certain types of cancers. In this study, the effects of Toxoplasma gondii and Toxocara canis egg antigens in comparison with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) (known to have anticancer distinctive) on WEHI-164 fibosarcoma transplanted to BALB/c mice was investigated. Groups of 6 male BALB/c mice injected with T. gondii antigen, BCG, or T. canis egg antigen as case groups and alum alone as control groups. All mice were then challenged with WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cells. The mice were examined for growth of the solid tumor and the tumor sizes were measured every other day up to 4 wk. The mean tumor area in T. gondii, BCG, or alum alone injected mice in 4 different days of measurements was 25 mm2, 23 mm2, and 186 mm2 respectively. Also the mean tumor area in T. canis injected mice in 4 different days was 25.5 mm2 compared to the control group (alum treated) which was 155 mm2. T. gondii parasites and T. canis egg antigens induced inhibition of the tumor growth in the fibrosarcoma mouse model. We need further study to clarify the mechanisms of anti-cancer effects. PMID:19488426

  9. Antioxidant Effect of Berberine and its Phenolic Derivatives Against Human Fibrosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pongkittiphan, Veerachai; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Supabphol, Roongtawan

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (B1), isolated from stems of Coscinium fenestratum (Goetgh.) Colebr, was used as a principle structure to synthesize three phenolic derivatives: berberrubine (B2) with a single phenolic group, berberrubine chloride (B3) as a chloride counter ion derivative, and 2,3,9,10-tetra-hydroxyberberine chloride (B4) with four phenolic groups, to investigate their direct and indirect antioxidant activities. For DPPH assay, compounds B4, B3, and B2 showed good direct antioxidant activity (IC50 values=10.7±1.76, 55.2±2.24, and 87.4±6.65 μM, respectively) whereas the IC50 value of berberine was higher than 500 μM. Moreover, compound B4 exhibited a better DPPH scavenging activity than BHT as a standard antioxidant (IC50=72.7±7.22 μM) due to the ortho position of hydroxyl groups and its capacity to undergo intramolecular hydrogen bonding. For cytotoxicity assay against human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) using MTT reagent, the sequence of IC50 value at 7-day treatment stated that B1

  10. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells. PMID:26940867

  11. Melanoma: oncogenic drivers and the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Riso, Aldo; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Richardet, Eduardo; Bria, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma over the past 30 years have contributed to a change in the consideration of melanoma as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. The finding that oncogenic BRAF mutations drive tumor growth in up to 50% of melanomas led to a molecular therapy revolution for unresectable and metastatic disease. Moving beyond BRAF, inactivation of immune regulatory checkpoints that limit T cell responses to melanoma has provided targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the molecular biology of melanoma and we focus on the recent advances of molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26605311

  12. Hedgehog Cholesterolysis: Specialized Gatekeeper to Oncogenic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Brian P; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Discussions of therapeutic suppression of hedgehog (Hh) signaling almost exclusively focus on receptor antagonism; however, hedgehog's biosynthesis represents a unique and potentially targetable aspect of this oncogenic signaling pathway. Here, we review a key biosynthetic step called cholesterolysis from the perspectives of structure/function and small molecule inhibition. Cholesterolysis, also called cholesteroylation, generates cholesterol-modified Hh ligand via autoprocessing of a hedgehog precursor protein. Post-translational modification by cholesterol appears to be restricted to proteins in the hedgehog family. The transformation is essential for Hh biological activity and upstream of signaling events. Despite its decisive role in generating ligand, cholesterolysis remains conspicuously unexplored as a therapeutic target. PMID:26473928

  13. Oncogenic role of nucleophosmin/B23.

    PubMed

    Yung, Benjamin Yat Ming

    2007-01-01

    Nucleophosmin/B23 was first identified as a nucleolar protein expressed at higher levels in cancer cells compared to normal cells. Nucleophosmin/B23 has long been thus thought to have a role in tumor formation. With our efforts and others in the last 15 years, nucleophosmin/B23 has proven to have an oncogenic role. In this review, we provide evidence suggesting that nucleophosmin/B23 may be a crucial gene in regulation of cancer growth and discuss how nucleophosmin/B23 can contribute to tumorigenesis. PMID:17939258

  14. Targeting oncogenes to improve breast cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Laura A; Finch, Rick A; Booker, Adam J; Vasquez, Karen M

    2006-04-15

    Despite recent advances in treatment, breast cancer remains a serious health threat for women. Traditional chemotherapies are limited by a lack of specificity for tumor cells and the cell cycle dependence of many chemotherapeutic agents. Here we report a novel strategy to help overcome these limitations. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to direct DNA damage site-specifically to oncogenes overexpressed in human breast cancer cells, we show that the effectiveness of the anticancer nucleoside analogue gemcitabine can be improved significantly. TFOs targeted to the promoter region of c-myc directly inhibited gene expression by approximately 40%. When used in combination, specific TFOs increased the incorporation of gemcitabine at the targeted site approximately 4-fold, presumably due to induction of replication-independent DNA synthesis. Cells treated with TFOs and gemcitabine in combination showed a reduction in both cell survival and capacity for anchorage-independent growth (approximately 19% of untreated cells). This combination affected the tumorigenic potential of these cancer cells to a significantly greater extent than either treatment alone. This novel strategy may be used to increase the range of effectiveness of antitumor nucleosides in any tumor which overexpresses a targetable oncogene. Multifaceted chemotherapeutic approaches such as this, coupled with triplex-directed gene targeting, may lead to more than incremental improvements in nonsurgical treatment of breast tumors. PMID:16618728

  15. TP53: an oncogene in disguise

    PubMed Central

    Soussi, T; Wiman, K G

    2015-01-01

    The standard classification used to define the various cancer genes confines tumor protein p53 (TP53) to the role of a tumor suppressor gene. However, it is now an indisputable fact that many p53 mutants act as oncogenic proteins. This statement is based on multiple arguments including the mutation signature of the TP53 gene in human cancer, the various gains-of-function (GOFs) of the different p53 mutants and the heterogeneous phenotypes developed by knock-in mouse strains modeling several human TP53 mutations. In this review, we will shatter the classical and traditional image of tumor protein p53 (TP53) as a tumor suppressor gene by emphasizing its multiple oncogenic properties that make it a potential therapeutic target that should not be underestimated. Analysis of the data generated by the various cancer genome projects highlights the high frequency of TP53 mutations and reveals that several p53 hotspot mutants are the most common oncoprotein variants expressed in several types of tumors. The use of Muller's classical definition of mutations based on quantitative and qualitative consequences on the protein product, such as ‘amorph', ‘hypomorph', ‘hypermorph' ‘neomorph' or ‘antimorph', allows a more meaningful assessment of the consequences of cancer gene modifications, their potential clinical significance, and clearly demonstrates that the TP53 gene is an atypical cancer gene. PMID:26024390

  16. Primary renal sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma: report of 2 cases with EWSR1-CREB3L1 gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Argani, Pedram; Lewin, Jack R; Edmonds, Pamela; Netto, George J; Prieto-Granada, Carlos; Zhang, Lei; Jungbluth, Achim A; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2015-03-01

    We report the first 2 genetically confirmed cases of primary renal sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF), occurring in a 17-year-old boy and a 61-year-old woman. In both cases, the tumors demonstrated the typical epithelioid clear cell morphology associated with extensive hyalinizing fibrosis, raising the differential diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor, metanephric stromal tumor, and the sclerosing variant of clear cell sarcoma of the kidney. Both neoplasms demonstrated diffuse immunoreactivity for MUC4, a highly specific marker for SEF, and both demonstrated evidence of rearrangement of both the EWSR1 and CREB3L1 genes, which have recently been shown to be fused in this entity. Both neoplasms presented with metastatic disease. Primary renal SEF represents yet another translocation-associated sarcoma now shown to arise primarily in the kidney. PMID:25353281

  17. Infantile Fibrosarcoma With NTRK3-ETV6 Fusion Successfully Treated With the Tropomyosin-Related Kinase Inhibitor LOXO-101.

    PubMed

    Nagasubramanian, Ramamoorthy; Wei, Julie; Gordon, Paul; Rastatter, Jeff C; Cox, Michael C; Pappo, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma (IFS) is a rare pediatric cancer typically presenting in the first 2 years of life. Surgical resection is usually curative and chemotherapy is active against gross residual disease. However, when recurrences occur, therapeutic options are limited. We report a case of refractory IFS with constitutive activation of the tropomyosin-related kinase (TRK) signaling pathway from an ETS variant gene 6-neurotrophin 3 receptor gene (ETV6-NTRK3) gene fusion. The patient enrolled in a pediatric Phase 1 trial of LOXO-101, an experimental, highly selective inhibitor of TRK. The patient experienced a rapid, radiographic response, demonstrating the potential for LOXO-101 to provide benefit for IFS harboring NTRK gene fusions. PMID:27093299

  18. MEK1act/tubulin interaction is an important determinant of mitotic stability in cultured HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jia-ning; Shafee, Norazizah; Vickery, Larry; Kaluz, Stefan; Ru, Ning; Stanbridge, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the MAPK pathway plays a major role in neoplastic cell transformation. Using a proteomics approach we identified α tubulin and β tubulin as proteins that interact with activated MEK1, a central MAPK regulatory kinase. Confocal analysis revealed spatio-temporal control of MEK1-tubulin co-localization that was most prominent in the mitotic spindle apparatus in variant HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Peptide arrays identified the critical role of positively charged amino acids R108, R113, R160 and K157 on the surface of MEK1 for tubulin interaction. Overexpression of activated MEK1 caused defects in spindle arrangement, chromosome segregation and ploidy. In contrast, chromosome polyploidy was reduced in the presence of an activated MEK1 mutant (R108A, R113A) that disrupted interactions with tubulin. Our findings indicate the importance of signaling by activated MEK1-tubulin in spindle organization and chromosomal instability. PMID:20570892

  19. 40 CFR 798.3320 - Combined chronic toxicity/oncogenicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combined chronic toxicity/oncogenicity. 798.3320 Section 798.3320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3320 Combined chronic toxicity/oncogenicity....

  20. Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of the kidney: clinicopathologic and molecular study of a rare neoplasm at a novel location.

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, Carsten-Henning; Brecht, Ines B; Junker, Kerstin; van der Zee, Jill A; Nistor, Adriana; Bohle, Rainer M; Stöckle, Michael; Metzler, Markus; Hartmann, Arndt; Agaimy, Abbas

    2015-08-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare fibrosarcoma variant with specific histomorphology and consistent translocation (EWSR1-CREB3L1/2). To date, 110 cases have been reported; only 15 originated within the abdomen. With only 2 cases reported parallel to our study and one case briefly mentioned in a previous series, primary renal SEF is exceptionally rare but might be underrecognized. We herein describe 2 cases affecting a 23-year-old woman and a 43-year-old man. Tumor size was 22 and 4.2 cm, respectively. Patient 1 developed skeletal and multiple pulmonary metastases. She died of disease 82 months later, despite aggressive multimodality therapy. Patient 2 has no evidence of recurrence or metastasis (8 months after surgery). Histologic examination showed similar appearance with monotonous bland medium-sized epithelioid cells with rounded slightly vesicular nuclei and clear cytoplasm imparting a carcinoma-like appearance set within a highly sclerotic hyaline fibrous stroma. The tumor cells were arranged in nests, single cell cords, trabeculae, or solid sheets with frequent entrapment of renal tubules and glomeruli. Immunohistochemistry showed strong expression of vimentin, bcl2, CD99, and MUC4, whereas cytokeratin and other markers were negative. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed a translocation involving the EWSR1 gene locus in case 2. Molecular analysis in case 1 was not successful due to poor signal quality. To our knowledge, this is the second report documenting primary renal SEF. Awareness of this entity would help avoid misinterpretation as clear cell carcinoma, sclerosing perivascular epithelioid cell tumor, Xp.11 translocation carcinoma, and other more frequent neoplasms at this site. PMID:25990776

  1. Hedgehog Cholesterolysis: Specialized Gatekeeper to Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Brian P.; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Discussions of therapeutic suppression of hedgehog (Hh) signaling almost exclusively focus on receptor antagonism; however, hedgehog’s biosynthesis represents a unique and potentially targetable aspect of this oncogenic signaling pathway. Here, we review a key biosynthetic step called cholesterolysis from the perspectives of structure/function and small molecule inhibition. Cholesterolysis, also called cholesteroylation, generates cholesterol-modified Hh ligand via autoprocessing of a hedgehog precursor protein. Post-translational modification by cholesterol appears to be restricted to proteins in the hedgehog family. The transformation is essential for Hh biological activity and upstream of signaling events. Despite its decisive role in generating ligand, cholesterolysis remains conspicuously unexplored as a therapeutic target. PMID:26473928

  2. Mutational patterns in oncogenes and tumour suppressors.

    PubMed

    Baeissa, Hanadi M; Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Richardson, Christopher J; Pearl, Frances M G

    2016-06-15

    All cancers depend upon mutations in critical genes, which confer a selective advantage to the tumour cell. Knowledge of these mutations is crucial to understanding the biology of cancer initiation and progression, and to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies. The key to understanding the contribution of a disease-associated mutation to the development and progression of cancer, comes from an understanding of the consequences of that mutation on the function of the affected protein, and the impact on the pathways in which that protein is involved. In this paper we examine the mutation patterns observed in oncogenes and tumour suppressors, and discuss different approaches that have been developed to identify driver mutations within cancers that contribute to the disease progress. We also discuss the MOKCa database where we have developed an automatic pipeline that structurally and functionally annotates all proteins from the human proteome that are mutated in cancer. PMID:27284061

  3. TGIF function in oncogenic Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Razzaque, Mohammed S; Atfi, Azeddine

    2016-04-01

    Transforming growth-interacting factor (TGIF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many types of human cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remained mostly enigmatic. Our recent study has revealed that TGIF functions as a mediator of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We found that TGIF can interact with and sequesters Axin1 and Axin2 into the nucleus, thereby culminating in disassembly of the β-catenin-destruction complex and attendant accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus, where it activates expression of Wnt target genes, including TGIF itself. We have provided proof-of-concept evidences that high levels of TGIF expression correlate with poor prognosis in patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), and that TGIF empowers Wnt-driven mammary tumorigenesis in vivo. Here, we will briefly summarize how TGIF influences Wnt signaling to promote tumorigenesis. PMID:26522669

  4. Oncogene regulation. An oncogenic super-enhancer formed through somatic mutation of a noncoding intergenic element.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Marc R; Abraham, Brian J; Anders, Lars; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Durbin, Adam D; Etchin, Julia; Lawton, Lee; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Sanda, Takaomi; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2014-12-12

    In certain human cancers, the expression of critical oncogenes is driven from large regulatory elements, called super-enhancers, that recruit much of the cell's transcriptional apparatus and are defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac). In a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases, we found that heterozygous somatic mutations are acquired that introduce binding motifs for the MYB transcription factor in a precise noncoding site, which creates a super-enhancer upstream of the TAL1 oncogene. MYB binds to this new site and recruits its H3K27 acetylase-binding partner CBP, as well as core components of a major leukemogenic transcriptional complex that contains RUNX1, GATA-3, and TAL1 itself. Additionally, most endogenous super-enhancers found in T-ALL cells are occupied by MYB and CBP, which suggests a general role for MYB in super-enhancer initiation. Thus, this study identifies a genetic mechanism responsible for the generation of oncogenic super-enhancers in malignant cells. PMID:25394790

  5. Oncogenic Ras stimulates Eiger/TNF exocytosis to promote growth

    PubMed Central

    Chabu, Chiswili; Xu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in Ras deregulate cell death and proliferation to cause cancer in a significant number of patients. Although normal Ras signaling during development has been well elucidated in multiple organisms, it is less clear how oncogenic Ras exerts its effects. Furthermore, cancers with oncogenic Ras mutations are aggressive and generally resistant to targeted therapies or chemotherapy. We identified the exocytosis component Sec15 as a synthetic suppressor of oncogenic Ras in an in vivo Drosophila mosaic screen. We found that oncogenic Ras elevates exocytosis and promotes the export of the pro-apoptotic ligand Eiger (Drosophila TNF). This blocks tumor cell death and stimulates overgrowth by activating the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signal from the neighboring wild-type cells. Inhibition of Eiger/TNF exocytosis or interfering with the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signaling at various steps suppresses oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth. Our findings highlight important cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic roles of exocytosis during oncogenic growth and provide a new class of synthetic suppressors for targeted therapy approaches. PMID:25411211

  6. Activation of ras oncogenes preceding the onset of neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barbacid, M. ); Sukumar, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The identification of ras oncogenes in human and animal cancers including precancerous lesions indicates that these genes participate in the early stages of neoplastic development. Yet, these observations do not define the timing of ras oncogene activation in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. To ascertain the timing of ras oncogene activation, an animal model system was devised that involves the induction of mammary carcinomas in rats exposed at birth to the carcinogen nitrosomethylurea. High-resolution restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ras sequences revealed the presence of both H-ras and K-ras oncogenes in normal mammary glands 2 weeks after carcinogen treatment and at least 2 months before the onset of neoplasia. These ras oncogenes can remain latent within the mammary gland until exposure to estrogens, demonstrating that activation of ras oncogenes can precede the onset of neoplasia and suggesting that normal physiological proliferative processes such as estrogen-induced mammary gland development may lead to neoplasia if the targeted cells harbor latent ras oncogenes.

  7. Noncanonical Roles of the Immune System in Eliciting Oncogene Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Bellovin, David I.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cancer is highly complex. The magnitude of this complexity makes it highly surprising that even the brief suppression of an oncogene can sometimes result in rapid and sustained tumor regression illustrating that cancers can be “oncogene addicted” [1-10]. The essential implication is that oncogenes may not only fuel the initiation of tumorigenesis, but in some cases necessarily their surfeit of activation is paramaount to maintain a neoplastic state [11]. Oncogene suppression acutely restores normal physiological programs that effectively overrides secondary genetic events and a cancer collapses [12,13]. Oncogene addiction is mediated both through both tumor intrinsic cell-autonomous mechanisms including proliferative arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and cellular senescence [1,2,4,12] but also host-dependent mechanisms that interact with these tumor intrinsic programs [14,15]. Notably, oncogene inactivation elicits a host immune response that involves specific immune effectors and cytokines that facilitate a remodeling of the tumor microenvironment including the shut down of angiogenesis and the induction of cellular senescence of tumor cells [16]. Hence, immune effectors are critically involved in tumor initiation and prevention [17-19] and progression [20], but also appear to be essential to tumor regression upon oncogene inactivation [21-23]. The understanding how the inactivation of an oncogene elicits a systemic signal in the host that prompts a deconstruction of a tumor could have important implications. The combination of oncogene-targeted therapy together with immunomodulatory therapy may be ideal for the development of both a robust tumor intrinsic as well as immunological effectively leading to sustained tumor regression. PMID:23571026

  8. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Protective effects of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid against radiation damage of normal tissues and a fibrosarcoma in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Milas, L.; Hunter, N.; Reid, B.O.; Thames, H.D. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) was investigated for its protective effect against radiation-produced damage of jejunum, testis, lung, hair follicles, and a fibrosarcoma of C3Hf/Kam mice. Most of these tissues were radioprotected, and the degree of radioprotection depended on the dose of WR-2721 and the time interval between administration of WR-2721 and radiation treatment. WR-2721 increased resistance of jejunal epithelial cells and spermatogenic cells to single doses of gamma-rays by factors of 1.64 and 1.54, respectively. Protection against hair loss was less pronounced; the dose-modifying factor here was 1.24. The radiation-induced acute damage of the lung expressed by the increased formation of tumor nodules in the lung was not decreased by treatment of animals with WR-2721 before radiation. In contrast, WR-2721 augmented the radiation-induced enhancement of metastasis formation in the lung. WR-2721 protected fibrosarcoma micrometastases in the lung against therapeutic effect of radiation by a factor of 1.238. In contrast, this compound had no effect on the therapy of an 8-mm fibrosarcoma growing in the legs of mice.

  10. Oncogenic Potential of Hepatitis C Virus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arup; Ray, Ratna B.; Ray, Ranjit

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major risk factor for liver disease progression, and may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HCV genome contains a single-stranded positive sense RNA with a cytoplasmic lifecycle. HCV proteins interact with many host-cell factors and are involved in a wide range of activities, including cell cycle regulation, transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism, and cell growth promotion. Increasing experimental evidences suggest that HCV contributes to HCC by modulating pathways that may promote malignant transformation of hepatocytes. At least four of the 10 HCV gene products, namely core, NS3, NS5A and NS5B play roles in several potentially oncogenic pathways. Induction of both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress by HCV proteins may also contribute to hepatocyte growth promotion. The current review identifies important functions of the viral proteins connecting HCV infections and potential for development of HCC. However, most of the putative transforming potentials of the HCV proteins have been defined in artificial cellular systems, and need to be established relevant to infection and disease models. The new insight into the mechanisms for HCV mediated disease progression may offer novel therapeutic targets for one of the most devastating human malignancies in the world today. PMID:21994721

  11. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis Through PKR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death. PMID:27486347

  12. Oncogene-dependent apoptosis is mediated by caspase-9

    PubMed Central

    Fearnhead, Howard O.; Rodriguez, Joe; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Guo, Wenjun; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Hannon, Greg; Lazebnik, Yuri A.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding how oncogenic transformation sensitizes cells to apoptosis may provide a strategy to kill tumor cells selectively. We previously developed a cell-free system that recapitulates oncogene dependent apoptosis as reflected by activation of caspases, the core of the apoptotic machinery. Here, we show that this activation requires a previously identified apoptosis-promoting complex consisting of caspase-9, APAF-1, and cytochrome c. As predicted by the in vitro system, preventing caspase-9 activation blocked drug-induced apoptosis in cells sensitized by E1A, an adenoviral oncogene. Oncogenes, such as E1A, appear to facilitate caspase-9 activation by several mechanisms, including the control of cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. PMID:9811857

  13. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis Through PKR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Janaina

    2016-01-01

    The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death. PMID:27486347

  14. ERBB2 oncogenicity: ERBIN helps to perform the job

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Borg, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    ERBB2 (v-erb-b2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2) is an oncogenic tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in breast cancer. Antibodies and inhibitors targeting ERBB2 are currently available, although therapeutic failures remain frequent. We discuss here recent data showing that the scaffold protein ERBB2IP (ERBB2 interacting protein, best known as ERBIN) regulates ERBB2 stability and may represent a future therapeutic target. PMID:27308480

  15. Silent assassin: oncogenic ras directs epigenetic inactivation of target genes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is associated with genetic changes and epigenetic alterations. A study now shows that oncogenic Ras uses a complex and elaborate epigenetic silencing program to specifically repress the expression of multiple unrelated cancer-suppressing genes through a common pathway. These results suggest that cancer-related epigenetic modifications may arise through a specific and instructive mechanism and that genetic changes and epigenetic alterations are intimately connected and contribute to tumorigenesis cooperatively. PMID:18385037

  16. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  17. Receptor-dependent antiproliferative effects of corticosteroids in radiation-induced fibrosarcomas and implications for sequential therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Braunschweiger, P.G.; Ting, H.L.; Schiffer, L.M.

    1982-05-01

    Competitive binding studies with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone and Scatchard analysis demonstrated a single class of high-affinity, low-capacity glucocorticoid receptor sites in 105,000 x g cytosols from radiation-induced fibrosarcomas. In vivo, both dexamethasone (DEX) and methylprednisolone treatments resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and cell proliferation. Changes in the sensitivity of the clonogenic cell population to 3 mM hydroxyurea were used to assess changes in the clonogenic cell proliferation during and after treatments with DEX or methylprednisolone. Neither methylprednisolone nor DEX given every 12 hr for three doses resulted in significant cell kill in the clonogenic fraction. However, changes in the hydroxyurea sensitivity of the clonogenic population after cessation of DEX treatments indicated G1 cell cycle progression delay with transient enrichment of S-phase clonogenic cells 24 to 48 hr after cessation of DEX treatments. The duration of the DEX-induced progression delay and the timing of maximal S-phase cellularity after DEX was directly correlated with the level of glucocorticoid receptors in the treated tumors. Using regrowth delay to assess the efficacy of kinetically directed sequential chemotherapy, the effectiveness of vincristine, given after DEX, was highly sequence dependent, with the most effective treatment interval being coincident with maximal S-phase clonogenic fraction. Other studies indicated that the effectiveness of cyclophosphamide could also be increased by time sequencing after DEX.

  18. Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma presenting as intraabdominal sarcomatosis with a novel EWSR1-CREB3L1 gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Stockman, David L; Ali, Siraj M; He, Jie; Ross, Jeffrey S; Meis, Jeanne M

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of intraabdominal sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) with a t (11;22)(p11.2;q12.2) Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 1 translocation. A 43-year old man presented with massive ascites and shortness of breath. Imaging studies revealed a large mesenteric-based mass with extensive omental/peritoneal disease. After resection and cytoreductive surgery, the tumor recurred with metastasis to the lungs; the patient is still alive with disease. Histologically, there was a uniform population of epithelioid cells arranged in cords and nests, embedded in a dense collagenous matrix; no areas of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma were identified. All immunohistochemical markers were nonreactive. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies showed rearrangement of Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1. Genomic profiling by clinical grade next-generation sequencing revealed a fusion gene between intron 11 of Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1 (22q12.2) and intron 5 of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 1 (11p11.2). This is the first report of "pure" or true SEF presenting as intraabdominal sarcomatosis with confirmation of the recently described unique Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 1 gene fusion in SEF without areas of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma. PMID:25123073

  19. Primary sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of kidney with variant histomorphologic features: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ertoy Baydar, Dilek; Kosemehmetoglu, Kemal; Aydin, Oguz; Bridge, Julia A; Buyukeren, Berrin; Aki, Fazil Tuncay

    2015-01-01

    The authors present two cases of primary sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) of the kidney. Both patients had a mass in the upper part of the left kidney without any primary extrarenal neoplastic lesions. Grossly, the tumors were solid masses both measuring 7.5 cm in the greatest diameter. Histologically, one of the lesions exhibited a predominantly lobular growth of round or oval small uniform epithelioid cells in variable cellularity. Circular zones of crowded tumor cells alternating with hypocellular collagenous tissue in a concentric fashion around entrapped native renal tubules were distinctive. The second case was distinctive with significant cytological atypia in the neoplastic cells and prominent reactive proliferations in the trapped renal tubules. Immunohistochemically, vimentin, bcl-2 and MUC4 were diffusely positive in both. They were negative for S-100 protein, CD34, and desmin, whereas CD99 were positive in one lesion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization assay using dual staining probes detected EWSR1-CREB3L1 fusion in each lesion, which is characteristic molecular findings of SEF. One patient presented widespread distant metastases at the time of diagnosis. In the other, no tumor deposits were detected other than primary. Both patients have been alive with 30 and 10 month follow-ups, respectively. These tumors are 6th and 7th cases of primary renal SEF in the literature confirmed by FISH study, which exhibit unique and remarkable histomorphologic features. PMID:26449317

  20. Repositioning of human interphase chromosomes by nucleolar dynamics in the reverse transformation of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Krystosek, A

    1998-05-25

    An experimental system which should be valuable for studying the role of spatial positioning of the nuclear genome in human cell function has been developed. Reverse transformation of the malignant HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line upon treatment with 8-chloro-cAMP results in growth inhibition, cytoskeletal reorganization, changes in nuclear shape and chromatin accessibility, and formation of prominent nucleoli. Fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to study DNA positioning during nuclear remodeling. Morphometric analysis of the hybridization sites for both repetitive sequences and "painting probes" for whole chromosomes indicated dispersal of acrocentric chromosomes in untreated cells and a highly organized central location of these ribosome gene-containing chromosomes in association with one or a few large nucleoli in nondividing treated cells. The results suggest that there was a directed movement of interphase chromosomes during a response which normalized a malignant cell line. These large-scale repositionings may serve two functions in restoring a normal transcriptional setup to the nucleus. First, ribosome genes are placed in the nucleolus, their transcriptional suborganelle. Second, nucleolar anchorings together with additional perinucleolar centromeric associations orient the domain shapes of entire chromosomes, installing gene-rich chromosomal regions into pockets of (accessible) DNAse I-sensitive chromatin populated by spliceosomes. PMID:9633529

  1. Hydrophilic extract from Posidonia oceanica inhibits activity and expression of gelatinases and prevents HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line invasion

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Emanuela; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Fratianni, Florinda; Pessani, Daniela; Degl'Innocenti, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile is an endemic Mediterranean sea-grass distributed in the infralittoral zones, where it forms meadows playing a recognized ecological role in the coastal marine habitat. Although its use as a traditional herbal remedy is poorly documented, recent literature reports interesting pharmacological activities as antidiabetic, antioxidant and vasoprotective. Differently from previous literature, this study presents a hydrophilic extraction method that recovers metabolites that may be tested in biological buffers. We showed for the first time in the highly invasive HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line that our hydrophilic extract from P. oceanica was able to strongly decrease gene and protein expression of gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and to directly inhibit in a dose-dependent manner gelatinolytic activity in vitro. Moreover, we have revealed that our extract strongly inhibited HT1080 cell migration and invasion. Biochemical analysis of the hydrophilic extract showed that catechins were the major constituents with minor contribution of gallic acid, ferulic acid and chlorogenic plus a fraction of uncharacterized phenols. However, if each individual compound was tested independently, none by itself was able to induce a direct inhibition of gelatinases as strong as that observed in total extract, opening up new routes to the identification of novel compounds. These results indicate that our hydrophilic extract from P. oceanica might be a source of new pharmacological natural products for treatment or prevention of several diseases related to an altered MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. PMID:26176658

  2. Hydrophilic extract from Posidonia oceanica inhibits activity and expression of gelatinases and prevents HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line invasion.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Emanuela; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Fratianni, Florinda; Pessani, Daniela; Degl'Innocenti, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile is an endemic Mediterranean sea-grass distributed in the infralittoral zones, where it forms meadows playing a recognized ecological role in the coastal marine habitat. Although its use as a traditional herbal remedy is poorly documented, recent literature reports interesting pharmacological activities as antidiabetic, antioxidant and vasoprotective. Differently from previous literature, this study presents a hydrophilic extraction method that recovers metabolites that may be tested in biological buffers. We showed for the first time in the highly invasive HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line that our hydrophilic extract from P. oceanica was able to strongly decrease gene and protein expression of gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and to directly inhibit in a dose-dependent manner gelatinolytic activity in vitro. Moreover, we have revealed that our extract strongly inhibited HT1080 cell migration and invasion. Biochemical analysis of the hydrophilic extract showed that catechins were the major constituents with minor contribution of gallic acid, ferulic acid and chlorogenic plus a fraction of uncharacterized phenols. However, if each individual compound was tested independently, none by itself was able to induce a direct inhibition of gelatinases as strong as that observed in total extract, opening up new routes to the identification of novel compounds. These results indicate that our hydrophilic extract from P. oceanica might be a source of new pharmacological natural products for treatment or prevention of several diseases related to an altered MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. PMID:26176658

  3. Growth-related variations in the glycosaminoglycan synthesis of ultraviolet light-induced murine cutaneous fibrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Piepkorn, M.; Carney, H.; Linker, A.

    1985-08-01

    Glycosaminoglycan synthesis was studied in cell populations of ultraviolet light-induced murine cutaneous fibrosarcoma cells under conditions of varying growth rates in vitro. After labeling with the precursors, /sup 3/H-glucosamine and /sup 35/SO/sub 4/, sulfated glycosaminoglycans recoverable by direct proteolysis of the culture monolayers increased approximately 5-fold on a per cell basis from sparsely populated, exponential cell cultures (greater than 85% of cells in S, G2, or M phases) to stationary cultures inhibited by high cell density (greater than 50% of cells in G1). Within this cell surface-associated material, the relative ratio of heparan sulfate to the chondroitin sulfates was approximately 60/40% under conditions of exponential growth; in the growth-arrested cultures, the reverse ratio was found. The substratum attached material, obtained from the flask surface after ethyl glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA)-mediated detachment of the monolayers, contained relatively more hyaluronic acid, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfates in the most actively proliferating cultures compared with the growth-inhibited cell populations. Furthermore, heparan sulfate and the chondroitin sulfates, which were enriched in the substratum material and in the cell pellet of exponential cultures, showed a relative shift to the cell surface-associated compartment (releasable by mild trypsinization after EGTA-mediated cell detachment) and to the compartment loosely associated with the pericellular matrix (i.e., released into the supernatant during detachment of the monolayers in the presence of EGTA).

  4. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the ‘DFG-out’ inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the ‘gatekeeper’ V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET. PMID:26046350

  5. Oncogenic Ras influences the expression of multiple lncRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Niida, Hiroyuki; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Shirasawa, Senji; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2016-08-01

    Recent ultrahigh-density tiling array and large-scale transcriptome analysis have revealed that large numbers of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcribed in mammals. Several lncRNAs have been implicated in transcriptional regulation, organization of nuclear structure, and post-transcriptional processing. However, the regulation of expression of lncRNAs is less well understood. Here, we show that the exogenous and endogenous expression of an oncogenic form of small GTPase Ras (called oncogenic Ras) decrease the expression of lncRNA ANRIL (antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus), which is involved in the regulation of cellular senescence. We also show that forced expression of oncogenic Ras increases the expression of lncRNA PANDA (p21 associated ncRNA DNA damage activated), which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Microarray analysis demonstrated that expression of multiple lncRNAs fluctuated by forced expression of oncogenic Ras. These findings indicate that oncogenic Ras regulates the expression of a large number of lncRNAs including functional lncRNAs, such as ANRIL and PANDA. PMID:25501747

  6. Inhibition of ras oncogene: a novel approach to antineoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    Scharovsky, O G; Rozados, V R; Gervasoni, S I; Matar, P

    2000-01-01

    The most frequently detected oncogene alterations, both in animal and human cancers, are the mutations in the ras oncogene family. These oncogenes are mutated or overexpressed in many human tumors, with a high incidence in tumors of the pancreas, thyroid, colon, lung and certain types of leukemia. Ras is a small guanine nucleotide binding protein that transduces biological information from the cell surface to cytoplasmic components within cells. The signal is transduced to the cell nucleus through second messengers, and it ultimately induces cell division. Oncogenic forms of p21(ras) lead to unregulated, sustained signaling through downstream effectors. The ras family of oncogenes is involved in the development of both primary tumors and metastases making it a good therapeutic target. Several therapeutic approaches to cancer have been developed pointing to reducing the altered gene product or to eliminating its biological function: (1) gene therapy with ribozymes, which are able to break down specific RNA sequences, or with antisense oligonucleotides, (2) immunotherapy through passive or active immunization protocols, and (3) inhibition of p21(ras) farnesylation either by inhibition of farnesyl transferase or synthesis inhibition of farnesyl moieties. PMID:10895051

  7. Oncogenic Ras/Src cooperativity in pancreatic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shields, DJ; Murphy, EA; Desgrosellier, JS; Mielgo, A; Lau, SKM; Barnes, LA; Lesperance, J; Huang, M; Schmedt, C; Tarin, D; Lowy, AM; Cheresh, DA

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies and is characterized by activating mutations of Kras, present in 95% of patients. More than 60% of pancreatic cancers also display increased c-Src activity, which is associated with poor prognosis. Although loss of tumor suppressor function (for example, p16, p53, Smad4) combined with oncogenic Kras signaling has been shown to accelerate pancreatic duct carcinogenesis, it is unclear whether elevated Src activity contributes to Kras-dependent tumorigenesis or is simply a biomarker of disease progression. Here, we demonstrate that in the context of oncogenic Kras, activation of c-Src through deletion of C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) results in the development of invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) by 5–8 weeks. In contrast, deletion of CSK alone fails to induce neoplasia, while oncogenic Kras expression yields PDA at low frequency after a latency of 12 months. Analysis of cell lines derived from Ras/Src-induced PDA’s indicates that oncogenic Ras/Src cooperativity may lead to genomic instability, yet Ras/Src-driven tumor cells remain dependent on Src signaling and as such, Src inhibition suppresses growth of Ras/Src-driven tumors. These findings demonstrate that oncogenic Ras/Src cooperate to accelerate PDA onset and support further studies of Src-directed therapies in pancreatic cancer. PMID:21242978

  8. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  9. Growth-Inhibitory and Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Punica granatum L. var. spinosa (Apple Punice) on Fibrosarcoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sineh Sepehr, Koushan; Baradaran, Behzad; Mazandarani, Masoumeh; Yousefi, Bahman; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Meghdad; Khori, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Punica granatum L. var. granatum (Pomegranate), an herbaceous plant found in Iran, The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects, induction of apoptosis, and the mechanism of cell death of ethanol extract from Punica granatum L. var. spinosa on the mouse fibrosarcoma cell line, WEHI-164. Methods: Various parts of the herbs were extracted from fruit using ethanol as the solvent, and the cytotoxicity and cell viability of the ethanolic extract were determined by the MTT assay. To determine whether necrosis or apoptosis is the predominant cause of cell death, cell death detection was performed using the ELISA method. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase- (TdT-) mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Moreover, a sensitive immunoblotting technique was used to examine the production of Caspase-3 and Bcl2 proteins. Results: Our findings suggested that the ethalonic extract of Punica granatum L. var. spinosa altered cell morphology, decreased cell viability, suppressed cell proliferation and induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner in WEHI-164 cells (IC50 = 229.024μg/ml), when compared to a chemotherapeutic anticancer drug, Toxol (Vesper Pharmaceuticals), with increased nucleosome production from apoptotic cells. Induction of apoptosis by the plant extract was proved by the decrease of pro-Caspase-3 and Bcl2 proteins and quantitatively confirmed by Immunoblotting analysis. Conclusion: The results obtained from the present study have demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of Ethanol Extracts from Punica granatum L. var. spinosa, and clearly showed that apoptosis was the major mechanism of in-vitro cell death induced by the extract. PMID:25671193

  10. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D.; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M. S.; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  11. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M S; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu; Pandey, B N

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  12. Opposing oncogenic activities of small DNA tumor virus transforming proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chinnadurai, G.

    2011-01-01

    The E1A gene of species C human adenovirus is an intensely investigated model viral oncogene that immortalizes primary cells and mediates oncogenic cell transformation in cooperation with other viral or cellular oncogenes. Investigations using E1A proteins have illuminated important paradigms in cell proliferation and the functions of cellular proteins such as the retinoblastoma protein. Studies with E1A have led to the surprising discovery that E1A also suppresses cell transformation and oncogenesis. Here, I review our current understanding of the transforming and tumor suppressive functions of E1A, and how E1A studies led to the discovery of a related tumor suppressive function in benign human papillomaviruses. The potential role of these opposing functions in viral replication in epithelial cells is also discussed. PMID:21330137

  13. Oncogene addiction: pathways of therapeutic response, resistance, and road maps toward a cure

    PubMed Central

    Pagliarini, Raymond; Shao, Wenlin; Sellers, William R

    2015-01-01

    A key goal of cancer therapeutics is to selectively target the genetic lesions that initiate and maintain cancer cell proliferation and survival. While most cancers harbor multiple oncogenic mutations, a wealth of preclinical and clinical data supports that many cancers are sensitive to inhibition of single oncogenes, a concept referred to as ‘oncogene addiction’. Herein, we describe the clinical evidence supporting oncogene addiction and discuss common mechanistic themes emerging from the response and acquired resistance to oncogene-targeted therapies. Finally, we suggest several opportunities toward exploiting oncogene addiction to achieve curative cancer therapies. PMID:25680965

  14. Abnormal structure of the canine oncogene, related to the human c-yes-1 oncogene, in canine mammary tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, N; Tateyama, S; Ogawa, K; Yamaguchi, R; Kuroda, H; Yasuda, N; Shimizu, T

    1991-12-01

    Cellular oncogenes of genomic DNA in 6 canine primary mammary tumors were screened by Southern blot analysis, using 7 oncogene probes. A canine genomic oncogene related to the human c-yes-1 oncogene was detected as abnormal bands in solid carcinoma genomic DNA digested with EcoRI, HindIII, HindIII-EcoRI, or HindIII-BamHI. Comparison was made between other tumor specimens and control specimens obtained from 4 clinically normal dogs--1 mixed breed and 3 Shiba Inu dogs (the same breed as the dog from which the solid carcinoma was obtained). These abnormal bands were 0.1 to 1 kilobase shorter than the normal gene. However, digestion of genomic DNA obtained from normal WBC of this dog also produced all of the abnormal bands as observed in digested DNA from the solid carcinoma tissue. Therefore, in this dog, the genomic DNA of all somatic cells from the ontogenic stage still had the abnormal sequences related to the human c-yes-1 oncogene, and it is possible that this abnormal structure may have some role (eg, as an initiator) in tumorigenesis or the progression of this tumor. PMID:1789521

  15. Oncogenic osteomalacia: Problems in diagnosis and long-term management

    PubMed Central

    Dhammi, Ish K; Jain, Anil K; Singh, Ajay Pal; Mishra, Puneet; Jain, Saurabh

    2010-01-01

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare association between mesenchymal tumors and hypophosphatemic rickets. It is more of a biochemical entity than a clinical one. The pathophysiology of the tumor is not clear. However, it has been seen that the clinical and biochemical parameters become normal if the lesion responsible for producing the osteomalacia is excised. For a clinical diagnosis a high index of suspicion is necessary. We present three such cases where in one the oncogenic osteomalacia reversed while in rest it did not. We present this case report to sensitize about the entity. PMID:20924490

  16. Stromal control of oncogenic traits expressed in response to the overexpression of GLI2, a pleiotropic oncogene.

    PubMed

    Snijders, A M; Huey, B; Connelly, S T; Roy, R; Jordan, R C K; Schmidt, B L; Albertson, D G

    2009-02-01

    Hedgehog signaling is often activated in tumors, yet it remains unclear how GLI2, a transcription factor activated by this pathway, acts as an oncogene. We show that GLI2 is a pleiotropic oncogene. The overexpression induces genomic instability and blocks differentiation, likely mediated in part by enhanced expression of the stem cell gene SOX2. GLI2 also induces transforming growth factor (TGF)B1-dependent transdifferentiation of foreskin and tongue, but not gingival fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, creating an environment permissive for invasion by keratinocytes, which are in various stages of differentiation having downregulated GLI2. Thus, upregulated GLI2 expression is sufficient to induce a number of the acquired characteristics of tumor cells; however, the stroma, in a tissue-specific manner, determines whether certain GLI2 oncogenic traits are expressed. PMID:19015636

  17. Mouse Elk oncogene maps to chromosome X and a novel Elk oncogene (Elk3) maps to chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Y; Taketo, M; Nozaki, M; Seldin, M F

    1995-03-20

    The Elk protein is a member of the Ets family found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Human ELK1 encoded by ELK1 binds alone or together with serum response factor to DNA and regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. Using a panel of interspecific backcross mice, we have mapped the Elk oncogene (Elk) and a novel type Elk oncogene (Elk3), closely related to ELK1. Elk maps to Chr X, and Elk3 maps to the proximal region of Chr 10. PMID:7601474

  18. Mouse Elk oncogene maps to chromosome X and a novel Elk oncogene (Elk3) maps to chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Yoshitaka; Taketo, Makoto; Nozaki, Masami

    1995-03-20

    The Elk protein is a member of the Ets family found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Human ELK1 encoded by ELK1 binds alone or together with serum response factor to DNA and regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. Using a panel of interspecific backcross mice, we have mapped the Elk oncogene (Elk) and a novel type Elk oncogene (Elk3), closely related to ELK1. Elk maps to Chr X, and Elk3 maps to the proximal region of Chr 10. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Emerging landscape of oncogenic signatures across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ciriello, Giovanni; Miller, Martin L; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy is challenged by the diversity of molecular implementations of oncogenic processes and by the resulting variation in therapeutic responses. Projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) provide molecular tumor maps in unprecedented detail. The interpretation of these maps remains a major challenge. Here we distilled thousands of genetic and epigenetic features altered in cancers to ~500 selected functional events (SFEs). Using this simplified description, we derived a hierarchical classification of 3,299 TCGA tumors from 12 cancer types. The top classes are dominated by either mutations (M class) or copy number changes (C class). This distinction is clearest at the extremes of genomic instability, indicating the presence of different oncogenic processes. The full hierarchy shows functional event patterns characteristic of multiple cross-tissue groups of tumors, termed oncogenic signature classes. Targetable functional events in a tumor class are suggestive of class-specific combination therapy. These results may assist in the definition of clinical trials to match actionable oncogenic signatures with personalized therapies. PMID:24071851

  20. The Minority Report: Targeting the Rare Oncogenes in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    McCoach, Caroline E.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is still responsible for the highest number of cancer deaths worldwide. Despite this fact, significant progress has been made in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, efforts to identify and treat genetic alterations (gene mutations, gene fusions, gene amplification events, etc.) that result in oncogenic drivers are now standard of care (EGFR and ALK) or an intense area of research. The most prevalent oncogenic drivers have likely already been identified; thus, there is now a focus on subgroups of tumors with less common genetic alterations. Interestingly, as we explore these less common mutations, we are discovering that many occur across other tumor types (i.e., non-lung cancer), further justifying their study. Furthermore, many studies have demonstrated that by searching broadly for multiple genetic alterations in large subsets of patients they are able to identify potentially targetable alterations in the majority of patients. Although individually, the rare oncogenic drivers subgroups may seem to occur too infrequently to justify their exploration, the fact that the majority of patients with NSCLC harbor a potentially actionable driver mutation within their tumors and the fact that different types of cancers often have the same oncogenic driver justifies this approach. PMID:25228144

  1. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels. PMID:26732534

  2. Folate levels modulate oncogene-induced replication stress and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Noa; Maoz, Karin; Bester, Assaf C; Im, Michael M; Shewach, Donna S; Karni, Rotem; Kerem, Batsheva

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal instability in early cancer stages is caused by replication stress. One mechanism by which oncogene expression induces replication stress is to drive cell proliferation with insufficient nucleotide levels. Cancer development is driven by alterations in both genetic and environmental factors. Here, we investigated whether replication stress can be modulated by both genetic and non-genetic factors and whether the extent of replication stress affects the probability of neoplastic transformation. To do so, we studied the effect of folate, a micronutrient that is essential for nucleotide biosynthesis, on oncogene-induced tumorigenicity. We show that folate deficiency by itself leads to replication stress in a concentration-dependent manner. Folate deficiency significantly enhances oncogene-induced replication stress, leading to increased DNA damage and tumorigenicity in vitro. Importantly, oncogene-expressing cells, when grown under folate deficiency, exhibit a significantly increased frequency of tumor development in mice. These findings suggest that replication stress is a quantitative trait affected by both genetic and non-genetic factors and that the extent of replication stress plays an important role in cancer development. PMID:26197802

  3. Serum screening for oncogene proteins in workers exposed to PCBs.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt-Rauf, P W; Niman, H L

    1988-01-01

    A cohort of 16 municipal workers engaged in cleaning oil from old transformers was examined for possible health effects from exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In addition to the evaluation of routine clinical parameters (history, physical examination, liver function tests, serum triglycerides, serum PCB values), a new screening technique for the presence of oncogene proteins in serum using monoclonal antibodies was used to ascertain the potential carcinogenic risk from exposure in these workers. Except for one individual, serum PCB concentrations were found to be relatively low in this cohort, probably due to the observance of appropriate protective precautions. The results of liver function test were within normal limits and serum triglyceride concentrations showed no consistent relation to PCB concentrations. Six individuals, all of whom were smokers, showed abnormal banding patterns for fes oncogene related proteins. The individual with the highest serum PCB concentration also exhibited significantly raised levels of the H-ras oncogene related P21 protein in his serum. These oncogene protein findings may be indicative of an increased risk for the development of malignant disease in these individuals. Images PMID:3143397

  4. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M; Worboys, Jonathan D; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C; Miller, Crispin J; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-05-01

    Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRAS(G12D)) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRAS(G12D) signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRAS(G12D) engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D). Consequently, reciprocal KRAS(G12D) produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D) alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27087446

  5. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David JH; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David TW; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimlmg, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Paragraph Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoural heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and Group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for the majority of paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to Groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family protooncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1/GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate ‘enhancer hijacking’ as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer. PMID:25043047

  6. Autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihua; Wang, Xiao Dan; Lapi, Eleonora; Sullivan, Alexandra; Jia, Wei; He, You-Wen; Ratnayaka, Indrika; Zhong, Shan; Goldin, Robert D.; Goemans, Christoph G.; Tolkovsky, Aviva M.; Lu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    RAS is frequently mutated in human cancers and has opposing effects on autophagy and tumorigenesis. Identifying determinants of the cellular responses to RAS is therefore vital in cancer research. Here, we show that autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS. N-terminal Apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2) mediates RAS-induced senescence and inhibits autophagy. Oncogenic RAS-expressing ASPP2(Δ3/Δ3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that escape senescence express a high level of ATG5/ATG12. Consistent with the notion that autophagy levels control the cellular response to oncogenic RAS, overexpressing ATG5, but not autophagy-deficient ATG5 mutant K130R, bypasses RAS-induced senescence, whereas ATG5 or ATG3 deficiency predisposes to it. Mechanistically, ASPP2 inhibits RAS-induced autophagy by competing with ATG16 to bind ATG5/ATG12 and preventing ATG16/ATG5/ATG12 formation. Hence, ASPP2 modulates oncogenic RAS-induced autophagic activity to dictate the cellular response to RAS: to proliferate or senesce. PMID:22847423

  7. In silico search of DNA drugs targeting oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent a class of drug candidates for antigene therapy. Based on strict criteria, we investigated the potential of 25 known oncogenes to be regulated by TFOs in the mRNA synthesis level and we report specific target sequences found in seven of these genes. PMID:23221090

  8. miR-17–92 explains MYC oncogene addiction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yulin; Casey, Stephanie C; Choi, Peter S; Felsher, Dean W

    2014-01-01

    MYC regulates tumorigenesis by coordinating the expression of thousands of genes. We found that MYC appears to regulate the decisions between cell survival versus death and self-renewal versus senescence through the microRNA miR-17–92 cluster. Addiction to the MYC oncogene may therefore in fact be an addiction to miR-17–92. PMID:27308380

  9. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  10. Notch signaling: switching an oncogene to a tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Lobry, Camille; Oh, Philmo; Mansour, Marc R.; Look, A. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a regulator of self-renewal and differentiation in several tissues and cell types. Notch is a binary cell-fate determinant, and its hyperactivation has been implicated as oncogenic in several cancers including breast cancer and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Recently, several studies also unraveled tumor-suppressor roles for Notch signaling in different tissues, including tissues where it was before recognized as an oncogene in specific lineages. Whereas involvement of Notch as an oncogene in several lymphoid malignancies (T-ALL, B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia, splenic marginal zone lymphoma) is well characterized, there is growing evidence involving Notch signaling as a tumor suppressor in myeloid malignancies. It therefore appears that Notch signaling pathway’s oncogenic or tumor-suppressor abilities are highly context dependent. In this review, we summarize and discuss latest advances in the understanding of this dual role in hematopoiesis and the possible consequences for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:24608975

  11. Protein kinase Cι expression and oncogenic signaling mechanisms in cancer.

    PubMed

    Murray, Nicole R; Kalari, Krishna R; Fields, Alan P

    2011-04-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that PKCι is an oncogene and prognostic marker that is frequently targeted for genetic alteration in many major forms of human cancer. Functional data demonstrate that PKCι is required for the transformed phenotype of lung, pancreatic, ovarian, prostate, colon, and brain cancer cells. Future studies will be required to determine whether PKCι is also an oncogene in the many other cancer types that also overexpress PKCι. Studies of PKCι using genetically defined models of tumorigenesis have revealed a critical role for PKCι in multiple stages of tumorigenesis, including tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. Recent studies in a genetic model of lung adenocarcinoma suggest a role for PKCι in transformation of lung cancer stem cells. These studies have important implications for the therapeutic use of aurothiomalate (ATM), a highly selective PKCι signaling inhibitor currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Significant progress has been made in determining the molecular mechanisms by which PKCι drives the transformed phenotype, particularly the central role played by the oncogenic PKCι-Par6 complex in transformed growth and invasion, and of several PKCι-dependent survival pathways in chemo-resistance. Future studies will be required to determine the composition and dynamics of the PKCι-Par6 complex, and the mechanisms by which oncogenic signaling through this complex is regulated. Likewise, a better understanding of the critical downstream effectors of PKCι in various human tumor types holds promise for identifying novel prognostic and surrogate markers of oncogenic PKCι activity that may be clinically useful in ongoing clinical trials of ATM. PMID:20945390

  12. A Network-Based Model of Oncogenic Collaboration for Prediction of Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Laderas, Ted G.; Heiser, Laura M.; Sönmez, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process, involving the acquisition of multiple oncogenic mutations that transform cells, resulting in systemic dysregulation that enables proliferation, invasion, and other cancer hallmarks. The goal of precision medicine is to identify therapeutically-actionable mutations from large-scale omic datasets. However, the multiplicity of oncogenes required for transformation, known as oncogenic collaboration, makes assigning effective treatments difficult. Motivated by this observation, we propose a new type of oncogenic collaboration where mutations in genes that interact with an oncogene may contribute to the oncogene’s deleterious potential, a new genomic feature that we term “surrogate oncogenes.” Surrogate oncogenes are representatives of these mutated subnetworks that interact with oncogenes. By mapping mutations to a protein–protein interaction network, we determine the significance of the observed distribution using permutation-based methods. For a panel of 38 breast cancer cell lines, we identified a significant number of surrogate oncogenes in known oncogenes such as BRCA1 and ESR1, lending credence to this approach. In addition, using Random Forest Classifiers, we show that these significant surrogate oncogenes predict drug sensitivity for 74 drugs in the breast cancer cell lines with a mean error rate of 30.9%. Additionally, we show that surrogate oncogenes are predictive of survival in patients. The surrogate oncogene framework incorporates unique or rare mutations from a single sample, and therefore has the potential to integrate patient-unique mutations into drug sensitivity predictions, suggesting a new direction in precision medicine and drug development. Additionally, we show the prevalence of significant surrogate oncogenes in multiple cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas, suggesting that surrogate oncogenes may be a useful genomic feature for guiding pancancer analyses and assigning therapies across many tissue

  13. Functional implications of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generated by oncogenic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Bong; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Between 15–20% of human cancers are associated with infection by oncogenic viruses. Oncogenic viruses, including HPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV-1, target mitochondria to influence cell proliferation and survival. Oncogenic viral gene products also trigger the production of reactive oxygen species which can elicit oxidative DNA damage and potentiate oncogenic host signaling pathways. Viral oncogenes may also subvert mitochondria quality control mechanisms such as mitophagy and metabolic adaptation pathways to promote virus replication. Here, we will review recent progress on viral regulation of mitophagy and metabolic adaptation and their roles in viral oncogenesis. PMID:25580106

  14. Regulation of oncogene-induced cell cycle exit and senescence by chromatin modifiers

    PubMed Central

    David, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Oncogene activation leads to dramatic changes in numerous biological pathways controlling cellular division, and results in the initiation of a transcriptional program that promotes transformation. Conversely, it also triggers an irreversible cell cycle exit called cellular senescence, which allows the organism to counteract the potentially detrimental uncontrolled proliferation of damaged cells. Therefore, a tight transcriptional control is required at the onset of oncogenic signal, coordinating both positive and negative regulation of gene expression. Not surprisingly, numerous chromatin modifiers contribute to the cellular response to oncogenic stress. While these chromatin modifiers were initially thought of as mere mediators of the cellular response to oncogenic stress, recent studies have uncovered a direct and specific regulation of chromatin modifiers by oncogenic signals. We review here the diverse functions of chromatin modifiers in the cellular response to oncogenic stress, and discuss the implications of these findings on the regulation of cell cycle progression and proliferation by activated oncogenes. PMID:22825329

  15. Enhancing Anti-Tumor Efficacy of Doxorubicin by Non-Covalent Conjugation to Gold Nanoparticles – In Vitro Studies on Feline Fibrosarcoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Michał; Lewandowski, Wiktor; Król, Magdalena; Pawłowski, Karol; Mieczkowski, Józef; Lechowski, Roman; Zabielska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Background Feline injection-site sarcomas are malignant skin tumors of mesenchymal origin, the treatment of which is a challenge for veterinary practitioners. Methods of treatment include radical surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The most commonly used cytostatic drugs are cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and vincristine. However, the use of cytostatics as adjunctive treatment is limited due to their adverse side-effects, low biodistribution after intravenous administration and multidrug resistance. Colloid gold nanoparticles are promising drug delivery systems to overcome multidrug resistance, which is a main cause of ineffective chemotherapy treatment. The use of colloid gold nanoparticles as building blocks for drug delivery systems is preferred due to ease of surface functionalization with various molecules, chemical stability and their low toxicity. Methods Stability and structure of the glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles non-covalently modified with doxorubicin (Au-GSH-Dox) was confirmed using XPS, TEM, FT-IR, SAXRD and SAXS analyses. MTT assay, Annexin V and Propidium Iodide Apoptosis assay and Rhodamine 123 and Verapamil assay were performed on 4 feline fibrosarcoma cell lines (FFS1WAW, FFS1, FFS3, FFS5). Statistical analyses were performed using Graph Pad Prism 5.0 (USA). Results A novel approach, glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles (4.3 +/- 1.1 nm in diameter) non-covalently modified with doxorubicin (Au-GSH-Dox) was designed and synthesized. A higher cytotoxic effect (p<0.01) of Au-GSH-Dox than that of free doxorubicin has been observed in 3 (FFS1, FFS3, FFS1WAW) out of 4 feline fibrosarcoma cell lines. The effect has been correlated to the activity of glycoprotein P (main efflux pump responsible for multidrug resistance). Conclusions The results indicate that Au-GSH-Dox may be a potent new therapeutic agent to increase the efficacy of the drug by overcoming the resistance to doxorubicin in feline fibrosarcoma cell lines. Moreover, as

  16. Eriobotrya japonica hydrophilic extract modulates cytokines in normal tissues, in the tumor of Meth-A-fibrosarcoma bearing mice, and enhances their survival time

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytokines play a key role in the immune response to developing tumors, and therefore modulating their levels and actions provides innovative strategies for enhancing the activity of antigen presenting cells and polarizing towards T helper 1 type response within tumor microenvironment. One of these approaches could be the employment of plant extracts that have cytokine immunomodulation capabilities. Previously, we have shown that the Eriobotrya japonica hydrophilic extract (EJHE) induces proinflammatory cytokines in vitro and in vivo. Methods The present study explored the in vivo immunomodulatory effect on interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-17 (IL-17), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) evoked by two water-extracts prepared from EJ leaves in the tissues of normal and Meth-A-fibrosarcoma bearing mice. Results Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 10 μg of EJHE and EJHE-water residue (WR), prepared from butanol extraction, increased significantly IFN-γ production in the spleen (p < 0.01) and lung (p < 0.03) tissues at 6-48 hours and suppressed significantly TGF-β1 production levels (p < 0.001) in the spleen for as long as 48 hours. The latter responses, however, were not seen in Meth-A fibrosarcoma-bearing mice. On the contrary, triple i.p. injections, 24 hours apart; of 10 μg EJHE increased significantly IFN-γ production in the spleen (p < 0.02) while only EJHE-WR increased significantly IFN-γ, TGF-β1 and IL-17 (p < 0.03 - 0.005) production within the tumor microenvironment of Meth-A fibrosarcoma. In addition, the present work revealed a significant prolongation of survival time (median survival time 72 days vs. 27 days of control, p < 0.007) of mice inoculated i.p. with Meth-A cells followed by three times/week for eight weeks of i.p. administration of EJHE-WR. The latter prolonged survival effect was not seen with EJHE. Conclusions The therapeutic value of EJHE-WR as an anticancer agent merits further investigation of

  17. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  18. Oncogenic microtubule hyperacetylation through BEX4-mediated sirtuin 2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Kwan; Lee, Janet; Go, Heounjeong; Lee, Chang Geun; Kim, Suhyeon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Cho, Hyeseong; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Ha, Geun-Hyoung; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Five brain-expressed X-linked (BEX) gene members (BEX1-5) are arranged in tandem on chromosome X, and are highly conserved across diverse species. However, little is known about the function and role of BEX. This study represents a first attempt to demonstrate the molecular details of a novel oncogene BEX4. Among BEX proteins, BEX4 localizes to microtubules and spindle poles, and interacts with α-tubulin (α-TUB) and sirtuin 2 (SIRT2). The overexpression of BEX4 leads to the hyperacetylation of α-TUB by inhibiting SIRT2-mediated deacetylation. Furthermore, we found BEX4 expression conferred resistance to apoptotic cell death but led to acquisition of aneuploidy, and also increased the proliferating potential and growth of tumors. These results suggest that BEX4 overexpression causes an imbalance between TUB acetylation and deacetylation by SIRT2 inhibition and induces oncogenic aneuploidy transformation. PMID:27512957

  19. Oncogenes and human cancer--a surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Markham, N. I.

    1985-01-01

    Amongst the most significant of the advances that have occurred in molecular biology in the last decade has been the development of our understanding of oncogenes, genes that would seem to be responsible for causing cancer. Subtle genetic differences between tumour cells and their normal counterparts have now been discovered, and there is much excitement being generated as new light is shed on the very roots of malignant change. Much of the technology is complicated and confusing, yet the subject should be one with which practising surgeons have a background understanding, for clinicians will possibly soon be able to utilise the results of this basic scientific research in everyday practice. This review article attempts to explain the background to the discovery of oncogenes, how they act, and how the technology may be able to be clinically used in the future in the battle to overcome cancer. PMID:4051429

  20. SUMOylated IRF-1 shows oncogenic potential by mimicking IRF-2

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sun-Mi; Chae, Myounghee; Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Seo, Taegun; Jang, Ik-Soon; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Il-Chul; Lee, Je-Ho; Park, Junsoo

    2010-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an interferon-induced transcriptional activator that suppresses tumors by impeding cell proliferation. Recently, we demonstrated that the level of SUMOylated IRF-1 is elevated in tumor cells, and that SUMOylation of IRF-1 attenuates its tumor-suppressive function. Here we report that SUMOylated IRF-1 mimics IRF-2, an antagonistic repressor, and shows oncogenic potential. To demonstrate the role of SUMOylated IRF-1 in tumorigenesis, we used SUMO-IRF-1 recombinant protein. Stable expression of SUMO-IRF-1 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in focus formation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Inoculation of SUMO-IRF-1-transfected cells into athymic nude mice resulted in tumor formation and infiltration of adipose tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that SUMO-IRF-1 transforms NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that SUMOylated IRF-1 may act as an oncogenic protein in tumor cells.

  1. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    An extensive experiment involving approximately 400 rats exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA and to electrons is nearing completion. Progress is described in three areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) carcinogenesis and DNA strand breaks in rat skin following exposure by the neon ions or electrons; (2) oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; (3) DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration. 59 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Comparison of liver oncogenic potential among human RAS isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sook In; Moon, Hyuk; Ju, Hye-Lim; Kim, Dae Yeong; Cho, Kyung Joo; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Calvisi, Diego F.; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in one of three RAS genes (i.e., HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) leading to constitutive activation of RAS signaling pathways is considered a key oncogenic event in human carcinogenesis. Whether activated RAS isoforms possess different oncogenic potentials remains an unresolved question. Here, we compared oncogenic properties among RAS isoforms using liver-specific transgenesis in mice. Hydrodynamic transfection was performed using transposons expressing short hairpin RNA downregulating p53 and an activated RAS isoform, and livers were harvested at 23 days after gene delivery. No differences were found in the hepatocarcinogenic potential among RAS isoforms, as determined by both gross examination of livers and liver weight per body weight ratio (LW/BW) of mice expressing HRASQ61L, KRAS4BG12V and NRASQ61K. However, the tumorigenic potential differed significantly between KRAS splicing variants. The LW/BW ratio in KRAS4AG12V mice was significantly lower than in KRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.001), and KRAS4AG12V mice lived significantly longer than KRRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.0001). Notably, tumors from KRAS4AG12V mice displayed higher expression of the p16INK4A tumor suppressor when compared with KRAS4BG12V tumors. Forced overexpression of p16INK4A significantly reduced tumor growth in KRAS4BG12V mice, suggesting that upregulation of p16INK4A by KRAS4AG12V presumably delays tumor development driven by the latter oncogene. PMID:26799184

  3. Oncogenic mutations in GNAQ occur early in uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Michael D.; Worley, Lori A.; Long, Meghan D.; Duan, Shenghui; Council, M. Laurin; Bowcock, Anne M.; Harbour, J. William

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Early/initiating oncogenic mutations have been identified for many cancers, but such mutations remain unidentified in uveal melanoma (UM). An extensive search for such mutations was undertaken, focusing on the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, which is often the target of initiating mutations in other types of cancer. Methods DNA samples from primary UMs were analyzed for mutations in 24 potential oncogenes that affect the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway. For GNAQ, a stimulatory αq G-protein subunit which was recently found to be mutated in uveal melanomas, re-sequencing was expanded to include 67 primary UMs and 22 peripheral blood samples. GNAQ status was analyzed for association with clinical, pathologic, chromosomal, immunohistochemical and transcriptional features. Results Activating mutations at codon 209 were identified in GNAQ in 33/67 (49%) primary UMs, including 2/9 (22%) iris melanomas and 31/58 (54%) posterior UMs. No mutations were found in the other 23 potential oncogenes. GNAQ mutations were not found in normal blood DNA samples. Consistent with GNAQ mutation being an early or initiating event, this mutation was not associated with any clinical, pathologic or molecular features associated with late tumor progression. Conclusions GNAQ mutations occur in about half of UMs, representing the most common known oncogenic mutation in this cancer. The presence of this mutation in tumors at all stages of malignant progression suggests that it is an early event in UM. Mutations in this G-protein provide new insights into UM pathogenesis and could lead to new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:18719078

  4. Oncogenic long noncoding RNA FAL1 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaomin; Hu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are defined as RNA transcripts larger than 200 nucleotides that do not appear to have protein-coding potential. Accumulating evidence indicates that lncRNAs are involved in tumorigenesis. Our work reveals that lncRNA FAL1 (focally amplified lncRNA on chromosome 1) is frequently and focally amplified in human cancers and mediates oncogenic functions. PMID:27308441

  5. Lung cancers unrelated to smoking: characterized by single oncogene addiction?

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2011-08-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Currently, adenocarcinoma is its most common histological subtype in many countries. In contrast with small cell lung cancer or squamous cell carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma often arises in never-smokers, especially in East Asian countries, as well as in smokers. Adenocarcinoma in never-smokers is associated with a lower incidence of genetic alterations (i.e., somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity, and methylation) than in smokers. In addition, most adenocarcinomas in never-smokers harbor one of the proto-oncogene aberrations that occur in a mutually exclusive manner (EGFR mutation, KRAS mutation, HER2 mutations, or ALK translocation). It is of note that the proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells that harbor one of these oncogenic aberrations depend on the signaling from each aberrantly activated oncoprotein (oncogene addiction). Therefore, most adenocarcinomas in never-smokers can be effectively treated by molecularly targeted drugs that inhibit each oncoprotein. Moreover, from a pathological aspect, lung adenocarcinoma in never-smokers is characterized by terminal respiratory unit-type adenocarcinoma and a particular gene expression profile. Finally, epidemiological analyses have identified many candidate causes of lung cancer in never-smokers (genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors). The elucidation of the particular features of lung cancer unrelated to smoking and the development of new therapeutic modalities may reduce the mortality from lung cancers in the future. PMID:21655907

  6. PVT1: A Rising Star among Oncogenic Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Teresa; Farina, Lorenzo; Macino, Giuseppe; Paci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that short and long noncoding RNAs critically participate in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and (mis)function. However, while the functional characterization of short non-coding RNAs has been reaching maturity, there is still a paucity of well characterized long noncoding RNAs, even though large studies in recent years are rapidly increasing the number of annotated ones. The long noncoding RNA PVT1 is encoded by a gene that has been long known since it resides in the well-known cancer risk region 8q24. However, a couple of accidental concurrent conditions have slowed down the study of this gene, that is, a preconception on the primacy of the protein-coding over noncoding RNAs and the prevalent interest in its neighbor MYC oncogene. Recent studies have brought PVT1 under the spotlight suggesting interesting models of functioning, such as competing endogenous RNA activity and regulation of protein stability of important oncogenes, primarily of the MYC oncogene. Despite some advancements in modelling the PVT1 role in cancer, there are many questions that remain unanswered concerning the precise molecular mechanisms underlying its functioning. PMID:25883951

  7. PERK Integrates Oncogenic Signaling and Cell Survival During Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yiwen; Diehl, J Alan

    2016-10-01

    Unfolded protein responses (UPR), consisting of three major transducers PERK, IRE1, and ATF6, occur in the midst of a variety of intracellular and extracellular challenges that perturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER stress occurs and is thought to be a contributing factor to a number of human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and various metabolic syndromes. In the context of neoplastic growth, oncogenic stress resulting from dysregulation of oncogenes such as c-Myc, Braf(V600E) , and HRAS(G12V) trigger the UPR as an adaptive strategy for cancer cell survival. PERK is an ER resident type I protein kinase harboring both pro-apoptotic and pro-survival capabilities. PERK, as a coordinator through its downstream substrates, reprograms cancer gene expression to facilitate survival in response to oncogenes and microenvironmental challenges, such as hypoxia, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Herein, we discuss how PERK kinase engages in tumor initiation, transformation, adaption microenvironmental stress, chemoresistance and potential opportunities, and potential opportunities for PERK targeted therapy. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2088-2096, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864318

  8. The human minisatellite consensus at breakpoints of oncogene translocations.

    PubMed Central

    Krowczynska, A M; Rudders, R A; Krontiris, T G

    1990-01-01

    A reexamination of human minisatellite (hypervariable) regions following the cloning and sequencing of the new minisatellite, VTR1.1, revealed that many of these structures possessed a strongly conserved copy of the chi-like octamer, GC[A/T]GG[A/T]GG. In oncogene translocations apparently created by aberrant VDJ recombinase activity, this VTR octamer was often found within a few bases of the breakpoint (p less than 10(-10)). Three bcl2 rearrangements which occurred within 2 bp of one another were located precisely adjacent to this consensus; it defined the 5' border of that oncogene's major breakpoint cluster. Several c-myc translocations also occurred within 2 bp of this sequence. While the appearance of a chi-like element in polymorphic minisatellite sequences is consistent with a role promoting either recombination or replication slippage, the existence of such elements at sites of somatic translocations suggests chi function in site-specific recombination, perhaps as a subsidiary recognition signal in immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. We discuss the implications of these observations for mechanisms by which oncogene translocations and minisatellite sequences are generated. Images PMID:1969618

  9. CRAF R391W is a melanoma driver oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Atefi, Mohammad; Titz, Bjoern; Tsoi, Jennifer; Avramis, Earl; Le, Allison; Ng, Charles; Lomova, Anastasia; Lassen, Amanda; Friedman, Michael; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ribas, Antoni; Graeber, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 75% of melanomas have known driver oncogenic mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNA11 or GNAQ, while the mutations providing constitutive oncogenic signaling in the remaining melanomas are not known. We established a melanoma cell line from a tumor with none of the common driver mutations. This cell line demonstrated a signaling profile similar to BRAF-mutants, but lacked sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. RNA-seq mutation data implicated CRAF R391W as the alternative driver mutation of this melanoma. CRAF R391W was homozygous and over expressed. These melanoma cells were highly sensitive to CRAF, but not BRAF knockdown. In reconstitution experiments, CRAF R391W, but not CRAF WT, transformed NIH3T3 cells in soft-agar colony formation assays, increased kinase activity in vitro, induced MAP kinase signaling and conferred vemurafenib resistance. MAP kinase inducing activity was dependent on CRAF dimerization. Thus, CRAF is a bona fide alternative oncogene for BRAF/NRAS/GNAQ/GNA11 wild type melanomas. PMID:27273450

  10. Activation of oncogenes by radon progeny and x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal is to study the carcinogenic effect of both high and low LET radiation at the molecular level, utilizing techniques developed in molecular biology, cancer cell biology and radiation biology. The underlying assumption is that malignant transformation of normal cells is a multistep process requiring two or more molecular events in the genomic DNA. We hypothesize that radiation may induce such events in one or more steps of the multistep process. We will use in vitro models of transformation that reproduce the stepwise progression of normal cells toward the transformed phenotype and ask whether radiation can provide the necessary activating function at discrete steps along this path. Our strategy involves transfecting into normal primary cells a variety of cloned oncogenes that are known to supply only some of the functions necessary for full transformation. These partially transformed'' cells will be the targets for irradiation by x-rays and alpha particles. The results will provide the basis for assessing the ability of ionizing radiation to activate oncogenic functions that complement'' the oncogene already present in the transfected cells and produce the fully transformed phenotype. Progress is described. 121 refs.

  11. RNAi screens in mice identify physiological regulators of oncogenic growth

    PubMed Central

    Beronja, Slobodan; Janki, Peter; Heller, Evan; Lien, Wen-Hui; Keyes, Brice; Oshimori, Naoki; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tissue growth is the multifaceted outcome of a cell’s intrinsic capabilities and its interactions with the surrounding environment. Decoding these complexities is essential for understanding human development and tumorigenesis. Here, we tackle this problem by carrying out the first genome-wide RNAi-mediated screens in mice. Focusing on skin development and oncogenic (HrasG12V-induced) hyperplasia, our screens uncover novel as well as anticipated regulators of embryonic epidermal growth. Among top oncogenic screen hits are Mllt6 and the Wnt effector β-catenin; they maintain HrasG12V-dependent hyperproliferation. We also expose β-catenin as an unanticipated antagonist of normal epidermal growth, functioning through Wnt-independent intercellular adhesion. Finally, we document physiological relevance to mouse and human cancers, thereby establishing the feasibility of in vivo mammalian genome-wide investigations to dissect tissue development and tumorigenesis. By documenting some oncogenic growth regulators, we pave the way for future investigations of other hits and raise promise for unearthing new targets for cancer therapies. PMID:23945586

  12. PVT1: a rising star among oncogenic long noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Teresa; Farina, Lorenzo; Macino, Giuseppe; Paci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that short and long noncoding RNAs critically participate in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and (mis)function. However, while the functional characterization of short non-coding RNAs has been reaching maturity, there is still a paucity of well characterized long noncoding RNAs, even though large studies in recent years are rapidly increasing the number of annotated ones. The long noncoding RNA PVT1 is encoded by a gene that has been long known since it resides in the well-known cancer risk region 8q24. However, a couple of accidental concurrent conditions have slowed down the study of this gene, that is, a preconception on the primacy of the protein-coding over noncoding RNAs and the prevalent interest in its neighbor MYC oncogene. Recent studies have brought PVT1 under the spotlight suggesting interesting models of functioning, such as competing endogenous RNA activity and regulation of protein stability of important oncogenes, primarily of the MYC oncogene. Despite some advancements in modelling the PVT1 role in cancer, there are many questions that remain unanswered concerning the precise molecular mechanisms underlying its functioning. PMID:25883951

  13. KRAS insertion mutations are oncogenic and exhibit distinct functional properties

    PubMed Central

    White, Yasmine; Bagchi, Aditi; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Inguva, Anagha; Bollag, Gideon; Zhang, Chao; Carias, Heidi; Dickens, David; Loh, Mignon; Shannon, Kevin; Firestone, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS mutations introduce discrete amino acid substitutions that reduce intrinsic Ras GTPase activity and confer resistance to GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Here we discover a partial duplication of the switch 2 domain of K-Ras encoding a tandem repeat of amino acids G60_A66dup in a child with an atypical myeloproliferative neoplasm. K-Ras proteins containing this tandem duplication or a similar five amino acid E62_A66dup mutation identified in lung and colon cancers transform the growth of primary myeloid progenitors and of Ba/F3 cells. Recombinant K-RasG60_A66dup and K-RasE62_A66dup proteins display reduced intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates, accumulate in the GTP-bound conformation and are resistant to GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Remarkably, K-Ras proteins with switch 2 insertions are impaired for PI3 kinase binding and Akt activation, and are hypersensitive to MEK inhibition. These studies illuminate a new class of oncogenic KRAS mutations and reveal unexpected plasticity in oncogenic Ras proteins that has diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26854029

  14. Oncogenic transformation of diverse gastrointestinal tissues in primary organoid culture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingnan; Nadauld, Lincoln; Ootani, Akifumi; Corney, David C.; Pai, Reetesh K.; Gevaert, Olivier; Cantrell, Michael A.; Rack, Paul G.; Neal, James T.; Chan, Carol W-M.; Yeung, Trevor; Gong, Xue; Yuan, Jenny; Wilhelmy, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Attardi, Laura D.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; Hung, Kenneth E.; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Ji, Hanlee P.; Kuo, Calvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of primary organoid cultures containing epithelial and mesenchymal elements to cancer modeling holds promise for combining the accurate multilineage differentiation and physiology of in vivo systems with the facile in vitro manipulation of transformed cell lines. Here, a single air-liquid interface culture method was used without modification to engineer oncogenic mutations into primary epithelial/mesenchymal organoids from mouse colon, stomach and pancreas. Pancreatic and gastric organoids exhibited dysplasia upon KrasG12D expression and/or p53 loss, and readily generated adenocarcinoma upon in vivo transplantation. In contrast, primary colon organoids required combinatorial Apc, p53, KrasG12D and Smad4 mutations for progressive transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma-like histology in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, recapitulating multi-hit models of colorectal cancer (CRC), and versus more promiscuous transformation of small intestinal organoids. Colon organoid culture functionally validated the microRNA miR-483 as a dominant driver oncogene at the Insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF2) 11p15.5 CRC amplicon, inducing dysplasia in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. These studies demonstrate the general utility of a highly tractable primary organoid system for cancer modeling and driver oncogene validation in diverse gastrointestinal tissues. PMID:24859528

  15. Utilizing signature-score to identify oncogenic pathways of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chen, Hung-I Harry; Lu, Jo-Yang; Lin, Pei-Ying; Keller, Charles; Comerford, Sarah; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Chen, Yidong

    2013-01-01

    Extracting maximal information from gene signature sets (GSSs) via microarray-based transcriptional profiling involves assigning function to up and down regulated genes. Here we present a novel sample scoring method called Signature-score (S-score) which can be used to quantify the expression pattern of tumor samples from previously identified gene signature sets. A simulation result demonstrated an improved accuracy and robustness by S-score method comparing with other scoring methods. By applying the S-score method to cholangiocarcinoma (CAC), an aggressive hepatic cancer that arises from bile ducts cells, we identified enriched oncogenic pathways in two large CAC data sets. Thirteen pathways were enriched in CAC compared with normal liver and bile duct. Moreover, using S-score, we were able to dissect correlations between CAC-associated oncogenic pathways and Gene Ontology function. Two major oncogenic clusters and associated functions were identified. Cluster 1, which included beta-catenin and Ras, showed a positive correlation with the cell cycle, while cluster 2, which included TGF-beta, cytokeratin 19 and EpCAM was inversely correlated with immune function. We also used S-score to identify pathways that are differentially expressed in CAC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the more common subtype of liver cancer. Our results demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of S-score in assigning functional roles to tumor-associated gene signature sets and in identifying potential therapeutic targets for specific liver cancer subtypes. PMID:23905013

  16. Oncogene-mediated tumor transformation sensitizes cells to autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Gargini, Ricardo; García-Escudero, Vega; Izquierdo, Marta; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    The process of tumorigenesis induces alterations in numerous cellular pathways including the main eukaryotic metabolic routes. It has been recently demonstrated that autophagy is part of the oncogene-induced senescence phenotype although its role in tumor establishment has not been completely clarified. In the present study, we showed that non‑transformed cells are sensitized to mitochondrial stress and autophagy induction when they are transformed by oncogenes such as c-Myc or Ras. We observed that overexpression of c-Myc or Ras increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and the expression of p62, a known partner for degradation by autophagy. The activation of AMPK was found to favor the activation of FoxO3 which was prevented by the inhibition of AMPK. The transcriptional activation mediated by FoxO3 upregulated genes such as BNIP3 and LC3. Finally, the transformation by oncogenes such as c-Myc and Ras predisposes tumor cells to autophagy induction as a consequence of mitochondrial stress and impairs tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, which may have therapeutic implications. PMID:27035659

  17. Glucose metabolism and hexosamine pathway regulate oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Gitenay, D; Wiel, C; Lallet-Daher, H; Vindrieux, D; Aubert, S; Payen, L; Simonnet, H; Bernard, D

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) prevents the ability of oncogenic signals to induce tumorigenesis. It is now largely admitted that the mitogenic effect of oncogenes requires metabolic adaptations to respond to new energetic and bio constituent needs. Yet, whether glucose metabolism affects OIS response is largely unknown. This is largely because of the fact that most of the OIS cellular models are cultivated in glucose excess. In this study, we used human epithelial cells, cultivated without glucose excess, to study alteration and functional role of glucose metabolism during OIS. We report a slowdown of glucose uptake and metabolism during OIS. Increasing glucose metabolism by expressing hexokinase2 (HK2), which converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), favors escape from OIS. Inversely, expressing a glucose-6-phosphatase, [corrected] pharmacological inhibition of HK2, or adding nonmetabolizable glucose induced a premature senescence. Manipulations of various metabolites covering G6P downstream pathways (hexosamine, glycolysis, and pentose phosphate pathways) suggest an unexpected role of the hexosamine pathway in controlling OIS. Altogether, our results show that decreased glucose metabolism occurs during and participates to OIS. PMID:24577087

  18. Oncogene-tumor suppressor gene feedback interactions and their control.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Baltazar D; del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Chan, Michael W Y

    2015-12-01

    We propose the hypothesis that for a particular type of cancer there exists a key pair of oncogene (OCG) and tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that is normally involved in strong stabilizing negative feedback loops (nFBLs) of molecular interactions, and it is these interactions that are sufficiently perturbed during cancer development. These nFBLs are thought to regulate oncogenic positive feedback loops (pFBLs) that are often required for the normal cellular functions of oncogenes. Examples given in this paper are the pairs of MYC and p53, KRAS and INK4A, and E2F1 and miR-17-92. We propose dynamical models of the aforementioned OCG-TSG interactions and derive stability conditions of the steady states in terms of strengths of cycles in the qualitative interaction network. Although these conditions are restricted to predictions of local stability, their simple linear expressions in terms of competing nFBLs and pFBLs make them intuitive and practical guides for experimentalists aiming to discover drug targets and stabilize cancer networks. PMID:26775863

  19. Galangin and kaempferol suppress phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yu Jung; Lee, Young Hun; Lee, Seung-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 degrades type IV collagen in the basement membrane and plays crucial roles in several pathological implications, including tumorigenesis and inflammation. In this study, we analyzed the effect of flavonols on MMP-9 expression in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. Galangin and kaempferol efficiently decreased MMP-9 secretion, whereas fisetin only weakly decreased its secretion. Galangin and kaempferol did not affect cell viability at concentrations up to 30 μM. Luciferase reporter assays showed that galangin and kaempferol decrease transcription of MMP-9 mRNA. Moreover, galangin and kaempferol strongly reduce IκBα phosphorylation and significantly decrease JNK phosphorylation. These results indicate that galangin and kaempferol suppress PMA-induced MMP-9 expression by blocking activation of NF-κB and AP-1. Therefore, these flavonols could be used as chemopreventive agents to lower the risk of diseases involving MMP-9. PMID:25518925

  20. Distant metastatic spread of molecularly proven infantile fibrosarcoma of the chest in a 2-month-old girl: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    van Grotel, Martine; Blanco, Esther; Sebire, Neil J; Slater, Olga; Chowdhury, Tanzina; Anderson, John

    2014-04-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma (IFS) is a malignant neoplasm, arising in children younger than 2 years of age and with a hallmark chromosomal translocation t(12;15)(p13;q26) encoding an ETV6-NTRK3 fusion oncoprotein. A review of the world literature found no reported cases of molecularly proven IFS with distant metastatic spread at presentation. We report the case of a 2-month-old infant girl presenting with a chest wall primary IFS bearing and expressing the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion, who had several pulmonary metastatic deposits at diagnosis. She achieved complete remission with chemotherapy and surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of molecularly proven IFS with distant metastatic spread. PMID:24276045

  1. Inhibitory effect of the carnosine-gallic acid synthetic peptide on MMP-2 and MMP-9 in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Rae; Eom, Tae-Kil; Byun, Hee-Guk

    2014-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases that degrade extracellular matrix components and play important roles in a variety of biological and pathological processes such as malignant tumor metastasis and invasion. In this study, we constructed carnosine-gallic acid peptide (CGP) to identify a better MMP inhibitor than carnosine. The inhibitory effects of CGP on MMP-2 and MMP-9 were investigated in the human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cell line. As a result, CGP significantly decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression levels without a cytotoxic effect. Moreover, CGP may inhibit migration and invasion in HT1080 cells through the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-uPA receptor signaling pathways to inhibit MMP-2 and MMP-9. Based on these results, it appears that CGP may play an important role in preventing and treating several MMP-2 and MMP-9-mediated health problems such as metastasis. PMID:24956509

  2. Salinomycin causes migration and invasion of human fibrosarcoma cells by inducing MMP-2 expression via PI3-kinase, ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-06-01

    Salinomycin (SAL) is a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to regulate a variety of cellular responses in various human cancer cells. However, the effects of SAL on metastatic capacity of HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells have not been elucidated. We investigated the effect of SAL on migration and invasion, with emphasis on the expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Treatment of SAL promoted the expression and activation of MMP-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as detected by western blot analysis, gelatin zymography, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. SAL also increased metastatic capacities, as determined by an increase in the migration and invasion of cells using the wound healing assay and the invasion assay, respectively. To confirm the detailed molecular mechanisms of these effects, we measured the activation of phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3-kinase) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)s (ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase), as detected by the phosphorylated proteins through western blot analysis. SAL treatment increased the phosphorylation of Akt and MAPKs. Inhibition of PI3-kinase, ERK-1/2, and p38 kinase with LY294002, PD98059, and SB203580, respectively, in the presence of SAL suppressed the metastatic capacity by reducing MMP-2 expression, as determined by gelatin zymography. Our results indicate that the PI3-kinase and MAPK signaling pathways are involved in migration and invasion of HT1080 through induction of MMP-2 expression and activation. In conclusion, SAL significantly increases the metastatic capacity of HT1080 cells by inducing MMP-2 expression via PI3-kinase and MAPK pathways. Our results suggest that SAL may be a potential agent for the study of cancer metastatic capacities. PMID:27035160

  3. The Superficial Musculoaponeurotic System of the Face: A Model Explored

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, M.; Fyfe, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Regional differences in the integument of the body are explained, at least in part, by differences in fascial arrangements. In the face, where the skin is more mobile due to the action of the underlying facial muscles, fascial organisation is important for support and separation of muscle groups. This study used bequeathed cadaver material to investigate a current model of the SMAS proposed by Macchi et al., the original boundaries of which were explored and extended using both histology and gross dissection. As a clearly identifiable structure spanning the lateral and midface, the SMAS in the specimen supported the model proposed by Macchi et al. The three main findings that support the model were the layered morphological appearance of the SMAS, its progression from fibrous to aponeurotic in a lateral to medial direction, and the enveloping of the zygomaticus musculature. Extension beyond the proposed model into the temporal region was observed, but nasal and forehead regions showed no evidence of SMAS, while its presence in the cervical platysma region remained inconclusive. Fascial and soft tissue variability was considerable within facial regions of the examined specimen, helping to explain the debate around the SMAS in the literature. PMID:24294524

  4. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Cornelia; Teichler, Sabine; Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  5. Autism Linked to Increased Oncogene Mutations but Decreased Cancer Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Bassuk, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one phenotypic aspect of many monogenic, hereditary cancer syndromes. Pleiotropic effects of cancer genes on the autism phenotype could lead to repurposing of oncology medications to treat this increasingly prevalent neurodevelopmental condition for which there is currently no treatment. To explore this hypothesis we sought to discover whether autistic patients more often have rare coding, single-nucleotide variants within tumor suppressor and oncogenes and whether autistic patients are more often diagnosed with neoplasms. Exome-sequencing data from the ARRA Autism Sequencing Collaboration was compared to that of a control cohort from the Exome Variant Server database revealing that rare, coding variants within oncogenes were enriched for in the ARRA ASD cohort (p<1.0x10-8). In contrast, variants were not significantly enriched in tumor suppressor genes. Phenotypically, children and adults with ASD exhibited a protective effect against cancer, with a frequency of 1.3% vs. 3.9% (p<0.001), but the protective effect decreased with age. The odds ratio of neoplasm for those with ASD relative to controls was 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.19; p<0.0001) in the 0 to 14 age group; 0.35 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.87; p = 0.024) in the 15 to 29 age group; 0.41 (95% CI: 0.15, 1.17; p = 0.095) in the 30 to 54 age group; and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.14, 1.74; p = 0.267) in those 55 and older. Both males and females demonstrated the protective effect. These findings suggest that defects in cellular proliferation, and potentially senescence, might influence both autism and neoplasm, and already approved drugs targeting oncogenic pathways might also have therapeutic value for treating autism. PMID:26934580

  6. Targeting the oncogenic Met receptor by antibodies and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Vigna, E; Comoglio, P M

    2015-04-01

    The receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a tyrosine kinase encoded by the Met oncogene, has a crucial role in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. It is a validated therapeutic target for 'personalized' treatment of a number of malignancies. Therapeutic tools prompting selective, robust and highly effective Met inhibition potentially represent a major step in the battle against cancer. Antibodies targeting either Met or its ligand HGF, although challenging, demonstrate to be endowed with promising features. Here we briefly review and discuss the state of the art in the field. PMID:24882574

  7. IGF-Binding Protein 2 – Oncogene or Tumor Suppressor?

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Adam; McCance, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    The role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) in cancer is unclear. In general, IGFBP2 is considered to be oncogenic and its expression is often observed to be elevated in cancer. However, there are a number of conflicting reports in vitro and in vivo where IGFBP2 acts in a tumor suppressor manner. In this mini-review, we discuss the factors influencing the variation in IGFBP2 expression in cancer and our interpretation of these findings. PMID:25774149

  8. Oncogenic rearrangements driving ionizing radiation–associated human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear disaster has caused a remarkable increase in radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinoma in children and young adults. In this issue of the JCI, Ricarte-Filho and colleagues demonstrate that chromosomal rearrangements are the oncogenic “drivers” in most post-Chernobyl carcinomas and that they often lead to unscheduled activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. These findings represent a major step forward in our understanding of radiation-induced carcinogenesis and suggest various hypotheses about the mechanisms underlying the formation and selection of gene rearrangements during cancer cell evolution. PMID:24162670

  9. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Flavahan, William A; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B; Gillespie, Shawn M; Venteicher, Andrew S; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Suvà, Mario L; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas. Mutant IDH protein produces a new onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5'-methylcytosine hydroxylases. TET enzymes catalyse a key step in the removal of DNA methylation. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), although the functional importance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that human IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hypermethylation at cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to interact aberrantly with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with a demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and downregulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wild-type gliomaspheres upregulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  10. The role of human cervical cancer oncogene in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Human cervical cancer oncogene (HCCR) was identified by differential display RT-PCR by screened abnormally expressed genes in cervical human cancers. The overexpressed gene is not only identified in cervical tissues, but also in various human cancers as leukemia/lymphoma, breast, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and ovarian cancer. For its special sensitivities and specificities in human breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, it is expected to be a new biomarker to replace or combine with the existing biomarkers in the diagnose. The HCCR manifests as a negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, and its expression is regulated by the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, modulated by TCF/β-catenin, it also participates in induction of the c-kit proto-oncogene, in activation of PKC and telomerase activities, but the accurate biochemical mechanisms of how HCCR contributes to the malignancies is still unknown. The aim of this review is to summarize the roles of HCCR in cancer progression and the molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:26309489

  11. KIT oncogene inhibition drives intratumoral macrophage M2 polarization.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, Michael J; Zeng, Shan; Kim, Teresa S; Sorenson, Eric C; Ocuin, Lee M; Balachandran, Vinod P; Seifert, Adrian M; Greer, Jonathan B; Popow, Rachel; Crawley, Megan H; Cohen, Noah A; Green, Benjamin L; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2013-12-16

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major component of the cancer microenvironment. Modulation of TAMs is under intense investigation because they are thought to be nearly always of the M2 subtype, which supports tumor growth. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common human sarcoma and typically results from an activating mutation in the KIT oncogene. Using a spontaneous mouse model of GIST and 57 freshly procured human GISTs, we discovered that TAMs displayed an M1-like phenotype and function at baseline. In both mice and humans, the KIT oncoprotein inhibitor imatinib polarized TAMs to become M2-like, a process which involved TAM interaction with apoptotic tumor cells leading to the induction of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factors. In human GISTs that eventually developed resistance to imatinib, TAMs reverted to an M1-like phenotype and had a similar gene expression profile as TAMs from untreated human GISTs. Therefore, TAM polarization depends on tumor cell oncogene activity and has important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies in human cancers. PMID:24323358

  12. Development of lung adenocarcinomas with exclusive dependence on oncogene fusions.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motonobu; Shimada, Yoko; Shiraishi, Kouya; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Tsuta, Koji; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Kato, Mamoru; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    This report delivers a comprehensive genetic alteration profile of lung adenocarcinomas (LADC) driven by ALK, RET, and ROS1 oncogene fusions. These tumors are difficult to study because of their rarity. Each drives only a low percentage of LADCs. Whole-exome sequencing and copy-number variation analyses were performed on a Japanese LADC cohort (n = 200) enriched in patients with fusions (n = 31, 15.5%), followed by deep resequencing for validation. The driver fusion cases showed a distinct profile with smaller numbers of nonsynonymous mutations in cancer-related genes or truncating mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex genes than in other LADCs (P < 0.0001). This lower mutation rate was independent of age, gender, smoking status, pathologic stage, and tumor differentiation (P < 0.0001) and was validated in nine fusion-positive cases from a U.S. LADCs cohort (n = 230). In conclusion, our findings indicate that LADCs with ALK, RET, and ROS1 fusions develop exclusively via their dependence on these oncogene fusions. The presence of such few alterations beyond the fusions supports the use of monotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the fusion products in fusion-positive LADCs. PMID:25855381

  13. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W S; Dick, Ian M; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  14. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo

    PubMed Central

    Greening, David W.; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W. S.; Dick, Ian M.; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  15. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-06-20

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients. PMID:25944692

  16. Knockin of mutant PIK3CA activates multiple oncogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, John P.; Karakas, Bedri; Weiss, Michele B.; Abukhdeir, Abde M.; Lauring, Josh; Garay, Joseph P.; Cosgrove, David; Tamaki, Akina; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Yuko; Mohseni, Morassa; Wang, Grace; Rosen, D. Marc; Denmeade, Samuel R.; Higgins, Michaela J.; Vitolo, Michele I.; Bachman, Kurtis E.; Park, Ben Ho

    2009-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase subunit PIK3CA is frequently mutated in human cancers. Here we used gene targeting to “knock in” PIK3CA mutations into human breast epithelial cells to identify new therapeutic targets associated with oncogenic PIK3CA. Mutant PIK3CA knockin cells were capable of epidermal growth factor and mTOR-independent cell proliferation that was associated with AKT, ERK, and GSK3β phosphorylation. Paradoxically, the GSK3β inhibitors lithium chloride and SB216763 selectively decreased the proliferation of human breast and colorectal cancer cell lines with oncogenic PIK3CA mutations and led to a decrease in the GSK3β target gene CYCLIN D1. Oral treatment with lithium preferentially inhibited the growth of nude mouse xenografts of HCT-116 colon cancer cells with mutant PIK3CA compared with isogenic HCT-116 knockout cells containing only wild-type PIK3CA. Our findings suggest GSK3β is an important effector of mutant PIK3CA, and that lithium, an FDA-approved therapy for bipolar disorders, has selective antineoplastic properties against cancers that harbor these mutations. PMID:19196980

  17. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'. PMID:24780858

  18. Design of a small molecule against an oncogenic noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Cameron, Michael D; Haga, Christopher L; Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Duckett, Derek R; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    The design of precision, preclinical therapeutics from sequence is difficult, but advances in this area, particularly those focused on rational design, could quickly transform the sequence of disease-causing gene products into lead modalities. Herein, we describe the use of Inforna, a computational approach that enables the rational design of small molecules targeting RNA to quickly provide a potent modulator of oncogenic microRNA-96 (miR-96). We mined the secondary structure of primary microRNA-96 (pri-miR-96) hairpin precursor against a database of RNA motif-small molecule interactions, which identified modules that bound RNA motifs nearby and in the Drosha processing site. Precise linking of these modules together provided Targaprimir-96 (3), which selectively modulates miR-96 production in cancer cells and triggers apoptosis. Importantly, the compound is ineffective on healthy breast cells, and exogenous overexpression of pri-miR-96 reduced compound potency in breast cancer cells. Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-Down (Chem-CLIP), a small-molecule RNA target validation approach, shows that 3 directly engages pri-miR-96 in breast cancer cells. In vivo, 3 has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and decreases tumor burden in a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer. Thus, rational design can quickly produce precision, in vivo bioactive lead small molecules against hard-to-treat cancers by targeting oncogenic noncoding RNAs, advancing a disease-to-gene-to-drug paradigm. PMID:27170187

  19. Oncogenic KRAS confers chemoresistance by upregulating NRF2

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shasha; Wang, Shue; Moghaddam, Seyed Javad; Ooi, Aikseng; Chapman, Eli; Wong, Pak K.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS mutations found in 20–30% of all non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are associated with chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Here we demonstrate that activation of the cell protective stress response gene NRF2 by KRAS is responsible for its ability to promote drug resistance. RNAi-mediated silencing of NRF2 was sufficient to reverse resistance to cisplatin elicited by ectopic expression of oncogenic KRAS in NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, KRAS increased NRF2 gene transcription through a TPA response element (TRE) located in the NRF2 promoter. In a mouse model of mutant KrasG12D-induced lung cancer, we found that suppressing the NRF2 pathway with the chemical inhibitor brusatol enhanced the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin. Co-treatment reduced tumor burden and improved survival. Our findings illuminate the mechanistic details of KRAS-mediated drug resistance and provide a preclinical rationale to improve the management of lung tumors harboring KRAS mutations with NRF2 pathway inhibitors. PMID:25339352

  20. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B.; Gillespie, Shawn M.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Suvà, Mario L.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas1,2. Mutant IDH protein produces a novel onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), that interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5′-methylcytosine hydroxylases3–7. TET enzymes catalyze a key step in the removal of DNA methylation8,9. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP)10,11, though the functional significance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hyper-methylation at CTCF binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to aberrantly interact with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and down-regulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wildtype gliomaspheres up-regulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  1. Can anti-tumor immunity help to explain “oncogene addiction”?

    PubMed Central

    Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary “Oncogene addiction” refers to the process of tumor cell death that can occur after inactivation of a single oncogene. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Rakhra, et al. argue that complete tumor clearance after molecular targeted therapies requires a functioning immune system, pointing the way toward radically new combination therapies. PMID:21075303

  2. Comparative Full Length Sequence Analysis of Oncogenic and Vaccine (Rispens) Strains of Marek's Disease Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete DNA sequence of the Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 vaccine strain CVI988 was determined and consists of 178,311 bp with an overall gene organization identical to that of the oncogenic strains. In examining open reading frames (ORFs), nine ORFs differ between vaccine and oncogenic stra...

  3. GENES FOR TUMOR MARKERS ARE CLUSTERED WITH CELLULAR PROTO-ONCOGENES ON HUMAN CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative mapping positions of genes for polypeptides expressed abnormally in tumors (tumor markers) and cellular proto-oncogenes were analyzed and a remarkable degree of co-mapping of tumor marker genes with oncogenes in the human karyotype were found. It is proposed that abe...

  4. Dimerization mediated through a leucine zipper activates the oncogenic potential of the met receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, G A; Park, M

    1993-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of the met (hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor) receptor tyrosine kinase involves a genomic rearrangement that generates a hybrid protein containing tpr-encoded sequences at its amino terminus fused directly to the met-encoded receptor kinase domain. Deletion of Tpr sequences abolishes the transforming ability of this protein, implicating this region in oncogenic activation. We demonstrate, by site-directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, that a leucine zipper motif within Tpr mediates dimerization of the tpr-met product and is essential for the transforming activity of the met oncogene. By analogy with ligand-stimulated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, we propose that constitutive dimerization mediated by a leucine zipper motif within Tpr is responsible for oncogenic activation of the Met kinase. The possibility that this mechanism of activation represents a paradigm for a class of receptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes activated by DNA rearrangement is discussed. Images PMID:8413267

  5. Nuclear compartmentalization of the v-myb oncogene product.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, W J; Lampert, M A; Li, A C; Baluda, M A

    1985-01-01

    Nuclei obtained from chicken leukemic myeloblasts transformed by avian myeloblastosis virus were fractionated into various subnuclear compartments, which were then analyzed by specific immunoprecipitation for the presence of the leukemogenic product, p48v-myb, of the viral oncogene. In cells labeled for 30 or 60 min with L-[35S]methionine and in unlabeled exponentially dividing leukemic cells analyzed by Western blotting, p48v-myb was detected within the nucleoplasm (29 +/- 9% [standard deviation] of the total), chromatin (7 +/- 4%), and lamina-nuclear matrix (64 +/- 9%). Also, in myeloblasts analyzed by immunofluorescence during mitosis, p48v-myb appeared to be dispersed through the cell like the lamina-nuclear matrix complex. Strong attachment to the nuclear matrix-lamina complex suggests that p48v-myb may be involved in DNA replication or transcription or both. Images PMID:3018495

  6. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn M; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark A; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Rickman, David S; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-06-14

    Mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a computational drug-repositioning approach for targeting TF activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions, and a global drug-protein network analysis supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently overexpressed oncogenic TF, predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of electronic medical record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy for identifying drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  7. SOCS1 in cancer: An oncogene and a tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Beaurivage, Claudia; Champagne, Audrey; Tobelaim, William S; Pomerleau, Véronique; Menendez, Alfredo; Saucier, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    The Suppressor Of Cytokine Signaling 1 (SOCS1) has been extensively investigated in immune cells where it works as a potent inhibitor of inflammation by negative feedback regulation of the cytokine-activated JAK-STAT signaling pathways. SOCS1 is also recognized as a tumor suppressor in numerous cancers and its critical functional relevance in non-immune cells, including epithelial cells, has just begun to emerge. Most notably, conflicting results from clinical and experimental studies suggest that SOCS1 may function as either a tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter, in a cell context-dependent manner. Here, we present an overview of the mechanisms underlying SOCS1 function as a tumor suppressor and discuss the emerging evidences of SOCS1 activity as an oncogene. PMID:26811119

  8. A mouse model of melanoma driven by oncogenic KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Milagre, Carla; Dhomen, Nathalie; Geyer, Felipe C; Hayward, Robert; Lambros, Maryou; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Marais, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The small G-protein NRAS is mutated in 22% of human melanomas, whereas the related proteins, KRAS and HRAS are mutated in only 2% and 1% of melanomas respectively. We have developed a mouse models of melanoma in which Cre recombinase/loxP technology is used to drive inducible expression of G12VKRAS in the melanocytic lineage. The mice develop skin hyper-pigmentation, nevi and tumors that bear many of the cardinal histopathology features and molecular characteristics of human melanoma. These tumors invade and destroy the underlying muscles and cells derived from them can grow as subcutaneous tumors and colonise the lungs of nude mice. These data establish that oncogenic KRAS can be a founder event in melanomagenesis. PMID:20516123

  9. Induction of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) oncogenic domains (PODs) by papillomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Tomomi; Lambert, Paul F.

    2007-09-30

    Promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs), also called nuclear domain 10 (ND10), are subnuclear structures that have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes as well as the life cycle of DNA viruses including papillomaviruses. In order to investigate the interplay between papillomaviruses and PODs, we analyzed the status of PODs in organotypic raft cultures of human keratinocytes harboring HPV genome that support the differentiation-dependent HPV life cycle. The number of PODs per nucleus was increased in the presence of HPV genomes selectively within the poorly differentiated layers but was absent in the terminally differentiated layers of the stratified epithelium. This increase in PODs was correlated with an increase in abundance of post-translationally modified PML protein. Neither the E2-dependent transcription nor viral DNA replication was reliant upon the presence of PML. Implications of these findings in terms of HPV's interaction with its host are discussed.

  10. Oncogenic Transcription Factors: Cornerstones of Inflammation-Linked Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Sandra; Ellenrieder, Volker; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that regulate gene expression by modulating the synthesis of messenger RNA. Since this process is frequently one dominant control point in the production of many proteins, transcription factors represent the key regulators of numerous cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Pancreatic cancer progression is characterized by the activation of inflammatory signaling pathways converging on a limited set of transcription factors that fine-tune gene expression patterns contributing to the growth and maintenance of these tumors. Thus, strategies targeting these transcriptional networks activated in pancreatic cancer cells could block the effects of upstream inflammatory responses participating in pancreatic tumorigenesis. In this article we review this field of research and summarize current strategies to target oncogenic transcription factors and their activating signaling networks in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21997559

  11. Oncogenic viruses: Lessons learned using next-generation sequencing technologies.

    PubMed

    Flippot, Ronan; Malouf, Gabriel G; Su, Xiaoping; Khayat, David; Spano, Jean-Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Fifteen percent of cancers are driven by oncogenic human viruses. Four of those viruses, hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus, integrate the host genome. Viral oncogenesis is the result of epigenetic and genetic alterations that happen during viral integration. So far, little data have been available regarding integration mechanisms and modifications in the host genome. However, the emergence of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools enables researchers to establish the landscape of genomic alterations and predict the events that follow viral integration. Cooperative working groups are currently investigating these factors in large data sets. Herein, we provide novel insights into the initiating events of cancer onset during infection with integrative viruses. Although much remains to be discovered, many improvements are expected from the clinical point of view, from better prognosis classifications to better therapeutic strategies. PMID:27156225

  12. Oncogenic and Therapeutic Targeting of PTEN Loss in Bone Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yongming; Chen, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Being a tumor suppressor, PTEN functions as a dual-specificity protein and phospholipid phosphatase and regulates a variety of cellular processes and signal transduction pathways. Loss of PTEN function has been detected frequently in different forms of cancers, such as breast, prostate and lung cancer, gastric and colon cancer, skin cancer, as well as endometrial carcinoma. In this review, we provide a summary of PTEN and its role in bone malignancies including bone metastases, multiple myeloma, and osteosarcoma, etc. We highlight the importance of PTEN loss leading to activation of the oncogenic PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in tumorigenesis and progression, which can be attributed to both genetic and non-genetic alterations involving gene mutation, loss of heterozygosity, promoter hypermethylation, and microRNA mediated negative regulation. We also discuss the emerging therapeutic applications targeting PTEN loss for the treatment of these bone malignant diseases. PMID:25773992

  13. Significance of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in AML prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kavianpour, Maria; Ahmadzadeh, Ahmad; Shahrabi, Saeid; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disorder among hematologic malignancies. Several genetic alterations occur in this disease, which cause proliferative progression, reducing differentiation and apoptosis in leukemic cells as well as increasing their survival. In the genetic study of AML, genetic translocations, gene overexpression, and mutations effective upon biology and pathogenesis of this disease have been recognized. Proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which are important in normal development of myeloid cells, are involved in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, undergo mutation in this type of leukemia, and are effective in prognosis of AML subtypes. This review deals with these genes, the assessment of which can be important in the diagnosis and prognosis of patients as well as therapeutic outcome. PMID:27179964

  14. Structural Effects of Oncogenic PI3K alpha Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    S Gabelli; C Huang; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Physiological activation of PI3K{alpha} is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3K{alpha} result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  15. Oncogenes in human testicular cancer: DNA and RNA studies.

    PubMed Central

    Peltomäki, P.; Alfthan, O.; de la Chapelle, A.

    1991-01-01

    Oncogene dosage and expression were studied in 16 testicular neoplasms, 14 of germ cell and two of non-germ cell origin. In comparison with normal DNA, tumour DNA of a total of eight patients (seven with germ cell neoplasm and one with testicular lymphoma) showed increased dosages of KRAS2, PDGFA, EGFR, MET and PDGFB. The most frequent (occurring in six tumours) and prominent (up to 3-4-fold) increases were detected in the dosages of KRAS2 (on chromosome 12p) and PDGFA (chromosome 7p), relative to a reference locus from chromosome 2. Importantly, there was a similar increase in 12p dosage in general in these tumours, suggesting the presence of the characteristic isochromosome 12p marker. On the contrary, possible 7p polysomy (assessed by molecular methods) did not explain the PDGFA (or EGFR) changes in all cases. NRAS, MYCN, CSFIR, MYB, MYC, ABL, HRASI, TP53, and ERBB2 did not reveal any consistent alterations in tumour DNA. In RNA dot blot assays the expression of KRAS2, PDGFA, EGFR, or MYC was generally not increased in the tumour samples when compared to that in normal testicular tissue of the same patients although there was interindividual variation in mRNA levels. It thus appears that while oncogene dosage changes occur in a proportion of testis cancers, they are often part of changes in large chromosomal regions or whole arms and are seldom accompanied by altered expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1829952

  16. Comprehensive analysis of targetable oncogenic mutations in chinese cervical cancers

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Libing; Li, Jiajia; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Xuxia; Yang, Wentao; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in 16 targetable oncogenic genes were examined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct sequencing in 285 Chinese cervical cancers. Their clinicopathological relevance and prognostic significance was assessed. Ninety-two nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified in 29.8% of the cancers. The mutation rates were as follows: PIK3CA (12.3%), KRAS (5.3%), HER2 (4.2%), FGFR3-TACC3 fusions (3.9%), PTEN (2.8%), FGFR2 (1.8%), FGFR3 (0.7%), NRAS (0.7%), HRAS (0.4%) and EGFR (0.4%). No mutations were detected in AKT1 or BRAF, and the fusions FGFR1-TACC1, EML4-ALK, CCDC6-RET and KIF5B-RET were not found in any of the cancers. RTK and RAS mutations were more common in non-squamous carcinomas than in squamous carcinomas (P=0.043 and P=0.042, respectively). RAS mutations were more common in young patients (<45 years) (13.7% vs. 7.7%, P=0.027). RTK mutations tended to be more common in young patients, whereas PIK3CA/PTEN/AKT mutations tended to be more common in old patients. RAS mutations were significantly associated with disease relapse. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of major targetable oncogenic mutations in a large cohort of cervical cancer cases. Our data reveal that a considerable proportion of patients with cervical cancers harbor known druggable mutations and might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:25669975

  17. Class I PI3K in oncogenic cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Vogt, Peter K.

    2009-01-01

    Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is a dimeric enzyme, consisting of a catalytic and a regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit occurs in four isoforms designated as p110α, p110β, p110γ and p110δ. These combine with several regulatory subunits; for p110α, β and δ the standard regulatory subunit is p85, for p110γ it is p101. PI3Ks play important roles in human cancer. PIK3CA, the gene encoding p110α, is mutated frequently in common cancers, including carcinoma of the breast, prostate, colon and endometrium. Eighty percent of these mutations are represented by one of three amino acid substitutions in the helical or kinase domains of the enzyme. The mutant p110α shows a gain of function in enzymatic and signaling activity and is oncogenic in cell culture and in animal model systems. Structural and genetic data suggest that the mutations affect regulatory inter- and intramolecular interactions and support the conclusion that there are at least two molecular mechanisms for the gain-of-function in p110α. One of these mechanisms operates largely independently of binding to p85, the other abolishes the requirement for an interaction with Ras. The non-alpha isoforms of p110 do not show cancer-specific mutations. However, they are often differentially expressed in cancer and, in contrast to p110α, wild-type non-alpha isoforms of p110 are oncogenic when overexpressed in cell culture. The isoforms of p110 have become promising drug targets. Isoform-selective inhibitors have been identified. Inhibitors that target exclusively the cancer-specific mutants of p110α constitute an important goal and challenge for current drug development. PMID:18794883

  18. Dimerize RACK1 upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, L.-Y.; Chen, Y.-H.; Chuang, N.-N. . E-mail: zonnc@sinica.edu.tw

    2005-05-06

    From our previous studies, we learned that syndecan-2/p120-GAP complex provided docking site for Src to prosecute tyrosine kinase activity upon transformation with oncogenic ras. And, RACK1 protein was reactive with syndecan-2 to keep Src inactivated, but not when Ras was overexpressed. In the present study, we characterized the reaction between RACK1 protein and Ras. RACK1 was isolated from BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q{sub 61}K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus and RACK1 was revealed to react with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), not GDP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K). This selective interaction between RACK1 and GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) was further confirmed with RACK1 of human placenta and mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein. We found that RACK1 was dimerized upon reaction with GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K), as well as with 14-3-3{beta} and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, as revealed by phosphorylation with Src tyrosine kinase. We reported the complex of RACK1/GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) reacted selectively with p120-GAP. This interaction was sufficient to dissemble RACK1 into monomers, a preferred form to compete for the binding of syndecan-2. These data indicate that the reaction of GTP-K{sub B}-Ras(Q{sub 61}K) with RACK1 in dimers may operate a mechanism to deplete RACK1 from reaction with syndecan-2 upon transformation by oncogenic ras and the RACK1/GTP-Ras complex may provide a route to react with p120-GAP and recycle monomeric RACK1 to syndecan-2.

  19. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Giardullo, Paola; Pasquali, Emanuela; Tanori, Mirella; De Stefano, Ilaria; Casciati, Arianna; Naus, Christian C.; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1{sup +/−}) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1{sup +/−} and Cx43{sup +/−} mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1{sup +/−} mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases.

  20. Pancreatitis promotes oncogenic KrasG12D-induced pancreatic transformation through activation of Nupr1

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Daniel; Garcia, Maria Noé; Hamidi, Tewfik; Cano, Carla; Calvo, Ezequiel; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2014-01-01

    During the initiation stage of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced by oncogenic Kras, pancreatic cells are exposed to both a protumoral effect and an opposing tumor suppressive process known as oncogene-induced senescence. Pancreatitis disrupts this balance in favor of the transforming effect of oncogenes by lowering the tumor suppressive threshold of oncogene-induced senescence through expression of the stress protein Nupr1. PMID:27308320

  1. Cumulative influence of elastin peptides and plasminogen on matrix metalloproteinase activation and type I collagen invasion by HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huet, Eric; Brassart, Bertrand; Cauchard, Jean-Hubert; Debelle, Laurent; Birembaut, Philippe; Wallach, Jean; Emonard, Herve; Polette, Myriam; Hornebeck, William

    2002-01-01

    HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells express at their plasma membrane the elastin-binding protein (EBP). Occupancy of EBP by elastin fragments, tropoelastin or XGVAPG peptides was found to trigger procollagenase-1 (proMMP-1) overproduction by HT-1080 cells at the protein and enzyme levels. RT-PCR analysis indicated that elastin peptides did not modify the MMP-1 mRNA steady state levels, suggesting the involvement of a post-transcriptional mechanism. We previously reported that binding of elastin peptides to EBP induced other matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MT1-MMP) expression. Since those peptides were here found to also accelerate the secretion of urokinase from HT-1080 cells, culture medium was supplemented with plasminogen together with elastin peptides at aims to induce or potentiate MMPs activation cascades. In such conditions, plasmin activity was generated and exacerbate proMMP-1 and proMMP-2 activation. As a consequence, elastin peptides and plasminogen-treated HT-1080 cells displayed a significant type I collagen matrix invasive capacity. PMID:11964074

  2. 5-Azacytidine regulates matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, and the migration and invasion of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells via PI3-kinase and ERK1/2 pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal methylation of promoter CpG islands is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, and is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases. 5-azacytidine (5-aza C), a methyltransferase inhibitor, can cause demethylation of promoter regions of diverse genes. Epigenetic processes contribute to the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. However, little is known about the mechanisms and effects of 5-aza C on the invasive and migratory capacities of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. In the present study, we found that 5-aza C induces MMP-9 activity, as determined by zymography. HT1080 cell proliferation was determined following 5-aza C administration by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell cycle was examined by flow cytometry. 5-aza C treatment inhibited cell proliferation without affecting cell viability. Furthermore, 5-aza C significantly promoted migration and invasion of HT1080 cells. 5-aza C treatment enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide (PI)3-kinase/Akt, and their inhibitors blocked MMP-9 activity induction, and cellular invasion and migration. Together, these findings suggest that promoter methylation may be one of the mechanisms modulating MMP-9 levels in HT1080 cells, and that 5-aza C-induced MMP-9 production is associated with the activation of ERK and PI3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways. PMID:27573026

  3. T cell intrinsic USP15 deficiency promotes excessive IFN-γ production and an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in MCA-induced fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Qiang; Jin, Jin; Xiao, Yichuan; Zhou, Xiaofei; Hu, Hongbo; Cheng, Xuhong; Kazimi, Nasser; Ullrich, Stephen E; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2015-01-01

    USP15 is a deubiquitinase that negatively regulates activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and generation of IFN-γ-producing T helper 1 (Th1) cells. USP15 deficiency in mice promotes antitumor T cell responses in a transplantable cancer model; however, it has remained unclear how deregulated T cell activation impacts primary tumor development during the prolonged interplay between tumors and the immune system. Here, we find that the USP15-deficient mice are hypersensitive to methylcholantrene (MCA)-induced fibrosarcomas. Excessive IFN-γ production in USP15-deficient mice promotes expression of the immunosuppressive molecule PD-L1 and the chemokine CXCL12, causing accumulation of T-bet+ regulatory T cells and CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells at tumor site. Mixed bone marrow adoptive transfer studies further reveals a T cell-intrinsic role for USP15 in regulating IFN-γ production and tumor development. These findings suggest that T cell intrinsic USP15 deficiency causes excessive production of IFN-γ, which promotes an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, during MCA-induced primary tumorigenesis. PMID:26686633

  4. Exposure to airborne PM2.5 suppresses microRNA expression and deregulates target oncogenes that cause neoplastic transformation in NIH3T3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinxin; Shao, Mingming; Wu, Chen; Wang, Suhan; Li, Hongmin; Wei, Lixuan; Gao, Yanning; Tan, Wen; Cheng, Shujun; Wu, Tangchun; Yu, Dianke; Lin, Dongxin

    2015-01-01

    Long-term exposure to airborne PM2.5 is associated with increased lung cancer risk but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We characterized global microRNA and mRNA expression in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to PM2.5 organic extract and integrally analyzed microRNA-mRNA interactions. Foci formation and xenograft tumorigenesis in mice with NIH3T3 cells expressing genes targeted by microRNAs were performed to explore the oncogenic potential of these genes. We also detected plasma levels of candidate microRNAs in subjects exposed to different levels of air PM2.5 and examined the aberrant expression of genes targeted by these microRNAs in human lung cancer. Under our experimental conditions, treatment of cells with PM2.5 extract resulted in downregulation of 138 microRNAs and aberrant expression of 13 mRNAs (11 upregulation and 2 downregulation). In silico and biochemical analyses suggested SLC30A1, SERPINB2 and AKR1C1, among the upregulated genes, as target for miR-182 and miR-185, respectively. Ectopic expression of each of these genes significantly enhanced foci formation in NIH3T3 cells. Following subcutaneous injection of these cells into nude mice, fibrosarcoma were formed from SLC30A1- or SERPINB2-expressing cells. Reduced plasma levels of miR-182 were detected in subjects exposed to high level of PM2.5 than in those exposed to low level of PM2.5 (P = 0.043). Similar results were seen for miR-185 although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.328). Increased expressions of SLC30A1, SERPINB2 and AKR1C1 were detected in human lung cancer. These results suggest that modulation of miR-182 and miR-185 and their target genes may contribute to lung carcinogenesis attributable to PM2.5 exposure. PMID:26338969

  5. Sequence comparison in the crossover region of an oncogenic avian retrovirus recombinant and its nononcogenic parent: Genetic regions that control growth rate and oncogenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Tsichlis, P.N.; Donehower, L.; Hager, G.; Zeller, N.; Malavarca, R.; Astrin, S.; Skalka, A.M.

    1982-11-01

    NTRE is an avian retrovirus recombinant of the endogeneous nononcogenic Rous-associated virus-0 (RAV-0) and the oncogenic, exogeneous, transformation-defective (td) Prague strain of Rous sarcoma virus B (td-PrRSV-B). Oligonucleotide mapping had shown that the recombinant virus is indistinguishable from its RAV-0 parent except for the 3'-end sequences, which were derived from td-PrRSV-B. However, the virus exhibits properties which are typical of an exogenous virus: it grows to high titers in tissue culture, and it is oncogenic in vivo. To accurately define the genetic region responsible for these properties, the authors determined the nucleotide sequences of the recombinant and its RAV-0 parent by using molecular clones of their DNA. These were compared with sequences already available for PrRSV-C, a virus closely related to the exogenous parent td-PrRSV-B. The results suggested that the crossover event which generated NTRE 7 took place in a region -501 to -401 nucleotides from the 3' end of the td-PrRSV parental genome and that sequences to the right of the recombination region were responsible for its growth properties and oncogenic potential. Since the exogenous-virus-specific sequences are expected to be missing from transformation-defective mutants of the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of RSV, which, like other exogeneous viruses, grow to high tiers in tissue culture and are oncogenic in vivo, the authors concluded that the growth properties and oncogenic potential of the exogeneous viruses are determined by sequences in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. However, the authors propose that the exogeneous-virus-specific region may play a role in determining the oncogenic spectrum of a given oncogenic virus.

  6. Decreased virus population diversity in p53-null mice infected with weakly oncogenic Abelson virus.

    PubMed

    Marchlik, Erica; Kalman, Richard; Rosenberg, Naomi

    2005-09-01

    The Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MLV), like other retroviruses that contain v-onc genes, arose following a recombination event between a replicating retrovirus and a cellular oncogene. Although experimentally validated models have been presented to address the mechanism by which oncogene capture occurs, very little is known about the events that influence emerging viruses following the recombination event that incorporates the cellular sequences. One feature that may play a role is the genetic makeup of the host in which the virus arises; a number of host genes, including oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, have been shown to affect the pathogenesis of many murine leukemia viruses. To examine how a host gene might affect an emerging v-onc gene-containing retrovirus, we studied the weakly oncogenic Ab-MLV-P90A strain, a mutant that generates highly oncogenic variants in vivo, and compared the viral populations in normal mice and mice lacking the p53 tumor suppressor gene. While variants arose in both p53+/+ and p53-/- tumors, the samples from the wild-type animals contained a more diverse virus population. Differences in virus population diversity were not observed when wild-type and null animals were infected with a highly oncogenic wild-type strain of Ab-MLV. These results indicate that p53, and presumably other host genes, affects the selective forces that operate on virus populations in vivo and likely influences the evolution of oncogenic retroviruses such as Ab-MLV. PMID:16140739

  7. Common and overlapping oncogenic pathways contribute to the evolution of acute myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Kvinlaug, Brynn T; Chan, Wai-In; Bullinger, Lars; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Sears, Christopher; Foster, Donna; Lazic, Stanley E; Okabe, Rachel; Benner, Axel; Lee, Benjamin H; De Silva, Inusha; Valk, Peter JM; Delwel, Ruud; Armstrong, Scott A; Döhner, Hartmut; Gilliland, D Gary; Huntly, Brian JP

    2011-01-01

    Fusion oncogenes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) promote self-renewal from committed progenitors, thereby linking transformation and self-renewal pathways. Like most cancers, AML is a genetically and biologically heterogeneous disease, but it is unclear whether transformation results from common or overlapping genetic programs acting downstream of multiple mutations, or by the engagement of unique genetic programs acting cooperatively downstream of individual mutations. This distinction is important, because the involvement of common programs would imply the existence of common molecular targets to treat AML, no matter which fusion oncogenes are involved. Here we demonstrate that the ability to promote self-renewal is a generalized property of leukemia-associated oncogenes. Disparate oncogenes initiated overlapping transformation and self-renewal gene expression programs, the common elements of which were defined in established leukemia stem cells from an animal model as well as from a large cohort of patients with differing AML subtypes, where they strongly predicted pathobiological character. Notably, individual genes commonly activated in these programs could partially phenocopy the self-renewal function of leukemia-associated oncogenes in committed murine progenitors. Further, they could generate AML following expression in murine bone marrow. In summary, our findings reveal the operation of common programs of self-renewal and transformation downstream of leukemia-associated oncogenes, suggesting mechanistically common therapeutic approaches to AML are likely to be possible, regardless of the identity of the driver oncogene involved. PMID:21505102

  8. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 mum^2 at about 500 keV/mum. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/mum produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/mum). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  9. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 micrometer2 at about 500 keV/micrometer. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/micrometer produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micrometer). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  10. An in vivo screen identifies ependymoma oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M.; Currle, David S.; White, Elsie; Boulos, Nidal; Dapper, Jason; Eden, Christopher; Nimmervoll, Birgit; Thiruvenkatam, Radhika; Connelly, Michele; Kranenburg, Tanya A.; Neale, Geoffrey; Olsen, Scott; Wang, Yong-Dong; Finkelstein, David; Wright, Karen; Gupta, Kirti; Ellison, David W.; Thomas, Arzu Onar; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancers are characterized by non-random, chromosome copy number alterations that presumably contain oncogenes and tumor–suppressor genes (TSGs). The affected loci are often large, making it difficult to pinpoint which genes are driving the cancer. Here, we report a cross-species in vivo screen of 84 candidate oncogenes and 39 candidate TSGs, located within 28 recurrent chromosomal alterations in ependymoma. Through a series of mouse models we validate eight new ependymoma oncogenes and 10 ependymoma TSGs that converge on a small number of cell functions including vesicle trafficking, DNA modification and cholesterol biosynthesis, pinpointing these as potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:26075792