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Sample records for musculoskeletal system-a prospective

  1. Burdensome problems of chronic musculoskeletal pain and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Ushida, Takahiro

    2015-11-01

    According to a recent survey, about 15 % of the Japanese population suffers from moderate-severe chronic musculoskeletal pain persisting for at least 6 months. Social factors and related psychological factors (including depression) thus appear to greatly affect chronic musculoskeletal pain. This suggests the need for measures that take these factors into account. Treatment for musculoskeletal pain at present is generally based on a biomedical model that has been used for many years in this field, and modern medical imaging technologies have been a high priority to support this model and treatment strategy. Under the concept of the biomedical model, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, channel blockers and opioid analgesics are generally used as pharmacotherapy to alleviate chronic pain. However, these drugs are commonly associated with problems such as adverse effects, drug dependency and drug abuse, and they must be used with care. Surgery may also be effective in treating certain diseases, but studies have shown that many patients suffer residual chronic pain even after such treatment. Besides, exercise therapy has been found to be effective in treating many different types of chronic pain. Lately, various countries have been launching interdisciplinary pain centers that use a multidisciplinary approach to treat chronic musculoskeletal pain. Treatment in these centers is provided by a team of specialists in anesthesiology, psychiatry and orthopedics as well as the relevant paramedical professionals. The therapeutic strategy is based on a cognitive-behavioral approach, and patients are taught about methods for restoring physical function and coping with pain, mostly with drugs and exercise therapy, so that any pain present does not impair function and the patient can reintegrate into society. PMID:26260256

  2. The WISTAH hand study: A prospective cohort study of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few prospective cohort studies of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders have been performed. Past studies have provided somewhat conflicting evidence for occupational risk factors and have largely reported data without adjustments for many personal and psychosocial factors. Methods/design A multi-center prospective cohort study was incepted to quantify risk factors for distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and potentially develop improved methods for analyzing jobs. Disorders to analyze included carpal tunnel syndrome, lateral epicondylalgia, medial epicondylalgia, trigger digit, deQuervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis and other tendinoses. Workers have thus far been enrolled from 17 different employment settings in 3 diverse US states and performed widely varying work. At baseline, workers undergo laptop administered questionnaires, structured interviews, two standardized physical examinations and nerve conduction studies to ascertain demographic, medical history, psychosocial factors and current musculoskeletal disorders. All workers’ jobs are individually measured for physical factors and are videotaped. Workers are followed monthly for the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Repeat nerve conduction studies are performed for those with symptoms of tingling and numbness in the prior six months. Changes in jobs necessitate re-measure and re-videotaping of job physical factors. Case definitions have been established. Point prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome is a combination of paraesthesias in at least two median nerve-served digits plus an abnormal nerve conduction study at baseline. The lifetime cumulative incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome will also include those with a past history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Incident cases will exclude those with either a past history or prevalent cases at baseline. Statistical methods planned include survival analyses and logistic regression. Discussion A prospective cohort study of

  3. Musculoskeletal injuries in physical education versus non-physical education teachers: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Lennert; Vercruysse, Sien; Cardon, Greet; Haerens, Leen; Witvrouw, Erik; De Clercq, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Physical education (PE) teachers have a physically demanding job, putting them at a considerable risk for musculoskeletal injuries. To structurally develop tailored injury prevention programmes for PE teachers, a clear understanding of the extent, characteristics and underlying factors of their musculoskeletal injuries compared to referents is necessary. Therefore, the current study prospectively followed 103 PE teachers and 58 non-PE teachers, who registered musculoskeletal injuries and time of exposure to sports participation during one school year. Pearson χ(2)-tests and independent samples t-tests determined significant differences between PE and non-PE teachers regarding demographics and variables possibly related to injury occurrence. PE teachers had 1.23 and non-PE teachers 0.78 injuries/teacher/school year. This difference was significantly different after adjustment for hours spent weekly on intracurricular teaching during the career and for injury history during the preceding six months (P = 0.009; OR = 0.511; 95% CI = 0.308-0.846). PE teachers' most affected body parts were the knee and the back. PE teachers had a more extensive injury history (P < 0.001), a higher work- (P < 0.001) and sport index (P < 0.001), practiced more sports (P < 0.002) and taught more extracurricular sports (P = 0.001). Future injury prevention programmes should take account for the great injury history and heavy physical load in PE teachers. PMID:26419187

  4. Familial Risk of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and the Importance of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Lier, Ragnhild; Mork, Paul Jarle; Holtermann, Andreas; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of the current study was i) to prospectively examine if chronic musculoskeletal pain in parents is associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring, and ii) to assess if these parent-offspring associations are modified by offspring body mass index and leisure time physical activity. We used data on 4,742 adult offspring linked with their parents who participated in the population-based HUNT Study in Norway in 1995–97 and in 2006–08. Family relations were established through the national Family Registry. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). In total, 1,674 offspring (35.3%) developed chronic musculoskeletal pain during the follow-up period of approximately 11 years. Both maternal (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.55) and paternal chronic musculoskeletal pain (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.57) was associated with increased risk of offspring chronic musculoskeletal pain. Compared to offspring of parents without chronic musculoskeletal pain, the adverse effect of parental pain was somewhat stronger among offspring who reported a low (RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.52) versus high (RR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.84) level of leisure time physical activity. Offspring of parents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and who were classified as obese had more than twofold increased risk (RR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.68, 3.24) of chronic musculoskeletal pain compared to normal weight offspring of parents without pain. In conclusion, parental chronic musculoskeletal pain is positively associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring. Maintenance of normal body weight may reduce the risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in offspring of pain-afflicted parents. PMID:27082110

  5. Familial Risk of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and the Importance of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lier, Ragnhild; Mork, Paul Jarle; Holtermann, Andreas; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of the current study was i) to prospectively examine if chronic musculoskeletal pain in parents is associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring, and ii) to assess if these parent-offspring associations are modified by offspring body mass index and leisure time physical activity. We used data on 4,742 adult offspring linked with their parents who participated in the population-based HUNT Study in Norway in 1995-97 and in 2006-08. Family relations were established through the national Family Registry. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). In total, 1,674 offspring (35.3%) developed chronic musculoskeletal pain during the follow-up period of approximately 11 years. Both maternal (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.55) and paternal chronic musculoskeletal pain (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.57) was associated with increased risk of offspring chronic musculoskeletal pain. Compared to offspring of parents without chronic musculoskeletal pain, the adverse effect of parental pain was somewhat stronger among offspring who reported a low (RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.52) versus high (RR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.84) level of leisure time physical activity. Offspring of parents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and who were classified as obese had more than twofold increased risk (RR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.68, 3.24) of chronic musculoskeletal pain compared to normal weight offspring of parents without pain. In conclusion, parental chronic musculoskeletal pain is positively associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring. Maintenance of normal body weight may reduce the risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in offspring of pain-afflicted parents. PMID:27082110

  6. Musculoskeletal extremity injuries in a cohort of schoolchildren aged 6-12: a 2.5-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, E; Rexen, C T; Franz, C; Møller, N C; Froberg, K; Wedderkopp, N

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this prospective school cohort study were to describe the epidemiology of diagnosed musculoskeletal extremity injuries and to estimate the injury incidence rates in relation to different settings, different body regions and injury types. In all, 1259 schoolchildren, aged 6-12, were surveyed weekly during 2.5 years using a new method of automated mobile phone text messaging asking questions on the presence of any musculoskeletal problems. All injuries were clinically diagnosed. Physical activity was measured from text messaging and accelerometers. A total number of 1229 injuries were diagnosed; 180 injuries in the upper extremity and 1049 in the lower extremity, with an overall rate of 1.59 injuries per 1000 physical activity units [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50-1.68]. Upper extremities accounted for a rate of 0.23 (95% CI 0.20-0.27) and lower extremities accounted for 1.36 (95% CI 1.27-1.44). This study has added a wide overall perspective to the area concerning incidence and incidence rates of musculoskeletal extremity injuries in schoolchildren aged 6-12 years, including severe and less severe, traumatic, and overuse injuries. The understanding of injury epidemiology in children is fundamental to the acknowledgement and insurance of the appropriate prevention and treatment. PMID:24472003

  7. A prospective twin cohort study of disability pensions due to musculoskeletal diagnoses in relation to stability and change in pain.

    PubMed

    Ropponen, Annina; Svedberg, Pia; Kalso, Eija; Koskenvuo, Markku; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2013-10-01

    Pain is known to play an important role in the pathway to becoming work disabled, in particular for award of disability pensions (DP) due to musculoskeletal diagnoses (MSD). This prospective cohort study investigated MSD-related pain stability and/or changes as predictors for DP during a 23-year follow-up. Additionally confounding factors were examined to elucidate whether familial effects (including genetics and family background) or socioeconomic status, other pain, or use of medication would affect the associations between pain and DP. Data were available on 11,224 twins (4399 complete pairs) born before 1958 surveyed through questionnaires about background factors and musculoskeletal (low back, neck, and shoulder) pain impairing work ability in 1975 and 1981. The follow-up data were collected from pension registers until 2004. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used. During the 23-year follow-up, 508 DPs due to MSD, 166 DPs due to osteoarthritis (OA), and 162 DPs due to low back diagnoses (LBD) were granted. Musculoskeletal pain impairing work ability both measured at 1 time point and 6 years apart, and either 1 pain location or multiple locations, predicted increased risk for DP due to MSD, OA, and LBD. The associations were independent of familial confounding factors and of several influential background factors, including headache; migraine; use of analgesics, hypnotics, or tranquillizers; life satisfaction; and education and marital status. This study concluded that musculoskeletal pain impairing work ability is an early and direct predictor for DP due to MSD, OA, and LBD. PMID:23711476

  8. Prediction of function in daily life following multidisciplinary rehabilitation for individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain; a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lillefjell, Monica; Krokstad, Steinar; Espnes, Geir Arild

    2007-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal pain is high, with widespread negative economic, psychological, and social consequences for the individual. It is therefore important to find ways to predict the outcome of rehabilitation programmes in terms of function in daily life. The aims of this study were to investigate the improvements over time from multidisciplinary rehabilitation in terms of pain and function, and analyse the relative impact of individual and psychosocial factors as predictors of function in daily life in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods A prospective study was conducted among one hundred and forty three (N = 143) musculoskeletal pain patients. Measures of pain, function, and functional health status were obtained at baseline, after 5 weeks of intensive training, at the end of the 57-week rehabilitation programme, and at a 1 year follow-up, using validated self-administrated measures. Linear regression analysis was applied to investigate the relative impact of musculoskeletal pain, individual-, and psychosocial factors in function. Results The participants studied showed a significant increase in function during the 57 weeks rehabilitation period. There was also a significant increase in function from the end of the rehabilitation period (57th week) to the one year follow-up measures. Pain intensity associated significantly with pain experience over all measurement periods. High levels of pain intensity (β = .42**) and pain experience (β = .37*), and poor psychological capacity (β = -.68*) at baseline, as well as poor physiological capacity (β = -.44**) and high levels of anxiety (β = .48**) and depression (β = .58***) at the end of the rehabilitation program were the most important prognostic factors of variance in functioning over the 4 measurement periods. Conclusion The data suggest that physical capacity, emotional distress and coping skills should be priority areas in rehabilitation programmes to

  9. Medicare's prospective payment system: A critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Coulam, Robert F.; Gaumer, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    Implementation of the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for hospital payment has produced major changes in the hospital industry and in the way hospital services are used by physicians and their patients. The substantial published literature that examines these changes is reviewed in this article. This literature suggests that most of the intended effects of PPS on costs and intensity of care have been realized. But the literature fails to answer fundamental questions about the effectiveness and equity of administered pricing as a policy tool for cost containment. The literature offers some hope that the worst fears about the effects of PPS on quality of care and the health of the hospital industry have not materialized. But because of data lags, the studies done to date seem to tell us more about the effects of the early, more generous period of PPS than about the opportunity costs of reducing hospital cost inflation. PMID:25372306

  10. Prevention of musculoskeletal disorders within management systems: A scoping review of practices, approaches, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Amin; Neumann, W Patrick; Imbeau, Daniel; Bigelow, Philip; Pagell, Mark; Wells, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and summarize the current research evidence on approaches to preventing musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) within Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems (OHSMS). Databases in business, engineering, and health and safety were searched and 718 potentially relevant publications were identified and examined for their relevance. Twenty-one papers met the selection criteria and were subjected to thematic analysis. There was very little literature describing the integration of MSD risk assessment and prevention into management systems. This lack of information may isolate MSD prevention, leading to difficulties in preventing these disorders at an organizational level. The findings of this review argue for further research to integrate MSD prevention into management systems and to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:26154224

  11. Predictive risk factors for chronic regional and multisite musculoskeletal pain: a 5-year prospective study in a working population.

    PubMed

    Herin, Fabrice; Vézina, Michel; Thaon, Isabelle; Soulat, Jean-Marc; Paris, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    The role of psychosocial and physical factors in the development of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) has now been clearly demonstrated. However, it is unclear whether these factors contribute to specific regional MSP or to multisite pain. The main goal of this study was to assess the impact of work-related factors according to gender on the development of regional and multisite MSP. A total of 12,591 subjects (65% men and 35% women) who were born in 1938, 1943, 1948, and 1953 and were participating in a French longitudinal prospective epidemiological survey (ESTEV) in 1990 to 1995 were eligible. Personal factors and work exposure were assessed by self-administered questionnaires. Statistical associations between chronic MSP (regional body site or multisite), personal factors, and occupational factors were analyzed using logistic regression modeling. The incidence of regional MSP and multisite pain in 1995 were, respectively, 17% and 25.6%. For women, highly repetitive movements predicted neck/shoulder pain; posture and vibrations predicted arm and low back pain; and effort with tools predicted arm pain. For men, forceful effort and vibrations predicted neck/shoulder pain; posture and forceful effort predicted lower limb and low back pain; and forceful effort and effort with tools predicted arm pain. Physical constraints (ie, forceful effort or vibrations) were associated with multisite pain in both genders. Only for women, psychological factors were risk factors predictive of upper limb pain and in 3 or 4 painful anatomical sites. These results support the hypothesis that some physical and psychological work-related factors are predictive of regional or multisite MSP but differ according to gender. Gender differences and risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal pain should be also taken into account to more effectively target preventive measures. PMID:24561229

  12. Comparison of indium-labeled-leukocyte imaging with sequential technetium-gallium scanning in the diagnosis of low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis. A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, K.D.; Brown, M.L.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    We prospectively compared sequential technetium-gallium imaging with indium-labeled-leukocyte imaging in fifty patients with suspected low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis. Adequate images and follow-up examinations were obtained for forty-two patients. The presence or absence of low-grade sepsis was confirmed by histological and bacteriological examinations of tissue specimens taken at surgery in thirty of the forty-two patients. In these thirty patients, the sensitivity of sequential Tc-Ga imaging was 48 per cent, the specificity was 86 per cent, and the accuracy was 57 per cent, whereas the sensitivity of the indium-labeled-leukocyte technique was 83 per cent, the specificity was 86 per cent, and the accuracy was 83 per cent. When the additional twelve patients for whom surgery was deemed unnecessary were considered, the sensitivity of sequential Tc-Ga imaging was 50 per cent, the specificity was 78 per cent, and the accuracy was 62 per cent, as compared with a sensitivity of 83 per cent, a specificity of 94 per cent, and an accuracy of 88 per cent with the indium-labeled-leukocyte method. In patients with a prosthesis the indium-labeled-leukocyte image was 94 per cent accurate, compared with 75 per cent accuracy for sequential Tc-Ga imaging. Statistical analysis of these data demonstrated that the indium-labeled-leukocyte technique was superior to sequential Tc-Ga imaging in detecting areas of low-grade musculoskeletal sepsis.

  13. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  14. A prospective study of primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain: the identification of predictive factors for chronicity.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, R G; Jones, J M; Boardman, A P

    2000-01-01

    Primary care faces the challenge of reducing the proportion of patients continuing with musculoskeletal pain beyond the acute phase. This study assessed patients presenting in general practice with a four- to 12-week history of pain and re-assessed them 12 weeks later. Patients whose pain was described as 'none' or 'slight' were allocated to the 'acute group', and those whose pain continued to be 'moderate' or 'severe' were allocated to the 'chronic group'. Comparative analysis of the two groups' responses at initial assessment identified pain intensity, active coping score, and previous pain episode to be factors independently predictive of chronicity. PMID:10750237

  15. Seasonal variation in musculoskeletal extremity injuries in school children aged 6–12 followed prospectively over 2.5 years: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Eva; Holst, René; Franz, Claudia; Rexen, Christina T; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The type and level of physical activity in children vary over seasons and might thus influence the injury patterns. However, very little information is available on the distribution of injuries over the calendar year. This study aims to describe and analyse the seasonal variation in extremity injuries in children. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 10 public schools in the municipality of Svendborg, Denmark. Participants A total of 1259 school children aged 6–12 years participating in the Childhood Health, Activity, and Motor Performance School Study Denmark. Methods School children were surveyed each week during 2.5 school-years. Musculoskeletal injuries were reported by parents answering automated mobile phone text questions (SMS-Track) on a weekly basis and diagnosed by clinicians. Data were analysed for prevalence and incidence rates over time with adjustments for gender and age. Results Injuries in the lower extremities were reported most frequently (n=1049). There was a significant seasonal variation in incidence and prevalence for lower extremity injuries and for lower and upper extremity injuries combined (n=1229). For the upper extremities (n=180), seasonal variation had a significant effect on the risk of prevalence. Analysis showed a 46% increase in injury incidence and a 32% increase in injury prevalence during summer relative to winter for lower and upper extremity injuries combined. Conclusions There are clear seasonal differences in the occurrence of musculoskeletal extremity injuries among children with almost twice as high injury incidence and prevalence estimates during autumn, summer and spring compared with winter. This suggests further research into the underlying causes for seasonal variation and calls for preventive strategies to be implemented in order to actively prepare and supervise children before and during high-risk periods. PMID:24401728

  16. Occupational musculoskeletal and mental health: Significance of rationalization and opportunities to create sustainable production systems - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Westgaard, R H; Winkel, J

    2011-01-01

    This literature review aims to identify occupational musculoskeletal and mental health effects of production system rationalization as well as organizational-level measures that may improve health outcome ("modifiers" in this review). A short review of the effect of ergonomic interventions is included as background and rationalization is discussed as a theoretical concept. Indicator variables for occupational musculoskeletal and mental health and related risk factors are presented. Variables with a generalized format were allowed in the literature searches (e.g., job satisfaction and absenteeism were accepted as risk factor and health indicator, respectively), suitable for the research fields of work sociology, organization science, human resource management (HRM) and economics research. One hundred and sixty-two studies of rationalization effects on health and risk factors and 72 organization-level modifier results were accepted into the final database. Entries were sorted by rationalization strategy and work life sector, and trends in outcome (positive, mixed, no effect, or negative effect on health and risk factors) were determined. Rationalizations have a dominant negative effect on health and risk factors (57% negative, 19% positive); the most negative effects were found for downsizing and restructuring rationalizations in general (71 studies negative, 13 positive) and for the health care sector in particular (36 studies negative, 2 positive). The rationalization strategy High Performance Work System (HPWS) was associated with the highest fraction positive outcome studies (6 of 10 studies). Other rationalization strategies (lean practices, parallel vs. serial production and mechanization level) reported intermediate results, in part dependent on work life sector, but also on the year when studies were carried out. Worker participation, resonant management style, information, support, group autonomy and procedural justice were modifiers with favourable

  17. Musculoskeletal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peat, Frances J; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    The current understanding of pathology as it relates to common diseases of the equine musculoskeletal system is reviewed. Conditions are organized under the fundamental categories of developmental, exercise-induced, infectious, and miscellaneous pathology. The overview of developmental pathology incorporates the new classification system of juvenile osteochondral conditions. Discussion of exercise-induced pathology emphasizes increased understanding of the contribution of cumulative microdamage caused by repetitive cyclic loading. Miscellaneous musculoskeletal pathology focuses on laminitis, which current knowledge indicates should be regarded as a clinical syndrome with a variety of possible distinct mechanisms of structural failure that are outlined in this overview. PMID:26037607

  18. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter. PMID:26928749

  19. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H. Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited to the evaluation of the pediatric musculoskeletal system because of the increased ratio of cartilage to bone in the immature skeleton. The purpose of this article is to review the current uses of musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric patients. Hip sonography is widely accepted; other applications are increasing in popularity. PMID:11387111

  20. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  1. Musculoskeletal discipline science plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Life sciences research in the musculoskeletal discipline must identify possible consequences of weightlessness on this system, understand the mechanisms of these effects, and develop effective and operationally practical countermeasures to protect crewmembers. The musculoskeletal system is highly plastic in that is possesses the inherent capability to adapt its structural and functional properties in accordance with the type and degree of stimuli imposed on it. Prolonged space travel is essentially a period of significant unloading of the musculoskeletal system. This results in adaptive responses in the structure and function of this system, placing it on the low end of a continuum from one of complete disuse to one of maximal use. There is a high probability that the musculoskeletal system is functionally impaired with increasing duration of weightlessness. The purpose of this Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences division research and development activities in the area of musculoskeletal function. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines research opportunities, which encompass critical questions in the subdiscipline areas (e.g., muscle, bone, and other musculoskeletal connective tissues). These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  2. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  3. Becoming a musculoskeletal ultrasonographer.

    PubMed

    Iagnocco, Annamaria; Naredo, Esperanza; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2013-04-01

    Over the last decade, increasing numbers of rheumatologists have incorporated musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) as a valuable diagnostic tool into their clinical practice. Some countries have established training programmes for MSUS. The European League Against Rheumatism has developed education guidelines for the content and conductance of MSUS courses and it would be useful to standardise rheumatology MSUS training worldwide. A thorough knowledge of anatomy, US physics and technology, US scanning methods, US pattern of normal and pathological musculoskeletal tissues, definitions for US pathology, artefacts and pitfalls in both greyscale and Doppler modalities is necessary to perform efficient MSUS. MSUS training includes attending theoretical-practical and online courses, as well as studying textbooks and using digital video discs (DVDs). Having access to US equipment and performing supervised normal and pathological MSUS examinations for a training period are mandatory for consolidating MSUS learning. A proposal to accredit and certificate competence in MSUS is now being discussed. PMID:23731935

  4. Musculoskeletal Aspiration Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hansford, Barry Glenn; Stacy, Gregory Scott

    2012-01-01

    With advances in imaging technology, there has been a significant increase in the number and range of interventional musculoskeletal image-guided procedures. One of the most commonly performed image-guided musculoskeletal interventions is the diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous aspiration and drainage of multiple types of intra-articular, juxta-articular, and intramuscular pathologic fluid collections. These procedures may be performed under fluoroscopic, ultrasound, computed tomography, or even magnetic resonance guidance depending on the location to be accessed, type of pathology, patient characteristics, and operator preference. Musculoskeletal image-guided aspiration and drainage procedures are minimally invasive and generally very safe while offering valuable diagnostic information as well as therapeutic benefit. This article focuses on the appropriate indications, contraindications, and general technique for accessing the major joints via imaging guidance. For each joint, we discuss pertinent anatomy, appropriate imaging modalities, and preferred approaches to gaining intra-articular access. Additionally, the article discusses some of the more frequently encountered juxta-articular and intramuscular fluid collections that can be accessed and aspirated via percutaneous intervention, with mention of the importance of recognizing extremity sarcomas that can mimic these benign collections. PMID:24293800

  5. Musculoskeletal Disorders among Cosmetologists

    PubMed Central

    Tsigonia, Alexandra; Tanagra, Dimitra; Linos, Athena; Merekoulias, Georgios; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.

    2009-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the relationships between physical, psychosocial, and individual characteristics and different endpoints of low back, neck, shoulder, hand/wrist and knee musculoskeletal complaints among cosmetologists in Athens, Greece. The study population consisted of 95 female and seven male beauty therapists (response rate 90%) with a mean age and duration of employment of 38 and 16 years, respectively. Neck pain was the most prevalent musculoskeletal complaint, reported by 58% of the subjects, while hand/wrist and low back complaints resulted more frequently in self-reported consequences (chronicity, care seeking and absenteeism). Significant relationships were found between self-reported physical risk factors like prolonged sitting, use of vibrating tools, reaching far and awkward body postures and the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders at various body sites. Among psychosocial variables co-worker support and skill discretion seem to be the most important reflecting organizational problems and cognitive-behavioral aspects. The study results also suggest that effective intervention strategies most likely have to take into account both ergonomic improvements and organizational aspects. PMID:20049238

  6. Musculoskeletal disorders among cosmetologists.

    PubMed

    Tsigonia, Alexandra; Tanagra, Dimitra; Linos, Athena; Merekoulias, Georgios; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C

    2009-12-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the relationships between physical, psychosocial, and individual characteristics and different endpoints of low back, neck, shoulder, hand/wrist and knee musculoskeletal complaints among cosmetologists in Athens, Greece. The study population consisted of 95 female and seven male beauty therapists (response rate 90%) with a mean age and duration of employment of 38 and 16 years, respectively. Neck pain was the most prevalent musculoskeletal complaint, reported by 58% of the subjects, while hand/wrist and low back complaints resulted more frequently in self-reported consequences (chronicity, care seeking and absenteeism). Significant relationships were found between self-reported physical risk factors like prolonged sitting, use of vibrating tools, reaching far and awkward body postures and the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders at various body sites. Among psychosocial variables co-worker support and skill discretion seem to be the most important reflecting organizational problems and cognitive-behavioral aspects. The study results also suggest that effective intervention strategies most likely have to take into account both ergonomic improvements and organizational aspects. PMID:20049238

  7. Scintigraphic evaluation in musculoskeletal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, K.D.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr.; Brown, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    In this article, the mechanism of technetium, gallium, and indium-labeled white blood cell localization in septic processes is detailed, and the method of interpretation of these three isotopes with relationship to musculoskeletal infection is outlined. Specific clinical application of technetium, gallium, and indium-labeled white blood cell imaging for musculoskeletal sepsis is reviewed.

  8. Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gheno, Ramon; Cepparo, Juan M.; Rosca, Cristina E.; Cotten, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most common problems affecting the elderly. The resulting loss of mobility and physical independence can be particularly devastating in this population. The aim of this article is to present some of the most frequent musculoskeletal disorders of the elderly, such as fractures, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, microcrystal disorders, infections, and tumors. PMID:22919553

  9. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis*, **

    PubMed Central

    Nessrine, Akasbi; Zahra, Abourazzak Fatima; Taoufik, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause. It most commonly affects the pulmonary system but can also affect the musculoskeletal system, albeit less frequently. In patients with sarcoidosis, rheumatic involvement is polymorphic. It can be the presenting symptom of the disease or can appear during its progression. Articular involvement is dominated by nonspecific arthralgia, polyarthritis, and Löfgren's syndrome, which is defined as the presence of lung adenopathy, arthralgia (or arthritis), and erythema nodosum. Skeletal manifestations, especially dactylitis, appear mainly as complications of chronic, multiorgan sarcoidosis. Muscle involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis of rheumatic sarcoidosis is based on X-ray findings and magnetic resonance imaging findings, although the definitive diagnosis is made by anatomopathological study of biopsy samples. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis is generally relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids. In corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent forms of the disease, immunosuppressive therapy, such as treatment with methotrexate or anti-TNF-α, is employed. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the various types of osteoarticular and muscle involvement in sarcoidosis, focusing on their diagnosis and management. PMID:24831403

  10. Register-based data of psychosocial working conditions and occupational groups as predictors of disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses: a prospective cohort study of 24 543 Swedish twins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupations and psychosocial working conditions have rarely been investigated as predictors of disability pension in population-based samples. This study investigated how occupational groups and psychosocial working conditions are associated with future disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses, accounting for familial factors in the associations. Methods A sample of 24 543 same-sex Swedish twin individuals was followed from 1993 to 2008 using nationwide registries. Baseline data on occupations were categorized into eight sector-defined occupational groups. These were further used to reflect psychosocial working conditions by applying the job strain scores of a Job Exposure Matrix. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR) were estimated. Results During the 12-year (average) follow-up, 7% of the sample was granted disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses. Workers in health care and social work; agriculture, forestry and fishing; transportation; production and mining; and the service and military work sectors were two to three times more likely to receive a disability pension than those in the administration and management sector. Each single unit decrease in job demands and each single unit increase in job control and social support significantly predicted disability pension. Individuals with high work strain or an active job had a lower hazard ratio of disability pension, whereas a passive job predicted a significantly higher hazard ratio. Accounting for familial confounding did not alter these results. Conclusion Occupational groups and psychosocial working conditions seem to be independent of familial confounding, and hence represent risk factors for disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses. This means that preventive measures in these sector-defined occupational groups and specific psychosocial working conditions might prevent disability pension due to musculoskeletal diagnoses. PMID:24040914

  11. Low-severity Musculoskeletal Complaints Evaluated in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Samir; Hollander, Judd E.; Shofer, Frances; Bernstein, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Patients with musculoskeletal disorders represent a considerable percentage of emergency department volume. Although patients with acute or high-severity conditions are encouraged to seek care in the emergency department, patients with nonacute, low-severity conditions may be better served elsewhere. This study prospectively assessed patients presenting to the emergency department with nonacute, low-severity musculoskeletal conditions to test the hypothesis that these patients have access to care outside the emergency department. One thousand ten adult patients with a musculoskeletal complaint were identified, and a detailed questionnaire was completed by 862 (85.3%) during their emergency department stay. Three hundred fifty (40.6%) patients presented with nonacute, low-severity conditions. Patients with nonacute, low-severity problems were less likely to have a primary care physician (62.5% versus 72.3%) or to have medical insurance (82.5% versus 87.7%), but a majority had both (59.3%). Only 14.3% had neither. Forty-four percent of all patients with primary care physicians believed their primary care physician was incapable of managing musculoskeletal problems. Appropriate use of the emergency department by patients with musculoskeletal disorders may require not only increased access to insurance and primary care, but also improved public understanding of the scope of care offered by primary care physicians and the conflicting demands placed on emergency department providers. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18496728

  12. Computed tomography of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.W. Magid, D. Fishman, E.K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 10 chapters. The chapter titles are: Soft Tissue Masses; Primary Bone Tumors; The Role of CT in the Therapeutic Management of Soft Tissue Sarcomas; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Inflammation; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Trauma; The Foot and Ankle; The Shoulder; Measurement of Bone Mineral for Early Detection of Osteoporosis; MRI of the Musculoskeletal System; and Advances in CT Imaging of Musculoskeletal Pathology.

  13. Musculoskeletal involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lóránd, Veronika; Czirják, László; Minier, Tünde

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) involvement is a very frequent manifestation of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). There are several reports about clinical trials assessing musculoskeletal involvement in SSc. However, only few controlled studies have been conducted. The prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, clinical and radiographic findings has been assessed. The most important articular (arthralgia, synovitis, contractures), tendon (tendon friction rubs, tenosynovitis) and muscular manifestations (myalgia, muscle weakness, myositis) should be carefully evaluated during the assessment of SSc patients, because these are not only common, but substantially influence the quality of life and some of them also have predictive value concerning disease activity and severity. PMID:25179276

  14. Predicting pain outcomes after traumatic musculoskeletal injury.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Brittany N; Katz, Joel; Chin, Kelly Y W; Haslam, Lynn; Canzian, Sonya; Kreder, Hans J; McCartney, Colin J L

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic musculoskeletal injury results in a high incidence of chronic pain; however, there is little evidence about the nature, quality, and severity of the pain. This study uses a prospective, observational, longitudinal design to (1) examine neuropathic pain symptoms, pain severity, pain interference, and pain management at hospital admission and 4 months after traumatic musculoskeletal injury (n = 205), and (2) to identify predictors of group membership for patients with differing moderate-to-severe putative neuropathic pain trajectories. Data were collected on mechanism of injury, injury severity, pain (intensity, interference, neuropathic quality), anxiety (anxiety sensitivity, general anxiety, pain catastrophizing, pain anxiety), depression, and posttraumatic stress while patients were in-hospital and 4 months after injury. A third of patients had chronic moderate-to-severe neuropathic pain 4 months after injury. Specifically, 11% of patients developed moderate-to-severe pain by 4 months and 21% had symptoms immediately after injury that persisted over time. Significant predictors of the development and maintenance of moderate-to-severe neuropathic pain included high levels of general anxiety while in-hospital immediately after injury (P < 0.001) and symptoms of posttraumatic stress 4 months after injury (P < 0.001). Few patients had adequate pharmacological, physical, or psychological pain management in-hospital and at 4 months. Future research is needed among trauma patients to better understand the development of chronic pain and to determine the best treatment approaches. PMID:27058677

  15. Angelman syndrome: A review highlighting musculoskeletal and anatomical aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Rohit; Donkers, Sarah J; Kim, Soo Y

    2016-07-01

    Angelman's syndrome (AS) is a genetic neurodevelopment disorder. The cause is a known abnormality involving the maternal inherited ubiquitin-protein ligase (UBE3A) gene. Clinical characteristics universal to the disorder are well documented in the literature and include developmental delay, seizures, ataxia, altered tone, severely impaired speech and intellect, as well as an overall happy demeanor, frequent bouts of laughter, and hypermotoric behavior. Associated with this disorder are several musculoskeletal aberrations. To date, a review of case studies reporting on these musculoskeletal changes has not been carried out. Thus, the purpose of this paper was to provide an overview of the musculoskeletal changes present in individuals with AS. In our review of 21 case reports from 1965-2013, the most consistently reported anatomical changes were of the craniofacial region. These include microcephaly, brachycephaly, a palpable occipital groove, prognathism, and wide spaced teeth. Other musculoskeletal abnormalities less frequently reported in the literature include scoliosis, excessive lumbar lordosis, and pes planus. Given that the majority of the case reports reviewed was of young children, the possibility of underreporting musculoskeletal changes which may manifest in the later years of life may be present. Early diagnosis and interventions to minimize secondary complications are crucial to maintain quality of life. An overall multidisciplinary approach is emphasized to maximize developmental potential for these individuals. Future prospective studies that follow patients into adulthood are needed to better understand the prevalence and development of secondary musculoskeletal changes, which in turn can inform intervention techniques and preventative measures. Clin. Anat. 29:561-567, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26480021

  16. Management of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Richard L; Roberts, Timothy T; Papaliodis, Dean N; Mulligan, Michael T; Dubin, Andrew H

    2014-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain results from a complex interplay of mechanical, biochemical, psychological, and social factors. Effective management is markedly different from that of acute musculoskeletal pain. Understanding the physiology of pain transmission, modulation, and perception is crucial for effective management. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies such as psychotherapy and biofeedback exercises can be used to manage chronic pain. Evidence-based treatment recommendations have been made for chronic pain conditions frequently encountered by orthopaedic surgeons, including low back, osteoarthritic, posttraumatic, and neuropathic pain. Extended-release tramadol; select tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and anticonvulsants; and topical medications such as lidocaine, diclofenac, and capsaicin are among the most effective treatments. However, drug efficacy varies significantly by indication. Orthopaedic surgeons should be familiar with the widely available safe and effective nonnarcotic options for chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24486756

  17. Ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal applications

    PubMed Central

    Drakonaki, E E; Allen, G M; Wilson, D J

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a method to assess the mechanical properties of tissue, by applying stress and detecting tissue displacement using ultrasound. There are several EUS techniques used in clinical practice; strain (compression) EUS is the most common technique that allows real-time visualisation of the elastographic map on the screen. There is increasing evidence that EUS can be used to measure the mechanical properties of musculoskeletal tissue in clinical practice, with the future potential for early diagnosis to both guide and monitor therapy. This review describes the various EUS techniques available for clinical use, presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of EUS and discusses the technical issues, limitations and future perspectives of this method in the assessment of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23091287

  18. Musculoskeletal ageing and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Nedergaard, Anders; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A; Christiansen, Claus

    2013-10-01

    Loss of musculoskeletal mass and function is a natural ageing trait, reinforced by an unhealthy life style. Loss of bone (osteoporosis) and muscle (sarcopaenia) are conditions whose prevalence are increasing because of the change in population distribution in the western world towards an older mean age. Improvements in lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking and exercise, are the most powerful tools to combat this decline efficiently; however, public health interventions aimed at tackling these problems have shown abysmal success at the population level, mostly due to failure in compliance. With these issues in mind, we believe that the primary prevention modality in coming decades will be pharmacological. We review the basic biology of musculoskeletal ageing and what measures can be taken to prevent ageing-associated loss of musculoskeletal mass and function, with particular emphasis on pharmacological means. PMID:23891483

  19. Pharmacologic Therapies in Musculoskeletal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Loveless, Melinda S; Fry, Adrielle L

    2016-07-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are common, and there are many options for pharmacologic therapy. Unfortunately, there is not strong evidence for the use of many of these medications. Acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are generally first-line medications for most musculoskeletal pain, but there is more evidence these medications are not as safe as once thought. Other analgesic and antispasmodic medications can be effective for acute pain but generally are not as effective for chronic pain. Antidepressants and anticonvulsants can be more effective for chronic or neuropathic pain. Topical formulations of NSAIDs can be effective for pain with fewer side effects. PMID:27235619

  20. Musculoskeletal manifestations of endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Stephanie B; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Forrester, Deborah M; Masih, Sulabha; Matcuk, George R

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disorders can lead to disturbances in numerous systems within the body, including the musculoskeletal system. Radiological evaluation of these conditions can demonstrate typical appearances of the bones and soft tissues. Knowledge of these patterns can allow the radiologist to suggest a diagnosis that may not be clinically apparent. This review will highlight the typical musculoskeletal findings of acromegaly, hypercortisolism, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, pseudo- and pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, and diabetes mellitus. The radiological manifestations of each of these endocrine disorders, along with a brief discussion of the pathophysiology and clinical implications, will be discussed. PMID:24642251

  1. Ultrasound-assisted musculoskeletal procedures: A practical overview of current literature

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Nelson A; Farrin, Emily; Bahner, David P; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally performed by a small group of highly trained specialists, bedside sonographic procedures involving the musculoskeletal system are often delayed despite the critical need for timely diagnosis and treatment. Due to this limitation, a need evolved for more portability and accessibility to allow performance of emergent musculoskeletal procedures by adequately trained non-radiology personnel. The emergence of ultrasound-assisted bedside techniques and increased availability of portable sonography provided such an opportunity in select clinical scenarios. This review summarizes the current literature describing common ultrasound-based musculoskeletal procedures. In-depth discussion of each ultrasound procedure including pertinent technical details, indications and contraindications is provided. Despite the limited amount of prospective, randomized data in this area, a substantial body of observational and retrospective evidence suggests potential benefits from the use of musculoskeletal bedside sonography. PMID:22474637

  2. Musculoskeletal Fitness and Risk of Mortality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Craig, Cora L.

    2002-01-01

    Quantified the relationship between musculoskeletal fitness and all-cause mortality in Canada, using measures of musculoskeletal fitness (situps, pushups, grip strength, and sit- and-reach trunk flexibility) from adult male and female participants in the Canadian Fitness Survey. Results indicated that some components of musculoskeletal fitness,…

  3. [Musculoskeletal medicine--strategies towards a "good musculoskeletal consultation"].

    PubMed

    Vulfsons, Simon

    2011-03-01

    The burden of musculoskeletal disease and disability is huge. The direct costs of diagnosis and treatment are dwarfed by the indirect costs to society comprised of sick leave, early retirement, pension funds and disability allowances. Chronic musculoskeletal pain and dysfunction account for the most common cause for chronic pain and for up to 25% of all consultations to family practitioners in the developed world. It is therefore surprising to find that education and training in musculoskeletal medicine has been given short shrift by medical schools, specialist training programs for family practitioners and post graduate continuing medical education. This has been shown quite comprehensively by Mashov and Tabenkin in this edition of the journal. At the close of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010, as declared by the WHO, it is timely to see what has been achieved in terms of the original goals for this decade. There has been a major effort for increasing awareness both in the health community and the general public towards managing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Much has been written, but far less performed in changing the priorities of medical schools and family practice programs towards teaching and training doctors to adequately recognize and treat patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal problems. In Israel, it is estimated that the indirect costs through lost productivity amount to up to 1.15 billion shekels a year. Investing time and money in training programs for medical students and doctors, together with building an incentive program for primary care physicians to adequately treat this huge chronically disabled population is not only feasible, but can also make great inroads towards easing suffering while curtailing costs. PMID:21574355

  4. Psychological and physical correlates of musculoskeletal symptoms in male professional divers and offshore workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Underwater divers are more likely to complain of musculoskeletal symptoms than a control population. Accordingly, we conducted a study to determine whether musculoskeletal symptoms reflected observable physical disorder, to ascertain the relationship between symptoms and measures of mood, memory and executive function and to assess any need for future screening. Methods A 10% random sample of responders to a prior postal health questionnaire was examined (151 divers, 120 non-diving offshore workers). Participants underwent physical examination and a neuropsychological test battery for memory and executive function. Participants also completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for anxiety (HADSa) and depression (HADSd), and questionnaires for physical health-related quality of life (SF36 PCS), mental health-related quality of life (SF36 MCS), memory (Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ), Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ)), executive function (dysexecutive syndrome questionnaire (DEX)), musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) and general unrelated symptom reporting. Results Of participants with moderate/severe musculoskeletal symptoms, 52% had physical signs, and of participants with no symptoms, 73% had no physical signs. There was no difference in the prevalence of signs or symptoms between groups. Musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with lower SF36 PCS for both groups. In divers, musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with higher general unrelated symptom reporting and poorer scoring for HADSa, PRMQ, CFQ and DEX with scores remaining within the normative range. A positive physical examination was associated with general unrelated symptom reporting in divers. There were no differences in neuropsychological test scores attributable to either group or musculoskeletal symptoms. Conclusions Musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with physical signs, but this was not a strong effect. Reporting of musculoskeletal symptoms by

  5. Ageing, musculoskeletal health and work

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith; Goodson, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Changing demographics mean that many patients with soft tissue rheumatism, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, large joint prostheses, and age-related co-morbidities are seeking to work beyond the traditional retirement age. In this chapter we review the evidence on musculoskeletal health and work at older ages. We conclude that musculoskeletal problems are common in older workers and have a substantial impact on their work capacity. Factors that influence their job retention are described, together with approaches that may extend working life. Many gaps in evidence were found, notably on the health risks and benefits of continued work in affected patients and on which interventions work best. The roles of physicians and managers are also considered. PMID:26612237

  6. Ageing, musculoskeletal health and work.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Keith T; Goodson, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    Changing demographics mean that many patients with soft tissue rheumatism, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, large joint prostheses and age-related co-morbidities are seeking to work beyond the traditional retirement age. In this chapter, we review the evidence on musculoskeletal health and work at older ages. We conclude that musculoskeletal problems are common in older workers and have a substantial impact on their work capacity. Factors that influence their job retention are described, together with approaches that may extend working life. Many gaps in evidence were found, notably on the health risks and benefits of continued work in affected patients and on which interventions work best. The roles of physicians and managers are also considered. PMID:26612237

  7. Radiology of musculoskeletal stress injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Keats, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    With the new emphasis on physical fitness, musculoskeletal stress injuries are being seen with greater frequency in children and adults, and in locations that are not widely associated with stress injury. Some of the injuries continue to be mistaken for signs of more serious illnesses, such as infection and neoplasm, and this may lead to unnecessary investigative effort. This book covers both the classic stress injuries and the new manifestations.

  8. Palliative Care in Musculoskeletal Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gulia, Ashish; Byregowda, Suman; Panda, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients in advanced stages of illness trajectories with local and widespread musculoskeletal incurable malignancies, either treatment naive or having recurrence are referred to the palliative care clinic to relieve various disease-related symptoms and to improve the quality of life. Palliative care is a specialized medicine that offers treatment to the disease-specific symptoms, places emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of life and help the patients and their family to cope with advance stage cancer in a stronger and reasonable way. The overall outcome of musculoskeletal malignancies has improved with the advent of multidisciplinary management. Even then these tumors do relapse and leads to organ failures and disease-specific deaths in children and young adults in productive age group thus requiring an integrated approach to improve the supportive/palliative care needs in end-stage disease. In this article, we would like to discuss the spectrum of presentation of advanced musculoskeletal malignancies, skeletal metastasis, and their management. PMID:27559251

  9. Palliative Care in Musculoskeletal Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Ashish; Byregowda, Suman; Panda, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients in advanced stages of illness trajectories with local and widespread musculoskeletal incurable malignancies, either treatment naive or having recurrence are referred to the palliative care clinic to relieve various disease-related symptoms and to improve the quality of life. Palliative care is a specialized medicine that offers treatment to the disease-specific symptoms, places emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of life and help the patients and their family to cope with advance stage cancer in a stronger and reasonable way. The overall outcome of musculoskeletal malignancies has improved with the advent of multidisciplinary management. Even then these tumors do relapse and leads to organ failures and disease-specific deaths in children and young adults in productive age group thus requiring an integrated approach to improve the supportive/palliative care needs in end-stage disease. In this article, we would like to discuss the spectrum of presentation of advanced musculoskeletal malignancies, skeletal metastasis, and their management. PMID:27559251

  10. Musculoskeletal pain and effort-reward imbalance- a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain may be triggered by physical strains and psychosocial risk factors. The effort-reward imbalance model (ERI model) is a stress model which measures psychosocial factors in the working world. The question is whether workers with an effort-reward imbalance report musculoskeletal pain more frequently than those with no effort-reward imbalance. A systematic review using a best evidence synthesis approach was conducted to answer this question. Methods A literature search was conducted for the period from 1996 to 2012, using three databases (Pubmed, Embase and PsycINFO). The research criteria related to psychosocial, work-related stress as per the ERI model and to musculoskeletal pain. A quality score was developed using various quality criteria to assess the standard of the studies. The level of evidence was graded as in (Am J Ind Med 39:180–193, 2001). Results After applying the inclusion criteria, a total of 19 studies were included in the review: 15 cross-sectional studies, three prospective studies and one case–control study. 74% of all studies exhibited good methodological quality, 53% collected data using the original ERI questionnaire, and in 42% of the studies, there was adequate control for physical working conditions. Furthermore, different cut-off points were used to classify exposed and non-exposed individuals. On the basis of 13 studies with a positive, statistically significant association, a moderate level of evidence was inferred for the association between effort-reward imbalance and musculoskeletal pain. The evidence for a role of over-commitment and for its interaction with effort-reward imbalance was rated as inconclusive - on the basis of eight and five studies, respectively. Conclusions On the basis of the available evidence, no reliable conclusion may be drawn about any association between the psychosocial factors ascertained using the ERI model and musculoskeletal pain. Before a reliable statement can be made on

  11. Small Molecule based Musculoskeletal Regenerative Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kevin W.-H.; Jiang, Tao; Gagnon, Keith A.; Nelson, Clarke; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and scientists working in the field of regenerative engineering are actively investigating a wide range of methods to promote musculoskeletal tissue regeneration. Small molecule-mediated tissue regeneration is emerging as a promising strategy for regenerating various musculoskeletal tissues and a large number of small molecule compounds have been recently discovered as potential bioactive molecules for musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. In this review, we summarize the recent literature encompassing the past four years in the area of small bioactive molecule for promoting repair and regeneration of various musculoskeletal tissues including bone, muscle, cartilage, tendon, and nerve. PMID:24405851

  12. Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Anthony D.; Pfleger, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are a major burden on individuals, health systems, and social care systems, with indirect costs being predominant. This burden has been recognized by the United Nations and WHO, by endorsing the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010. This paper describes the burden of four major musculoskeletal conditions: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and low back pain. Osteoarthritis, which is characterized by loss of joint cartilage that leads to pain and loss of function primarily in the knees and hips, affects 9.6% of men and 18% of women aged > 60 years. Increases in life expectancy and ageing populations are expected to make osteoarthritis the fourth leading cause of disability by the year 2020. Joint replacement surgery, where available, provides effective relief. Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition that usually affects multiple joints. It affects 0.3-1.0% of the general population and is more prevalent among women and in developed countries. Persistent inflammation leads to joint destruction, but the disease can be controlled with drugs. The incidence may be on the decline, but the increase in the number of older people in some regions makes it difficult to estimate future prevalence. Osteoporosis, which is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration, is a major risk factor for fractures of the hip, vertebrae, and distal forearm. Hip fracture is the most detrimental fracture, being associated with 20% mortality and 50% permanent loss in function. Low back pain is the most prevalent of musculoskeletal conditions; it affects nearly everyone at some point in time and about 4-33% of the population at any given point. Cultural factors greatly influence the prevalence and prognosis of low back pain. PMID:14710506

  13. Relationship between Comorbid Health Problems and Musculoskeletal Disorders Resulting in Musculoskeletal Complaints and Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence among Employees in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Sun; Yi, Kwan Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and comorbid health problems, including depression/anxiety disorder, insomnia/sleep disorder, fatigue, and injury by accident, and to determine whether certain physical and psychological factors reduce comorbid health problems. Methods In total, 29,711 employees were selected from respondents of the Third Korean Working Conditions Survey and categorized into two groups: Musculoskeletal Complaints or Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence. Four self-reported health indicators (overall fatigue, depression/anxiety, insomnia/sleep disorder, and injury by accident) were selected as outcomes, based on their high prevalence in Korea. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the relationship between comorbid health problems, musculoskeletal complaints, and sickness absence. Results The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and musculoskeletal sickness absence due to muscular pain was 32.26% and 0.59%, respectively. Compared to the reference group, depression/anxiety disorder and overall fatigue were 5.2–6.1 times more prevalent in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group and insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were 7.6–11.0 times more prevalent in the Sickness Absence Group. When adjusted for individual and work-related physical factors, prevalence of all four comorbid health problems were slightly decreased in both groups. Conclusion Increases in overall fatigue and depression/anxiety disorder were observed in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group, while increases in insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were observed in the Sickness Absence Group. For management of musculoskeletal complaints and sickness absence in the workplace, differences in health problems between employees with musculoskeletal complaints and those with sickness absence as well as the physical and psychological risk factors should be considered. PMID:26106512

  14. [MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy].

    PubMed

    Daecke, W; Libicher, M; Mädler, U; Rumpf, C; Bernd, L

    2003-02-01

    MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy has been mentioned to be a minimally invasive method to obtain specimens for diagnostic purposes in bone tumors. To evaluate the viability, to assess the accuracy, and to record possible complications of this method, clinical data of 19 MRI-guided biopsies were analyzed. Interventions were performed on 18 patients (1-78 years) as an outpatient procedure: 15 skeletal and 4 soft tissue biopsies were taken from the pelvis, upper limb,or lower limb. We used T1-weighted gradient echoes (GE) for locating the puncture site and T2-weighted turbo spin echoes (TSE) for visualization of needle position. In 14 of 18 MRI-guided biopsies, a definite histological diagnosis was obtained. According to the pathologist, the inadequate size of the specimen was the main reason for missing the diagnoses in four cases.Long intervention time and inappropriate biopsy tools proved to be the main disadvantages of MRI-guided biopsy, but technical improvement might solve these technical problems in future.A postbiopsy hematoma was the only complication observed. Once technically improved, MRI-guided biopsy could be a precise alternative routine method for musculoskeletal biopsies in future. PMID:12607083

  15. Artifacts in musculoskeletal MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh R; Chin, Michael S M; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2014-02-01

    MR imaging has become an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of a vast number of pathologies and is of foremost importance in the evaluation of spine, joints, and soft tissue structures of the musculoskeletal system. MR imaging is susceptible to various artifacts that may affect the image quality or even simulate pathologies. Some of these artifacts have gained special importance with the use of higher field strength magnets and with the increasing need for MR imaging in postoperative patients, especially those with previous joint replacements or metallic implants. Artifacts may arise from patient motion or could be due to periodic motion, such as vascular and cardiac pulsation. Artifacts could also arise from various protocol errors including saturation, wraparound, truncation, shading, partial volume averaging, and radiofrequency interference artifacts. Susceptibility artifact occurs at interfaces with different magnetic susceptibilities and is of special importance with increasing use of metallic joint replacement prostheses. Magic angle phenomenon is a special type of artifact that occurs in musculoskeletal MR imaging. It is essential to recognize these artifacts and to correct them because they may produce pitfalls in image interpretation. PMID:24515878

  16. Comfort, satisfaction, and anxiolysis in surgical patients using a patient-adjustable comfort warming system: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Denise; Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Anderson, Jane E; Smith, Beverly A; Morris, Michelle

    2010-04-01

    Comfort warming systems aim to produce a comfortable local environment over which the individual patient has control. We studied a patient-adjustable comfort warming system using the Bair PAWS (Patient Adjustable Warming System) (Arizant Healthcare, Inc, Eden Prairie, MN), specifically to study comfort warming rather than therapeutic warming. One-hundred thirty patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized clinical trial, with 58 patients randomized to the patient warming gown, and 72 randomized to the warm blanket group. Groups were similar for gender, age, height, weight, surgical time, body surface area, and body mass index. The patient-adjustable warming system group had perceived greater control and satisfaction at 30 minutes after treatment was initiated compared with the warmed blanket control group. However, there were no differences in satisfaction levels with thermal comfort among those patients contacted one day postoperatively. Additional research is needed to improve external validity of study findings. Further refinement of a nursing definition of thermal comfort should be explored. PMID:20359643

  17. Personal and job characteristics of musculoskeletal injuries in an industrial population.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S P; Gilstrap, E L; Cowles, S R; Waddell, L C; Ross, C E

    1992-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted of 10,350 full-time regular employees who worked at Shell Oil Company's manufacturing facilities between 1987 and 1989. Two hundred seventy-five employees with low-back and 456 with nonlow-back musculoskeletal injuries were compared with 8295 employees who did not have musculoskeletal injuries during this period. Based on morbidity data collected from a prospective health surveillance system, this study shows that estimated relative risks (RRs) for low-back injuries are significantly higher among smokers (RR = 1.54, P less than .01) and overweight persons (RR = 1.42, P less than .01). This observation is also true for nonlow-back musculoskeletal injury (RR = 1.23, P = .05 for smokers and RR = 1.53, P less than .01 for overweight persons). In addition, persons in potentially more physically demanding jobs (primarily maintenance job titles) had an increased RR for both low-back and nonlow-back musculoskeletal injuries (RR = 1.57, P less than .01 and RR = 1.35, P = .02, respectively). The findings of this study suggest that it may be possible to reduce the impact of musculoskeletal injury through implementation of an integrated injury prevention program. Such programs would include not only the traditional elements of job factors evaluation and modifications, employee education and training, and an overall increased attention to ergonomics but also medical counseling and support for personal fitness programs, workplace smoking cessation programs, and weight-reduction programs. PMID:1619491

  18. [Advances in musculoskeletal MR imaging].

    PubMed

    Ho, Michael; Andreisek, Gustav

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal imaging is a rapidly developing field offering several new techniques. MR neurography provides an additive value with complementary and precise information about peripheral nerves. Hereby, MR neurography not only enables the radiologist to differentiate between a mononeuropathic or a polyneuropathic process, but also helps to find nerve compression syndromes by visualizing the nerve surrounding structures as well. An additional administration of contrast agent enables detection of tumors and inflammation of peripheral nerves. Whole body MRI opens new possibilities for detection and follow-up in oncological disorders, systemic diseases, in pediatric diagnostics and in preventive medicine. Guidelines are useful for an evidence-based application of this technique. MRI is generally considered to be the gold standard in diagnostic imaging of the spine. Continuous technical developments have led to a better image quality. New guidelines for standardized image interpretation and reporting have been published and should be used to avoid loss of information from high resolution imaging to effective treatment. PMID:26331202

  19. [Musculoskeletal hydatidosis: an unusual location].

    PubMed

    Pleguezuelo Navarro, M; Iglesias Flores, E M; Domínguez Jiménez, J L; González Galilea, A; Abad Lara, J A; Jiménez Sánchez, C; De Dios Vega, J F

    2006-05-01

    Hydatidosis is a zoonosis with a continuing high prevalence in our environment. The most commonly affected organs are the lungs and the liver, with the musculoskeletal location being considered an unusual one. We comment the case of a patient who presented a series of lesions in his left iliac crest and middle left buttock with spontaneous fistulization to the skin surface. In this case a combined treatment was given; prior to the surgical operation we administered a cycle of albendazol. Following removal of the lesion, the patient was given two further cycles of albendazol in order to minimize the risk of a recurrence of the illness. This patient is currently free of any symptoms relating to this illness. PMID:16817701

  20. Musculoskeletal trauma: the baseball bat.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, D. D.; Greenfield, R.; Martin, E.

    1992-01-01

    Between July 1987 and December 1990 in Washington, DC, 116 patients sustained 146 fractures and seven dislocations due to an assault with a baseball bat. The ulna was the most common site of trauma (61 fractures), followed by the hand (27 injuries) and the radius (14 injuries). Forty-two of the 146 fractures were significantly displaced and required open reduction and internal fixation to restore satisfactory alignment. Twenty-nine of the 146 fractures were open fractures. Treatment protocol for open fractures consisted of irrigation and debridement, antibiotic therapy, and bone stabilization with either internal or external fixation, or casting. Recognition of the severity of the soft tissue and bone damage is important in the management of musculoskeletal trauma secondary to the baseball bat. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1460683

  1. Musculoskeletal imaging insight 2015: Kenya.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathryn J; Mutiso, Kavulani; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Monu, Johnny

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 6 years the International Skeletal Society (ISS) outreach programs have become popular amongst the various radiology organizations in sub-Saharan Africa. So much so that that the ISS outreach is now routinely expected to participate in many of the international radiology conferences in that part of the world. The organizational planning for an outreach visit to Kenya took place over a 3-year period. Eventually a double-headed event; the seventh and eighth sub-Saharan outreach efforts were organized in Nairobi and in Mombasa, Kenya. The Nairobi outreach was an educational course on musculoskeletal imaging at the University of Nairobi and the Aga Khan University in Nairobi from 26 to 28 May 2015. The Mombasa outreach was organized in collaboration with the African Society of Radiology (ASR) at their annual meeting in Mombasa from 30 May to 2 June 2015. PMID:27115883

  2. Perspectives in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Aditya Ravindra; Karnik, Alpana Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is a safe, easily available, and cost-effective modality, which has the additional advantage of being real time for imaging and image-guided interventions of the musculoskeletal system. Musculoskeletal interventions are gaining popularity in sports and rehabilitation for rapid healing of muscle and tendon injuries in professional athletes, healing of chronic tendinopathies, aspiration of joint effusions, periarticular bursae and ganglia, and perineural injections in acute and chronic pain syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of the spectrum of musculoskeletal interventions that can be done under USG guidance both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26288519

  3. Implicit methods for efficient musculoskeletal simulation and optimal control

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogert, Antonie J.; Blana, Dimitra; Heinrich, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The ordinary differential equations for musculoskeletal dynamics are often numerically stiff and highly nonlinear. Consequently, simulations require small time steps, and optimal control problems are slow to solve and have poor convergence. In this paper, we present an implicit formulation of musculoskeletal dynamics, which leads to new numerical methods for simulation and optimal control, with the expectation that we can mitigate some of these problems. A first order Rosenbrock method was developed for solving forward dynamic problems using the implicit formulation. It was used to perform real-time dynamic simulation of a complex shoulder arm system with extreme dynamic stiffness. Simulations had an RMS error of only 0.11 degrees in joint angles when running at real-time speed. For optimal control of musculoskeletal systems, a direct collocation method was developed for implicitly formulated models. The method was applied to predict gait with a prosthetic foot and ankle. Solutions were obtained in well under one hour of computation time and demonstrated how patients may adapt their gait to compensate for limitations of a specific prosthetic limb design. The optimal control method was also applied to a state estimation problem in sports biomechanics, where forces during skiing were estimated from noisy and incomplete kinematic data. Using a full musculoskeletal dynamics model for state estimation had the additional advantage that forward dynamic simulations, could be done with the same implicitly formulated model to simulate injuries and perturbation responses. While these methods are powerful and allow solution of previously intractable problems, there are still considerable numerical challenges, especially related to the convergence of gradient-based solvers. PMID:22102983

  4. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-03-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice. PMID:20380955

  5. Complications in Musculoskeletal Intervention: Important Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David T.; Dubois, Melissa; Tutton, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) intervention has proliferated in recent years among various subspecialties in medicine. Despite advancements in image guidance and percutaneous technique, the risk of complication has not been fully eliminated. Overall, complications in MSK interventions are rare, with bleeding and infection the most common encountered. Other complications are even rarer. This article reviews various complications unique to musculoskeletal interventions, assists the reader in understanding where pitfalls lie, and highlights ways to avoid them. PMID:26038623

  6. The musculoskeletal effects of perioperative smoking.

    PubMed

    Argintar, Evan; Triantafillou, Kostas; Delahay, John; Wiesel, Brent

    2012-06-01

    Although the carcinogenic consequences of smoking are well known, further research is needed on the effects of smoking on musculoskeletal health and surgical outcomes. Orthopaedic perioperative complications of smoking include impaired healing, increased infection, delayed and/or impaired fracture union and arthrodesis, and inferior arthroplasty outcomes. The incorporation of smoking cessation protocols such as transdermal patches, chewing gum, lozenges, inhalers, sprays, bupropion, and varenicline in the perioperative period may result in substantial benefits for patients' musculoskeletal and general health. PMID:22661565

  7. Improving musculoskeletal health: global issues.

    PubMed

    Mody, Girish M; Brooks, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders are among the leading reasons why patients consult a family or primary health practitioner, take time off work and become disabled. Many of the MSK disorders are more common in the elderly. Thus, as the proportion of the elderly increases all over the world, MSK disorders will make a greater contribution to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that the spectrum of MSK disorders in developing countries is similar to that seen in industrialised countries, but the burden of disease tends to be higher due to a delay in diagnosis or lack of access to adequate health-care facilities for effective treatment. Musculoskeletal pain is very common in the community while fibromyalgia is being recognised as part of a continuum of chronic widespread pain rather than a narrowly defined entity. This will allow research to improve our understanding of pain in a variety of diffuse pain syndromes. The availability of newer more effective therapies has resulted in efforts to initiate therapy at an earlier stage of diseases. The new criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and the diagnosis of axial and peripheral involvement in spondyloarthritis, permit an earlier diagnosis without having to wait for radiological changes. One of the major health challenges is the global shortage of health workers, and based on current training of health workers and traditional models of care for service delivery, the global situation is unlikely to change in the near future. Thus, new models of care and strategies to train community health-care workers and primary health-care practitioners to detect and initiate the management of patients with MSK disorders at an earlier stage are required. There is also a need for prevention strategies with campaigns to educate and raise awareness among the entire population. Lifestyle interventions such as maintaining an ideal body weight to prevent obesity, regular exercises, avoidance of smoking and alcohol

  8. Mini Treadmill for Musculoskeletal Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Because NASA's approach to space exploration calls for long-term extended missions, there is a pressing need to equip astronauts with effective exercise regimens that will maintain musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health. ZIN Technologies, Inc., has developed an innovative miniature treadmill for use in both zero-gravity and terrestrial environments. The treadmill offers excellent periodic impact exercise to stimulate cardiovascular activity and bone remodeling as well as resistive capability to encourage full-body muscle maintenance. A novel speed-control algorithm allows users to modulate treadmill speed by adjusting stride, and a new subject load device provides a more Earth-like gravity replacement load. This new and compact treadmill offers a unique approach to managing astronaut health while addressing the inherent and stringent challenges of space flight. The innovation also has the potential to offer numerous terrestrial applications, as a real-time daily load stimulus (DLS) measurement feature provides an effective mechanism to combat or manage osteoporosis, a major public health threat for 55 percent of Americans over the age of 50.

  9. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. PMID:21644200

  10. Approach to managing musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Richard H.; Choquette, Denis; Craig, Brian N.; De Angelis, Carlo; Habal, Flavio; Fulthorpe, Gordon; Stewart, John I.; Turpie, Alexander G.G.; Davis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians and pharmacists with practical, evidence- and expertise-based guidance on choosing the safest approach to using analgesics to manage patients with musculoskeletal pain. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Health care providers from family practice, rheumatology, gastroenterology, hepatology, internal medicine, and pharmacy participated in an educational needs assessment regarding the management of pain and the safety of commonly used analgesics. Feedback from one-on-one interviews was compiled and distributed to participants who selected key topics. Topics chosen formed the basis for the discussions of this multidisciplinary panel that reviewed data on the safety of analgesics, particularly in regard to comorbidity and concurrent use with other therapies. MAIN MESSAGE Treatment should begin with an effective analgesic with the best safety profile at the lowest dose and escalate to higher doses and different analgesics as required. Acetaminophen is a safe medication that should be considered first-line therapy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with potential adverse gastrointestinal, renal, hepatic, and cardiovascular effects. Physicians should not prescribe NSAIDs before taking a careful history and doing a physical examination so they have the information they need to weigh the risks (adverse effects and potential drug interactions) and benefits for individual patients. CONCLUSION Taking a complete and accurate history and doing a physical examination are essential for choosing the safest analgesic for a particular patient. PMID:17872814

  11. Evolving strategies in mechanobiology to more effectively treat damaged musculoskeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Butler, David L; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Shearn, Jason T; Kinneberg, Kirsten R C; Breidenbach, Andrew P; Lalley, Andrea L; Gilday, Steven D; Gooch, Cynthia; Rao, M B; Liu, Chia-feng; Wylie, Christopher

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we had four primary objectives. (1) We reviewed a brief history of the Lissner award and the individual for whom it is named, H.R. Lissner. We examined the type (musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and other) and scale (organism to molecular) of research performed by prior Lissner awardees using a hierarchical paradigm adopted at the 2007 Biomechanics Summit of the US National Committee on Biomechanics. (2) We compared the research conducted by the Lissner award winners working in the musculoskeletal (MS) field with the evolution of our MS research and showed similar trends in scale over the past 35 years. (3) We discussed our evolving mechanobiology strategies for treating musculoskeletal injuries by accounting for clinical, biomechanical, and biological considerations. These strategies included studies to determine the function of the anterior cruciate ligament and its graft replacements as well as novel methods to enhance soft tissue healing using tissue engineering, functional tissue engineering, and, more recently, fundamental tissue engineering approaches. (4) We concluded with thoughts about future directions, suggesting grand challenges still facing bioengineers as well as the immense opportunities for young investigators working in musculoskeletal research. Hopefully, these retrospective and prospective analyses will be useful as the ASME Bioengineering Division charts future research directions. PMID:23445046

  12. The Burden of Musculoskeletal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Clémence; Ravaud, Jean-François; Papelard, Agathe; Ravaud, Philippe; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the burden of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs), these conditions probably deserve more attention from public health authorities in several countries including developed ones. We assessed their contribution to disability. Methods Data on disabilities associated with RMDs were extracted from the national 2008–2009 Disability-Health Survey of 29,931 subjects representative of the population in France. We used the core set of disability categories for RMDs of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for analysis. Diagnosis and disabilities were self-reported. We assessed the risk of disability associated with RMDs using odds ratios (ORs) and the societal impact of RMDs using the average attributable fraction (AAF). Results Overall 27.7% (about 17.3 million people) (95% CI 26.9–28.4%) of the population reported having RMDs. The most prevalent RMDs were low back pain (12.5%, 12.1–13.1) and osteoarthritis (12.3%, 11.8–12.7). People reporting osteoarthritis were more disabled in walking (adjusted OR 1.9, 1.7–2.2) than those without. People reporting inflammatory arthritis were more limited in activities of daily living (from 1.4, 1.2–1.8 for walking to 2.1, 1.5–2.9 for moving around). From a societal perspective, osteoarthritis was the main contributor to activity limitations (AAF 22% for walking difficulties). Changing jobs was mainly attributed to neck pain (AAF 13%) and low back pain (11.5%). Conclusion RMDs are highly prevalent and significantly affect activity limitations and participation restrictions. More effort is needed to improve care and research in this field. PMID:24595187

  13. Musicians' Medicine: Musculoskeletal Problems in String Players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Sung; Park, Ho Youn; Yoon, Jun O; Kim, Jin Sam; Chun, Jae Myeung; Aminata, Iman W.; Cho, Won-Joon

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing attention to medical problems of musicians. Many studies find a high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians, ranging from 73.4% to 87.7%, and string players have the highest prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. This paper examines the various positions and movements of the upper extremities in string players: 1) basic postures for holding instruments, 2) movements of left upper extremity: fingering, forearm posture, high position and vibrato, 3) movements of right upper extremity: bowing, bow angles, pizzicato and other bowing techniques. These isotonic and isometric movements can lead to musculoskeletal problems in musicians. We reviewed orthopedic disorders that are specific to string players: overuse syndrome, muscle-tendon syndrome, focal dystonia, hypermobility syndrome, and compressive neuropathy. Symptoms, interrelationships with musical performances, diagnosis and treatment of these problems were then discussed. PMID:24009899

  14. Postoperative ultrasonography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Cho, Kil-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the postoperative musculoskeletal system plays an important role in the Epub ahead of print accurate diagnosis of abnormal lesions in the bone and soft tissues. Ultrasonography is a fast and reliable method with no harmful irradiation for the evaluation of postoperative musculoskeletal complications. In particular, it is not affected by the excessive metal artifacts that appear on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Another benefit of ultrasonography is its capability to dynamically assess the pathologic movement in joints, muscles, or tendons. This article discusses the frequent applications of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in various postoperative situations including those involving the soft tissues around the metal hardware, arthroplasty, postoperative tendons, recurrent soft tissue tumors, bone unions, and amputation surgery. PMID:25971901

  15. Advances in Musculoskeletal MRI – Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lauren; Harish, Monica; Hargreaves, Brian; Staroswiecki, Ernesto; Gold, Garry

    2012-01-01

    The technology of musculoskeletal MRI imaging is advancing at a dramatic rate. MR imaging is now done at medium and higher field strengths with more specialized surface coils and with more variable pulse sequences and post processing techniques than ever before. These numerable technical advances are advantageous as they lead to an increased signal to noise ratio and increased variety of soft tissue contrast options. However, at the same time they potentially produce more imaging artifacts when compared with past techniques. Substantial technical advances have considerable clinical challenges in musculoskeletal radiology such as postoperative patient imaging, cartilage mapping, and molecular imaging. In this review, we consider technical advances in hardware and software of musculoskeletal MR imaging along with their clinical applications. PMID:22987756

  16. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Danyu; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26445979

  17. Integrated musculoskeletal service design by GP consortia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal conditions are common in primary care and are associated with significant co-morbidity and impairment of quality of life. Traditional care pathways combined community-based physiotherapy with GP referral to hospital for a consultant opinion. Locally, this model led to only 30% of hospital consultant orthopaedic referrals being listed for surgery, with the majority being referred for physiotherapy. The NHS musculoskeletal framework proposed the use of interface services to provide expertise in diagnosis, triage and management of musculoskeletal problems not requiring surgery. The White Paper Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS has replaced PCT commissioning with GP consortia, who will lead future service development. Setting Primary and community care, integrated with secondary care, in the NHS in England. Question How can GP consortia lead the development of integrated musculoskeletal services? Review: The Ealing experience We explore here how Ealing implemented a ‘See and Treat’ interface clinic model to improve surgical conversion rates, reduce unnecessary hospital referrals and provide community treatment more efficiently than a triage model. A high-profile GP education programme enabled GPs to triage in their practices and manage patients without referral. Conclusion In Ealing, we demonstrated that most patients with musculoskeletal conditions can be managed in primary care and community settings. The integrated musculoskeletal service provides clear and fast routes to secondary care. This is both clinically effective and cost-effective, reserving hospital referral for patients most likely to need surgery. GP consortia, in conjunction with strong clinical leadership, inbuilt organisational and professional learning, and a GP champion, are well placed to deliver service redesign by co-ordinating primary care development, local commissioning of community services and the acute commissioning vehicles responsible for secondary

  18. Musicians' illness perceptions of musculoskeletal complaints.

    PubMed

    Kok, Laura M; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; Fiocco, Marta; Kaptein, Ad A; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to know the views of people about their illness, i.e., illness perceptions, determine coping strategies, and outcome. Previous research suggests a higher prevalence and a different perception of musculoskeletal complaints between musicians and nonmusicians. The aim of this study is to compare illness perceptions related to musculoskeletal complaints between musicians and nonmusicians. In this cross-sectional study, students from three music academies (n = 345) and one university medical center (n = 2,870) in the Netherlands received an electronic questionnaire concerning questions on sociodemographic characteristics, use of musical instruments, occurrence and characteristics of musculoskeletal complaints in the past year, and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ). Baseline and B-IPQ scores were compared between the samples by means of t tests, chi-square tests, and regression models to adjust for differences in sociodemographic characteristics. Eighty-three music academy students and 494 medical students completed the questionnaire (response rates, 25.5 and 17.6 %, respectively). Seventy-four (89 %) persons in the musician group and 382 (78 %) persons in the nonmusician group reported occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints during the last 12 months. Adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, the B-IPQ scores of the domains consequences (my illness is a serious condition), concern (I am extremely concerned about my illness), and emotions (my illness makes me scared) were significantly higher among musicians, whereas personal control (there is little I can do to improve my illness), identity (number of symptoms patient sees as part of illness) were not significantly different. Music academy students had a significant more positive score on treatment control. Music academy students report more negative perceptions of their musculoskeletal complaints compared to medical students. Although some selection bias is

  19. Raman Spectroscopy of Soft Musculoskeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Tendon, ligament, and joint tissues are important in maintaining daily function. They can be affected by disease, age, and injury. Slow tissue turnover, hierarchical structure and function, and nonlinear mechanical properties present challenges to diagnosing and treating soft musculoskeletal tissues. Understanding these tissues in health, disease, and injury is important to improving pharmacologic and surgical repair outcomes. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in the examination of soft musculoskeletal tissues. This article highlights exciting basic science and clinical/translational Raman studies of cartilage, tendon, and ligament. PMID:25286106

  20. Musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disease in children.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Skinner, Joline

    2008-02-01

    A wide variety of neuromuscular diseases affect children, including central nervous system disorders such as cerebral palsy and spinal cord injury; motor neuron disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy; peripheral nerve disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; neuromuscular junction disorders such as congenital myasthenia gravis; and muscle fiber disorders such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Although the origins and clinical syndromes vary significantly, outcomes related to musculoskeletal complications are often shared. The most frequently encountered musculoskeletal complications of neuromuscular disorders in children are scoliosis, bony rotational deformities, and hip dysplasia. Management is often challenging to those who work with children who have neuromuscular disorders. PMID:18194756

  1. Musculoskeletal disorders among municipal solid waste workers in India: A cross-sectional risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Endreddy Manikanta; Yasobant, Sandul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Waste management is a necessary activity around the world, but involves a variety of health hazards. In a developing country like India, municipal solid waste is collected manually requiring heavy physical activity. Among all occupational health issues, musculoskeletal problems are common among waste collectors in the form of nonfatal injuries because of the presence of such risk factors (lifting, carrying, pulling, and pushing). We have thus conducted this study to evaluate musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among municipal solid waste (MSW) workers. Methodology: A cross-sectional study using probability proportionate to size sampling, recruited 220 MSW workers from the Chennai Municipal Corporation, India for this study. A pretested validated questionnaire has been used to collect data on demographic and occupational history and information on musculoskeletal pain. Data analysis was performed using R software (3.0.1 version). Results: 70% of the participants reported that they had been troubled with musculoskeletal pain in one or more of the 9 defined body regions during the last 12 months, whereas 91.8% had pain during the last 7 days. Higher prevalence of symptoms in knees, shoulders, and lower back was found to be 84.5%, 74.5%, and 50.9% respectively. Female illiterate workers with lower socioeconomic status were found to have higher odds for MSDs. Similarly, higher body mass index having no physical activity increases the chance of odds having MSDs. Conclusion: The higher percentage of musculoskeletal symptoms among MSW workers could be attributed to the long duration of employment, the low job control, and the nature of their job, which is physically demanding. A workplace of health promotion model integration can minimize the reported high prevalence, and a prospective cohort study could be recommended further. PMID:26985409

  2. [The role of psychosocial work factors in the development of musculoskeletal disorders in workers].

    PubMed

    Bugajska, Joanna; Zołnierczyk-Zreda, Dorota; Jedryka-Góral, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of psychosocial work factors in the development of musculoskeletal disorders in workers. It should be stressed that over a decade these disorders have been the subject of studies because of complaints reported not only by workers performing heavy physical work or working in awkward, forced body posture. It has also been acknowledged that stress at work caused by various psychosocial work factors can significantly influence their development. One of the models, most popular nowadays, was used in the study. It takes into account various risk factors in the etiology of cervical spine disorders. Based on this model it was shown that certain psychosocial and cultural variables (e.g., work demands and control, individual variables, individual values, work group's culture) may constitute occupational stressors and, when combined with physical load factors, may lead to stress and musculoskeletal disorders. It was also indicated that such psychosocial work factors as excessive work demands (quantitative or qualitative), inadequate control at work or lack of social support are the most frequent sources of work-related stress. The article presents the results of some prospective studies in which the role of these factors in the development of musculoskeletal disorders has been considered. Apart from work properties (factors), the role of other psychological variables was shown; these include: work involvement, perfectionism, negative affectivity or work style, which in numerous studies turned out to be important risk factors in the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Finally, potential mechanisms underlying the relationships between psychosocial factors and musculoskeletal disorders were indicated. However, it was stressed that the majority of them still require to be confirmed in future descriptive or experimental studies. PMID:22312957

  3. Comparison of work-related fear-avoidance beliefs across different anatomical locations with musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Corey B; Stryker, Sandra E; George, Steven Z

    2011-01-01

    Background The influence of work-related fear-avoidance on pain and function has been consistently reported for patients with musculoskeletal low back pain. Emerging evidence suggests similar influences exist for other anatomical locations of musculoskeletal pain, such as the cervical spine and extremities. However, research is limited in comparing work-related fear-avoidance and associations with clinical outcomes across different anatomical locations. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between work-related fear-avoidance, gender, and clinical outcomes across four different musculoskeletal pain locations for patients being treated in an outpatient physical therapy setting. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of data obtained prospectively from a cohort of 313 participants receiving physical therapy from an outpatient clinic. Results No interaction was found between gender and anatomical location of musculoskeletal pain on work-related fear-avoidance scores. Work-related fear-avoidance scores were higher in the cervical group versus the lower extremity group; however, there were no other differences across anatomical locations. Work-related fear-avoidance influenced intake pain intensity in patients with spine pain but not extremity pain. Conversely, work-related fear-avoidance influenced intake function for participants with extremity pain but not spine pain. Similar results were observed for change scores, with higher work-related fear-avoidance being associated with more, not less, change in pain and function for certain anatomical locations. Conclusion These findings suggest that work-related fear-avoidance is similar for patients experiencing musculoskeletal pain. However, associations between work-related fear-avoidance and clinical outcomes may differ based on the anatomical location of that pain. Further, increased work-related fear-avoidance may not be indicative of poor clinical outcomes for this type of patient population

  4. Musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S M; Sumar, B; Dixon, K A

    2014-01-01

    This review seeks to provide a current overview of musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children. Databases searched were Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, Proquest Health and Medical Complete, Scopus, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscuss and Trove for studies published between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2012. We used a broad definition of children within a 3- to 18-year age range. The search strategy included the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pain, musculoskeletal pain, child, adolescent, chronic pain, back pain, lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, foot pain and pelvic pain. Two authors independently assessed each record, and any disagreement was resolved by the third author. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach owing to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measures. Ninety-seven records were initially identified using a variety of terms associated with children, obesity and musculoskeletal pain. Ten studies were included for thematic analysis when predetermined inclusion criteria were applied. Bone deformity and dysfunction, pain reporting and the impact of children being overweight or obese on physical activity, exercise and quality of life were the three themes identified from the literature. Chronic pain, obesity and a reduction in physical functioning and activity may contribute to a cycle of weight gain that affects a child's quality of life. Future studies are required to examine the sequela of overweight and obese children experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24077005

  5. Musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Sumar, B; Dixon, K A

    2014-01-01

    This review seeks to provide a current overview of musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children. Databases searched were Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, Proquest Health and Medical Complete, Scopus, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscuss and Trove for studies published between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2012. We used a broad definition of children within a 3- to 18-year age range. The search strategy included the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pain, musculoskeletal pain, child, adolescent, chronic pain, back pain, lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, foot pain and pelvic pain. Two authors independently assessed each record, and any disagreement was resolved by the third author. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach owing to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measures. Ninety-seven records were initially identified using a variety of terms associated with children, obesity and musculoskeletal pain. Ten studies were included for thematic analysis when predetermined inclusion criteria were applied. Bone deformity and dysfunction, pain reporting and the impact of children being overweight or obese on physical activity, exercise and quality of life were the three themes identified from the literature. Chronic pain, obesity and a reduction in physical functioning and activity may contribute to a cycle of weight gain that affects a child's quality of life. Future studies are required to examine the sequela of overweight and obese children experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24077005

  6. Limb Salvage Surgery for Musculoskeletal Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wan Ismail, Wan Faisham Nu’man Bin

    2015-01-01

    The management of musculoskeletal tumours has progressed tremendously over the past few decades. Limb salvage surgery has become a standard practise without compromising the oncological outcome. Patients generally will benefit with superior function and a better quality of life compared with definitive amputation. The multidisciplinary approach and advancement of surgeries are important to achieve patient survival and optimum function. PMID:26715902

  7. Musculoskeletal training: are GP trainees exposed to the right case mix for independent practice?

    PubMed

    Goff, Iain; Wise, Elspeth Mary; Coady, David; Walker, David

    2016-02-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are common in general practice, but clinicians express poor self confidence in dealing with them. Training in general practice relies on clinical exposure to a range of presentations in order to gain competence. It has been suggested that trainees are exposed to a different case mix from qualified general practices (GPs), due to seeing more minor illness and less chronic disease and that this may be responsible in part for their subsequent lack of confidence. The aims of this study were to analyse the case mix of musculoskeletal conditions encountered by general practice trainees and to compare this to the overall population consulting behaviour. This is a prospective observational study. Thirteen general practices in North East England were recruited. Musculoskeletal disorders encountered by 13 GP trainees (7 junior and 6 senior) were prospectively recorded using a handheld diary. Disorders were classified according to working diagnosis or body region if diagnosis was unclear. Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders comprised 17 % of consultations, and the distribution of diagnoses of these was in proportion to epidemiological studies of MSK disorders in the UK as they present in primary care. Back pain was the most frequent label with 141 (29 %) consultations with a further 43 (9 %) for neck pain. Inflammatory arthritis accounted for the same number 43 (9 %). Individual joint problems were 115 (24 %) with knee being most common. A specific diagnosis was more likely to be applied when symptoms were more distal and less likely when axial. Trainees are exposed to the same spectrum of MSK disorders as are present in the population as a whole. Case mix does not appear to be a significant factor in low confidence levels in dealing with MSK disorders. PMID:25190366

  8. White matter involvement in chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Gregory; Shpaner, Marina; Watts, Richard; Andrews, Trevor; Filippi, Christopher G.; Davis, Marcia; Naylor, Magdalena R.

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that chronic musculoskeletal pain is associated with anatomical and functional abnormalities in gray matter. However, little research has investigated the relationship between chronic musculoskeletal pain and white matter (WM). In this study, we used whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics, and region-of-interest analyses of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data to demonstrate that patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain exhibit several abnormal WM integrity as compared to healthy controls. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was associated with lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in the splenium of corpus callosum, and left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus. Patients also had higher radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium, right anterior and posterior limbs of internal capsule, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cerebral peduncle. Patterns of axial diffusivity (AD) varied: patients exhibited lower AD in the left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus and higher AD bilaterally in the anterior limbs of internal capsule, and in the right cerebral peduncle. Several correlations between diffusion metrics and clinical variables were also significant at a p<0.01 level: FA in the left uncinate fasciculus correlated positively with Total Pain Experience and typical levels of pain severity. AD in the left anterior limb of internal capsule and left uncinate fasciculus were correlated with Total Pain Experience and typical pain level. Positive correlations were also found between AD in the right uncinate and both Total Pain Experience and Pain Catastrophizing. These results demonstrate that WM abnormalities play a role in chronic musculoskeletal pain; either as a cause, predisposing factor, consequence, or compensatory adaptation. PMID:25135468

  9. Musculoskeletal manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noureldine, M H A; Khamashta, M A; Merashli, M; Sabbouh, T; Hughes, G R V; Uthman, I

    2016-04-01

    The scope of clinical and laboratory manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has increased dramatically since its discovery in 1983, where any organ system can be involved. Musculoskeletal complications are consistently reported in APS patients, not only causing morbidity and mortality, but also affecting their quality of life. We reviewed all English papers on APS involvement in the musculoskeletal system using Google Scholar and Pubmed; all reports are summarized in a table in this review. The spectrum of manifestations includes arthralgia/arthritis, avascular necrosis of bone, bone marrow necrosis, complex regional pain syndrome type-1, muscle infarction, non-traumatic fractures, and osteoporosis. Some of these manifestations were reported in good quality studies, some of which showed an association between aPL-positivity and the occurrence of these manifestations, while others were merely described in case reports. PMID:26923284

  10. Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit: Summit Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Walton, Marlei; Davis-Street, Janis; Smaka, Todd J.; Griffin, DeVon

    2006-01-01

    The Medical Informatics and Health Care Systems group in the Office of Space Medicine at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has been tasked by NASA with improving overall medical care on the International Space Station (ISS) and providing insights for medical care for future exploration missions. To accomplish this task, a three day Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit was held on August 23-25th, 2005 at Space Center Houston. The purpose of the summit was to review NASA#s a) current strategy for preflight health maintenance and injury screening, b) current treatment methods in-flight, and c) risk mitigation strategy for musculoskeletal injuries or syndromes that could occur or impact the mission. Additionally, summit participants provided a list of research topics NASA should consider to mitigate risks to astronaut health. Prior to the summit, participants participated in a web-based pre-summit forum to review the NASA Space Medical Conditions List (SMCL) of musculoskeletal conditions that may occur on ISS as well as the resources currently available to treat them. Data from the participants were compiled and integrated with the summit proceedings. Summit participants included experts from the extramural physician and researcher communities, and representatives from NASA Headquarters, the astronaut corps, JSC Medical Operations and Human Adaptations and Countermeasures Offices, Glenn Research Center Human Research Office, and the Astronaut Strength, Conditioning, and Reconditioning (ASCR) group. The recommendations in this document are based on a summary of summit discussions and the best possible evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal care for astronauts while on the ISS, and include recommendati ons for exploration class missions.

  11. Musculoskeletal health, frailty and functional decline.

    PubMed

    Milte, R; Crotty, M

    2014-06-01

    Frailty in older people is associated with a vulnerability to adverse events. While ageing is associated with a loss of physiological reserves, identifying those with the syndrome of frailty has the potential to assist clinicians to tailor treatments to those at the risk of future decline into disability with an increased risk of complications, morbidity and mortality. Sarcopenia is a key component of the frailty syndrome and on its own puts older people at risk of fragility fractures; however, the clinical syndrome of frailty affects the musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal systems. Hip fractures are becoming a prototype condition in the study of frailty. Following a hip fracture, many of the interventions are focused on limiting mobility disability and restoring independence with activities of daily living, but there are multiple factors to be addressed including osteoporosis, sarcopenia, delirium and weight loss. Established techniques of geriatric evaluation and management allow systematic assessment and intervention on multiple components by multidisciplinary teams and deliver the best outcomes. Using the concept of frailty to identify older people with musculoskeletal problems as being at the risk of a poor outcome assists in treatment planning and is likely to become more important as effective pharmacological treatments for sarcopenia emerge. This review will focus on the concept of frailty and its relationship with functional decline, as well as describing its causes, prevalence, risk factors, potential clinical applications and treatment strategies. PMID:25481423

  12. Functional imaging of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging, which provides information of how tissues function rather than structural information, is well established in neuro- and cardiac imaging. Many musculoskeletal structures, such as ligaments, fascia and mineralized bone, have by definition a mainly structural role and clearly don’t have the same functional capacity as the brain, heart, liver or kidney. The main functionally responsive musculoskeletal tissues are the bone marrow, muscle and nerve and, as such, magnetic resonance (MR) functional imaging has primarily addressed these areas. Proton or phosphorus spectroscopy, other fat quantification techniques, perfusion imaging, BOLD imaging, diffusion and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are the main functional techniques applied. The application of these techniques in the musculoskeletal system has mainly been research orientated where they have already greatly enhanced our understanding of marrow physiology, muscle physiology and neural function. Going forwards, they will have a greater clinical impact helping to bridge the disconnect often seen between structural appearances and clinical symptoms, allowing a greater understanding of disease processes and earlier recognition of disease, improving prognostic prediction and optimizing the monitoring of treatment effect. PMID:26029633

  13. Magnetic resonance--guided musculoskeletal interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Carrino, John A; Blanco, Roberto

    2006-06-01

    As an imaging modality, magnetic resonance (MR) guidance has great potential to direct diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed in the musculoskeletal region and influence patient management. MR-guided interventional procedures involving bone, soft tissue, intervertebral discs, and joints are safe and sufficiently effective for use in clinical practice. This article discusses and illustrates the procedural characteristics and techniques when performing MR-guided musculoskeletal interventions. Biopsy procedures are similar to other modalities for bone and soft tissue lesions. MR guidance is advantageous if the lesion is not visible by other modalities and for regions adjacent to hardware and implants, subselective targeting, intra-articular locations, and periarticular cyst aspiration. MR guidance has also been used for a host of spine injections and pain management procedures such as sacroiliac joint injections, discography, transforaminal epidural injection, selective nerve block, sympathetic block, celiac plexus block, and facet joint cryotherapy neurotomies. Future directions of clinical applications include tumor ablation and multimodality procedure suites. MR-guided musculoskeletal procedures will continue to be a growth area particularly for the diagnosis and treatment of bone and soft tissue neoplasia. PMID:16586322

  14. [Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in nursing professionals].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Natália Fonseca; Fernandes, Rita de Cássia Pereira; Solla, Davi Jorge Fontoura; Santos Junior, Anivaldo Costa; de Sena Junior, Antonio Santos

    2012-06-01

    A cross-sectional study estimated the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among nursing assistants in Salvador, Bahia. Three hundred and eight workers, randomly selected, answered a questionnaire applied by trained interviewers during working hours. The majority of respondents worked the day shift and did not usually work overtime. About 34% reported having another regular job. Average time in the formal or informal labor market was 19 years. There was high occupational exposure to repetitive hand movements, standing posture, walking, inadequate postures of the trunk and manual handling of loads. The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in at least one body segment was 83.4%.The most affected body segments were: low back (53.9%), legs (51.9%), neck (36.4%), upper back (35.7%) and shoulders (33.8%). There was high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the studied population, which points out to the need for improvements in the working conditions of those professionals. PMID:22782108

  15. The Effect of Financial Compensation on Health Outcomes following Musculoskeletal Injury: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Murgatroyd, Darnel F.; Casey, Petrina P.; Cameron, Ian D.; Harris, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of financial compensation on health outcomes following musculoskeletal injury requires further exploration because results to date are varied and controversial. This systematic review identifies compensation related factors associated with poorer health outcomes following musculoskeletal injury. Searches were conducted using electronic medical journal databases (Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Informit, Web of Science) for prospective studies published up to October 2012. Selection criteria included: prognostic factors associated with validated health outcomes; six or more months follow up; and multivariate statistical analysis. Studies solely measuring return to work outcomes were excluded. Twenty nine articles were synthesised and then assessed using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology to determine evidence levels. The results were mixed. There was strong evidence of an association between compensation status and poorer psychological function; and legal representation and poorer physical function. There was moderate evidence of an association between compensation status and poorer physical function; and legal representation and poorer psychological function. There was limited evidence of an association between compensation status and increased pain. In seven studies the association depended on the outcome measured. No studies reported an association between compensation related factors and improved health outcomes. Further research is needed to find plausible reasons why compensation related factors are associated with poorer health following musculoskeletal injury. PMID:25680118

  16. Musculoskeletal modelling in dogs: challenges and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dries, Billy; Jonkers, Ilse; Dingemanse, Walter; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Vander Sloten, Jos; van Bree, Henri; Gielen, Ingrid

    2016-05-18

    Musculoskeletal models have proven to be a valuable tool in human orthopaedics research. Recently, veterinary research started taking an interest in the computer modelling approach to understand the forces acting upon the canine musculoskeletal system. While many of the methods employed in human musculoskeletal models can applied to canine musculoskeletal models, not all techniques are applicable. This review summarizes the important parameters necessary for modelling, as well as the techniques employed in human musculoskeletal models and the limitations in transferring techniques to canine modelling research. The major challenges in future canine modelling research are likely to centre around devising alternative techniques for obtaining maximal voluntary contractions, as well as finding scaling factors to adapt a generalized canine musculoskeletal model to represent specific breeds and subjects. PMID:27102147

  17. Impact of joint laxity and hypermobility on the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Cameron, Kenneth L; Owens, Brett D

    2011-08-01

    Excessive joint laxity, or hypermobility, is a common finding of clinical importance in the management of musculoskeletal conditions. Hypermobility is common in young patients and in general is associated with an increased incidence of musculoskeletal injury. Hypermobility has been implicated in ankle sprains, anterior cruciate ligament injury, shoulder instability, and osteoarthritis of the hand. Patients with hypermobility and musculoskeletal injuries often seek care for diffuse musculoskeletal pain and injuries with no specific inciting event. Orthopaedic surgeons and other healthcare providers should be aware of the underlying relationship between hypermobility and musculoskeletal injury to avoid unnecessary diagnostic tests and inappropriate management. Prolonged therapy and general conditioning are typically required, with special emphasis on improving strength and proprioception to address symptoms and prevent future injury. Orthopaedic surgeons must recognize the implications of joint mobility syndromes in the management and rehabilitation of several musculoskeletal injuries and orthopaedic disorders. PMID:21807914

  18. The role of platelet rich plasma in musculoskeletal science

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zafar; Howard, Daniel; Brooks, Roger A; Wardale, John; Henson, Fran MD; Getgood, Alan; Rushton, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The idea of using platelet rich plasma (PRP) in medicine has been around since the 1970s. It is only more recently that its use has been employed in the area of musculoskeletal science. Platelet rich plasma in this area has received much media attention being used by many celebrity sports athletes for musculoskeletal injuries. Therefore it is important for the musculoskeletal practitioner to be aware of the concepts surrounding its use and application. In this article we cover what platelet rich plasma is, how it is prepared and administered, its potential clinical application, and what the current literature discusses in the various areas of musculoskeletal science. PMID:22768374

  19. Effect of Neurocognition and Concussion on Musculoskeletal Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Daniel C.; Zaremski, Jason L.; Vincent, Heather K.; Vincent, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Research regarding musculoskeletal injury risk has focused primarily on anatomical, neuromuscular, hormonal, and environmental risk factors; however, subsequent injury risk screening and intervention programs have been largely limited to neuromuscular factors and have faced challenges in both implementation and efficacy. Recent studies indicate that poor neurocognitive performance, either at baseline or in the aftermath of a concussion, is associated with elevated risk of musculoskeletal injury. Despite the relatively limited current understanding regarding the nature of the relationship between different aspects of neurocognitive performance and musculoskeletal injury risk, this is a promising area of research that may yield significant advances in musculoskeletal injury risk stratification, rehabilitation, and prevention. PMID:25968852

  20. T1ρ MR Imaging of Human Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the direct visualization of human musculoskeletal (MSK) system, especially all diarthrodial tissues including cartilage, bone, menisci, ligaments, tendon, hip, synovium etc. Conventional MR imaging techniques based on T1- and T2-weighted, proton density (PD) contrast are inconclusive in quantifying early biochemically degenerative changes in MSK system in general and articular cartilage in particular. In recent years, quantitative MR parameter mapping techniques have been used to quantify the biochemical changes in articular cartilage with a special emphasis on evaluating joint injury, cartilage degeneration, and soft tissue repair. In this article, we will focus on cartilage biochemical composition, basic principles of T1ρ MR imaging, implementation of T1ρ pulse sequences, biochemical validation, and summarize the potential applications of T1ρ MR imaging technique in MSK diseases including osteoarthritis (OA), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and knee joint repair. Finally, we will also review the potential advantages, challenges, and future prospects of T1ρ MR imaging for widespread clinical translation. PMID:24935818

  1. T₁ρ MRI of human musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the direct visualization of the human musculoskeletal (MSK) system, especially all diarthrodial tissues including cartilage, bone, menisci, ligaments, tendon, hip, synovium, etc. Conventional MRI techniques based on T1 - and T2 -weighted, proton density (PD) contrast are inconclusive in quantifying early biochemically degenerative changes in MSK system in general and articular cartilage in particular. In recent years, quantitative MR parameter mapping techniques have been used to quantify the biochemical changes in articular cartilage, with a special emphasis on evaluating joint injury, cartilage degeneration, and soft tissue repair. In this article we focus on cartilage biochemical composition, basic principles of T1ρ MRI, implementation of T1ρ pulse sequences, biochemical validation, and summarize the potential applications of the T1ρ MRI technique in MSK diseases including osteoarthritis (OA), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and knee joint repair. Finally, we also review the potential advantages, challenges, and future prospects of T1ρ MRI for widespread clinical translation. PMID:24935818

  2. STEM CELL HOMING IN MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Li Shan E.; Chan, Casey K.; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2010-01-01

    The regenerative potential of injured adult tissue suggests the physiological existence of cells capable of participating in the reparative process. Recent studies indicate that stem-like cells residing in tissues contribute to tissue repair and are replenished by precursor bone marrow–derived cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are among the candidates for reparative cells. These cells can potentially be mobilized into the circulation in response to injury signals and exert their reparative effects at the site of injury. Current therapies for musculoskeletal injuries pose unavoidable risks which can impede full recovery. Trafficking of MSC to the injury site and their subsequent participation in the regenerative process is thought to be a natural healing response that can be imitated or augmented by enhancing the endogenous MSC pool with exogenously administered MSC. Therefore, a promising alternative to the existing strategies employed in the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries is to reinforce the inherent reparative capacity of the body by delivering MSC harvested from the patient’s own tissues to the site of injury. The aim of this review is to inform the reader of studies that have evaluated the intrinsic homing and regenerative abilities of MSC, with particular emphasis on the repair of musculoskeletal injuries. Research that supports the direct use of MSC (without in vitro differentiation into tissue-specific cells) will also be reported. Based on accruing evidence that the natural healing mechanism involves the recruitment of MSC and their subsequent reparative actions at the site of injury, as well as documented therapeutic response after the exogenous administration of MSC, the feasibility of the emerging strategy of instant stem-cell therapy will be proposed. PMID:20933277

  3. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed. PMID:24715952

  4. Management of musculoskeletal dysfunction in infants

    PubMed Central

    YAO, DAN; DENG, XINGQIANG; WANG, MINGGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Excessive crying (or infant colic) is a common pain syndrome of infancy without any specific known aetiology or effective management. Many cases result in long-term poor sleep, behavioral problems and parental stress. The biomechanical aspects of this condition lack adequate investigation despite its strong link with assisted and/or difficult births. The present review focused on the current trends in the management of this mal-musculoskeletal health of infants associated with the condition of excessive crying. In addition, the risk factors associated with therapeutic procedures used to manage the above conditions were also discussed. PMID:27284288

  5. Emergency Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Musculoskeletal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumaravel, Manickam; Weathers, William M

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department. Computed tomography and radiography are the main forms of imaging assessment, but the use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become more common in the emergency room (ER) setting for evaluation of low-velocity/sports-related injury and high-velocity injury. The superior soft tissue contrast and detail provided by MR imaging gives clinicians a powerful tool in the management of acute MSK injury in the ER. This article provides an overview of techniques and considerations when using MR imaging in the evaluation of some of the common injuries seen in the ER setting. PMID:27150325

  6. Fast musculoskeletal registration based on shape matching.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Benjamin; Pai, Dinesh K

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for computing elastic and plastic deformations in the context of discrete deformable model-based registration. Internal forces are estimated by averaging local transforms between reference and current particle positions. Our technique can accommodate large non-linear deformations, and is unconditionally stable. Moreover, it is simple to implement and versatile. We show how to tune model stiffness and computational cost, which is important for efficient registration, and demonstrate our technique in the complex problem of inter-patient musculoskeletal registration. PMID:18982681

  7. Epidemiology of Musculoskeletal Injuries among Sedentary and Physically Active Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hootman, Jennifer M.; Macera, Carol A.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Addy, Cheryl L.; Martin, Malissa; Blair, Steven N.

    2002-01-01

    Examined types and frequencies of musculoskeletal injuries among adults with above average activity levels enrolled in the Dallas Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. Participant surveys and examinations indicated that one-quarter of all respondents reported musculoskeletal injuries (most of which were activity- related). Sport participants had the…

  8. Dynamic Ultrasound Imaging Applications to Quantify Musculoskeletal Function

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Wei, Qi; Cortes, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging methods have led to new capability to study muscle and tendon motion in vivo. Direct measurements of muscle and tendon kinematics using imaging may lead to improved understanding of musculoskeletal function. This review presents quantitative ultrasound methods for muscle dynamics that can be used to assess in vivo musculoskeletal function when integrated with other conventional biomechanical measurements. PMID:24949846

  9. Coping with Musculoskeletal Pain: Implications for Office Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztug, Ozhan; Cowie, Helen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to understand how office workers cope with back, neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders at work (and their implications for work). A small (N = 120) questionnaire survey collected information about potential participants' background and history of musculoskeletal disorders. These data were used to inform…

  10. An overview of recent patents on musculoskeletal interface tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rohit T; Browe, Daniel P; Lowe, Christopher J; Freeman, Joseph W

    2016-02-01

    Interface tissue engineering involves the development of engineered grafts that promote integration between multiple tissue types. Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are critical to the safe and efficient transmission of mechanical forces between multiple musculoskeletal tissues, e.g., between ligament and bone tissue. However, these interfaces often do not physiologically regenerate upon injury, resulting in impaired tissue function. Therefore, interface tissue engineering approaches are considered to be particularly relevant for the structural restoration of musculoskeletal tissues interfaces. In this article, we provide an overview of the various strategies used for engineering musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a specific focus on the recent important patents that have been issued for inventions that were specifically designed for engineering musculoskeletal interfaces as well as those that show promise to be adapted for this purpose. PMID:26577344

  11. Mechanoresponsive musculoskeletal tissue differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trumbull, Andrew; Subramanian, Gayathri; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal tissues are constantly under mechanical strains within their microenvironment. Yet, little is understood about the effect of in vivo mechanical milieu strains on cell development and function. Thus, this review article outlines the in vivo mechanical environment of bone, muscle, cartilage, tendon, and ligaments, and tabulates the mechanical strain and stress in these tissues during physiological condition, vigorous, and moderate activities. This review article further discusses the principles of mechanical loading platforms to create physiologically relevant mechanical milieu in vitro for musculoskeletal tissue regeneration. A special emphasis is placed on adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) as an emerging valuable tool for regenerative musculoskeletal tissue engineering, as they are easily isolated, expanded, and able to differentiate into any musculoskeletal tissue. Finally, it highlights the current state-of-the art in ADSCs-guided musculoskeletal tissue regeneration under mechanical loading. PMID:27103394

  12. Helpful tips for performing musculoskeletal injections.

    PubMed

    Metz, John P

    2010-01-01

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection. PMID:20052957

  13. Musculoskeletal injections: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Beutler, Anthony I; O'Connor, Francis G

    2008-10-15

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection. PMID:18953975

  14. Radionuclide Imaging of Musculoskeletal Infection: A Review.

    PubMed

    Palestro, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    There are numerous imaging tests for diagnosing musculoskeletal infection. Radiographs are routinely performed, because even when not diagnostic, they provide an anatomic overview of the region of interest that could influence subsequent procedure selection and interpretation. MRI is sensitive and provides superb anatomic detail. Bone scintigraphy accurately diagnoses osteomyelitis in bones not affected by underlying conditions. (67)Ga is used primarily for spondylodiskitis. Although in vitro labeled leukocyte imaging is the radionuclide test of choice for complicating osteomyelitis such as diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection, it is not useful for spondylodiskitis. Antigranulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments have limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for spondylodiskitis. Radiolabeled synthetic fragments of the antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin are promising infection-specific agents. (18)F-FDG is the radiopharmaceutical of choice for spondylodiskitis. Its role in diabetic pedal osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint infection is not established. Preliminary data suggest (68)Ga may be useful in musculoskeletal infection. (124)I-fialuridine initially showed promise as an infection-specific radiopharmaceutical, but subsequent investigations were disappointing. The development of PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging systems, which combine anatomic and functional imaging, has revolutionized diagnostic imaging. These hybrid systems are redefining the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected or known infection and inflammation by improving diagnostic accuracy and influencing patient management. PMID:27390160

  15. Musculoskeletal interventional radiology: ultrasound and CT.

    PubMed

    Martel Villagrán, J; Bueno Horcajadas, Á; Agrela Rojas, E

    2016-05-01

    We aim to describe imaging-guided (ultrasound and CT) interventional techniques in the musculoskeletal system that can be performed by general radiologists, whether in hospitals, primary care clinics, private offices, or other settings. The first requirement for doing these procedures is adequate knowledge of the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system. The second requirement is to inform the patient thoroughly about the technique, the risks involved, and the alternatives available in order to obtain written informed consent. The third requirement is to ensure that the procedure is performed in accordance with the principles of asepsis in relation to the puncture zone and to all the material employed throughout the procedure. The main procedures that can be done under ultrasound guidance are the following: fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), core needle biopsy (CNB), diagnostic and/or therapeutic arthrocentesis, drainage of juxta-articular fluid collections, drainage of abscesses, drainage of hematomas, treatment of Baker's cyst, treatment of ganglia, treatment of bursitis, infiltrations and treatment of plantar fasciitis, plantar fibrosis, epicondylitis, Achilles tendinopathy, and Morton's neuroma, puncture and lavage of calcifications in calcifying tendinopathy. We also review the following CT-guided procedures: diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, FNAC of metastases, arthrography, drainages. Finally, we also mention more complex procedures that can only be done in appropriate settings: bone biopsies, treatment of facet joint pain, radiofrequency treatment. PMID:27134018

  16. Musculoskeletal pain syndromes that affect adolescents.

    PubMed

    Szer, I S

    1996-07-01

    Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common pains of adolescence, along with headache and abdominal pain, and arthralgia is the single most common reason for referral to the pediatric rheumatologist. Not surprisingly, the pediatric rheumatologist is frequently called to distinguish organic from functional symptoms. During the past decade, the pediatric rheumatology community has been evaluating increasing numbers of adolescents and preadolescents who experience musculoskeletal symptoms presumably as a defense against emotional stress from achievement either in academic work or in sports. To complicate the challenge further, coexistent organic and psychologic disturbance is not rare. Clearly, organic illness does not protect a patient from emotional plan, and it may be most difficult to differentiate nonorganic pain in a patient with a known organic illness. Conversely, adolescents with organic illness may use their disease for secondary gain. Fear of misdiagnosis of physical illness as psychiatric and the notion that all of the patient's complaints should be explained by a unifying diagnosis cause diagnostic error in both psychogenic illness with physical manifestations and physical illness with psychogenic symptoms. PMID:8673201

  17. Standard reference values for musculoskeletal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, W; Schmidt, H; Schicke, B; Gromnica-Ihle, E

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To determine standard reference values for musculoskeletal ultrasonography in healthy adults. Methods: Ultrasonography was performed on 204 shoulders, elbows, hands, hips, knees, and feet of 102 healthy volunteers (mean age 38.4 years; range 20–60; 54 women) with a linear probe (10–5 MHz; Esaote Technos MP). Diameters of tendons, bursae, cartilage, erosions, hypoechoic rims around tendons and at joints were measured with regard to established standard scans. Mean, minimum, and maximum values, as well as two standard deviations (2 SD) were determined. Mean values ±2 SD were defined as standard reference values. Results: Hypoechoic rims were normally present in joints and tendon sheaths owing to physiological synovial fluid and/or cartilage. Similarly, fluid was found in the subdeltoid bursa in 173/204 (85%), at the long biceps tendon in 56 (27%), in the suprapatellar recess in 158 (77%), in the popliteal bursae in 32 (16%), and in the retrocalcaneal bursa in 49 (24%). Erosions of >1 mm were seen at the humeral head in 47 (23%). Values for important intervals were determined. The correlation between two investigators was 0.96 (0.78–0.99). The reliability of follow up investigations was 0.83 (0.52–0.99). Conclusions: Fluid in bursae as well as hypoechoic rims within joints and around tendons are common findings in healthy people. This study defines standard reference values for musculoskeletal ultrasonography to prevent misinterpretation of normal fluid as an anatomical abnormality. PMID:15249327

  18. Common musculoskeletal problems in the performing artist.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pamela A; Reed, Kristi

    2006-11-01

    In this chapter we touched on a wide variety of unique musculoskeletal conditions in the musician and dancer. We outlined generalized methods of evaluation that stress the importance of the interdisciplinary approach in this highly specialized patient population and stressed the importance of specific involvement of the music or dance instructor in evaluation and management. We sought to emphasize the need to refer to specialized care early when in doubt of diagnosis or when usual first-line treatments fail. We gave examples of specific injury patterns common in these subgroups and suggestions for early management. Finally, we described some general principals for prevention of musculoskeletal injury in this group. A physician treating the performing artist must always keep in mind that in this unique patient population, their occupation is not only a means of earning a living, it is their passion. Artists make great sacrifice both physically and mentally to bring the world such immeasurable beauty. It is our responsibility to care for them in the most comprehensive and compassionate manner possible while informing them as honestly as possible about their treatment options. PMID:17097480

  19. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Cho, KiHun; Cho, Hwi-young; Han, Gyeong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psychosocial stress, occupational stress, and musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners. [Subjects and Methods] Self-reported questionnaires were distributed to 401 dental practitioners in Korea. To assess the risk factors related to musculoskeletal disorders, the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, the Korean Occupational Stress Scale, and Psychosocial Well-Being Index Short Form were used. General and work-related characteristics of the subjects consisted of seven items, including age, career, height, weight, working days/week, working hours/day, and physical strain levels. [Results] In this study, 86.8% of the practitioners experienced musculoskeletal symptoms (shoulders, 72.8%; neck, 69.3%; waist, 68.3%; wrist, 58.4%; back, 44.1%; ankle, 38.7%; knee, 36.9%; hip, 20.4%; and elbows, 9.2%). Moreover, psychosocial and occupational stress can affect the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. In particular, we found that psychosocial stress has significant influence on the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. [Conclusion] To increase the quality of life and provide high-quality medical service for dental practitioners, risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders must be managed. Accordingly, dental practitioners must maintain good posture, get an appropriate amount of rest, and perform regular stretching exercise to reduce psychological stress and improve the work environment. PMID:26957728

  20. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Cho, KiHun; Cho, Hwi-Young; Han, Gyeong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psychosocial stress, occupational stress, and musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean dental practitioners. [Subjects and Methods] Self-reported questionnaires were distributed to 401 dental practitioners in Korea. To assess the risk factors related to musculoskeletal disorders, the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, the Korean Occupational Stress Scale, and Psychosocial Well-Being Index Short Form were used. General and work-related characteristics of the subjects consisted of seven items, including age, career, height, weight, working days/week, working hours/day, and physical strain levels. [Results] In this study, 86.8% of the practitioners experienced musculoskeletal symptoms (shoulders, 72.8%; neck, 69.3%; waist, 68.3%; wrist, 58.4%; back, 44.1%; ankle, 38.7%; knee, 36.9%; hip, 20.4%; and elbows, 9.2%). Moreover, psychosocial and occupational stress can affect the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. In particular, we found that psychosocial stress has significant influence on the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. [Conclusion] To increase the quality of life and provide high-quality medical service for dental practitioners, risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders must be managed. Accordingly, dental practitioners must maintain good posture, get an appropriate amount of rest, and perform regular stretching exercise to reduce psychological stress and improve the work environment. PMID:26957728

  1. Pediatric craniofacial osteosynthesis and distraction using an ultrasonic-assisted pinned resorbable system: a prospective report with a minimum 30 months' follow-up.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Eric; Renier, Dominique

    2009-11-01

    Resorbable osteosynthesis is an important tool in pediatric craniofacial surgery. A prospective clinical study was carried out to evaluate the Sonic Welding resorbable osteosynthesis system. Twenty pediatric patients with craniosynostosis were operated on for craniofacial reconstruction. The techniques used were the same than usual (fronto-orbital remodeling or advancement). During the process of osteosynthesis, similar resorbable miniplates were used, but for fixation, only 2 steps were necessary (drilling and welding), tapping being unnecessary. Clinically, the hold of the pins in the bone seemed stronger, and less-than-usual osteosynthesis materials were necessary. Clearly, the pins were able to hold in a very thin bone in which no screws could hold. Subjectively, the satisfaction of the surgeon was greater owing to the avoidance of the tapping step. On follow-up, resorption took place with an initial swelling effect, like with another pure polylactic acid material. The good resistance of pins suggests that, in such a system, the resorbable plate becomes the weak point. PMID:19881368

  2. Corticosteroid Injections for Common Musculoskeletal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Zoë J; Voss, Tyler T; Hatch, Jacquelynn; Frimodig, Adam

    2015-10-15

    Family physicians considering corticosteroid injections as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for musculoskeletal diagnoses will find few high-quality studies to assist with evidence-based decision making. Most studies of corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis, tendinopathy, bursitis, or neuropathy include only small numbers of patients and have inconsistent long-term follow-up. Corticosteroid injections for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis result in short-term improvements in pain and range of motion. For subacromial impingement syndrome, corticosteroid injections provide short-term pain relief and improvement in function. In medial and lateral epicondylitis, corticosteroid injections offer only short-term improvement of symptoms and have a high rate of symptom recurrence. Corticosteroid injections for carpal tunnel syndrome may help patients avoid or delay surgery. Trigger finger and de Quervain tenosynovitis may be treated effectively with corticosteroid injections. Patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis may have short-term symptom relief with corticosteroid injections. PMID:26554409

  3. Musculoskeletal conditions and complementary/alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2004-08-01

    Complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions. It is, therefore, essential to define CAM's value for such indications. This chapter summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for back pain, fibromyalgia, neck pain, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. None of the treatments in question is totally devoid of risks. By and large the data are not compelling, not least due to their paucity and methodological limitations. It is, therefore, concluded that our research efforts must be directed towards defining which form of CAM generates more good than harm for which condition. PMID:15301985

  4. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Edmund YS; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation. PMID:17343764

  5. Musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kamper, Steve J.; Henschke, Nicholas; Hestbaek, Lise; Dunn, Kate M.; Williams, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have little empirical evidence to underpin their clinical practice. In this article we summarise the state of the evidence concerning MSK pain in children and adolescents, and offer suggestions for future research. Results Rates of self-reported MSK pain in adolescents are similar to those in adult populations and they are typically higher in teenage girls than boys. Epidemiological research has identified conditions such as back and neck pain as major causes of disability in adolescents, and in up to a quarter of cases there are impacts on school or physical activities. A range of physical, psychological and social factors have been shown to be associated with MSK pain report, but the strength and direction of these relationships are unclear. There are few validated instruments available to quantify the nature and severity of MSK pain in children, but some show promise. Several national surveys have shown that adolescents with MSK pain commonly seek care and use medications for their condition. Some studies have revealed a link between MSK pain in adolescents and chronic pain in adults. Conclusion Musculoskeletal pain conditions are often recurrent in nature, occurring throughout the life-course. Attempts to understand these conditions at a time close to their initial onset may offer a better chance of developing effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:27437719

  6. In-111 WBC imaging in musculoskeletal sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.; Ouzounian, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy and utility of the In-111 labeled WBC imaging in a series of patients who were suspected of having musculoskeletal sepsis. The labeling of the WBCs was patterned after a method previously described, in which the WBCs are labeled with In-111 oxine in plasma. The WBCs from 100 ml of blood are separated and incubated with In-111 oxine complex, and then 500 ..mu..Ci. of the labeled cells were reinjected into the patient. Images of the areas in question were obtained at 24 hrs. In some instances, 48 hour images were also obtained. Images were interpreted using consistent criteria. Forty imaging procedures were done on 39 patients. These included 39 total joint protheses, and 17 other images to evaluate possible osteomyelitis, septic arthritis or deep abscesses. Of these studies, 15 were positive, and 42 negative. The findings were then correlated with operative culture and pathology in 21, aspiration cultures and gram stains in 14, and with clinical findings in the remaining 21. This correlation showed 41 true negatives, 12 true positives, 1 false negative, and 2 false positives. The sensitivity was 92.9% and the specificity was 95.2%l. The false negative occurred in a patient on chronic suppressive antibiotic therapy for an infected total hip replacement. The false positive images occurred in a patient with active rheumatoid arthritis and in a patient imaged one month post operative placement of the prosthesis. These images were very useful in several septic patients who had many possible sites of infection. The authors conclude that In-III imaging is an accurate and useful non-invasive method of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis.

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN AND ASSOCIATED DISABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Coggon, David

    2015-01-01

    Although much attention has been given to the physical determinants of common musculoskeletal complaints such as back and arm pain, research points to a stronger influence of psychological factors. Multiple studies have implicated poor mental health and somatisation (a tendency to worry about common somatic symptoms) in the incidence and chronicity of musculoskeletal pain and associated disability. Also important are adverse beliefs about the prognosis of such disorders, and about the role of physical activity in their development and persistence. Differences in societal beliefs may have contributed to major variation in the prevalence of disabling musculoskeletal pain that has been observed between countries and in the same countries over time. Psychosocial aspects of work have also been linked with musculoskeletal pain, although relative risks have generally been smaller. There is a need to take account of psychological factors in the clinical management of patients with back, neck and arm pain. PMID:26612236

  8. Risk factors for musculoskeletal symptoms among Korean radiation workers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Moo-Seong; Ahn, Jae-Ouk

    2015-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms. The second aim was to study the association between musculoskeletal symptoms and factors in radiation workers from the active lists of clinics and hospitals and then to provide basic data for a systematic and effective resource management of radiation workers' musculoskeletal problems in the future. A questionnaire survey was conducted on radiation workers in clinics, general hospitals, and Dong-A university hospitals around the Korean city Buscan from July 10 to 31, 2011. The results showed that the rate of musculoskeletal symptoms was higher in the shoulder, waist, neck, leg/foot, hand/wrist/finger than arm/elbow. The probability of neck pain was 2 times higher in patients with a disease. PMID:24219636

  9. Musculoskeletal impairments and physical disablement among the aged.

    PubMed

    Jette, A M; Branch, L G; Berlin, J

    1990-11-01

    This article summarizes the results of a longitudinal investigation of the progression of sight, hearing, and musculoskeletal impairments and their association with change in physical disability, in 10 ADLs among members of the Massachusetts Health Care Panel Study. The findings confirm widely held clinical beliefs that specific types of musculoskeletal decrement are an important cause of physical disability among older persons. Decrement in hand function is a significant musculoskeletal impairment influencing limitations in Basic ADL, and progression of Instrumental ADL dysfunction is influenced by progression of lower extremity impairments. Progression of sight and hearing impairments was not associated with change in physical disability. Musculoskeletal impairments, one of the most prevalent and symptomatic chronic complaints of middle and old age, deserve increased attention from epidemiologists, disability researchers, and clinicians seeking ways to prevent disablement among the aged. PMID:2229943

  10. Global core recommendations for a musculoskeletal undergraduate curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, A; Walsh, N; Akesson, K

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To develop core recommendations for the learning outcomes of an undergraduate curriculum in musculoskeletal conditions for any parts of the globe. Methods: Recommendations were developed by wide consultation with experts in orthopaedics, rheumatology, osteoporosis, and rehabilitation from all parts of the world who had interest and experience in these specialties, with the support of international and national societies. All possible knowledge, skills, and attitudes that might be of relevance to musculoskeletal conditions were initially considered and then reduced to those considered essential for all doctors. Results: The recommendations focus on (a) basic skills to assess and diagnose musculoskeletal problems; (b) the competency to assess specific common or urgent musculoskeletal problems; (c) the theoretical background of the conditions and their management; and (d) the core knowledge necessary to support diagnosis and management, including basic sciences. At the end of the course, all students should be able to differentiate normal from abnormal locomotor symptoms in a patient, determine the relevant investigations and interpret the results, formulate a limited differential diagnosis, recognise the impact of the problem on the individual patient, and make an appropriate management plan. Conclusions: The recommendations set global standards for the minimum level of competence in managing patients with musculoskeletal problems. They define what all doctors should know when graduating from medical school, regardless of further specialisation. They are intended to form the basis of a curriculum for a musculoskeletal course and can be adapted for any medical school in any country throughout the world. PMID:15082481

  11. Effect of physical activity on musculoskeletal discomforts among handicraft workers

    PubMed Central

    Shakerian, Mahnaz; Rismanchian, Masoud; Khalili, Pejman; Torki, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Handicrafts seems to be one of the high-risk jobs regarding work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) which necessitate the implementation of different corrective intervention like regular physical activities. This study aimed to investigate the impact of physical activity on WMSDs among craftsmen. Methods: This cross-sectional study was an analytical – descriptive study carried out on 100 craftsmen working in Isfahan, Iran, in 2013. The sampling method was census, and all workshops involved with this job were included. Information on demographic parameters and physical activity was collected by demographic forms. The data related to worker's musculoskeletal discomforts were conducted using Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire. The data were analyzed using statistical tests including independent t-test, Chi-square, and ANOVA. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 18. Results: The highest percentages of complaints related to severe musculoskeletal discomfort were reported in right shoulder (%36), right wrist (%26), neck (%25), and upper right arm (%24), respectively. A significant relationship was observed between physical activity and musculoskeletal discomforts of left wrist (P = 0.012), lower back (P = 0.016), and neck (P = 0.006). Discussion and Conclusion: Based on the study results, it can be inferred that regular but not too heavy physical activity can have a positive impact on decreasing the musculoskeletal discomforts. PMID:27512700

  12. Diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound: part 2. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jay; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2009-02-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound involves the use of high-frequency sound waves to image soft tissues and bony structures in the body for the purposes of diagnosing pathology or guiding real-time interventional procedures. Recently, an increasing number of physicians have integrated musculoskeletal ultrasound into their practices to facilitate patient care. Technological advancements, improved portability, and reduced costs continue to drive the proliferation of ultrasound in clinical medicine. This increased interest creates a need for education pertaining to all aspects of musculoskeletal ultrasound. The primary purpose of this article is to review diagnostic ultrasound technology and its potential clinical applications in the evaluation and treatment of patients with neurological and musculoskeletal disorders. After reviewing this article, physicians should be able to (1) list the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound compared to other available imaging modalities; (2) describe how ultrasound machines produce images using sound waves; (3) discuss the steps necessary to acquire and optimize an ultrasound image; (4) understand the difference ultrasound appearances of tendons, nerves, muscles, ligaments, blood vessels, and bones; and (5) identify multiple applications for diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound. Part 2 of this 2-part article will focus on the clinical applications of musculoskeletal ultrasound in clinical practice, including the ultrasonographic appearance of normal and abnormal tissues as well as specific diagnostic and interventional applications in major body regions. PMID:19627890

  13. Diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound: part 1. Fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jay; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound involves the use of high-frequency sound waves to image soft tissues and bony structures in the body for the purposes of diagnosing pathology or guiding real-time interventional procedures. Recently, an increasing number of physicians have integrated musculoskeletal ultrasound into their practices to facilitate patient care. Technological advancements, improved portability, and reduced costs continue to drive the proliferation of ultrasound in clinical medicine. This increased interest creates a need for education pertaining to all aspects of musculoskeletal ultrasound. The primary purpose of this article is to review diagnostic ultrasound technology and its potential clinical applications in the evaluation and treatment of patients with neurologic and musculoskeletal disorders. After reviewing this article, physicians should be able to (1) list the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound compared with other available imaging modalities, (2) describe how ultrasound machines produce images using sound waves, (3) discuss the steps necessary to acquire and optimize an ultrasound image, (4) understand the different ultrasound appearances of tendons, nerves, muscles, ligaments, blood vessels, and bones, and (5) identify multiple applications for diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound in musculoskeletal practice. Part 1 of this 2-part article reviews the fundamentals of clinical ultrasonographic imaging, including relevant physics, equipment, training, image optimization, and scanning principles for diagnostic and interventional purposes. PMID:19627875

  14. The clinical profile of musculoskeletal injuries in children attending a major hospital in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Sural, Sumit; Verma, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Background Children are vulnerable to musculoskeletal injuries both at home and on the street for various reasons. Morbidity and disabilities resulting from these, mostly preventable, injuries, make them a burden to their families and society. The role of various factors associated with injuries is often not documented. Methods This prospective study, done on 100 children aged up to 12 years with musculoskeletal trauma, analysed in details, the various modes of injuries. Results One in every five patient was a child below 12 years of age. Boys were injured more than girls. Injuries, especially fractures, were most common in the extremities, the upper limb more commonly injured than the lower limb. Most of the injuries occurred at home. The most common mode of injuries was falls that happened while playing both within and outside the home, followed by road traffic accidents. Most injuries occurred during daytime. Conclusions Injuries in children were found to be preventable. Small interventions while constructing homes can contribute tremendously to injury prevention and control in children. Parental awareness about the various modes of injury, role of supervised playing and their responsibility towards injury prevention can play a key role in reducing the morbidity associated with childhood fractures. PMID:26549946

  15. [Epidemiology of illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders in grocery stores and catering].

    PubMed

    Bonzini, Matteo; Battevi, Natale; Stucchi, Giulia; Vitelli, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Large scale retail industry and catering industry are characterized by the widespread presence of several risk factors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD): repetitive movements, incongruous postures and manual handling tasks. We reviewed current epidemiological evidence related to musculoskeletal disorders within these two sectors, distinguishing between symptoms and clinically documented disorders. In retail industry cashier is the most investigated figure, regarding upper limbs disorders as a consequence of repetitive tasks. In the catering sector there are few studies, mostly focused only on the job as a cook. The majority of studies showed a high prevalence of WMSD and, to a lesser extent, a high frequency ofmusculoskeletal alterations; suggesting the presence of a not negligible risk. These findings, however, are affected by a number of methodological limitations: they derive from cross-sectional studies, are based on voluntary self-selected workers, are focused on not unequivocally defined health outcomes, and are usually lacking a proper comparison. with the prevalence in less exposed/reference working groups. In order to achieve an effective control of the workers' risk, it is therefore necessary to design and conduct prospective studies that compare the risk of developing disorders and/or diseases in workers exposed to different levels of biomechanical load. It appears essential to involve occupational physicians in active health surveillance programs in order to identify critical areas and to develop effective preventive measures. PMID:25558714

  16. Chronic musculoskeletal complaints as a predictor of mortality-The HUNT study.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Anders N; Stovner, Lars J; Zwart, John-Anker; Winsvold, Bendik S; Heuch, Ingrid; Hagen, Knut

    2016-07-01

    The impact of chronic musculoskeletal complaints (CMSC) and chronic widespread chronic musculoskeletal complaints (CWMSC) on mortality is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between these conditions and mortality. In this prospective population-based cohort study from Norway, baseline data from the second Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT2, performed 1995-1997) were linked to the comprehensive National Cause of Death Registry in Norway with follow-up through the year 2011. A total of 65,026 individuals (70%) participated and were categorized based on their response to CMSC questions in HUNT2 (no CMSC, CMSC, or CWMSC). Hazard ratios (HRs) of mortality during a mean of 14.1 years of follow-up were estimated using Cox regression. During the follow-up period, 12,521 subjects died, 5162 from cardiovascular diseases, 3478 from cancer, and 3881 from all other causes. In the multivariate-adjusted analyses, there was no difference in all-cause mortality between individuals with or without CMSC (HR 1.01, confidence interval, 0.97-1.05) and CWMSC (HR 1.01, confidence interval, 0.96-1.05). Similarly, there was no association between CMSC or CWMSC and cardiovascular mortality, mortality from cancer, or mortality from all other causes. Therefore, from this study, we conclude that there is no evidence for a higher mortality rate among individuals with CMSC or CWMSC. PMID:26919487

  17. [Musculoskeletal disorders and housework in Italy].

    PubMed

    Rosano, A; Moccaldi, R; Cioppa, M; Lanzieri, G; Persechino, B; Spagnolo, A

    2004-01-01

    The housework exposes to the risk of musculoskeletal disorders, which may appear as disabling diseases, both temporary and permanent ones. To evaluate the epidemiology of the phenomenon a retrospective survey was conducted by administering a mail questionnaire to a sample of 1,000 families residing in the whole national territory. The participation rate was 31.7%. Among respondents 20.5% reported spinal pain, 65.6% of them with continuous pains (41.4% assumed pain-killer drugs). 37.0% of the interviewed persons reported to disorders in upper limbs. It was analysed the association between the presence of disorders and the frequency in making some housework duties. Washing clothes (OR=1.8; C.I. 95%: 0.6-4.5), making beds (OR=1.5; C.I. 95%: 0.2-13.1), and taking care of pets (OR=1.4; C.I. 95%: 0.6-3.4) were associated, even if not in a statistically significant way, with the presence of spinal pain. Upper limbs disorders were associated with duties naturally related to such a disorder, like washing dishes (OR=4.6; C.I. 95%: 1.3-16.5), cleaning clothes (OR=3.1; C.I. 95%: 1.3-7.0), cleaning up carpets (OR=2.3; C.I. 95%: 1.3-3.9). To assist the relatives in state of need was identified as risk factor for both the body areas (OR=2.9; C.I. 95%: 1.2-6.7 for the spine, OR=2.6; C.I. 95%: 1.3-5.2 for upper limbs), putting in evidence the physical stress attributable to the duty. The exact identification of the typology of housework which can induce musculoskeletal disorders, and the level of related risks, are essential information to devise campaigns and protocols of health education aimed at the prevention of chronic pathologies caused by the housework. PMID:15368941

  18. HIV and Orthopaedics: Musculoskeletal Manifestations and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pretell-Mazzini, Juan; Subhawong, Ty; Hernandez, Victor H; Campo, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    ➤Advances in combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in recent years have transformed HIV infection into a chronic disease when treatment is available, increasing a patient's life expectancy and the chances that orthopaedic surgeons will encounter such patients in their clinical practice.➤Musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with HIV infection are common and sometimes are the initial presentation of the disease. Knowledge about neoplasms and associated conditions affecting muscle, bones, and joints is essential for successful management.➤Since the advent of cART, total joint arthroplasty has been shown to be a safe procedure; however, perioperative infection is still a small risk in patients with uncontrolled viral loads or CD4 counts of <400 cells/mm(3).➤With regard to trauma surgery, the rates of early and late infection around implants, as well as union rates, are comparable with those in the HIV-negative population; however, there is an increased risk of pulmonary, renal, and infectious or septic complications in the polytrauma setting.➤Factors such as CD4 count, nutritional status, cART therapy, viral load count, and other comorbidities (hemophilia, infection among intravenous drug users, etc.) should be considered when treating these patients in order to optimize their clinical outcomes. PMID:27147691

  19. Musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions of instrumental musicians.

    PubMed

    Bejjani, F J; Kaye, G M; Benham, M

    1996-04-01

    Performing Arts Medicine is a broad field that includes the study of medical conditions and injuries incurred by dancers, instrumental musicians, and vocalists. This article summarizes the most relevant literature of approximately the past 10 years concerning the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions of musicians. A literature search was done for relevant articles in English by physicians or scientists. Some older, but fundamental, articles are included; incidental case reports were excluded to the extent possible. Included were articles on incidence, prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and biomechanical studies in musicians. Although nearly all of these conditions are the same ones seen in the general work force, it is clear that their occurrence patterns in the professional musician are unique, as is their impact on the life and livelihood of the patient. The content of the Arts Medicine literature does not permit a truly critical review. Research in the last 10 years appears not to have been done in a true blinded, random case-controlled fashion. Many authors support their statements with only their respective clinical experiences. The research cited here includes 58 series, 9 case studies, 5 surveys, 2 pre/post intervention studies, and 1 double-blind crossover clinical trial. PMID:8607768

  20. A musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Christophy, Miguel; Faruk Senan, Nur Adila; Lotz, Jeffrey C; O'Reilly, Oliver M

    2012-01-01

    A new musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine is described in this paper. This model features a rigid pelvis and sacrum, the five lumbar vertebrae, and a rigid torso consisting of a lumped thoracic spine and ribcage. The motion of the individual lumbar vertebrae was defined as a fraction of the net lumbar movement about the three rotational degrees of freedom: flexion-extension lateral bending, and axial rotation. Additionally, the eight main muscle groups of the lumbar spine were incorporated using 238 muscle fascicles with prescriptions for the parameters in the Hill-type muscle models obtained with the help of an extensive literature survey. The features of the model include the abilities to predict joint reactions, muscle forces, and muscle activation patterns. To illustrate the capabilities of the model and validate its physiological similarity, the model's predictions for the moment arms of the muscles are shown for a range of flexion-extension motions of the lower back. The model uses the OpenSim platform and is freely available on https://www.simtk.org/home/lumbarspine to other spinal researchers interested in analyzing the kinematics of the spine. The model can also be integrated with existing OpenSim models to build more comprehensive models of the human body. PMID:21318374

  1. NASA Musculoskeletal Space Medicine and Reconditioning Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Scheuring, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Astronaut Strength, Conditioning, and Rehabilitation (ASCR) group is comprised of certified strength and conditioning coaches and licensed and certified athletic trainers. The ASCR group works within NASA s Space Medicine Division providing direction and supervision to the astronaut corp with regards to physical readiness throughout all phases of space flight. The ASCR group is overseen by flight surgeons with specialized training in sports medicine or physical medicine and rehabilitation. The goals of the ASCR group include 1) designing and administering strength and conditioning programs that maximize the potential for physical performance while minimizing the rate of injury, 2) providing appropriate injury management and rehabilitation services, 3) collaborating with medical, research, engineering, and mission operations groups to develop and implement safe and effective in-flight exercise countermeasures, and 4) providing a structured, individualized post-flight reconditioning program for long duration crew members. This Panel will present the current approach to the management of musculoskeletal injuries commonly seen within the astronaut corp and will present an overview of the pre-flight physical training, in-flight exercise countermeasures, and post-flight reconditioning program for ISS astronauts.

  2. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  3. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  4. Musculoskeletal disorders in labor-intensive agriculture.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Fadi A

    2010-10-01

    This paper gives an overview of the extent of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in agriculture, and a historical perspective on how ergonomics has been used to reduce the health effects of labor-intensive agriculture. A summary of exposure to MSD physical risk factors within various classes of crops, along with various administrative and engineering controls for abating MSDs in agriculture is given. These controls range from programmed rest breaks to mechanized or partially-mechanized operations. Worker-based approaches such as prone carts and platforms, and load transfer devices hold promise in combating the prevalent stooped work in agriculture. Including the worker as an integral contributor to all aspects of developing and implementing an intervention, and considering the psychosocial and socio-cultural aspects of the work environment are crucial elements of effective interventions for reducing MSDs. Despite the advent progress in new technologies in agricultural practices, reliance on labor, especially in fresh market fruits and vegetables, will always be a major cornerstone of agriculture for at least the foreseen future. It is encouraging to see the increased interest among health and safety professionals, epidemiologists, engineers, social scientists, and ergonomists throughout the world who are committed to the plight of reducing MSDs and other health problems among agricultural workers. PMID:20398891

  5. The Development and Validation of Hundred Paisa Pain Scale for Measuring Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Anwar, Dilshad; Nezamuddin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The reduction in the pain intensity is one of the most important outcome measures in musculoskeletal disorders. The assessment of pain required reliable and valid scale. The aims of this prospective observational study were to develop and evaluate concurrent validity and test–retest reliability of hundred paisa pain scale (HPPS) for measuring musculoskeletal pain. A consecutive 74 patients with musculoskeletal pain with a wide variety of diagnoses were enrolled. Patients reported their intensity of pain on the following scale: HPPS, “visual analog scale (VAS),” and “numerical rating scale (NRS).” Patients were asked to complete another HPPS, VAS, and NRS after 2 days to determine the reproducibility of the scales. Spearman rank correlation coefficients between the HPPS and the NRS, and VAS were used to determine the validity of the scales. The correlation between the change score of HPPS, VAS, and NRS was used to determine the responsiveness of HPPS. Results of test–retest indicate that the reproducibility of HPPS was good to excellent with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) value of 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76–0.91). The standard error of measurement (SEM) was 5.24. The minimum detectable change based on the SEM for test–retest was 14.52. The reproducibility of VAS is moderate to good with the ICC value of 0.82 (95% CI, 0.72–0.88). The reproducibility of NRS is good to excellent with the ICC value of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.81–0.92). There was a strong correlation between the HPPS and the VAS, and NRS (P < 0.01), which confirm the validity. The HPPS was responsive as the correlation of the change score of HPPS with the change score of VAS, and NRS were good (0.80 and 0.86, respectively). The HPPS is a valid and reliable scale to assess musculoskeletal pain, with psychometric properties in agreement with other comparable scale. PMID:26200616

  6. Improved education in musculoskeletal conditions is necessary for all doctors.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, Kristina; Dreinhöfer, Karsten E.; Woolf, A. D.

    2003-01-01

    It is likely that everyone will, at some time, suffer from a problem related to the musculoskeletal system, ranging from a very common problem such as osteoarthritis or back pain to severely disabling limb trauma or rheumatoid arthritis. Many musculoskeletal problems are chronic conditions. The most common symptoms are pain and disability, with an impact not only on individuals' quality of life but also, importantly, on people's ability to earn a living and be independent. It has been estimated that one in four consultations in primary care is caused by problems of the musculoskeletal system and that these conditions may account for up to 60% of all disability pensions. In contrast, teaching at undergraduate and graduate levels--and the resulting competence and confidence of many doctors--do not reflect the impact of these conditions on individuals and society. Many medical students do not have any clinical training in assessing patients with bone and joint problems. Under the umbrella of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010, experts from all parts of the world with an interest in teaching have developed recommendations for an undergraduate curriculum to improve the teaching of musculoskeletal conditions in medical schools. The goal for each medical school should be a course in musculoskeletal medicine concentrating on clinical assessment, common outpatient musculoskeletal problems and recognition of emergencies. Improving competency in the management of musculoskeletal problems within primary care settings through improved education is the next aim, but there are needs for improvement for all professionals and at all levels within the health care system. PMID:14710510

  7. Principles of prehospital care of musculoskeletal injuries.

    PubMed

    Worsing, R A

    1984-05-01

    Prehospital management of musculoskeletal injuries in the traumatized patient is based on the application of a few basic principles in an orderly but expeditious manner. The patient must be assessed for immediate life-threatening conditions involving airway, respiratory, and circulatory functions while the cervical spine is protected. Resuscitative efforts to reestablish and preserve an adequate circulating volume of oxygenated blood must follow, using airways, oxygen therapy, and fluid replacement through MAST trousers and intravenous fluids. Cardiac function must be maintained as well. Respiratory function must be monitored and assisted as required. Finally, neurologic status must be assessed and monitored. Secondary assessment of all pertinent history and physical findings is made to delineate all other injuries that do not pose an immediate threat to the life or limb of the patient. Definitive care follows but is limited to basic resuscitation, stabilization, and immobilization techniques under medical control through telemetry and radio communication. Immediate definitive care of the traumatized patient requires the expeditious intervention of the trauma team in a hospital setting with surgical, blood banking, radiographic, laboratory, and other hospital-based capabilities available. Field management of the traumatized patient is directed at the expeditious delivery of the viable patient to the trauma team. In the multiply traumatized patient with severe injuries to several organ systems, prehospital care may need to be expedited to provide this patient the in-hospital care required to save his or her life. Appropriate treatment in such life-threatening trauma situations will consist of a rapid primary assessment, airway and cervical spine control, appropriate respiratory and cardiovascular assistance, gross whole body fracture immobilization using a backboard, and immediate transport. For less severely injured patients, primary assessment, resuscitation

  8. Role of Health Literacy in Self-Reported Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Catherine L.; Appleton, Sarah L.; Black, Julie; Hoon, Elizabeth; Rudd, Rima E.; Adams, Robert J.; Gill, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Self-report of musculoskeletal conditions is often used to estimate population prevalence and to determine disease burden and influence policy. However, self-report of certain musculoskeletal conditions is frequently inaccurate, suggesting inadequate communication to the patient of their diagnosis. The aim of this study is to determine the association between functional health literacy (FHL) and self-reported musculoskeletal conditions in a representative population survey. FHL was measured using Newest Vital Sign in 2824 randomly selected adults. Participants also self-reported medically diagnosed arthritis, gout, and osteoporosis. Multiple logistic regression was adjusted for age and sex. The prevalence of self-reported arthritis, gout, and osteoporosis was 25.2%, 4.9%, and 5.6%, respectively. The prevalence of those at risk for inadequate FHL was 24.0% and high likelihood of inadequate FHL was 21.0%. However, over 50% of respondents with arthritis or gout had at risk/inadequate FHL, increasing to 70% of those self-reporting osteoporosis. After adjustment for age and sex, respondents in the arthritis subgroup of “don't know” and self-reported osteoporosis were significantly more likely to have inadequate FHL than the general population. This study indicates a substantial burden of low health literacy amongst people with musculoskeletal disease. This has implications for provider-patient communication, individual healthcare, population estimates of musculoskeletal disease, and impact of public health messages. PMID:26357571

  9. Ergonomic intervention, workplace exercises and musculoskeletal complaints: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Heydari, Mohammad; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most prevalent occupational disorders in different jobs such as office work. Some interventions such as ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises are introduced as the methods for alleviating these disorders. In this study we compared the effect of ergonomic modifications and workplace exercises on musculoskeletal pain and discomfort in a group of office workers. Methods: In an interventional study on office workers, the effect of two interventions was compared. Ergonomic modification consisted of correcting the arrangement of workstation and changing some equipment; workplace exercises included stretching exercises focusing on neck, shoulders, low back, and hand and wrist. Musculoskeletal complaints were assessed and compared before and after 1 month interventions. Results: The frequency of musculoskeletal complaints was high before the study. Both interventions significantly reduced complaints in a similar manner except for low back pain which was reduced in exercise group more than the other group. Conclusion: In this study we found a beneficial short-term effect for both ergonomic modifications and stretching work-place exercises on reducing musculoskeletal pain in office workers. PMID:25405134

  10. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Ross A.; Lackner, Johanna B.; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (d-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. STUDY SELECTION Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. DATA EXTRACTION Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. DATA SYNTHESIS Fourteen RCTs, 1 case–control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA), spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8) and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood–Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective) with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective) outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies and positive

  11. Predicting response to physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal shoulder pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background People suffering from musculoskeletal shoulder pain are frequently referred to physiotherapy. Physiotherapy generally involves a multimodal approach to management that may include; exercise, manual therapy and techniques to reduce pain. At present it is not possible to predict which patients will respond positively to physiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify which prognostic factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy in the management of musculoskeletal shoulder pain. Methods A comprehensive search was undertaken of Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED (from inception to January 2013). Prospective studies of participants with shoulder pain receiving physiotherapy which investigated the association between baseline prognostic factors and change in pain and function over time were included. Study selection, data extraction and appraisal of study quality were undertaken by two independent assessors. Quality criteria were selected from previously published guidelines to form a checklist of 24 items. The study protocol was prospectively registered onto the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. Results A total of 5023 titles were retrieved and screened for eligibility, 154 articles were assessed as full text and 16 met the inclusion criteria: 11 cohort studies, 3 randomised controlled trials and 2 controlled trials. Results were presented for the 9 studies meeting 13 or more of the 24 quality criteria. Clinical and statistical heterogeneity resulted in qualitative synthesis rather than meta-analysis. Three studies demonstrated that high functional disability at baseline was associated with poor functional outcome (p ≤ 0.05). Four studies demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between longer duration of shoulder pain and poorer outcome. Three studies, demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between increasing age and poorer function; three studies

  12. [Working women with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a case series].

    PubMed

    Ordóñez-Hernández, Cecilia Andrea; Contreras-Estrada, Mónica Isabel; Soltero-Avelar, Ruben

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the experience of working women suffering from chronic musculoskeletal pain, using a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The technique drew on in-depth interviews with five working women that presented to the orthopedics and neurosurgery departments of a hospital in Guadalajara, Mexico, with a complaint of musculoskeletal pain for more than six months. The study showed that the women felt rejection, segregation, discrimination, lack of support at the workplace, and feelings of frustration and powerlessness related to their health condition. The women also perceived as a barrier the lack of efficiency in disability proceedings and job reintegration or relocation. Financial and family responsibilities were their main reason for continuing to work despite their chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:26735388

  13. Novel Musculoskeletal Loading System for Small Exercise Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan; Newby, Nate; Trinh, Tinh; Hanson, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight places astronauts at increased risk for muscle strain and bone fracture upon return to a 1-g or partial gravity environment. Functionally limiting decrements in musculoskeletal health are likely during Mars proving-ground and Earth-independent missions given extended transit times and the vehicle limitations for exercise devices (low-mass, small volume, little to no power). This is particularly alarming for exploration missions because astronauts will be required to perform novel and physically demanding tasks (i.e. vehicle egress, exploration, and habitat building activities) on unfamiliar terrain. Accordingly, NASA's exploration roadmap identifies the need for development of small exercise equipment that can prevent musculoskeletal atrophy and has the ability to assess musculoskeletal health at multiple time points during long-duration missions.

  14. Schoolbag weight and musculoskeletal symptoms in New Zealand secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Whittfield, J; Legg, S J; Hedderley, D I

    2005-03-01

    The weight of schoolbags and the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms amongst 140 students (70 third form students comprising 35 females and 35 males, and 70 sixth form students comprising 35 females and 35 males) from five New Zealand secondary schools was investigated. Schoolbag weight for third form students (mean age 13.6 years) was 13.2% of their body weight, while for sixth form students (mean age 17.1 years) it was 10.3% of their body weight. These weights may exceed the recommended guideline load limits for adult industrial workers. Musculoskeletal symptoms were reported by 77.1% of the students. Symptoms were most prevalent in the neck, shoulders, upper back and lower back. Although musculoskeletal symptoms are believed to be multifactorial in origin, the carriage of heavy schoolbags is a suspected contributory factor and may represent an overlooked daily physical stress for New Zealand secondary school students. PMID:15694073

  15. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Symptoms Among Batik Workers in Kelantan

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Razlan; Kyi, Win; Rampal, K.G

    2000-01-01

    A cross sectional study was carried out to evaluate the extent of occupational health problems focusing on some aspects of musculoskeletal symptoms among batik workers in Kelantan, Malaysia. The workers selected must have been in that industry for at least one year. Using cluster sampling, 202 workers were selected from 21 factories. More than half (60.2%) of the workers had been troubled with musculoskeletal symptoms at work. The most common symptoms were pain over the shoulders (41.0%), lower back (34.4%) and ankle (34.4%). Duration of employment, younger age group, prolonged standing and awkward working task were among contributing factors. It is therefore necessary to improve on both ergonomic and psychosocial environments of batik workers in order to prevent these musculoskeletal symptoms. PMID:22977385

  16. Proton MR Spectroscopy in Metabolic Assessment of Musculoskeletal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Subhawong, Ty K.; Wang, Xin; Durand, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Carrino, John A.; Machado, Antonio J.; Fayad, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purposes of this review are to describe the principles and method of MR spectroscopy, summarize current published data on musculoskeletal lesions, and report additional cases that have been analyzed with recently developed quantitative methods. CONCLUSION Proton MR spectroscopy can be used to identify key tissue metabolites and may serve as a useful adjunct to radiographic evaluation of musculoskeletal lesions. A pooled analysis of 122 musculoskeletal tumors revealed that a discrete choline peak has a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 68% in the detection of malignancy. Modest improvements in diagnostic accuracy in 22 of 122 cases when absolute choline quantification was used encourage the pursuit of development of choline quantification methods. PMID:22194493

  17. Recommendations from NASA's Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.; Scheuring, R. A.; Walton, M. E.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Smaka, T.; McCulley, P. A.; Jones, J. A.; Stokes, C. R.; Parker, K. K.; Wear, M.; Johnson-Throop, K. A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Continuously evolving medical standards of care, limited crew training time, and the inherent constraints of space flight necessitate regular revisions of the mission medical support infrastructure and methodology. A three-day Operational and Research Musculoskeletal Summit was held to review NASA s current strategy for preflight health maintenance and injury screening, risk mitigation for musculoskeletal injuries or syndromes, treatment methods during flight, and research topics to mitigate risks to astronaut health. The Summit also undertook consideration of the best evidence-based terrestrial musculoskeletal practices to recommend their adaptation for use in space. Methods: The types and frequencies of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by short- and long-duration astronauts were obtained from the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health. The Summit panel was comprised of experts from the clinical and research communities, as well as representatives from NASA Headquarters, the Astronaut corps, and the offices of JSC Medical Operations, JSC Human Adaptation and Countermeasures, Glenn Research Center Human Research, and Astronaut Strength Conditioning and Rehabilitation. Before the summit, panelists participated in a Web-based review of NASA s Space Medical Conditions List (SMCL). Results: The Summit generated seventy-five operational and research recommendations to the NASA Office of Space Medicine, including changes to the SMCL and to the musculoskeletal section of the ISS debrief questionnaire. From these recommendations, seven were assigned highest value and priority, and could be immediately adopted for the exploration architecture. Discussion: Optimized exercise and conditioning to improve performance and forestall musculoskeletal damage on orbit were the primary area of focus. Special attention was paid to exercise timing and muscle group specificity. The panel s recommendations are currently in various stages of consideration or integration

  18. Occupational Respiratory and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Egyptian Female Hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Hassan, O M; Bayomy, H

    2015-08-01

    Hairdressing is associated with exposure to a variety of harmful agents which have been linked to respiratory and musculoskeletal disorders in hairdressers. This study aimed to identify respiratory and musculoskeletal disorders in hairdressers compared to office workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 80 female hairdressers and 50 matched controls. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on personal and occupational data, hairdressing activities, the presence of respiratory symptoms and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in the past 12 months. Reported symptoms were compared between hairdressers and controls. The associations between self-reported symptoms and hairdressing activities were investigated. Hairdressers were more likely to report symptoms than controls particularly for those who were older, with higher body mass index and longer duration of work as hairdresser. There were significant associations between frequent hair treatments (bleaching, dye and wave) and hand dermatitis (P < 0.001), running nose (P < 0.05), eye irritation (P < 0.01) and phlegm (P < 0.05). Elbow pain and shoulder and back pain were the most prevalent musculoskeletal pains in the past 12 months (13.8 and 12.5% respectively), back and knee pains were the most frequent chronic pain (7.5%), hand and wrist pain led 12.5% of hairdressers to visit a doctor and shoulder pain and back pain indicated a period of sickness absence in 13.8% of hairdressers. Musculoskeletal disorders were associated with manual handling, prolonged standing, strenuous shoulder movements and awkward body posture. Hairdressing is associated with increased risk to respiratory and musculoskeletal disorders due to adverse work conditions. PMID:25663369

  19. A musculoskeletal model of the elbow joint complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Roger V.; Barr, Ronald E.; Abraham, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a musculoskeletal model that represents human elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. Musculotendon parameters and the skeletal geometry were determined for the musculoskeletal model in the analysis of ballistic elbow joint complex movements. The key objective was to develop a computational model, guided by optimal control, to investigate the relationship among patterns of muscle excitation, individual muscle forces, and movement kinematics. The model was verified using experimental kinematic, torque, and electromyographic data from volunteer subjects performing both isometric and ballistic elbow joint complex movements. In general, the model predicted kinematic and muscle excitation patterns similar to what was experimentally measured.

  20. The effect of relaxin on the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, F; Haerian, B S; Muniandy, S; Yusof, A; Dragoo, J L; Salleh, N

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin is a hormone structurally related to insulin and insulin-like growth factor, which exerts its regulatory effect on the musculoskeletal and other systems through binding to its receptor in various tissues, mediated by different signaling pathways. Relaxin alters the properties of cartilage and tendon by activating collagenase. This hormone is also involved in bone remodeling and healing of injured ligaments and skeletal muscle. In this review, we have summarized the literature on the effect of relaxin in musculoskeletal system to provide a broad perspective for future studies in this field. PMID:24283470

  1. The role of MRI in musculoskeletal practice: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dean Deyle, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This clinical perspective presents an overview of current and potential uses for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in musculoskeletal practice. Clinical practice guidelines and current evidence for improved outcomes will help providers determine the situations when an MRI is indicated. The advanced competency standard of examination used by physical therapists will be helpful to prevent overuse of musculoskeletal imaging, reduce diagnostic errors, and provide the appropriate clinical context to pathology revealed on MRI. Physical therapists are diagnostically accurate and appropriately conservative in their use of MRI consistent with evidence-based principles of diagnosis and screening. PMID:22851878

  2. 78 FR 40486 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  3. Musculoskeletal pain and limitations in work ability in Swedish marines: a cross-sectional survey of prevalence and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Monnier, Andreas; Larsson, Helena; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Brodin, Lars-Åke; Äng, Björn O

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of self-rated musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability in Swedish Armed Forces (SAF) marines, and to study factors potentially associated with pain limiting work ability for the most prevalent pain regions reported. Design Population-based, cross-sectional survey. Participants There were 272 SAF marines from the main marine battalion in Sweden included in the study. Outcomes Self-assessed musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting the marines' work ability within a 6-month period, as obtained from structured questionnaires. The association of individual, health and work-related factors with musculoskeletal pain limiting work ability was systematically regressed with multiple logistic models, estimating OR and 95% CI. Results Musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability were most common in the back, at 46% and 20%, and lower extremities at 51% and 29%, respectively. Physical training ≤1 day/week (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.7 to 16.8); body height ≤1.80 m (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6 to 15.1) and ≥1.86 m (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 14.1); computer work 1/4 of the working day (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.0 to 10.0) and ≥1/2 (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 10.1) of the working day were independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. None of the studied variables emerged significantly associated with such pain for the lower extremities. Conclusions Our findings show that musculoskeletal pain and resultant limitations in work ability are common in SAF marines. Low frequency of physical training emerged independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. This suggests that marines performing physical training 1 day per week or less are suitable candidates for further medical evaluation and secondary preventive actions. While also associated, body height and computer work need further exploration as underlying mechanisms for back pain limiting work ability. Further prospective studies are necessary to clarify the direction

  4. Analyzing musculoskeletal neck pain, measured as present pain and periods of pain, with three different regression models: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Grimby-Ekman, Anna; Andersson, Eva M; Hagberg, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Background In the literature there are discussions on the choice of outcome and the need for more longitudinal studies of musculoskeletal disorders. The general aim of this longitudinal study was to analyze musculoskeletal neck pain, in a group of young adults. Specific aims were to determine whether psychosocial factors, computer use, high work/study demands, and lifestyle are long-term or short-term factors for musculoskeletal neck pain, and whether these factors are important for developing or ongoing musculoskeletal neck pain. Methods Three regression models were used to analyze the different outcomes. Pain at present was analyzed with a marginal logistic model, for number of years with pain a Poisson regression model was used and for developing and ongoing pain a logistic model was used. Presented results are odds ratios and proportion ratios (logistic models) and rate ratios (Poisson model). The material consisted of web-based questionnaires answered by 1204 Swedish university students from a prospective cohort recruited in 2002. Results Perceived stress was a risk factor for pain at present (PR = 1.6), for developing pain (PR = 1.7) and for number of years with pain (RR = 1.3). High work/study demands was associated with pain at present (PR = 1.6); and with number of years with pain when the demands negatively affect home life (RR = 1.3). Computer use pattern (number of times/week with a computer session ≥ 4 h, without break) was a risk factor for developing pain (PR = 1.7), but also associated with pain at present (PR = 1.4) and number of years with pain (RR = 1.2). Among life style factors smoking (PR = 1.8) was found to be associated to pain at present. The difference between men and women in prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was confirmed in this study. It was smallest for the outcome ongoing pain (PR = 1.4) compared to pain at present (PR = 2.4) and developing pain (PR = 2.5). Conclusion By using different regression models different aspects of neck

  5. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in construction workers in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the prevalence, characteristics, and distribution of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire about musculoskeletal pain in different parts of the body was completed by 165 construction workers from the construction industries in Dammam and Riyadh cities. The descriptive data were analyzed using chi-square test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Eighty (48.5%) of the responding workers had pain in neck, shoulders, lower back, hand, knee, or ankle. The majority of respondents had low back pain (50%) followed by knee pain (20%). The average intensity of pain at all sites during activity and rest was 6.65 and 3.59, respectively. Thirty-four (42.5%) respondents had dull aching pain and 24 (30%) had cramping pain. There was an association between years of experience, duration of break during work, and use of protective equipment with the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in construction workers (P < 0.05). Most of the workers complaining of pain got medical treatment (62.5%) and only 25% received physical therapy. It can be concluded from this study that the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia is high. PMID:25811043

  6. NSAIDs and Musculoskeletal Treatment: What is the Clinical Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stovitz, Steven D.; Johnson, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed for musculoskeletal injuries because the conditions are considered inflammatory in nature. However, because inflammation is a necessary component in healing, decreasing inflammation may be counterproductive. Also, many tendon injuries are, in fact, degenerative and not…

  7. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Pain in Construction Workers in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the prevalence, characteristics, and distribution of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire about musculoskeletal pain in different parts of the body was completed by 165 construction workers from the construction industries in Dammam and Riyadh cities. The descriptive data were analyzed using chi-square test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Eighty (48.5%) of the responding workers had pain in neck, shoulders, lower back, hand, knee, or ankle. The majority of respondents had low back pain (50%) followed by knee pain (20%). The average intensity of pain at all sites during activity and rest was 6.65 and 3.59, respectively. Thirty-four (42.5%) respondents had dull aching pain and 24 (30%) had cramping pain. There was an association between years of experience, duration of break during work, and use of protective equipment with the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in construction workers (P < 0.05). Most of the workers complaining of pain got medical treatment (62.5%) and only 25% received physical therapy. It can be concluded from this study that the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia is high. PMID:25811043

  8. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Norwegian female biathlon athletes

    PubMed Central

    Østerås, Håvard; Garnæs, Kirsti Krohn; Augestad, Liv Berit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to examine musculoskeletal disorders in Norwegian female biathlon athletes (age ≥ 16), both juniors and seniors. The design was a retrospective cross-sectional study. In all, 148 athletes (79.1%) responded; of these, 118 athletes were 16–21 years (juniors) (77.6%), and 30 athletes were 22 years or older (seniors) (20.3%), and mean age was 19.1. A validated questionnaire was used to collect the data. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 57.8%. The most affected parts were the knee (23.0% of the total injuries), calf (12.2%), ankle/foot (10.8%), lower back (10.8%), and thigh (10.1%). The disorders resulted in training/competition cessation for 73.5% of athletes, in alternative training for 87.8%. Fifty percent of the athletes had one or several musculoskeletal disorders. Most of the problems occurred preseason, and the duration of symptoms was often prolonged. Few differences between the juniors and seniors were found. This study showed the prevalence of musculoskeletal problems among female biathlon athletes. The results indicate that prevention of lower limb problems must be prioritized, especially during the preseason. PMID:24379711

  9. The phenotypic and genetic signatures of common musculoskeletal pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Diatchenko, Luda; Fillingim, Roger B; Smith, Shad B; Maixner, William

    2013-06-01

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, such as fibromyalgia and low back pain, tend to coexist in affected individuals and are characterized by a report of pain greater than expected based on the results of a standard physical evaluation. The pathophysiology of these conditions is largely unknown, we lack biological markers for accurate diagnosis, and conventional therapeutics have limited effectiveness. Growing evidence suggests that chronic pain conditions are associated with both physical and psychological triggers, which initiate pain amplification and psychological distress; thus, susceptibility is dictated by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Herein, we review phenotypic and genetic markers of common musculoskeletal pain conditions, selected based on their association with musculoskeletal pain in previous research. The phenotypic markers of greatest interest include measures of pain amplification and 'psychological' measures (such as emotional distress, somatic awareness, psychosocial stress and catastrophizing). Genetic polymorphisms reproducibly linked with musculoskeletal pain are found in genes contributing to serotonergic and adrenergic pathways. Elucidation of the biological mechanisms by which these markers contribute to the perception of pain in these patients will enable the development of novel effective drugs and methodologies that permit better diagnoses and approaches to personalized medicine. PMID:23545734

  10. Body mass index and musculoskeletal pain: is there a connection?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most common complaints that patients report to physicians and two-thirds of the population has an elevated body mass index (BMI), indicating they are either overweight or obese. It was once assumed that extra body weight would stress the low back and lead to pain, however, researchers have reported inconsistencies association between body weight and back pain. In contrast, more recent studies do indicate that an elevated BMI is associated with back pain and other musculoskeletal pain syndromes due to the presence of a chronic systemic inflammatory state, suggesting that the relationship between BMI and musculoskeletal pains be considered in more detail. Objective To describe how an elevated BMI can be associated with chronic systemic inflammation and pain expression. To outline measurable risk factors for chronic inflammation that can be used in clinical practice and discuss basic treatment considerations. Discussion Adiposopathy, or “sick fat” syndrome, is a term that refers to an elevated BMI that is associated with a chronic systemic inflammatory state most commonly referred to as the metabolic syndrome. The best available evidence suggests that the presence of adiposopathy determines if an elevated BMI will contribute to musculoskeletal pain expression. It is not uncommon for physicians to fail to identify the presence of adiposopathy/metabolic syndrome. Conclusion Patients with an elevated BMI should be further examined to identify inflammatory factors associated with adiposopathy, such as the metabolic syndrome, which may be promoting back pain and other musculoskeletal pain syndromes. PMID:23687943

  11. Working conditions and musculoskeletal pain among Brazilian pottery workers.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Adriana Cristina de Souza; Iguti, Aparecida Mari

    2010-03-01

    In the municipality of Pedreira in São Paulo State, Brazil, a large number of workers from the ceramic industry have left their jobs because of work related musculoskeletal disorders. The objectives of this study were to describe the work conditions pertaining to the ceramic industry, to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and to identify the associations between symptoms and organizational, biomechanical, psychosocial and individual variables. Nine ceramic manufacturers participated. The activities of 18 individuals were analyzed through direct observation. All workers answered a questionnaire about work and health (n = 235). The results found that the general working conditions in the pottery manufacturers were poor. A 38.5% prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was found. Repetition, tool use, lack of control over decisions, worries regarding work demands, relationship issues, work dissatisfaction and the wish to move on to another function were all associated with pain. We concluded that musculoskeletal pain is one of the outcomes of elevated human requirements resulting from working conditions and organization in the ceramic industry. PMID:20464068

  12. Bacteriology laboratories and musculoskeletal tissue banks in Australia.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2012-11-01

    In Australia, there are six Therapeutic Goods Administration-licensed clinical bacteriology laboratories providing bacterial and fungal bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal samples sent from 10 tissue banks. Musculoskeletal swab and/or tissue biopsy samples are collected at the time of allograft retrieval and sent to bacteriology laboratories for bioburden testing, in some cases requiring interstate transport. Bacteria and fungi may be present within the allograft at the time of retrieval or contaminated from an external source. The type of organism recovered will determine if the allograft is rejected for transplant, which may include all allografts from the same donor. Bacteriology staff also provides unpaid support of tissue banks through meeting involvement, consultations, licence-related activities, validations and research funded by their organisation and not part of any contractual agreement. Bacteriology laboratories and tissue banks must be compliant to the Code of Good Manufacturing Practice - Human Blood and Tissues and regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. Clinical bacteriology laboratories also require mandatory accreditation to Standards Australia International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) 15189:2009 medical laboratories - particular requirements for quality and competence, and may also attain Standards Australia/New Zealand Standard ISO 9001:2000 quality management systems certification. Bacteriology laboratories and musculoskeletal tissue banks are integral partners in providing safe allograft musculoskeletal tissue for transplant. PMID:22882601

  13. The coming of age of musculoskeletal tissue engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Rocky S.

    2016-01-01

    Standfirst Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have advanced rapidly towards the development of therapeutic solutions for musculoskeletal disorders. In 2012, breakthroughs have been made in the guidance of adult stem cell homing, the tissue regenerative activity of stem-cell-derived extracellular matrix has been tested, and novel, mechanically superior biomaterials have been fabricated. PMID:23321611

  14. Musculoskeletal symptom survey among cement and concrete workers.

    PubMed

    Goldsheyder, David; Weiner, Shira Schecter; Nordin, Margareta; Hiebert, Rudi

    2004-01-01

    Work in construction is associated with a high risk for musculoskeletal disorders and injuries. The symptom survey was conducted to determine the magnitude and musculoskeletal injury characteristics among the cement and concrete workers and identify the most problematic work-related activities and job factors that might have contributed to the occurrence of these disorders. Findings revealed that a large proportion of the laborers (77%) experienced at least one musculoskeletal disorder in the last year. Low back pain was reported as the most frequently experienced symptom (66%). 'Working while in pain' the concrete workers perceived as the major problem in the trade. Other problematic work-related activities included 'bending or twisting the back', 'work in hot, cold or wet conditions', and 'handling heavy objects'. Most of the laborers (82%) requested on-the-job safety training. Survey results combined with the outcomes of focus groups discussions and work site observations were used in the design of a training program aimed at the prevention of musculoskeletal morbidity in the trade. The program incorporated ergonomics principles, hazard recognition, safe work practices, problem solving and personal protection in the training curriculum for membership of the trade. PMID:15502291

  15. Depressive Symptoms, Anatomical Region, and Clinical Outcomes for Patients Seeking Outpatient Physical Therapy for Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Beneciuk, Jason M.; Valencia, Carolina; Werneke, Mark W.; Hart, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines advocate the routine identification of depressive symptoms for patients with pain in the lumbar or cervical spine, but not for other anatomical regions. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and impact of depressive symptoms for patients with musculoskeletal pain across different anatomical regions. Design This was a prospective, associational study. Methods Demographic, clinical, depressive symptom (Symptom Checklist 90–Revised), and outcome data were collected by self-report from a convenience sample of 8,304 patients. Frequency of severe depressive symptoms was assessed by chi-square analysis for demographic and clinical variables. An analysis of variance examined the influence of depressive symptoms and anatomical region on intake pain intensity and functional status. Separate hierarchical multiple regression models by anatomical region examined the influence of depressive symptoms on clinical outcomes. Results Prevalence of severe depression was higher in women, in industrial and pain clinics, and in patients who reported chronic pain or prior surgery. Lower prevalence rates were found in patients older than 65 years and those who had upper- or lower-extremity pain. Depressive symptoms had a moderate to large effect on pain ratings (Cohen d=0.55–0.87) and a small to large effect on functional status (Cohen d=0.28–0.95). In multivariate analysis, depressive symptoms contributed additional variance to pain intensity and functional status for all anatomical locations, except for discharge values for the cervical region. Conclusions Rates of depressive symptoms varied slightly based on anatomical region of musculoskeletal pain. Depressive symptoms had a consistent detrimental influence on outcomes, except on discharge scores for the cervical anatomical region. Expanding screening recommendations for depressive symptoms to include more anatomical regions may be indicated in physical therapy

  16. Musculoskeletal injuries in Homer's Iliad: the War of Troy revisited.

    PubMed

    Kömürcü, Erkam; Tok, Fatih; Simşek, Ayşe; Ozçakar, Levent

    2014-04-01

    Homer's Iliad--the most famous and influential epic poem--has been previously reviewed with respect to head, craniomaxillofacial, neck, thoracic, and hand injuries in the literature. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no data regarding musculoskeletal injuries. This article describes the musculoskeletal injuries that had ensued during the war of Troy. The Turkish translation of the original epic poem Iliad was reviewed for musculoskeletal injuries, that is, their descriptions, outcome, the weapons used, and the engaged warriors. Extremity injuries were evaluated as regards the affected bones. The pertinent treatment methods were also recorded. In total, 103 musculoskeletal injuries were detected during 81 combats. The most commonly involved areas were the shoulder (15.5%), the head (14.5%), the cervical vertebrae (14.5%), and the thoracic vertebrae (8.7%). The weapons used were spear (n = 52); sword (n = 9); arrow (n = 9); stone (n = 8); and cane, animal, the hand, Chariot race, and broken yoke (n = 1 for each). Fifty-four combats (66.6%) resulted in death. Therapeutic herbs, compound of milk, and essence of fig were used as treatment alternatives. While providing a historic snapshot on the war of Troy, in this article, the authors have reviewed the musculoskeletal injuries and their management in those ancient times. Despite the long period in between, unfortunately, physicians/surgeons are still faced with war injuries in current medical practice. The authors strongly hope that, at least in the near future, physicians will be left with only natural health problems and without those artificially generated by human beings. PMID:24406735

  17. Musculoskeletal evaluation in severe haemophilia A patients from Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Ozelo, M C; Villaça, P R; Pérez-Bianco, R; Candela, M; Garcia-Chavez, J; Moreno-Rodriguez, B; Rodrigues, M B; Rodriguez-Grecco, I; Solano, M H; Chumpitaz, G; Morales-Gana, M M; Ruiz-Sáez, A

    2013-01-01

    Summary There is a paucity of literature on haemophilia treatment in Latin American countries, a region characterized by rapidly improving systems of care, but with substantial disparities in treatment between countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal status of haemophilia patients from Latin America and to examine the relationship between musculoskeletal status and treatment practices across countries. The Committee of Latin America on the Therapeutics of Inhibitor Groups conducted a survey of its member country representatives on key aspects of haemophilia treatment in 10 countries. Musculoskeletal status of patients was obtained during routine comprehensive evaluations between March 2009 and March 2011. Eligible patients had severe haemophilia A (factor VIII <1%) without inhibitors (<0.6 BU mL−1) and were ≥5 years of age. Musculoskeletal status was compared between three groups of countries, based primarily on differences in the availability of long-term prophylaxis. Overall, 143 patients (5–66 years of age) were enrolled from nine countries. In countries where long-term prophylaxis had been available for at least 10 years (Group A), patients aged 5–10 years had significantly better mean World Federation of Hemophilia clinical scores, fewer target joints and fewer affected joints than patients from countries where long-term prophylaxis has been available for about 5 years (Group B) or was not available (Group C). In Latin America, the musculoskeletal status of patients with severe haemophilia without inhibitors has improved significantly in association with the provision of long-term prophylaxis. As more countries in Latin America institute this practice, further improvements are anticipated. PMID:24354487

  18. Role of yoga and physical activity in work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dentists

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Suneetha; Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal pain is one of the occupational hazards in dentists. Aims: To find the prevalence and severity of musculoskeletal pain in dentists, to compare musculoskeletal pain among dentists practicing yoga, those practicing physical activities, and those without any physical activity, and also to know the effects of sex, age, and workload on musculoskeletal pain. Materials and Methods: A self-reporting work-related questionnaire and the Nordic questionnaire for analysis of musculoskeletal disorders were given to graduated dentists attending Indian dental conference in Mumbai, to know the musculoskeletal pain experienced in the last 12 months and feedback was obtained from 220 dentists. Results: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in dentists was 34.5%. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was 10.5%, 21.7%, and 45.6% in dentists with regular yoga practice, other physical activity, and no physical activity, respectively. There was statistically significant difference in the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among dentists who were practicing yoga when compared with those in no regular activity group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, there was significant role of physical activity on the quality and quantity of work-related musculoskeletal disorders experienced by dentists. Yoga was found to be more effective than other modes of physical activities. More research is needed on musculoskeletal problems in dentists, with an emphasis on larger sample sizes and correlating other factors like age and sex of the dentists, duration of practice, years of practicing yoga, and working hours per week. PMID:26236679

  19. Polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor co-chaperone FKBP5 predict persistent musculoskeletal pain after traumatic stress exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bortsov, Andrey V.; Smith, Jennifer E.; Diatchenko, Luda; Soward, April C.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Rossi, Catherine; Swor, Robert A.; Hauda, William E.; Peak, David A.; Jones, Jeffrey S.; Holbrook, Debra; Rathlev, Niels K.; Foley, Kelly A.; Lee, David C.; Collette, Renee; Domeier, Robert M.; Hendry, Phyllis L.; McLean, Samuel A.

    2013-01-01

    Individual vulnerability factors influencing the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to the risk of the development of persistent musculoskeletal pain after traumatic stress exposure. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between polymorphisms in the gene encoding FK506 binding protein 51, FKBP5, a glucocorticoid receptor co-chaperone, and musculoskeletal pain severity six weeks after two common trauma exposures. The study included data from two prospective emergency department-based cohorts: a discovery cohort (n=949) of European Americans experiencing motor vehicle collision and a replication cohort of adult European American women experiencing sexual assault (n=53). DNA was collected from trauma survivors at the time of initial assessment. Overall pain and neck pain six weeks after trauma exposure were assessed using a 0–10 numeric rating scale. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, six FKBP5 polymorphisms showed significant association (minimum p <0.0001) with both overall and neck pain in the discovery cohort. The association of rs3800373, rs9380526, rs9394314, rs2817032, and rs2817040 with neck pain and/or overall pain six weeks after trauma was replicated in the sexual assault cohort, showing the same direction of the effect in each case. The results of this study indicate that genetic variants in FKBP5 influence the severity of musculoskeletal pain symptoms experienced during the weeks after motor vehicle collision and sexual assault. These results suggest that glucocorticoid pathways influence the development of persistent post-traumatic pain, and that such pathways may be a target of pharmacologic interventions aimed at improving recovery after trauma. PMID:23707272

  20. Usefulness of strain elastography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a widely used technique for assessing the mechanical characteristics of tissues. Although there are several ultrasound elastography techniques, strain elastography (SE) is currently the most widely used technique for visualizing an elastographic map in real time. Among its various indications, SE is especially useful in evaluating the musculoskeletal system. In this article, we review the SE techniques for clinical practice and describe the images produced by these techniques in the context of the musculoskeletal system. SE provides information about tissue stiffness and allows real-time visualization of the image; however, SE cannot completely replace gray-scale, color, or power Doppler ultrasonography. SE can increase diagnostic accuracy and may be useful for the follow-up of benign lesions. PMID:26810195

  1. Exercise Prescriptions to Prevent Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dodda Kiran; Mohan, Sreevalli; Begum, Mohammadi; Prasad, Bhanu; Prasad, Eswar Ravi Vara

    2014-01-01

    Since the number of dental patients is increasing day by day dentists are forced to spend longer times in dental chairs. This is increasing the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. This article reviews the mechanisms causing musculoskeletal disorders among dentists and also covers the exercises that can be done to prevent them. Exercises that increase the fitness of a dentist are divided into aerobic exercises – concentrating on total body fitness, stretching exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that tend to tighten in prolonged dental postures and strengthening exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that are opposite to the tight muscles. These exercises are made simple and of minimal intensity so that a dentist can practice them independently. PMID:25177661

  2. Exercise prescriptions to prevent musculoskeletal disorders in dentists.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dodda Kiran; Rathan, Neelima; Mohan, Sreevalli; Begum, Mohammadi; Prasad, Bhanu; Prasad, Eswar Ravi Vara

    2014-07-01

    Since the number of dental patients is increasing day by day dentists are forced to spend longer times in dental chairs. This is increasing the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. This article reviews the mechanisms causing musculoskeletal disorders among dentists and also covers the exercises that can be done to prevent them. Exercises that increase the fitness of a dentist are divided into aerobic exercises - concentrating on total body fitness, stretching exercises - that concentrate on the muscles that tend to tighten in prolonged dental postures and strengthening exercises - that concentrate on the muscles that are opposite to the tight muscles. These exercises are made simple and of minimal intensity so that a dentist can practice them independently. PMID:25177661

  3. Developmental process of musculoskeletal integration in ostracod antenna.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Tomonari

    2012-03-01

    The functional morphology of arthropod appendages shows remarkable diversity. Plausible functional integrations, particularly between muscles and the exoskeleton, must be achieved in these diverse morphologies. This study provides an insight into the evolutionary pathway of diversified appendages from a functional point of view. The musculoskeletal structure and development of antennae in five species of Cypridocopina were compared. The muscle and skeletal systems are integrated in several ways: The integration in Propontocypris attenuata occurs during various stages of the molting growth, whereas that in Fabaeformiscandona breuili occurs during the myogenesis. These two types of developmental processes have notable similarities, despite their occurrence during different developmental phases. From the overview of the molecular phylogeny presented by earlier studies, it is suggested that the integrated musculoskeletal system has reappeared repeatedly in cypridoid lineages as an atavism. This study demonstrates how arthropod appendages evolve without losing the integrity of the functional whole. PMID:22305643

  4. Prevalence of minor musculoskeletal anomalies in children with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    El Kholy, Mohamed; Fahmi, Marwa E; Nassar, Ayman E; Selim, Samia; Elsedfy, Heba H

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade a high frequency of extrathyroidal congenital anomalies has been reported in infants with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) detected by neonatal screening. In the present study the occurrence of additional congenital malformations (CM) in a cohort of children with confirmed primary CH due to thyroid dysgenesis was investigated. A high prevalence of extrathyroidal major congenital anomalies (15.9%), more than 5-fold higher than that reported in the Egyptian population (2.7%), was found. The cardiac and musculoskeletal systems were the most commonly involved, comprising 9.09 and 47.72% of all anomalies, respectively. The high prevalence of musculoskeletal anomalies in this study was mostly due to minor anomalies as brachydactyly and digitalization of thumbs. The type of dysgenesis (i.e. aplastic, ectopic or hypoplastic) as well as the severity of hypothyroidism, as assessed by TSH and T(4) levels at diagnosis, had no relation with the occurrence of extrathyroidal abnormalities. PMID:17587855

  5. Origin of a Musculoskeletal Guideline: Caring for Older Workers.

    PubMed

    Delloiacono, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    Today's employers are hiring a more age-diverse workforce. As Americans work longer, age-related changes often create activity limitations. Musculoskeletal disorders affect many older workers heightening their risk of workplace injury. Compounded by multiple comorbidities, older workers will need occupational health nurses with expert knowledge to maintain safe and productive workplaces. Older workers do not experience as many injuries as younger workers, but when they are injured, recovery is longer. The author developed and conducted a survey of New Jersey occupational health nurses. The results showed that overexertion injuries are the most frequently treated injuries in employee health offices. For occupational health nurses to keep employees safe, best practices must be delineated; this musculoskeletal safety guideline provides recommendations for evidence-based care of older workers. PMID:27154746

  6. Musculoskeletal Sepsis Associated with Deep Vein Thrombosis in a Child.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Ying; Lee, Yu-Sheng; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Soong, Wen-Jue

    2016-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a rare disease in pediatric patients. We report a pediatric patient who developed DVT in association with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia complicated with septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and myositis extensively. It is crucial to consider musculoskeletal infection associated with DVT in any child who presents with severe swollen limbs and limitations of motion. Prompt antibiotic and anticoagulant treatments should be initiated to reduce the risk of fatal complications. PMID:24279976

  7. Musculoskeletal Modeling Component of the NASA Digital Astronaut Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, B. E.; Pennline, J. A.; Stalker, A. R.; Mulugeta, L.; Myers, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Digital Astronaut Project s (DAP) objective is to provide computational tools that support research of the physiological response to low gravity environments and analyses of how changes cause health and safety risks to the astronauts and to the success of the mission. The spaceflight risk associated with muscle atrophy is impaired performance due to reduced muscle mass, strength and endurance. Risks of early onset of osteoporosis and bone fracture are among the spaceflight risks associated with loss of bone mineral density. METHODS: Tools under development include a neuromuscular model, a biomechanical model and a bone remodeling model. The neuromuscular model will include models of neuromuscular drive, muscle atrophy, fiber morphology and metabolic processes as a function of time in space. Human movement will be modeled with the biomechanical model, using muscle and bone model parameters at various states. The bone remodeling model will allow analysis of bone turnover, loss and adaptation. A comprehensive trade study was completed to identify the current state of the art in musculoskeletal modeling. The DAP musculoskeletal models will be developed using a combination of existing commercial software and academic research codes identified in the study, which will be modified for use in human spaceflight research. These individual models are highly dependent upon each other and will be integrated together once they reach sufficient levels of maturity. ANALYSES: The analyses performed with these models will include comparison of different countermeasure exercises for optimizing effectiveness and comparison of task requirements and the state of strength and endurance of a crew member at a particular time in a mission. DISCUSSION: The DAP musculoskeletal model has the potential to complement research conducted on spaceflight induced changes to the musculoskeletal system. It can help with hypothesis formation, identification of causative mechanisms and

  8. Use of Traditional Korean Medicine by Patients with Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo-Ram; Choi, In Young; Kim, Kwang-Jum; Kwon, Young Dae

    2013-01-01

    Background South Korea has maintained a dual healthcare delivery system that incorporates both traditional Korean and Western medicine. In this research, we identified the determinants of the frequency of using traditional Korean medicine among musculoskeletal patients, who are known to be the most frequent users of complementary and alternative medicine. Methods In this research, we reviewed 2 consecutive years of nationally representative survey data from the 2008 and 2009 Korea Health Panel Survey. We analyzed the utilization of outpatient services by musculoskeletal patients within 12 months of the 2009 survey date. A two-part model was used because some patients did not use traditional Korean medicine and skewness was present in the data on traditional Korean medicine use. In the first part, logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the use of traditional Korean medicine. In the second part, multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze the frequency of traditional Korean medicine usage among the subjects who visited traditional Korean medical institutions. Results The frequency of traditional Korean medicine usage was positively associated with ages of 40–49 years and over 60, restrictions on daily life, a greater number of chronic diseases, not being hospitalized, and more frequent visits (more than five times) to conventional hospitals or clinics for musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusions The important determinants of the frequency of traditional Korean medicine usage were age, activity restrictions, the number of chronic diseases, hospitalization history, and the number of visits to conventional hospitals for musculoskeletal disorders. The results contribute to our understanding of the characteristics of traditional Korean medicine users and may be used as a basic resource for related policymaking by government officials and medical professionals. PMID:23658811

  9. Musculoskeletal trauma in four-wheeled all-terrain vehicles.

    PubMed

    Rios-Reboyras, Luis A; Grovis, Jorge E; Ramirez, Norman; Zierenberg, Charles; Otero, Antonio; Vilella, Fernando E

    2002-10-01

    A longitudinal study of four-wheeled all-terrain vehicle-related musculoskeletal injuries requiring orthopedic surgery was performed. Avoidable risk factors such as alcohol intake, lack of helmets, inexperience, and excess speed were identified. This study also shows that the quantity, severity, cost, and frequency of preventable accidents while riding continue to be the same as prior to a Consent Decrees issued by the Consumer Products Safety Commission > 10 years ago. PMID:12401015

  10. Etodolac: analgesic effects in musculoskeletal and postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Pena, M

    1990-01-01

    Numerous clinical trials have shown etodolac to be an effective analgesic. The purpose of the present report is to review results of 14 studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of etodolac in a variety of painful conditions. Presented are the results of four postsurgical pain studies, one study of acute gouty arthritis and nine studies of acute musculoskeletal disorders: acute low back pain, acute painful shoulder, tendinitis and bursitis, and acute sports injuries. A single oral dose of etodolac (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg) was compared with aspirin (650 mg) or a combination of acetaminophen (600 mg) plus codeine (60 mg) for the relief of pain up to 12 h following oral, urogenital or orthopedic surgery. In multiple dose studies of acute gouty arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions, etodolac 200 or 300 mg twice a day (b.i.d.) or 200 mg three times a day (t.i.d.) was compared with naproxen 500 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., diclofenac 50 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., and piroxicam 20 or 40 mg once a day (o.d.) administered over 5 to 14 days. The efficacy of etodolac was at least equal and in some ways superior to aspirin and acetaminophen plus codeine in the relief of postsurgical pain. In studies of acute gouty arthritis, significant improvement from baseline were seen for all efficacy parameters evaluated for both the etodolac- and naproxen-treated patients. All the present studies of musculoskeletal conditions have shown etodolac to be effective and comparable in analgesic efficacy to naproxen, diclofenac or piroxicam. In summary, etodolac therapy for pain following surgery, in acute gouty arthritis and in acute musculoskeletal conditions resulted in analgesia comparable to that provided by several well-established analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:2150571

  11. [Deleterious effects of smoking on the musculoskeletal system].

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B; Ozturk, M; El-Achachi, S; Menetrey, J

    2014-07-16

    Tobacco smoking has important negative effects on the musculoskeletal system: decrease of bone mineral density, increase of the risk of injury, illness, and perioperative complications such as fracture-healing complications and wound complications. Orthopaedic surgeons should inform all patients of the increased risks associated with active smoking in the perioperative period and should encourage them to quit smoking four to eight weeks in advance of the proposed procedure. PMID:25141568

  12. Musculoskeletal Pain Disorders among Secondary School Saudi Female Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Magdy A.; Al-Zuhair, Shatha Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study was conducted to estimate prevalence and pattern of musculoskeletal pain disorders among secondary school Saudi female teachers in Al-Khobar area and the psychodemographic and psychosocial factors that may affect them. Material and Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted using sample of secondary schools teachers (governmental and private school) in Al-Khobar area, Saudi Arabia (KSA). Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. Result. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain disorders was 79.17%. Main sites of pain were lower back (63.8%) followed by shoulder (45.4%), neck (42.1%), leg (40.0%), wrist (16.2%), and elbow joint (10.0%). Factors that showed significant relationship were type of school (p value 0.038), age (p value 0.002), weight (p value 0.007), number of children (p value 0.006), shoe type (p value 0.000), teaching years (p value 0.003), and working daily hours (p value 0.027). Conclusion. Secondary school female teachers showed high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain disorders in most anatomic sites, namely, the back, shoulder, neck, legs, wrist, and elbow joint. Risk factors associated with significant pain were type of school, age, weight, number of children, and number of teaching years. PMID:23970968

  13. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging for characterizing musculoskeletal lesions.

    PubMed

    Subhawong, Ty K; Jacobs, Michael A; Fayad, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging is a functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique that can readily be incorporated into a routine non-contrast material-enhanced MR imaging protocol with little additional scanning time. DW imaging is based on changes in the Brownian motion of water molecules caused by tissue microstructure. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is a quantitative measure of Brownian movement: Low ADC values typically reflect highly cellular microenvironments in which diffusion is restricted by the presence of cell membranes, whereas acellular regions allow free diffusion and result in elevated ADC values. Thus, with ADC mapping, one may derive useful quantitative information regarding the cellularity of a musculoskeletal lesion using a nonenhanced technique. The role of localized DW imaging in differentiating malignant from benign osseous and soft-tissue lesions is still evolving; when carefully applied, however, this modality has proved helpful in a subset of tumor types, such as nonmyxoid soft-tissue tumors. Studies of the use of DW imaging in assessing the treatment response of both osseous and soft-tissue tumors have shown that higher ADC values correlate with better response to cytotoxic therapy. Successful application of DW imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal lesions requires familiarity with potential diagnostic pitfalls that stem from technical artifacts and confounding factors unrelated to lesion cellularity. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the impact of DW imaging-ADC mapping on management and outcome in patients with musculoskeletal lesions. PMID:25208274

  14. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D's central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported. PMID:27258303

  15. Association between shift working and musculoskeletal symptoms among nursing personnel

    PubMed Central

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Raeisi, Saeed; Namvar, Mohamad; Golabadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some health problems are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. Musculoskeletal disorders are considered as one of the most common health-related problems that can cause disability among health care workers. The aim of this study was to assess the associations between shift working and the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms (MSs) among nursing personnel. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted among 454 health care workers including nurses and nurses’ aides in a general hospital in Iran. A Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to evaluate the prevalence of MSs. Logistic regression analysis with adjusting for confounding factors was performed to evaluate the associations between shift working and the prevalence of MSs. Results: Lower back, knees, and upper back symptoms with the prevalence of 57.4%, 48.4%, and 47%, respectively, were the most common MSs. The prevalence of MSs in eight regions of the body (lower back, neck, knees, upper back, shoulder, wrist, buttock, and ankle) was higher among shift workers than day workers. The differences were statistically significant only in the lower back and ankle regions (P < 0.05). Odds Ratio for lower back symptoms in shift workers was 1.94 compared to day workers (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Findings of this study suggested that shift working could be associated with increased prevalence of lower back disorders among nursing personnel. This study emphasizes on the importance of proper work planning and regulating working hours for nursing personnel. PMID:24949072

  16. Musculoskeletal training for orthopaedists and nonorthopaedists: experiences in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Banskota, Ashok K

    2008-10-01

    Orthopaedic surgical training in Nepal began in 1998, and four major centers now produce between 15 and 20 graduates annually. The duration of the training is four years in one center and three years in the remaining centers. Trainees have adequate trauma exposure. The major challenges include: tailoring training to suit local needs, avoiding the dangers of market driven orthopaedic surgery, adequately emphasizing and implementing time honored methods of closed fracture treatment, and ensuring uniformity of exposure to the various musculoskeletal problems. Training in research methods needs to be implemented more effectively. The evaluation process needs to be more uniform and all training programs need to complement one another and avoid unhealthy competition. Training for nonorthopaedists providing musculoskeletal care is virtually nonexistent in Nepal. Medical graduates have scant exposure to trauma and musculoskeletal diseases during their training. General surgeons provide the majority of trauma care and in the rural areas, health assistants, auxiliary health workers and physiotherapy assistants provide much needed basic services, but all lack formal training. Traditional "bone setters" in Nepal often cater to certain faithful clientele with sprains, minor fractures etc. A large vacuum exists in Nepal for trained nonorthopaedists leading to deficiencies in prehospital care, safe transport and basic, primary emergency care. The great challenges are yet to be addressed. PMID:18626724

  17. Musculoskeletal injuries and pain in dancers: a systematic review update.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Craig L; Hincapié, Cesar A; Cassidy, J David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assemble and synthesize the best available literature from 2004 to 2008 on musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. MEDLINE and CINAHL were the primary sources of data. Indexed terms such as dance, dancer, dancing, athletic injuries, occupational injuries, sprains and strains, musculoskeletal diseases, bone density, menstruation disturbances, and eating disorders were used to search the databases. Citations were screened for relevance using a priori criteria, and relevant studies were critically reviewed for scientific merit by the best-evidence synthesis method. After screening, 19 articles were found to be scientifically admissible. Data from accepted studies were abstracted into evidence tables relating to: prevalence and associated factors; incidence and risk factors; intervention; and injury characteristics and prognosis of musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. Principal findings included: a high prevalence and incidence of lower extremity, hip and back injuries; preliminary evidence that psychosocial and psychological issues such as stress and coping strategies affect injury frequency and duration; history of a previous lateral ankle sprain is associated with an increased risk of ankle sprain in the contralateral ankle in dance students; fatigue may play a role in ACL injury in dancers; acute hamstring strains in dancers affect tendon more than muscle tissue, often resulting in prolonged absence from dance. It is concluded that, while there are positive developments in the literature on the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of MSK injuries and pain in dancers, much room for improvement remains. Suggestions for future research are offered. PMID:22687721

  18. Musculoskeletal Hydatid Cysts Resembling Tumors: A Report of Five Cases.

    PubMed

    Toğral, Güray; Arıkan, Şefik M; Ekiz, Timur; Kekeç, Ahmet F; Ekşioğlu, Mehmet F

    2016-05-01

    Although challenges in treatment of musculoskeletal hydatid cysts (HC) lesions have been documented, data regarding the musculoskeletal HC lesions resembling tumor is scarce. This paper presented 5 patients (3 males, 2 females) with a mean age of 41.6 years with tumor-like lesions of HC. Three of them had left ilium and acetabulum involvement, one involved left femur, and one involved left thigh muscle compartments. Pain was the main symptom and was seen in all patients. Clinical examination, radiologic evaluation, and histologic analysis were performed for diagnosis. Patients were treated through different surgical options, including simple debridement, bone cement filling with or without internal fixation, hip arthrodesis, reconstruction using hemipelvic replantation with femoral prosthesis and distal femur endoprosthetic replacement. After surgery, the operation region was washed by 20% hypertonic saline, and debridement was performed carefully without contamination. All patients received albendazole treatment. Cases were followed up 1 to 9 years for the recurrence. Walking difficulty and pain were the main symptoms during the follow-up. One patient was symptom-free. A reoccurrence in the perioperative soft tissue was detected in only one patient and control visits with antihelmintic treatment were recommended. We would like to emphasize that HC should be kept in mind for the differential diagnosis of the cystic or tumoral lesions of the musculoskeletal system, particularly in the endemic regions. Prompt diagnosis is of paramount importance for preventing destruction and complications. PMID:27384735

  19. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D’s central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported. PMID:27258303

  20. Musculoskeletal adaptations to weightlessness and development of effective countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; White, T. P.; Arnaud, S. B.; Edgerton, V. R.; Kraemer, W. J.; Kram, R.; Raab-Cullen, D.; Snow, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    A Research Roundtable, organized by the American College of Sports Medicine with sponsorship from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, met in November 1995 to define research strategies for effective exercise countermeasures to weightlessness. Exercise was considered both independently of, and in conjunction with, other therapeutic modalities (e.g., pharmacological nutritional, hormonal, and growth-related factors) that could prevent or minimize the structural and functional deficits involving skeletal muscle and bone in response to chronic exposure to weightlessness, as well as return to Earth baseline function if a degree of loss is inevitable. Musculoskeletal deficits and countermeasures are described with respect to: 1) muscle and connective tissue atrophy and localized bone loss, 2) reductions in motor performance, 3) potential proneness to injury of hard and soft tissues, and 4) probable interaction between muscle atrophy and cardiovascular alterations that contribute to the postural hypotension observed immediately upon return from space flight. In spite of a variety of countermeasure protocols utilized previously involving largely endurance types of exercise, there is presently no activity-specific countermeasure(s) that adequately prevent or reduce musculoskeletal deficiencies. It seems apparent that countermeasure exercises that have a greater resistance element, as compared to endurance activities, may prove beneficial to the musculoskeletal system. Many questions remain for scientific investigation to identify efficacious countermeasure protocols, which will be imperative with the emerging era of long-term space flight.

  1. Biodiversity Prospecting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittenfeld, Ana; Lovejoy, Annie

    1994-01-01

    Examines the use of biodiversity prospecting as a method for tropical countries to value biodiversity and contribute to conservation upkeep costs. Discusses the first agreement between a public interest organization and pharmaceutical company for the extraction of plant and animal materials in Costa Rica. (LZ)

  2. Residency and Beyond: Subspecialization Trends Among Graduating Physiatry Residents and the Musculoskeletal Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aaron Jay; Brakke, Rachel A; Boimbo, Sandra; Sauerwein, Kelly; Coronado, Rogelio A; Schumacher, Alexandra

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies and informal surveys have demonstrated a trend among graduating physiatry residents who desired to practice in an outpatient musculoskeletal (MSK)- or spine-type setting. However, there has been no updated information on the current trend among graduating residents as well as sparse information on gauging if current trainees feel prepared on graduation to treat patients with such disorders. This article describes a prospective survey of graduating chief residents during the 2013-2014 academic year in which 72% of chief residents planned to pursue a fellowship. A total of 54% of those chief residents planned to pursue a pain, sports, or spine fellowship. Seventy-five percent of the responding chief residents reported that most of the residents in their program felt that the current amount of required rotations in MSK, sports, spine, or pain medicine was adequate and 85% felt comfortable practicing in a noninterventional spine or MSK position after graduation without a fellowship. The results of this survey provide an updated perspective on the current trends among graduating residents as well as how residents perceive their MSK curriculum. These results may prove useful when evaluating MSK curriculums and shaping resident education to maximize career goals. PMID:26259054

  3. The musculoskeletal diagnosis cohort: examining pain and pain care among veterans.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Joseph L; Kerns, Robert D; Bair, Matthew; Becker, William C; Brennan, Penny; Burgess, Diana J; Carroll, Constance M; Dobscha, Steven; Driscoll, Mary A; Fenton, Brenda T; Fraenkel, Liana; Haskell, Sally G; Heapy, Alicia A; Higgins, Diana M; Hoff, Rani A; Hwang, Ula; Justice, Amy C; Piette, John D; Sinnott, Patsi; Wandner, Laura; Womack, Julie A; Brandt, Cynthia A

    2016-08-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are highly prevalent, painful, and costly disorders. The MSD Cohort was created to characterize variation in pain, comorbidities, treatment, and outcomes among patients with MSD receiving Veterans Health Administration care across demographic groups, geographic regions, and facilities. We searched electronic health records to identify patients treated in Veterans Health Administration who had ICD-9-CM codes for diagnoses including, but not limited to, joint, back, and neck disorders, and osteoarthritis. Cohort inclusion criteria were 2 or more outpatient visits occurring within 18 months of one another or one inpatient visit with an MSD diagnosis between 2000 and 2011. The first diagnosis is the index date. Pain intensity numeric rating scale (NRS) scores, comorbid medical and mental health diagnoses, pain-related treatments, and other characteristics were collected retrospectively and prospectively. The cohort included 5,237,763 patients; their mean age was 59, 6% were women, 15% identified as black, and 18% reported severe pain (NRS ≥ 7) on the index date. Nontraumatic joint disorder (27%), back disorder (25%), and osteoarthritis (21%) were the most common MSD diagnoses. Patients entering the cohort in recent years had more concurrent MSD diagnoses and higher NRS scores. The MSD Cohort is a rich resource for collaborative pain-relevant health service research. PMID:27023420

  4. Musculoskeletal pain among women of menopausal age in Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Goode-Null, Susan K

    2005-06-01

    Worldwide, complaints of musculoskeletal pain are more frequent than complaints of hot flashes amongst women of menopausal age. The purpose of this study was to examine musculoskeletal pain among women of menopausal age in the city of Puebla, Mexico. An opportunity sample was recruited from public parks and markets, with representation from all social classes (n=755). Mean age was 50.1 years, and the majority were employed as saleswomen in small businesses. Symptom frequencies were collected by open-ended interviews and with a structured symptom list that queried symptom experience during the two weeks prior to interview. In response to open-ended questions, "dolores de huesos" (bone pain) was volunteered by 47% of respondents as a symptom associated with menopause, second only to hot flashes (53%). From the structured symptom list, 55.8% and 55.6% reported back pain and joint stiffness during the two weeks prior to interview. Women with back pain and joint stiffness were less likely to report being active during their leisure time (p<.01). The results of backwards stepwise logistic regressions indicate that women with back pain were more likely to be older, with less education, a higher BMI, and ate less meat. Women with joint pain were more likely to be post-menopausal, with less education, more children, a higher BMI, and were likely to drink milk and coffee more than once/week but less than once/day. While menopause is not necessarily a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain, it is important to recognize the pervasiveness of this complaint among women of menopausal age. PMID:16917748

  5. Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Drivers of All-Terrain Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    REHN, B.; BERGDAHL, I. A.; AHLGREN, C.; FROM, C.; JÄRVHOLM, B.; LUNDSTRÖM, R.; NILSSON, T.; SUNDELIN, G.

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to characterize the risk of experiencing musculoskeletal symptoms in the region of the neck, shoulders and upper and lower back for professional drivers of various categories of all-terrain vehicles and to assess the association between symptoms and duration of exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock from driving all-terrain vehicles. The study group consisted of 215 drivers of forest machines, 137 drivers of snowmobiles and 79 drivers of snowgroomers and a control group of 167 men randomly selected from the general population. The subjects were all from one of the four most northern counties in Sweden and they were all men. Musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed by use of a standardized questionnaire. In addition, the questionnaire held items about the driving time with all-terrain vehicles and a subjective estimation of exposure to unpleasant movements (shock, jolt, irregular sway). The job strain was measured according to Karasek's demands/control model. The prevalence ratios were adjusted for age, smoking and job strain. Among drivers, significantly increased prevalence ratios within the range of 1∂5-2·9 were revealed for symptoms from the neck-shoulder and thoracic regions during the previous year. None of the driver categories had a statistically significantly increased risk of low back pain. Forest vehicles were those most reported to cause unpleasant movements. In conclusion, drivers of all-terrain vehicles exhibit an increased risk of symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck-shoulder and thoracic regions. The increased risk is suggested to be related to physical factors such as exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock, static overload or extreme body postures. However, since symptoms of low back pain were not significantly increased, it appears that factors other than WBV would explain the occurrence of symptoms in the group of all-terrain drivers.

  6. Musculoskeletal Disease in Aged Horses and Its Management.

    PubMed

    van Weeren, Paul René; Back, Willem

    2016-08-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are the most prevalent health problem in aging horses. They are not life threatening, but are painful and an important welfare issue. Chronic joint disease (osteoarthritis) and chronic laminitis are the most prevalent. Treating osteoarthritis in the elderly horse is similar to treating performance horses, but aims at providing a stable situation with optimal comfort. Immediate medical treatment of flare-ups, long-term pain management, and adaptation of exercise and living conditions are the mainstays of treatment. Laminitis in the geriatric horse is related often to pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, which may be treated with additional pergolide. PMID:27449390

  7. Musculoskeletal disorders. When are they caused by hormone imbalance?

    PubMed

    Brick, J E; Brick, J F; Elnicki, D M

    1991-11-01

    Often, the source of a musculoskeletal problem can be traced to an endocrine disorder. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome is not uncommon in patients who are pregnant or have diabetes, hypothyroidism, or acromegaly. Joint problems and arthritis are other common findings in diabetes, pregnancy, and hyperparathyroidism. Muscle weakness or stiffness is seen in both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, and muscle wasting is a characteristic of adrenocorticoid insufficiency. Bone disorders are common with glucocorticoid excess, acromegaly, and hyperparathyroidism. Some presentations are a classic picture of a specific endocrine condition and are readily recognized if the index of suspicion is appropriately high. PMID:1946104

  8. Surgical Management of Orthopedic and Musculoskeletal Diseases of Feedlot Calves.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David E; Miesner, Matt D

    2015-11-01

    Injuries, infections, and disorders of the musculoskeletal system are common in feedlot calves. These conditions often are amenable to surgical treatment with return of the calf to productivity. Weight gain and carcass quality are expected to be significantly adversely affected by pain and debilitation. The goal of surgical management of disorders of the joints, muscles, and feet should be resolution of the inciting cause, mitigation of pain, and restoration of form and function. If these are achieved, calves should return to acceptable, if not normal, feed intake, rate of gain, and carcass quality. PMID:26210767

  9. Economic impact of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) on work in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the leading cause of work disability, sickness absence from work, 'presenteeism' and loss of productivity across all the European Union (EU) member states. It is estimated that the total cost of lost productivity attributable to MSDs among people of working age in the EU could be as high as 2% of gross domestic product (GDP). This paper examines the available evidence on the economic burden of MSDs on work across Europe and highlights areas of policy, clinical and employment practice which might improve work outcomes for individuals and families and reduce the economic and social costs of MSDs. PMID:26612235

  10. Developing ergonomic solutions for prevention of musculoskeletal disorder disability.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, T J; Franzblau, A; Haig, A; Keyserling, W M; Levine, S; Streilein, K; Ulin, S; Werner, R

    2001-01-01

    Numerous models have been proposed to help understand the relationship between personal and work factors that affect participation in work. The authors use a generic version of these models as a framework for identifying gaps between job demands and worker capacities. They describe metrics for assessing factors associated with causing or aggravating musculoskeletal disorders. Two case examples are presented to illustrate the hierarchical assessment of jobs and the evaluation of gaps between job demands and worker capacities. Finally, the authors describe the development of a job database to facilitate future evaluations. PMID:12530835

  11. How intraoperative navigation is changing musculoskeletal tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Satcher, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) was introduced, developed, and implemented in musculoskeletal tumor surgery recently to enhance surgical precision in resecting malignant and benign tumors. The origins of computer-assisted surgery were in other subspecialties including maxillofacial surgery, spine surgery, and arthroplasty. Early studies have shown that CAOS can also be used safely for bone tumor resection surgery. Additional technological improvements may allow use of CAOS in soft tissue tumor surgery. It has the potential to improve surgical precision and accuracy, but more study is needed to evaluate clinical efficacy and long term results. PMID:24095079

  12. Musculoskeletal Sonopathology and Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Alan J. R.; Sites, Brian D.; Sites, Vincent R.; Naraghi, Ali M.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Singh, Mandeep; Antonakakis, John G.

    2010-01-01

    The use of real-time ultrasound guidance has revolutionized the practice of regional anesthesia. Ultrasound is rapidly becoming the technique of choice for nerve blockade due to increased success rates, faster onset, and potentially improved safety. In the course of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, unexpected pathology may be encountered. Such anomalous or pathological findings may alter the choice of nerve block and occasionally affect surgical management. This case series presents a variety of musculoskeletal conditions that may be encountered during ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia practice. PMID:22294960

  13. Musculoskeletal Changes, Injuries and Rehabilitation Associated with Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    The in-flight musculoskeletal database provides the foundation for directing operationally-relevant research in space medicine. This effort will enable medical operations to develop medical kits, training programs, and preventive medicine strategies for future CxP missions: a) Quantify medications and medical supplies for next-generation spacecraft. b) Objective data for engineers to determine weight requirements. Flight surgeons can make specific recommendations to astronauts based on injury data, such as emphasizing hand protection while in-flight. EVA and spacecraft engineers can examine evidence-based data on injuries and design countermeasures to help prevent them.

  14. Musculoskeletal adaptation to mechanical forces on Earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A major concern of the US and Russian space programs is the health and safety of astronauts and cosmonauts. One of the areas receiving the most attention has been the effects of long duration space flight on the musculoskeletel system. After three decades of space flight and research, questions continue. Can exercise in space maintain musculoskeletal tissue mass and function in an adult? The objective of this paper is to address this question in a way that hopefully provides a rational basis for quantifying and evaluating the influnence of daily activities on muscle and bone on Earth and in space.

  15. Managing Minor Musculoskeletal Injuries and Conditions Bradley David Managing Minor Musculoskeletal Injuries and Conditions 394pp £32.99 Wiley Blackwell Publishing 9780470673102 0470673109 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    IT WAS a great pleasure to review this book, which is a comprehensive collection of musculoskeletal minor injuries and conditions that are seen on a daily basis in emergency departments throughout the UK and Ireland. PMID:25466742

  16. Musculoskeletal adverse drug reactions: a review of literature and data from ADR spontaneous reporting databases.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Anita; Chiamulera, Christian; Moretti, Ugo; Colcera, Sonia; Fumagalli, Guido; Leone, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be a target organ for adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Drug-induced muscle, bone or connective tissue injuries may be due to, i), primary direct drug action, or, ii), undirected consequence of generalized drug-induced disease. Musculoskeletal ADRs may be only temporarily disabling, such as muscle cramps, as well as in other cases may be serious and life-threatening, such as rhabdomyolysis. In the last few years there has been an increasing awareness of musculoskeletal ADRs. Some recent drug safety issues dealt with serious or uncommon musculoskeletal reactions like rhabdomyolysis associated to statins and tendon rupture associated to fluoroquinolones. In this review, we firstly selected those drug classes having a significantly high percentage of musculoskeletal disorder reports in the WHO adverse drug reaction database, maintained by the Uppsala Monitoring Centre. Secondly, the different musculoskeletal ADRs were closely analyzed through the data obtained from an Italian interregional ADRs spontaneous reporting database. The findings on drugs associated to different musculoskeletal disorders, have been integrated with a review of the epidemiological data available in the literature. For the most involved drugs (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones, corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, retinoids) the underlying musculoskeletal ADR mechanisms were also reviewed and discussed. PMID:18690950

  17. Assessment of musculoskeletal and other health complaints in female hospital staff.

    PubMed

    Bru, E; Mykletun, R J; Svebak, S

    1994-04-01

    Musculoskeletal and other health complaints were investigated in a sample of 586 female hospital staff. Health complaints, including musculoskeletal pain, were assessed by the Ursin Health Inventory (UHI). Factor analyses of the UHI favoured a seven-factor solution in which musculoskeletal pain emerged as an independent factor of complaints. Other complaint factors could be labelled lower digestive, upper digestive, cardiorespiratory, allergy, cold/influenza and headache. Factor analyses of the extended version of the Nordic Questionnaire (NQ-EV), which focuses specifically on musculoskeletal pain from nine body areas, favoured a three-factor solution in which complaints from the upper back, low back and extremities emerged as the independent factors. Product-moment coefficients of correlation between factor-based sum scores in the two survey measures stated that the UHI factor 'musculoskeletal pain' and the NQ-EV factor 'upper back' were significantly correlated. This indicated an orientation of the UHI 'musculoskeletal pain' factor to pain in the upper part of the back. Only very moderate coefficients of correlation emerged between the NQ-EV factor scores and the remaining UHI scores. The results support the assumption that musculoskeletal complaints are not closely related to other types of health complaints, and that musculoskeletal complaints among female hospital staff should be assessed with separate items for upper back (neck/shoulders), low back and the extremities. PMID:15676956

  18. Leclercia adecarboxylata Musculoskeletal Infection in an Immune Competent Pediatric Patient: An Emerging Pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, W. Jeffrey; Funk, Shawn S.; Schoenecker, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Case. An immune competent pediatric patient presented with a persistent lower extremity infection with Leclercia adecarboxylata after a penetrating injury. This case report details the presentation, clinical course, and treatment. Conclusion. Leclercia adecarboxylata has increasing reports in immunosuppressed and adult patients with musculoskeletal infection. This case now indicates that Leclercia adecarboxylata is a potential pathogen in immune competent children in musculoskeletal tissue. PMID:26609458

  19. The Musculoskeletal System. Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This instructional modular unit with instructor's guide provides materials on aspects of one of the major systems of the human body--the musculoskeletal system. Its purpose is to introduce the student to the structures and functions of the human musculoskeletal system--and the interrelationships of the two--and to familiarize the student with some…

  20. Evaluation of the Relationship Between Musculoskeletal Discomforts and Occupational Stressors Among Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Kamran; Hosseini, Alireza; Safarian, Mohammad Hasan; Abedi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stress in nurses may increase the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomforts. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal discomforts and job stress among nurses and to investigate the association between musculoskeletal discomforts and occupational stressors. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 144 nurses in one of the main referral hospitals of Tehran-Iran were randomly selected and studied. Data were collected by HSE job stress questionnaire and The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire through interviews with nurses in their workplace. Results: Most reported musculoskeletal discomforts localized in the neck, back, knee and shoulder and the minimal discomforts were in wrist and elbow. On the other hand, stressors such as demand, changes in workplace, control and responsibilities had significant effect on increasing musculoskeletal discomforts of organs such as neck, shoulders and back (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There was a significant association between stressors such as demand, control, responsibilities and changes in workplace and reported musculoskeletal disorders, especially in neck, shoulders and back. It is suggested to use defined programs for management and control of stressors to control occupational stress in nurses. Moreover, prevention of musculoskeletal discomforts due to their high prevalence in the study population is important. PMID:26258080

  1. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module IX. Musculoskeletal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on the musculoskeletal system is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Five units of study are presented: (1) the major bones, joints, and muscles of the body; (2) patient assessment of a musculoskeletal injury; (3) pathophysiology and management…

  2. 77 FR 61011 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  3. 75 FR 67989 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel. Centers of Research Translation Grant Review....

  4. 78 FR 17679 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Closed Meeting

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    2013-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Clinical Trial Outcome Development. Date: March...

  5. 75 FR 14173 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business Research Funding Opportunities....

  6. 75 FR 63492 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Career Development, Research Training & Pathways...

  7. 77 FR 16246 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-03-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and...

  8. 78 FR 18357 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Loan Repayment Program Review. Date: April...

  9. 78 FR 59945 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIAMS Building Interdisciplinary Research Team...

  10. 77 FR 18253 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trial Review. Date: April 9, 2012. Time: 2...

  11. 75 FR 29770 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Career Development, Research Training & Pathways...

  12. 78 FR 32261 - National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-05-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis And Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  13. 75 FR 63496 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  14. 77 FR 28397 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, P30 Rheumatic Diseases Core Center Review. Date: June...

  15. 78 FR 8549 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  16. 75 FR 6676 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  17. 75 FR 6046 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Clinical Studies. Date: February 16,...

  18. 78 FR 70312 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-11-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Business Innovation Research on...

  19. 76 FR 6807 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  20. 78 FR 66021 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Mentored Career Development, Institutional...

  1. 77 FR 27470 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  2. 77 FR 32651 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Program Project Grant Review. Date: June 13, 2012....

  3. 76 FR 40385 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-07-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Studies to Large Ongoing Clinical...

  4. 77 FR 38847 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Small Grant Research Review (R03). Date: July 18,...

  5. 77 FR 60447 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  6. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Special Emphasis Panel, Small Grants Research Review. Date: October 13,...

  7. 78 FR 64509 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  8. 75 FR 27352 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  9. 77 FR 12605 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  10. 75 FR 1792 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Small Research Grants Review. Date: February 4,...