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Sample records for mutant vaccine strain

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Intermediate Rough Vaccine Strain Brucella abortus S19Δper Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Pallab; Goswami T, Tapas K.; Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Kaur, Gurpreet; Vishnu, Udayakumar S.; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of the intermediate rough vaccine strain mutant, Brucella abortus S19Δper. The length of the draft genome was 3,271,238 bp, with 57.2% G+C content. A total of 3,204 protein-coding genes and 56 RNA genes were predicted. PMID:26564050

  2. Generation and Characterization of an Attenuated Mutant in a Response Regulator Gene of Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS)

    PubMed Central

    Sammons-Jackson, Wendy L.; McClelland, Karen; Manch-Citron, Jean N.; Metzger, Dennis W.; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar; Garcia, Emilio; Rasley, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic bacterium that must exist in diverse environments ranging from arthropod vectors to mammalian hosts. To better understand how virulence genes are regulated in these different environments, a transcriptional response regulator gene (genome locus FTL0552) was deleted in F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS). The FTL0552 deletion mutant exhibited slightly reduced rates of extracellular growth but was unable to replicate or survive in mouse macrophages and was avirulent in the mouse model using either BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice. Mice infected with the FTL0552 mutant produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines, exhibited reduced histopathology, and cleared the bacteria quicker than mice infected with LVS. Mice that survived infection with the FTL0552 mutant were afforded partial protection when challenged with a lethal dose of the virulent SchuS4 strain (4 of 10 survivors, day 21 postinfection) when compared to naive mice (0 of 10 survivors by day 7 postinfection). Microarray experiments indicate that 148 genes are regulated by FTL0552. Most of the genes are downregulated, indicating that FTL0552 controls transcription of genes in a positive manner. Genes regulated by FTL0552 include genes located within the Francisella pathogenicity island that are essential for intracellular survival and virulence of F. tularensis. Further, a mutant in FTL0552 or the comparable locus in SchuS4 (FTT1557c) may be an alternative candidate vaccine for tularemia. PMID:18613792

  3. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Tiffany M.; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 104 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Conclusions/Significance Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis. PMID:26114445

  4. The Brucella abortus phosphoglycerate kinase mutant is highly attenuated and induces protection superior to that of vaccine strain 19 in immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Trant, Cyntia G M C; Lacerda, Thais L S; Carvalho, Natalia B; Azevedo, Vasco; Rosinha, Gracia M S; Salcedo, Suzana P; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2010-05-01

    Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that can function as virulence factors to better understand the host-pathogen interplay. Herein, we identified the gene encoding the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) of B. abortus strain 2308. To test the role of PGK in Brucella pathogenesis, a pgk deletion mutant was constructed. Replacement of the wild-type pgk by recombination was demonstrated by Southern and Western blot analyses. The B. abortus Delta pgk mutant strain exhibited extreme attenuation in bone marrow-derived macrophages and in vivo in BALB/c, C57BL/6, 129/Sv, and interferon regulatory factor-1 knockout (IRF-1 KO) mice. Additionally, at 24 h postinfection the Delta pgk mutant was not found within the same endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment as the wild-type bacteria, but, instead, over 60% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP1. Furthermore, the B. abortus Delta pgk deletion mutant was used as a live vaccine. Challenge experiments revealed that the Delta pgk mutant strain induced protective immunity in 129/Sv or IRF-1 KO mice that was superior to the protection conferred by commercial strain 19 or RB51. Finally, the results shown here demonstrated that Brucella PGK is critical for full bacterial virulence and that a Delta pgk mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies. PMID:20194591

  5. The Brucella abortus Phosphoglycerate Kinase Mutant Is Highly Attenuated and Induces Protection Superior to That of Vaccine Strain 19 in Immunocompromised and Immunocompetent Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Trant, Cyntia G. M. C.; Lacerda, Thais L. S.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Azevedo, Vasco; Rosinha, Gracia M. S.; Salcedo, Suzana P.; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2010-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that can function as virulence factors to better understand the host-pathogen interplay. Herein, we identified the gene encoding the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) of B. abortus strain 2308. To test the role of PGK in Brucella pathogenesis, a pgk deletion mutant was constructed. Replacement of the wild-type pgk by recombination was demonstrated by Southern and Western blot analyses. The B. abortus Δpgk mutant strain exhibited extreme attenuation in bone marrow-derived macrophages and in vivo in BALB/c, C57BL/6, 129/Sv, and interferon regulatory factor-1 knockout (IRF-1 KO) mice. Additionally, at 24 h postinfection the Δpgk mutant was not found within the same endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment as the wild-type bacteria, but, instead, over 60% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP1. Furthermore, the B. abortus Δpgk deletion mutant was used as a live vaccine. Challenge experiments revealed that the Δpgk mutant strain induced protective immunity in 129/Sv or IRF-1 KO mice that was superior to the protection conferred by commercial strain 19 or RB51. Finally, the results shown here demonstrated that Brucella PGK is critical for full bacterial virulence and that a Δpgk mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies. PMID:20194591

  6. Use of a genetically defined double mutant strain of Bordetella bronchiseptica lacking adenylate cyclase and type III secretion as a live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mann, Paul; Goebel, Elizabeth; Barbarich, James; Pilione, Mylisa; Kennett, Mary; Harvill, Eric

    2007-07-01

    While most vaccines consisting of killed bacteria induce high serum antibody titers, they do not always confer protection as effective as that induced by infection, particularly against mucosal pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica is a gram-negative respiratory pathogen that is endemic in many nonhuman mammalian populations and causes substantial disease in a variety of animals. At least 14 different live attenuated vaccines against this pathogen are available for use in a variety of livestock and companion animals. However, there are few published data on the makeup or efficacy of these vaccines. Here we report the use of a genetically engineered double mutant of B. bronchiseptica, which lacks adenylate cyclase and type III secretion, as a vaccine candidate. This strain is safe at high doses, even for highly immunocompromised animals, and induces immune responses that are protective against highly divergent B. bronchiseptica strains, preventing colonization in the lower respiratory tract and decreasing the bacterial burden in the upper respiratory tract. This novel B. bronchiseptica vaccine candidate induces strong local immunity while eliminating damage caused by the two predominant cytotoxic mechanisms. PMID:17452472

  7. Oral immunization with an attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum mutant as a fowl typhoid vaccine with a live adjuvant strain secreting the B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Salmonella Gallinarum (SG) lon/cpxR deletion mutant JOL916 was developed as a live vaccine candidate for fowl typhoid (FT), and a SG mutant secreting an Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), designated JOL1229, was recently constructed as an adjuvant strain for oral vaccination against FT. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective properties of the SG mutant JOL916 and the LTB adjuvant strain JOL1229 in order to establish a prime and boost immunization strategy for each strain. In addition, we compared the increase in body weight, the immunogenicity, the egg production rates, and the bacteriological egg contamination of these strains with those of SG 9R, a widely used commercial vaccine. Results Plasma IgG, intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA), and cell-mediated responses were significantly induced after a boost inoculation with a mixture of JOL916 and JOL1229, and significant reductions in the mortality of chickens challenged with a wild-type SG strain were observed in the immunized groups. There were no significant differences in increases in body weight, cell-mediated immune responses, or systemic IgG responses between our vaccine mixture and the SG 9R vaccine groups. However, there was a significant elevation in intestinal sIgA in chickens immunized with our mixture at 3 weeks post-prime-immunization and at 3 weeks post-boost-immunization, while sIgA levels in SG 9R-immunized chickens were not significantly elevated compared to the control. In addition, the SG strain was not detected in the eggs of chickens immunized with our mixture. Conclusion Our results suggest that immunization with the LTB-adjuvant strain JOL1229 can significantly increase the immune response, and provide efficient protection against FT with no side effects on body weight, egg production, or egg contamination. PMID:23647814

  8. Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a vaccine strain CVD 1204 expressing colonization factor antigen I and mutant heat-labile enterotoxin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, H; Levine, M M; Anderson, R J; Losonsky, G; Pizza, M; Barry, E M

    2000-09-01

    A multivalent live oral vaccine against both Shigella spp. and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is being developed based on the hypothesis that protection can be achieved if attenuated shigellae express ETEC fimbrial colonization factors and genetically detoxified heat-labile toxin from a human ETEC isolate (LTh). Two detoxified derivatives of LTh, LThK63 and LThR72, were engineered by substitution-serine to lysine at residue 63, or lysine to arginine at residue 72. The genes encoding these two derivatives were cloned separately on expression plasmids downstream from the CFA/I operon. Following electroporation into S. flexneri 2a vaccine strain CVD 1204, coexpression of CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, GM(1) binding assays, and agglutination with anti-CFA/I antiserum. Hemagglutination and electron microscopy confirmed surface expression of CFA/I. Guinea pigs immunized intranasally on days 0 and 15 with CVD 1204 expressing CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 exhibited high titers of both serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal secretory IgA anti-CFA/I; 40% of the animals produced antibodies directed against LTh. All immunized guinea pigs also produced mucosal IgA (in tears) and serum IgG anti-S. flexneri 2a O antibodies. Furthermore, all immunized animals were protected from challenge with wild-type S. flexneri 2a. This prototype Shigella-ETEC hybrid vaccine demonstrates the feasibility of expressing multiple ETEC antigens on a single plasmid in an attenuated Shigella vaccine strain and engendering immune responses against both the heterologous antigens and vector strain. PMID:10948101

  9. Newly attenuated Mycobacterium bovis mutants as vaccines against bovine tuberculosis, particularly for possums.

    PubMed

    Collins, D M; Buddle, B M; Kawakami, R P; Hotter, G; Mildenhall, N; Mouat, P; Murney, R; Ataera, H; Price-Carter, M; Bruere, P; Wards, B J; de Lisle, G W

    2011-07-01

    Bovine tuberculosis costs New Zealand more than $80 million per year, mostly because extensive areas of the country are occupied by brushtail possums infected with Mycobacterium bovis. AgResearch has a major programme to produce new live tuberculosis vaccines that can be delivered to possums. Primary work involved development of molecular biological methods to enable genetic manipulation of M. bovis, including the production of random and specific mutants. Many avirulent mutants of M. bovis have been produced and their vaccine efficacy has been compared to BCG in guinea pigs. Selected mutants that perform at least as well as BCG are retested in guinea pigs using an extended vaccination protocol in which animals are pre-sensitized to environmental mycobacteria to mimic natural exposure. Ten candidate vaccines that have induced good protection in guinea pigs have been subsequently tested as vaccines in possums. While the protective efficacy of an M. bovis mutant inoculated into guinea pigs reliably indicated that some protection would be induced in possums, the most protective mutant in guinea pigs was different from that in possums. This illustrates the importance of testing in the target species as part of new vaccine development. An important outcome of this work was the identification of an operon in M. bovis whose inactivation produced an avirulent M. bovis vaccine candidate that was better than BCG in protecting possums from experimental tuberculosis. Allelic exchange methods are now being used to produce vaccine strains with multiple specific mutations to improve safety and immunological characteristics. PMID:21420259

  10. Immuogenicity and safety of a natural rough mutant of Brucella suis as a vaccine for swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and clearance of the natural rough mutant of Brucella suis strain 353-1 (353-1) as a vaccine in domestic swine. In three studies encompassing 155 animals, pigs were inoculated with 353-1 by conjunctival (5 x 10**7 CFU), p...

  11. DeltaznuADeltapurE Brucella abortus 2308 mutant as a live vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W

    2010-01-22

    To create a new, safe brucellosis live vaccine, a double mutant strain was constructed from Brucella abortus 2308. Using the DeltaznuA B. abortus 2308 mutant, a second mutation was introduced by deleting purE gene. The DeltaznuA DeltapurE B. abortus 2308 strain was less capable of surviving in macrophages. When evaluated in vivo, it was cleared within 8 weeks (wks) from mice, causing significantly less inflammation than spleens obtained from wild-type B. abortus 2308-infected mice. Furthermore, two doses of DeltaznuA DeltapurE B. abortus 2308 conferred 0.79 log protection, similar to S19 as did a single dose of DeltaznuA B. abortus 2308. Thus, this study shows the DeltaznuA DeltapurE B. abortus 2308 strain to be a potential livestock vaccine candidate. PMID:19914192

  12. Live Attenuated Borrelia burgdorferi Targeted Mutants in an Infectious Strain Background Protect Mice from Challenge Infection.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Beth L; Padmore, Lavinia J; Ristow, Laura C; Curtis, Michael W; Coburn, Jenifer

    2016-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, B. garinii, and B. afzelii are all agents of Lyme disease in different geographic locations. If left untreated, Lyme disease can cause significant and long-term morbidity, which may continue after appropriate antibiotic therapy has been administered and live bacteria are no longer detectable. The increasing incidence and geographic spread of Lyme disease are renewing interest in the vaccination of at-risk populations. We took the approach of vaccinating mice with two targeted mutant strains of B. burgdorferi that, unlike the parental strain, are avirulent in mice. Mice vaccinated with both strains were protected against a challenge with the parental strain and a heterologous B. burgdorferi strain by either needle inoculation or tick bite. In ticks, the homologous strain was eliminated but the heterologous strain was not, suggesting that the vaccines generated a response to antigens that are produced by the bacteria both early in mammalian infection and in the tick. Partial protection against B. garinii infection was also conferred. Protection was antibody mediated, and reactivity to a variety of proteins was observed. These experiments suggest that live attenuated B. burgdorferi strains may be informative regarding the identification of protective antigens produced by the bacteria and recognized by the mouse immune system in vivo Further work may illuminate new candidates that are effective and safe for the development of Lyme disease vaccines. PMID:27335385

  13. Conjunctival and intramuscular vaccination of pigs with a live avirulent strain of Salmonella cholerae-suis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, T T; Pardon, P; Marly, J; Bernard, S

    1987-07-01

    An avirulent mutant strain of Salmonella cholerae-suis was cloned for resistance to streptomycin and nalidixic acid. The mutant strain 33-13 also was used because of its avirulence and immunogenicity in mice. Weaned pigs were vaccinated with live strain 33-13; 5 pigs were vaccinated by conjunctivally administered 5.5 X 10(7) organisms (low dose), 5 were conjunctivally administered 5.5 X 10(9) organisms (high dose), and 5 pigs were administered 5.5 X 10(9) organisms (high dose) IM. Transient fever and transient fecal shedding of the vaccine strain developed in pigs vaccinated IM, but not in 2 groups of pigs vaccinated conjunctivally. After intratracheal administration of virulent strain 38-9, nonvaccinated control pigs (n = 9) developed persistent high fever, anorexia, bacteremia, diarrhea, and fecal shedding of strain 38-9, whereas vaccinated pigs remained afebrile and clinically normal. Nonvaccinated and uninfected sentinel pigs (n = 8) were kept in units of 2 pigs with each group of experimental pigs, and remained healthy throughout the experiment. Thirteen vaccinated and 7 nonvaccinated control pigs were killed 42 days after vaccination, and 2 vaccinated, 2 nonvaccinated, and 8 sentinel control pigs were killed 58 days after vaccination. Ten organs were evaluated by quantitative bacteriology on necropsy of all pigs for the presence of vaccine strain 33-13, and for virulent strain 38-9. Strain 33-13 was not found. Lung and liver, lesions were found in most of the nonvaccinated control pigs, with a high frequency of recovery of large numbers of strain 38-9 from the mesenteric lymph nodes, lungs, liver, and ileum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3631689

  14. Inactivated pep27 mutant as an effective mucosal vaccine against a secondary lethal pneumococcal challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang-Yoon; Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Briles, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A pep27 mutant may be able to elicit mucosal immunity against pneumococcal diseases, and could be employed as an inexpensive attenuated vaccine. However, this particular mutant contains an erythromycin-resistance marker. The purpose of the current study is to develop a markerless pep27 mutant and assess whether this inactivated mutant is able to induce mucosal immunity. Materials and Methods Mice were vaccinated intranasally with the inactivated markerless pep27 mutant every 2 weeks for a total of three times, after which time serum samples were analyzed for antibody titers. The mice were then challenged with a lethal D39 strain and their survival time was measured. The cross-reactivity of the antisera against pep27 was also compared to other mutant serotypes. Results Intranasal immunization of mice with the inactivated markerless pep27 mutant provides effective protection and rapidly cleared bacterial colonization in vivo. Moreover, antisera raised against the pep27 mutant may cross-react with several other serotype strains. Conclusion Intranasal immunization with the inactivated pep27 mutant may be able to provide mucosal immunity, and could represent an efficient mucosal vaccine. PMID:23596592

  15. Mutant Native Outer Membrane Vesicles Combined with a Serogroup A Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine for Prevention of Meningococcal Epidemics in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Fergus, Andrew M.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) polysaccharide conjugate vaccine used in Sub-Saharan Africa does not prevent disease caused by MenW or MenX strains, which also cause epidemics in the region. We investigated the vaccine-potential of native outer membrane vesicles with over-expressed factor H-binding protein (NOMV-fHbp), which targeted antigens in African meningococcal strains, and was combined with a MenA polysaccharide conjugate vaccine. Methodology/Principal Findings The NOMV-fHbp vaccine was prepared from a mutant African MenW strain with PorA P1.5,2, attenuated endotoxin (ΔLpxL1), deleted capsular genes, and over-expressed fHbp in variant group 1. The NOMV-fHbp was adsorbed with Al(OH)3 and used to reconstitute a lyophilized MenA conjugate vaccine, which normally is reconstituted with liquid MenC, Y and W conjugates in a meningococcal quadrivalent conjugate vaccine (MCV4-CRM, Novartis). Mice immunized with the NOMV-fHbp vaccine alone developed serum bactericidal (human complement) activity against 13 of 15 African MenA strains tested; 10 of 10 African MenX strains, 7 of 7 African MenW strains, and 6 of 6 genetically diverse MenB strains with fHbp variant group 1 (including 1 strain from The Gambia). The combination NOMV-fHbp/MenA conjugate vaccine elicited high serum bactericidal titers against the two MenA strains tested that were resistant to bactericidal antibodies elicited by the NOMV-fHbp alone; the combination elicited higher titers against the MenA and MenW strains than those elicited by a control MCV4-CRM vaccine (P<0.05); and high titers against MenX and MenB strains. For most strains, the titers elicited by a control NOMV-fHbp knock out vaccine were <1∶10 except when the strain PorA matched the vaccine (titers >1∶000). Conclusion/Significance The NOMV-fHbp/MenA conjugate vaccine provided similar or higher coverage against MenA and MenW strains than a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, and extended protection against Men

  16. Combinatorial Synthetic Peptide Vaccine Strategy Protects against Hypervirulent CovR/S Mutant Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Mortensen, Rasmus; Calcutt, Ainslie; Powell, Jessica; Batzloff, Michael R; Dietrich, Jes; Good, Michael F

    2016-04-15

    Cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovR/S) mutant group A streptococci (GAS) are serious human pathogens of multiple M protein strains that upregulate expression of virulence factors, including the IL-8 proteaseStreptococcus pyogenescell envelope proteinase (SpyCEP), thus blunting neutrophil-mediated killing and enabling ingress of bacteria from a superficial wound to deep tissue. We previously showed that a combination vaccine incorporating J8-DT (conserved peptide vaccine from the M protein) and a recombinant SpyCEP fragment protects against CovR/S mutants. To enhance the vaccine's safety profile, we identified a minimal epitope (S2) that was the target for anti-SpyCEP Abs that could protect IL-8 from SpyCEP-mediated proteolysis. Abs from healthy humans and from mice experimentally infected with GAS also recognized S2, albeit at low titers. Native SpyCEP may be poorly immunogenic (cryptic or subdominant), and it would be to the organism's advantage if the host did not induce a strong Ab response against it. However, S2 conjugated to diphtheria toxoid is highly immunogenic and induces Abs that recognize and neutralize SpyCEP. Hence, we describe a two-component peptide vaccine that induces Abs (anti-S2) that protect IL-8 from proteolysis and other Abs (anti-J8) that cause strain-independent killing in the presence of neutrophils. We show that either component alone is ineffectual in preventing skin infection and bacteremia due to CovR/S mutants but that the combination induces complete protection. This protection correlated with a significant influx of neutrophils to the infection site. The data strongly suggest that the lack of natural immunity to hypervirulent GAS strains in humans could be rectified by this combination vaccine. PMID:26969753

  17. Evaluation of Brucella abortus Phosphoglucomutase (pgm) Mutant as a New Live Rough-Phenotype Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde, Juan Esteban; Comerci, Diego José; Leguizamón, M. Susana; Ugalde, Rodolfo Augusto

    2003-01-01

    Brucella abortus S19 is the vaccine most frequently used against bovine brucellosis. Although it induces good protection levels, it cannot be administered to pregnant cattle, revaccination is not advised due to interference in the discrimination between infected and vaccinated animals during immune-screening procedures, and the vaccine is virulent for humans. Due to these reasons, there is a continuous search for new bovine vaccine candidates that may confer protection levels comparable to those conferred by S19 but without its disadvantages. A previous study characterized the phenotype associated with the phosphoglucomutase (pgm) gene disruption in Brucella abortus S2308, as well as the possible role for the smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in virulence and intracellular multiplication in HeLa cells (J. E. Ugalde, C. Czibener, M. F. Feldman, and R. A. Ugalde, Infect. Immun. 68:5716-5723, 2000). In this report, we analyze the protection, proliferative response, and cytokine production induced in BALB/c mice by a Δpgm deletion strain. We show that this strain synthesizes O antigen with a size of approximately 45 kDa but is rough. This is due to the fact that the Δpgm strain is unable to assemble the O side chain in the complete LPS. Vaccination with the Δpgm strain induced protection levels comparable to those induced by S19 and generated a proliferative splenocyte response and a cytokine profile typical of a Th1 response. On the other hand, we were unable to detect a specific anti-O-antigen antibody response by using the fluorescence polarization assay. In view of these results, the possibility that the Δpgm mutant could be used as a vaccination strain is discussed. PMID:14573645

  18. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli ΔtonB mutants are safe and protective live-attenuated vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Holden, Karen M; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Markham, Philip; Marenda, Marc S

    2014-10-10

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) cause colibacillosis, a serious respiratory disease in poultry. Most APEC strains possess TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters for the siderophores salmochelin and aerobactin, which both contribute to their capacity to cause disease. To assess the potential of iron transport deficient mutants as vaccine candidates, the tonB gene was deleted in the APEC wild type strain E956 and a Δfur (ferric uptake repressor) mutant of E956. The growth of the ΔtonB and ΔtonB/Δfur mutants was impaired in iron-restricted conditions, but not in iron-replete media. Day old chicks were exposed to aerosols of the mutants to assess their efficacy as live attenuated vaccines. At day 18, the birds were challenged with aerosols of the virulent parent strain E956. Both mutants conferred protection against colibacillosis; weight gains and lesion scores were significantly different between the vaccinated groups and an unvaccinated challenged control group. Thus mutation of iron uptake systems can be used as a platform technology to generate protective live attenuated vaccines against extraintestinal E. coli infections, and potentially a range of Gram negative pathogens of importance in veterinary medicine. PMID:25205199

  19. Novel BVDV-2 mutants as new candidates for modified-live vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zemke, Johanna; König, Patricia; Mischkale, Katrin; Reimann, Ilona; Beer, Martin

    2010-04-21

    Protection against Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 2 infection of commercially available vaccines is often limited due to marked genetic and antigenic differences between BVDV types 1 (BVDV-1) and 2 (BVDV-2). Therefore, the immunogenicity of selected BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 mutants derived from infectious full-length cDNA clones and their use as modified-live vaccine candidates against challenge infection with a virulent heterologous BVDV-2 field isolate were investigated. Deletion mutants of BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 lacking a part of the N(pro) gene (BVDV-1DeltaN(pro)/BVDV-2DeltaN(pro)) were used as well as a packaged replicon with a deletion in the structural core protein encoding region (BVDV-2DeltaC-pseudovirions). The 25 calves used in this vaccination/challenge trial were allocated in five groups (n=5/group). One group received BVDV-1DeltaN(pro) (1 shot), one group BVDV-2DeltaN(pro) (1 shot), one group received both, BVDV-1DeltaN(pro) and BVDV-2DeltaN(pro) (1 shot), and one group was immunised with the BVDV-2DeltaC-pseudovirions (2 shots). The fifth group served as non-vaccinated control group. All groups were challenged intranasally with the BVDV-2 strain HI916 and monitored for signs of clinical disease, virus shedding and viremia. All tested BVDV vaccine candidates markedly reduced the outcome of the heterologous virulent BVDV-2 challenge infection showing graduated protective effects. The BVDV-2DeltaN(pro) mutant was able to induce complete protection and a "sterile immunity" upon challenge. Thus it represents a promising candidate for an efficacious future live vaccine. PMID:19875253

  20. Staphylococcus aureus avirulent mutant vaccine induces humoral and cellular immune responses on pregnant heifers.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, M; Rodriguez, N; Vivas, A; Giraudo, J; Bogni, C

    2016-06-17

    Bovine mastitis produces economic losses, attributable to the decrease in milk production, reduced milk quality, costs of treatment and replacement of animals. A successful prophylactic vaccine against Staphylococcus aureus should elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. In a previous report we evaluated the effectiveness of a live vaccine to protect heifers against challenge with a virulent strain. In the present study the immunological response of heifers after combined immunization schedule was investigated. In a first experimental trial, heifers were vaccinated with 3 subcutaneous doses of avirulent mutant S. aureus RC122 before calving and one intramammary dose (IMD) after calving. Antibodies concentration in blood, bactericidal effect of serum from vaccinated animals and lymphocyte proliferation was determined. The levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 in colostrum and the lymphocyte proliferation index were significantly higher in vaccinated respect to non-vaccinated group throughout the experiment. The second trial, where animals were inoculated with different vaccination schedules, was carried out to determine the effect of the IMD on the level of antibodies in blood and milk, cytokines (IL-13 and IFN-γ) concentration and milk's SCC and bacteriology. The bacterial growth of the S. aureus strains was totally inhibited at 1-3×10(6) and 1-3×10(3)cfu/ml, when the strains were mixed with pooled serum diluted 1/40. The results shown that IMD has not a significant effect on the features determinate. In conclusion, a vaccination schedule involving three SC doses before calving would be enough to stimulate antibodies production in milk without an IMD. Furthermore, the results showed a bactericidal effect of serum from vaccinated animals and this provides further evidence about serum functionality. Immune responses, humoral (antigen-specific antibodies and Th2 type cytokines) and cellular (T-lymphocyte proliferation responses and Th1 type cytokines), were

  1. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  2. Rescue of a vaccine strain of peste des petits ruminants virus: In vivo evaluation and comparison with standard vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Muniraju, Murali; Mahapatra, Mana; Buczkowski, Hubert; Batten, Carrie; Banyard, Ashley C.; Parida, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Across the developing world peste des petits ruminants virus places a huge disease burden on agriculture, primarily affecting the production of small ruminant. The disease is most effectively controlled by vaccinating sheep and goats with live attenuated vaccines that provide lifelong immunity. However, the current vaccines and serological tests are unable to enable Differentiation between naturally Infected and Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). This factor precludes meaningful assessment of vaccine coverage and epidemiological surveillance based on serology, in turn reducing the efficiency of control programmes. The availability of a recombinant PPRV vaccine with a proven functionality is a prerequisite for the development of novel vaccines that may enable the development of DIVA tools for PPRV diagnostics. In this study, we have established an efficient reverse genetics system for PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain and, further rescued a version of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain that expresses eGFP as a novel transcription cassette and a version of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain with mutations in the haemagglutinin (H) gene to enable DIVA through disruption of binding to H by the C77 monoclonal antibody used in the competitive (c) H-ELISA. All three rescued viruses showed similar growth characteristics in vitro in comparison to parent vaccine strain and, following in vivo assessment the H mutant provided full protection in goats. Although the C77 monoclonal antibody used in the cH-ELISA was unable to bind to the mutated form of H in vitro, the mutation was not sufficient to enable DIVA in vivo. PMID:25444790

  3. Rescue of a vaccine strain of peste des petits ruminants virus: In vivo evaluation and comparison with standard vaccine.

    PubMed

    Muniraju, Murali; Mahapatra, Mana; Buczkowski, Hubert; Batten, Carrie; Banyard, Ashley C; Parida, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Across the developing world peste des petits ruminants virus places a huge disease burden on agriculture, primarily affecting the production of small ruminant. The disease is most effectively controlled by vaccinating sheep and goats with live attenuated vaccines that provide lifelong immunity. However, the current vaccines and serological tests are unable to enable Differentiation between naturally Infected and Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). This factor precludes meaningful assessment of vaccine coverage and epidemiological surveillance based on serology, in turn reducing the efficiency of control programmes. The availability of a recombinant PPRV vaccine with a proven functionality is a prerequisite for the development of novel vaccines that may enable the development of DIVA tools for PPRV diagnostics. In this study, we have established an efficient reverse genetics system for PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain and, further rescued a version of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain that expresses eGFP as a novel transcription cassette and a version of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 vaccine strain with mutations in the haemagglutinin (H) gene to enable DIVA through disruption of binding to H by the C77 monoclonal antibody used in the competitive (c) H-ELISA. All three rescued viruses showed similar growth characteristics in vitro in comparison to parent vaccine strain and, following in vivo assessment the H mutant provided full protection in goats. Although the C77 monoclonal antibody used in the cH-ELISA was unable to bind to the mutated form of H in vitro, the mutation was not sufficient to enable DIVA in vivo. PMID:25444790

  4. Detection of Novel Rotavirus Strain by Vaccine Postlicensure Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Teel, Elizabeth N.; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Payne, Daniel C.; Roy, Sunando; Foytich, Kimberly; Parashar, Umesh D.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Bowen, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance for rotavirus-associated diarrhea after implementation of rotavirus vaccination can assess vaccine effectiveness and identify disease-associated genotypes. During active vaccine postlicensure surveillance in the United States, we found a novel rotavirus genotype, G14P[24], in a stool sample from a child who had diarrhea. Unusual rotavirus strains may become more prevalent after vaccine implementation. PMID:23876297

  5. Ethanol production characteristics for a respiratory deficient mutant yeast strain

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A. III; Grilione, P.

    1982-01-01

    Barley was fermented with a defined strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a chemical induced respiratory deficient mutant RD, specific gravity, pH, CO/sub 2/ production and ethanol production rates and yield were compared. RD fermentation were slower but yielded slightly more ethanol after a considerable time. Partial reversion to a respiratory capable strain occurred.

  6. Prevention of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis after oral vaccination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC mutants.

    PubMed

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination of laying hens has been successfully used to reduce egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis, decreasing human salmonellosis cases worldwide. Currently used vaccines for layers are either inactivated vaccines or live attenuated strains produced by mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletion mutants hold promise for future vaccines, because specific bacterial functions can be removed that may improve safety and allow differentiation from field strains. In this study, the efficacy of Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains in laying hens as live vaccines was evaluated. The mutants are deficient in either the membrane channel TolC (ΔtolC) or the multi-drug efflux systems acrAB, acrEF and mdtABC (ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC). These strains have a decreased ability for gut and tissue colonization and are unable to survive in egg white, the latter preventing transmission of the vaccine strains to humans. Two groups of 30 laying hens were orally inoculated at day 1, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with 10(8) cfu of either vaccine strain, while a third group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 5 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The vaccine strains were not shed or detected in the gut, internal organs or eggs, 2 weeks after the third vaccination. The strains significantly protected against gut and internal organ colonization, and completely prevented egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis under the conditions of this study. This indicates that Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains might be valuable strains for vaccination of layers against Salmonella Enteritidis. PMID:27519174

  7. Bovine herpesvirus-1: evaluation of genetic diversity of subtypes derived from field strains of varied clinical syndromes and their relationship to vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Eberle, R; Moeller, R B; Campen, H Van; O'Toole, D; Chase, C; Miller, M M; Sprowls, R; Nydam, D V

    2015-01-15

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) causes significant disease in cattle. Control programs in North America incorporate vaccination with modified live viral (MLV) or killed (KV) vaccine. BoHV-1 strains are isolated from diseased animals or fetuses after vaccination. There are markers for differentiating MLV from field strains using whole-genome sequencing and analysis identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Using multiple primer sets and sequencing of products permits association of BoHV-1 isolates with vaccines. To determine association between vaccine virus and strains isolated from clinical cases following vaccination, we analyzed 12 BoHV-1 isolates from animals with various clinical syndromes; 9 corresponded to BoHV-1.1 respiratory group. The remaining three corresponded to BoHV-1.2b, typically found in genital tracts of cattle. Four BoHV-1 isolates were identical to a vaccine strain; three were from post-vaccination abortion episodes with typical herpetic lesions whose dams had received MLV vaccine during pregnancy, and one from a heifer given a related MLV vaccine; Sequences of two respiratory isolates perfectly matched mutations characterizing RLB106 strain, a temperature sensitive mutant used in intranasal and parenteral vaccines. The last three respiratory strains clearly appeared related to a group of MLV vaccines. Previously the MLV vaccines were grouped into four groups based on SNPs patterns. In contrast with above-mentioned isolates that closely matched SNP patterns of their respective MLV vaccine virus, these 3 strains both lacked some and possessed a number of additional mutations compared to a group of MLV vaccine viral genome. Finding BoHV-1.2b in respiratory cases indicates focus should be given BoHV-1.2b as an emerging virus or a virus not recognized nor fully characterized in BRD. PMID:25454086

  8. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  9. Viable Newcastle Disease Vaccine Strains in a Pharmaceutical Dump

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Silvia; Canuti, Marta; Zappa, Alessandra; Zanoni, Giovanna; Koncan, Raffaella; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Cornaglia, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Alessandro Remo; Tridente, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    To assess the viability of discarded and buried vaccine strains, we examined vaccines that had been buried for >20 years in an industrial waste dump in the city of Milan, Italy. Viability results showed potential biological risk associated with uncontrolled burial of pharmaceutical industry waste, including some live vaccines. PMID:18258042

  10. Transmission of a live Eimeria acervulina vaccine strain and response to infection in vaccinated and contact-vaccinated broilers.

    PubMed

    Velkers, Francisca C; Bouma, Annemarie; Stegeman, J Arjan; de Jong, Mart C M

    2012-01-01

    Live vaccines for coccidiosis control are infrequently used in broilers, mainly due to variability in efficacy and relatively high costs. More insight in transmission of vaccine and wild-type strains can facilitate optimization of vaccination strategies and might increase its use as an alternative for anticoccidial drugs. The aim of this study was to quantify transmission of a live Eimeria acervulina vaccine strain and to determine the degree of protection against a subsequent infection with a wild-type E. acervulina strain. An experiment was carried out with 4 groups of 22 SPF broilers. At 2 days of age, 11 birds of groups 2 to 4 were vaccinated directly by oral application of E. acervulina oocysts of the Paracox™ vaccine and 11 birds were placed in contact with these birds (contact-vaccinated). Birds in group 1 remained unvaccinated (controls) and were not exposed to vaccinated birds. At day 28 of age, 6 groups of 10 birds were formed, with 2 groups (duplo) for each treatment group, i.e. vaccinated, contact-vaccinated or unvaccinated control birds. Five birds of each group were orally inoculated with wild-type E. acervulina oocysts and five were contact-exposed. Single droppings were examined daily from days 5 to 49 of age for oocyst output and to determine the time of infection. The transmission rate of the vaccine strain was estimated to be 1.6 per day and of the wild-type strain 2.3, 8.7 and 20.8 per day for vaccinated, contact-vaccinated and unvaccinated birds, respectively. Although transmission of wild-type coccidia was not significantly reduced in vaccinated or contact-vaccinated groups, both groups were equally protected against high oocyst output after infection compared to unvaccinated groups. These results suggest that factors influencing transmission of live vaccine strains in flocks may be important targets for improvement of vaccine efficacy and warrant further research. PMID:22075084

  11. Increases of efficacy as vaccine against Brucella abortus infection in mice by simultaneous inoculation with avirulent smooth bvrS/bvrR and rough wbkA mutants.

    PubMed

    Grilló, María Jesús; Manterola, Lorea; de Miguel, María Jesús; Muñoz, Pilar María; Blasco, José María; Moriyón, Ignacio; López-Goñi, Ignacio

    2006-04-01

    The Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 strains are the most widely used live vaccines against bovine brucellosis. However, both can induce abortion and milk excretion, S19 vaccination interferes in serological tests, and RB51 is less effective. We have shown previously that a rough wbkAB. abortus mutant is attenuated and a better vaccine than RB51 in BALB/c mice, and that mutants in the two-component regulatory system bvrS/bvrR are markedly attenuated while keeping a smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS). In this work, we tested whether simultaneous inoculation with live bvrS increases wbkA vaccine efficacy in mice. Even at high doses, the bvrS mutant was cleared much faster from spleens than the wbkA mutant. The splenic persistence of the wbkA mutant increased when inoculated along with the bvrS mutant, but also with inactivated bvrS cells or with purified B. abortus S-LPS, strongly suggesting that S-LPS in the bvrS mutant played a determinant role in the wbkA persistence. When inoculated alone, both mutants protected against virulent B. abortus but less than when inoculated simultaneously, and the protection afforded by the combination was better than that obtained with B. abortus S19. Increased protection was also obtained after simultaneous inoculation of the wbkA mutant and inactivated bvrS cells or purified S-LPS, showing again the role played by the S-LPS in the bvrS cells. In mice, the bvrS-wbkA combination induced an antibody response reduced with respect to B. abortus S19 vaccination. Thus, the simultaneous use of live bvrS and wbkA B. abortus mutants seems a promising approach to overcome the problems of the S19 andRB51 vaccines. PMID:16439039

  12. Nonreplicating, Cyst-Defective Type II Toxoplasma gondii Vaccine Strains Stimulate Protective Immunity against Acute and Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccine strains, such as type I nonreplicating uracil auxotroph mutants, are highly effective in eliciting lifelong immunity to virulent acute infection by Toxoplasma gondii. However, it is currently unknown whether vaccine-elicited immunity can provide protection against acute infection and also prevent chronic infection. To address this problem, we developed nonreverting, nonreplicating, live attenuated uracil auxotroph vaccine strains in the type II Δku80 genetic background by targeting the deletion of the orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) and uridine phosphorylase (UP) genes. Deletion of OMPDC induced a severe uracil auxotrophy with loss of replication, loss of virulence in mice, and loss of the ability to develop cysts and chronic infection. Vaccination of mice using type II Δku80 Δompdc mutants stimulated a fully protective CD8+ T cell-dependent immunity that prevented acute infection by type I and type II strains of T. gondii, and this vaccination also severely reduced or prevented cyst formation after type II challenge infection. Nonreverting, nonreplicating, and non-cyst-forming Δompdc mutants provide new tools to examine protective immune responses elicited by vaccination with a live attenuated type II vaccine. PMID:25776745

  13. Nonreplicating, cyst-defective type II Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strains stimulate protective immunity against acute and chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2015-05-01

    Live attenuated vaccine strains, such as type I nonreplicating uracil auxotroph mutants, are highly effective in eliciting lifelong immunity to virulent acute infection by Toxoplasma gondii. However, it is currently unknown whether vaccine-elicited immunity can provide protection against acute infection and also prevent chronic infection. To address this problem, we developed nonreverting, nonreplicating, live attenuated uracil auxotroph vaccine strains in the type II Δku80 genetic background by targeting the deletion of the orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) and uridine phosphorylase (UP) genes. Deletion of OMPDC induced a severe uracil auxotrophy with loss of replication, loss of virulence in mice, and loss of the ability to develop cysts and chronic infection. Vaccination of mice using type II Δku80 Δompdc mutants stimulated a fully protective CD8(+) T cell-dependent immunity that prevented acute infection by type I and type II strains of T. gondii, and this vaccination also severely reduced or prevented cyst formation after type II challenge infection. Nonreverting, nonreplicating, and non-cyst-forming Δompdc mutants provide new tools to examine protective immune responses elicited by vaccination with a live attenuated type II vaccine. PMID:25776745

  14. Evaluation of aroA deletion mutant of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi for its vaccine candidate potential.

    PubMed

    Alam, Javad; Singh, B R; Hansda, D; Singh, V P; Verma, J C

    2009-11-01

    The present study on a defined deletion aroA mutant (B-26) of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi (S. Abortusequi) for residual virulence and safety in experimental model revealed that the virulence of the strain was at no difference in any of the cell assays (caprine alveolar macrophages, bovine alveolar macrophages, guinea pig blood mononuclear cells and horse blood mononuclear cells) than that of its parent virulence plasmid cured (S-787) and wild type (E-156) strains. The mutant did not cause any apparent illness in baby guinea pigs (15 days old), adult male and female guinea pigs and also not in pregnant (54-55 days of gestation) guinea pigs through oral (4.2 x 10(9) cfu/ animal) and intramuscular (im) routes (4.2 x 10(7) cfu/ animal). In pregnant females the mutant also induced abortion as its parent (E-156) though to lesser extent (33%) than the parent strain (100%) on inoculation through intravaginal (4.2 x 10(9) cfu/ animal) and intraperitoneal (4.2 x 10(7) cfu/ animal) routes. The babies born from mutant inoculated mothers survived better and were also resistant to intraperitoneal lethal challenge (7.82 x 10(9) cfu/ animal) with 100% protection. Female guinea pigs challenged after 135-165 days of inoculation with the mutant afforded 100% protection from abortion and mortality caused by lethal infection (7.82 x 10(9) cfu/ animal) of wild type S. enterica Abortusequi (E-156). The study revealed that aroA mutant (B-26) was safe through oral and im routes for immunization and afforded 100% protection against salmonellosis for more than 5.5 months in guinea pigs. Although immunization with aroA mutant in experimental model afforded good protection against abortion and mortality induced by S. Abortusequi, further studies are needed in horses to exploit the strain's vaccine potential in the natural host. PMID:20099460

  15. Meningococcal Factor H Binding Proteins in Epidemic Strains from Africa: Implications for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Fergus, Andrew M.; Koeberling, Oliver; Caugant, Dominique A.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Factor H binding protein (fHbp) is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH), which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81%) had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates), 9 (W-135), or 74 (X) in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135) in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine. Conclusion/Significance NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate

  16. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II), to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:21794145

  17. Symptomatic Infection and Detection of Vaccine and Vaccine-Reassortant Rotavirus Strains in 5 Children: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Boom, Julie A.; Sahni, Leila C.; Payne, Daniel C.; Gautam, Rashi; Lyde, Freda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Bowen, Michael D.; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Rench, Marcia A.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Baker, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine or vaccine-reassortant rotavirus strains were detected in fecal specimens from 5 of 106 (4.7%) immunocompetent children who required treatment for rotavirus gastroenteritis at a large pediatric hospital in Texas in 2009–2010. Four strains were related to pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, whereas one was related to monovalent rotavirus vaccine. The contribution of these strains to each patient’s illness was unclear given that 2 patients had prominent respiratory symptoms and 2 were concurrently infected with another pathogen (group F adenovirus and norovirus). Continued monitoring is necessary to assess the role of vaccine strains and vaccine-reassortant strains in pediatric rotavirus infections. PMID:22872730

  18. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  19. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens.

    PubMed

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  20. A Colanic Acid Operon Deletion Mutation Enhances Induction of Early Antibody Responses by Live Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shifeng; Shi, Huoying; Li, Yuhua; Shi, Zhaoxing; Zhang, Xin; Baek, Chang-Ho; Mothershead, Tabor

    2013-01-01

    Colanic acid (CA) is a common exopolysaccharide produced by many genera in the Enterobacteriaceae. It is critical for biofilm formation on HEp-2 cells and on chicken intestinal tissue by Salmonella. In this study, we generated different CA synthesis gene mutants and evaluated the immune responses induced by these mutants. One of these mutations, Δ(wza-wcaM)8, which deleted the whole operon for CA synthesis, was introduced into two Salmonella vaccine strains attenuated by auxotrophic traits or by the regulated delayed attenuation strategy (RDAS). The mice immunized with the auxotrophic Salmonella vaccine strain with the deletion mutation Δ(wza-wcaM)8 developed higher vaginal IgA titers against the heterologous protective antigen and higher levels of antigen-specific IgA secretion cells in lungs. In Salmonella vaccine strains with RDAS, the strain with the Δ(wza-wcaM)8 mutation resulted in higher levels of protective antigen production during in vitro growth. Mice immunized with this strain developed higher serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody responses at 2 weeks. This strain also resulted in better gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses than the strain without this deletion at doses of 108 and 109 CFU. Thus, the mutation Δ(wza-wcaM)8 will be included in various recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strains with RDAS derived from Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi to induce protective immunity against bacterial pathogens. PMID:23774599

  1. A colanic acid operon deletion mutation enhances induction of early antibody responses by live attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shifeng; Shi, Huoying; Li, Yuhua; Shi, Zhaoxing; Zhang, Xin; Baek, Chang-Ho; Mothershead, Tabor; Curtiss, Roy

    2013-09-01

    Colanic acid (CA) is a common exopolysaccharide produced by many genera in the Enterobacteriaceae. It is critical for biofilm formation on HEp-2 cells and on chicken intestinal tissue by Salmonella. In this study, we generated different CA synthesis gene mutants and evaluated the immune responses induced by these mutants. One of these mutations, Δ(wza-wcaM)8, which deleted the whole operon for CA synthesis, was introduced into two Salmonella vaccine strains attenuated by auxotrophic traits or by the regulated delayed attenuation strategy (RDAS). The mice immunized with the auxotrophic Salmonella vaccine strain with the deletion mutation Δ(wza-wcaM)8 developed higher vaginal IgA titers against the heterologous protective antigen and higher levels of antigen-specific IgA secretion cells in lungs. In Salmonella vaccine strains with RDAS, the strain with the Δ(wza-wcaM)8 mutation resulted in higher levels of protective antigen production during in vitro growth. Mice immunized with this strain developed higher serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibody responses at 2 weeks. This strain also resulted in better gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses than the strain without this deletion at doses of 10(8) and 10(9) CFU. Thus, the mutation Δ(wza-wcaM)8 will be included in various recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strains with RDAS derived from Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi to induce protective immunity against bacterial pathogens. PMID:23774599

  2. The ERA strain of rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lawson, K F; Crawley, J F

    1972-10-01

    An antigenic extinction trial in cats showed that the ERA rabies vaccine had superior antigenic properties over Flury H.E.P. C.E.O. and killed tissue culture rabies vaccine. Dogs and cats on a duration of immunity study of ERA rabies vaccine were challenged with fox salivary gland "street" rabies virus. The results of this challenge show a duration of immunity of five years in dogs and four years in cats. Vaccination of dams in late pregnancy with ERA rabies vaccine resulted in transference of maternal antibody to the newborn, in both cattle and dogs. This maternally derived antibody interfered with the successful active immunization of the young calf. Calves free of antibodies for rabies could be successfully vaccinated as early as 17 days of age and were able to withstand a challenge with virulent "street" rabies virus two years later. PMID:4263912

  3. The ERA Strain of Rabies Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, K. F.; Crawley, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    An antigenic extinction trial in cats showed that the ERA rabies vaccine had superior antigenic properties over Flury H.E.P. C.E.O. and killed tissue culture rabies vaccine. Dogs and cats on a duration of immunity study of ERA rabies vaccine were challenged with fox salivary gland “street” rabies virus. The results of this challenge show a duration of immunity of five years in dogs and four years in cats. Vaccination of dams in late pregnancy with ERA rabies vaccine resulted in transference of maternal antibody to the newborn, in both cattle and dogs. This maternally derived antibody interfered with the successful active immunization of the young calf. Calves free of antibodies for rabies could be successfully vaccinated as early as 17 days of age and were able to withstand a challenge with virulent “street” rabies virus two years later. PMID:4263912

  4. Vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) by using attenuated mutants selected by neutralizing monoclonal antibodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberti, K.A.; Rohovec, J.S.; Winton, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutralizing monoclonal antibody against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was used to select neutralization-resistant mutants from isolates of virus obtained from adult steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss returning to the Round Butte Hatchery (RB mutants) on the Deschutes River in Oregon, USA, and from rainbow trout (nonanadromous O. mykiss) at a commercial hatchery in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA (193-110 mutants). Two of the mutants, RB-1 and 193-110-4, were significantly (P 0.05) in protection among fish exposed to the RB-1 vaccine strain at a dose of 1 x 105 TCID50/mL for periods of either 1, 12, or 24 h, held for 14 d, and then challenged with the wild-type RB isolate, although the 1-h exposure seemed to be somewhat less effective. Fish were vaccinated with the RB-1 strain at 1 x 103-1 x 105 TCID50/mL for 24 h then challenged after 1, 7, 14, or 21 d with the wild-type RB isolate. No significant (P > 0.1) protection was observed at 1 d postvaccination, but the relative percent survival increased progressively at each subsequent challenge period, becoming statistically significant by day 7 (P < 0.001) and beyond. These results suggested that resistance to challenge with wild-type virus resulted from development of IHNV-specific immunity and not from viral interference or interferon induction, and they reinforce the potential of an attenuated vaccine to control this important disease.

  5. An invasive and low virulent Edwardsiella tarda esrB mutant promising as live attenuated vaccine in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizheng; Wang, Lixia; Zhang, Lingzhi; Qu, Jiangbo; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-02-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a leading fish pathogen haunting worldwide aquaculture industry. In E. tarda, two-component system EsrA-EsrB positively regulates type III and VI secretion systems (T3SS and T6SS) and negatively regulates hemolysin EthA, which has been demonstrated to be essential for the invasion processes in fish. In order to develop a live attenuated vaccine (LAV) with high invasiveness to be practically and economically used as immersion-administered vaccine in aquaculture, here, we generated a random mutation library of esrB sequences by error-prone PCR and introduced them into the E. tarda esrB deletion mutant. The mutant YWZ47 with significantly increased hemolytic activity and low T3SS and T6SS secretion was screened. Phenotypes including extracellular protein profiles, invasion in macrophages, lethality toward fish, and infection kinetics were investigated in the wild-type strain EIB202 and the mutants ΔesrB, ΔT3SS, ΔT6SS, ΔT3SS/ΔT6SS, and YWZ47. Compared to the documented LAV strain ΔesrB, YWZ47 showed higher invasive capability and low in vivo virulence toward fish. Significantly higher relative percent survival (RPS) could be generated in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) against the challenge of the wild-type EIB202 when inoculated through immersion route, and the RPS was comparable with that of ΔesrB through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection inoculation. Two mutated points, K167M and H197L, were found by sequence analysis of EsrBYWZ47 variant. These structural modifications underpin the variations in the regulatory functions of the mutant and wild-type EsrB. This study promoted understanding of virulence regulation by EsrB in E. tarda and presented a promising candidate of invasive attenuated vaccine used in aquaculture industries. PMID:25431010

  6. A carAB mutant of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli serogroup O2 is attenuated and effective as a live oral vaccine against colibacillosis in turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Kwaga, J K; Allan, B J; van der Hurk, J V; Seida, H; Potter, A A

    1994-01-01

    Colibacillosis is a serious and economically important disease of the respiratory tract of chickens and turkeys. The serogroups of Escherichia coli commonly associated with colibacillosis in poultry are O1, O2, and O78. Although previous attempts to develop a vaccine have not been very successful, vaccination is still considered the most effective way of controlling the disease. Therefore, our laboratory has been involved in the development of an attenuated live vaccine that will be effective in the prevention of colibacillosis. The carAB operon coding for carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, an essential enzyme in arginine and pyrimidine metabolism, was selected for study. Generalized transduction was used to transfer a Tn10-generated mutation from a laboratory strain to virulent avian field isolates of E. coli. Molecular techniques were used to determine the point of Tn10 insertion within the carAB operon. The insertion mutants were then cured of the tetracycline resistance gene of the transposon to select for antibiotic-sensitive and stable carAB mutants. The degree of attenuation obtained by the mutation was determined in day-old chickens. Typically, when 100-fold the 50% lethal dose (for the wild type) was given, no more than 50% mortality in the day-old chickens was observed. The deletion mutant of serotype O2 was also found to be avirulent in turkeys rendered susceptible to infection with hemorrhagic enteritis virus A. Turkey poults vaccinated orally at 4 weeks old with either the wild-type E. coli EC317 strain or its carAB mutant EC751 were completely protected from infection following challenge with the homologous wild-type strain. Our data indicate that carAB mutants of virulent avian strains of E. coli will be effective and safe as live oral vaccines for prevention of colibacillosis in poultry. Images PMID:8063392

  7. Mismatching between circulating strains and vaccine strains of influenza: Effect on Hajj pilgrims from both hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-03-01

    The trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine is expected to provide optimum protection if the vaccine strains match the circulating strains. The effect of worldwide mismatch between the vaccine strains and extant strains on travelers attending Hajj pilgrimage is not known. Annually 2-3 million Muslims coming from north and south hemispheres congregate at Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where intense congestion amplifies the risk of respiratory infection up to eight fold. In order to estimate, to what extent mismatching increases the risk of vaccine failure in Hajj pilgrims, we have examined the global data on influenza epidemiology since 2003, in light of the available data from Hajj. These data demonstrate that globally mismatching between circulating and vaccine strains has occurred frequently over the last 12 years, and the mismatch seems to have affected the Hajj pilgrims, however, influenza virus characteristics were studied only in a limited number of Hajj seasons. When the vaccines are different, dual vaccination of travelers by vaccines for southern and northern hemispheres should be considered for Hajj pilgrims whenever logistically feasible. Consideration should also be given to the use of vaccines with broader coverage, i.e., quadrivalent, or higher immunogenicity. Continuous surveillance of influenza at Hajj is important. PMID:26317639

  8. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Restores the Virulence of Plague Vaccine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C.; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv−/−) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv−/− mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv−/− mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines. PMID:22896664

  9. Novel Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Choleraesuis Strains as Live Vaccine Candidates Generated by Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Yu-We; McDonough, Sean P.; Palaniappan, Raghavan U. M.; Chang, Chao-Fu; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is a host-adapted pathogen that causes swine paratyphoid. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was used to understand the pathogenicity of S. enterica serovar Choleraesuis in its natural host and also to develop novel attenuated live vaccine candidates against this disease. A library of 960 signature-tagged mutants of S. enterica serovar Choleraesuis was constructed and screened for attenuation in pigs. Thirty-three mutants were identified by the STM screening, and these mutants were further screened for attenuation by in vivo and in vitro competitive growth. Of these, 20 mutants targeting the outer membrane, type III secretion, transporter, lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, and other unknown proteins were confirmed for attenuation. Five highly attenuated mutants (SC2D2 [ssaV], SC4A9 [gifsy-1], SC6F9 [dgoT], SC12B12 [ssaJ], and SC10B1[spiA]) were selected and evaluated for safety and protective efficacy in pigs by comparison with a commercially available vaccine strain. STM-attenuated live vaccine strains SC4A9 (gifsy-1) and SC2D2 (ssaV) were superior to commercially available live vaccine because they provided both safety and a protective immune response against challenge in pigs. PMID:16299315

  10. [CONSTRUCTION AND PROPERTIES OF THE FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS VACCINE STRAIN WITHOUT ONE COPY OF THE IGLC GENE AND WITHOUT RECA GENE].

    PubMed

    Mokrievich, A N; Vakhrameeva, G M; Titareva, G M; Bakhteeva, I V; Mironova, R I; Kombarova, T I; Kravchenko, T B; Dyatlov, I A; Pavlov, V M

    2015-01-01

    The live vaccine based on the Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica vaccine strain 15 NIIEG line is used in Russia against tularemia. This vaccine is highly effective, but fairly unstable. Therefore, development of stable live tularemia vaccine with minimal side effect is rather urgent. The method of allel removal in the F. tularensis vaccine strain was used to remove one copy of the iglC gene, which is required to provide intracellular production of the vaccine strain, as well as removal of the recA gene. The latter is crucial for homological recombination. pGM5 suicide vector based on pHV33 bireplicon plasmid was constructed to provide replacement of intact F. tularensis chromosome segments by modified segments. Modified chromosome segments contain F. Tularensis DNA fragment without iglC structural gene segment 545 p. b. (in pGMΔiglC plasmid), as well as DNA fragment containing no recA structural gene segment 1060 p.b. (pGMΔrecA plasmid). The constructed 15/23-1ΔrecA mutant, in contrast to the vaccine strain 15, was capable of reproducing in the macrophage-like cells J774A.1 line, whereas the efficiency of the reproduction was 8-10 times less. BALB/c mouse responded to immunization by the 15/23-1ΔrecA strain by smaller weight decrease (-2%) as compared to the strain 15 (-14%). Bacteria of the 15/23-1ΔrecA strain were virtually incapable of germinating from the BALB/c murine spleen 14 days after invasion, whereas bacteria of the strain 15 were found in the murine organs even after 21 days. The F. tularensis 15/23-1ΔrecA strain having smaller reaction ability can be used as a basis for construction of stable live safe tularemia vaccine. PMID:26665740

  11. Mutants of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9 affected in dimorphism.

    PubMed

    San-Blas, F; San-Blas, G

    1992-01-01

    Morphological mutants were isolated after nitrosoguanidine treatment of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9. Two of these mutants, Pb257 and Pb258, developed a typical mycelia at 23 degrees C, however, the yeast cells which developed at 37 degrees C were indistinguishable from those of the parental strain. A third mutant, strain Pb267, was thermosensitive, grew as yeast-like cells at 23 degrees C, but was unable to survive at 37 degrees C. Morphological observations as well as serological and segregation tests confirmed that the mutant strains originated from P. brasiliensis. Cell wall chemical analyses of the mutant strains grown at 23 degrees C indicated the presence of alkali-soluble, acid-insoluble polysaccharides absent in the parental wild-type strain Pb9 grown under the same conditions. The phenotypes shown by the mutant strains may be related to deficiencies in the proper synthesis of cell wall components of the mycelial phase of this fungus. PMID:1573521

  12. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  13. Biofilm formation by exopolysaccharide mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355 produces the soluble exopolysaccharides alternan and dextran in planktonic cultures. A set of mutants of this strain are available that are deficient in the production of alternan, dextran, or both. Another mutant of NRRL B-1355, strain R1510, produces ...

  14. The efficacy of Mycoplasma gallisepticum K-strain live vaccine in broiler and layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Noel, N M; Williams, S M

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccine candidate (K-strain) was compared to commercially available vaccines in broiler-type chickens (Trial 1) and layer-type chickens (Trial 2). In Trial 1, three-week-old broiler-type chickens were vaccinated via aerosol with K-strain or an F-strain vaccine. The vaccinated chickens and 10 non-vaccinated controls were subsequently challenged with virulent R-strain via aerosol at six weeks post vaccination; both K-strain and F-strain vaccination resulted in significant protection from air sac and tracheal lesions, as well as R-strain colonization (P ≤ 0.05). In Trial 2, commercial layer-type chickens were vaccinated with ts-11 (via eye drop) or K-strain (via aerosol) at 12 weeks of age. At 25 weeks of age these birds were challenged with R-strain via aerosol. The ts-11 and K-strain vaccinated groups both had significantly lower air sac lesion scores and a lower prevalence of ovarian regression after challenge as compared to non-vaccinated chickens (P ≤ 0.05). K-strain vaccination also prevented significant tracheal lesions and R-strain colonization (P ≤ 0.05). K-strain shows great potential as a highly efficacious live MG vaccine in broiler and layer-type chickens for protection of the respiratory and reproductive systems as well as prevention of infection with field strains. PMID:25571953

  15. Generation and Evaluation of High β-Glucan Producing Mutant Strains of Sparassis crispa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Rak; Kang, Hyeon-Woo

    2013-01-01

    A chemical mutagenesis technique was employed for development of mutant strains of Sparassis crispa targeting the shortened cultivation time and the high β-glucan content. The homogenized mycelial fragments of S. crispa IUM4010 strain were treated with 0.2 vol% methyl methanesulfonate, an alkylating agent, yielding 199 mutant strains. Subsequent screening in terms of growth and β-glucan content yielded two mutant strains, B4 and S7. Both mutants exhibited a significant increase in β-glucan productivity by producing 0.254 and 0.236 mg soluble β-glucan/mg dry cell weight for the B4 and S7 strains, respectively, whereas the wild type strain produced 0.102 mg soluble β-glucan/mg dry cell weight. The results demonstrate the usefulness of chemical mutagenesis for generation of mutant mushroom strains. PMID:24198672

  16. Francisella tularensis type B ΔdsbA mutant protects against type A strain and induces strong inflammatory cytokine and Th1-like antibody response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Straskova, Adela; Spidlova, Petra; Mou, Sherry; Worsham, Patricia; Putzova, Daniela; Pavkova, Ivona; Stulik, Jiri

    2015-11-01

    Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular bacterial pathogen, causing the disease tularemia. However, a safe and effective vaccine for routine application against F. tularensis has not yet been developed. We have recently constructed the deletion mutants for the DsbA homolog protein (ΔdsbA/FSC200) and a hypothetical protein IglH (ΔiglH/FSC200) in the type B F. tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200 strain, which exerted different protection capacity against parental virulent strain. In this study, we further investigated the immunological correlates for these different levels of protection provided by ΔdsbA/FSC200 and ΔiglH/FSC200 mutants. Our results show that ΔdsbA/FSC200 mutant, but not ΔiglH/FSC200 mutant, induces an early innate inflammatory response leading to strong Th1-like antibody response. Furthermore, vaccination with ΔdsbA/FSC200 mutant, but not with ΔiglH/FSC200, elicited protection against the subsequent challenge with type A SCHU S4 strain in mice. An immunoproteomic approach was used to map a spectrum of antigens targeted by Th1-like specific antibodies, and more than 80 bacterial antigens, including novel ones, were identified. Comparison of tularemic antigens recognized by the ΔdsbA/FSC200 post-vaccination and the SCHU S4 post-challenge sera then revealed the existence of 22 novel SCHU S4 specific antibody clones. PMID:26253078

  17. Isolation of a mutant strain of Pseudomonas sp ATCC 31461 exhibiting elevated polysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    West, T P

    2002-10-01

    A mutant strain of the bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ATCC 31461 that exhibited elevated production of the polysaccharide gellan on glucose or corn syrup as a carbon source was isolated. Gellan production by the mutant strain was about twofold higher than its parent strain on glucose or corn syrup after 48 h of growth, and about 1.4-fold higher after 72 h. An increase in biomass production was not correlated with enhanced gellan synthesis by the mutant strain. The increased gellan production by the mutant strain on either carbon source resulted in an increase in its culture medium viscosity and the viscosity of the isolated polysaccharide produced by glucose-grown cells. No differences in the glucuronic acid content of the polysaccharides produced by the mutant and parent strains were observed. PMID:12355317

  18. Vaccination with an Attenuated Ferritin Mutant Protects Mice against Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Pandey, Ruchi; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rodriguez, G. Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis the causative agent of tuberculosis affects millions of people worldwide. New tools for treatment and prevention of tuberculosis are urgently needed. We previously showed that a ferritin (bfrB) mutant of M. tuberculosis has altered iron homeostasis and increased sensitivity to antibiotics and to microbicidal effectors produced by activated macrophages. Most importantly, M. tuberculosis lacking BfrB is strongly attenuated in mice, especially, during the chronic phase of infection. In this study, we examined whether immunization with a bfrB mutant could confer protection against subsequent infection with virulent M. tuberculosis in a mouse model. The results show that the protection elicited by immunization with the bfrB mutant is comparable to BCG vaccination with respect to reduction of bacterial burden. However, significant distinctions in the disease pathology and host genome-wide lung transcriptome suggest improved containment of Mtb infection in animals vaccinated with the bfrB mutant, compared to BCG. We found that downmodulation of inflammatory response and enhanced fibrosis, compared to BCG vaccination, is associated with the protective response elicited by the bfrB mutant. PMID:26339659

  19. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain. PMID:27271739

  20. Efficacy of Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 compared to the reference vaccine Brucella abortus strain 19 in water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Caporale, Vincenzo; Bonfini, Barbara; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Di Provvido, Andrea; Forcella, Simona; Giovannini, Armando; Tittarelli, Manuela; Scacchia, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 250,000 water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) live in the Campania region of southern Italy where the breeding of this species is very popular. Of these animals, almost 150,000 are concentrated in the Caserta province where the prevalence of Brucella abortus in this species represents approximately 20% at herd level. The Italian brucellosis eradication programme provides a slaughter and vaccination strategy for this province. B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51) has become the official vaccine for the prevention of brucellosis in cattle in several countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of RB51 in water buffalo compared to the B. abortus S19 vaccine (S19). The study was performed in accordance with a protocol described in mice. Female buffalo aged five months were inoculated. Five received a RB51 dosage on two occasions that was three times greater than that approved for use in cattle and a booster after one month, five received B. abortus S19 vaccine at the standard dosage and three controls received a phosphate buffer solution. Buffalo were then challenged with a virulent B. abortus strain 544 thirty days post vaccination. Antibodies that developed in the five animals vaccinated with RB51 were not detected by the Rose Bengal test or complement fixation test (CFT) and were also tested by CFT prepared with RB51 antigen. After culling, B. abortus was cultured from the spleen, retropharyngeal and supra-mammary lymph nodes. A statistical evaluation was performed to assess the immunogenicity values obtained in buffalo vaccinated with S19, compared to those obtained in buffalo vaccinated with the RB51 vaccine and in the unvaccinated control group. PMID:20391363

  1. Benomyl-resistant mutant strain of Trichoderma sp. with increased mycoparasitic activity.

    PubMed

    Olejníková, P; Ondrusová, Z; Krystofová, S; Hudecová, D

    2010-01-01

    Application of UV radiation to the strain Trichoderma sp. T-bt (isolated from lignite) resulted in the T-brm mutant which was resistant to the systemic fungicide benomyl. The tub2 gene sequence in the T-brm mutant differed from the parent as well as the collection strain (replacing tyrosine with histidine in the TUB2 protein). Under in vitro conditions this mutant exhibited a higher mycoparasitic activity toward phytopathogenic fungi. PMID:20336512

  2. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  3. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct. PMID:19716523

  4. Live Attenuated Rubella Vaccine (Cendehill Strain) in School Children

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Patricia A.; Izumi, Toshiaki; Davidson, W. George; Grocott, H. C.; Martin, Hulda M.

    1970-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further determine the efficacy and safety in school children of the Cendehill strain of live attenuated rubella vaccine. Parental permission was requested for 255 children in Grades I, II and VI, attending two adjacent schools, to have blood taken for rubella hemagglutination-inhibition studies at the beginning and end of the study, and for each child seronegative on initial testing to participate as a vaccinee or a control. Vaccinees received either 0.5 ml. (full recommended dose) or 0.25 ml. of rubella virus vaccine, live attenuated, Cendehill strain (Smith Kline & French). Eighty-one per cent of the parents consented to have their child take part. Seventy-nine per cent of Grade I and II pupils and 41% of Grade VI pupils were found to be susceptible to rubella at the time of the initial test (HI titres [unk] 8). Eighty children received rubella vaccine and 98.7% showed at least a four-fold rise in antibody titre. One child who received 0.25 ml. showed only a two-fold rise. Clinical reactions to the vaccine were absent or minimal. Thirty-eight controls remained serologically negative during the study. The good response to half-doses of Cendehill vaccine is not significant because there were >3000 TCID50 in a full dose (three times the dose recommended). This information was unknown by the investigators until the termination of the study. PMID:5506107

  5. Vaccine potential of a nonflagellated, virulence-plasmid-cured (fliD-, pSEVΔ) mutant of Salmonella Enteritidis for chickens.

    PubMed

    Imre, Ariel; Szmolka, Ama; Olasz, Ferenc; Nagy, Béla

    2015-09-01

    The aim of these studies was to assess residual virulence and early protective capacity of a negatively markered live attenuated vaccine candidate Salmonella Enteritidis mutant against a highly virulent S. Enteritidis strain using a dayold chicken model. Nonflagellated FliD negative mutants of Salmonella Enteritidis 11 (SE11) with and without the virulence plasmid proved to be sufficiently attenuated (limited invasiveness in vitro/in vivo) without reduced ability to colonise chicken gut. The early protective activity of a nonflagellated, virulence-plasmidcured (fliD-, pSEVΔ) mutant against organ invasion, caecal colonisation and faecal shedding by the highly virulent challenge strain S. Enteritidis 147 Nal(R) proved to be effective and safe. The innate and adaptive immunity was demonstrable during the first four weeks of life, and the serological response was clearly distinguishable from the response induced by the wild parental strain. In conclusion, we provided data for the first time about a virulence-plasmid-cured, nonflagellated mutant of S. Enteritidis to serve as a basis for development of a negatively markered potential live oral vaccine against virulent S. Enteritidis in chicken. PMID:26551419

  6. Capripox disease in Ethiopia: Genetic differences between field isolates and vaccine strain, and implications for vaccination failure.

    PubMed

    Gelaye, Esayas; Belay, Alebachew; Ayelet, Gelagay; Jenberie, Shiferaw; Yami, Martha; Loitsch, Angelika; Tuppurainen, Eeva; Grabherr, Reingard; Diallo, Adama; Lamien, Charles Euloge

    2015-07-01

    Sheeppox virus (SPPV), goatpox virus (GTPV) and lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) of the genus Capripoxvirus (CaPV) cause capripox disease in sheep, goats and cattle, respectively. These viruses are not strictly host-specific and their geographical distribution is complex. In Ethiopia, where sheep, goats and cattle are all affected, a live attenuated vaccine strain (KS1-O180) is used for immunization of both small ruminants and cattle. Although occurrences of the disease in vaccinated cattle are frequently reported, information on the circulating isolates and their relation to the vaccine strain in use are still missing. The present study addressed the parameters associated with vaccination failure in Ethiopia. Retrospective outbreak data were compiled and isolates collected from thirteen outbreaks in small ruminants and cattle at various geographical locations and years were analyzed and compared to the vaccine strain. Isolates of GTPV and LSDV genotypes were responsible for the capripox outbreaks in small ruminants and cattle, respectively, while SPPV was absent. Pathogenic isolates collected from vaccinated cattle were identical to those from the non-vaccinated ones. The vaccine strain, genetically distinct from the outbreak isolates, was not responsible for these outbreaks. This study shows capripox to be highly significant in Ethiopia due to low performance of the local vaccine and insufficient vaccination coverage. The development of new, more efficient vaccine strains, a GTPV strain for small ruminants and a LSDV for cattle, is needed to promote the acceptance by farmers, thus contribute to better control of CaPVs in Ethiopia. PMID:25907637

  7. Identification of over-expressed genes in modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to virulent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  8. Stable Listeria monocytogenes live vaccine candidate strains with graded attenuation on the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Linde, K; Abraham, A A; Beer, J

    1991-02-01

    Metabolic drift (antibiotics resistance) mutations were used to construct stable two (and three) marker vaccine candidate strains of the predominant Listeria monocytogenes serotypes 1/2a and 4b by stepwise selection. Derived from wild-type strains, spontaneous chromosomal streptomycin-resistant clones with their i.p. LD50 elevated from less than or equal to 10(5.0) c.f.u. to approximately 10(6.1) c.f.u. were used in the second step to isolate the rifampicin-resistant mutants with i.p. LD50 values ranging from 10(6.6) to 10(7.4). On i.p. immunization with fully tolerated doses (less than or equal to 1% LD50), these potential vaccine strains were found to protect not less than 95% of the mice against a lethal (approximately 100 LD50) challenge with the homologous wild-type strain. Further elevation of the i.p. LD50 to greater than 10(8.3) c.f.u. by means of a third attenuating fosfomycin-resistance marker resulted in overattenuation and reduced protective capacity. PMID:1905446

  9. Characterization of attenuated Renibacterium salmoninarum strains and their use as live vaccines.

    PubMed

    Daly, J G; Griffiths, S G; Kew, A K; Moore, A R; Olivier, G

    2001-03-01

    Two nutritionally mutant strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) were isolated that grew on tryticase soy agar (Rs TSA1) or brain heart infusion agar (Rs BHI1). These 2 strains could be continuously cultured on these media, whereas typical R. salmoninarum would only grow on KDM-2 agar. We determined no other phenotypic difference that could be used to distinguish them from wild-type R. salmoninarum. Both strains were found to be avirulent when 5 x 10(6) bacteria were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected into Atlantic salmon. Rs TSA1, Rs BHI1, and Rs MT-239 (a R. salmoninarum strain previously shown to be attenuated) were tested as live vaccines in 2 separate trials. The best protection was seen with Rs TSA1. Vaccinated Atlantic salmon had relative percent survival (RPS) of 50 at 74 d post-challenge in Trial 1 and 76 at 60 d post-challenge in Trial 2. In both trials, 100% of the control salmon died from bacterial kidney disease (BKD) (within 40 d for Trial 1 and 50 d for Trial 2) after i.p. challenge with 5 x 10(6) live cells of the virulent isolate Rs Margaree. PMID:11324812

  10. Prevention of clinical coliform mastitis in dairy cows by a mutant Escherichia coli vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    González, R N; Cullor, J S; Jasper, D E; Farver, T B; Bushnell, R B; Oliver, M N

    1989-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken in two commercial California dairies. The treatment group, 246 cows, received three doses of a whole cell bacterin of J5 Escherichia coli (mutant of E. coli O111:B4) plus Freund's incomplete adjuvant vaccine (two in the dry period and one after calving) while 240 unvaccinated cows served as controls. Thirty-five cases of clinical coliform mastitis were diagnosed, six in vaccinated cows and 29 in unvaccinated cows. Bacteria isolated from the clinical cases included 15 E. coli five Klebsiella pneumoniae, three K. oxytoca, three K. ozaenae, five Enterobacter aerogenes, three Serratia marcescens and one Serratia spp. Four control cows were culled, three of them because of chronic coliform mastitis and one because of postcoliform infection agalactia. Incidence rate of clinical gram-negative mastitis was 2.57% in vaccinated cows and 12.77% in unvaccinated cows. The estimated risk ratio, the measure of risk of having clinical gram-negative mastitis for vaccinated cows to unvaccinated cows, was 0.20 (p less than 0.005), indicating a strong relationship between vaccination and lack of clinical gram-negative mastitis. The results of this trial indicate that the administration of the E. coli J5 vaccine is protective against natural challenge to gram-negative bacteria, and reduces the incidence of clinical gram-negative mastitis in dairy cows during the first three months of lactation. PMID:2670166

  11. Use of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine and the prevalence of antibodies to vaccine-targeted strains among female service members before and after vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Lee; Nsouli-Maktabi, Hala; Rohrbeck, Patricia; Clark, Leslie L

    2016-02-01

    The quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) has been shown to generate a robust immune response among fully vaccinated individuals; however, among U.S. service members, HPV vaccine completion rates are low. This study compared the immunogenicity of HPV4 vaccine among partially and fully vaccinated service members at 4-6 years post-vaccination. A random sample was obtained of 2,091 female service members, aged 17-26 years, who received 1-3 HPV4 doses during 2006-2012, stratified by number of doses (one, two, or three). Pre- and post-immunization sera from these service members were tested for antibodies to the HPV strains covered by the vaccine. Prior to immunization 42% were seropositive for HPV strain 6; 34% for strain 11; 29% for strain 16; and 16% for strain 18. Among those naive to all four strains prior to immunization, there was 100% seroconversion after one, two, or three doses. The results indicate that many service members had already been exposed to strains of HPV prior to receiving the vaccine; however, seropositivity prevalence was lower for the oncogenic HPV strains 16 and 18. The data demonstrate sustained immunogenicity after a single dose of vaccine, with modest improvement with successive doses for all strains except 18. PMID:26930146

  12. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to saline (control; n=7) or single vaccination (n=24) with 1010 CFU of B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51). Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with 10**10 CFU of RB51 at 11 months after initial vaccination (n=16). When comp...

  13. A commercial PCV2a-based vaccine is effective in protection from experimental challenge of PCV2 mutant with two amino acids elongation in capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long-Jun; Fu, Yu-Jie; Huang, Li-Ping; Wang, Yi-Ping; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2015-07-17

    Current commercial PCV2 vaccines are almost based on PCV2a and have been shown to be effective in reducing PCV2a and PCV2b viremia and PCV2-associated lesions and diseases. The recent emergence of novel mutant PCV2 (mPCV2) strains and linkage of mPCV2 with cases of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) in pig herds have raised concerns over emergence of vaccine-escape mutants and reduced efficacy of PCV2a-based vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of a commercial PCV2a-based vaccine developed by our laboratory to protect conventional pigs against experimental challenge with mPCV2 at 9 weeks of age. Twenty 4-week-old pigs free of PCV2 infection were randomly divided into four treatment groups with 5 pigs each. Two groups were unvaccinated as positive and negative controls. Another two groups were vaccinated with the commercial PCV2a-based vaccine (PCV2-LG strain, China) at 4 weeks of age and identical booster immunization was conducted 3 weeks post primary immunization. At 9 weeks of age, all pigs except the negative control were challenged with a mutant PCV2b/YJ (mPCV2b/YJ) with two amino acids elongation in capsid protein. The experiment was terminated 28 days after challenge. Under the conditions of this study, vaccinated pigs were protected against PCV2 viremia and lesions whereas unvaccinated pigs were not. Moreover, mPCV2b/YJ infection was demonstrated in positive control and almost all had macroscopic or microscopic lesions consistent with PCVAD while negative control did not develop PCVAD. This study indicates that mPCV2b/YJ infection alone can trigger PCVAD development and that the commercial vaccine (PCV2-LG) is still effective in protecting conventional pigs against the emerging mPCV2b/YJ strain in China. PMID:26051516

  14. Mutant strains of Tetrahymena thermophila defective in thymidine kinase activity: Biochemical and genetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, K.V.; Pearlman, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Three mutant strains, one conditional, of Tetrahymena thermophila were defective in thymidine phosphorylating activity in vivo and in thymidine kinase activity in vitro. Nucleoside phosphotransferase activity in mutant cell extracts approached wild-type levels, suggesting that thymidine kinase is responsible for most, if not all, thymidine phosphorylation in vivo. Thymidine kinase activity in extracts of the conditional mutant strain was deficient when the cells were grown or assayed or both at the permissive temperature, implying a structural enzyme defect. Analysis of the reaction products from in vitro assays with partially purified enzymes showed that phosphorylation by thymidine kinase and nucleoside phosphotransferase occurred at the 5' position. Genetic analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was recessive and that mutations in each of the three mutant strains did not complement, suggesting allelism.

  15. A Wide Extent of Inter-Strain Diversity in Virulent and Vaccine Strains of Alphaherpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Szpara, Moriah L.; Tafuri, Yolanda R.; Parsons, Lance; Shamim, S. Rafi; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Legendre, Matthieu; Enquist, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    Alphaherpesviruses are widespread in the human population, and include herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and 2, and varicella zoster virus (VZV). These viral pathogens cause epithelial lesions, and then infect the nervous system to cause lifelong latency, reactivation, and spread. A related veterinary herpesvirus, pseudorabies (PRV), causes similar disease in livestock that result in significant economic losses. Vaccines developed for VZV and PRV serve as useful models for the development of an HSV-1 vaccine. We present full genome sequence comparisons of the PRV vaccine strain Bartha, and two virulent PRV isolates, Kaplan and Becker. These genome sequences were determined by high-throughput sequencing and assembly, and present new insights into the attenuation of a mammalian alphaherpesvirus vaccine strain. We find many previously unknown coding differences between PRV Bartha and the virulent strains, including changes to the fusion proteins gH and gB, and over forty other viral proteins. Inter-strain variation in PRV protein sequences is much closer to levels previously observed for HSV-1 than for the highly stable VZV proteome. Almost 20% of the PRV genome contains tandem short sequence repeats (SSRs), a class of nucleic acids motifs whose length-variation has been associated with changes in DNA binding site efficiency, transcriptional regulation, and protein interactions. We find SSRs throughout the herpesvirus family, and provide the first global characterization of SSRs in viruses, both within and between strains. We find SSR length variation between different isolates of PRV and HSV-1, which may provide a new mechanism for phenotypic variation between strains. Finally, we detected a small number of polymorphic bases within each plaque-purified PRV strain, and we characterize the effect of passage and plaque-purification on these polymorphisms. These data add to growing evidence that even plaque-purified stocks of stable DNA viruses exhibit limited sequence

  16. Induction, isolation, and characterization of aspergillus niger mutant strains producing elevated levels of beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed Central

    Nevalainen, K M

    1981-01-01

    An Aspergillus niger mutant strain, VTT-D-80144, with an improvement of three- to fourfold in the production of extracellular beta-galactosidase was isolated after mutagenesis. The production of beta-galactosidase by this mutant was unaffected by fermentor size, and the enzyme was also suitable for immobilization. PMID:6784672

  17. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    PubMed

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines. PMID:20521635

  18. Increased immunity to cottontail rabbit papillomavirus infection in EIII/JC inbred rabbits after vaccination with a mutant E6 that correlates with spontaneous regression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Christensen, Neil D

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that a progressive cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) strain containing a single amino acid change in E6 (E6G252E) induced papilloma regression in EIII/JC inbred rabbits. This finding implied that the point mutation might cause an increase in the antigenicity of the mutant versus the wild-type E6. To test this hypothesis, groups of four EIII/JC inbred rabbits were immunized with wild-type CRPVE6, CRPVE6G252E, CRPV E5, or with vector alone. A gene gun delivery system was used to deliver the DNA vaccines. Two of four rabbits from both E6G252E- and wild-type E6-vaccinated groups were free of papillomas at week 12 after viral challenge. Significantly smaller papillomas were found on E6G252E-vaccinated rabbits than on E6-, E5-, and control vector-vaccinated rabbits (p = 0.01, unpaired Student t test) and these small papillomas regressed at week 20 after viral challenge. E5 vaccination failed to provide protection against viral challenge, and the mean papilloma size was also comparable to that of the control vector-vaccinated rabbits (p > 0.05, unpaired Student t test). We conclude that a single amino acid change in the CRPV E6 protein (G252E) increased protection against wild-type infectious CRPV. PMID:17603848

  19. Safety and protective efficacy of a spiC and crp deletion mutant of Salmonella gallinarum as a live attenuated vaccine for fowl typhoid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhao; Yin, Junlei; Kang, Xilong; Geng, Shizhong; Hu, Maozhi; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-08-01

    With an aim to develop a safe, immunogenic fowl typhoid (FT) vaccine, the safety and efficacy of 1009ΔspiCΔcrp, a spiC and crp deletion mutant of Salmonella gallinarum, were evaluated in chickens. Three-day-old chickens were intramuscularly immunized with 1009ΔspiCΔcrp (1×10(7)CFU) and boosted 7days later (at 10-days old) with the same dose and via the same route (vaccinated group). The vaccinated group showed no clinical symptoms and no differences in body weight compared to the unvaccinated control group. 1009ΔspiCΔcrp bacteria colonized and persisted in the liver and spleen of vaccinated chickens for >14days, and significant specific humoral and cellular immune responses were induced. Vaccinated chickens were challenged with S. gallinarum strain SG9 at 21days post-immunization (24-day-old chickens), and efficient protection was observed based on the mortality and clinical symptoms, as compared to those in the control group. These results demonstrate that 1009ΔspiCΔcrp can be used as a live attenuated vaccine. PMID:27473974

  20. Efficient production of ethanol from crude glycerol by a Klebsiella pneumoniae mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Oh, Baek-Rock; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Heo, Sun-Yeon; Hong, Won-Kyung; Luo, Lian Hua; Joe, Min-ho; Park, Don-Hee; Kim, Chul Ho

    2011-02-01

    A mutant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, termed GEM167, was obtained by γ irradiation, in which glycerol metabolism was dramatically affected on exposure to γ rays. Levels of metabolites of the glycerol reductive pathway, 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) and 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP), were decreased in the GEM167 strain compared to a control strain, whereas the levels of metabolites derived from the oxidative pathway, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), ethanol, lactate, and succinate, were increased. Notably, ethanol production from glycerol was greatly enhanced upon fermentation by the mutant strain, to a maximum production level of 21.5 g/l, with a productivity of 0.93 g/l/h. Ethanol production level was further improved to 25.0 g/l upon overexpression of Zymomonas mobilis pdc and adhII genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (Adh), respectively in the mutant strain GEM167. PMID:21186120

  1. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  2. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  3. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  4. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  5. Evaluation in mice of Brucella ovis attenuated mutants for use as live vaccines against B. ovis infection.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Pilar; Tejedor, Carmen; Sidhu-Muñoz, Rebeca S; Fernández-Lago, Luis; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Brucella ovis causes ram contagious epididymitis, a disease for which a specific vaccine is lacking. Attenuated Brucella melitensis Rev 1, used as vaccine against ovine and caprine brucellosis caused by B. melitensis, is also considered the best vaccine available for the prophylaxis of B. ovis infection, but its use for this purpose has serious drawbacks. In this work, two previously characterized B. ovis attenuated mutants (Δomp25d and Δomp22) were evaluated in mice, in comparison with B. melitensis Rev 1, as vaccines against B. ovis. Similarities, but also significant differences, were found regarding the immune response induced by the three vaccines. Mice vaccinated with the B. ovis mutants developed anti-B. ovis antibodies in serum of the IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b subclasses and their levels were higher than those observed in Rev 1-vaccinated mice. After an antigen stimulus with B. ovis cells, splenocytes obtained from all vaccinated mice secreted similar levels of TNF-α and IL12(p40) and remarkably high amounts of IFN-γ, a crucial cytokine in protective immunity against other Brucella species. By contrast, IL-1α -an enhancer of T cell responses to antigen- was present at higher levels in mice vaccinated with the B. ovis mutants, while IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was significantly more abundant in Rev 1-vaccinated mice. Additionally, the B. ovis mutants showed appropriate persistence, limited splenomegaly and protective efficacy against B. ovis similar to that observed with B. melitensis Rev 1. These characteristics encourage their evaluation in the natural host as homologous vaccines for the specific prophylaxis of B. ovis infection. PMID:24898325

  6. Evaluation in mice of Brucella ovis attenuated mutants for use as live vaccines against B. ovis infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brucella ovis causes ram contagious epididymitis, a disease for which a specific vaccine is lacking. Attenuated Brucella melitensis Rev 1, used as vaccine against ovine and caprine brucellosis caused by B. melitensis, is also considered the best vaccine available for the prophylaxis of B. ovis infection, but its use for this purpose has serious drawbacks. In this work, two previously characterized B. ovis attenuated mutants (Δomp25d and Δomp22) were evaluated in mice, in comparison with B. melitensis Rev 1, as vaccines against B. ovis. Similarities, but also significant differences, were found regarding the immune response induced by the three vaccines. Mice vaccinated with the B. ovis mutants developed anti-B. ovis antibodies in serum of the IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b subclasses and their levels were higher than those observed in Rev 1-vaccinated mice. After an antigen stimulus with B. ovis cells, splenocytes obtained from all vaccinated mice secreted similar levels of TNF-α and IL12(p40) and remarkably high amounts of IFN-γ, a crucial cytokine in protective immunity against other Brucella species. By contrast, IL-1α -an enhancer of T cell responses to antigen- was present at higher levels in mice vaccinated with the B. ovis mutants, while IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was significantly more abundant in Rev 1-vaccinated mice. Additionally, the B. ovis mutants showed appropriate persistence, limited splenomegaly and protective efficacy against B. ovis similar to that observed with B. melitensis Rev 1. These characteristics encourage their evaluation in the natural host as homologous vaccines for the specific prophylaxis of B. ovis infection. PMID:24898325

  7. Evaluation of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Pullorum Pathogenicity Island 2 Mutant as a Candidate Live Attenuated Oral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junlei; Cheng, Zhao; Wang, Xiaochun; Xu, Lijuan; Li, Qiuchun; Geng, Shizhong

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum (S. Pullorum) is a highly adapted pathogen that causes pullorum disease (PD), an important systemic disease of poultry that causes severe economic losses in developing countries. In the interests of developing a safe and immunogenic oral vaccine, the efficacy of a Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2)-deleted mutant of S. Pullorum (S06004ΔSPI2) was evaluated in chickens. S06004ΔSPI2 was severely less virulent than the parental wild-type strain S06004 as determined by the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for 3-day-old chickens when injected intramuscularly. Two-day-old chickens immunized with a single oral dose of S06004ΔSPI2 showed no differences in body weight or clinical symptoms compared with those in the negative-control group. S06004ΔSPI2 bacteria were not isolated from livers or spleens of immunized chickens after a short period of time, and specific humoral and cellular immune responses were significantly induced. Immunized chickens were challenged with S. Pullorum strain S06004 and Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (S. Gallinarum) strain SG9 at 10 days postimmunization (dpi), and efficient protection against the challenges was observed. None of the immunized chickens died, the clinical symptoms were slight and temporary following challenge in immunized chickens compared with those in the control group, and these chickens recovered by 3 to 5 dpi. Overall, these results demonstrate that S06004ΔSPI2 can be used as a live attenuated oral vaccine. PMID:25924763

  8. Evaluation of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Pullorum Pathogenicity Island 2 Mutant as a Candidate Live Attenuated Oral Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Junlei; Cheng, Zhao; Wang, Xiaochun; Xu, Lijuan; Li, Qiuchun; Geng, Shizhong; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum (S. Pullorum) is a highly adapted pathogen that causes pullorum disease (PD), an important systemic disease of poultry that causes severe economic losses in developing countries. In the interests of developing a safe and immunogenic oral vaccine, the efficacy of a Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2)-deleted mutant of S. Pullorum (S06004ΔSPI2) was evaluated in chickens. S06004ΔSPI2 was severely less virulent than the parental wild-type strain S06004 as determined by the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for 3-day-old chickens when injected intramuscularly. Two-day-old chickens immunized with a single oral dose of S06004ΔSPI2 showed no differences in body weight or clinical symptoms compared with those in the negative-control group. S06004ΔSPI2 bacteria were not isolated from livers or spleens of immunized chickens after a short period of time, and specific humoral and cellular immune responses were significantly induced. Immunized chickens were challenged with S. Pullorum strain S06004 and Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (S. Gallinarum) strain SG9 at 10 days postimmunization (dpi), and efficient protection against the challenges was observed. None of the immunized chickens died, the clinical symptoms were slight and temporary following challenge in immunized chickens compared with those in the control group, and these chickens recovered by 3 to 5 dpi. Overall, these results demonstrate that S06004ΔSPI2 can be used as a live attenuated oral vaccine. PMID:25924763

  9. The role of rpoS, hmp, and ssrAB in Salmonella enterica Gallinarum and evaluation of a triple-deletion mutant as a live vaccine candidate in Lohmann layer chickens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Youngjae; Park, Yoon Mee; Barate, Abhijit Kashinath; Park, So-Yeon; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Mi Rae; Truong, Quang Lam; Yoon, Jang Won

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Gallinarum (SG) causes fowl typhoid (FT), a septicemic disease in avian species. We constructed deletion mutants lacking the stress sigma factor RpoS, the nitric oxide (NO)-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp, and the SsrA/SsrB regulator to confirm the functions of these factors in SG. All gene products were fully functional in wild-type (WT) SG whereas mutants harboring single mutations or a combination of rpoS, hmp, and ssrAB mutations showed hypersusceptibility to H2O2, loss of NO metabolism, and absence of Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-2 expression, respectively. A triple-deletion mutant, SGΔ3 (SGΔrpoSΔhmpΔssrAB), was evaluated for attenuated virulence and protection efficacy in two-week-old Lohmann layer chickens. The SGΔ3 mutant did not cause any mortality after inoculation with either 1 × 106 or 1 × 108 colony-forming units (CFUs) of bacteria. Significantly lower numbers of salmonellae were recovered from the liver and spleen of chickens inoculated with the SGΔ3 mutant compared to chickens inoculated with WT SG. Vaccination with the SGΔ3 mutant conferred complete protection against challenge with virulent SG on the chickens comparable to the group vaccinated with a conventional vaccine strain, SG9R. Overall, these results indicate that SGΔ3 could be a promising candidate for a live Salmonella vaccine against FT. PMID:25549217

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi Escape Mutants That Survive in the Presence of Antiserum to the OspA Vaccine Are Killed When Complement Is Also Present

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Mónica; Bantar, Carlos; Indest, Karl; Gu, Yan; Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Coughlin, Richard; Philipp, Mario T.

    1998-01-01

    As an initial attempt to investigate the possible role of outer surface protein A (OspA) escape mutants of Borrelia burgdorferi in decreasing the efficacy of the OspA vaccine, mutants of the HB19 strain of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto were selected in vitro from an uncloned, low-passage-number isolate. The antiserum used for selection was obtained from rhesus monkeys that had been given a vaccine of the same formulation and dose, and by the same route of administration, as that given to humans in several trials. All of the mutants selected in liquid medium and subsequently cloned twice in solid medium expressed a single abundant protein of 28 to 34 kDa instead of both OspA and OspB. Depending on the mutant, this protein reacted strongly, weakly, or not detectably with the anti-OspA antibody used for selection. Analysis of the ospAB locus of each of four representatives from these three groups of mutants by PCR with oligonucleotide primers that hybridize to flanking regions of the ospAB operon, and of the corresponding phenotype with monoclonal antibodies that bind to the amino or carboxyl terminus of the OspA or OspB polypeptide, indicated that in all cases a deletion within the operon had occurred. Spirochetes from the four mutant strains chosen for further analysis could be killed in antibody-dependent, complement-mediated killing assays with the selecting anti-OspA antibody, despite their resistance to killing with this antibody in the absence of complement. Complement-mediated killing occurred at an antibody concentration higher than that required to kill wild-type spirochetes. If anti-OspA antibody acts only within the tick, where complement is probably ineffective due to tick-derived decomplementing factors, then OspA escape mutants, if infectious, could seriously diminish the efficacy of OspA vaccines. On the other hand, if the killing of B. burgdorferi with anti-OspA antibody also takes place within the human host, then our results indicate that chimeric

  11. Experimental study of a further attenuated live measles vaccine of the Sugiyama strain in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mirchamsy, H.; Shafyi, A.; Rafyi, M. R.; Bahrami, S.; Nazari, P.; Fatemie, S.

    1974-01-01

    After encouraging results of the mass vaccination programme in Iran, in which 5 million children in rural areas were vaccinated with the Japanese Sugiyama strain at its 82nd passage in baby calf kidney, and a progressive decrease in the incidence of measles as well as a reduction of excessive infant mortality, a further attenuated vaccine, produced with the same strain, cloned in Japan, was compared in a field trial with the parent vaccine. The new strain caused fewer reactions than the original strain. Seroconversion with a geometric mean antibody titre of 6·1 was observed in 95% of susceptible children. PMID:4522721

  12. A Web-Based Platform for Designing Vaccines against Existing and Emerging Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Vir, Pooja; Singla, Deepak; Gupta, Sudheer; Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is crucial for saving millions of premature deaths every year due to tuberculosis. This paper describes a web portal developed for assisting researchers in designing vaccines against emerging Mtb strains using traditional and modern approaches. Firstly, we annotated 59 genomes of Mycobacterium species to understand similarity/dissimilarity between tuberculoid, non-tuberculoid and vaccine strains at genome level. Secondly, antigen-based vaccine candidates have been predicted in each Mtb strain. Thirdly, epitopes-based vaccine candidates were predicted/discovered in above antigen-based vaccine candidates that can stimulate all arms of immune system. Finally, a database of predicted vaccine candidates at epitopes as well at antigen level has been developed for above strains. In order to design vaccine against a newly sequenced genome of Mtb strain, server integrates three modules for identification of strain-, antigen-, epitope-specific vaccine candidates. We observed that 103522 unique peptides (9mers) had the potential to induce an antibody response and/or promiscuous binder to MHC alleles and/or have the capability to stimulate T lymphocytes. In summary, this web-portal will be useful for researchers working on designing vaccines against Mtb including drug-resistant strains. Availability: The database is available freely at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/mtbveb/. PMID:27096425

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bluetongue Virus (BTV) Vaccine Strains from a Commercial Live Attenuated Vaccine, a BTV-4 Field Strain from South Africa, and a Reassortant Strain Isolated from Experimentally Vaccinated Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Peter; le Grange, Misha; Venter, Estelle H.

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the five virus strains included in a South African commercial trivalent bluetongue virus (BTV) attenuated live virus vaccine, a BTV-4 field strain isolated from Rustenburg, South Africa, in 2011, and a bluetongue reassortant (bluetongue virus 4 strain 4/O. aries-tc/ZAF/11/OBP-115) isolated from experimentally vaccinated cattle. Full-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses show that the bluetongue virus 9 strain 9/B. taurus-tc/ZAF/15/Onderstepoort_B02b is a reassortant virus containing segments from both BTV-9 and BTV-8. PMID:27340051

  14. Characterization of a non-pigment producing Monascus purpureus mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Rasheva, Tanya V; Nedeva, Trayana S; Hallet, Jean-Noel; Kujumdzieva, Anna V

    2003-01-01

    A characterization of a non-pigment producing mutant Monascus purpureus M12 compared with its parental strain Monascus purpureus Went CBS 109.07 has been performed aiming to investigate the relation between pigment biosynthesis and other characteristics of these fungi. A comparison has been made of morphological features, some physiological properties and biochemical activities of both strains. The albino mutant exhibits an anamorph life cycle, high conidia forming capability, slower radial growth rate and temperature sensitivity. The assimilation capacity of both strains for mono-, disaccharides and some alcohols is in the same range (Yx/c 0.2 - 0.35), while the red strain has a higher fermentation capacity. In a selected albino mutant, the growth rate, metabolic activity and capacity for production of typical for Monascus fungi secondary metabolites were reduced considerably. Hydrolytic activity towards natural substrates expressed through glucoamylase and protease was approximately 10 fold lower in the non pigment producing strain (0.05 - 0.08 U/mg protein and 0.01 - 0.07 U/mg protein respectively) compared with the red one. Important qualitative differences between both strains was found in fatty acid composition and in the production of citrinin and monacolin. The mutant strain possessed C17, C20 and C22 fatty acids and did not produce citrinin. PMID:12777069

  15. Transcriptional profiling of recall responses to Francisella live vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Paranavitana, Chrysanthi; DaSilva, Luis; Vladimirova, Antoaneta; Pittman, Phillip R; Velauthapillai, Mahendran; Nikolich, Mikeljon

    2014-03-01

    Global gene expression profile changes were monitored in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after challenge with the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis. Because these PBMCs were from individuals previously immunized with LVS, stimulating these cells with LVS should activate memory responses. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool identified pathways, functions, and networks associated with this in vitro recall response, including novel pathways triggered by the memory response. Dendritic cell (DC) maturation was the most significant among the more than 25 relevant pathways discovered. Interleukin 15, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 signaling pathways were also significant. Pathway analysis indicated that Class 1 antigen presentation may not be optimal with LVS vaccination. The top three biological functions were antigen presentation, cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. Network analysis revealed that the top network associated with these functions had IFNγ and TNFα in central interactive positions. Our results suggest that DC maturation is a key factor in the recall responses and that more effective antigen processing and presentation is needed for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Taken together, these considerations are critical for future tularemia vaccine development studies. PMID:24453125

  16. Biological methods for archiving and maintaining mutant laboratory mice. Part I: conserving mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Fray, Martin D

    2009-01-01

    The mouse is now firmly established as the model organism of choice for scientists studying mammalian biology and human disease. Consequently, a plethora of novel, genetically altered (GA) mouse lines have been created. In addition, the output from the large scale mutagenesis programmes currently under way around the world will increase the collection of GA mouse strains still further. Because of the implications for animal welfare and the constraints on resources, it would be unreasonable to expect anything other than those strains essential for ongoing research programmes to be maintained as breeding colonies. Unfortunately, unless the redundant strains are preserved using robust procedures, which guarantee their recovery, they will be lost to future generations of researchers.This chapter describes some of the preservation methods currently used in laboratories around the world to archive novel mouse strains. PMID:19504080

  17. Humoral response to calicivirus in captive tigers given a dual-strain vaccine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Harrison, Scott H; Sikarskie, James G; Armstrong, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The current feline vaccine with a single strain of calicivirus has been used for captive tigers, yet it may not protect against virulent systemic calicivirus infections. A cross-institutional study investigated the humoral response to a new dual-strain, killed-virus calicivirus vaccine for nine captive tigers. The subspecies of these tigers were Amur (Panthera tigris altaica), Bengal (Panthera tigris tigris), and Malayan (Panthera tigris jacksoni). Serum neutralization titers for virulent feline calicivirus strain FCV-DD1 were higher following dual-strain vaccine administration. There were no reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Dual-strain vaccination may afford broadened cross-protection against different calicivirus strains and is desirable to reduce the risk of virulent systemic calicivirus disease in tigers. PMID:24712158

  18. Isolation of rifampicin resistant Flavobacterium psychrophilum strains and their potential as live attenuated vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that passage of pathogenic bacteria on increasing concentrations of the antibiotic rifampicin leads to the attenuation of virulence and these resistant strains may serve as live attenuated vaccines. Two rifampicin resistant strains of Flavobacterium psychrophilum,...

  19. Effects of a Mutant Strain and a Wild Type Strain of Verticillium lecanii on Heterodera glycines Populations in the Greenhouse

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Susan L. F.; Meyer, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A wild type strain ofVerticillium lecanii and a mutant strain with increased tolerance to the fungicide benomyl were evaluated in greenhouse experiments for effects on Heterodera glycines populations. Nematodes were applied at 300 eggs and juveniles per 4,550-cm³ pot (two soybean plants in 4,990 g loamy sand per pot) and at both 300 and 10,000 eggs and juveniles per 1,720-cm³ pot (one soybean plant in 2,060 g sand per pot). With 300 nematodes added per pot, both V. lecanii strains significantly reduced nematode populations in loamy sand (fungus applied at 0.02% dry weight per dry weight loamy sand) and sand (0.006% and 0.06% fungus application rates). The mutant strain applied at 0.002% to sand also significantly reduced cyst numbers. When 10,000 nematodes were added per pot, only the mutant strain at 0.06% significantly decreased population. Various media were tested for isolation of the fungus strains from prills, loamy sand, and sand, but the fungi were recovered from few of the greenhouse pots. PMID:19277306

  20. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Jing; Wan, Wen-Yan; Li, Hong-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-Tao; Chang, Hong-Tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-Qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry. PMID:26850542

  1. [Generation of nalidixic acid-resistant strains and signature-tagged mutants of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Shang, Lin; Li, Wei; Li, Liangjun; Li, Lu; Zhang, Sihua; Li, Tingting; Li, Yaokun; Liu, Lei; Guo, Zhiwei; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2008-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a very important respiratory pathogen for swine and causes great economic losses in pig industry worldwide. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is an effective method to identify virulence genes in bacteria. In this study, we selected nalidixic acid-resistant strains of APP serotypes 1 and 3 by in vitro cultivation, and used as receipt strains for constructing transposon mutants by mating with E. coli CC 118 lambdapir or S17-1 lambdapir containing mini-Tn10 tag plasmids pLOF/TAG1-48, with or without the help of E. coli DH5alpha (pRK2073). We screened mutant strains by antibiotics selection, PCR and Southern blot identification. Our data revealed that nalidixic acid-resistance of APP strains could easily be induced in vitro and the resistance was due to the mutation in the DNA gyrase A subunit gene gyrA. In the mating experiments, the bi-parental mating was more effective and easier than tri-parental mating. Different APP strains showed a different mating and transposon efficiency in the bi-parental mating, with the strains of serotype 1 much higher than serotype 3 and the reference strain of serotype 3 higher than the field strains. These data were helpful for the construction of STM mutants and pickup of virulence genes of APP. PMID:18338580

  2. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26440913

  3. Salmonella abortusovis, strain Rv6, a new vaccinal vehicle for small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Bourgogne, A; Sanchis, R; Clément, J M; Pépin, M

    1998-03-31

    Salmonella abortusovis strain Rv6 (Sao Rv6) is a live attenuated vaccine used for a few years to protect ewes against abortive salmonellosis. As Salmonellae, particularly Salmonella aro mutants, have considerable potential as vehicles for the presentation of heterologous vaccine antigens, Sao Rv6 was tested in order to develop a vaccinal vehicle for small ruminants. Five vector plasmids were tested in Sao Rv6; these plasmids, which carry Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) expressed as protein, but differ in their promotors, had been previously tested in S. typhimurium strain SL3261, and were transferred into Sao Rv6. The five plasmids were stable in vitro, and the recombinant Sao Rv6 expressed MBP at various levels. Intraperitoneal infection of OF1 mice with the recombinant bacteria did not modify the characteristics of Sao Rv6; dissemination and infection levels were similar in all groups and all mice developed antibodies to Salmonella antigens as measured by ELISA. In contrast, only animals immunized with Sao Rv6 carrying the pNTE plasmid developed a serum antibody response to MBP. This plasmid was then tested in sheep; following subcutaneous immunization with Sao Rv6-pNTE, dissemination and infection levels were not modified in comparison with sheep immunized with Sao Rv6 lacking plasmid. Antibodies specific to MBP were detected in sera of sheep immunized with Sao Rv6-pNTE, purified MBP, and with S. typhimurium SL3261-pNTE as positive controls. These results demonstrate that Sao Rv6 can be used as a vehicle for heterologous antigens in sheep with pNTE as plasmid vector. PMID:9631532

  4. Classical swine fever virus Strain 'C'. How long is it detectable after oral vaccination?

    PubMed

    Kaden, V; Lange, E; Riebe, R; Lange, B

    2004-08-01

    To determine the persistence period of C-strain vaccine virus in immunized animals, domestic pigs and wild boars were vaccinated orally and killed on different days post vaccinationem (dpv). Tissue samples were taken at necropsy from both species for detection of C-strain virus. From domestic pigs nasal swabs and faeces were also collected. During the investigation period (2-12 dpv) vaccine virus could never be detected in nasal secretions and in faeces of vaccinated domestic pigs. In contrast, C-strain virus was found in organs until day 8 pv in domestic pigs and until day 9 pv in wild boars. Whereas in domestic pigs virus was detected in tonsils, Ln. mandibularis or in spleen, in wild boar it only was found in tonsils. We conclude that C-strain vaccine virus is not detectable in wild boars longer than 10-12 days after intake of the vaccine baits. PMID:15458487

  5. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R.; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors. PMID:24396177

  6. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors. PMID:24396177

  7. Assessment of inactivated human rabies vaccines: biochemical characterization and genetic identification of virus strains.

    PubMed

    Finke, Stefan; Karger, Axel; Freuling, Conrad; Müller, Thomas

    2012-05-21

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the periodic evaluation of the purity of the cell lines used in the production of rabies vaccines, as well as the antigenic identity of the virus strains. Here, we analyzed seventeen marketed inactivated human rabies virus vaccines for viral and non-viral proteins by SDS-PAGE and Coomassie/silver staining. Mass spectrometric analysis of an abundant 60-70 kDa signal indicated that in most vaccines serum albumin of human origin (HSA) was the major component. Quantification of HSA in the vaccines revealed a mean concentration of 22 mg HSA/dose in all tested PVRV (purified vero cell rabies vaccine), HDCV (human diploid cell rabies vaccine) and PHK (primary hamster kidney) vaccines. In contrast, 1000-fold lower HSA levels and no HSA were detected in PCECV (purified chick embryo cell-culture vaccine) and PDEV (duck embryo rabies vaccine), respectively. Western blot analyses further confirmed a high bias in the HSA content, whereas the virus protein levels were rather similar in all tested vaccines. In addition, the vaccine viruses were sequenced within the N- and G-genes to identify the strain. In the majority of sequenced vaccines, the declared vaccine strain was confirmed. However, some discrepancies in the genetic identification were observed, supporting WHO's recommendation for the molecular characterization of vaccine seed strains. This research highlights the variation in purity found between different human rabies virus vaccines, and suggests that further research is needed to establish the impact non-active components have on the potency of such vaccines. PMID:22469862

  8. Comparative Full Length Sequence Analysis of Oncogenic and Vaccine (Rispens) Strains of Marek's Disease Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete DNA sequence of the Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 vaccine strain CVI988 was determined and consists of 178,311 bp with an overall gene organization identical to that of the oncogenic strains. In examining open reading frames (ORFs), nine ORFs differ between vaccine and oncogenic stra...

  9. Effectiveness of Meningococcal B Vaccine against Endemic Hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis W Strain, England.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Biolchi, Alessia; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Beebeejaun, Kazim; Lucidarme, Jay; Findlow, Jamie; Ramsay, Mary E; Borrow, Ray

    2016-02-01

    Serum samples from children immunized with a meningococcal serogroup B vaccine demonstrated potent serum bactericidal antibody activity against the hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W strain circulating in England. The recent introduction of this vaccine into the United Kingdom national immunization program should also help protect infants against this endemic strain. PMID:26811872

  10. Effectiveness of Meningococcal B Vaccine against Endemic Hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis W Strain, England

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Biolchi, Alessia; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Beebeejaun, Kazim; Lucidarme, Jay; Findlow, Jamie; Ramsay, Mary E.; Borrow, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Serum samples from children immunized with a meningococcal serogroup B vaccine demonstrated potent serum bactericidal antibody activity against the hypervirulent Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W strain circulating in England. The recent introduction of this vaccine into the United Kingdom national immunization program should also help protect infants against this endemic strain. PMID:26811872

  11. Effect of polymyxin B and environmental conditions on isolation of Brucella species and the vaccine strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Allen E; Halling, Shirley M

    2010-03-01

    Brucella are resistant to polymyxin B (PB), but their relative susceptibility to PB and its derivative, colistin (COL) has not been rigorously or systematically studied. Comparative susceptibility of Brucella reference strains, vaccine strain RB51, and Brucella isolates from marine mammals to these two cationic peptides were determined by Etest. Vast differences among Brucella species were found in susceptibility to both PB and COL. Brucella demonstrated similar pattern of relative susceptibility to PB as that of COL, but they were less susceptible to COL. Both B. melitensis and B. suis were the least susceptible to polymyxins and rough strains were more susceptible to both PB and COL than the smooth except for the BvrR mutant. Strains were generally less susceptible to PB when cultured in CO(2) rather than ambient air; some became more susceptible in acidified medium. Results show that environment cultural conditions must be considered when selecting for CO(2)-independent strains of Brucella especially the vaccine strain RB51 on selective media containing PB. Our observations extend basic knowledge of the differential resistance of Brucella to polymyxins. PMID:18814911

  12. Genetic stability of vaccine strain Salmonella Typhi Ty21a over 25 years.

    PubMed

    Kopecko, Dennis J; Sieber, Heike; Ures, Jose A; Fürer, Andreas; Schlup, Jacqueline; Knof, Ulrich; Collioud, Andre; Xu, Deqi; Colburn, Kevin; Dietrich, Guido

    2009-04-01

    The attenuated live bacterial vaccine strain Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Ty21a is the main constituent of Vivotif, the only licensed oral vaccine against typhoid fever. The strain was developed in the 1970s by chemical mutagenesis. In the course of this mutagenesis, a number of mutations were introduced into the vaccine strain. Characterisation of the vaccine strain during development as well as release of master- and working seed lots (MSL and WSL) and commercial batches is based on phenotypic assays assessing microbiological and biochemical characteristics of Ty21a. In the current study, we have analysed by DNA sequencing the specific mutations originally correlated with the attenuation of strain Ty21a. These data demonstrate the stability of these mutations for MSLs and WSLs of Ty21a produced between 1980 and 2005. Finally, we have confirmed the correlation of these genetic mutations with the expected phenotypic attenuations for the seed lots used in vaccine manufacture over 25 years. PMID:19121604

  13. The serological response of young dogs to the Flury LEP strain of rabies virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Aghomo, H O; Oduye, O O; Rupprecht, C E

    1990-01-01

    The serological response of puppies from Nigeria to live Flury low egg passage (LEP) rabies vaccine was determined. Two sets of puppies were used: one set from rabies-vaccinated bitches and another set from non-vaccinated bitches. Puppies were vaccinated intramuscularly with Flury LEP strain rabies vaccine and serially bled from the 4th week to the 30th week. Serum rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) were measured by a modified rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Puppies from non-vaccinated bitches responded well to vaccination after the 4th week and through to the 10th week of age, showing a progressive increase in VNA. In contrast, puppies from vaccinated bitches responded well to rabies vaccination only at 10 weeks of age, although detectable maternal rabies VNA and rabies anti-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) antibodies had decreased by 6 weeks post partum. PMID:2247948

  14. Global carbon utilization profiles of wild-type, mutant, and transformant strains of Hypocrea jecorina.

    PubMed

    Druzhinina, Irina S; Schmoll, Monika; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2006-03-01

    The ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), an industrial producer of cellulases and hemicellulases, can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides. However, the catabolic pathways for the resulting monomers and their relationship to enzyme induction are not well known. Here we used the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays technique to evaluate the growth of H. jecorina on 95 carbon sources. For this purpose, we compared several wild-type isolates, mutants producing different amounts of cellulases, and strains transformed with a heterologous antibiotic resistance marker gene. The wild-type isolates and transformed strains had the highest variation in growth patterns on individual carbon sources. The cellulase mutants were relatively similar to their parental strains. Both in the mutant and in the transformed strains, the most significant changes occurred in utilization of xylitol, erythritol, D-sorbitol, D-ribose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, maltotriose, and beta-methyl-glucoside. Increased production of cellulases was negatively correlated with the ability to grow on gamma-aminobutyrate, adonitol, and 2-ketogluconate; and positively correlated with that on d-sorbitol and saccharic acid. The reproducibility, relative simplicity, and high resolution (+/-10% of increase in mycelial density) of the phenotypic microarrays make them a useful tool for the characterization of mutant and transformed strains and for a global analysis of gene function. PMID:16517662

  15. Bovine herpesvirus-1: comparison and differentiation of vaccine and field strains based on genomic sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Eberle, R

    2013-03-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) causes significant disease in cattle including respiratory, fetal diseases, and reproductive tract infections. Control programs usually include vaccination with a modified live viral (MLV) vaccine. On occasion BoHV-1 strains are isolated from diseased animals or fetuses postvaccination. Currently there are no markers for differentiating MLV strains from field strains of BoHV-1. In this study several BoHV-1 strains were sequenced using whole-genome sequencing technologies and the data analyzed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Strains sequenced included the reference BoHV-1 Cooper strain (GenBank Accession JX898220), eight commercial MLV vaccine strains, and 14 field strains from cases presented for diagnosis. Based on SNP analyses, the viruses could be classified into groups having similar SNP patterns. The eight MLV strains could be differentiated from one another although some were closely related to each other. A number of field strains isolated from animals with a history of prior vaccination had SNP patterns similar to specific MLV viruses, while other field isolates were very distinct from all vaccine strains. The results indicate that some BoHV-1 isolates from clinically ill cattle/fetuses can be associated with a prior MLV vaccination history, but more information is needed on the rate of BoHV-1 genome sequence change before irrefutable associations can be drawn. PMID:23333211

  16. Construction of an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A vaccine strain harboring defined mutations in htrA and yncD.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunyue; Xiong, Kun; Chen, Zhijin; Hu, Xiaomei; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Yiran; Rao, Xiancai; Cong, Yanguang

    2015-08-01

    The global epidemic features of enteric fever have changed greatly in recent years. The incidence of enteric fever caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A has progressively increased. In some areas of Asia, infections with S. Paratyphi A have exceeded those with S. Typhi, resulting in S. Paratyphi A becoming the main causative agent of enteric fever. However, two currently licensed typhoid vaccines do not confer adequate cross-protection against S. Paratyphi A infection. Therefore, development of specific vaccines against enteric fever caused by S. Paratyphi A is urgently needed. In the present study, an attenuated strain was constructed by double deletion of the htrA and yncD genes in a wild-type strain of S. Paratyphi A and its safety and immunogenicity assessed. In a mouse model, the 50% lethal dose of the double deletion mutant and the wild-type strain were 3.0 × 10(8) CFU and 1.9 × 10(3) CFU, respectively, suggesting that the double deletion resulted in remarkably decreased bacterial virulence. Bacterial colonization of the double deletion mutant in the livers and spleens of infected mice was strikingly less than that of the wild-type strain. A single nasal administration of the attenuated vaccine candidate elicited high concentrations of anti-LPS and anti-flagellin IgG in a mouse model and protected immunized mice against lethal challenge with the wild-type strain. Thus, our findings suggest that the attenuated vaccine strain is a promising candidate worthy of further evaluation both as a human enteric fever vaccine and as a vaccine delivery vector for heterologous antigens. PMID:26084199

  17. Selection and Characterization of Phage-Resistant Mutant Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Reveal Host Genes Linked to Phage Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Denes, Thomas; den Bakker, Henk C.; Tokman, Jeffrey I.; Guldimann, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Listeria-infecting phages are readily isolated from Listeria-containing environments, yet little is known about the selective forces they exert on their host. Here, we identified that two virulent phages, LP-048 and LP-125, adsorb to the surface of Listeria monocytogenes strain 10403S through different mechanisms. We isolated and sequenced, using whole-genome sequencing, 69 spontaneous mutant strains of 10403S that were resistant to either one or both phages. Mutations from 56 phage-resistant mutant strains with only a single mutation mapped to 10 genes representing five loci on the 10403S chromosome. An additional 12 mutant strains showed two mutations, and one mutant strain showed three mutations. Two of the loci, containing seven of the genes, accumulated the majority (n = 64) of the mutations. A representative mutant strain for each of the 10 genes was shown to resist phage infection through mechanisms of adsorption inhibition. Complementation of mutant strains with the associated wild-type allele was able to rescue phage susceptibility for 6 out of the 10 representative mutant strains. Wheat germ agglutinin, which specifically binds to N-acetylglucosamine, bound to 10403S and mutant strains resistant to LP-048 but did not bind to mutant strains resistant to only LP-125. We conclude that mutant strains resistant to only LP-125 lack terminal N-acetylglucosamine in their wall teichoic acid (WTA), whereas mutant strains resistant to both phages have disruptive mutations in their rhamnose biosynthesis operon but still possess N-acetylglucosamine in their WTA. PMID:25888172

  18. Selection and Characterization of Phage-Resistant Mutant Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Reveal Host Genes Linked to Phage Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Denes, Thomas; den Bakker, Henk C; Tokman, Jeffrey I; Guldimann, Claudia; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Listeria-infecting phages are readily isolated from Listeria-containing environments, yet little is known about the selective forces they exert on their host. Here, we identified that two virulent phages, LP-048 and LP-125, adsorb to the surface of Listeria monocytogenes strain 10403S through different mechanisms. We isolated and sequenced, using whole-genome sequencing, 69 spontaneous mutant strains of 10403S that were resistant to either one or both phages. Mutations from 56 phage-resistant mutant strains with only a single mutation mapped to 10 genes representing five loci on the 10403S chromosome. An additional 12 mutant strains showed two mutations, and one mutant strain showed three mutations. Two of the loci, containing seven of the genes, accumulated the majority (n = 64) of the mutations. A representative mutant strain for each of the 10 genes was shown to resist phage infection through mechanisms of adsorption inhibition. Complementation of mutant strains with the associated wild-type allele was able to rescue phage susceptibility for 6 out of the 10 representative mutant strains. Wheat germ agglutinin, which specifically binds to N-acetylglucosamine, bound to 10403S and mutant strains resistant to LP-048 but did not bind to mutant strains resistant to only LP-125. We conclude that mutant strains resistant to only LP-125 lack terminal N-acetylglucosamine in their wall teichoic acid (WTA), whereas mutant strains resistant to both phages have disruptive mutations in their rhamnose biosynthesis operon but still possess N-acetylglucosamine in their WTA. PMID:25888172

  19. Genetics of Peripheral Vestibular Dysfunction: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of research has been published about genetic hearing impairment. Fifty to sixty percent of hearing loss is thought to have a genetic cause. Genes may also play a significant role in acquired hearing loss due to aging, noise exposure, or ototoxic medications. Between 1995 and 2012, over 100 causative genes have been identified for syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of hereditary hearing loss (see Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage http://hereditaryhearingloss.org). Mouse models have been extremely valuable in facilitating the discovery of hearing loss genes, and in understanding inner ear pathology due to genetic mutations or elucidating fundamental mechanisms of inner ear development. Purpose Whereas much is being learned about hereditary hearing loss and the genetics of cochlear disorders, relatively little is known about the role genes may play in peripheral vestibular impairment. Here we review the literature with regard to genetics of vestibular dysfunction and discuss what we have learned from studies using mutant mouse models and direct measures of peripheral vestibular neural function. Results Several genes are considered that when mutated lead to varying degrees of inner ear vestibular dysfunction due to deficits in otoconia, stereocilia, hair cells, or neurons. Behavior often does not reveal the inner ear deficit. Many of the examples presented are also known to cause human disorders. Conclusions Knowledge regarding the roles of particular genes in the operation of the vestibular sensory apparatus is growing and it is clear that gene products co-expressed in the cochlea and vestibule may play different roles in the respective end organs. The discovery of new genes mediating critical inner ear vestibular function carries the promise of new strategies in diagnosing, treating and managing patients as well as predicting the course and level of morbidity in human vestibular disease. PMID:25032973

  20. Frequency-dependent viability in mutant strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Curtsinger, J W; Sheen, F M

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the effects of genotypic frequencies on egg-to-adult viabilities in pairwise combinations of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The experiments involved mixture of a total of 42,000 eggs in varying proportions under controlled densities and observation of surviving adults. Viabilities were found to depend on frequencies in several genotypic combinations. In the most extreme case, the absolute viability of cn;bw females increased monotonically from 54% when common to 70% when rare. The results illustrate several statistical and methodological problems that might explain why some experiments have failed to detect frequency-dependent viabilities. These problems include heterogeneity between replications, sex differences in susceptibility to competition, and strong dependence of the experimental outcome on the choice of competitor genotypes. PMID:1901577

  1. Selecting vaccine strains for H3N2 human influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    H3N2 human influenza A virus causes epidemics of influenza mainly in the winter season in temperate regions. Since the antigenicity of this virus evolves rapidly, several attempts have been made to predict the major amino acid sequence of hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) in the target season of vaccination. However, the usefulness of predicted sequence was unclear because its relationship to the antigenicity was unknown. Here the antigenic model for estimating the degree of antigenic difference (antigenic distance) between amino acid sequences of HA1 was integrated into the process of selecting vaccine strains for H3N2 human influenza A virus. When the effectiveness of a potential vaccine strain for a target season was evaluated retrospectively using the average antigenic distance between the strain and the epidemic viruses sampled in the target season, the most effective vaccine strain was identified mostly in the season one year before the target season (pre-target season). Effectiveness of actual vaccines appeared to be lower than that of the strains randomly chosen in the pre-target season on average. It was recommended to replace the vaccine strain for every target season with the strain having the smallest average antigenic distance to the others in the pre-target season. The procedure of selecting vaccine strains for future epidemic seasons described in the present study was implemented in the influenza virus forecasting system (INFLUCAST) (http://www.nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp/~yossuzuk/influcast.html). PMID:25893173

  2. Derepression of colicin E1 synthesis in the constitutive tif mutant strain (spr tif sfi) and in a tif sfi mutant strain of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Tessman, E S; Gritzmacher, C A; Peterson, P K

    1978-01-01

    We show here that expression of the colicin gene of the ColE1 plasmid is greatly derepressed in Escherichia coli K-12 strain DM1187 spr tif sfi, which is a constitutive tif mutant, altered in the lexA gene, and which shows constitutive expression of various pathways of the recA-dependent, lexA-blocked (SOS) repair system. In this strain colicin E1 synthesis is at least 100-fold greater than that observed in uninduced control strains (spr+ tif sfi and spr+ tif+ sfi). This result confirms the regulatory role of the lexA product in colicin E1 synthesis. Colicin yields by the uninduced strain DM1187 are as high as the maximum yields from mitomycin-induced control strains and often are several-fold higher. When the nonconstitutive tif sfi strain GC467 is raised to 43 degrees C to induce the SOS system, a low level of colicin synthesis is observed which is less than one-tenth of the yield obtained by induction with mitomycin C. Addition of adenine at the time of shift-up can increase the colicin yield of tif sfi to about one-third of the yield obtained with mitomycin C. We have also found that colicin overproduction can be detected by altered colony appearance in an overlay assay with colicin-sensitive bacteria. In addition, the lethality of the process of colicin synthesis is observed here without the use of bacteriostatic inducing agents. Images PMID:353034

  3. Genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis attenuated vaccine strain A16R used for human in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiankai; Qi, Xinpeng; Zhu, Li; Wang, Dongshu; Gao, Zhiqi; Deng, Haijun; Wu, Weili; Hu, Tao; Chen, Chen; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Hengliang

    2015-09-20

    An attenuated Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain for human use, A16R, was obtained in China after ultraviolet radiation treatment and continuous subculture of the wild-type strain A16. A16R can synthesize the exotoxin, but without a capsule. We sequenced and annotated the A16R genome to encourage the use of this strain. The genome sequencing of the wild-type strain A16 is underway and the genomic comparison between the two strains will help to illustrate the attenuating mechanism of the A16R vaccine strain. PMID:26116813

  4. Mechanical properties of elytra from Tribolium castaneum wild-type and body color mutant strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cuticle tanning in insects involves simultaneous cuticular hardening and pigmentation. The dynamic mechanical properties of the highly modified and cuticle-rich forewings (elytra) from Tribolium castaneum (red flour beetle) body color mutant strains were investigated to determine the relationship b...

  5. Large scale parallel pyrosequencing technology: PRRSV strain VR-2332 nsp2 deletion mutant stability in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomes from fifteen porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates were derived simultaneously using 454 pyrosequencing technology. The viral isolates sequenced were from a recent swine study, in which engineered Type 2 prototype PRRSV strain VR-2332 mutants, with 87, 184, 200...

  6. Effects of vaccination with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum on egg production and quality parameters of commercial layer hens previously vaccinated with 6/85-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of overlaying (revaccinating) F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) at 22 or 45 weeks of age on commercial leghorn hens previously vaccinated with 6/85 strain MG at 10 weeks of age. The treatment groups include unvaccinated hens (group 1), hens r...

  7. Predicted Strain Coverage of a New Meningococcal Multicomponent Vaccine (4CMenB) in Spain: Analysis of the Differences with Other European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Raquel; Medina, Verónica; Stella, Maria; Boccadifuoco, Giuseppe; Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Vázquez, Julio A.

    2016-01-01

    where the multicomponent vaccine is introduced. This is really important in countries like Spain where most of the strains are predicted to be covered by only one vaccine antigen and the chance for escape mutants to emerge with vaccine use is higher. Based on the observed data, cc213 should receive special attention as it is associated with low predicted strain coverage, and has recently emerged in Spain. PMID:26950303

  8. Vaccination with an Attenuated Mutant of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Induces Pathogen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Immunity and Protection from Tick-Transmitted Wild-Type Challenge in the Canine Host

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Jodi L.; Nair, Arathy D. S.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Rusk, Rachel A.; Jaworski, Deborah C.; Ganta, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen and the causative agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Transmitted by the Amblyomma americanum tick, E. chaffeensis also causes disease in several other vertebrate species including white-tailed deer and dogs. We have recently described the generation of an attenuated mutant strain of E. chaffeensis, with a mutation in the Ech_0660 gene, which is able to confer protection from secondary, intravenous-administered, wild-type E. chaffeensis infection in dogs. Here, we extend our previous results, demonstrating that vaccination with the Ech_0660 mutant protects dogs from physiologic, tick-transmitted, secondary challenge with wild-type E. chaffeensis; and describing, for the first time, the cellular and humoral immune responses induced by Ech_0660 mutant vaccination and wild-type E. chaffeensis infection in the canine host. Both vaccination and infection induced a rise in E. chaffeensis-specific antibody titers and a significant Th1 response in peripheral blood as measured by E. chaffeensis antigen-dependent CD4+ T cell proliferation and IFNγ production. Further, we describe for the first time significant IL-17 production by peripheral blood leukocytes from both Ech_0660 mutant vaccinated animals and control animals infected with wild-type E. chaffeensis, suggesting a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and Th17 cells in the immune response to rickettsial pathogens. Our results are a critical first step towards defining the role of the immune system in vaccine-induced protection from E. chaffeensis infection in an incidental host; and confirm the potential of the attenuated mutant clone, Ech_0660, to be used as a vaccine candidate for protection against tick-transmitted E. chaffeensis infection. PMID:26841025

  9. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae: porphobilinogenase activity in a wild-type strain and its heme-deficient mutant].

    PubMed

    Araujo, L S; Lombardo, M E; Rossetti, M V; Batlle, A M

    1987-01-01

    Properties of Porphobilinogenase (PBGase), the enzyme complex converting porphobilinogen (PBG) into uroporphyrinogens, were comparatively studied in a wild strain D273-10B and its mutant B231 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Figure 1 shows the growth curves for both strains. The basic pattern of growth was observed but, although S. cerevisiae is a facultative aerobe and was grown on dextrose, a diauxic growth curve was not observed. The beginning of the exponential phase was slightly delayed for the mutant, so, its generation time (G = 3.20 h) was greater than that for the wild strain (G = 1.26 h). Optimum conditions for extracting the enzyme from both strains were found to be sonication at 10 mu for 3 min (Table 1). Table 2 shows the effect of centrifugation at 24,000 xg for 30 min on activity. For both strains the amount of porphyrins formed was the same either in the absence or presence of air. It was found (Figure 2) that urogen formation was linear with protein over a wide range of concentrations and with incubation time up to 2h in agreement with previous results for the enzyme of different sources. Figure 3 shows the effect of pH on PBGase activity. An optimum pH of 7.4 was found for both strains employing sodium phosphate buffer pH 8.0. The shape of the pH curve as well as optimum pH were the same in both Tris-HCl and phosphate buffer, however PBGase was 15% less active in the former. When plots of velocity against PBG concentration were analyzed for PBGase, it was found that measuring the rate of the reaction on the basis of total urogen formation, saturation curves for wild and mutant strains harvested at the exponential phase, followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Saturation was reached at PBG concentration of about 70-90 microM. Therefore, double reciprocal plots (Figure 4) were linear and from these plots apparent Km's values of 20 and 14 microM were obtained for the wild and mutant strain respectively. It is known that in some organisms, the

  10. Mutant strains of Pichia pastoris with enhanced secretion of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sasha; Weaver, Jun; de Sa Campos, Katherine; Bulahan, Rhobe; Nguyen, Jackson; Grove, Heather; Huang, Amy; Low, Lauren; Tran, Namphuong; Gomez, Seth; Yau, Jennifer; Ilustrisimo, Thomas; Kawilarang, Jessica; Lau, Jonathan; Tranphung, Maivi; Chen, Irene; Tran, Christina; Fox, Marcia; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P

    2013-11-01

    Although Pichia pastoris is a popular protein expression system, it exhibits limitations in its ability to secrete heterologous proteins. Therefore, a REMI (restriction enzyme mediated insertion) strategy was utilized to select mutant beta-g alactosidase s upersecretion (bgs) strains that secreted increased levels of a β-galactosidase reporter. Many of the twelve BGS genes may have functions in intracellular signaling or vesicle transport. Several of these strains also appeared to contain a more permeable cell wall. Preliminary characterization of four bgs mutants showed that they differed in the ability to enhance the export of other reporter proteins. bgs13, which has a disruption in a gene homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein kinase C (PKC1), gave enhanced secretion of most recombinant proteins that were tested, raising the possibility that it has the universal super-secreter phenotype needed in an industrial production strain of P. pastoris. PMID:23881328

  11. Genetic characterisation of attenuated SAD rabies virus strains used for oral vaccination of wildlife.

    PubMed

    Geue, Lutz; Schares, Susann; Schnick, Christina; Kliemt, Jeannette; Beckert, Aline; Freuling, Conrad; Conraths, Franz J; Hoffmann, Bernd; Zanoni, Reto; Marston, Denise; McElhinney, Lorraine; Johnson, Nicholas; Fooks, Anthony R; Tordo, Noel; Müller, Thomas

    2008-06-19

    The elimination of rabies from the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Western Europe has been achieved by the oral rabies vaccination (ORV) of wildlife with a range of attenuated rabies virus strains. With the exception of the vaccinia rabies glycoprotein recombinant vaccine (VRG), all strains were originally derived from a common ancestor; the Street Alabama Dufferin (SAD) field strain. However, after more than 30 years of ORV it is still not possible to distinguish these vaccine strains and there is little information on the genetic basis for their attenuation. We therefore sequenced and compared the full-length genome of five commercially available SAD vaccine viruses (SAD B19, SAD P5/88, SAG2, SAD VA1 and SAD Bern) and four other SAD strains (the original SAD Bern, SAD VA1, ERA and SAD 1-3670 Wistar). Nucleotide sequencing allowed identifying each vaccine strain unambiguously. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of the currently used commercial attenuated rabies virus vaccines appear to be derived from SAD B19 rather than from SAD Bern. One commercially available vaccine virus did not contain the SAD strain mentioned in the product information of the producer. Two SAD vaccine strains appeared to consist of mixed genomic sequences. Furthermore, in-del events targeting A-rich sequences (in positive strand) within the 3' non-coding regions of M and G genes were observed in SAD-derivates developed in Europe. Our data also supports the idea of a possible recombination that had occurred during the derivation of the European branch of SAD viruses. If confirmed, this recombination event would be the first one reported among RABV vaccine strains. PMID:18485548

  12. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingliang; Liu, Guanchen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Chang, Junliang; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71), both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024) isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL) in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine. PMID:26193302

  13. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingliang; Liu, Guanchen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Chang, Junliang; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71), both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024) isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL) in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine. PMID:26193302

  14. Complex adenovirus-vectored vaccine protects guinea pigs from three strains of Marburg virus challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Danher; Hevey, Michael; Juompan, Laure Y.; Trubey, Charles M.; Raja, Nicholas U.; Deitz, Stephen B.; Woraratanadharm, Jan; Luo Min; Yu Hong; Swain, Benjamin M.; Moore, Kevin M.; Dong, John Y. . E-mail: dongj@genphar.com

    2006-09-30

    The Marburg virus (MARV), an African filovirus closely related to the Ebola virus, causes a deadly hemorrhagic fever in humans, with up to 90% mortality. Currently, treatment of disease is only supportive, and no vaccines are available to prevent spread of MARV infections. In order to address this need, we have developed and characterized a novel recombinant vaccine that utilizes a single complex adenovirus-vectored vaccine (cAdVax) to overexpress a MARV glycoprotein (GP) fusion protein derived from the Musoke and Ci67 strains of MARV. Vaccination with the cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine led to efficient production of MARV-specific antibodies in both mice and guinea pigs. Significantly, guinea pigs vaccinated with at least 5 x 10{sup 7} pfu of cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine were 100% protected against lethal challenges by the Musoke, Ci67 and Ravn strains of MARV, making it a vaccine with trivalent protective efficacy. Therefore, the cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine serves as a promising vaccine candidate to prevent and contain multi-strain infections by MARV.

  15. Characterization of genetically inactivated pertussis toxin mutants: candidates for a new vaccine against whooping cough.

    PubMed Central

    Nencioni, L; Pizza, M; Bugnoli, M; De Magistris, T; Di Tommaso, A; Giovannoni, F; Manetti, R; Marsili, I; Matteucci, G; Nucci, D

    1990-01-01

    the introduction of two amino acid substitutions within the enzymatically active subunit S1 of pertussis toxin (PT) abolishes its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and toxicity on CHO cells (Pizza et al., Science 246:497-500, 1989). These genetically inactivated molecules are also devoid of other in vivo adverse reactions typical of PT, such as induction of leukocytosis, potentiation of anaphylaxis, stimulation of insulin secretion, and histamine sensitivity. However, the mutant PT molecules are indistinguishable from wild-type PT in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and maintain all the physical and chemical properties of PT, including affinity for toxin-neutralizing poly- and monoclonal antibodies. Either alone or stabilized with formaldehyde, PT mutants are able to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies and to protect mice in a dose-dependent fashion against intracerebral challenge with virulent B. pertussis. These results clearly show that these genetically inactivated PT molecules are nontoxic but still immunogenic and justify their development as a component of a new, safer acellular vaccine against whooping cough. Images PMID:2323818

  16. Genetic stability of vaccine strains by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis: Implications for quality control of the leptospiral vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yinghua; Zhang, Jinlong; Cui, Shenghui; Li, Min; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Honggang; Xin, Xiaofang; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-01-01

    Quality control of vaccine strains is directly associated with the safety and efficacy of inactivated whole bacterial vaccines. The assessment of genetic stability is one of the essential elements to guarantee the quality of vaccine strains. The multiple-valence inactivated leptospiral vaccine, comprising the main circulating serogroups, has played an important role in the control of Leptospira infection in China. In the present study, to assess the genetic stability of vaccine strains and develop novel quality control tests that enhance and extend the existing procedures, 7 Chinese leptospiral vaccine strains were characterized during in vivo and in vitro passages by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. The seven vaccine strains were found to have distinct sequence types (STs) and PFGE profiles. Further analysis showed that the ST and PFGE pattern of each vaccine strain, after in vivo or serial in vitro passages (up to 20 passages), were identical to those of the initial strain, demonstrating that these strains were genetically stable and homogeneous. Taken together, PFGE and MLST provide a reproducible and reliable means for confirming the identity and genetic stability of vaccine seeds, suggesting that these approaches can be used to evaluate the quality of leptospiral vaccine strains. PMID:25806658

  17. Protective immunity spectrum induced by immunization with a vaccine from the TBEV strain Sofjin.

    PubMed

    Chernokhaeva, L L; Rogova, Yu V; Vorovitch, M F; Romanova, L Iu; Kozlovskaya, L I; Maikova, G B; Kholodilov, I S; Karganova, G G

    2016-04-29

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) circulates widely in the territory of Eurasia with up to 10,000 cases registered annually. The TBE virus (TBEV) includes three main subtypes: European, Siberian and Far-Eastern, and two new Asiatic variants, phylogenetically distant from the others. The inactivated antigen of European or Far-Eastern strains is used in commercial TBE vaccines. A set of 14 TBEV strains, isolated in 1937-2008, with different passage histories, representing all subtypes and variants, was used in this work. The chosen set covers almost all the TBE area. Sera of mice, immunized with the TBE vaccine Moscow, prepared from the TBEV strain Sofjin, were studied in a plaque neutralization test against the set of TBEV strains. The vaccine induced antibodies at a protective titer against all TBEV strains and Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV) with Е protein amino acid distances of 0.008-0.069, but not against Powassan virus. We showed that after a course of two immunizations, factors such as the period between vaccinations (1-4 weeks), the challenging virus dose (30-1000 LD50) and terms of challenge (1-4 weeks after the last immunization) did not significantly affect the assessment of protective efficacy of the vaccine in vivo. The protective effect of the TBE vaccine Moscow against the set of TBEV strains and the OHFV was demonstrated in in vivo experiments. TBE vaccine Moscow did not protect mice against 10 LD50 of the Powassan virus. We showed that this range of Е protein amino acid distances between the vaccine strain and challenging virus do not have a decisive impact on the TBE vaccine protective effect in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the TBE vaccine Moscow induces an immune response protective against a wide range of TBEV variants. PMID:27013433

  18. Molecular characterization of a novobiocin-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila catfish vaccine strain compared to its virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 10 and 13 missense mutations were found in the deduced gyrB and rpoB proteins, respectively, between avirulent AH11NOVO vaccine strain and its virulent parent strain AH11P. SDS-PAGE revealed that six proteins bands were significantly over-expressed in AH11NOVO whereas five bands were sign...

  19. Molecular characterization of a novobiocin-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila catfish vaccine strain compared to its virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 10 and 13 missense mutations were found in the deduced GyrB and RpoB proteins, respectively, between avirulent AH11NOVO vaccine strain and its virulent parent strain AH11P. SDS-PAGE revealed that six proteins bands were significantly over-expressed in AH11NOVO whereas five bands were sign...

  20. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses after vaccination of human volunteers with the live vaccine strain of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Waag, D M; McKee, K T; Sandstrom, G; Pratt, L L; Bolt, C R; England, M J; Nelson, G O; Williams, J C

    1995-03-01

    The specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses of human volunteers vaccinated with the Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) were evaluated. In the search for an optimal antigen to measure the immunogenicity of the vaccine in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we tested irradiation-killed LVS, an aqueous ether extract of the LVS (EEx), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from LVS, and a virulent strain (SCHU4). Volunteers were immunized with LVS by scarification. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to LVS and LPS gave the highest background titers when tested with sera from unimmunized volunteers, whereas IgA, IgG, and IgM background titers to EEx and SCHU4 were low. Vaccination caused a significant rise (P < 0.01) in IgA, IgG, and IgM titers to all antigens tested, except for the IgG response to LPS. Eighty percent of vaccinated volunteers developed a positive IgG response to EEx 14 days postvaccination, while 50% were positive to LVS. By day 14 after vaccination, 70% of immunized volunteers exhibited a positive response to EEx in an in vitro peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation assay. EEx, a specific and sensitive antigen for evaluating immune responses of vaccinated volunteers, may be a superior antigen for the diagnosis of tularemia. PMID:7697521

  1. Biotransformation of ethanol to acetaldehyde by wild and mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, O.M.; Sibirnyi, A.A.; Ksheminskaya, G.P. |

    1995-05-01

    The conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by intact cells of wild and mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha was studied. It was established that mutations that lower the activity of aldehyde reductase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase stimulate acetaldehyde accumulation. The highest accumulation of acetaldehyde was found in a mutant that possessed increased alcohol oxidase activity in growth on a medium with glucose. A decrease in formaldehyde dehydrogenase did not stimulate acetaldehyde accumulation. Bioconversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde was most effective at lowered temperatures due to marked suppression of catabolic alcohol oxidase inactivation, but not to the activity of this enzyme under indicated conditions. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Mucosal and Parenteral Vaccination against Acute and Latent Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) Infection by Using an Attenuated MCMV Mutant

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Margaret R.; Li, Xi-Yang; Stenberg, Richard M.; Campbell, Ann E.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    1998-01-01

    We used a live attenuated murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) mutant to analyze mechanisms of vaccination against acute and latent CMV infection. We selected MCMV mutant RV7 as a vaccine candidate since this virus grows well in tissue culture but is profoundly attenuated for growth in normal and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice (V. J. Cavanaugh et al., J. Virol. 70:1365–1374, 1996). BALB/c mice were immunized twice (0 and 14 days) subcutaneously (s.c.) with tissue culture-passaged RV7 and then challenged with salivary gland-passaged wild-type MCMV (sgMCMV) intraperitoneally (i.p.) on day 28. RV7 vaccination protected mice against challenge with 105 PFU of sgMCMV, a dose that killed 100% of mock-vaccinated mice. RV7 vaccination reduced MCMV replication 100- to 500-fold in the spleen between 1 and 8 days after challenge. We used the capacity to control replication of MCMV in the spleen 4 days after challenge as a surrogate for protection. Protection was antigen specific and required both live RV7 and antigen-specific lymphocytes. Interestingly, RV7 was effective when administered s.c., i.p., perorally, intranasally, and intragastrically, demonstrating that attenuated CMV applied to mucosal surfaces can elicit protection against parenteral virus challenge. B cells and immunoglobulin G were not essential for RV7-induced immunity since B-cell-deficient mice were effectively vaccinated by RV7. CD8 T cells, but not CD4 T cells, were critical for RV7-induced protection. Depletion of CD8 T cells by passive transfer of monoclonal anti-CD8 (but not anti-CD4) antibody abrogated RV7-mediated protection, and RV7 vaccination was less efficient in CD8 T-cell-deficient mice with a targeted mutation in the β2-microglobulin gene. Although gamma interferon is important for innate resistance to MCMV, it was not essential for RV7 vaccination since gamma interferon receptor-deficient mice were protected by RV7 vaccination. Establishment of and/or reactivation from latency by sg

  3. Development and introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines derived from Sabin strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    During the endgame of global polio eradication, the universal introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines is urgently required to reduce the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and polio outbreaks due to wild and vaccine-derived polioviruses. In particular, the development of inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) derived from the attenuated Sabin strains is considered to be a highly favorable option for the production of novel IPV that reduce the risk of facility-acquired transmission of poliovirus to the communities. In Japan, Sabin-derived IPVs (sIPVs) have been developed and introduced for routine immunization in November 2012. They are the first licensed sIPVs in the world. Consequently, trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine was used for polio control in Japan for more than half a century but has now been removed from the list of vaccines licensed for routine immunization. This paper reviews the development, introduction, characterization, and global status of IPV derived from attenuated Sabin strains. PMID:25448090

  4. Genotype Characterization of Commonly Used Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine Strains of India

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Satish; Kataria, Jag Mohan; Vakharia, Vikram N.

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease is an avian pathogen causing severe economic losses to the Indian poultry industry due to recurring outbreaks in vaccinated and unvaccinated flocks. India being an endemic country, advocates vaccination against the virus using lentogenic and mesogenic strains. Two virus strains which are commonly used for vaccination are strain F (a lentogenic virus) and strain R2B (a mesogenic virus). Strain F is given to 0–7 days old chicks and R2B is given to older birds which are around 6–8 weeks old. To understand the genetic makeup of these two strains, a complete genome study and phylogenetic analysis of the F, HN genes of these vaccine strains were carried out. Both the viral strains had a genome length of 15,186 nucleotides and consisted of six genes with conserved complimentary 3' leader and 5' trailer regions. The fusion protein cleavage site of strain F is GGRQGRL and strain R2B is RRQKRF. Although both the viral strains had different virulence attributes, the length of the HN protein was similar with 577 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of F, HN and complete genome sequences grouped these two strains in genotype II category which are considered as early genotypes and corroborated with their years of isolation. PMID:24897503

  5. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  6. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  7. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed. PMID:21874277

  8. TLP01, an mshA mutant of Vibrio cholerae O139 as vaccine candidate against cholera.

    PubMed

    Ledón, Talena; Ferrán, Beatriz; Pérez, Celso; Suzarte, Edith; Vichi, Joivier; Marrero, Karen; Oliva, Reinaldo; Fando, Rafael

    2012-09-01

    No commercially live vaccine against cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae O139 serogroup is available and it is currently needed. Virulent O139 strain CRC266 was genetically modified by firstly deleting multiple copies of the filamentous phage CTXφ, further tagging by insertion of the endoglucanase A coding gene from Clostridium thermocellum into the hemagglutinin/protease gene and finally deleting the mshA gene, just to improve the vaccine biosafety. One of the derived strains designated as TLP01 showed full attenuation and good colonizing capacity in the infant mouse cholera model, as well as highly immunogenic properties in the adult rabbit and rat models. Since TLP01 lacks MSHA fimbriae, it is refractory to infection with another filamentous phage VGJφ and therefore protected of acquiring CTXφ from a recombinant hybrid VGJφ/CTXφ. This strategy could reduce the possibilities of stable reversion to virulence out of the human gut. Furthermore, this vaccine strain was impaired to produce biofilms under certain culture conditions, which might have implications for the strain survival in natural settings contributing to vaccine biosafety as well. The above results has encouraged us to consider TLP01 as a live attenuated vaccine strain having an adequate performance in animal models, in terms of attenuation and immunogenicity, so that it fulfills the requirements to be evaluated in human volunteers. PMID:22546527

  9. Effects of challenge with a virulent genotype II strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on piglets vaccinated with an attenuated genotype I strain vaccine.

    PubMed

    Roca, M; Gimeno, M; Bruguera, S; Segalés, J; Díaz, I; Galindo-Cardiel, I J; Martínez, E; Darwich, L; Fang, Y; Maldonado, J; March, R; Mateu, E

    2012-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is endemic in most parts of Asia, where genotype I and II strains of diverse virulence may coexist. This study evaluated the outcome of infection with a highly virulent Asian genotype II PRRSV isolate in piglets vaccinated with a genotype I vaccine. Twenty-one 3-week-old piglets were divided in three groups: Pigs in group V (n=8) were vaccinated with an attenuated genotype I commercial PRRSV vaccine, while pigs in group U (n=8) and a control group (group C; n=5) were unvaccinated; 6 weeks later, pigs in groups V and U were challenged intranasally with a highly virulent strain of genotype II PRRSV (1×10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious doses/mL), while pigs in group C received a placebo. Over a period of 21 days after challenge, vaccinated pigs had significantly lower mortality (0/8 versus 2/8), fewer days of fever, a lower frequency of catarrhal bronchopneumonia, higher weight gains (13.4 versus 6.6 kg) and lower levels of viraemia compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. Immunisation with a genotype I attenuated PRRSV vaccine provided partial protection against challenge with a highly virulent genotype II strain. PMID:22264642

  10. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; McGill, J L; Sacco, R E; Hennager, S G

    2015-04-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 10(10) CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P < 0.05) in vaccinated bison after initial and booster vaccination than in nonvaccinated bison. The proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the vaccinated bison were greater (P < 0.05) than those in the nonvaccinated bison at 16 and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination but not after the booster vaccination. The relative gene expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was increased (P < 0.05) in the RB51-vaccinated bison at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination and at 8 weeks after the booster vaccination. The vaccinated bison had greater (P < 0.05) in vitro production of IFN-γ at all sampling times, greater interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in various samplings after the initial and booster vaccinations, and greater IL-6 production at one sampling time after the booster vaccination. Between 170 and 180 days of gestation, the bison were intraconjunctivally challenged with approximately 1 × 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. The incidences of abortion and infection were greater (P < 0.05) in the nonvaccinated bison after experimental challenge than in the bison receiving either vaccination treatment. Booster-vaccinated, but not single-vaccinated bison, had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of infection in fetal tissues and maternal tissues compared to that in the controls. Compared to the nonvaccinated bison, both vaccination treatments lowered the colonization (measured as the CFU/g of tissue) of Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against

  11. Improved Newcastle disease vaccine approaches using virus strains selected on antigenic composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virulent Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) from the 1971 to 2002 U.S. outbreaks, are the same serotype but a different genotype than current vaccine strains. It is widely recognized that an efficacious Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine made with any NDV does induce protection against morbidity and morta...

  12. Experimental studies with homologous subtype vaccines produced with multiple antigenically different seed strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the high antigenic variability of avian influenza virus, vaccines need to be continually updated to maintain adequate protection to evolving field strains. One possible approach, to mitigating the effects of antigenic change, is to use vaccines containing more than one isolate of the same su...

  13. Genome sequence of SG33 strain and recombination between wild-type and vaccine myxoma viruses.

    PubMed

    Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle; Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination. PMID:21470452

  14. Live Attenuated Mutants of Francisella tularensis Protect Rabbits against Aerosol Challenge with a Virulent Type A Strain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Le'Kneitah P.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Santiago, Araceli E.; Mann, Barbara J.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia. No licensed vaccine is currently available for protection against tularemia, although an attenuated strain, dubbed the live vaccine strain (LVS), is given to at-risk laboratory personnel as an investigational new drug (IND). In an effort to develop a vaccine that offers better protection, recombinant attenuated derivatives of a virulent type A strain, SCHU S4, were evaluated in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Rabbits vaccinated via scarification with the three attenuated derivatives (SCHU S4 ΔguaBA, ΔaroD, and ΔfipB strains) or with LVS developed a mild fever, but no weight loss was detected. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all vaccinated rabbits were seropositive for IgG to F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4 at doses ranging from 50 to 500 50% lethal doses (LD50). All rabbits developed fevers and weight loss after challenge, but the severity was greater for mock-vaccinated rabbits. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives provided partial protection against death (27 to 36%) and a prolonged time to death compared to results for the mock-vaccinated group. In contrast, LVS and the ΔfipB strain both prolonged the time to death, but there were no survivors from the challenge. This is the first demonstration of vaccine efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent type A F. tularensis in a species other than a rodent since the original work with LVS in the 1960s. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives warrant further evaluation and consideration as potential vaccines for tularemia and for identification of immunological correlates of protection. PMID:24614653

  15. Vaccination with non-toxic mutant toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 induces IL-17-dependent protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kouji; Hu, Dong-Liang; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2015-06-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) is one of superantigens produced by Staphylococcus aureus. We have previously demonstrated that vaccination with non-toxic mutant TSST-1 (mTSST-1) develops host protection to lethal S. aureus infection in mice. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this protection is necessary to elucidate because the passive transfer of antibodies against TSST-1 fails to provide complete protection against S. aureus infection. In this study, the results showed that interleukin-17A (IL-17A)-producing cells were increased in the spleen cells of mTSST-1-vaccinated mice. The main source of IL-17A in mTSST-1-vaccinated mice was T-helper 17 (Th17) cells. The protective effect of vaccination was induced when the vaccinated wild type but not IL-17A-deficient mice were challenged with S. aureus. Gene expression of chemokines, CCL2 and CXCL1, and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages were increased in spleens and livers of vaccinated mice after infection. The IL-17A-dependent immune response was TSST-1 specific because TSST-1-deficient S. aureus failed to induce the response. The present study suggests that mTSST-1 vaccination is able to provide the IL-17A-dependent host defense against S. aureus infection which promotes chemokine-mediated infiltration of phagocytes into the infectious foci. PMID:25857736

  16. Efficacy of Brucella suis strain 2 vaccine against Brucella ovis in rams.

    PubMed

    Blasco, J M; Marín, C; Jiménez de Bagüés, M P; Barberán, M

    1993-10-01

    The protective efficacy against Brucella ovis of live vaccine Brucella suis strain 2 (S2) and Brucella melitensis strain Rev 1 has been evaluated in rams. Fourteen 4-month-old Brucella-free Aragonesa rams were vaccinated conjunctivally with 2 x 10(9) c.f.u. S2. Sixteen rams of the same breed, condition and age were conjunctivally vaccinated the same day with 1.6 x 10(9) Rev 1. Thirteen rams were unvaccinated controls. Eight months after vaccination all rams were challenged with 6 x 10(9) c.f.u. B. ovis and slaughtered 2 months thereafter for bacteriological and pathological studies. The percentage of infection in the group vaccinated with Rev 1 (43.7%) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of the S2-vaccinated animals (78.6%) and unvaccinated controls (84.6%). No significant differences were found when comparing the percentages of infection corresponding to S2-vaccinated and control groups. The degree of infection (percentage of necropsy samples infected) was significantly lower in Rev 1-vaccinated (13%) than in S2-vaccinated (36.9%) or control groups (47.4%) (p < 0.001). However, no significant differences were found when comparing S2-vaccinated and control groups. PMID:8296481

  17. Genomic variations associated with attenuation in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis vaccine strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) whole cell vaccines have been widely used tools in the control of Johne’s disease in animals despite being unable to provide complete protection. Current vaccine strains derive from stocks created many decades ago; however their genotypes, underlying mechanisms and relative degree of their attenuation are largely unknown. Results Using mouse virulence studies we confirm that MAP vaccine strains 316 F, II and 2e have diverse but clearly attenuated survival and persistence characteristics compared with wild type strains. Using a pan genomic microarray we characterise the genomic variations in a panel of vaccine strains sourced from stocks spanning over 40 years of maintenance. We describe multiple genomic variations specific for individual vaccine stocks in both deletion (26–32 Kbp) and tandem duplicated (11–40 Kbp) large variable genomic islands and insertion sequence copy numbers. We show individual differences suitable for diagnostic differentiation between vaccine and wild type genotypes and provide evidence for functionality of some of the deleted MAP-specific genes and their possible relation to attenuation. Conclusions This study shows how culture environments have influenced MAP genome diversity resulting in large tandem genomic duplications, deletions and transposable element activity. In combination with classical selective systematic subculture this has led to fixation of specific MAP genomic alterations in some vaccine strain lineages which link the resulting attenuated phenotypes with deficiencies in high reactive oxygen species handling. PMID:23339684

  18. Impact of variation in acute virulence of BVDV1 strains on design of better vaccine efficacy challenge models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to antigenic differences between BVDV1 and BVDV2 strains both pestivirus species are included in U.S. vaccines. The efficacy of these vaccines in preventing acute infections is evaluated based on reduction of clinical disease. While high virulence BVDV2 strains are used in U.S. vaccine efficac...

  19. Long-term follow-up of patients with resected pancreatic cancer following vaccination against mutant K-ras.

    PubMed

    Wedén, Synne; Klemp, Marianne; Gladhaug, Ivar P; Møller, Mona; Eriksen, Jon Amund; Gaudernack, Gustav; Buanes, Trond

    2011-03-01

    K-ras mutations are frequently found in adenocarcinomas of the pancreas and can elicit mutation-specific immune responses. Targeting the immune system against mutant Ras may thus influence the clinical course of the disease. Twenty-three patients who were vaccinated after surgical resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (22 pancreaticoduodenectomies, one distal resection), in two previous Phase I/II clinical trials, were followed for more than 10 years with respect to long-term immunological T-cell reactivity and survival. The vaccine was composed of long synthetic mutant ras peptides designed mainly to elicit T-helper responses. Seventeen of 20 evaluable patients (85%) responded immunologically to the vaccine. Median survival for all patients was 27.5 months and 28 months for immune responders. The 5-year survival was 22% and 29%, respectively. Strikingly, 10-year survival was 20% (four patients out of 20 evaluable) versus zero (0/87) in a cohort of nonvaccinated patient treated in the same period. Three patients mounted a memory response up to 9 years after vaccination. The present observation of long-term immune response together with 10-year survival following surgical resection indicates that K-ras vaccination may consolidate the effect of surgery and represent an adjuvant treatment option for the future. PMID:20473937

  20. Development of a mutant strain of Bacillus polymyxa showing enhanced production of 2,3-butanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Mallonee, D.H.; Speckman, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    2,3-Butanediol is a feedstock chemical of potential industrial importance. It can serve as a monomer for many polymers of consumer interest that are currently supplied by the fossil fuel industry. Bacillus polymyxa can grow on inexpensive waste products of the food-processing industry and produce this glycol. This paper describes a mutant strain of B. polymyxa which displays constitutive production of catabolic ..cap alpha..-acetolactate synthase, an enzyme in the 2,3-butanediol pathway which is normally produced only in the late log or stationary phase of growth. The mutant was obtained by treating the wild type with nitrosoguanidine and subjecting it to a penicillin counterselection procedure. One of the selected mutant strains produced four times as much of the glycol as the wild type and utilized approximately 25% of the energy source, compared with essentially complete utilization of the energy source by the wild type. Studies are under way to optimize the production of the glycol by the mutant.

  1. Identification of in vitro upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC©, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and t...

  2. Molecular characterization of the Israeli B. bigemina vaccine strain and field isolates.

    PubMed

    Molad, T; Erster, O; Fleiderovitz, L; Roth, A; Leibovitz, B; Wolkomirsky, R; Mazuz, M L; Behar, A; Markovics, A

    2015-09-15

    The present study demonstrated the genetic character of the Israeli Babesia bigemina vaccine strain and field isolates, based on rap-1a and rap-1c gene sequences. The RAP-1a of blood-derived Israeli B. bigemina field isolates shared 100% amino acid sequence identity. However, comparison of RAP-1c from various Israeli B. bigemina field isolates revealed that the total sequence identity among the field isolates ranged from 98.2 to 100%. High identity was observed when RAP-1a sequences from the Israeli vaccine strain and field isolates were compared with RAP-1a from Egypt, Syria, Mexico and South Africa, while, the Israeli RAP-1c sequences showed the highest identity to the Mexican isolate JG-29 and to the PR isolate from Puerto-Rico. Based on sequence variations between the rap-1a of the vaccine strain and that of the field isolate, and between the rap-1c of the vaccine strain and that of the field isolates, nPCR-RFLP procedures were developed that enable, for the first time differentiation between the Israeli B. bigemina vaccine strain and field-infection isolates. These assays could serve as fast and sensitive methods for detection and differentiation between Israeli B. bigemina vaccine strains and field isolates, as well as for epidemiological investigations. PMID:26154404

  3. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  4. Efficacy, Safety, and Interactions of a Live Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Vaccine for Chickens Based on Strain IBD V877.

    PubMed

    Geerligs, Harm J; Ons, Ellen; Boelm, Gert Jan; Vancraeynest, Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a highly contagious disease in young chickens which can result in high morbidity and mortality and also in great economic losses. The main target for the virus is the lymphoid tissue with a special predilection for the bursa of Fabricius. Several vaccines are available to control the disease. Intermediate plus vaccines are used in chickens with high maternal antibody titers which face high infection pressure. An example of an intermediate plus vaccine is a live vaccine based on IBD strain V877. The results of an efficacy study in commercial broilers with different levels of maternally derived antibodies (MDA) showed that the V877-based IBD vaccine can break through maternal antibody titers of higher than 1100 as determined by an IBD ELISA. The safety of the vaccine was demonstrated in a study in which specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens were vaccinated with a tenfold dose of the vaccine strain and a tenfold dose of the vaccine strain after five back passages in SPF chickens. The vaccine virus caused lesions, as could be expected for an intermediate plus vaccine, but the scores were not much higher than the maximal scores allowed for mild IBD vaccines in the European Pharmacopoeia, and reversion to virulence was absent. In studies in SPF chickens, there were no negative impacts by the IBD V877 vaccine on the efficacy of a live QX-like IB vaccine and a live Newcastle disease La Sota vaccine in vaccination challenge studies, although the IBD vaccine had a negative effect on the antibody response generated by the QX-like IB vaccine. It is concluded that the IBD V877 vaccine has the capacity to break through high levels of MDA, has a satisfactory safety profile, and interactions with other live vaccines are limited. In order to limit bursal lesions after vaccination it is recommended to confirm the presence of MDA before vaccinating with the V877 vaccine. PMID:26292544

  5. Mathematical model of tuberculosis transmission in a two-strain with vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainggolan, J.; Supian, S.; Supriatna, A. K.; Anggriani, N.

    2014-02-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical analysis of the spread of tuberculosis with vaccination in a two-strain model. The vaccination reproduction ratio (Rrs) and equilibria quantities for the models are determined and stability of the solution is analyzed. We prove that if the vaccination reproduction ratio Rrs < 1 the disease free equilibrium is locally and asymptotically stable on the nonnegative orthant and if Rrs > 1 of the other equilibria is locally and asymptotically stable. At the end of this study, the numerical computation presented and it shows that vaccination and treatment capable to reduce the number of exposed and infected compartments.

  6. Isolation and characterization of symbiotic mutants of bradyrhizobium sp. (Arachis) strain NC92: mutants with host-specific defects in nodulation and nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K J; Anjaiah, V; Nambiar, P T; Ausubel, F M

    1987-01-01

    Random transposon Tn5 mutagenesis of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Arachis) strain NC92, a member of the cowpea cross-inoculation group, was carried out, and kanamycin-resistant transconjugants were tested for their symbiotic phenotype on three host plants: groundnut, siratro, and pigeonpea. Two nodulation (Nod- phenotype) mutants were isolated. One is unable to nodulate all three hosts and appears to contain an insertion in one of the common nodulation genes (nodABCD); the other is a host-specific nodulation mutant that fails to nodulate pigeonpea, elicits uninvaded nodules on siratro, and elicits normal, nitrogen-fixing nodules on groundnut. In addition, nine mutants defective in nitrogen fixation (Fix- phenotype) were isolated. Three fail to supply symbiotically fixed nitrogen to all three host plants. Surprisingly, nodules elicited by one of these mutants exhibit high levels of acetylene reduction activity, demonstrating the presence of the enzyme nitrogenase. Three more mutants have partially effective phenotypes (Fix +/-) in symbiosis with all three host plants. The remaining three mutants fail to supply fixed nitrogen to one of the host plants tested while remaining partially or fully effective on the other two hosts; two of these mutants are Fix- in pigeonpea and Fix +/- on groundnut and on siratro, whereas the other one is Fix- on groundnut but Fix+ on siratro and on pigeonpea. These latter mutants also retain significant nodule acetylene reduction activity, even in the ineffective symbioses. Such bacterial host-specific fixation (Hsf) mutants have not previously been reported. Images PMID:3032910

  7. Vaccination against Anthrax with Attenuated Recombinant Strains of Bacillus anthracis That Produce Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, John P.; Friedlander, Arthur M.

    1999-01-01

    The protective efficacy of several live, recombinant anthrax vaccines given in a single-dose regimen was assessed with Hartley guinea pigs. These live vaccines were created by transforming ΔANR and ΔSterne, two nonencapsulated, nontoxinogenic strains of Bacillus anthracis, with four different recombinant plasmids that express the anthrax protective antigen (PA) protein to various degrees. This enabled us to assess the effect of the chromosomal background of the strain, as well as the amount of PA produced, on protective efficacy. There were no significant strain-related effects on PA production in vitro, plasmid stability in vivo, survival of the immunizing strain in the host, or protective efficacy of the immunizing infection. The protective efficacy of the live, recombinant anthrax vaccine strains correlated with the anti-PA antibody titers they elicited in vivo and the level of PA they produced in vitro. PMID:9916059

  8. An outbreak of mumps in a population partially vaccinated with the Rubini strain.

    PubMed

    Germann, D; Ströhle, A; Eggenberger, K; Steiner, C A; Matter, L

    1996-01-01

    Since 1991, 6 years after the recommendation of universal childhood triple vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella (M + M + R), Switzerland has been confronted with an increasing number of mumps cases affecting both vaccinated and unvaccinated children. The M + M + R vaccine mainly used in the Swiss population after 1986 contains the highly attenuated Rubini strain of mumps virus. We analysed an outbreak of 102 suspected mumps cases by virus isolation, determination of IgM antibodies to mumps virus in 27 acute phase sera, and verification of vaccination histories. Mumps was confirmed by virus isolation in 88 patients, of whom 72 had previously received the Rubini vaccine strain. IgM antibodies to mumps virus were detected in 24/27 acute phase serum samples. A group of 92 subjects from the same geographic area without signs of mumps virus infection served as controls. IgG antibodies to mumps virus and vaccination status were assessed in these children. The vaccination rate in these controls was 61%, with equal seropositivity for unvaccinated and Rubini-vaccinated subjects. These data support other recent reports which indicate an insufficient protective efficacy of current mumps vaccines. PMID:8863352

  9. Sequencing analysis of Mycoplasma gallisepticum wild strains in vaccinated chicken breeder flocks.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Rabab; Eissa, Sabry; El-Hariri, Mahmoud; Refai, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infection is still of continuing economic concern in commercial broiler breeder chicken flocks in Egypt. MG infection continues to emerge despite the application of vaccination programs in breeder flocks. This prompted flock surveillance including MG isolation and molecular characterization of the circulating MG strains. The present study was concerned with 15 broiler breeder flocks of different ages (5-51 weeks). Three flocks were apparently healthy and 12 flocks were diseased. The aim of the study was to characterize the MG strains recovered from tracheal swabs. Four positive MG DNA extracts identified by rt-PCR and confirmed by isolation were subjected to sequencing of the mgc2 gene and intergenic spacer region (IGSR). The current molecular study demonstrated the presence of 3 different wild-type MG strains (RabE1-08, RabE2-09 and RabE3-09) in vaccinated diseased flocks, while the fourth strain (RabE4-08), which was isolated from a nonvaccinated apparently healthy breeder flock, scored 100% of homology and similarity to the F-strain vaccine by the sequence analysis of mgc2 and IGSR. It can be assumed that the vaccine F strain, which is supposed to replace field strains not only failed to do that, but also infected nonvaccinated flocks. Accordingly, there is a need to revise the control program including vaccine strategy in parallel with biosecurity measures. PMID:24525899

  10. Altered Regulation of Escherichia coli Biotin Biosynthesis in BirA Superrepressor Mutant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chakravartty, Vandana

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the Escherichia coli biotin (bio) operon is directly regulated by the biotin protein ligase BirA, the enzyme that covalently attaches biotin to its cognate acceptor proteins. Binding of BirA to the bio operator requires dimerization of the protein, which is triggered by BirA-catalyzed synthesis of biotinoyl-adenylate (biotinoyl-5′-AMP), the obligatory intermediate of the ligation reaction. Although several aspects of this regulatory system are well understood, no BirA superrepressor mutant strains had been isolated. Such superrepressor BirA proteins would repress the biotin operon transcription in vivo at biotin concentrations well below those needed for repression by wild-type BirA. We isolated mutant strains having this phenotype by a combined selection-screening approach and resolved multiple mutations to give several birA superrepressor alleles, each having a single mutation, all of which showed repression dominant over that of the wild-type allele. All of these mutant strains repressed bio operon transcription in vivo at biotin concentrations that gave derepression of the wild-type strain and retained sufficient ligation activity for growth when overexpressed. All of the strains except that encoding G154D BirA showed derepression of bio operon transcription upon overproduction of a biotin-accepting protein. In BirA, G154D was a lethal mutation in single copy, and the purified protein was unable to transfer biotin from enzyme-bound biotinoyl-adenylate either to the natural acceptor protein or to a biotin-accepting peptide sequence. Consistent with the transcriptional repression data, each of the purified mutant proteins showed increased affinity for the biotin operator DNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Surprisingly, although most of the mutations were located in the catalytic domain, all of those tested, except G154D BirA, had normal ligase activity. Most of the mutations that gave superrepressor phenotypes altered residues

  11. Mutants of Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT899 that do not induce chlorosis in plants.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, K P; Raffel, S J; Saville, B J; Handelsman, J

    1998-09-01

    Type B strains of Rhizobium tropici induce severe foliar chlorosis when applied at planting to seeds of symbiotic host and non-host dicotyledonous plants. A Tn5-induced mutant, designated CT4812, or R. tropici strain CIAT899 that was unable to induce chlorosis was isolated. Cloning and sequencing of the DNA flanking the transposon in CT4812 revealed that the Tn5 insertion is located in a gene similar to glnD, which encodes uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme in enteric bacteria. Two marker-exchange mutants with insertions in glnD also failed to induce chlorosis in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants. The 5'-most insertion in glnD (in mutant strain ME330) abolished the ability of R. tropici to utilize nitrate as a sole carbon source, whereas a mutation in glnD further downstream (in mutant strain ME245) did not have an obvious effect on nitrate utilization. A gene similar to the Salmonella typhimurium virulence gene mviN overlaps the 3' end of the R. tropici glnD homologue. A mutation in mviN had no effect on the ability of CIAT899 to induce chlorosis in bean plants. Therefore the glnD homologue, but not mviN, appears to be required for induction of chlorosis in plants by R. tropici strain CIAT899. A high nitrogen: carbon ratio in the rhizosphere of bean plants also prevented R. tropici from inducing chlorosis in bean plants. Mutations in either the glnD homologue or mviN had no significant effect on root nodule formation or acetylene reduction activity. A mutation in mviN eliminated motility in R. tropici. The sequence data, the inability of the glnD mutant to utilize nitrate, and the role of the R. tropici glnD gene in chlorosis induction in plants, a process that is nitrogen regulated, suggest that glnD plays a role in nitrogen sensing in R. tropici as its homologues do in other organisms. PMID:9782510

  12. Association between Interferon Response and Protective Efficacy of NS1-Truncated Mutants as Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyesun; Ngunjiri, John M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus mutants that encode C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-truncated mutants) are attractive candidates for avian live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) development because they are both attenuated and immunogenic in chickens. We previously showed that a high protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV in chickens corresponds with induction of high levels of type I interferon (IFN) responses in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene responses in vivo and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV. Our data demonstrates that accelerated antibody induction and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV correlates well with upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes. Further, through oral administration of recombinant chicken IFN alpha in drinking water, we provide direct evidence that type I IFN can promote rapid induction of adaptive immune responses and protective efficacy of influenza vaccine in chickens. PMID:27257989

  13. Association between Interferon Response and Protective Efficacy of NS1-Truncated Mutants as Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyesun; Ngunjiri, John M.; Lee, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus mutants that encode C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-truncated mutants) are attractive candidates for avian live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) development because they are both attenuated and immunogenic in chickens. We previously showed that a high protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV in chickens corresponds with induction of high levels of type I interferon (IFN) responses in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene responses in vivo and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV. Our data demonstrates that accelerated antibody induction and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV correlates well with upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes. Further, through oral administration of recombinant chicken IFN alpha in drinking water, we provide direct evidence that type I IFN can promote rapid induction of adaptive immune responses and protective efficacy of influenza vaccine in chickens. PMID:27257989

  14. Evaluation of an attenuated strain of Ehrlichia canis as a vaccine for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis.

    PubMed

    Rudoler, Nir; Baneth, Gad; Eyal, Osnat; van Straten, Michael; Harrus, Shimon

    2012-12-17

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis is an important tick-borne disease worldwide. No commercial vaccine for the disease is currently available and tick control is the main preventive measure against the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of a multi-passaged attenuated strain of Ehrlichia canis to serve as a vaccine for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, and to assess the use of azithromycin in the treatment of acute ehrlichiosis. Twelve beagle dogs were divided into 3 groups of 4 dogs. Groups 1 and 2 were inoculated (vaccinated) with an attenuated strain of E. canis (#611A) twice or once, respectively. The third group consisted of naïve dogs which served as controls. All 3 groups were challenged with a wild virulent strain of E. canis by administering infected dog-blood intravenously. Transient thrombocytopenia was the only hematological abnormality observed following inoculation of dogs with the attenuated strain. Challenge with the virulent strain resulted in severe disease in all 4 control dogs while only 3 of 8 vaccinated dogs presented mild transient fever. Furthermore, the mean blood rickettsial load was significantly higher in the control group (27-92-folds higher during days 14-19 post challenge with the wild the strain) as compared to the vaccinated dogs. The use of azithromycin was assessed as a therapeutic agent for the acute disease. Four days treatment resulted in further deterioration of the clinical condition of the dogs. Molecular comparison of 4 genes known to express immunoreactive proteins and virulence factors (p30, gp19, VirB4 and VirB9) between the attenuated strain and the challenge wild strain revealed no genetic differences between the strains. The results of this study indicate that the attenuated E. canis strain may serve as an effective and secure future vaccine for canine ehrlichiosis. PMID:23072894

  15. Safety and immunogenicity of a vaccine bait containing ERA strain of attenuated rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Lawson, K F; Black, J G; Charlton, K M; Johnston, D H; Rhodes, A J

    1987-10-01

    Ninety percent of foxes fed commercial ERA vaccine in a specially designed bait developed rabies serum neutralizing antibodies. The vaccine bait did not cause clinical signs of rabies when consumed by foxes, raccoons, skunks, dogs, cats, cattle and monkeys. When presented, in the laboratory, to wild rodents of the species Microtus, Mus musculus and Peromyscus, the vaccine baits caused vaccine-induced rabies only in Mus musculus. Laboratory mice of the CD-1 and CLL strain were susceptible to vaccine-induced rabies; however, studies showed that transmission of virus to other animals did not occur. These studies suggest that the vaccine bait described could be useful in a rabies control program in areas where foxes and wild dogs are the principal vectors. PMID:3330965

  16. Genome Sequence of Brucella abortus Vaccine Strain S19 Compared to Virulent Strains Yields Candidate Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Crasta, Oswald R.; Folkerts, Otto; Fei, Zhangjun; Mane, Shrinivasrao P.; Evans, Clive; Martino-Catt, Susan; Bricker, Betsy; Yu, GongXin; Du, Lei; Sobral, Bruno W.

    2008-01-01

    The Brucella abortus strain S19, a spontaneously attenuated strain, has been used as a vaccine strain in vaccination of cattle against brucellosis for six decades. Despite many studies, the physiological and molecular mechanisms causing the attenuation are not known. We have applied pyrosequencing technology together with conventional sequencing to rapidly and comprehensively determine the complete genome sequence of the attenuated Brucella abortus vaccine strain S19. The main goal of this study is to identify candidate virulence genes by systematic comparative analysis of the attenuated strain with the published genome sequences of two virulent and closely related strains of B. abortus, 9–941 and 2308. The two S19 chromosomes are 2,122,487 and 1,161,449 bp in length. A total of 3062 genes were identified and annotated. Pairwise and reciprocal genome comparisons resulted in a total of 263 genes that were non-identical between the S19 genome and any of the two virulent strains. Amongst these, 45 genes were consistently different between the attenuated strain and the two virulent strains but were identical amongst the virulent strains, which included only two of the 236 genes that have been implicated as virulence factors in literature. The functional analyses of the differences have revealed a total of 24 genes that may be associated with the loss of virulence in S19. Of particular relevance are four genes with more than 60bp consistent difference in S19 compared to both the virulent strains, which, in the virulent strains, encode an outer membrane protein and three proteins involved in erythritol uptake or metabolism. PMID:18478107

  17. Genome sequence of Brucella abortus vaccine strain S19 compared to virulent strains yields candidate virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Crasta, Oswald R; Folkerts, Otto; Fei, Zhangjun; Mane, Shrinivasrao P; Evans, Clive; Martino-Catt, Susan; Bricker, Betsy; Yu, GongXin; Du, Lei; Sobral, Bruno W

    2008-01-01

    The Brucella abortus strain S19, a spontaneously attenuated strain, has been used as a vaccine strain in vaccination of cattle against brucellosis for six decades. Despite many studies, the physiological and molecular mechanisms causing the attenuation are not known. We have applied pyrosequencing technology together with conventional sequencing to rapidly and comprehensively determine the complete genome sequence of the attenuated Brucella abortus vaccine strain S19. The main goal of this study is to identify candidate virulence genes by systematic comparative analysis of the attenuated strain with the published genome sequences of two virulent and closely related strains of B. abortus, 9-941 and 2308. The two S19 chromosomes are 2,122,487 and 1,161,449 bp in length. A total of 3062 genes were identified and annotated. Pairwise and reciprocal genome comparisons resulted in a total of 263 genes that were non-identical between the S19 genome and any of the two virulent strains. Amongst these, 45 genes were consistently different between the attenuated strain and the two virulent strains but were identical amongst the virulent strains, which included only two of the 236 genes that have been implicated as virulence factors in literature. The functional analyses of the differences have revealed a total of 24 genes that may be associated with the loss of virulence in S19. Of particular relevance are four genes with more than 60 bp consistent difference in S19 compared to both the virulent strains, which, in the virulent strains, encode an outer membrane protein and three proteins involved in erythritol uptake or metabolism. PMID:18478107

  18. Efficacy of single calfhood vaccination of elk with Brucella abortus strain 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Jones, L.C.; Coffin, K.; Drew, M.L.; Sweeney, Steven J.; Hagius, S.D.; Elzer, P.H.; Davis, D.

    2004-01-01

    Brucellosis has been eradicated from cattle in the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, USA. However, free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) that use feedgrounds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks still have high seroprevalence to the disease and have caused loss of brucellosis-free status in Wyoming. Management tools to control or eliminate the disease are limited; however, wildlife vaccination is among the methods currently used by wildlife managers in Wyoming. We conducted a controlled challenge study of single calfhood vaccination. Elk calves, caught in January and February of 1999 and 2000 and acclimated to captivity for 3 weeks, were randomly assigned to control or vaccinate groups. The vaccinate groups received Brucetta abortus vaccine strain 19 (S19) by hand-delivered intramuscular injection. Calves were raised to adulthood and bred at either 2.5 or 3.5 years of age for 2000 and 1999 captures, respectively. Eighty-nine (44 controls, 45 vaccinates) pregnant elk entered the challenge portion of the study. We challenged elk at mid-gestation with pathogenic B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival instillation. Abortion occurred in significantly more (P = 0.002) controls (42; 93%) than vaccinates (32; 71%), and vaccine protected 25% of the vaccinate group. We used Brucella culture of fetus/calf tissues to determine the efficacy of vaccination for preventing infection, and we found that the number of infected fetuses/calves did not differ between controls and vaccinates (P = 0.14). Based on these data, single calfhood vaccination with S19 has low efficacy, will likely have only little to moderate effect on Brucella prevalence in elk, and is unlikely to eradicate the disease in wildlife of the GYA.

  19. Construction of upp deletion mutant strains of Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis based on counterselective system using temperature-sensitive plasmid.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Cui, Hongyu; Tang, Lijie; Qiao, Xinyuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Yanping; Cui, Wen; Li, Yijing

    2014-07-01

    Integration plasmids are often used in constructing chromosomal mutations, as it enables the alternation of genes at any location by integration or replacement. Food-grade integration vectors can integrate into the host genome without introducing any selectable markers or residual bases, and the recombination often happens in non-coding region. In this study we used the temperature-sensitive pWV01 replicon to construct 2 chloramphenicol-resistant integration plasmids (pGBHC32-upp) containing the uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (upp) gene as a counterselective marker for Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) ATCC393 and Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) MG1363. We then ligated the designed homologous arms to the pGBHC32-upp plasmids to allow their integration to the bacterial chromosome, and selected upp deletion mutants of L. casei ATCC393 and L. lactis MG1363 in the presence of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Analysis of genetic stability, growth curve, carbon utilization and scanning electronic microscopy showed that, except for 5-FU resistance, there were no significant differences between the wild type and mutant lactic acid bacteria. The integration system and the upp deletion strains could be used in the insertion or deletion of genes at any location of the chromosome of both L. casei ATCC 393 and L. lactis MG1363, and the homologous recombination would not introduce any selectable markers or residual bases. These mutant strains can be further investigated for heterologous protein expression and construction of a live mucosal vaccine carrier. PMID:24798148

  20. Sequence Variation and Immunologic Cross-Reactivity among Babesia bovis Merozoite Surface Antigen 1 Proteins from Vaccine Strains and Vaccine Breakthrough Isolates

    PubMed Central

    LeRoith, Tanya; Brayton, Kelly A.; Molloy, John B.; Bock, Russell E.; Hines, Stephen A.; Lew, Ala E.; McElwain, Terry F.

    2005-01-01

    The Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen 1 (MSA-1) is an immunodominant membrane glycoprotein that is the target of invasion-blocking antibodies. While antigenic variation has been demonstrated in MSA-1 among strains from distinct geographical areas, the extent of sequence variation within a region where it is endemic and the effect of variation on immunologic cross-reactivity have not been assessed. In this study, sequencing of MSA-1 from two Australian B. bovis vaccine strains and 14 breakthrough isolates from vaccinated animals demonstrated low sequence identity in the extracellular region of the molecule, ranging from 19.8 to 46.7% between the T vaccine strain and eight T vaccine breakthrough isolates, and from 18.7 to 99% between the K vaccine strain and six K vaccine breakthrough isolates. Although MSA-1 amino acid sequence varied substantially among strains, overall predicted regions of hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity in the extracellular domain were conserved in all strains examined, suggesting a conserved functional role for MSA-1 despite sequence polymorphism. Importantly, the antigenic variation created by sequence differences resulted in a lack of immunologic cross-reactivity among outbreak strains using sera from animals infected with the B. bovis vaccine strains. Additionally, sera from cattle hyperinfected with the Mexico strain of B. bovis and shown to be clinically immune did not cross-react with MSA-1 from any other isolate tested. The results indicate that isolates of B. bovis capable of evading vaccine-induced immunity contain an msa-1 gene that is significantly different from the msa-1 of the vaccine strain, and that the difference can result in a complete lack of cross-reactivity between MSA-1 from vaccine and breakthrough strains in immunized animals. PMID:16113254

  1. A comparative study of live attenuated F strain-derived Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  2. Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Oral Vaccine Strain Ty21a.

    PubMed

    Xu, Deqi; Cisar, John O; Poly, Frédéric; Yang, Jinghua; Albanese, Jason; Dharmasena, Madushini; Wai, Tint; Guerry, Patricia; Kopecko, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain Ty21a is an important vaccine for controlling typhoid fever and serves as an oral vector for delivering heterologous antigens. The key attenuating features of this randomly mutated strain remain in question. Genome sequencing has revealed 679 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and will help define alterations contributing to Ty21a safety and immunogenicity. PMID:23969054

  3. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. PMID:26319139

  4. Response of layer and broiler strain chickens to parenteral administration of a live Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine.

    PubMed

    Groves, Peter J; Sharpe, Sue M; Cox, Julian M

    2015-07-01

    Responses to the parenteral administration of a live aroA deletion Salmonella serovar Typhimurium vaccine given to three brown egg layer strains and two broiler strains were studied. Twenty-five birds of each strain were reared together in floor pens to 6 weeks of age and then moved as individual strains to new floor pens and injected with 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) per bird of the vaccine bacteria intramuscularly or subcutaneously, 10(6) CFU per bird subcutaneously, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) subcutaneously as a vaccination control. Three birds of one layer strain were injected intramuscularly with 0.5mg/ bird S. Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to evaluate whether response was similar for vaccine and endotoxin. Birds were weighed, and rectal temperatures recorded at the time of injection, then observed over 24 hours. Rectal temperatures were measured and blood samples collected for serum IL-6 assay at 3 hours post injection (PI). At 12 hours PI blood samples were drawn for analyses for plasma phosphorus (P), glucose (Glu), cholesterol (Cho), aspartate transaminase (AST), total protein (Ptn) and creatinine kinase (CK). Blood was sampled 14 days PI and tested for serum antibody to S. Typhimurium. Vaccination resulted in significant seroconversion by 14 days PI in all strains compared to the controls. The three layer strains exhibited a clinical malaise, evident within 90 minutes of injection, lasting for 12 hours, with complete recovery by 24 hours PI. Only the 10(8) CFU dose given subcutaneously produced an increase in rectal temperature 3 hours PI. Vaccination had no effect on IL-6 or Ptn. All vaccine doses increased P and the higher dose by either route decreased Cho in all bird strains. The 10(8) vaccine dose increased Glu and intramuscular injection markedly elevated CK only in the layer strains. The response was not completely congruous with that to LPS alone. The results highlight the need for consideration of differences in response of

  5. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  6. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp-5-3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 1014 N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant, S-34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  7. Production and downstream processing of (1→3)-β-D-glucan from mutant strain of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We isolated a mutant that produced higher levels of curdlan than the wild strain Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750 by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl-N-nitro-nitrosoguanidine. The mutant strain produced 66 g/L of curdlan in 120 h with a yield of (0.88) while, the wild strain produced 41 g/L in 120 h with a yield of (0.62) in a stirred bioreactor. The mutant could not produce curdlan when the pH was shifted from 7.0 to 5.5 after nitrogen depletion as followed for wild strain. In contrast, pH optimum for cell growth and curdlan production for mutant was found to be 7.0. We optimized the downstream processing of curdlan by varying different volumes of NaOH and HCl for extraction and precipitation of curdlan. The molecular weight of the purified curdlan from the wild and mutant strain was 6.6 × 105 Da and 5.8 × 105 Da respectively. The monosaccharide analyses confirm that curdlan from both wild and mutant strain contains only glucose units. From the NMR and FTIR data, it has been confirmed that curdlan was exclusively composed of β (1 → 3)-D-glucan residues. PMID:22681895

  8. Safety of classical swine fever virus vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Jaejo; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Kim, Ha-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Kim, Byounghan; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Lee, Jung-Bok; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-12

    The present study aimed to evaluate the safety of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows. Pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody were inoculated with a commercial LOM vaccine during early pregnancy (day 38; n=3) or mid-pregnancy (days 49-59; n=11). In pregnant sows vaccinated during the early stages of gestation, abortion (day 109) was observed in one case, with two stillbirths and seven mummified fetuses. The viability of live-born piglets was 34.9% in sows vaccinated during mid-pregnancy compared with 81.8% in the control group. Post-mortem examination of the organs of the sows and piglets did not reveal any pathological lesions caused by CSFV; however, CSFV RNA was detected in the organs of several vaccinated sows and their litters. The LOM strain was transmitted from sows with free CSFV antibody to their fetus, but did not appear to induce immune tolerance in the offspring from vaccinated pregnant sows. Side effects were not observed in pregnant sows with antibody to the LOM strain: transmission from sow to their litters and stillbirth or mummified fetuses. The LOM strain may induce sterile immunity and provide rapid, long-lasting, and complete protection against CSFV; however, it should be contraindicated in pregnant sows due to potential adverse effects in pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody. PMID:26947495

  9. Duplex PCR for differentiation of the vaccine strain Brucella suis S2 and B. suis biovar 1 from other strains of Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenlong; Tan, Pengfei; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zouliang; Mao, Kairong; Peng, Daxin; Chen, Yiping

    2014-09-01

    Immunisation with attenuated Brucella spp. vaccines prevents brucellosis, but may also interfere with diagnosis. In this study, a duplex PCR was developed to distinguish Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 from field strains of B. suis biovar 1 and other Brucella spp. The PCR detected 60 fg genomic DNA of B. suis S2 or biovar 1 field strains and was able to distinguish B. suis S2 and wild-type strains of B. suis biovar 1 among 76 field isolates representing all the common species and biovars, as well as four vaccine strains, of Brucella. PMID:25011712

  10. Vaccination With a UV-Irradiated Genetically Attenuated Mutant of Staphylococcus aureus Provides Protection Against Subsequent Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Kellie; Lembo, Annalisa; Harrell, Maria Isabel; Klein, Jessica Abbey; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Siegesmund, Amy M.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Oukka, Mohamed; Molina, Douglas M.; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are gram-positive bacteria that cause clinically significant infections in humans. Severe S. aureus infections are particularly problematic in hospitalized patients and reoccur despite therapeutic measures. The absence of natural protective immune responses and the lack of high-throughput approaches to identify S. aureus antigens have imposed constraints in the development of effective vaccines. Here, we showed that vaccination with the genetically attenuated S. aureus mutant, inactivated using UV irradiation rather than heat, significantly increased survival and diminished bacterial burden and kidney abscesses when mice were challenged with virulent methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Protection conferred by immunization could be transferred to the naive host and was not observed in B-cell–deficient mice. Using a novel S. aureus whole-proteome microarray, we show that immunoglobulin G antibody responses to 83 proteins were observed in the immunized mice. These results suggest that protection against S. aureus infections requires antibody responses to the wide repertoire of antigens/virulence factors. Vaccination using UV-irradiated genetically attenuated S. aureus induces humoral immunity and provides a vaccine strategy for pathogens that fail to induce protective immunity. We also describe a novel, high-throughput technology to easily identify S. aureus antigens for vaccine development. PMID:22966130

  11. Development of a highly immunogenic Newcastle disease virus chicken vaccine strain of duck origin.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Kye, S J; Lee, H J; Gaikwad, S; Lee, H S; Jung, S C; Choi, K S

    2016-04-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain NDRL0901 was developed as a live vaccine candidate for control of Newcastle disease. NDV isolate KR/duck/13/07 (DK1307) of duck origin was used as the selected vaccine strain. DK1307 was passaged 6 times in chickens. Then a single clone from the chicken-adapted virus (DK1307C) was finally selected, and the vaccine strain was named NDRL0901. DK1307C and the clone NDRL0901 viruses showed enhanced immunogenicity compared to the DK1307 virus. Principal component analysis based on fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase genes revealed the codon usage pattern in the dataset is distinct separating duck viral sequences and avian sequences, and passage of the duck origin virus into the chicken host causes deviation in the codon usage pattern. The NDRL0901 virus was avirulent and did not acquire viral virulence even after 7 back passages in chickens. When day-old chicks were vaccinated with the NDRL0901 virus via spray, eye drops, and drinking water, the vaccinated birds showed no clinical signs and had significant protection efficacy (>80%) against very virulent NDV (Kr005 strain) infection regardless of the administration route employed. The results indicate that the NDRL0901 strain is safe in chickens and can offer protective immunity. PMID:26769266

  12. Strain-specific protective immunity following vaccination against experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Haolla, Filipe A; Claser, Carla; de Alencar, Bruna C G; Tzelepis, Fanny; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silvério, Jaline C; Machado, Alexandre V; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena B P; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-09-18

    Immunisation with Amastigote Surface Protein 2 (asp-2) and trans-sialidase (ts) genes induces protective immunity in highly susceptible A/Sn mice, against infection with parasites of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Based on immunological and biological strain variations in T. cruzi parasites, our goal was to validate our vaccination results using different parasite strains. Due to the importance of the CD8(+) T cells in protective immunity, we initially determined which strains expressed the immunodominant H-2K(k)-restricted epitope TEWETGQI. We tested eight strains, four of which elicited immune responses to this epitope (Y, G, Colombian and Colombia). We selected the Colombian and Colombia strains for our studies. A/Sn mice were immunised with different regimens using both T. cruzi genes (asp-2 and ts) simultaneously and subsequently challenged with blood trypomastigotes. Immune responses before the challenge were confirmed by the presence of specific antibodies and peptide-specific T cells. Genetic vaccination did not confer protective immunity against acute infection with a lethal dose of the Colombian strain. In contrast, we observed a drastic reduction in parasitemia and a significant increase in survival, following challenge with an otherwise lethal dose of the Colombia strain. In many surviving animals with late-stage chronic infection, we observed alterations in the heart's electrical conductivity, compared to naive mice. In summary, we concluded that immunity against T. cruzi antigens, similar to viruses and bacteria, may be strain-specific and have a negative impact on vaccine development. PMID:19635607

  13. A diagnostic protocol to identify water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tittarelli, Manuela; Atzeni, Marcello; Calistri, Paolo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Ferri, Nicola; Marchi, Enrico; Martucciello, Alessandra; De Massis, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The use of live vaccine strain RB51 for vaccination of domestic water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) at risk of infection with Brucella abortus is permitted notwithstanding the plans for the eradication and only under strict veterinary control. The antibodies induced by RB51 vaccination are not detectable using conventional diagnostic techniques; therefore, it is necessary to have a specific diagnostic tool able to discriminate vaccinated from unvaccinated animals. The combination of a complement fixation test (CFT) with specific RB51 antigen (RB51-CFT) and a brucellin skin test has been demonstrated to be a reliable diagnostic system to identify single cattle (Bos taurus) vaccinated with RB51. So far, no data are available in the international scientific literature regarding the use of this test association in water buffalo. For this reason the suitability of this test combination has been evaluated in a water buffalo herd. One hundred twenty-seven animals farmed in a herd of Salerno province (Campania, Southern Italy), in the context of a presumptive unauthorized use of RB51 vaccine were chosen for this study. All tested animals resulted negative to Rose Bengal test (RBT) and complement fixation test (CFT) used for the detection of specific antibodies against Brucella field strains. Seventy-one animals (56%) developed RB51 antigen-specific CFT (RB51-CFT) antibodies against RB51 vaccine in a first sampling, while 104 animals (82%) gave positive result to a second serum sampling conducted 11 days after the intradermal inoculation of the RB51 brucellin. One hundred and seven animals (84%) showed a positive reaction to the RB51-CFT in at least 1 sampling, while 111 animals (87%) resulted positive to the RB51 brucellin skin test. Thus, analysing the results of the 3 testing in parallel, 119 animals (94%) were positive to at least 1 of the performed tests. The results suggest that the use in parallel of the RB51 brucellin skin test with RB51-CFT may represent a reliable

  14. The ultrastructure of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant strain lacking phytoene synthase resembles that of a colorless alga.

    PubMed

    Inwood, William; Yoshihara, Corinne; Zalpuri, Reena; Kim, Kwang-Seo; Kustu, Sydney

    2008-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains lacking phytoene synthase, the first enzyme of carotenoid biosynthesis, are white. They lack carotenoid pigments, have very low levels of chlorophyll, and can grow only heterotrophically in the dark. Our electron and fluorescence microscopic studies showed that such a mutant strain (lts1-204) had a proliferated plastid envelope membrane but no stacks of thylakoid membranes within the plastid. It accumulated cytoplasmic compartments that appeared to be autophagous vacuoles filled with membranous material. The lts1 mutants apparently lacked pyrenoid bodies, which normally house ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco), and accumulated many starch granules. Although these mutant strains cannot synthesize the carotenoid and carotenoid-derived pigments present in the phototactic organelle (eyespot), the mutant we examined made a vestigial eyespot that was disorganized and often mislocalized to the posterior end of the cell. The absence of a pyrenoid body, the accumulation of starch, and the disorganization of the eyespot may all result from the absence of thylakoids. The ultrastructure of lts1 mutant strains is similar to but distinct from that of previously described white and yellow mutant strains of C. reinhardtii and is similar to that of naturally colorless algae of the Polytoma group. PMID:19825593

  15. Symbiotic effectiveness of antibiotic-resistant mutants of fast- and slow-growing strains of Rhizobium nodulating Lotus species.

    PubMed

    Pankhurst, C E

    1977-08-01

    Mutants resistant ot 16 individual antibiotics were isolated from two fast-growing and two slow-growing strains of Lotus rhizobia and their symbiotic effectiveness on Lotus pedunculatus evaluated. Resistance to streptomycin, spectinomycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline (inhibitors of protein synthesis) was associated with little or no loss of effectiveness with all four strains but resistance to nalidixic acid and rifampicin (inhibitors of nucleic acid synthesis), and to D-cycloserine, novobiocin, and penicillin (inhibitors of cell wall-cell membrane synthesis) was associated with significant loss of effectiveness in 20-100% of the mutants. Resistance to viomycin, neomycin, kanamycin, and vibramycin was associated with loss of effectiveness with mutants of the two fast-growing strains but not with mutants of the two slow-growing strains. When tested on four alternate host legumes individual mutants of a slow-growing strain showed significantly different levels of effectiveness. The results suggest that both the inherent characteristics of the bacterium and of the host plant will influence the symbiotic effectiveness of antibiotic-resistant mutants of Rhizobium. PMID:890601

  16. Determination of H5N1 vaccine potency using reference antisera from heterologous strains of influenza

    PubMed Central

    Vodeiko, Galina M.; Weir, Jerry P.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Vodeiko and Weir (2011). Determination of H5N1 vaccine potency using reference antisera from heterologous strains of influenza. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), 176–187. Background  Standardization of inactivated influenza vaccines by hemagglutinin (HA) content is performed by the single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) method. Regulatory agencies prepare, calibrate, and distribute SRID reagent standards necessary for testing of seasonal influenza vaccines, and a similar process is used to produce potency reagents for candidate pandemic influenza vaccines that are manufactured for emergency stockpiles. Objectives  Because of the concerns in generating a timely strain‐specific potency antiserum for an emerging pandemic virus, we evaluated the feasibility of using heterologous potency reference antiserum as a replacement for a strain‐specific (homologous) antiserum in the SRID potency assay for stockpiled H5N1 vaccines. Results  The results indicate that a heterologous H5N1 antiserum can be used to determine the accurate potency of inactivated H5N1 influenza vaccines. Additionally, when H5N1 vaccine was subjected to an accelerated stability protocol, both homologous and heterologous antisera provided similar measurements of vaccine potency decline. Limitations to the heterologous antiserum approach to potency determination were shown by the inability of antiserum to recent seasonal H1N1 viruses to work in an SRID assay with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 A/California/07/2009 antigen. Conclusions  The data demonstrate the feasibility of using heterologous antiserum for potency determination of at least some candidate vaccines in case of a shortage or delay of homologous antiserum. Further, the results suggest the prudence of stockpiling a broad library of potency reagents including many strains of influenza viruses with pandemic potential to provide an added measure of assurance that reagent production would not be a

  17. Strain Selection for Generation of O-Antigen-Based Glycoconjugate Vaccines against Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A.; Micoli, Francesca; Rondini, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, are a major cause of invasive bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa with no vaccine currently available. Conjugation of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to a carrier protein constitutes a promising vaccination strategy. Here we describe a rational process to select the most appropriate isolates of Salmonella as source of O-antigen for developing a bivalent glycoconjugate vaccine. We screened a library of 30 S. Typhimurium and 21 S. Enteritidis in order to identify the most suitable strains for large scale O-antigen production and generation of conjugate vaccines. Initial screening was based on growth characteristics, safety profile of the isolates, O-antigen production, and O-antigen characteristics in terms of molecular size, O-acetylation and glucosylation level and position, as determined by phenol sulfuric assay, NMR, HPLC-SEC and HPAEC-PAD. Three animal isolates for each serovar were identified and used to synthesize candidate glycoconjugate vaccines, using CRM197 as carrier protein. The immunogenicity of these conjugates and the functional activity of the induced antibodies was investigated by ELISA, serum bactericidal assay and flow cytometry. S. Typhimurium O-antigen showed high structural diversity, including O-acetylation of rhamnose in a Malawian invasive strain generating a specific immunodominant epitope. S. Typhimurium conjugates provoked an anti-O-antigen response primarily against the O:5 determinant. O-antigen from S. Enteritidis was structurally more homogeneous than from S. Typhimurium, and no idiosyncratic antibody responses were detected for the S. Enteritidis conjugates. Of the three initially selected isolates, two S. Typhimurium (1418 and 2189) and two S. Enteritidis (502 and 618) strains generated glycoconjugates able to induce high specific antibody levels with high breadth of serovar-specific strain coverage, and were selected for use in vaccine production. The

  18. Strain Selection for Generation of O-Antigen-Based Glycoconjugate Vaccines against Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease.

    PubMed

    Lanzilao, Luisa; Stefanetti, Giuseppe; Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A; Micoli, Francesca; Rondini, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, are a major cause of invasive bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa with no vaccine currently available. Conjugation of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to a carrier protein constitutes a promising vaccination strategy. Here we describe a rational process to select the most appropriate isolates of Salmonella as source of O-antigen for developing a bivalent glycoconjugate vaccine. We screened a library of 30 S. Typhimurium and 21 S. Enteritidis in order to identify the most suitable strains for large scale O-antigen production and generation of conjugate vaccines. Initial screening was based on growth characteristics, safety profile of the isolates, O-antigen production, and O-antigen characteristics in terms of molecular size, O-acetylation and glucosylation level and position, as determined by phenol sulfuric assay, NMR, HPLC-SEC and HPAEC-PAD. Three animal isolates for each serovar were identified and used to synthesize candidate glycoconjugate vaccines, using CRM197 as carrier protein. The immunogenicity of these conjugates and the functional activity of the induced antibodies was investigated by ELISA, serum bactericidal assay and flow cytometry. S. Typhimurium O-antigen showed high structural diversity, including O-acetylation of rhamnose in a Malawian invasive strain generating a specific immunodominant epitope. S. Typhimurium conjugates provoked an anti-O-antigen response primarily against the O:5 determinant. O-antigen from S. Enteritidis was structurally more homogeneous than from S. Typhimurium, and no idiosyncratic antibody responses were detected for the S. Enteritidis conjugates. Of the three initially selected isolates, two S. Typhimurium (1418 and 2189) and two S. Enteritidis (502 and 618) strains generated glycoconjugates able to induce high specific antibody levels with high breadth of serovar-specific strain coverage, and were selected for use in vaccine production. The

  19. Exploitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reporter Strains to Probe the Impact of Vaccination at Sites of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Bree B.; Russell, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains a major public health problem, with an effective vaccine continuing to prove elusive. Progress in vaccination strategies has been hampered by a lack of appreciation of the bacterium's response to dynamic changes in the host immune environment. Here, we utilize reporter Mtb strains that respond to specific host immune stresses such as hypoxia and nitric oxide (hspX′::GFP), and phagosomal maturation (rv2390c′::GFP), to investigate vaccine-induced alterations in the environmental niche during experimental murine infections. While vaccination undoubtedly decreased bacterial burden, we found that it also appeared to accelerate Mtb's adoption of a phenotype better equipped to survive in its host. We subsequently utilized a novel replication reporter strain of Mtb to demonstrate that, in addition to these alterations in host stress response, there is a decreased percentage of actively replicating Mtb in vaccinated hosts. This observation was supported by the differential sensitivity of recovered bacteria to the front-line drug isoniazid. Our study documents the natural history of the impact that vaccination has on Mtb's physiology and replication and highlights the value of reporter Mtb strains for probing heterogeneous Mtb populations in the context of a complex, whole animal model. PMID:25233380

  20. FMD virus isolates: the candidate strains for polyvalent vaccine development in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ayelet, G; Soressa, M; Sisay, T; Belay, A; Gelaye, E; Jembere, S; Skjerve, E; Asmare, K

    2013-06-01

    The study was conducted on foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) viruses with the aim of selecting appropriate vaccinal strain to control of FMD in Ethiopia. The study was conducted in two-dimensional virus neutralization assay to determine the antigenic relationship 'r' value between the candidate vaccine strains and field isolates. A total of 21 serotype O, 7 serotype A, and 8 serotype SAT 2 FMD viruses, which were isolated from cattle and swine. A couple of isolates from each serotype were identified as vaccine candidates in the trial (O-ETH/38/2005, O-ETH/58/2008, A-ETH/7/2008, A-ETH/6/2000, SAT2-ETH/76/2009 and SAT2-ETH/64/2009). The finding revealed all the vaccine candidate depicted high antigenic similarity, above the mean "r" value, to their own serotypes in the studied serotype population except for one serotype A field isolate, A-ETH/13/1981, with "r" value=0.14 and 0.25) which is significantly lower than the minimum requirement. In general, the result indicated that these candidate vaccinal strains can be used for polyvalent vaccine production in the country. PMID:23416124

  1. Variable Virulence and Efficacy of BCG Vaccine Strains in Mice and Correlation With Genome Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ru, Huan-wei; Chen, Fu-zeng; Jin, Chun-yan; Sun, Rui-feng; Fan, Xiao-yong; Guo, Ming; Mai, Jun-tao; Xu, Wen-xi; Lin, Qing-xia; Liu, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is the only vaccine available for tuberculosis (TB) control. However, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: BCG exhibits highly variable effectiveness against the development of TB both in pediatric and adult populations and can cause disseminated BCG disease in immunocompromised individuals. BCG comprises a number of substrains that are genetically distinct. Whether and how these genetic differences affect BCG efficacy remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed comparative analyses of the virulence and efficacy of 13 BCG strains, representing different genetic lineages, in SCID and BALB/c mice. Our results show that BCG strains of the DU2 group IV (BCG-Phipps, BCG-Frappier, BCG-Pasteur, and BCG-Tice) exhibit the highest levels of virulence, and BCG strains of the DU2 group II (BCG-Sweden, BCG-Birkhaug) are among the least virulent group. These distinct levels of virulence may be explained by strain-specific duplications and deletions of genomic DNA. There appears to be a general trend that more virulent BCG strains are also more effective in protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Our findings have important implications for current BCG vaccine programs and for future TB vaccine development. PMID:26643797

  2. Protection of gruntlings against classical swine fever virus-infection after oral vaccination of sows with C-strain vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kaden, V; Lange, E; Müller, T; Teuffert, J; Teifke, J P; Riebe, R

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the maternal protection of gruntlings derived from wild sows vaccinated orally against classical swine fever (CSF) using C-strain vaccine. Three vaccinated sows and one unvaccinated control sow were included. Challenge infection of the progeny was carried out either intranasally or by contact at the beginning of the third month of life (61-65 days post-natum). Whereas, two of three litters had maternal antibodies, the progeny of one vaccinated sow was seronegative at challenge. The progeny of the control sow, which was challenged by contact infection, developed moderate clinical signs except for one animal which became ill and died. Two gruntlings derived from the vaccinated sows also died of CSF, although one of them had a relatively high maternal antibody titre (128 ND(50)). The transient infection and partial virus shedding observed in a small number of gruntlings with maternal antibodies and the fact that one animal with maternal antibodies became ill and died confirm the incomplete maternal protection at this age. The reason for this incomplete protection is discussed. As none of the surviving gruntlings could be shown to carry CSFV or viral RNA at the end of the experiment (36 or 70 d.p.i.), it may be concluded that these animals do not represent a potential CSFV reservoir. PMID:17123422

  3. Differentiation of field isolates and vaccine strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus by DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Jorge Luis; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2009-11-12

    Two different regions of the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) gene of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) were amplified and sequenced for characterization of field isolates and tissue culture-origin (TCO) and chicken embryo-origin (CEO) vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the two regions showed differences in nucleotide and amino acid sequences between field isolates and attenuated vaccines. The PCR-RFLP results were identical to those obtained by DNA sequencing and validated their use to differentiate ILTV strains. The approach using the sequencing of the two fragments of the ICP4 gene showed to be an efficient and practical procedure to differentiate between field isolates and vaccine strains of ILTV. PMID:19747995

  4. Production of a thermal stress resistant mutant Euglena gracilis strain using Fe-ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Kazama, Yusuke; Mitra, Sharbanee; Marukawa, Yuka; Arashida, Ryo; Abe, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Euglena gracilis is a common phytoplankton species, which also has motile flagellate characteristics. Recent research and development has enabled the industrial use of E. gracilis and selective breeding of this species is expected to further expand its application. However, the production of E. gracilis nuclear mutants is difficult because of the robustness of its genome. To establish an efficient mutation induction procedure for E. gracilis, we employed Fe-ion beam irradiation in the RIKEN RI beam factory. A decrease in the survival rate was observed with the increase in irradiation dose, and the upper limit used for E. gracilis selective breeding was around 50 Gy. For a practical trial of Fe-ion irradiation, we conducted a screening to isolate high-temperature-tolerant mutants. The screening yielded mutants that proliferated faster than the wild-type strain at 32 °C. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation on E. gracilis selective breeding. PMID:27075598

  5. Efficacy of dart or booster vaccination with strain RB51 in protecting bison against experimental Brucella abortus challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination is an effective tool for reducing the prevalence of brucellosis in natural hosts. In this study, we characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (Hand RB51), single pneumatic dart delivery (Dart ...

  6. [Production of a vaccine against enterotoxemia from Clostridium perfringens strains isolated in the field].

    PubMed

    Cherfaoui, S; Kadra, B

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated eight strains of C. perfringens from cases of enterotoxaemia. Five of these strains have revealed themselves toxic with respective types (type "A":2, type "C":2, type "D":1). In order to produce anti-enterotoxaemia vaccine, we have proceeded at the cultivation in fermenter of isolated strains and reference strains CWA 35, CWC and CWD AF. At the end of fermentation, we have evaluated the two following parameters: obtained biomass, and toxin titers. With the two classes of strains we reached an important biomass but toxins titers relatively weak comparatively to that which is usually required. It will be necessary then, to demonstrate the immunogen value of the produced vaccines by testing their efficacity. PMID:1309137

  7. Oral vaccination with microencapsuled strain 19 vaccine confers enhanced protection against Brucella abortus strain 2308 challenge in red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M; Ficht, Thomas A; Davis, Donald S; Elzer, Philip H; Kahl-McDonagh, Melissa; Wong-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Rice-Ficht, Allison C

    2009-10-01

    Bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA), USA, are infected with Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, and they serve as a wildlife reservoir for the disease. Bovine brucellosis recently has been transmitted from infected elk to cattle in Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho and has resulted in their loss of brucellosis-free status. An efficacious Brucella vaccine with a delivery system suitable for wildlife would be a valuable tool in a disease prevention and control program. We evaluated Strain 19 (S19) in a sustained release vehicle consisting of alginate microspheres containing live vaccine. In a challenge study using red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) as a model for elk, alginate, a naturally occurring polymer combined with a protein of Fasciola hepatica vitelline protein B was used to microencapsulate S19. Red deer were orally or subcutaneously immunized with 1.5 x 10(10) colony-forming units (CFUs) using microencapsulated S19. Humoral and cellular profiles were analyzed bimonthly throughout the study. The vaccinated red deer and nonvaccinated controls were challenged 1 yr postimmunization conjunctivally with 1 x 10(9) CFUs of B. abortus strain 2308. Red deer vaccinated with oral microencapsulated S19 had a statistically significant lower bacterial tissue load compared with controls. These data indicate for the first time that protection against Brucella-challenge can be achieved by combining a commonly used vaccine with a novel oral delivery system such as alginate-vitelline protein B microencapsulation. This system is a potential improvement for efficacious Brucella-vaccine delivery to wildlife in the GYA. PMID:19901378

  8. Development and Characterization of Rifampicin Resistant Flavobacterium Psychrophilum Strains and Their Potential as Live Attenuated Vaccine Candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that passage of pathogenic bacteria on increasing concentrations of the antibiotic rifampicin leads to the attenuation of virulence and these resistant strains may serve as live attenuated vaccines. Two rifampicin resistant strains of Flavobacterium psychrophilum,...

  9. Mutants of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin as safe and strong adjuvants for intranasal delivery of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Peppoloni, Samuele; Ruggiero, Paolo; Contorni, Mario; Morandi, Maurizio; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Podda, Audino; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2003-04-01

    Cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin are powerful mucosal adjuvants but their high toxicity hampers their use in humans. Site-directed mutagenesis has allowed the generation of several cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin mutants with abolished or strongly reduced toxicity that still retain strong mucosal adjuvanticity. Among them, LTK63 (Ser to Lys substitution at position 63 in the A subunit) is completely nontoxic and LTR72 (Ala to Arg at position 72) retains a very low residual enzymatic activity. Both of them have been shown to be safe and effective in enhancing the immunogenicity of intranasally coadministered vaccines, also resulting in protective responses in several animal models. Clinical grade preparations of these mutants have now been produced, tested in animals and proven to be totally safe. Indeed, they did not induce any inflammatory event in the respiratory tract nor, more importantly, in the olfactory bulbs and in the meninges. The fully nontoxic LTK63 mutant has now been successfully tested in human volunteers with a trivalent subunit influenza vaccine. PMID:12899578

  10. Identification of the pXO1 plasmid in attenuated Bacillus anthracis vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xudong; Zhang, Huijuan; Zhang, Enmin; Wei, Jianchun; Li, Wei; Wang, Bingxiang; Dong, Shulin; Zhu, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Anthrax toxins and capsule are the major virulence factors of Bacillus anthracis. They are encoded by genes located on the plasmids pXO1 and pXO2, respectively. The vaccine strain Pasteur II was produced from high temperature subcultures of B. anthracis, which resulted in virulence attenuation through the loss of the plasmid pXO1. However, it is unclear whether the high temperature culture completely abolishes the plasmid DNA or affects the replication of the plasmid pXO1. In this study, we tested 3 B. anthracis vaccine strains, including Pasteur II from France, Qiankefusiji II from Russia, and Rentian II from Japan, which were all generated from subcultures at high temperatures. Surprisingly, we detected the presence of pXO1 plasmid DNA using overlap PCR in all these vaccine strains. DNA sequencing analysis of overlap PCR products further confirmed the presence of pXO1. Moreover, the expression of the protective antigen (PA) encoded on pXO1 was determined by using SDS-PAGE and western blotting. In addition, we mimicked Pasteur's method and exposed the A16R vaccine strain, which lacks the pXO2 plasmid, to high temperature, and identified the pXO1 plasmid in the subcultures at high temperatures. This indicated that the high temperature treatment at 42.5°C was unable to eliminate pXO1 plasmid DNA from B. anthracis. Our results suggest that the attenuation of the Pasteur II vaccine strain is likely due to the impact of high temperature stress on plasmid replication, which in turn limits the copy number of pXO1. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms of the remaining immunogenicity and toxicity of the vaccine strains. PMID:27029580

  11. Protection against Helicobacter pylori infection in mice by intragastric vaccination with H. pylori antigens is achieved using a non-toxic mutant of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) as adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, M; Rossi, M; Giannelli, V; Giuliani, M M; Pizza, M; Censini, S; Covacci, A; Massari, P; Pagliaccia, C; Manetti, R; Telford, J L; Douce, G; Dougan, G; Rappuoli, R; Ghiara, P

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that infection of mice with H. pylori can be prevented by oral immunization with H. pylori antigens given together with E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) as adjuvant. Since LT cannot be used in humans because of its unacceptable toxicity, we investigated whether protection of mice could be achieved by co-administration of antigens with non-toxic LT mutants. Here we show that CD1/SPF mice are protected against infection after oral vaccination with either purified H. pylori antigens (native and recombinant VacA, urease and CagA), or whole-cell vaccine formulations, given together with the non-toxic mutant LTK63 as a mucosal adjuvant. Furthermore we show that such protection is antigen-specific since immunization with recombinant or native VacA plus LTK63 conferred protection against infection by an H. pylori Type I strain, which expresses VacA, but not against challenge with a Type II strain which is not able to express this antigen. These results show that: (1) protection against H. pylori can be achieved in the mouse model of infection using subunit recombinant constructs plus non-toxic mucosal adjuvants; and (2) this mouse model is an useful tool in testing H. pylori vaccine formulations for eventual use in humans. PMID:9607006

  12. Brucella suis strain 2 vaccine is safe and protective against heterologous Brucella spp. infections.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangquan; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Ge; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Nan; Ding, Jiabo; Suo, Xun

    2016-01-12

    Brucellosis is a wide spread zoonotic disease that causes abortion and infertility in mammals and leads to debilitating, febrile illness in humans. Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis are the major pathogenic species to humans. Vaccination with live attenuated B. suis strain 2 (S2) vaccine is an essential and critical component in the control of brucellosis in China. The S2 vaccine is very effective in preventing brucellosis in goats, sheep, cattle and swine. However, there are still debates outside of China whether the S2 vaccine is able to provide protection against heterologous virulent Brucella species. We investigated the residual virulence, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the S2 vaccine in BALB/c mice by determining bacteria persistence in spleen, serum antibody response, cellular immune response and protection against a heterologous virulent challenge. The S2 vaccine was of low virulence as there were no bacteria recovered in spleen four weeks post vaccination. The vaccinated mice developed Brucella-specific IgG in 2-3 weeks, and a burst production of IFN-γ at one week as well as a two-fold increase in TNF-α production. The S2 vaccine protected mice from a virulent challenge by B. melitensis M28, B. abortus 2308 and B. suis S1330, and the S2 vaccinated mice did not develop any clinical signs or tissue damage. Our study demonstrated that the S2 vaccine is of low virulence, stimulates good humoral and cellular immunity and protects animals against infection by heterologous, virulent Brucella species. PMID:26626213

  13. Assembling flagella in Salmonella mutant strains producing a type III export apparatus without FliO.

    PubMed

    Barker, Clive S; Meshcheryakova, Irina V; Inoue, Tomoharu; Samatey, Fadel A

    2014-12-01

    The type III export apparatus of the Salmonella flagellum consists of six transmembrane proteins (FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR) and three soluble proteins (FliH, FliI, and FliJ). Deletion of the fliO gene creates a mutant strain that is poorly motile; however, suppressor mutations in the fliP gene can partially rescue motility. To further understand the mechanism of suppression of a fliO deletion mutation, we isolated new suppressor mutant strains with partially rescued motility. Whole-genome sequence analysis of these strains found a missense mutation that localized to the clpP gene [clpP(V20F)], which encodes the ClpP subunit of the ClpXP protease, and a synonymous mutation that localized to the fliA gene [fliA(+36T→C)], which encodes the flagellar sigma factor, σ(28). Combining these suppressor mutations with mutations in the fliP gene additively rescued motility and biosynthesis of the flagella in fliO deletion mutant strains. Motility was also rescued by an flgM deletion mutation or by plasmids carrying either the flhDC or fliA gene. The fliA(+36T→C) mutation increased mRNA translation of a fliA'-lacZ gene fusion, and immunoblot analysis revealed that the mutation increased levels of σ(28). Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR showed that either the clpP(V20F) or fliA(+36T→C) mutation rescued expression of class 3 flagellar and chemotaxis genes; still, the suppressor mutations in the fliP gene had a greater effect on bypassing the loss of fliO function. This suggests that the function of FliO is closely associated with regulation of FliP during assembly of the flagellum. PMID:25201947

  14. Genetic characterisation of the rabies virus vaccine strains used for oral immunization of foxes in Poland to estimate the effectiveness of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Orłowska, Anna; Żmudziński, Jan Franciszek

    2015-02-01

    The main reservoir of rabies virus in Poland has been the red fox. To control rabies in wildlife, oral immunization of foxes was introduced in 1993. The vaccine is effective when it confers immunity against the virus circulating in the environment. To assess the above issue, a study of the molecular characteristics of 570-bp fragments of the N and G genes of vaccine strains SAD B19 and SAD Bern against street virus strains was performed. The results confirmed the similarity of the vaccine strains and rabies virus strains circulating in the environment and also demonstrate the genetic stability of vaccine strains that have been distributed in Poland for 20 years. PMID:25408374

  15. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  16. Single-cycle replicable Rift Valley fever virus mutants as safe vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Kaori; Tercero, Breanna R; Makino, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus circulating between ruminants and mosquitoes to maintain its enzootic cycle. Humans are infected with RVFV through mosquito bites or direct contact with materials of infected animals. The virus causes Rift Valley fever (RVF), which was first recognized in the Great Rift Valley of Kenya in 1931. RVF is characterized by a febrile illness resulting in a high rate of abortions in ruminants and an acute febrile illness, followed by fatal hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis in humans. Initially, the virus was restricted to the eastern region of Africa, but the disease has now spread to southern and western Africa, as well as outside of the African continent, e.g., Madagascar, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. There is a serious concern that the virus may spread to other areas, such as North America and Europe. As vaccination is an effective tool to control RVFV epidemics, formalin-inactivated vaccines and live-attenuated RVFV vaccines have been used in endemic areas. The formalin-inactivated vaccines require boosters for effective protection, whereas the live-attenuated vaccines enable the induction of protective immunity by a single vaccination. However, the use of live-attenuated RVFV vaccines for large human populations having a varied health status is of concern, because of these vaccines' residual neuro-invasiveness and neurovirulence. Recently, novel vaccine candidates have been developed using replication-defective RVFV that can undergo only a single round of replication in infected cells. The single-cycle replicable RVFV does not cause systemic infection in immunized hosts, but enables the conferring of protective immunity. This review summarizes the properties of various RVFV vaccines and recent progress on the development of the single-cycle replicable RVFV vaccines. PMID:26022573

  17. Evaluation of the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of three capripoxvirus vaccine strains against lumpy skin disease virus.

    PubMed

    Gari, Getachew; Abie, Getnet; Gizaw, Daniel; Wubete, Alehegn; Kidane, Membere; Asgedom, Hagos; Bayissa, Berecha; Ayelet, Gelagay; Oura, Christopher A L; Roger, Francois; Tuppurainen, Eeva S M

    2015-06-22

    The safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of three commercially available vaccines against lumpy skin disease (LSD) in cattle have been evaluated using a combination of vaccine challenge experiments and the monitoring of immune responses in vaccinated animals in the field. The three vaccines evaluated in the study included two locally produced (Ethiopian) vaccines (lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) Neethling and Kenyan sheep and goat pox (KSGP) O-180 strain vaccines) and a Gorgan goat pox (GTP) vaccine manufactured by Jordan Bio-Industries Centre (JOVAC). The latter vaccine was evaluated for the first time in cattle against LSDV. The Ethiopian Neethling and KSGPO-180 vaccines failed to provide protection in cattle against LSDV, whereas the Gorgan GTP vaccine protected all the vaccinated calves from clinical signs of LSD. There was no significant difference in protective efficacy detected between two dosage levels (P=0.2, P=0.25, and P=0.1 for KSGP, Neethling and Gorgan vaccines, respectively). Additionally, the Gorgan GTP vaccinated cattle showed stronger levels of cellular immune responses measured using Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions at the vaccination site indicating higher levels of immunogenicity produced by the GTPV vaccine in cattle, as opposed to the other two vaccines. This study indicated, for the first time, that the Gorgan GTP vaccine can effectively protect cattle against LSDV and that the Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccine were not protective. The results emphasise the need for molecular characterization of the Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccine seed viruses used for vaccine production in Ethiopia. In addition, the potency and efficacy testing process of the Ethiopian LSD Neethling and KSGP O-180 vaccines should be re-evaluated. PMID:26056063

  18. Development and Characterization of attenuated Mutant Candidate Vaccines for Control of Paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative pathogen of Johne’s disease, a chronic inflammatory wasting disease in ruminants. The disease has been difficult to control because of the lack of an effective vaccine. To develop a live attenuated vaccine for Map, as well as for the...

  19. Cytokine responses in camels (Camelus bactrianus) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Odbileg, Raadan; Purevtseren, Byambaa; Gantsetseg, Dorj; Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Buyannemekh, Tumurjav; Galmandakh, Zagd; Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we determined the levels of cytokines produced by camel (Camelus bactrianus) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to live attenuated Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S19 vaccine. Seven camels were vaccinated with commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine, and their cytokine responses were determined using a real-time PCR assay. Cytokine responses to B. abortus S19 were examined at 6 hr, 48 hr and 1, 2 and 3 weeks post-vaccination. Serological tests were performed to further confirm these immune responses. The results revealed that IFN-gamma and IL-6 were upregulated during the first week post-vaccination. Low level expressions of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNFalpha and IL-10 and no expression of IL-2 and IL-4 were observed compared with the control camels. The findings showed that B. abortus stimulates cell-mediated immunity by directly activating camel Th1 cells to secrete IFN-gamma. This quantification of cytokine expression in camels is essential for understanding of Camelidae disease development and protective immune responses. This is the first report of in vivo camel cytokine quantification after vaccination. PMID:18319583

  20. Recovery of Nonpathogenic Mutant Bacteria from Tumors Caused by Several Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strains: a Frequent Event?▿

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Pablo; Murillo, Jesús; Lastra, Beatriz; López, María M.

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the interaction that bacterial genotypes and plant hosts have with the loss of pathogenicity in tumors, using seven Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains inoculated on 12 herbaceous and woody hosts. We performed a screening of the agrobacteria present inside the tumors, looking for nonpathogenic strains, and found a high variability of those strains in this niche. To verify the origin of the putative nonpathogenic mutant bacteria, we applied an efficient, reproducible, and specific randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis method. In contrast with previous studies, we recovered a very small percentage (0.01%) of nonpathogenic strains that can be considered true mutants. Of 5,419 agrobacterial isolates examined, 662 were nonpathogenic in tomato, although only 7 (from pepper and tomato tumors induced by two A. tumefaciens strains) could be considered to derive from the inoculated strain. Six mutants were affected in the transferred DNA (T-DNA) region; one of them contained IS426 inserted into the iaaM gene, whereas the whole T-DNA region was apparently deleted in three other mutants, and the virulence of the remaining two mutants was fully restored with the T-DNA genes as well. The plasmid profile was altered in six of the mutants, with changes in the size of the Ti plasmid or other plasmids and/or the acquisition of new plasmids. Our results also suggest that the frequent occurrence of nonpathogenic clones in the tumors is probably due to the preferential growth of nonpathogenic agrobacteria, of either endophytic or environmental origin, but different from the bacterial strain inducing the tumor. PMID:19700547

  1. Genetic Vaccination against Experimental Infection with Myotropic Parasite Strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Adriano Fernando; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Ersching, Jonatan; Dominguez, Mariana Ribeiro; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; Machado, Alexandre Vieira; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Soares, Milena Botelho; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins

    2014-01-01

    In earlier studies, we reported that a heterologous prime-boost regimen using recombinant plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective adenovirus vector, both containing Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding trans-sialidase (TS) and amastigote surface protein (ASP) 2, provided protective immunity against experimental infection with a reticulotropic strain of this human protozoan parasite. Herein, we tested the outcome of genetic vaccination of F1 (CB10XBALB/c) mice challenged with myotropic parasite strains (Brazil and Colombian). Initially, we determined that the coadministration during priming of a DNA plasmid containing the murine IL-12 gene improved the immune response and was essential for protective immunity elicited by the heterologous prime-boost regimen in susceptible male mice against acute lethal infections with these parasites. The prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination of resistant female mice led to a drastic reduction in the number of inflammatory infiltrates in cardiac and skeletal muscles during the chronic phase of infection with either strain. Analysis of the electrocardiographic parameters showed that prophylactic vaccination reduced the frequencies of sinus arrhythmia and atrioventricular block. Our results confirmed that prophylactic vaccination using the TS and ASP-2 genes benefits the host against acute and chronic pathologies caused by T. cruzi and should be further evaluated for the development of a veterinary or human vaccine against Chagas disease. PMID:25061263

  2. [Antigenic determination of human anti-rabies vaccine against viral street strains common in the wild animal population in Poland].

    PubMed

    Seroka, D

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the antigen properties of a vaccine strain with street strains isolated from various animal hosts throughout the country. Investigation was carried out using monoclonal antibodies against NC protein. Also, two tests were carried out: the modified NIH test for potency and the neutralization test using the sera of people vaccinated against rabies (PM vaccine strain). The investigated street strains were used in both tests as the challenge viruses. A suspension of these strains diluted five times made it possible to avoid extreme values of animal survival (0% or 100%) what, consequently, made calculation of the LD50 value easier. A different rabies virus serotype (EBLI virus) in the population of insectivore bats Eptesicus serotinus and antigen variants within the first serotype, having common epitopes with strains of the vaccine virus SAD B19 and the polar rabies virus, were found to be present throughout the country. The concentrated and purified vaccine containing the PM virus did not protect mice against infection with strains of viruses isolated from bats (protection index 10 and lower). For the remaining strains, depending on the animal source of their isolation, the protection index ranged from 10 to 1000 and higher. The properties neutralizing a dose of 5 i.u./ml of serum from the subject inoculated with the vaccine containing the PM strain were similar for all the investigated strains; 0,5 i.u./ml did not neutralize the strain isolated from a racoon dog. PMID:7541494

  3. Whole genome analyses of G1P[8] rotavirus strains from vaccinated and non-vaccinated South African children presenting with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Magagula, Nonkululeko B; Esona, Mathew D; Nyaga, Martin M; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Stockwell, Timothy B; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis and eventually death among infants and young children worldwide, and disease prevention and management through vaccination is a public health priority. In August 2009, Rotarix™ was introduced in the South African Expanded Programme on Immunisation. As a result, substantial reductions in RVA disease burden have been reported among children younger than 5 years old. Rotavirus strain surveillance post-vaccination is crucial to, inter alia, monitor and study the evolution of vaccine escape strains. Here, full-genome sequence data for the 11 gene segments from 11 South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains were generated, including 5 strains collected from non-vaccinated children during the 2004-2009 rotavirus seasons and 6 strains collected from vaccinated children during the 2010 rotavirus season. These data were analyzed to gain insights into the overall genetic makeup and evolution of South African G1P[8] rotavirus strains and to compare their genetic backbones with those of common human Wa-like RVAs from other countries, as well as with the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components. All 11 South African G1P[8] strains revealed a complete Wa-like genotype constellation of G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. On the basis of sequence similarities, the South African G1P[8] strains (with the exception of strain RVA/Human-wt/ZAF/1262/2004/G1P[8]) were closely related to each other (96-100% identity in all gene segments). Comparison to the Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™ G1P[8] vaccine components revealed a moderate nucleotide identity of 89-96% and 93-95%, respectively. The results indicated that none of the gene segments of these 11 South African G1P[8] strains were vaccine-derived. This study illustrates that large-scale next generation sequencing will provide crucial information on the influence of the vaccination program on evolution of rotavirus strains. This is the first report to describe

  4. Intact immune defenses are required for mice to resist the ts-4 vaccine strain of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Sayles, P C; Johnson, L L

    1996-01-01

    The ts-4 strain of Toxoplasma gondii is a temperature-sensitive mutant that fails to grow at 40 degrees C in vitro. Unlike mildly virulent cyst-forming strains, which can cause fatal chronic infections in certain mouse strains, ts-4 has been widely used to vaccinate mice against virulent T. gondii and is a valuable tool with which to investigate mechanisms of acquired resistance to this parasite. In this report, the basis for the avirulence of ts-4 is analyzed. It is shown that ts-4 is able to persist long-term in vivo in mildly immunocompromised mice, which rules out an intrinsic growth defect as a reason for avirulence. ts-4 does not induce body temperatures in mice as high as that needed to kill it in vitro. Moreover, the mild fevers elicited in resistant B6 mice are also seen in susceptible C57BL/6 scid/scid mice. However, ts-4 elicits strong preimmune defenses, dependent on gamma interferon, which are needed by mice to survive acute infection. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-dependent acquired immunity is essential for long-term survival of ts-4-infected mice. PMID:8757838

  5. Choice of High-Efficacy Strains for the Annual Influenza Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a model of protein evolution to explain limitations in the immune system response to vaccination and disease [1]. The phenomenon of original antigenic sin, wherein vaccination creates memory sequences that can increase susceptibility to future exposures to the same disease, is explained as stemming from localization of the immune system response in antibody sequence space. This localization is a result of the roughness in sequence space of the evolved antibody affinity constant for antigen and is observed for diseases with high year-to-year mutation rates, such as influenza. We show that the order parameter within this theory correlates well with efficacies of the H3N2 influenza A component of the annual vaccine between 1971 and 2004 [2,3]. This new measure of antigenic distance predicts vaccine efficacy significantly more accurately than do current state-of-the-art phylogenetic sequence analyses or ferret antisera inhibition assays. We discuss how this new measure of antigenic distance may be used in the context of annual influenza vaccine design and monitoring of vaccine efficacy. 1) M. W. Deem and H. Y. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 068101. 2) E. T. Munoz and M. W. Deem,q-bio.BM/0408016. 3) V. Gupta, D. J. Earl, and M. W. Deem, ``Choice of High-Efficacy Strains for the Annual Influenza Vaccine,'' submitted.

  6. Some guidelines for determining foot-and-mouth disease vaccine strain matching by serology.

    PubMed

    Mattion, Nora; Goris, Nesya; Willems, Tom; Robiolo, Blanca; Maradei, Eduardo; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Perez, Alejandro; Smitsaart, Eliana; Fondevila, Norberto; Palma, Eduardo; De Clercq, Kris; La Torre, José

    2009-01-29

    The selection of matching strains for use in outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus can be assessed in vivo or by serological r-value determination. Sera from animals involved in vaccine potency and cross-protection trials performed using the "Protection against Podal Generalization" (PPG) test for two serotype A strains were collected and analyzed by the virus neutralization test (VNT) and liquid-phase ELISA (lpELISA) in three laboratories. The average VNT r-values for medium and high serum titer classes from the A(24) Cruzeiro vaccinated animals were in line with the A/Arg/01 heterologous PPG outcome for all testing laboratories, suggesting that the vaccine strain A(24) Cruzeiro is unlikely to protect against the field isolate A/Arg/01. The corresponding lpELISA r-values were slightly higher and indicate a closer relationship between both strains. Pooling of serum samples significantly reduced the inter-animal and inter-trial variation. The results suggest that a suitable reference serum for vaccine matching r-value experiments might be a pool or a medium to high VNT or lpELISA titer serum. Furthermore, the VNT seems to produce the most reproducible inter-laboratory results. More work is, however, needed in order to substantiate these claims. PMID:19041355

  7. [Evaluation of the vaccine potentiality of 2 strains from Leptospira interrogans serogroup Ballum].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Andrés González; Jiménez, Yoandra Rodríguez; Santiesteban, Niurka Batista; Abreu, Yolanda Valdés; Osenes, Juan Francisco Núñez; González, Marta González

    2005-01-01

    Two vacine candidate strains from Ballum serogroup were characterized and their immunogenicity and protective power were studied in hamster. The monovalent vaccine formulations obtained showed a high immunogenicity and capacity of homologous protection and, in a lesser degree, of cross protection. PMID:17966485

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Vaccination Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Straube, Eberhard; Karrasch, Matthias; Keller, Peter M; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of ITALIC! Mycobacterium bovisBCG S4-Jena, a tuberculosis vaccine strain. The genome of S4-Jena is represented by 48 scaffolds, consisting of 132 scaffolded contigs and amounting to a size of about 4.2 Mb. New genes potentially encoding a phage fragment were identified in the genome. PMID:27103721

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Vaccination Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena

    PubMed Central

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Straube, Eberhard; Karrasch, Matthias; Keller, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena, a tuberculosis vaccine strain. The genome of S4-Jena is represented by 48 scaffolds, consisting of 132 scaffolded contigs and amounting to a size of about 4.2 Mb. New genes potentially encoding a phage fragment were identified in the genome. PMID:27103721

  10. Rapid generation of pandemic influenza virus vaccine candidate strains using synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Verity, Erin E.; Camuglia, Sarina; Agius, Catherine T.; Ong, Chi; Shaw, Robert; Barr, Ian; Middleton, Deborah; Rockman, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Verity et al. (2011) Rapid generation of pandemic influenza virus vaccine candidate strains using synthetic DNA. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI:10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2011.00273.x. Background  Vaccination is considered the most effective means of reducing influenza burden. The emergence of H5N1 and pandemic spread of novel H1N1/2009 viruses reinforces the need to have strategies in place to rapidly develop seed viruses for vaccine manufacture. Methods  Candidate pandemic vaccine strains consisting of the circulating strain haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) in an A/PR/8/34 backbone were generated using alternative synthetic DNA approaches, including site‐directed mutagenesis of DNA encoding related virus strains, and rapid generation of virus using synthetic DNA cloned into plasmid vectors. Results  Firstly, synthetic A/Bar Headed Goose/Qinghai/1A/2005 (H5N1) virus was generated from an A/Vietnam/1194/2004 template using site‐directed mutagenesis. Secondly, A/Whooper Swan/Mongolia/244/2005 (H5N1) and A/California/04/09 (H1N1) viruses were generated using synthetic DNA encoding the viral HA and NA genes. Replication and antigenicity of the synthetic viruses were comparable to that of the corresponding non‐synthetic viruses. Conclusions  In the event of an influenza pandemic, the use of these approaches may significantly reduce the time required to generate and distribute the vaccine seed virus and vaccine manufacture. These approaches also offer the advantage of not needing to handle wild‐type virus, potentially diminishing biocontainment requirements. PMID:21771285

  11. Isolation, characterization and biological activities of verotetrone from a mutant strain of Streptomyces aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Prikrylová, V; Podojil, M; Hilgert, I; Fuska, J; Vokoun, J; Vanĕk, Z

    1980-01-01

    A new metabolite denoted as verotetrone was isolated from the mycelium of the mutant strain Streptomyces aureofaciens NMG-2. Interpretations of physical data concerning verotetrone and its triacetate and, the determination of its degradation product indicate that verotetrone belongs to pretetramide-type metabolites. Verotetrone exhibits neither antibacterial nor antifungal activity. In vitro it inhibits the synthesis of nucleic acids as well as proteins in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. Both verotetrone and its triacetate interfere in vivo with the metabolism of tumour and lymphoid cells, exhibiting antitumour or immunosuppressive activity. This activity, which is more intense with verotetrone than with its triacetate, is detectable in a dose which is already toxic in some animals. PMID:6774935

  12. Evaluation of vaccine candidate potential of deltaaroA, deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutants of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Chandra, Mudit; Hansda, Dhananjoy; Alam, Javed; Babu, Narayanan; Siddiqui, Mehtab Z; Agrawal, Ravi K; Sharma, Gautam

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi (S. Abortusequi), a host adapted Salmonella causes abortions, still births and foal mortality in equids. Though known since more than 100 years, it is still a problem in many of the developing countries including India. There is dearth of really good vaccine affording immunity lasting at least for one full gestation. In search of a potential vaccine candidate, three defined deletion mutants (deltaaroA, deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA) of S. Abortusequi were tested in guinea pig model for attenuation, safety, immunogenicity, humoral immune response, protective efficacy and persistence in host. The deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutants were found to be safe on oral inoculation in doses as high as 4.2 x 10(9) cfu/animal. Also through subcutaneous inoculation deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutant did not induce any abortion in pregnant guinea pigs. All the three mutants did not induce any illness or death in 1-2 week-old baby guinea pigs except deltahtrA mutant which caused mortality on intraperitoneal inoculation. Inoculation with mutants protected against challenge and increased breeding efficiency of guinea pigs. After >4.5 months of mutant inoculation, guinea pigs were protected against abortifacient dose of wild type S. Abortusequi and mother guinea pigs also conferred resistance to their babies to the similar challenge. Early humoral immune response of S. Abortusequi mutants was characteristic. Faecal excretion of deltaaroA and htrA mutants was detected up to 45 days of inoculation in guinea pigs while deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutant could not be detected after 21 days of inoculation. The results indicated that the double deletion mutant (deltaaroAdeltahtrA) was the most effective and safe candidate for vaccination against S. Abortusequi through mucosal route of inoculation. PMID:24195347

  13. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin mutant Y30A-Y196A as a recombinant vaccine candidate against enterotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Hall, Charlotte A; Vance, Charlotte; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Savva, Christos G; Naylor, Claire E; Cole, Ambrose R; Basak, Ajit K; Moss, David S; Titball, Richard W

    2014-05-13

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) is a β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens toxinotypes B and D and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of enterotoxemia, a severe, often fatal disease of ruminants that causes significant economic losses to the farming industry worldwide. This study aimed to determine the potential of a site-directed mutant of Etx (Y30A-Y196A) to be exploited as a recombinant vaccine against enterotoxemia. Replacement of Y30 and Y196 with alanine generated a stable variant of Etx with significantly reduced cell binding and cytotoxic activities in MDCK.2 cells relative to wild type toxin (>430-fold increase in CT50) and Y30A-Y196A was inactive in mice after intraperitoneal administration of trypsin activated toxin at 1000× the expected LD50 dose of trypsin activated wild type toxin. Moreover, polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits against Y30A-Y196A provided protection against wild type toxin in an in vitro neutralisation assay. These data suggest that Y30A-Y196A mutant could form the basis of an improved recombinant vaccine against enterotoxemia. PMID:24709588

  14. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin mutant Y30A-Y196A as a recombinant vaccine candidate against enterotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Hall, Charlotte A.; Vance, Charlotte; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P.; Savva, Christos G.; Naylor, Claire E.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Basak, Ajit K.; Moss, David S.; Titball, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) is a β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens toxinotypes B and D and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of enterotoxemia, a severe, often fatal disease of ruminants that causes significant economic losses to the farming industry worldwide. This study aimed to determine the potential of a site-directed mutant of Etx (Y30A-Y196A) to be exploited as a recombinant vaccine against enterotoxemia. Replacement of Y30 and Y196 with alanine generated a stable variant of Etx with significantly reduced cell binding and cytotoxic activities in MDCK.2 cells relative to wild type toxin (>430-fold increase in CT50) and Y30A-Y196A was inactive in mice after intraperitoneal administration of trypsin activated toxin at 1000× the expected LD50 dose of trypsin activated wild type toxin. Moreover, polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits against Y30A-Y196A provided protection against wild type toxin in an in vitro neutralisation assay. These data suggest that Y30A-Y196A mutant could form the basis of an improved recombinant vaccine against enterotoxemia. PMID:24709588

  15. Degradation of p-chlorotoluene by a mutant of Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6

    SciTech Connect

    Haigler, B.E.; Spain, J.C. )

    1989-02-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS6 grows on chlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, or toluene as a sole source of carbon and energy. It does not grow on p-chlorotoluene (p-CT). Growth on glucose in the presence of p-CT resulted in the accumulation of 4-chloro-2,3- dihydroxy-1-methyl benzene (3-chloro-6- methylcatechol), 4-chloro- 2,3-dihydroxy-1-methyl cyclohexa- 4,6-diene (p-CT dihydrodoil), and 2-methyl-4-carboxy methylenebut-2-en-4-olide (2-methyl dienelactone). Strain JS21, a spontaneous mutant capable of growth on p-CT, was isolated from cultures of strain JS6 after extended exposure to p-CT. In addition to growing on p-CT, JS21 grew on all of the substrates that supported growth of the parent strain, including p-dichlorobenzene, chlorobenzene, benzene, toluene, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenol, and ethylbenzene. The pathway for degradation of p-CT by JS21 was investigated by respirometry, isolation of intermediates, and assay of enzymes in cell extracts. p-CT was converted to 3-chloro-6-methylcatechol by dioxygenase and dihydrodiol dehydrogenase enzymes. 3-Chloro-6-methylcatechol underwent ortho ring cleavage catalyzed by a catechol 1,2-dioxygenase to form 2-chloro-5-methyl-cis,cis-muconate, which was converted to 2-methyl dienelactone. A dienelactone hydrolase converted 2-methyl dienelactone to 2-methylmaleylacetic acid. Preliminary results indicate that a change in wild-type induction patterns allows JS21 to grow on p-CT.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-Cancerous Scopularide Production by a Marine Microascus brevicaulis Strain and Its UV Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Annemarie; Beck, Hans Christian; Kumar, Abhishek; Kristensen, Lars Peter; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Labes, Antje

    2015-01-01

    The marine fungus Microascus brevicaulis strain LF580 is a non-model secondary metabolite producer with high yields of the two secondary metabolites scopularides A and B, which exhibit distinct activities against tumour cell lines. A mutant strain was obtained using UV mutagenesis, showing faster growth and differences in pellet formation besides higher production levels. Here, we show the first proteome study of a marine fungus. Comparative proteomics were applied to gain deeper understanding of the regulation of production and of the physiology of the wild type strain and its mutant. For this purpose, an optimised protein extraction protocol was established. In total, 4759 proteins were identified. The central metabolic pathway of strain LF580 was mapped using the KEGG pathway analysis and GO annotation. Employing iTRAQ labelling, 318 proteins were shown to be significantly regulated in the mutant strain: 189 were down- and 129 upregulated. Proteomics are a powerful tool for the understanding of regulatory aspects: The differences on proteome level could be attributed to limited nutrient availability in the wild type strain due to a strong pellet formation. This information can be applied for optimisation on strain and process level. The linkage between nutrient limitation and pellet formation in the non-model fungus M. brevicaulis is in consensus with the knowledge on model organisms like Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. PMID:26460745

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-Cancerous Scopularide Production by a Marine Microascus brevicaulis Strain and Its UV Mutant.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Annemarie; Beck, Hans Christian; Kumar, Abhishek; Kristensen, Lars Peter; Imhoff, Johannes F; Labes, Antje

    2015-01-01

    The marine fungus Microascus brevicaulis strain LF580 is a non-model secondary metabolite producer with high yields of the two secondary metabolites scopularides A and B, which exhibit distinct activities against tumour cell lines. A mutant strain was obtained using UV mutagenesis, showing faster growth and differences in pellet formation besides higher production levels. Here, we show the first proteome study of a marine fungus. Comparative proteomics were applied to gain deeper understanding of the regulation of production and of the physiology of the wild type strain and its mutant. For this purpose, an optimised protein extraction protocol was established. In total, 4759 proteins were identified. The central metabolic pathway of strain LF580 was mapped using the KEGG pathway analysis and GO annotation. Employing iTRAQ labelling, 318 proteins were shown to be significantly regulated in the mutant strain: 189 were down- and 129 upregulated. Proteomics are a powerful tool for the understanding of regulatory aspects: The differences on proteome level could be attributed to limited nutrient availability in the wild type strain due to a strong pellet formation. This information can be applied for optimisation on strain and process level. The linkage between nutrient limitation and pellet formation in the non-model fungus M. brevicaulis is in consensus with the knowledge on model organisms like Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. PMID:26460745

  18. Biotransformation of L-tyrosine to Dopamine by a Calcium Alginate Immobilized Mutant Strain of Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sikander; Nawaz, Wajeeha

    2016-08-01

    The present research work is concerned with the biotransformation of L-tyrosine to dopamine (DA) by calcium alginate entrapped conidiospores of a mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae. Different strains of A. oryzae were isolated from soil. Out of 13 isolated strains, isolate-2 (I-2) was found to be a better DA producer. The wild-type I-2 was chemically improved by treating it with different concentrations of ethyl methyl sulfonate (EMS). Among seven mutant variants, EMS-6 exhibiting maximal DA activity of 43 μg/ml was selected. The strain was further exposed with L-cysteine HCl to make it resistant against diversion and environmental stress. The conidiospores of selected mutant variant A. oryzae EMS-6 strain were entrapped in calcium alginate beads. Different parameters for immobilization were investigated. The activity was further improved from 44 to 62 μg/ml under optimized conditions (1.5 % sodium alginate, 2 ml inoculum, and 2 mm bead size). The best resistant mutant variable exhibited over threefold increase in DA activity (62 μg/ml) than did wild-type I-2 (21 μg/ml) in the reaction mixture. From the results presented in the study, it was observed that high titers of DA activity in vitro could effectively be achieved by the EMS-induced mutagenesis of filamentous fungus culture used. PMID:27068833

  19. Induced drought tolerance through wild and mutant bacterial strain Pseudomonas simiae in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sarita; Vaishnav, Anukool; Jain, Shekhar; Varma, Ajit; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on the overproducing mutant of a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae strain AU (MTCC-12057) for significant drought tolerance in mung bean plants. Five mutants namely AU-M1, AU-M2, AU-M3, AU-M4 and AU-M5 were made after treatment of wild type strain with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Mutant strain AU-M4 was recorded for enhanced ACC deaminase (ACC-D) activity, indole acetic acid (IAA) production and inorganic phosphate (Pi) solubilization compared to wild strain and other four mutant strains under drought condition. AU-M4 showed higher phosphate solubilization index (8.17) together with higher ACC-D activity (98 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (69.35 µg/ml) compared with the wild type P. simiae strain AU ACC-D activity (79 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (38.98 µg/ml) respectively. In this report, we investigated the effect of both wild and mutant type bacterial strain on mung bean plants under drought stress. Results showed that mutant AU-M4 and wild type strain AU inoculated plants exhibited superior tolerance against drought stress, as shown by their enhanced plant biomass (fresh weight), higher water content, higher proline accumulation and lower osmotic stress injury. Mutant AU-M4 and wild strain AU inoculated plants reduced the ethylene level by 59 and 45% respectively, compared to the control under stress condition. Furthermore, bacterial inoculated plants showed enhanced induced systemic drought tolerance by reducing stomata size and net photosynthesis resulting higher water content in mung bean plants that may help in survival of plants during drought condition. To mitigate the effects of drought stress, use of PGPR will be needed to ensure sufficient production of food from crop plants. Taking current leads available, concerted future research is needed in this area, particularly on field evaluation with application of potential microorganisms. PMID:26712619

  20. Production in Vero cells of an inactivated rabies vaccine from strain FRV/K for animal and human use.

    PubMed

    el-Karamany, R M

    1987-08-01

    A new concentrated and purified rabies vaccine was produced in Vero cells. Two rabies virus strains, the fixed rabies virus Pasteur (FRV) and Pittman Moore (PM) were adapted to Vero cells by 20 cycles of alternating passages in the brain of weaning mice. Intracerebral (i.c.) inoculation of weaning mice was followed then by 17 and 20 serial passages in Vero cells of RFV and PM strains, respectively. The adapted strains designated as FRV/K and PM/K gave titres of 10(6) +/- 1.5 log (LD50/ml for i.c. inoculated mice) in several harvests taken from one infected cell culture. Pooled harvests were concentrated 20-fold by ultrafiltration and were tested as animal vaccine after inactivation with beta-propiolactone (BPL). Another vaccine preparation destined for human use, in addition to concentration and inactivation, was also purified by gel filtration. Control tests revealed that the antigenic content of different strain FRV/K harvests was very high in comparison with that of strain PM/K and the reference tissue culture vaccine (RIV, Netherland). In sheep the antibody response induced by the FRV/K strain was very high; serum neutralizing index (NI) higher than 4 was reached 40 days after the second vaccine dose, whereas the vaccine preparation from strain PM/K gave NI of 2.3 and the reference vaccine NI of 3.8, respectively. Safety tests in rabbits and guinea pigs showed neither pyrogenicity nor toxicity. PMID:2892381

  1. Propagation of the Israeli vaccine strain of Anaplasma centrale in tick cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Palomar, Ana M; Bradford, Emma L; Shkap, Varda

    2015-09-30

    Anaplasma centrale has been used in cattle as a live blood vaccine against the more pathogenic Anaplasma marginale for over 100 years. While A. marginale can be propagated in vitro in tick cell lines, facilitating studies on antigen production, immunisation and vector-pathogen interaction, to date there has been no in vitro culture system for A. centrale. In the present study, 25 cell lines derived from 13 ixodid tick species were inoculated with the Israeli vaccine strain of A. centrale and monitored for at least 12 weeks by microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained cytocentrifuge smears. Infection of 19 tick cell lines was subsequently attempted by transfer of cell-free supernate from vaccine-inoculated tick cells. In two separate experiments, rickettsial inclusions were detected in cultures of the Rhipicephalus appendiculatus cell line RAE25 28-32 days following inoculation with the vaccine. Presence of A. centrale in the RAE25 cells was confirmed by PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA, groEL and msp4 genes; sequenced PCR products were 100% identical to published sequences of the respective genes in the Israeli vaccine strain of A. centrale. A. centrale was taken through three subcultures in RAE25 cells over a 30 week period. In a single experiment, the Dermacentor variabilis cell line DVE1 was also detectably infected with A. centrale 11 weeks after inoculation with the vaccine. Availability of an in vitro culture system for A. centrale in tick cells opens up the possibility of generating a safer and more ethical vaccine for bovine anaplasmosis. PMID:26210950

  2. Propagation of the Israeli vaccine strain of Anaplasma centrale in tick cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Palomar, Ana M.; Bradford, Emma L.; Shkap, Varda

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma centrale has been used in cattle as a live blood vaccine against the more pathogenic Anaplasma marginale for over 100 years. While A. marginale can be propagated in vitro in tick cell lines, facilitating studies on antigen production, immunisation and vector-pathogen interaction, to date there has been no in vitro culture system for A. centrale. In the present study, 25 cell lines derived from 13 ixodid tick species were inoculated with the Israeli vaccine strain of A. centrale and monitored for at least 12 weeks by microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained cytocentrifuge smears. Infection of 19 tick cell lines was subsequently attempted by transfer of cell-free supernate from vaccine-inoculated tick cells. In two separate experiments, rickettsial inclusions were detected in cultures of the Rhipicephalus appendiculatus cell line RAE25 28–32 days following inoculation with the vaccine. Presence of A. centrale in the RAE25 cells was confirmed by PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA, groEL and msp4 genes; sequenced PCR products were 100% identical to published sequences of the respective genes in the Israeli vaccine strain of A. centrale. A. centrale was taken through three subcultures in RAE25 cells over a 30 week period. In a single experiment, the Dermacentor variabilis cell line DVE1 was also detectably infected with A. centrale 11 weeks after inoculation with the vaccine. Availability of an in vitro culture system for A. centrale in tick cells opens up the possibility of generating a safer and more ethical vaccine for bovine anaplasmosis. PMID:26210950

  3. Persistence and spreading of field and vaccine strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in vaccinated and unvaccinated geographic regions, in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Jorge Luis; Núñez, Luis Fabian Naranjo; Vejarano, Maria Pilar; Parra, Silvana Hipatia Santander; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete Serrano; Ferreira, Antonio José Piantino

    2015-08-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly infectious respiratory disease that causes morbidity and mortality in commercial chickens. Despite the use of attenuated vaccines, ILT outbreaks have been described in broiler and long-lived birds. Molecular approaches, including polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and DNA sequencing, are used to characterize ILT viruses (ILTVs) detected in vaccinated and unvaccinated geographical regions. As part of an ILT control program implemented in a region of commercial layer production, samples of conjunctiva, trachea, and trigeminal ganglia were collected from chickens in a vaccinated and quarantined region over a period of 8 years after initiation of vaccination. To determine the origin of new ILT outbreaks in unvaccinated regions, samples collected from ill chickens were also analyzed. Chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccine viruses and the Bastos field strain were detected circulating in healthy chickens in the vaccinated region. CEO strains and field viruses molecularly related to the Bastos strain were also detected outside of the quarantined region in chickens showing clinical signs of ILT. This study reveals the persistence and circulation of a wild field strain, despite the intensive use of tissue culture origin (TCO) and CEO vaccines in a quarantined region. Spreading of CEO viruses to unvaccinated regions and the capacity of this virus to establish latent infections and cause severe outbreaks were also observed. PMID:25904510

  4. Phage-resistant mutants of Lactobacillus delbrueckii may have functional properties that differ from those of parent strains.

    PubMed

    Vinderola, Gabriel; Marcó, Mariángeles Briggiler; Guglielmotti, Daniela M; Perdigón, Gabriela; Giraffa, Giorgio; Reinheimer, Jorge; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    Three commercial phage sensitive Lactobacillus delbrueckii strains (identified as Ab(1), YSD V and Ib(3)), and four spontaneous phage-resistant mutants isolated from them were tested for their capacity to activate the gut mucosal immune response in mice, as indicated by the numbers of IgA-producing cells. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis revealed a strong genetic homology between the sensitive strains and their respective derivatives. The phage-resistant mutants exhibited high levels of phage resistance, elevated stability of this phenotype and technological properties comparable to those of their respective parent strains. The tolerance to acidic conditions, bile salts and lysozyme was strain dependent and total cell viability losses as a result of exposure to all three stresses ranged from 2.0 to 3.7 log units. All the strains were highly resistant to a simulated gastric solution of pH 3, while significant additional losses in cell viability were observed when acid treated cells were exposed to bile salts and lysozyme. BALB/c mice received pure cultures of Lb. delbrueckii sensitive and phage-resistant strains for 2, 5 or 7 consecutive days. The ability of the parent strains to activate the small intestine immune response was preserved or enhanced in phage-resistant mutants. The maximal proliferation of IgA(+) cells was observed at day 5 or 7, depending on the strain. Mutants isolated in this study using natural selection strategies had improved phage resistance, adequate technological properties and satisfactory gut mucosal immunostimulation ability, and so would be good candidates for industrial applications in functional foods. PMID:17307269

  5. Enhancing cellulase production by overexpression of xylanase regulator protein gene, xlnR, in Talaromyces cellulolyticus cellulase hyperproducing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Naoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    We obtained strains with the xylanase regulator gene, xlnR, overexpressed (HXlnR) and disrupted (DXlnR) derived from Talaromyces cellulolyticus strain C-1, which is a cellulase hyperproducing mutant. Filter paper degrading enzyme activity and cellobiohydrolase I gene expression was the highest in HXlnR, followed by C-1 and DXlnR. These results indicate that the enhancement of cellulase productivity was succeeded by xlnR overexpression. PMID:27309759

  6. Differential Immune Responses and Protective Effects in Avirulent Mycobacterial Strains Vaccinated BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Laicheng; Fu, Ruiling; Yuan, Xuefeng; Shi, Chunwei; Wang, Shuling; Lu, Xianyu; Ma, Zhao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Qin, Weiyan; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-07-01

    Screening live mycobacterial vaccine candidates is the important strategy to develop new vaccines against adult tuberculosis (TB). In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of several avirulent mycobacterial strains including Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. vaccae, M. terrae, M. phlei, M. trivial, and M. tuberculosis H37Ra were compared with M. bovis BCG in BALB/c mice. Our results demonstrated that differential immune responses were induced in different mycobacterial species vaccinated mice. As BCG-vaccinated mice did, M. terrae immunization resulted in Th1-type responses in the lung, as well as splenocytes secreting IFN-γ against a highly conserved mycobacterial antigen Ag85A. M. smegmatis also induced the same splenocytes secreting IFN-γ as BCG and M. terrae did. In addition, M. terrae and M. smegmatis-immunized mice predominantly increased expression of IL-10 and TGF-β in the lung. Most importantly, mice vaccinated with H37Ra and M. vaccae could provide the same protection in the lung against virulent M. tuberculosis challenge as BCG. The result may have important implications in developing adult TB vaccine. PMID:25995039

  7. A short-filament mutant of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 that fragments in nitrogen-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, C C; Buikema, W J; Black, K; Haselkorn, R

    1995-01-01

    Strain 129 is a fragmentation mutant of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Growing with fixed nitrogen, this mutant forms filaments that are much shorter than wild-type filaments. Following starvation for fixed nitrogen, strain 129 becomes nearly unicellular and forms few heterocysts, although electron microscopy suggests that proheterocysts form while fragmentation occurs. Starvation for sulfate, phosphate, iron, and calcium does not cause this fragmentation. The affected gene in strain 129, fraC, was cloned by complementation and characterized. It encodes a unique 179-amino-acid protein rich in phenylalanine. Insertional inactivation of the chromosomal copy of fraC results in a phenotype identical to that of strain 129, while complementation using a truncated version of FraC results in only partial complementation of the original mutant. Heterocysts could be induced to form in N-replete cultures of strain 129, as in wild-type cells, by supplying extra copies of the hetR gene on a plasmid. Thus, FraC is required for the integrity of cell junctions in general but is apparently not directly involved in normal differentiation and nitrogen fixation. PMID:7883709

  8. [Selected research problems of anthrax vaccine development].

    PubMed

    Zakowska, Dorota; Kocik, Janusz; Bartoszcze, Michał

    2009-01-01

    The threat of bioterrorism with B. anthracis against civilian population is one of major concern. After successful bioterroristic attack in 2001 in US renewed research interest has prompted in the development of new and more effective vaccine against anthrax. There are two licensed vaccines against anthrax--AVA-Bio-Thrax US and UK--sterile culture filtrate prepared by alum precipitation. Both vaccines are based on PA antigen. There are several concerns regarding PA based vaccines. They require six sc injections and yearly booster, high rates of local reaction after vaccination is observed, the immunity is not long lasting, vaccination do not protect animals against different strains of B. anthracis. New strategies in the development of anthrax vaccines have been presented (recombinant PA, subunits vaccine, mutants, conjugated). Using proteomic approaches new antigens have been also identified as candidates for future vaccines. More effective and easy to perform methods of vaccination have been reviewed. PMID:20120948

  9. Altered calmodulin activity in fluphenazine-resistant mutant strains. Pleiotropic effect on development and cellular organization in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Kurn, N; Sela, B A

    1981-12-01

    Genetically altered calmodulin activity in spontaneously derived mutant strains, which were selected for resistance to the toxic effect of a specific inhibitor, the phenothiazine drug fluphenazine, is demonstrated. Partially purified calmodulin preparations from wild-type and fluphenazine-resistant strains of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, were tested for the ability to activate Ca2+-ATPase of the erythrocyte membranes, and the inhibition of this stimulatory activity by fluphenazine. Unlike the preparation obtained from wild-type cells, mutant calmodulin is shown to be insensitive to fluphenazine inhibition, in one case, and calmodulin from another strain was found to be inactive in vitro, i.e. it did not activate Ca2+-ATPase. The pleiotropic phenotype of the spontaneously derived mutant strains involved aberrant multicellular organization and hormone-independent commitment of the multipotent asexual reproductive cells, gonodia, to sexual development. These results clearly implicate calmodulin in the control of development and morphogenesis in this simple multicellular eukaryote. In addition, intracellular inhibition of calmodulin in wild-type cells is shown to block the morphogenic process of embryo inversion and to arrest motility. The availability of mutant calmodulin will facilitate further investigation of the role of this ubiquitous regulatory protein in the control of development and differentiation in multicellular eukarytes, as well as the fine structure/function relationship with regard to calmodulin modulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. PMID:6459931

  10. In vivo and in vitro genetic recombination between conventional and gene-deleted vaccine strains of pseudorabies virus.

    PubMed

    Henderson, L M; Katz, J B; Erickson, G A; Mayfield, J E

    1990-10-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV), an alpha-herpesvirus, causes substantial economic losses in the swine industry and is currently the focus of eradication and control programs. Some of these programs rely on the ability of veterinarians to differentiate animals exposed to virulent strains of PRV from animals exposed to avirulent vaccine strains of PRV on the basis of a serologic response to nonessential glycoproteins that are deleted in some vaccine strains of PRV. Genetic recombination resulting in the creation of virulent strains of PRV with the same negative immunologic markers as vaccine strains could disrupt these programs. Two strains of PRV were coinoculated either into tissue culture or into sheep to facilitate recombination. Progeny viruses were selected to detect a specific recombinant phenotype. We were able to detect genetic recombination between vaccine strains of PRV following in vitro or in vivo coinoculation of 2 strains of PRV. The selected recombinants had marker-deleted phenotypes in strains with restored virulence genes. Increased virulence was observed in sheep after coinoculation of 2 avirulent vaccine strains of PRV. PMID:2173449

  11. A halocin-H4 mutant Haloferax mediterranei strain retains the ability to inhibit growth of other halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Naor, Adit; Yair, Yael; Gophna, Uri

    2013-11-01

    Many members of the Halobacteriaceae were found to produce halocins, molecules that inhibit the growth of other halophilic archaea. Halocin H4 that is produced by Haloferax mediterranei and inhibits the growth of Halobacterium salinarum is one of the best studied halocins to date. The gene encoding this halocin had been previously identified as halH4, located on one of Hfx. mediterranei megaplasmids. We generated a mutant of the halH4 gene and examined the killing ability of the Haloferax mediterranei halH4 mutant with respect to both Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax volcanii. We showed that both wild-type Hfx. mediterranei and the halH4 mutant strain efficiently inhibited the growth of both species, indicating halocin redundancy. Surprisingly, the halH4 deletion mutant exhibited faster growth in standard medium than the wild type, and is likely to have a better response to several nucleotides, which could explain this phenotype. PMID:24037372

  12. Construction and Evaluation of V. cholerae O139 Mutant, VCUSM21P, as a Safe Live Attenuated Cholera Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Murugaiah, Chandrika; Nik Mohd Noor, Nik Zuraina; Mustafa, Shyamoli; Manickam, Ravichandran; Pattabhiraman, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is a major infectious disease, affecting millions of lives annually. In endemic areas, implementation of vaccination strategy against cholera is vital. As the use of safer live vaccine that can induce protective immunity against Vibrio cholerae O139 infection is a promising approach for immunization, we have designed VCUSM21P, an oral cholera vaccine candidate, which has ctxA that encodes A subunit of ctx and mutated rtxA/C, ace and zot mutations. VCUSM21P was found not to disassemble the actin of HEp2 cells. It colonized the mice intestine approximately 1 log lower than that of the Wild Type (WT) strain obtained from Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. In the ileal loop assay, unlike WT challenge, 1×106 and 1×108 colony forming unit (CFU) of VCUSM21P was not reactogenic in non-immunized rabbits. Whereas, the reactogenicity caused by the WT in rabbits immunized with 1×1010 CFU of VCUSM21P was found to be reduced as evidenced by absence of fluid in loops administered with 1×102–1×107 CFU of WT. Oral immunization using 1×1010 CFU of VCUSM21P induced both IgA and IgG against Cholera Toxin (CT) and O139 lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The serum vibriocidal antibody titer had a peak rise of 2560 fold on week 4. Following Removable Intestinal Tie Adult Rabbit Diarrhoea (RITARD) experiment, the non-immunized rabbits were found not to be protected against lethal challenge with 1×109 CFU WT, but 100% of immunized rabbits survived the challenge. In the past eleven years, V. cholerae O139 induced cholera has not been observed. However, attenuated VCUSM21P vaccine could be used for vaccination program against potentially fatal endemic or emerging cholera caused by V. cholerae O139. PMID:24505241

  13. New Strains Intended for the Production of Inactivated Polio Vaccine at Low-Containment After Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Knowlson, Sarah; Burlison, John; Giles, Elaine; Fox, Helen; Macadam, Andrew J.; Minor, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has nearly been eradicated through the efforts of the World Health Organization’s Global Eradication Initiative raising questions on containment of the virus after it has been eliminated in the wild. Most manufacture of inactivated polio vaccines currently requires the growth of large amounts of highly virulent poliovirus, and release from a production facility after eradication could be disastrous; WHO have therefore recommended the use of the attenuated Sabin strains for production as a safer option although it is recognised that they can revert to a transmissible paralytic form. We have exploited the understanding of the molecular virology of the Sabin vaccine strains to design viruses that are extremely genetically stable and hyperattenuated. The viruses are based on the type 3 Sabin vaccine strain and have been genetically modified in domain V of the 5’ non-coding region by changing base pairs to produce a cassette into which capsid regions of other serotypes have been introduced. The viruses give satisfactory yields of antigenically and immunogenically correct viruses in culture, are without measurable neurovirulence and fail to infect non-human primates under conditions where the Sabin strains will do so. PMID:26720150

  14. Intranasal immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines with nontoxic mutants of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins as adjuvants protects mice against invasive pneumococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, H; Schulz, D; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Jónsdóttir, I

    1999-11-01

    Host defenses against Streptococcus pneumoniae depend largely on phagocytosis following opsonization by polysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and complement. Since colonization of the respiratory mucosa is the first step in pneumococcal pathogenesis, mucosal immune responses may play a significant role. In addition to inducing systemic immune responses, mucosal vaccination with an effective adjuvant has the advantage of inducing mucosal IgA antibodies. The heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of Escherichia coli is a well-studied mucosal adjuvant, and adjuvant activity of nontoxic LT mutants has been demonstrated for several protein antigens. We investigated the immunogenicity of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PNC) of serotypes 1 and 3 in mice after intranasal (i.n.) immunization by using as an adjuvant the nontoxic LT mutant LT-K63 or LT-R72, which has minimal residual toxicity. Pneumococcal serotype-specific antibodies were measured in serum (IgM, IgG, and IgA) and saliva (IgA), and vaccine-induced protection was evaluated by i.n. challenge with virulent pneumococci of the homologous serotype. When administered with LT mutants, i.n. immunization with both conjugates induced systemic and mucosal immune responses, and serum IgG antibody levels were significantly higher than after subcutaneous immunization. All mice immunized i.n. with PNC-1 and LT mutants were protected against bacteremia and cleared the pneumococci from the lung 24 h after i.n. challenge; pneumococcal density correlated significantly with serum IgG antibody levels. Similarly, the survival of mice immunized i.n. with PNC-3 and LT mutants was significantly prolonged. These results demonstrate that i.n. vaccination with PNC and potent adjuvants can protect mice against invasive and lethal pneumococcal infections, indicating that mucosal vaccination with PNC may be an alternative vaccination strategy for humans. PMID:10531245

  15. Live Attenuated Shigella dysenteriae Type 1 Vaccine Strains Overexpressing Shiga Toxin B Subunit ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Grassel, Christen; Levine, Myron M.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2011-01-01

    Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (S. dysenteriae 1) is unique among the Shigella species and serotypes in the expression of Shiga toxin which contributes to more severe disease sequelae and the ability to cause explosive outbreaks and pandemics. S. dysenteriae 1 shares characteristics with other Shigella species, including the capability of causing clinical illness with a very low inoculum (10 to 100 CFU) and resistance to multiple antibiotics, underscoring the need for efficacious vaccines and therapeutics. Following the demonstration of the successful attenuating capacity of deletion mutations in the guaBA operon in S. flexneri 2a vaccine strains in clinical studies, we developed a series of S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine candidates containing the fundamental attenuating mutation in guaBA. All strains are devoid of Shiga toxin activity by specific deletion of the gene encoding the StxA subunit, which encodes enzymatic activity. The StxB subunit was overexpressed in several derivatives by either plasmid-based constructs or chromosomal manipulation to include a strong promoter. All strains are attenuated for growth in vitro in the HeLa cell assay and for plaque formation and were safe in the Serény test and immunogenic in the guinea pigs. Each strain induced robust serum and mucosal anti-S. dysenteriae 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responses and protected against wild-type challenge. Two strains engineered to overexpress StxB induced high titers of Shiga toxin neutralizing antibodies. These candidates demonstrate the potential for a live attenuated vaccine to protect against disease caused by S. dysenteriae 1 and potentially to protect against the toxic effects of other Shiga toxin 1-expressing pathogens. PMID:21969003

  16. Vector Development for the Expression of Foreign Proteins in the Vaccine Strain Brucella abortus S19

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Pollevick, Guido D.; Vigliocco, Ana M.; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    1998-01-01

    A vector for the expression of foreign antigens in the vaccine strain Brucella abortus S19 was developed by using a DNA fragment containing the regulatory sequences and the signal peptide of the Brucella bcsp31 gene. This fragment was cloned in broad-host-range plasmid pBBR4MCS, resulting in plasmid pBEV. As a reporter protein, a repetitive antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. The recombinant fusion protein is stably expressed and secreted into the Brucella periplasmic space, inducing a good antibody response against the T. cruzi antigen. The expression of the repetitive antigen in Brucella neither altered its growth pattern nor generated a toxic or lethal effect during experimental infection. The application of this strategy for the generation of live recombinant vaccines and the tagging of B. abortus S19 vaccine is discussed. This is the first time that a recombinant protein has been expressed in the periplasm of brucellae. PMID:9673273

  17. The effect of gamma irradiation on astaxanthin synthetase encoding gene in two mutant strains of Phaffia rhodozyma

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Naeimeh; Hosseini, Ramin; Ahmadi, Ali-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Astaxanthin, an orange-red carotenoid pigment, acts as a protective agent against oxidative damage to cells in vivo. The astaxanthin synthetase gene (crtS) size consists of 3995 bp. This gene has been suggested to catalyse β-carotene to astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma. The aim of this research was to find any possible changes in this gene in two mutant strains, Gam1 and Gam2 (with high astaxanthin pigment production), previously created by gamma irradiation. Materials and Methods The astaxanthin synthetase gene sequence of Phaffia rhodozyma in the NCBI Gene bank was used to design primer. In Gam1, this gene was amplified using primers Asta F1, Asta R2, Asta F3, Asta R4. In Gam2, primers asta F1, asta R4 were used to amplify the gene. The amplified fragments were 8 sequenced using primers Asta F1, Asta R1, Asta F2, Asta R2, Asta F3, Asta R3 and Asta F4, Asta R4. Astaxanthin synthetase gene from two mutant strains, Gam1 and Gam2 were amplified using PCR. The amplified products were sequenced and aligned using the ClustalW software. Conclusion The comparison of this gene showed 98% and 99% similarities between the reference sequence and Gam1 and Gam2 mutant strains, respectively, whereas the comparison of this gene in Gam1 and Gam2 mutant strains showed 97% similarity. However, the deduced proteins showed 78% and 83% between the reference protein obtained from the wild type and Gam1 and Gam2, respectively. This similarity was 75% between the mutant strains. PMID:24475339

  18. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and a vaccine strain of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi using pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Livengood, Julia L; Lanka, Saraswathi; Maddox, Carol; Tewari, Deepanker

    2016-07-25

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi), the causative agent of strangles, is an important equine pathogen. Strangles is a highly contagious disease and a commercial modified live vaccine (MLV) is used for protection, which although effective, may also result in clinical signs of the disease. A rapid means to differentiate between the MLV and wild-type infection is crucial for quarantine release and limiting the disease spread. This study describes the use of a pyrosequencing assay targeting a single nucleotide deletion upstream of the SzPSe gene to distinguish between the wild-type and vaccine strains. A set of 96 characterized clinical specimens and isolates were tested using the assay. The assay was successful in differentiating between wild-type S. equi and the vaccine strains and in discriminating S. equi from other Streptococci. The vaccine strain was identified in 61.7% (29/47) of the strangles cases in horses with a history of MLV vaccination. PMID:27317457

  19. [Comparative study of the immunizing ability of some attenuated strains of sheep pox virus and of a sensitizing vaccine].

    PubMed

    Achour, H A; Bouguedour, R; Bouhbal, A; Guechtouli, A; Aouissat, M

    2000-12-01

    The authors present the results of a study designed to compare the immunogenicity of several attenuated strains of sheep pox virus and a virus/immune serum vaccine. Two of the strains studied present immunogenic characteristics that make them particularly interesting for the manufacture of a vaccine. The first, named Djelfa, confers solid immunity to animals without provoking a vaccinal reaction; the second, known as Romania, can provide protection beyond twenty-four months, but causes persistent vaccinal lesions. In a country like Algeria, these two strains could be used for immunoprophylaxis of sheep pox: the first in those regions in which prevalence is low and sheep are vaccinated on a regular basis, and the second in regions of high prevalence where herds are moved to new pastures each season. PMID:11107620

  20. The Live Attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Triple-Deletion Mutant ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1 Strain, SLW05, Immunizes Pigs against Lethal Challenge with Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulin; Ou, Jiwen; Zhang, Minmin; Xu, Juan; Liu, Huazhen; Liu, Jinlin; Yuan, Fangyan; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae both belong to the family Pasteurellaceae and are major respiratory pathogens that cause large economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. We previously constructed an attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 live vaccine prototype, SLW05 (ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1), which is able to produce nontoxic but immunogenic ApxIA, ApxIIA, and ApxIVA. This triple-deletion mutant strain was shown to elicit protective immunity against virulent A. pleuropneumoniae. In the present study, we investigated whether immunization with SLW05 could also protect against lethal challenge with virulent H. parasuis SH0165 (serovar 5) or MD0322 (serovar 4). The SLW05 strain was found to elicit a strong humoral antibody response in pigs and to confer significant protection against challenge with a lethal dose of H. parasuis SH0165 or MD0322. IgG subtype analysis revealed that SLW05 induces a bias toward a Th1-type immune response and stimulates interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production. Moreover, antisera from SLW05-vaccinated pigs efficiently inhibited both A. pleuropneumoniae and H. parasuis growth in a whole-blood assay. This is the first report that a live attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae vaccine with SLW05 can protect against lethal H. parasuis infection, which provides a novel approach for developing an attenuated H. parasuis vaccine. PMID:23220998

  1. Chinese border disease virus strain JSLS12-01 infects piglets and down-regulates the antibody responses of classical swine fever virus C strain vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li; Li, Wenliang; Liu, Xia; Hao, Fei; Yang, Leilei; Deng, Jiawu; Zhang, Wenwen; Wei, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jieyuan

    2015-07-31

    During 2012 and 2013, several border disease virus (BDV) strains were identified from Chinese goat and sheep herds. At the same time, pigs from the same areas were found to be seropositive to BDV by ELISA, without showing clinical signs (unpublished data). To examine the susceptibility of pigs to the Chinese BDV strains, BDV isolate JSLS12-01, isolated from naturally infected sheep, was used to infect pigs. Antibody responses, viremia, clinical signs and pathological changes of the infected animals were examined. It confirmed that the current BDV strain could infect the domestic pigs, the animals showed viremia during 4 to 14 days post infection (dpi) and sero-conversion from 14dpi; no clinical and pathological changes were observed. In addition, CSFV maternal antibody did not influence BDV infection. Subsequently, pigs were infected with the BDV isolate and vaccinated with Hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV) 21 days later to determine the effect of BDV infection on antibody induction of CSFV vaccination. The specific CSFV antibody and neutralizing antibody titers of the BDV infected group remained negative after the primary vaccination. Even after the boost vaccination, they were still significantly lower than those of the uninfected groups (p<0.05). These results indicated that BDV infection could down-regulate the antibody responses of CSFV C-strain vaccination. It should be paid attention that BDV prevalence in pig herds and in live vaccines might hamper the vaccination of CSF. PMID:26117151

  2. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Latasa, Cristina; Echeverz, Maite; García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo; Solano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  3. Evaluation of a Salmonella Strain Lacking the Secondary Messenger C-di-GMP and RpoS as a Live Oral Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    García, Begoña; Gil, Carmen; García-Ona, Enrique; Burgui, Saioa; Casares, Noelia; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Lasarte, Juan José; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food, with chicken and pig related products being key reservoirs of infection. Although numerous studies on animal vaccination have been performed in order to reduce Salmonella prevalence, there is still a need for an ideal vaccine. Here, with the aim of constructing a novel live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidate, we firstly analyzed the impact of the absence of cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in Salmonella virulence. C-di-GMP is an intracellular second messenger that controls a wide range of bacterial processes, including biofilm formation and synthesis of virulence factors, and also modulates the host innate immune response. Our results showed that a Salmonella multiple mutant in the twelve genes encoding diguanylate cyclase proteins that, as a consequence, cannot synthesize c-di-GMP, presents a moderate attenuation in a systemic murine infection model. An additional mutation of the rpoS gene resulted in a synergic attenuating effect that led to a highly attenuated strain, referred to as ΔXIII, immunogenic enough to protect mice against a lethal oral challenge of a S. Typhimurium virulent strain. ΔXIII immunogenicity relied on activation of both antibody and cell mediated immune responses characterized by the production of opsonizing antibodies and the induction of significant levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17 and IL-10. ΔXIII was unable to form a biofilm and did not survive under desiccation conditions, indicating that it could be easily eliminated from the environment. Moreover, ΔXIII shows DIVA features that allow differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals. Altogether, these results show ΔXIII as a safe and effective live DIVA vaccine. PMID:27537839

  4. Immune Responses to Virulent and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Bronchitis Viruses in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Rajesh; Chantrey, Julian; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2015-11-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) is an acute and highly contagious chicken viral disease, causing severe economic losses to poultry producers worldwide. In the last few decades, infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) has been extensively studied, but knowledge of immune responses to virulent or vaccine strains of IBVs remains limited. This review focuses on fundamental aspects of immune responses against IBV, including the role of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in identification of conserved viral structures and the role of different components of innate immunity (e.g., heterophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, acute phase protein, and cytokines). Studies on adaptive immune activation and the role of humoral and cellular immunity in IBV clearance are also reviewed. Multiple interlinking immune responses are essential for protection against virulent IBVs, including passive, innate, adaptive, and effector T cells active at mucosal surfaces. Although the development of approaches for chicken transcriptome and proteome analyses have greatly helped the understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms for immunity, there are still major knowledge gaps, such as the role of mucosal and cellular responses to IBVs. In view of recent reports of emergent IBV variants in many countries, there is renewed interest in a more complete understanding of poultry immune responses to both virulent and vaccine strains of IBVs. This will be critical for developing new vaccine or vaccination strategies and other intervention programs. PMID:26301315

  5. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater. PMID:24034892

  6. Genome sequences of three live attenuated vaccine strains of Brucella species and implications for pathogenesis and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Zhoujia; Yuan, Xitong; Qiu, Yefeng; Zhen, Qing; Xu, Jie; Li, Tiefeng; Wang, Dali; Huang, Liuyu; Chen, Zeliang

    2012-11-01

    Live attenuated vaccines play essential roles in the prevention of brucellosis. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three vaccine strains, Brucella melitensis M5-10, B. suis S2-30, and B. abortus 104M. Primary genome sequence analysis identified mutations, deletions, and insertions which have implications for attenuation and signatures for differential diagnosis. PMID:23045513

  7. Characterisation of Brucella abortus strain 19 cultures isolated from vaccinated cattle.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Bracewell, C D; Corbel, M J

    1981-01-31

    Thirty-four cultures recovered from material of bovine origin in England, Scotland and Wales were identified unequivocally as Brucella abortus strain 19 (S19). All had the properties of carbon dioxide-independent B abortus biotype 1 strains, were inhibited by penicillin G and thionin blue at standard concentrations and behaved in oxidative metabolism and guinea pig virulence tests as typical S19. Their sensitivity to i-erythritol varied somewhat between cultures as did reference subcultures of S19. Of the total number of isolates, 11 were recovered from abortion material or cyetic products, 10 were from calves which died from a hypersensitivity reaction within 24 hours of S19 vaccination and the remainder were from milk or internal organs. From the evidence available, there is little to suggest that calfhood vaccination with S19 has resulted in persistent systemic infection in other than a very small proportion of the animals inoculated. PMID:6789543

  8. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant rabies vaccine strain (ERAG3G) induces complete protection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose New rabies vaccine bait for both pets and raccoon dogs residing in Korea is needed to eradicate rabies infection among animals. In this study, we constructed a recombinant rabies virus (RABV), the ERAG3G strain, using a reverse genetics system. Then we investigated the efficacy of this strain in mice after oral administration and the safety of this strain in cats after intramuscular administration. Materials and Methods The ERAG3G strain was rescued in BHK/T7-9 cells using the full-length genome mutated at the amino acid position 333 of the glycoprotein gene of RABV and helper plasmids. Four-week-old mice underwent one or two oral administrations of the ERAG3G strain and were challenged with the highly virulent RABV strain CVSN2c 14 days after the second administration. Clinical symptoms were observed and body weights were measured every day after the challenge. Results All mice showed complete protection against virulent RABV. In addition, cats intramuscularly inoculated with the ERAG3G strain showed high antibody titers ranging from 2.62 to 23.9 IU/mL at 28-day postinoculation. Conclusion The oral immunization of the ERAG3G strain plays an important role in conferring complete protection in mice, and intramuscular inoculation of the ERAG3G strain induces the formation of anti-rabies neutralizing antibody in cats. PMID:25648184

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides T1/44, a Vaccine Strain against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gourgues, Géraldine; Barré, Aurélien; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Weber, Johann; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Barbe, Valérie; Schieck, Elise; Jores, Joerg; Vashee, Sanjay; Blanchard, Alain; Lartigue, Carole; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma mycoidessubsp.mycoidesis the etiologic agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. We report here the complete genome sequence of the strain T1/44, which is widely used as a live vaccine in Africa. PMID:27081135

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides T1/44, a Vaccine Strain against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gourgues, Géraldine; Barré, Aurélien; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Weber, Johann; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Barbe, Valérie; Schieck, Elise; Jores, Joerg; Vashee, Sanjay; Blanchard, Alain; Lartigue, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is the etiologic agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. We report here the complete genome sequence of the strain T1/44, which is widely used as a live vaccine in Africa. PMID:27081135

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of the Three African Horse Sickness Virus Strains from a Commercial Trivalent Live Attenuated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Peter; Martin, Darren P.; Lourens, Carina W.; Venter, Estelle H.; Weyer, Camilla T.; Joone, Christopher; le Grange, Misha; Harper, Cindy K.; Howell, Peter G.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the three virus strains included in a South African commercial trivalent African horse sickness attenuated live virus vaccine. PMID:26294618

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Four African Horse Sickness Virus Strains from a Commercial Tetravalent Live Attenuated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Peter; Martin, Darren P.; Lourens, Carina W.; Venter, Estelle H.; Weyer, Camilla T.; Joone, Christopher; le Grange, Misha; Harper, Cindy K.; Howell, Peter G.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the four virus strains included in a South African commercial tetravalent African horse sickness attenuated live virus vaccine. PMID:26607890

  13. Sequential parametric optimization of lipase production by a mutant strain Rhizopus sp. BTNT-2.

    PubMed

    Bapiraju, K V V S N; Sujatha, P; Ellaiah, P; Ramana, T

    2005-01-01

    Lipase production by the mutant strain Rhizopus sp. BTNT-2 was optimized in submerged fermentation. Different chemical and physical parameters such as carbon sources, nitrogen sources, oils, inoculum level, pH, incubation time, incubation temperature and aeration have been extensively studied to increase lipase productivity. Potato starch (1.25% w/v) as a carbon source, corn steep liquor (1.5% w/v) as a nitrogen source and olive oil (0.5% v/v) as lipid source were found to be optimal for lipase production. The optimal levels of other parameters are 4 ml of inoculum (2.6x10(8) spores/ml), initial pH of 5.5, incubation time of 48 hours, incubation temperature of 28 degrees C and aeration rate of 120 rpm. With the optimized parameters, the highest production of lipase was 59.2 U/ml while an yield of only 28.7 U/ml was obtained before optimization resulting in 206% increase in the productivity. PMID:16028198

  14. Pilin regulation in the pilT mutant of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain MS11

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Manuela; Mollenkopf, Hans; So, Magdalene; Friedrich, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    The ATPase protein PilT mediates retraction of type IV pili (Tfp). Tfp retraction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes many signal transduction events and changes in gene expression in infected epithelial cells. To find out whether a pilT mutation and lack of Tfp retraction, respectively, lead also to gene regulation in bacteria we performed microarrays comparing the transcriptional profiles of the N. gonorrhoeae parent strain MS11 and its isogenic pilT mutant during growth in vitro. A loss-of-function-mutation in pilT led to altered transcript levels of 63 open reading frames. Levels of pilE transcripts and its deduced protein the major Tfp subunit pilin, were increased most markedly by a mutation in pilT. Further studies revealed that pilE expression was also controlled by two other genes encoding Tfp biogenesis proteins, pilD and pilF. Our studies strongly suggest that pilE expression is a finely-tuned process. PMID:19486161

  15. Selection by Anion-Exchange Chromatography of Exopolysaccharide Mutants of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Panoff, Jean-Michel; Joset, Françoise

    1989-01-01

    The degree of retention of whole cells of Synechocystis strain PCC 6803 on DEAE-cellulose columns was shown to depend on their content of exopolysaccharides, which are at least in part responsible for the external negative charge of the cells. This feature was used for the isolation of mutants modified in the apparent viscosity caused by these macromolecular constituents. When a wild-type suspension was loaded onto a DE52 column, the cells eluting in the two extreme fractions of a 0 to 5 M NaCl step gradient represented 10−9 to 10−7 of the total eluted population. The accuracy of the procedure was established through the analysis of four clones: Suc(0)32 and Suc(0)65 (0 M) and Suc(5)64A and Suc(5)61 (5 M). The decreased viscosity of the exopolymers of the two 0 M clones, which appeared identical, could be related to the production of molecules less charged in uronic acids and more readily liberated from the cells. The two 5 M clones exhibited a lower sedimentation velocity, correlating with either a 60% increase in uronic acid and a doubling of the specific viscosity of the exopolysaccharides [clone Suc(5)64A] or a doubling of the per-cell production of polymers otherwise identical to those from wild-type cells [clone Suc(5)61]. Images PMID:16347938

  16. Isolation and complementation of mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.; Cai, Y.; Cardemil, L.; Flores, E.; Hohn, B.; Murry, M.; Schmetterer, G.; Schrautemeier, B.; Wilson, R.

    1988-03-01

    Mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen were isolated by mutagenesis with UV irradiation, followed by a period of incubation in yellow light and then by penicillin enrichment. A cosmid vector, pRL25C, containing replicons functional in Escherichia coli and in Anabaena species was constructed. DNA from wild-type Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was partially digested with Sau3AI, and size-fractionated fragments about 40 kilobases (kb) in length were ligated into the phosphatase-treated unique BamHI site of pRL25C. A library of 1054 cosmid clones was generated in E. coli DH1 bearing helper plasmid pDS4101. A derivative of conjugative plasmid RP-4 was transferred to this library by conjugation, and the library was replicated to lawns of mutant Anabaena strains with defects in the polysaccharide layer of the envelopes of the heterocysts. Mutant EF116 was complemented by five cosmids, three of which were subjected to detailed restriction mapping; a 2.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from one of the cosmids was found to complement EF116. Mutant EF113 was complemented by a single cosmid, which was also restriction mapped, and was shown to be complemented by a 4.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from this cosmid.

  17. Biological methods for archiving and maintaining mutant laboratory mice. Part II: recovery and distribution of conserved mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Fray, Martin D

    2009-01-01

    The mouse is now firmly established as the model organism of choice for scientists studying mammalian biology and human disease. Consequently, large collections of novel genetically altered mouse lines have been deposited in secure archives around the world. If these resources are to be of value to the scientific community, they must be easily accessible to all researchers regardless of their embryological skills or geographical location.This chapter describes how the archiving centres attempt to make the strains they hold visible and accessible to all interested parties, and also outlines the methods currently used in laboratories around the world to recover mouse strains previously archived using the methods highlighted in this manual (see Chapter 20). PMID:19504081

  18. Rational Design of a Live Attenuated Dengue Vaccine: 2′-O-Methyltransferase Mutants Are Highly Attenuated and Immunogenic in Mice and Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David C.; Zhang, Bo; Balakrishnan, Thavamalar; Toh, Ying-Xiu; Jiang, Tao; Li, Shi-Hua; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Ellis, Brett R.; Ellis, Esther M.; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Fink, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and infects at least 100 million people every year. Progressive urbanization in Asia and South-Central America and the geographic expansion of Aedes mosquito habitats have accelerated the global spread of dengue, resulting in a continuously increasing number of cases. A cost-effective, safe vaccine conferring protection with ideally a single injection could stop dengue transmission. Current vaccine candidates require several booster injections or do not provide protection against all four serotypes. Here we demonstrate that dengue virus mutants lacking 2′-O-methyltransferase activity are highly sensitive to type I IFN inhibition. The mutant viruses are attenuated in mice and rhesus monkeys and elicit a strong adaptive immune response. Monkeys immunized with a single dose of 2′-O-methyltransferase mutant virus showed 100% sero-conversion even when a dose as low as 1,000 plaque forming units was administrated. Animals were fully protected against a homologous challenge. Furthermore, mosquitoes feeding on blood containing the mutant virus were not infected, whereas those feeding on blood containing wild-type virus were infected and thus able to transmit it. These results show the potential of 2′-O-methyltransferase mutant virus as a safe, rationally designed dengue vaccine that restrains itself due to the increased susceptibility to the host's innate immune response. PMID:23935499

  19. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  20. Phenotypes of Campylobacter jejuni luxS Mutants Are Depending on Strain Background, Kind of Mutation and Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Linda; Alter, Thomas; Sharbati, Soroush; Gölz, Greta

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery that Campylobacter (C.) jejuni produces Autoinducer 2 (AI-2), various studies have been conducted to explore the function and role of AI-2 in C. jejuni. However, the interpretation of these analyses has been complicated by differences in strain backgrounds, kind of mutation and culture conditions used. Furthermore, all research on AI-2 dependent phenotypes has been conducted with AI-2 synthase (luxS) mutants. This mutation also leads to a disruption of the activated-methyl-cycle. Most studies lack sufficient complementation resulting in not knowing whether phenotypes of luxS mutants depend on disrupted metabolism or lack of AI-2. Additionally, no AI-2 receptor has been found yet. All this contributes to an intensive discussion about the exact role of AI-2 in C. jejuni. Therefore, we examined the impact of different experiment settings on three different C. jejuni luxS mutants on growth and motility (37°C and 42°C). Our study showed that differing phenotypes of C. jejuni luxS mutants depend on strain background, mutation strategy and culture conditions. Furthermore, we complemented experiments with synthetic AI-2 or homocysteine as well as the combination of both. Complementation with AI-2 and AI-2+homocysteine significantly increased the cell number of C. jejuni NCTC 11168ΔluxS in stationary phase compared to the non-complemented C. jejuni NCTC 11168ΔluxS mutant. Genetic complementation of both C. jejuni 81-176 luxS mutants resulted in wild type comparable growth curves. Also swarming ability could be partially complemented. While genetic complementation restored swarming abilities of C. jejuni 81-176ΔluxS, it did not fully restore the phenotype of C. jejuni 81-176::luxS, which indicates that compensatory mutations in other parts of the chromosome and/or potential polar effects may appear in this mutant strain. Also with neither synthetic complementation, the phenotype of the wild type-strains was achieved, suggesting yet another reason for

  1. Haemophilus influenzae vaccine candidate outer membrane protein P6 is not conserved in all strains

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Arthur; Kaur, Ravinder; Michel, Lea Vacca; Casey, Janet R

    2011-01-01

    An outer membrane protein (OMP) of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), P6, is a vaccine candidate because it has been characterized as conserved among all H. influenzae strains. Among 151 isolates from children, age 6 to 30 months, evaluating NTHi nasopharyngeal (NP) and oropharyngeal (OP) colonization and tympanocentesis confirmed acute otitis media we identified 14 strains (9.3%) that had variant protein sequences of P6. One atypical omp P6 isolate had sequence mutations in the binding site of a proposed major antigenic epitope of omp P6 identified by monoclonal antibody 7F3. Eight strains (5.3%) had non-homologous variations in amino acids that could result in significant changes to the protein structure of P6, and 5 other strains had amino acid substitutions at four previously described key residue sites. These results show that NTHi omp P6 is not invariant in its structure among respiratory isolates from children. PMID:21285530

  2. Dynamics of Photosynthesis in a Glycogen-Deficient glgC Mutant of Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Simon A.; Eaton-Rye, Julian J.; Bryant, Donald A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacterial glycogen-deficient mutants display impaired degradation of light-harvesting phycobilisomes under nitrogen-limiting growth conditions and secrete a suite of organic acids as a putative reductant-spilling mechanism. This genetic background, therefore, represents an important platform to better understand the complex relationships between light harvesting, photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and carbon/nitrogen metabolisms. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of photosynthesis as a function of reductant sink manipulation in a glycogen-deficient glgC mutant of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. The glgC mutant showed increased susceptibility to photoinhibition during the initial phase of nitrogen deprivation. However, after extended periods of nitrogen deprivation, glgC mutant cells maintained higher levels of photosynthetic activity than the wild type, supporting continuous organic acid secretion in the absence of biomass accumulation. In contrast to the wild type, the glgC mutant maintained efficient energy transfer from phycobilisomes to photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers, had an elevated PSII/PSI ratio as a result of reduced PSII degradation, and retained a nitrogen-replete-type ultrastructure, including an extensive thylakoid membrane network, after prolonged nitrogen deprivation. Together, these results suggest that multiple global signals for nitrogen deprivation are not activated in the glgC mutant, allowing the maintenance of active photosynthetic complexes under conditions where photosynthesis would normally be abolished. PMID:26150450

  3. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  4. Mutant strains of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis to increase the efficiency of micro-ecological life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Igor

    The European Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an advanced idea for organizing a bioregenerative system for long term space flights and extraterrestrial settlements (Hendrickx, De Wever et al., 2005). Despite the hostility of both lunar and Martian environments to unprotected life, it seems possible to cultivate photosynthetic bacteria using closed bioreactors illuminated and heated by solar energy. Such reactors might be employed in critical processes, e.g. air revitalization, foodcaloric and protein source, as well as an immunomodulators production. The MELiSSA team suggested cyanobacterium Spirulina as most appropriate agent to revitalize air and produce a simple "fast" food. This is right suggestion because Spirulina was recently shown to be an oxygenic organism with the highest level of O2 production per unit mass (Ananyev et al., 2005). Chemical composition of Spirulina includes proteins (55Aiming to make Spirulina cultivation in life support systems like MELiSSA more efficient, we selected Spirulina mutant strains with increased fraction of methionine in the biomass of this cyanobacterium and compared the effect of parental wild strain of Spirulina and its mutants on the tendency of such experimental illnesses as radiationinduced lesions and hemolythic anemia. Results: It was found that mutant strains 198B and 27G contain higher quantities of total protein, essential amino acids, c-phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and chlorophyll a than parental wild strain of S. platensis. The strain 198B is also characterized with increased content of carotenoids. Revealed biochemical peculiarities of mutant strains suggest that these strains can serve as an additional source of essential amino acids as well as phycobiliproteins and carotenoids for the astronauts. Feeding animals suffering from radiation-induced lesions, c-phycocyanin, extracted from strain 27G, led to a correction in deficient dehydrogenase activity and energy-rich phosphate levels

  5. A rapid cycleave PCR method for distinguishing the vaccine strain Brucella abortus A19 in China.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenlong; Zhang, Yueyong; Tan, Pengfei; Xu, Zouliang; Chen, Yuqi; Mao, Kairong; Chen, Yiping

    2016-05-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. Immunization with attenuated vaccines has proved to be an effective method of prevention; however, it may also interfere with diagnosis. Brucella abortus strain A19, which is homologous to B. abortus strain S19, is widely used for the prevention of bovine brucellosis in China. For effective monitoring of the control of brucellosis, it is essential to distinguish A19 from field strains. Single-nucleotide polymorphism-based assays offer a new approach to such discrimination studies. In the current study, we developed a cycleave PCR assay that successfully distinguished attenuated vaccine strains A19 and S19 from 22 strains of B. abortus and 57 strains of 5 other Brucella species. The assay gave a negative reaction with 4 non-Brucella species. The minimum sensitivity of the assay, evaluated using 10-fold dilutions of chromosomal DNA, was 7.6 fg for the A19 strain and 220 fg for the single non-A19/non-S19 Brucella strain tested (B. abortus 104M). The assay was also reproducible (intra- and interassay coefficients of variation: 0.003-0.01 and 0.004-0.025, respectively). The cycleave assay gave an A19/S19-specific reaction in 3 out of 125 field serum samples, with the same 3 samples being positive in an alternative A19/S19-specific molecular assay. The cycleave assay gave a total of 102 Brucella-specific reactions (3 being the A19/S19-specific reactions), whereas an alternative Brucella-specific assay gave 92 positive reactions (all also positive in the cycleave assay). Therefore, this assay represents a simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific tool for use in brucellosis control. PMID:27075847

  6. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26221956

  7. Effects of Time-Specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays on Prelay ts-11-strain M. gallisepticum Vaccination on Blood Characteristics of Commercial Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay ts-11-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (ts-11MG) vaccination alone or in combination with subsequent time specific F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculations on the blood characteristics of commercial laying hens. The following 4 treat...

  8. Mycoplasma gallisepticum transmission: Comparison of commercial F-strain vaccine versus layer complex-derived field strains in a tunnel ventilated house

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two simultaneous trials were conducted using a commercially available, live, F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccine [Trial 1] or two inocula of layer complex-derived MG strains (LCD-MG) [Trial 2]. In each of the two trials, four commercial turkeys were housed in each of two adjoining pens ...

  9. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qicheng; Tian, Meijuan; Feng, Yi; Zhao, Kai; Xu, Jing; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV) as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT) was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1) viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1) and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs). ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH) strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector. PMID:23593246

  10. Evaluation of Factors Influencing Efficacy of Vaccine Strain CVI988 Against Marek's Disease in Meat-Type Chickens.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Isabel M; Cortes, Aneg L; Faiz, Nik M; Barbosa, Taylor; Villalobos, Tarsicio

    2015-09-01

    Marek's disease (MD) strain CVI988 is the most-protective commercially available vaccine against very virulent plus (vv+) Marek's disease virus (MDV). However, its use in meat-type chickens has been controversial. While several countries have been using CVI988 for more than 40 yr, others do not authorize its use or it is restricted mainly to layers. The use of CVI988 in meat-type chickens will be necessary in the future in areas where other vaccine protocols fail. The objective of this study was to evaluate factors (vaccine dose, vaccine origin, chicken genetics, age and route of vaccination, and combination with other MD vaccines) influencing the efficacy of CVI988 against MD in meat-type chickens. Three animal experiments were conducted in which various vaccine protocols using CVI988 were tested for their protection against challenge with vv+ strain 648A by contact at day of age. Experiments 1 and 2 were to compare the efficacy of CVI988 vaccines from three different origins (CVI988-A, CVI988-B, and CVI988-C) and evaluate the effect of vaccine dose and chicken genetics. Experiment 3 was to evaluate the effect of adding CVI988 vaccine to various vaccine protocols using other MD vaccines of serotypes 2 (SB-1) and 3 (rHVT). Our results show that, regardless of the origin of the vaccine, protection against early challenge with 648A was good when vaccines were administered at a high dose (>3000 plaque-forming units [PFU]). Differences among vaccines, however, were detected even when using a high dose in experiment 2 (vaccine CVI988-B conferred higher protection than did CVI988-C) but not in Experiment 1 (CVI988-B was compared to CVI988-A). The use of a fixed low dose (2000 PFU) of vaccine resulted in reduction in protection, and such reduction was more remarkable when using CV1988-A. No statistically significant differences were found when we compared the efficacy of CVI988 in two different genetic lines of broiler chickens (G1 and G2). Vaccination protocols that

  11. Evaluation of influenza vaccine effectiveness and description of circulating strains in outpatient settings in South Africa, 2014

    PubMed Central

    McAnerney, Johanna M; Treurnicht, Florette; Walaza, Sibongile; Cohen, Adam L; Tempia, Stefano; Mtshali, Senzo; Buys, Amelia; Blumberg, Lucille; Cohen, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of the trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine during the 2014 season in South Africa was assessed using a test-negative case–control study design including 472 cases and 362 controls. Influenza A(H3N2) was the dominant strain circulating. The overall vaccine effectiveness estimate, adjusted for age and underlying conditions, was 43·1% (95% CI: −26·8–74·5). 2014 H3N2 viruses from South Africa were mainly in sublineage 3C.3 with accumulation of amino acid changes that differentiate them from the vaccine strain in 3C.1. PMID:25865249

  12. Immune responses of elk to initial and booster vaccinations with Brucella abortus strain RB51 or 19.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; Fach, S J; Palmer, M V; Sacco, R E; Stoffregen, W C; Waters, W R

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that currently available brucellosis vaccines induce poor or no protection in elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). In this study, we characterized the immunologic responses of elk after initial or booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strains RB51 (SRB51) and 19 (S19). Elk were vaccinated with saline or 10(10) CFU of SRB51 or S19 (n=seven animals/treatment) and booster vaccinated with a similar dosage of the autologous vaccine at 65 weeks. Compared to nonvaccinates, elk vaccinated with SRB51 or S19 had greater (P<0.05) antibody responses to SRB51 or S19 after initial vaccination and after booster vaccination. Compared to nonvaccinated elk, greater (P<0.05) proliferative responses to autologous antigen after initial vaccination occurred at only a few sample times in SRB51 (6, 14, and 22 weeks) and S19 (22 weeks) treatment groups. In general, proliferative responses of vaccinates to nonautologous antigens did not differ (P>0.05) from the responses of nonvaccinated elk. Gamma interferon production in response to autologous or nonautologous Brucella antigens did not differ (P>0.05) between controls and vaccinates after booster vaccination. Flow cytometric techniques suggested that proliferation occurred more frequently in immunoglobulin M-positive cells, with differences between vaccination and control treatments in CD4+ and CD8+ subset proliferation detected only at 22 weeks after initial vaccination. After booster vaccination, one technique ([3H]thymidine incorporation) suggested that proliferative responses to SRB51 antigen, but not S19 antigen, were greater (P<0.05) in vaccinates compared to the responses of nonvaccinates. However, in general, flow cytometric and other techniques failed to detect significant anamnestic responses to autologous or nonautologous Brucella antigens in S19 or SRB51 vaccinates after booster vaccination. Although some cellular immune responses were detected after initial or booster vaccination of elk with SRB51

  13. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  14. Anthraquinone dyes decolorization capacity of anamorphic Bjerkandera adusta CCBAS 930 strain and its HRP-like negative mutants.

    PubMed

    Korniłłowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Rybczyńska, Kamila

    2014-06-01

    Cultures of the anamorphic fungus Bjerkandera adusta CCBAS 930 decolorizing, in stationary cultures, 0.01 % solutions of carminic acid and Poly R-478, were characterised by a strong increase in the activity of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP-like) and manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) at a low activity of lignin peroxidase. Genotypically modified mutants of B. adusta CCBAS 930: 930-5 and 930-14, with total or partial loss of decolorization capabilities relative to anthraquinonic dyes, showed inhibition of the activity of HRP-like peroxidase and MnP. Whereas, compared to the parental strain, in the mutant cultures there was an increase in the activity of lignin peroxidase and laccase. The paper presents a discussion of the role of the studied enzymatic activities in the process of decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes by the strain B. adusta CCBAS 930. PMID:24415463

  15. [Study of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Urusov, F A; Romanova, N I; Shmel'kova, A O; Kim, A I

    2012-11-01

    Transpositions of the gypsy retrotransposon in the Drosophila melanogaster genome are controlled by the flamenco locus, which is represented as an accumulation of defective copies of transposable elements. In the present work, genetic control by the flamenco locus of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon from the gypsy group was studied. Tissue-specific expression of Tirant was detected in the tissues of ovaries in a strain mutant for the flamenco locus. Tirant was found to be transpositionally active in isogenic D. melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus. The sites of two new insertions have been localized by the method of subtractive hybridization. It has been concluded from the results obtained that the flamenco locus is involved in the genetic control of Tirant transpositions. PMID:23297482

  16. In silico prediction of conserved vaccine targets in Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated from fish, cattle, and human samples.

    PubMed

    Pereira, U P; Soares, S C; Blom, J; Leal, C A G; Ramos, R T J; Guimarães, L C; Oliveira, L C; Almeida, S S; Hassan, S S; Santos, A R; Miyoshi, A; Silva, A; Tauch, A; Barh, D; Azevedo, V; Figueiredo, H C P

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Lancefield group B; group B streptococci) is a major pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis in fish, mastitis in cows, and neonatal sepsis and meningitis in humans. The available prophylactic measures for conserving human and animal health are not totally effective and have limitations. Effective vaccines against the different serotypes or genotypes of pathogenic strains from the various hosts would be useful. We used an in silico strategy to identify conserved vaccine candidates in 15 genomes of group B streptococci strains isolated from human, bovine, and fish samples. The degree of conservation, subcellular localization, and immunogenic potential of S. agalactiae proteins were investigated. We identified 36 antigenic proteins that were conserved in all 15 genomes. Among these proteins, 5 and 23 were shared only by human or fish strains, respectively. These potential vaccine targets may help develop effective vaccines that will help prevent S. agalactiae infection. PMID:24065646

  17. [Construction and immunogenicity of an attenuated mutant of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by insertional inactivation of apxIC].

    PubMed

    Xu, Fu-Zhou; Shi, Ai-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Yang, Bing; Wang, Jin-Luo

    2007-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the aetiological agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. Apx toxin, an exotoxin secreted by A. pleuropneumoniae, is one of the most important virulence factors. To construct an avirulent mutant strain by inactivation of ApxI toxin, the apxIC gene of A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 10 was inactivated by inserting a chloramphenicol resistance gene cassette into the downstream XhoI site of the apxIC gene for constructing the transfer plasmid. The transfer plasmid was introduced into the electrocompetent A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 10 for homologous recombination by electroporation. The mutant strain was obtained and identified by PCR and Southern blotting. The mutant strain was phenotypically identical to the parent strain except that it showed no haemolytic activity. The mutant strain was also able to secret the same ApxI toxin as the parent strain. In the intra-peritoneal mouse model, the virulence of the mutant strain decreased at least 100 fold compared with the parent strain. The mutant was evaluated as a potential vaccine using a vaccination-challenge trial in which pigs were given two intra-nasal doses of the mutant with 14 days' interval and then challenged 14 days after the last vaccination with A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 and serovar 10 reference strains respectively. The death number and lung lesion score in the vaccinated pigs given the serovar 1 challenge were obviously lower than those in the unvaccinated pigs. And the lower lung lesion score was also observed in the vaccinated pigs challenged with serovar 10. And the positive numbers of A. pleuropneumoniae re-isolation and PCR detection showed the same consistency. The vaccination-challenge trial suggested that the mutant strain could offer partial cross-protection as a live attenuated vaccine against A . pleuropneumoniae infection. PMID:18062275

  18. Characterization of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes in Euglena gracilis and its white mutant strain W(gm)ZOflL.

    PubMed

    Krnáčová, Katarína; Rýdlová, Ivana; Vinarčíková, Michaela; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej; Horváth, Anton

    2015-03-12

    The enzymes involved in Euglena oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) were characterized in this study. We have demonstrated that Euglena gracilis strain Z and its stable bleached non-photosynthetic mutant strain WgmZOflL both possess fully functional OXPHOS apparatus as well as pathways requiring terminal alternative oxidase(s) and alternative mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase(s). Light (or dark) and plastid (non)functionality seem to have little effect on oxygen consumption, the activities of the enzymes involved in OXPHOS and the action of respiration inhibitors in Euglena. This study also demonstrates biochemical properties of complex III (cytochrome c reductase) in Euglena. PMID:25660326

  19. A low-toxic site-directed mutant of Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin as a potential candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Xin, Wenwen; Gao, Shan; Kang, Lin; Wang, Jinglin

    2013-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), one of the most potent toxins known, is a potential biological weapon; therefore, the development of an effective vaccine is important for preventing intoxication or disease by ETX. In this study, genetically detoxified epsilon toxin mutants were developed as candidate vaccines. We used site-directed mutagenesis to mutate the essential amino acid residues (His106, Ser111 and Phe199). Six site-directed mutants of ETX (mETX (H106P) , mETX (S111H) , mETX (S111Y) , mETX (F199H) , mETX (F199E) , mETX (S111YF199E) ) were generated and then expressed in Escherichia coli. Both mETX (F199E) and mETX (H106P) with low or non-cytotoxicity that retained their immunogenicity were selected to immunize mice 3 times, and the mouse survival data were recorded after challenging with recombinant wild-type ETX. mETX (F199E) induces the same protection as mETX (H106P) , which was reported previously as a promising toxin mutant for vaccine, and both of them could protect immunized mice against a 100× LD₅₀ dose of active wild-type recombinant ETX. This work showed that mETX (F199E) is another promising candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia and other diseases caused by ETX. PMID:23835363

  20. A low-toxic site-directed mutant of Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin as a potential candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Xin, Wenwen; Gao, Shan; Kang, Lin; Wang, Jinglin

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), one of the most potent toxins known, is a potential biological weapon; therefore, the development of an effective vaccine is important for preventing intoxication or disease by ETX. In this study, genetically detoxified epsilon toxin mutants were developed as candidate vaccines. We used site-directed mutagenesis to mutate the essential amino acid residues (His106, Ser111 and Phe199). Six site-directed mutants of ETX (mETXH106P, mETXS111H, mETXS111Y, mETXF199H, mETXF199E, mETXS111YF199E) were generated and then expressed in Escherichia coli. Both mETXF199E and mETXH106P with low or non-cytotoxicity that retained their immunogenicity were selected to immunize mice 3 times, and the mouse survival data were recorded after challenging with recombinant wild-type ETX. mETXF199E induces the same protection as mETXH106P, which was reported previously as a promising toxin mutant for vaccine, and both of them could protect immunized mice against a 100× LD50 dose of active wild-type recombinant ETX. This work showed that mETXF199E is another promising candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia and other diseases caused by ETX. PMID:23835363

  1. Identification of the Immunogenic Spore and Vegetative Proteins of Bacillus anthracis Vaccine Strain A16R

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Erling; Wang, Xuefang; Zhu, Li; Wang, Hengliang

    2013-01-01

    Immunoproteomics was used to screen the immunogenic spore and vegetative proteins of Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain A16R. The spore and vegetative proteins were separated by 2D gel electrophoresis and transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride membranes, and then western blotting was performed with rabbit immune serum against B.anthracis live spores. Immunogenic spots were cut and digested by trypsin. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed to identify the proteins. As a result, 11 and 45 immunogenic proteins were identified in the spores and vegetative cells, respectively; 26 of which have not been reported previously. To verify their immunogenicity, 12 of the identified proteins were selected to be expressed, and the immune sera from the mice vaccinated by the 12 expressed proteins, except BA0887, had a specific western blot band with the A16R whole cellular lytic proteins. Some of these immunogenic proteins might be used as novel vaccine candidates themselves or for enhancing the protective efficacy of a protective-antigen-based vaccine. PMID:23516421

  2. Establishment of reverse genetics system for infectious bronchitis virus attenuated vaccine strain H120.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying Shun; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Hong Ning; Fan, Wen Qiao; Yang, Xin; Zhang, An Yun; Zeng, Fan Ya; Zhang, Zhi Kun; Cao, Hai Peng; Zeng, Cheng

    2013-02-22

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strain H120 was successfully rescued as infectious clone by reverse genetics. Thirteen 1.5-2.8 kb fragments contiguously spanning the virus genome were amplified and cloned into pMD19-T. Transcription grade complete length cDNA was acquired by a modified "No See'm" ligation strategy, which employed restriction enzyme Bsa I and BsmB I and ligated more than two fragments in one T4 ligase reaction. The full-length genomic cDNA was transcribed and its transcript was transfected by electroporation into BHK-21 together with the transcript of nucleocapsid gene. At 48 h post transfection, the medium to culture the transfected BHK-21 cells was harvested and inoculated into 10-days old SPF embryonated chicken eggs (ECE) to replicate the rescued virus. After passage of the virus in ECE five times, the rescued H120 virus (R-H120) was successfully recovered. R-H120 was subsequently identified to possess the introduced silent mutation site in its genome. Some biological characteristics of R-H120 such as growth curve, EID50 and HA titers, were tested and all of them were very similar to its parent strain H120. In addition, both R-H120 and H120 induced a comparable titer of HA inhibition (HI) antibody in immunized chickens and also provided up to 85% of immune protection to the chickens that were challenged with Mass41 IBV strain. The present study demonstrated that construction of infectious clone from IBV vaccine strain H120 is possible and IBV-H120 can be use as a vaccine vector for the development of novel vaccines through molecular recombination and the modified reverse genetics approach. PMID:22999521

  3. Evaluation of the non-toxic mutant of the diphtheria toxin K51E/E148K as carrier protein for meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pecetta, S; Vijayakrishnan, B; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Surdo, P Lo; Balocchi, C; Mori, E; Davis, B G; Berti, F

    2016-03-01

    Diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 is a common carrier protein for glycoconjugate vaccines, which has been proven an effective protein vector for, among others, meningococcal carbohydrates. The wide-range use of this protein in massive vaccine production requires constant increase of production yields and adaptability to an ever-growing market. Here we compare CRM197 with the alternative diphtheria non-toxic variant DT-K51E/E148K, an inactive mutant that can be produced in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Biophysical characterization of DT-K51E/E148K suggested high similarity with CRM197, with main differences in their alpha-helical content, and a suitable purity for conjugation and vaccine preparation. Meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) glycoconjugates were synthesized using CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K as carrier proteins, obtaining the same conjugation yields and comparable biophysical profiles. Mice were then immunized with these CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K conjugates, and essentially identical immunogenic and protective effects were observed. Overall, our data indicate that DT-K51E/E148K is a readily produced protein that now allows the added flexibility of E. coli production in vaccine development and that can be effectively used as protein carrier for a meningococcal conjugate vaccine. PMID:26845738

  4. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  5. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Alessandra; Lavezzo, Enrico; Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  6. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  7. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Brucella melitensis Vaccine Strain M5 Provides Insights into Virulence Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Wang, Heng; Zhao, Hongyan; Piao, Dongri; Tian, Guozhong; Chen, Chen; Cui, Buyun

    2013-01-01

    The Brucella melitensis vaccine strain M5 is widely used to prevent and control brucellosis in animals. In this study, we determined the whole-genome sequence of M5, and conducted a comprehensive comparative analysis against the whole-genome sequence of the virulent strain 16 M and other reference strains. This analysis revealed 11 regions of deletion (RDs) and 2 regions of insertion (RIs) within the M5 genome. Among these regions, the sequences encompassed in 5 RDs and 1 RI showed consistent variation, with a large deletion between the M5 and the 16 M genomes. RD4 and RD5 showed the large diversity among all Brucella genomes, both in RD length and RD copy number. Thus, RD4 and RD5 are potential sites for typing different Brucella strains. Other RD and RI regions exhibited multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, a genome fragment with a 56 kb rearrangement was determined to be consistent with previous studies. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that genomic island inversion in Brucella was widely present. With the genetic pattern common among all strains analyzed, these 2 RDs, 1 RI, and one inversion region are potential sites for detection of genomic differences. Several SNPs of important virulence-related genes (motB, dhbC, sfuB, dsbAB, aidA, aroC, and lysR) were also detected, and may be used to determine the mechanism of virulence attenuation. Collectively, this study reveals that comparative analysis between wild-type and vaccine strains can provide resources for the study of virulence and microevolution of Brucella. PMID:23967122

  8. Constitutive expression of the tzs gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens virG mutant strains is responsible for improved transgenic plant regeneration in cotton meristem transformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xudong; Chen, Yurong; Wan, Yuechun; Hong, Yun-Jeong; Ruebelt, Martin C; Gilbertson, Larry A

    2016-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : virG mutant strains of a nopaline type of Agrobacterium tumefaciens increase the transformation frequency in cotton meristem transformation. Constitutive cytokinin expression from the tzs gene in the virG mutant strains is responsible for the improvement. Strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were tested for their ability to improve cotton meristem transformation frequency. Two disarmed A. tumefaciens nopaline strains with either a virGN54D constitutively active mutation or virGI77V hypersensitive induction mutation significantly increased the transformation frequency in a cotton meristem transformation system. The virG mutant strains resulted in greener explants after three days of co-culture in the presence of light, which could be attributed to a cytokinin effect of the mutants. A tzs knockout strain of virGI77V mutant showed more elongated, less green explants and decreased cotton transformation frequency, as compared to a wild type parental strain, suggesting that expression of the tzs gene is required for transformation frequency improvement in cotton meristem transformation. In vitro cytokinin levels in culture media were tenfold higher in the virGN54D strain, and approximately 30-fold higher in the virGI77V strain, in the absence of acetosyringone induction, compared to the wild type strain. The cytokinin level in the virGN54D strain is further increased upon acetosyringone induction, while the cytokinin level in the virGI77V mutant is decreased by induction, suggesting that different tzs gene expression regulation mechanisms are present in the two virG mutant strains. Based on these data, we suggest that the increased cytokinin levels play a major role in increasing Agrobacterium attachment and stimulating localized division of the attached plant cells. PMID:26650837

  9. Bovine herpesvirus-1: Genetic diversity of field strains from cattle with respiratory disease, genital, fetal disease and systemic neonatal disease and their relationship to vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Dubovi, E J; Eberle, R

    2016-09-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) causes disease in cattle with varied clinical forms. In the U.S. there are two BoHV1 subtypes, BoHV-1.1 and BoHV-1.2b. Control programs in North America incorporate modified live (MLV) or killed (KV) viral vaccines. However, BoHV-1 strains continue to be isolated from diseased animals or fetuses after vaccination. It is possible to differentiate BoHV-1 wild-type from MLV vaccine strains by determining their single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns through either whole-genome sequencing or PCR sequencing of genomic regions containing vaccine-defining SNPs. To determine the BoHV-1 subtype in clinical isolates and their relationship to MLV strains, 8 isolates from varied clinical disease at three different laboratories in the U.S. were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Five samples were isolated within the past 5 years from New York and 3 were archived samples recovered 35 years prior from Oklahoma and Louisiana. Based on phylogenetic analysis, four of the cases appeared to be due to an MLV vaccine: 3 cases of aborted fetuses and one neonate with systemic BoHV-1 disease. One aborted fetus was from a herd with no reported history of MLV vaccination in two years. The remaining four isolates did not group with any MLV vaccines: two were associated with bovine respiratory disease, one with vulvovaginitis, and a fourth was determined to be a BoHV-1.2b respiratory isolate. Recovery of BoHV-1.1 that is very closely related to an MLV vaccine virus from a herd not receiving vaccines in an extended period prior to its isolation suggests that MLV viruses may remain latent or circulate within herds for long periods. PMID:27374060

  10. Development of a Recombinant Newcastle Disease Virus VG/GA Strain Infectious Clone as an Enterotropic Vaccine Vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Villegas-Glisson/University of Georgia (VG/GA) vaccine strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is commonly used worldwide to prevent Newcastle disease. The VG/GA strain is thought to preferentially replicate in intestinal tract of chickens and induce local mucosal immunoresponse. In the presen...

  11. Genomic sequence analysis of the United States infectious laryngotracheitis vaccine strains chicken embryo origin (CEO) and tissue culture origin (TCO)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomic sequences of low and high passages of U.S. infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) vaccine strains chicken embryo origin (CEO) and tissue culture origin (TCO) these strains were determined using hybrid next generation sequencing in order to define relevant genomic changes associated with att...

  12. A reassortment-incompetent live attenuated influenza virus vaccine for use in protection against pandemic virus strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) are safe for use in protection against seasonal influenza strains, concerns over their potential to reassort with wild-type virus strains have been voiced. LAIVs have been demonstrated to induce enhanced mucosal and cell-mediated immunity over inac...

  13. Reduction in faecal excretion of Salmonella typhimurium strain F98 in chickens vaccinated with live and killed S. typhimurium organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, P. A.; Hassan, J. O.; Berchieri, A.

    1990-01-01

    Chickens given orally at 4 days of age a smooth spectinomycin resistant mutant (Spcr) of Salmonella typhimurium strain F98 excreted the organism in their faeces for approximately 4 weeks. Following oral administration of a nalidixic acid resistant (Nalr) mutant of the same strain 4 weeks later when the chickens had virtually cleared themselves of the first infection, these chickens excreted far fewer salmonella organisms and for a shorter time than did a previously uninfected control group of chickens which were infected at the same time with the Nalr mutant. Chickens inoculated intramuscularly at 4 days developed a similar immunity to challenge and also excreted the immunizing strain in their faeces. In contrast intramuscular inoculation or incorporation into the food of formalin-killed S. typhimurium organisms had little lasting effect on the faecal excretion of the challenge strain. Two attenuated mutants of strain F98 Nalr were produced: one was a rough strain produced by lytic bacteriophage and the other was an aro A auxotrophic mutant which had been cured of the 85 kilobase-pair virulence-associated plasmid. These mutants were avirulent for chickens, mice, calves and man and when ingested by human volunteers did not persist in the faeces. When inoculated intramuscularly into chickens they produced an early reduction in faecal excretion of the challenge strain (Spcr) which was not maintained. Oral administration of both strains produced reductions in faecal excretion of the challenge strain. This was much more noticeable with the rough strain which was itself excreted for a much longer period than the parent strain. PMID:2189743

  14. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies reacting with the core component of lipopolysaccharide from Rhizobium leguminosarum strain 3841 and mutant derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, M M; Peart, J L; Brewin, N J; Kannenberg, E L

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reacting with the core oligosaccharide or lipid A component of Rhizobium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could be useful for the elucidation of the structure and biosynthesis of this group of macromolecules. Mutant derivatives of Rhizobium leguminosarum 3841 with LPS structures lacking the major O-antigen moiety were used as immunogens, and eight antibodies were selected for further study. All the antibodies reacted with the fast-migrating species known as LPS-2 following gel electrophoresis of Rhizobium cell extracts. For four of these antibodies, reactivity with affinity-purified LPS was lost after mild acid hydrolysis, indicating that they probably recognized the core oligosaccharide component. The four other antibodies still reacted with acid-treated LPS and may recognize the lipid A moiety, which is stable to mild acid hydrolysis. The pattern of antibody staining after gel electrophoresis revealed differences in LPS-2 epitope structure between each of the mutants and the wild type. Furthermore, for each of the mutants the antibodies crossreacted with a minor band that migrated more slowly than LPS-2; we have termed this more slowly migrating form LPS-3. The majority of the antibodies also reacted with LPS from strain CE109, a derivative of Rhizobium etli CE3, confirming that the LPS core antigens can be relatively conserved between strains of different Rhizobium species. One of the antibodies isolated in this study (JIM 32) was unusual because it appeared to react with all forms of LPS from strain 3841 (namely, LPS-1, LPS-2, and LPS-3). Furthermore, JIM 32 reacted positively with the LPS from many strains of Rhizobium tested (excluding the Rhizobium meliloti subgroup). JIM 32 did not react with representative strains from Bradyrhizobium, Azorhizobium or other related bacterial species. PMID:8631658

  15. Comparative studies of lipopolysaccharide and exopolysaccharide from a virulent strain of Pseudomonas solanacearum and from three avirulent mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Drigues, P; Demery-Lafforgue, D; Trigalet, A; Dupin, P; Samain, D; Asselineau, J

    1985-01-01

    The composition of the Pseudomonas solanacearum lipolysaccharide (LPS) was found to be similar to that described for the LPS of enterobacteria. The lipid A contained fatty acids and glucosamine in a molar ratio of 5:2. The LPS fraction contained 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid, L-glycero-D-mannoheptose, hexoses (glucose, rhamnose, and glucosamine), and a pentose (xylose). The LPSs from the wild-type strain (GMI1000), from the spontaneous rough mutant (GMI2000), and from their respective acridine orange-resistant (Acrr) mutants (GMI1178 and GMI2179) contained the same component sugars in their polysaccharide moieties, but the relative amounts of each sugar varied greatly. Spontaneous mutation to the rough type was characterized by a decrease in the ratio of rhamnose to glucose, whereas a reverse effect was seen for the acridine orange resistance mutation from the parent strains (GMI1000 and GMI2000) to the respective mutant strains (GMI1178 and GMI2179). The exopolysaccharide (EPS) from GMI1000 was found to be composed of two fractions: a heteropolysaccharide (galactosamine, glucose, and rhamnose) excluded from Sephadex G-50 and an additional glucan with a lower molecular weight. Strains GMI1000 and GMI1178 produced comparable amounts of EPS, GMI2179 synthesized less EPS, and GMI2000 produced no detectable EPS. High-pressure liquid chromatography and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed some differences between these EPSs. The glucan fraction seemed to be the major component of the EPS from GMI2179, whereas GMI1000 and GMI1178 EPSs contained both fractions and appeared to differ in the structures of their heteropolysaccharide fractions. Viscosity measurements confirmed differences between whole EPSs produced by the three strains. PMID:3988700

  16. Effects of vaccination and population structure on influenza epidemic spread in the presence of two circulating strains

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human influenza is characterized by seasonal epidemics, caused by rapid viral adaptation to population immunity. Vaccination against influenza must be updated annually, following surveillance of newly appearing viral strains. During an influenza season, several strains may be co-circulating, which will influence their individual evolution; furthermore, selective forces acting on the strains will be mediated by the transmission dynamics in the population. Clearly, viral evolution and public health policy are strongly interconnected. Understanding population-level dynamics of coexisting viral influenza infections, would be of great benefit in designing vaccination strategies. Methods We use a Markov network to extend a previous homogeneous model of two co-circulating influenza viral strains by including vaccination (either prior to or during an outbreak), age structure, and heterogeneity of the contact network. We explore the effects of changes in vaccination rate, cross-immunity, and delay in appearance of the second strain, on the size and timing of infection peaks, attack rates, and disease-induced mortality rate; and compare the outcomes of the network and corresponding homogeneous models. Results Pre-vaccination is more effective than vaccination during an outbreak, resulting in lower attack rates for the first strain but higher attack rates for the second strain, until a “threshold” vaccination level of ~30-40% is reached, after which attack rates due to both strains sharply dropped. A small increase in mortality was found for increasing pre-vaccination coverage below about 40%, due to increasing numbers of strain 2 infections. The amount of cross-immunity present determines whether a second wave of infection will occur. Some significant differences were found between the homogeneous and network models, including timing and height of peak infection(s). Conclusions Contact and age structure significantly influence the propagation of disease in the

  17. Safety and vaccine efficacy of a glycoprotein G deficient strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus delivered in ovo.

    PubMed

    Legione, Alistair R; Coppo, Mauricio J C; Lee, Sang-Won; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Hartley, Carol A; Browning, Glenn F; Gilkerson, James R; O'Rourke, Denise; Devlin, Joanne M

    2012-11-26

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), an alphaherpesvirus, causes respiratory disease in chickens and is commonly controlled by vaccination with conventionally attenuated vaccines. Glycoprotein G (gG) is a virulence factor in ILTV and a gG deficient strain of ILTV (ΔgG-ILTV) has shown potential for use as a vaccine. In the poultry industry vaccination via drinking water is common, but technology is now available to allow quicker and more accurate in ovo vaccination of embryos at 18 days of incubation. In this study ΔgG-ILTV was delivered to chicken embryos at three different doses (10(2), 10(3) and 10(4) plaque forming units per egg) using manual in ovo vaccination. At 20 days after hatching, birds were challenged intra-tracheally with wild type ILTV and protection was measured. In ovo vaccination was shown to be safe, as there were no developmental differences between birds from hatching up to 20 days of age, as measured by weight gain. The highest dose of vaccine was the most efficacious, resulting in a weight gain not significantly different from unvaccinated/unchallenged birds seven days after challenge. In contrast, birds vaccinated with the lowest dose showed weight gains not significantly different from unvaccinated/challenged birds. Gross pathology and histopathology of the trachea reflected these observations, with birds vaccinated with the highest dose having less severe lesions. However, qPCR results suggested the vaccine did not prevent the challenge virus replicating in the trachea. This study is the first to assess in ovo delivery of a live attenuated ILTV vaccine and shows that in ovo vaccination with ΔgG-ILTV can be both safe and efficacious. PMID:23084851

  18. Prior infection with influenza virus but not vaccination leaves a long-term immunological imprint that intensifies the protective efficacy of antigenically drifted vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Liepkalns, Justine; Reber, Adrian J; Lu, Xiuhua; Music, Nedzad; Jacob, Joshy; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-01-20

    The role of pre-existing immunity for influenza vaccine responses is of great importance for public health, and thus has been studied in various contexts, yet the impact of differential priming on vaccine responses in the midst of antigenic drift remains to be elucidated. To address this with antigenically related viruses, mice were first primed by either infection or immunization with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus, then immunized with whole-inactivated A/Fort Monmouth/1/47 (FM1) virus. The ensuing vaccine responses and the protective efficacy of FM1 were superior in PR8 infection-primed mice compared to PR8 immunization-primed or unprimed mice. Increased FM1-specific Ab responses of PR8 infection-primed mice also broadened cross-reactivity against contemporary as well as antigenically more drifted strains. Further, prior infection heightened the protective efficacy of antigenically distant strains, such as A/Brisbane/59/2006 infection followed by immunization with split pandemic H1N1 vaccine (A/California/07/2009). Therefore, influenza infection is a significant priming event that intensifies future vaccine responses against drift strains. PMID:26706277

  19. Virulence determinants of Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Pullorum identified by PCR signature-tagged mutagenesis and the spiC mutant as a candidate live attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shizhong; Jiao, Xinan; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang

    2014-01-31

    Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Pullorum (S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum) is the causative agent of pullorum disease (PD) in chickens which results in considerable economic losses to the poultry industries in developing countries. PCR-Signature Tagged Mutagenesis was used to identify virulence determinants of S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum and novel attenuated live vaccine candidates for use against this disease. A library of 1800 signature-tagged S. Gallinarum biovar Pullorum mutants was constructed and screened for virulence-associated genes in chickens. The attenuation of 10 mutants was confirmed by in vivo and in vitro competitive index (CI) studies. The transposons were found to be located in SPI-1 (2/10 mutants), SPI-2 (3/10), the virulence plasmid (1/10) and non-SPI genes (4/10). One highly attenuated spiC mutant persisted in spleen and liver for less than 10 days and induced high levels of circulating antibody and protective immunity against oral challenge in young broiler chickens. The spiC mutant is a potential new vaccine candidate for use with chickens against this disease. PMID:24355532

  20. [Analysis of the structure and expression of the DIP1 gene in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco gene].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Potanova, M V; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2009-02-01

    DIP1 gene transcription was analyzed with the use of RT-PCR in three Drosophila melanogaster strains with the flamenco- phenotype (flam(SS), flam(MS), and flam(Ore)) and in one flamenco+ strain at the stages of embryos (0-24 h), third-instar larvae, and adult flies. The mutant strains flam(SS) and flam(Ore) lack an active copy of transposon gypsy. Theflam(MS) strain was obtained by introducing an active copy of gypsy in flies of theflam(SS) strain and is characterized by a high rate of gypsy transpositions. The experiments showed that at least five forms of DIP1 gene transcripts are produced. The form of cDNA corresponding to CDS DIP1-d was discovered only in embryos. It was found that DIP1 gene transcription depends on the age of flies: at the larval stage the level of transcription is significantly reduced. However, no reduction of gene transcription is observed in theflam(Ore) strain. These results suggest that the flamenco- phenotype may be associated with an alteration of DIP1 gene transcription, as in differentflamenco- strains the DIP1 gene expression is changed differently. PMID:19334614

  1. Development of an edible rabies vaccine in maize using the Vnukovo strain.

    PubMed

    Loza-Rubio, E; Rojas, E; Gómez, L; Olivera, M T J; Gómez-Lim, M A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain transgenic maize expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G) of the Vnukovo strain and to evaluate its immunogenicity in mice, by the oral route. The ubiquitin maize promoter fused to the whole coding region of the rabies virus G gene, and a constitutive promoter from cauliflowermosaic virus (CaMV)were used. Maize embryogenic callus were transformed with the above construct by biolistics. Regenerated maize plants were recovered and grown in a greenhouse. The presence of the G gene and its product was detected by PCR and western blot, respectively. The amount of G protein detected in the grains was approximately 1% of the total soluble plant protein. Transformed kernels containing 50 microg of G protein were given once by the oral route in adult mice (BALB-C strain). Challenge was undertaken at 90-days post-vaccination using a lethal dose of a vampire bat rabies virus (100 LD 50% in mice); vampire bats are one of the main reservoirs in Latin America. The edible vaccine induced viral neutralizing antibodies (VNA) which, protected mice 100% against challenge. The control group did not survive. The G protein of the Vnukovo strain expressed in transgenic maize may be considered as an oral immunogen against rabies, conferring cross-protection. PMID:18634510

  2. Increased efficacy of inactivated vaccine candidates prepared with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains of predominant genotypes in ducks.

    PubMed

    Youn, S Y; Kwon, Y K; Song, C S; Lee, H J; Jeong, O M; Choi, B K; Jung, S C; Kang, M S

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has been a major causative agent of food-borne human disease, mainly due to consumption of contaminated food animal products. In particular, ducks serve as a reservoir of serovar Typhimurium, and are one of the common sources of human infection. To prevent infection of ducks, and therefore minimize human infection, it is critical to control the persistent epidemic strains in ducks. Here, we analyzed the genetic diversity and virulence of serovar Typhimurium isolates from ducks in Korea to identify the predominant strains that might be used as efficient vaccine candidates for ducks. Among the isolates, 2 representative isolates (ST26 and ST76) of predominant genotypes were selected as vaccine strains on the basis of genotypic analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA microarrays. Two-week-old ducks were then injected intramuscularly with inactivated vaccine candidates prepared using ST26 or ST76 (10(8) cfu/0.5 mL/duck or 10(9) cfu/0.5 mL/duck), and oral challenge with a highly virulent serovar Typhimurium strain (10(9) cfu/0.5 mL/duck) was carried out 2 wk later. Shedding of the challenge strain was significantly decreased in group 2 after vaccination. The antibody levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all vaccinated groups were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) compared to the unvaccinated control group. Overall, vaccination with ST26 or ST76 reduced bacterial shedding and colonization in internal organs, and induced elevated antibody response. In particular, serovar Typhimurium ST26 (10(8) cfu/0.5 mL/duck) was the most effective vaccine candidate, which can provide efficient protection against serovar Typhimurium in ducks with higher effectiveness compared to a commercial vaccine currently used worldwide. PMID:26994209

  3. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of meningococcal antigens to evaluate the potential strain coverage of protein-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, John; Medini, Duccio; Boccadifuoco, Giuseppe; Biolchi, Alessia; Ward, Joel; Frasch, Carl; Moxon, E. Richard; Stella, Maria; Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Andrews, William; Chen, Jie; Santos, George; Santini, Laura; Boucher, Philip; Serruto, Davide; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Giuliani, Marzia Monica

    2010-01-01

    A unique multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B meningococci incorporates the novel genome-derived proteins fHbp, NHBA, and NadA that may vary in sequence and level of expression. Measuring the effectiveness of such vaccines, using the accepted correlate of protection against invasive meningococcal disease, could require performing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) against many diverse strains for each geographic region. This approach is impractical, especially for infants, where serum volumes are very limited. To address this, we developed the meningococcal antigen typing system (MATS) by combining a unique vaccine antigen-specific ELISA, which detects qualitative and quantitative differences in antigens, with PorA genotyping information. The ELISA correlates with killing of strains by SBA and measures both immunologic cross-reactivity and quantity of the antigens NHBA, NadA, and fHbp. We found that strains exceeding a threshold value in the ELISA for any of the three vaccine antigens had ≥80% probability of being killed by immune serum in the SBA. Strains positive for two or more antigens had a 96% probability of being killed. Inclusion of multiple different antigens in the vaccine improves breadth of coverage and prevents loss of coverage if one antigen mutates or is lost. The finding that a simple and high-throughput assay correlates with bactericidal activity is a milestone in meningococcal vaccine development. This assay allows typing of large panels of strains and prediction of coverage of protein-based meningococcal vaccines. Similar assays may be used for protein-based vaccines against other bacteria. PMID:20962280

  4. Impact of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus-2 infection on the potency of the classical swine fever vaccine (LOM strain).

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Kim, Byounghan; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Jaejo; Kim, Ha-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Lee, Joong-Bok; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-09-25

    The classical swine fever (CSF) vaccine, which is derived from the LOM strain of the CSF virus (CSFV), induces protective immunity against CSFV infection. However, several factors influence vaccine efficacy. Evidence suggests that infection by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and/or porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) reduces the efficacy of several vaccines. Here, we examined the effect of PRRSV or PCV2 alone or co-infection by PRRSV/PCV2 on the potency of the LOM vaccine in pigs. Neither CSFV antibody levels nor the period during which CSFV antigens were detectable in LOM-vaccinated pigs were negatively affected by infection by PRRSV or PCV2. However, co-infection with PRRSV/PCV2 may affect the replication or activity of the CSF vaccine virus in pigs vaccinated with the LOM strain, although CSFV antibody levels were not negatively affected. Nevertheless, the LOM vaccine afforded complete protection against a virulent strain of CSFV. PMID:27599928

  5. Immunogenic and antigenic activity of an experimental oral rabies vaccine prepared from the strain Vnukovo-32/107.

    PubMed

    Svrcek, S; Durove, A; Ondrejka, R; Závadová, J; Süliová, J; Benísek, Z; Vrtiak, O J; Feketeová, J; Mad'ar, M

    1995-03-01

    The immunogenic and antigenic activity of an experimental live oral rabies vaccine prepared from the strain Vnukovo-32/107 was evaluated on the basis of results obtained in 3 sets of experiments. These were carried out as model experiments on white mice, then on target animals--red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and a related species--farm-bred polar foxes (Alopex lagopus). For quantitative determination of the immunogenic activity of the orally or subcutaneously administered rabies vaccines in model experiments on mice a method was used that had been developed in our laboratory. Antibodies were detected and quantified by an ELISA kit that had also been developed in our lab. Tenacity of the experimental vaccine (infectious tissue culture medium after yolk addition) was verified at different temperatures; the effects of storage temperature upon virus titre and immunogenic activity were investigated. An important part of the experiments--evaluation of the antigenic and immunogenic activity of the live vaccine at oral vaccination (vaccination baits, conditions simulating field vaccination) was carried out in foxes. The immunogenic activity (challenge experiments with a street virus on day 180 and 360 after vaccination) was evaluated in common foxes (Vulpes vulpes). The results document a high immunogenic and antigenic activity of the experimental live oral rabies vaccine. The strain Vnukovo-32/107 is suitable for the industrial manufacturing of vaccination baits. In the target species--common foxes challenged on day 180 after primovaccination an 83% protection was observed. Challenge on day 180 after revaccination (or day 360 after primovaccination), the orally immunized foxes proved to be 100% protected. For parallel evaluation of the immunogenic activity of an oral vaccine and for antibody titration it is recommended to employ the quantitative mice test and an ELISA technique, respectively. PMID:7762124

  6. Comparative Safety and Immunogenicity of Two Attenuated Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Vaccine Strains in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Robin; Bourgeois, A. Louis; Engstrom, Fayette; Hall, Eric; Chang, H. Sunny; Gomes, Joseph G.; Kyle, Jennifer L.; Cassels, Fred; Turner, Arthur K.; Randall, Roger; Darsley, Michael; Lee, Cynthia; Bedford, Philip; Shimko, Janet; Sack, David A.

    2006-01-01

    A vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is needed to prevent diarrheal illness among children in developing countries and at-risk travelers. Two live attenuated ETEC strains, PTL002 and PTL003, which express the ETEC colonization factor CFA/II, were evaluated for safety and immunogenicity. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 19 subjects ingested one dose, and 21 subjects ingested two doses (days 0 and 10) of PTL-002 or PTL-003 at 2 × 109 CFU/dose. Anti-CFA/II mucosal immune responses were determined from the number of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) in blood measured by enzyme-linked immunospot assay, the antibody in lymphocyte supernatants (ALS) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels determined by ELISA. Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) ELISA was more sensitive than standard colorimetric ELISA for measuring serum antibody responses to CFA/II and its components, CS1 and CS3. Both constructs were well tolerated. Mild diarrhea occurred after 2 of 31 doses (6%) of PTL-003. PTL-003 produced more sustained intestinal colonization than PTL-002 and better IgA response rates: 90% versus 55% (P = 0.01) for anti-CFA/II IgA-ASCs, 55% versus 30% (P = 0.11) for serum anti-CS1 IgA by TRF, and 65% versus 25% (P = 0.03) for serum anti-CS3 IgA by TRF. Serum IgG response rates to CS1 or CS3 were 55% in PTL-003 recipients and 15% in PTL-002 recipients (P = 0.02). Two doses of either strain were not significantly more immunogenic than one. Based on its superior immunogenicity, which was comparable to that of a virulent ETEC strain and other ETEC vaccine candidates, PTL-003 will be developed further as a component of a live, oral attenuated ETEC vaccine. PMID:16428745

  7. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Indonesia 15 Years After Adoption of a Universal Infant Vaccination Program: Possible Impacts of Low Birth Dose Coverage and a Vaccine-Escape Mutant.

    PubMed

    Purwono, Priyo Budi; Juniastuti; Amin, Mochamad; Bramanthi, Rendra; Nursidah; Resi, Erika Maria; Wahyuni, Rury Mega; Yano, Yoshihiko; Soetjipto; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge

    2016-09-01

    A universal hepatitis B vaccination program for infants was adopted in Indonesia in 1997. Before its implementation, the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals in the general population was approximately 5-10%. The study aimed to investigate the hepatitis B virus (HBV) serological status and molecular profile among children, 15 years after adoption of a universal infant vaccination program in Indonesia. According to the Local Health Office data in five areas, the percentages of children receiving three doses of hepatitis B vaccine are high (73.9-94.1%), whereas the birth dose coverage is less than 50%. Among 967 children in those areas, the seropositive rate of HBsAg in preschool- and school-aged children ranged from 2.1% to 4.2% and 0% to 5.9%, respectively. Of the 61 HBV DNA-positive samples, the predominant genotype/subtype was B/adw2 Subtype adw3 was identified in genotype C for the first time in this population. Six samples (11.5%) had an amino acid substitution within the a determinant of the S gene region, and one sample had T140I that was suggested as a vaccine-escape mutant type. The low birth dose coverage and the presence of a vaccine-escape mutant might contribute to the endemicity of HBV infection among children in Indonesia. PMID:27402524

  8. Genomic analysis of the vaccinia virus strain variants found in Dryvax vaccine.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Upton, Chris; Hazes, Bart; Evans, David H

    2011-12-01

    Smallpox was eradicated using variant forms of vaccinia virus-based vaccines. One of these was Dryvax, a calf lymph vaccine derived from the New York City Board of Health strain. We used genome-sequencing technology to examine the genetic diversity of the population of viruses present in a sample of Dryvax. These studies show that the conserved cores of these viruses exhibit a lower level of sequence variation than do the telomeres. However, even though the ends of orthopoxviruses are more genetically plastic than the cores, there are still many telomeric genes that are conserved as intact open reading frames in the 11 genomes that we, and 4 genomes that others, have sequenced. Most of these genes likely modulate inflammation. Our sequencing also detected an evolving pattern of mutation, with some genes being highly fragmented by randomly assorting mutations (e.g., M1L), while other genes are intact in most viruses but have been disrupted in individual strains (e.g., I4L in strain DPP17). Over 85% of insertion and deletion mutations are associated with repeats, and a rare new isolate bearing a large deletion in the right telomere was identified. All of these strains cluster in dendrograms consistent with their origin but which also surprisingly incorporate horsepox virus. However, these viruses also exhibit a "patchy" pattern of polymorphic sites characteristic of recombinants. There is more genetic diversity detected within a vial of Dryvax than between variola virus major and minor strains, and our study highlights how propagation methods affect the genetics of orthopoxvirus populations. PMID:21976639

  9. Comparative in vivo safety and efficacy of a glycoprotein G-deficient candidate vaccine strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus delivered via eye drop.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Mauricio J C; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Hartley, Carol A; Gilkerson, James R; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2011-08-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute respiratory disease in poultry that is commonly controlled by vaccination with conventionally attenuated virus strains. Despite the use of these vaccines, ILT remains a threat to the intensive poultry industry. Our laboratory has developed a novel candidate vaccine strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) lacking glycoprotein G (ΔgG-ILTV). The aim of the present study was to directly compare this candidate vaccine with three currently available commercial vaccines in vivo. Five groups of specific-pathogen-free chickens were eye-drop inoculated with one of the three commercial vaccine strains (SA2-ILTV, A20-ILTV or Serva-ILTV), or ΔgG-ILTV, or sterile medium. Vaccine safety was assessed by examining clinical signs, weight gain and persistence of virus in the trachea. Vaccine efficacy was assessed by scoring clinical signs and conducting post-mortem analyses following challenge with virulent virus. Following vaccination, birds that received ΔgG-ILTV had the highest weight gain among the vaccinated groups and had clinical scores that were significantly lower than birds vaccinated with SA2-ILTV or A20-ILTV, but not significantly different from those of birds vaccinated with Serva-ILTV. Analysis of clinical scores, weight gain, tracheal pathology and virus replication after challenge revealed a comparable level of efficacy for all vaccines. Findings from this study further demonstrate the suitability of ΔgG-ILTV as a vaccine to control ILT. PMID:21812721

  10. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Beingesser, J; Fisher, D J; Sayeed, S; McClane, B A; Posthaus, H; Uzal, F A

    2012-06-15

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch's postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. PMID:22296994

  11. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. P.; Beingesser, J.; Fisher, D. J.; Sayeed, S.; McClane, B. A.; Posthaus, H.; Uzal, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch’s postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24 h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24 h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. PMID:22296994

  12. Evaluation of safety and protection efficacy on cpxR and lon deleted mutant of Salmonella Gallinarum as a live vaccine candidate for fowl typhoid.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kiku; Chaudhari, Atul A; Lee, John Hwa

    2011-01-17

    We evaluated a recently developed live fowl typhoid (FT) vaccine candidate, JOL916, the cpxR/lon mutant of Salmonella Gallinarum (SG), for safety and protection efficacy in 5-week-old layer chickens. Intramuscular vaccination with JOL916 revealed no or very few lesions in livers and spleens of the animals until the fourth week post-vaccination (wpv). This candidate clearly induced cellular immune responses in 5 of 5 chickens on the first and second wpv based on the peripheral lymphocyte proliferation assay. Systemic IgG responses were observed in 5 of 5 chickens from the first wpv and dramatic elevations were observed on the second and third wpv. Vaccination of chickens offered efficient protection against challenge by a wild-type SG; only slight anorexia and depression were temporarily observed after challenge in the vaccinated group while 100% mortality was observed in the positive control group. Body weight increases per day were slightly reduced between the 3rd and 6th day post challenge (dpc) compared to the negative control group; it was recovered from the 6th dpc. Collectively, these results demonstrate the safety and protective efficacy of JOL916 as a live vaccine for systemic FT. PMID:21115058

  13. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  14. Strains of Rabies Virus Available for Preparation of Sylvatic Rabies Vaccines with Special Reference to Vaccines Prepared in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Rabies vaccines for use as a preventive in wildlife have not yet been licensed. There are several vaccines which, based on tests in dogs, merit trial especially in foxes and skunks and these are summarized in a table. Trials are being conducted in Canada on the effectiveness of several of these vaccines in foxes and skunks. PMID:7340931

  15. Effectiveness of Brucella abortus Strain 19 single calfhood vaccination in elk (Cervus elaphus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, Thomas J.; Jones, Lee C.; Coffin, Kenneth; Sweeney, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    Brucellosis in Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) bison and elk has been a source of controversy and focus of the Greater Yellowstone Interagency Brucellosis Committee (GYIBC) for years. Brucellosis has been eradicated from cattle in the 3 states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho and all three states currently are classified as “brucellosis free” with regard to livestock. Yet free-ranging elk that attend feedgrounds in the GYA, and bison in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, still have high seroprevalence to the disease and are viewed as a threat to the state-federal cooperative national brucellosis eradication program. Recently, cattle in eastern Idaho were found infected with brucellosis and transmission was apparently from fed elk. The GYIBC, formed of state and federal agencies involved in wildlife and livestock management in the 3 states, has committed to eventual elimination of the disease from wildlife. Management tools to control or eliminate the disease are limited; however, wildlife vaccination is one of the methods currently employed. Effective wildlife vaccination depends on dose efficacy, deliverability, and safety to non-targeted species. We commenced a single-dose efficacy study of vaccine Brucella abortus strain 19 (S19) in elk in 1999.

  16. Excretion of Brucella abortus vaccine B19 strain during a reproductive cycle in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, W. A.; Genovez, M. E.; Pozzi, C. R.; Silva, L. M. P.; Azevedo, S. S.; Did, C. C.; Piatti, R. M.; Pinheiro, E. S.; Castro, V.; Miyashiro, S.; Gambarini, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aimed to determine the excretion period of B19 vaccine strain during a complete reproductive cycle (from estrus synchronization, artificial insemination, pregnancy and until 30 days after parturition) of dairy cows from 3 to 9 years old that were previously vaccinated from 3 to 8 months. Three groups were monitored with monthly milk and urine collection during 12 months: G1 with seven cows from 3 to 4 years old; G2 with three cows from 5 to 6 years old; and G3 with four cows from 7 to 9 years old. Urine and milk samples were submitted to bacteriological culture and urine and PCR reactions for detection of Brucella spp. and PCR-multiplex for B19 strain identification. Ring test (RT) was also performed in the milk samples, and serum samples were tested by buffered acidified plate antigen test (BAPA). All animals were serologically negative at BAPA and Brucella spp. was not isolated from both urine and milk samples. RT revealed 13/210 (6.2%) positive milk samples. PCR reactions detected DNA of Brucella spp. in 86/420 (20.5%) samples. In urine it was found a significantly higher frequency (35.2%; 74/210) than in milk (5.7%; 12/210), more frequently from the estrus to 150 days of pregnancy and after parturition (6.7%; 10/150), and from 150 days of pregnancy to parturition (3.4%; 2/60), and they were all identified as B19 strain. In three groups, intermittent excretion of B19 strain was detected mainly in urine samples, which confirmed its multiplication and persistence in cows for until 9 years. PMID:24031869

  17. Evaluation of a Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis leuD Mutant as a Vaccine Candidate against Challenge in a Caprine Model

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Syed M.; Chen, Jenn-Wei; Yan, Falong; Chen, Tsai-Tzu; Useh, Nicodemus M.; Yan, Weiwei; Guo, Shanguang; Wang, Shih-Jon; Glaser, Amy L.; McDonough, Sean P.; Singh, Bhupinder; Davis, William C.; Akey, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is prevalent worldwide and has a significant impact on the global agricultural economy. In the present study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a leuD (Δleud) mutant and gained insight into differential immune responses after challenge with virulent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a caprine colonization model. The immune response and protective efficacy were compared with those of the killed vaccine Mycopar. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with johnin purified protein derivative showed that Mycopar and ΔleuD generated similar levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) but significantly higher levels than unvaccinated and challenged phosphate-buffered saline controls. However, only with ΔleuD was the IFN-γ response maintained. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the increase in IFN-γ correlated with proliferation and activation (increased expression of CD25) of CD4, CD8, and γδT cells, but this response was significantly higher in ΔleuD-vaccinated animals at some time points after challenge. Both Mycopar and ΔleuD vaccines upregulated Th1/proinflammatory and Th17 cytokines and downregulated Th2/anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines at similar levels at almost all time points. However, significantly higher levels of IFN-γ (at weeks 26 and 30), interleukin-2 (IL-2; week 18), IL-1b (weeks 14 and 22), IL-17 (weeks 18 and 22), and IL-23 (week 18) and a significantly lower level of IL-10 (weeks 14 and 18) and transforming growth factor β (week 18) were detected in the ΔleuD-vaccinated group. Most importantly, ΔleuD elicited an immune response that significantly limited colonization of tissues compared to Mycopar upon challenge with wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. In conclusion, the ΔleuD mutant is a promising vaccine candidate for development of a live attenuated vaccine for JD in ruminants. PMID:23408524

  18. Immune Responses and Protection against Experimental Challenge after Vaccination of Bison with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 or RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, S. C.; Boyle, S. M.; Schurig, G. G.; Sriranganathan, N. N.

    2009-01-01

    Vaccination is a tool that could be beneficial in managing the high prevalence of brucellosis in free-ranging bison in Yellowstone National Park. In this study, we characterized immunologic responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) or a recombinant RB51 strain overexpressing superoxide dismutase (sodC) and glycosyltransferase (wboA) genes (RB51+sodC,wboA). Bison were vaccinated with saline only or with 4.6 × 1010 CFU of RB51 or 7.4 × 1010 CFU of RB51+sodC,wboA (n = eight animals/treatment). Bison vaccinated with RB51 or RB51+sodC,wboA had greater (P < 0.05) antibody responses, proliferative responses, and production of gamma interferon to RB51 after vaccination than did nonvaccinates. However, bison vaccinated with RB51+sodC,wboA cleared the vaccine strain from draining lymph nodes faster than bison vaccinated with the parental RB51 strain. Immunologic responses of bison vaccinated with RB51+sodC,wboA were similar to responses of bison vaccinated with RB51. Pregnant bison were intraconjunctivally challenged in midgestation with 107 CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. Bison vaccinated with RB51, but not RB51+sodC,wboA vaccinates, had greater protection from abortion, fetal/uterine, mammary, or maternal infection than nonvaccinates. Our data suggest that the RB51+sodC,wboA strain is less efficacious as a calfhood vaccine for bison than the parental RB51 strain. Our data also suggest that the RB51 vaccine is a currently available management tool that could be utilized to help reduce brucellosis in free-ranging bison. PMID:19176693

  19. [Efficacy and safety of vaccines against tuberculosis in the relation to genetic variability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains].

    PubMed

    Prygiel, Marta; Janaszek-Seydlitz, Wiesława; Bucholc, Bozena

    2011-01-01

    All vaccines against tuberculosis used actually over the world contain Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) as active substance. Strain BCG, that was obtained in 1921 by Calmette and Guerin after 13 years ofpassaging on the potato-glicerol medium with addition of bile, was distributed to many laboratories for vaccine production. The repeated passages of M. bovis BCG strain in different culture conditions caused the numerous mutations and formation of many BCG substrains that differed according to efficacy and safety. The review of many publications related to genetic differences between BCG substrains was performed for identify the genes responsible for their virulence and protective characteristics. Possibility of development of new generation vaccines against tuberculosis is discussed. PMID:22390050

  20. Different levels of immunogenicity of two strains of Fowlpox virus as recombinant vaccine vectors eliciting T-cell responses in heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G; van Maurik, Andre; Zago, Manola; Newton, Angela T; Anderson, Richard J; Howard, M Keith; Schneider, Jörg; Skinner, Michael A

    2006-07-01

    The FP9 strain of F has been described as a more immunogenic recombinant vaccine vector than the Webster FPV-M (FPW) strain (R. J. Anderson et al., J. Immunol. 172:3094-3100, 2004). This study expands the comparison to include two separate recombinant antigens and multiple, rather than single, independent viral clones derived from the two strains. Dual-poxvirus heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimens using individual clones of recombinant FP9 or FPW in combination with recombinant modified V Ankara expressing the same antigen were evaluated for their ability to elicit T-cell responses against recombinant antigens from Plasmodium berghei (circumsporozoite protein) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein). Gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting assays of the responses to specific epitopes confirmed the approximately twofold-greater cellular immunogenicity of FP9 compared to FPW, when given as the priming or boosting immunization. Equality of transgene expression in mouse cells infected with the two strains in vitro was verified by Western blotting. Directed partial sequence analysis and PCR analysis of FPW and comparison to available whole-genome sequences revealed that many loci that are mutated in the highly attenuated and culture-adapted FP9 strain are wild type in FPW, including the seven multikilobase deletions. These "passage-specific" alterations are hypothesized to be involved in determining the immunogenicity of fowlpox virus as a recombinant vaccine vector. PMID:16829611

  1. Strain-Dependent Anterior Segment Dysgenesis and Progression to Glaucoma in Col4a1 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Smith, Richard S.; Alavi, Marcel V.; Marchant, Jeffrey K.; Cosma, Mihai; Libby, Richard T.; John, Simon W. M.; Gould, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the gene encoding collagen type IV alpha 1 (COL4A1) cause multisystem disorders including anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) and optic nerve hypoplasia. The penetrance and severity of individual phenotypes depends on genetic context. Here, we tested the effects of a Col4a1 mutation in two different genetic backgrounds to compare how genetic context influences ocular dysgenesis, IOP, and progression to glaucoma. Methods Col4a1 mutant mice maintained on a C57BL/6J background were crossed to either 129S6/SvEvTac or CAST/EiJ and the F1 progeny were analyzed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography. We also measured IOPs and compared tissue sections of eyes and optic nerves. Results. We found that the CAST/EiJ inbred strain has a relatively uniform and profound suppression on the effects of Col4a1 mutation and that mutant CASTB6F1 mice were generally only very mildly affected. In contrast, mutant 129B6F1 mice had more variable and severe ASD and IOP dysregulation that were associated with glaucomatous signs including lost or damaged retinal ganglion cell axons and excavation of the optic nerve head. Conclusions. Ocular defects in Col4a1 mutant mice model ASD and glaucoma that are observed in a subset of patients with COL4A1 mutations. We demonstrate that different inbred strains of mice give graded severities of ASD and we detected elevated IOP and glaucomatous damage in 129B6F1, but not CASTB6F1 mice that carried a Col4a1 mutation. These data demonstrate that genetic context differences are one factor that may contribute to the variable penetrance and severity of ASD and glaucoma in patients with COL4A1 mutations. PMID:26567795

  2. Efficacy of Fostera PRRS modified live virus vaccine against a Canadian heterologous virulent field strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    PubMed Central

    Savard, Christian; Alvarez, Fernando; Provost, Chantale; Chorfi, Younes; D’Allaire, Sylvie; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Gagnon, Carl A.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is a useful option to control infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and several modified live-PRRSV vaccines have been developed. These vaccines have shown some efficacy in reducing the incidence and severity of clinical disease as well as the duration of viremia and virus shedding but have failed to provide sterilizing immunity. The efficacy of modified live-virus (MLV) vaccines is greater against a homologous strain compared with heterologous PRRSV strains. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Fostera PRRS MLV vaccine in protecting against challenge with a heterologous field strain widely circulating in the swine herds of eastern Canada. Forty-six piglets were divided into 4 groups: nonvaccinated-nonchallenged; nonvaccinated-challenged; vaccinated-challenged; and vaccinated-nonchallenged. The animals were vaccinated at 23 d of age with Fostera PRRS and challenged 23 d later with a heterologous field strain of PRRSV (FMV12-1425619). Overall, the vaccine showed some beneficial effects in the challenged animals by reducing the severity of clinical signs and the viral load. A significant difference between nonvaccinated and vaccinated animals was detected for some parameters starting 11 to 13 d after challenge, which suggested that the cell-mediated immune response or other delayed responses could be more important than pre-existing PRRSV antibodies in vaccinated animals within the context of protection against heterologous strains. PMID:26732457

  3. Factors influencing preclinical in vivo evaluation of mumps vaccine strain immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Halassy, B; Kurtović, T; Brgles, M; Lang Balija, M; Forčić, D

    2015-01-01

    Immunogenicity testing in animals is a necessary preclinical assay for demonstration of vaccine efficacy the results of which are often the basis for the decision whether to proceed or withdraw the further development of the novel vaccine candidate. However, in vivo assays are rarely, if at all, optimized and validated. Here we clearly demonstrate the importance of in vivo assay (mumps virus immunogenicity testing in guinea pigs) optimization for gaining reliable results and the suitability of Fractional factorial design of experiments (DoE) for such a purpose. By the use of DoE with resolution IV (2IV((4-1))) we clearly revealed that the parameters significantly increasing assay sensitivity were interval between animal immunizations followed by the body weight of experimental animals. The quantity (0 versus 2%) of the stabilizer (fetal bovine serum, FBS) in the sample was shown as non-influencing parameter in DoE setup. However, the separate experiment investigating only the FBS influence, and performed under other parameters optimally set, showed that FBS also influences the results of immunogenicity assay. Such finding indicated that (a) factors with strong influence on the measured outcome can hide the effects of parameters with modest/low influence and (b) the matrix of mumps virus samples to be compared for immunogenicity must be identical for reliable virus immunogenicity comparison. Finally the 3 mumps vaccine strains widely used for decades in the licensed vaccines were for the first time compared in an animal model, and results obtained were in line with their reported immunogenicity in human population supporting the predictive power of the optimized in vivo assay. PMID:26376015

  4. T-bet regulates immunity to Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain infection, particularly in lungs.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Amanda A; Foreman, Oded; Bosio, Catharine M; Elkins, Karen L

    2014-04-01

    Upregulation of the transcription factor T-bet is correlated with the strength of protection against secondary challenge with the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis. Thus, to determine if this mediator had direct consequences in immunity to LVS, we examined its role in infection. Despite substantial in vivo gamma interferon (IFN-γ) levels, T-bet-knockout (KO) mice infected intradermally (i.d.) or intranasally (i.n.) with LVS succumbed to infection with doses 2 log units less than those required for their wild-type (WT) counterparts, and exhibited significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lung and spleen. Lungs of LVS-infected T-bet-KO mice contained fewer lymphocytes and more neutrophils and interleukin-17 than WT mice. LVS-vaccinated T-bet-KO mice survived lethal LVS intraperitoneal secondary challenge but not high doses of LVS i.n. challenge, independently of the route of vaccination. Immune T lymphocytes from the spleens of i.d. LVS-vaccinated WT or KO mice controlled intracellular bacterial replication in an in vitro coculture system, but cultures with T-bet-KO splenocyte supernatants contained less IFN-γ and increased amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, immune T-bet-KO lung lymphocytes were greatly impaired in controlling intramacrophage growth of LVS; this functional defect is the likely mechanism underpinning the lack of respiratory protection. Taken together, T-bet is important in host resistance to primary LVS infection and i.n. secondary challenge. Thus, T-bet represents a true, useful correlate for immunity to LVS. PMID:24421047

  5. T-bet Regulates Immunity to Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Infection, Particularly in Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Amanda A.; Foreman, Oded; Bosio, Catharine M.

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of the transcription factor T-bet is correlated with the strength of protection against secondary challenge with the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis. Thus, to determine if this mediator had direct consequences in immunity to LVS, we examined its role in infection. Despite substantial in vivo gamma interferon (IFN-γ) levels, T-bet-knockout (KO) mice infected intradermally (i.d.) or intranasally (i.n.) with LVS succumbed to infection with doses 2 log units less than those required for their wild-type (WT) counterparts, and exhibited significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lung and spleen. Lungs of LVS-infected T-bet-KO mice contained fewer lymphocytes and more neutrophils and interleukin-17 than WT mice. LVS-vaccinated T-bet-KO mice survived lethal LVS intraperitoneal secondary challenge but not high doses of LVS i.n. challenge, independently of the route of vaccination. Immune T lymphocytes from the spleens of i.d. LVS-vaccinated WT or KO mice controlled intracellular bacterial replication in an in vitro coculture system, but cultures with T-bet-KO splenocyte supernatants contained less IFN-γ and increased amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, immune T-bet-KO lung lymphocytes were greatly impaired in controlling intramacrophage growth of LVS; this functional defect is the likely mechanism underpinning the lack of respiratory protection. Taken together, T-bet is important in host resistance to primary LVS infection and i.n. secondary challenge. Thus, T-bet represents a true, useful correlate for immunity to LVS. PMID:24421047

  6. Protective efficacy afforded by live Pasteurella multocida vaccines in chickens is independent of lipopolysaccharide outer core structure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; John, Marietta; Edmunds, Mark; Wright, Amy; Ford, Mark; Turni, Conny; Blackall, P J; Cox, Andrew; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2016-03-29

    Pasteurella multocida is a major animal pathogen that causes a range of diseases including fowl cholera. P. multocida infections result in considerable losses to layer and breeder flocks in poultry industries worldwide. Both killed whole-cell and live-attenuated vaccines are available; these vaccines vary in their protective efficacy, particularly against heterologous strains. Moreover, until recently there was no knowledge of P. multocida LPS genetics and structure to determine precisely how LPS structure affects the protective capacity of these vaccines. In this study we show that defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants presented as killed whole-cell vaccines elicited solid protective immunity only against P. multocida challenge strains expressing highly similar or identical LPS structures. This finding indicates that vaccination of commercial flocks with P. multocida killed cell formulations will not protect against strains producing an LPS structure different to that produced by strains included in the vaccine formulation. Conversely, protective immunity conferred by vaccination with live P. multocida strains was found to be largely independent of LPS structure. Birds vaccinated with a range of live mutants belonging to the L1 and L3 LPS genotypes, each expressing a specific truncated LPS structure, were protected against challenge with the parent strain. Moreover, birds vaccinated with any of the five LPS mutants belonging to the L1 LPS genotype were also protected against challenge with an unrelated strain and two of the five groups vaccinated with live LPS mutants belonging to the L3 genotype were protected against challenge with an unrelated strain. In summary, vaccination with live P. multocida aroA mutants producing full-length L1 or L3 LPS or vaccination with live strains producing shortened L1 LPS elicited strong protective immunity against both homologous and heterologous challenge. PMID:26892738

  7. Field-oriented trial of the Chinese Brucella suis strain 2 vaccine on sheep and goats in Libya.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, A A; Abusowa, M

    1993-01-01

    The Chinese Brucella suis S2 vaccine was studied in a flock of sheep and goats in field conditions. The locally-produced vaccine was orally administered in the form of a drench to 446 ewes, 50 lambs and 20 adult goats. After vaccination, abortion and excretion of the vaccine strain in vaginal discharges or in milk did not occur. Serological tests became positive in 92% of animals at 4 wk post-vaccination and declined to near nil after 1 yr. The protection conferred by the vaccine against a double virulent B melitensis conjunctival challenge which infected 10/10 control ewes was on average 53% in ewes (32/60) and 71% in goats (5/7). Abortion rates were respectively 100% (7/7) in control ewes versus 44% (25/57) and 28% (2/7) in vaccinated ewes and goats. The vaccine was thus found to be safe, antigenic and reasonably protective against the challenge dose used. PMID:8260964

  8. Characterization of the endemic equilibrium and response to mutant injection in a multi-strain disease model.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Tomás; Bolster, Diogo; Nunes, Ana

    2015-03-01

    We explore a model of an antigenically diverse infection whose otherwise identical strains compete through cross-immunity. We assume that individuals may produce upon infection different numbers of antibody types, each of which matches the antigenic configuration of a particular epitope, and that one matching antibody type grants total immunity against a challenging strain. In order to reduce the number of equations involved in the analytic description of the dynamics, we follow the strategy proposed by Kryazhimskiy et al. (2007) and apply a low-order closure reminiscent of a pair approximation. Using this approximation, we go beyond the numerical studies of Kryazhimskiy et al. (2007) and explore the analytic properties of the ensuing model in the absence of mutation. We characterize its endemic equilibrium, comparing with the results of agent based simulations of the full model to assess the performance of the closure assumption. We show that a particular choice of immune response leads to a degenerate endemic equilibrium, where different strain prevalences may exist, breaking the symmetry of the model. Finally we study the behavior of the system under the injection of mutant strains. We find that the build up of diversity from a single founding strain is extremely unlikely for different choices of the population׳s immune response. PMID:25496729

  9. Characterization of two recent Japanese field isolates of canine distemper virus and examination of the avirulent strain utility as an attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Akiko; Yoneda, Misako; Seki, Takahiro; Uema, Masashi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Nishi, Toshiya; Fujita, Kentaro; Miura, Ryuichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2014-12-01

    Recently, several new strains of canine distemper virus (CDV) have been isolated in Japan. To investigate their pathogenesis in dogs, the Yanaka and Bunkyo-K strains were investigated by infecting dogs and determining clinical signs, amount of virus, and antibody responses. The Yanaka strain is avirulent and induced an antibody response. The Bunkyo-K strain induced typical CDV clinical signs in infected dogs and virulence was enhanced by brain passage. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of H genes demonstrated the Bunkyo-K strains were of a different lineage from Asia-1 group including the Yanaka strain and Asia-2 group that contain recent Japanese isolates, which were recently identified as major prevalent strains worldwide but distinct from old vaccine strains. Based on these data, we tested the ability of the Yanaka strain for vaccination. Inoculation with the Yanaka strain efficiently induced CDV neutralizing antibodies with no clinical signs, and the protection effects against challenge with either old virulent strain or Bunkyo-K strain were equal or greater when compared with vaccination by an original vaccine strain. Thus, the Yanaka strain is a potential vaccine candidate against recent prevalent CDV strains. PMID:25465179

  10. Differentiation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strains ts-11 and 6/85 from commonly used Mycoplasma gallisepticum challenge strains by PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses within the poultry layer industry. In an effort to develop tools to aid in MG research and diagnostics, we have compared available sequences of the attenuated MG vaccine strain ts-11 to those of commonl...

  11. Determination of efficacious vaccine seed strains for use against Egyptian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses through antigenic cartography and in vivo challenge studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2006, there have been reported outbreaks of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in vaccinated chickens in Africa and Asia. This study provides experimental data for selection of efficacious H5N1 vaccine seed strains against recently circulating strains of H5N1 HPAI viruses in Egypt....

  12. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  13. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  14. Calcofluor staining of cellulose during microcyst differentiation in wild-type and mutant strains of Polysphondylium pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, A H; O'Day, D H

    1984-01-01

    Calcofluor White ST was used to monitor the morphological events in the biogenesis of cellulose in the microcyst wall of the wild-type strain (WS-320) and two developmental mutants (mic-1 and mic-2) of Polysphondylium pallidum. During encystment, the cell surface acquires a Calcofluor-specific material which appears to be cellulose because of its sensitivity to purified cellulase. Cellulose-containing vesicles appear distributed throughout the cytoplasm of encysting cells of the three strains. Later, the cellulose-rich vesicles appear near the cell surface. Subsequently, the cell surface stains with Calcofluor, and the vesicles are no longer detectable. Intracellular vesicles resembling the cellulose-rich vesicles in size, in the timing of appearance, and in cellular location are also seen in thin sections. These vesicles are surrounded by a single unit membrane, and their amorphous matrix, which contains a dense irregular core, further implicates them as the basis for the bilayered microcyst wall. Images PMID:6197403

  15. Restoration of growth by manganese in a mutant strain of Escherichia coli lacking most known iron and manganese uptake systems.

    PubMed

    Taudte, Nadine; German, Nadezhda; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Grass, Gregor; Rensing, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    The interplay of manganese and iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli can give important insights into survival of bacteria in the phagosome and under differing iron or manganese bioavailabilities. Here, we characterized a mutant strain devoid of all know iron/manganese-uptake systems relevant for growth in defined medium. Based on these results an exit strategy enabling the cell to cope with iron depletion and use of manganese as an alternative for iron could be shown. Such a strategy would also explain why E. coli harbors some iron- or manganese-dependent iso-enzymes such as superoxide dismutases or ribonucleotide reductases. The benefits for gaining a means for survival would be bought with the cost of less efficient metabolism as indicated in our experiments by lower cell densities with manganese than with iron. In addition, this strain was extremely sensitive to the metalloid gallium but this gallium toxicity can be alleviated by low concentrations of manganese. PMID:27003826

  16. Levels of Expression and Immunogenicity of Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Expressing Escherichia coli Mutant Heat-Labile Enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Covone, M. Giuseppina; Brocchi, Marcelo; Palla, Emanuela; da Silveira, W. Dias; Rappuoli, Rino; Galeotti, Cesira L.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of heterologous gene dosage as well as Salmonella typhimurium strain variability on immune response toward both the heterologous antigen, the nontoxic mutant of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin LTK63, and the carrier Salmonella strain have been analyzed. Effects of a single integration into the host DNA and different-copy-number episomal vectors were compared in S. typhimurium Δcya Δcrp Δasd strains of two different serotypes, UK-1 and SR-11. Expression of the enterotoxin in the different Salmonella isolates in vitro was found to vary considerably and, for the episomal vectors, to correlate with the plasmid copy number. LTK63-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were highest in mice immunized with the high-level-expression strain. High anti-LTK63 IgG and IgA titers were found to correspond to higher anti-Salmonella immunity, suggesting that LTK63 exerts an adjuvant effect on response to the carrier. Statistically significant differences in anti-LTK63 immune response were observed between groups of mice immunized with the attenuated Δcya Δcrp UK-1 and SR-11 derivatives producing the antigen at the same rate. These data indicate that the same attenuation in S. typhimurium strains of different genetic backgrounds can influence significantly the immune response toward the heterologous antigen. Moreover, delivery of the LTK63 enterotoxin to the immune system by attenuated S. typhimurium strains is effective only when synthesis of the antigen is very high during the initial phase of invasion, while persistence of the S. typhimurium strain in deep tissues has only marginal influence. PMID:9423862

  17. Variability of genes encoding surface proteins used as vaccine antigens in meningococcal endemic and epidemic strain panels from Norway.

    PubMed

    Holst, Johan; Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Comandi, Sara; Oksnes, Jan; DeTora, Lisa; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Caugant, Dominique A

    2014-05-13

    Surface-expressed protein antigens such as factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisserial adhesin A (NadA), Neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA) and Porin protein A (PorA); all express sequence variability that can affect their function as protective immunogens when used in meningococcal serogroup B vaccines like the recently-approved 4CMenB (Bexsero(®)). We assessed the sequence variation of genes coding for these proteins and two additional proteins ("fusion partners" to fHbp and NHBA) in pathogenic isolates from a recent low incidence period (endemic situation; 2005-2006) in Norway. Findings among strains from this panel were contrasted to what was found among isolates from a historic outbreak (epidemic situation; 1985-1990). Multilocus sequence typing revealed 14 clonal complexes (cc) among the 66 endemic strains, while cc32 vastly predominated in the 38-strain epidemic panel. Serogroup B isolates accounted for 50/66 among endemic strains and 28/38 among epidemic strains. Potential strain-coverage ("sequence match") for the 4CMenB vaccine was identified among the majority (>70%) of the endemic serogroup B isolates and all of the epidemic serogroup B isolates evaluated. Further information about the degree of expression, surface availability and the true cross-reactivity for the vaccine antigens will be needed to fully characterize the clinical strain-coverage of 4CMenB in various geographic and epidemiological situations. PMID:24631075

  18. Serologic and bacteriologic test results after adult vaccination with strain 19 in three dairy herds infected with brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Breitmeyer, R E; Hird, D W; Carpenter, T E

    1992-03-15

    Milk culture data and serologic test results were evaluated after adult vaccination with Brucella abortus strain 19 in cattle of 3 large California dairy herds infected with brucellosis. Strain-19 organisms were isolated by culture of milk from 1.9% of the vaccinated cows. Isolation of field strain of B abortus varied directly with magnitude of complement-fixation (CF) and rivanol titers. At time of milk culture, 74% of cows from which field strain was isolated had CF titer greater than or equal to 160, compared with 58% of cows from which strain 19 was isolated. Cows with CF titer greater than or equal to 160 at 2 months or greater than or equal to 80 to 4 months after adult vaccination were more likely to be correctly classified as reactors (on the basis of subsequent milk culture results and/or persistently high serologic titer) than were cows with lower CF titer at these times. Cows from which B abortus strain 19 was isolated from milk were more likely to maintain persistent serologic titer than were cows from which neither strain of B abortus was isolated. PMID:1568926

  19. BCG vaccine in Korea.

    PubMed

    Joung, Sun Myung; Ryoo, Sungweon

    2013-07-01

    The anti-tuberculosis Bacille de Calmette et Guérin (BCG) vaccine was developed between 1905 and 1921 at Pasteur Institutes of Lille in France, and was adopted by many countries. BCG strains comprise natural mutants of major virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that BCG sub-strains differ markedly in virulence levels. The tuberculosis became endemic in Korea after the Korean War (1950s). The BCG strain, which was donated by Pasteur Institutes, was brought to Korea in 1955, and the first domestic BCG vaccine was produced by the National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), current Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC), in 1960. Since 1987, BCG manufacture work was handed over to the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (KIT), the freeze-dried BCG vaccine was manufactured at a scale required to meet the whole amount of domestic consumption. However, since 2006, the manufacture of BCG vaccine suspended and the whole amount of BCG was imported at this point of time. Now KIT is planning to re-produce the BCG vaccine in Korea under the supervision of KCDC, this will be render great role to National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP) and provide initiating step for developing new tuberculosis vaccines in Korea. PMID:23858398

  20. Regulators of pseudohyphal differentiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified through multicopy suppressor analysis in ammonium permease mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, M C; Heitman, J

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen-starved diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae differentiate into a filamentous, pseudohyphal growth form. Recognition of nitrogen starvation is mediated, at least in part, by the ammonium permease Mep2p and the Galpha subunit Gpa2p. Genetic activation of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase cascade, which is also required for filamentous growth, only weakly suppresses the filamentation defect of Deltamep2/Deltamep2 and Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 strain. Surprisingly, deletion of Mep1p, an ammonium permease not previously thought to regulate differentiation, significantly enhances the potency of MAP kinase activation, such that the STE11-4 allele induces filamentation to near wild-type levels in Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 and Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 strains. To identify additional regulatory components, we isolated high-copy suppressors of the filamentation defect of the Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 mutant. Multicopy expression of TEC1, PHD1, PHD2 (MSS10/MSN1/FUP4), MSN5, CDC6, MSS11, MGA1, SKN7, DOT6, HMS1, HMS2, or MEP2 each restored filamentation in a Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 strain. Overexpression of SRK1 (SSD1), URE2, DAL80, MEP1, or MEP3 suppressed only the growth defect of the Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 mutant strain. Characterization of these genes through deletion analysis and epistasis underscores the complexity of this developmental pathway and suggests that stress conditions other than nitrogen deprivation may also promote filamentous growth. PMID:9832522

  1. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Streptomyces lividans Wild-Type and ppk Mutant Strains Reveals the Importance of Storage Lipids for Antibiotic Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Le Maréchal, Pierre; Decottignies, Paulette; Marchand, Christophe H.; Degrouard, Jeril; Jaillard, Danièle; Dulermo, Thierry; Froissard, Marine; Smirnov, Aleksey; Chapuis, Violaine

    2013-01-01

    Streptomyces lividans TK24 is a strain that naturally produces antibiotics at low levels, but dramatic overproduction of antibiotics occurs upon interruption of the ppk gene. However, the role of the Ppk enzyme in relation to the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis remains poorly understood. In order to gain a better understanding of the phenotype of the ppk mutant, the proteomes of the wild-type (wt) and ppk mutant strains, grown for 96 h on R2YE medium limited in phosphate, were analyzed. Intracellular proteins were separated on two-dimensional (2D) gels, spots were quantified, and those showing a 3-fold variation or more were identified by mass spectrometry. The expression of 12 proteins increased and that of 29 decreased in the ppk mutant strain. Our results suggested that storage lipid degradation rather than hexose catabolism was taking place in the mutant. In order to validate this hypothesis, the triacylglycerol contents of the wt and ppk mutant strains of S. lividans as well as that of Streptomyces coelicolor M145, a strain that produces antibiotics at high levels and is closely related to S. lividans, were assessed using electron microscopy and thin-layer chromatography. These studies highlighted the large difference in triacylglycerol contents of the three strains and confirmed the hypothetical link between storage lipid metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces. PMID:23872561

  2. Emergence of potential superbug mycobacterium tuberculosis, lessons from new delhi mutant-1 bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Taha; Abraham, Suraj; Islam, Azharul

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that certain bacterial strains attain the New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) enzyme and become resistant to a broad range of antibiotics. Similarly, more dangerous "superbugs" of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensive drug resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are gradually emerging through rapid genetic mutation caused by prescription non-compliance or unsupervised indiscriminate use of anti-tubercular drugs or other antibiotics. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases have been reported in highly susceptible population groups including the aboriginal communities of US and Canada. In Canada alone, the total number of reported tuberculosis cases has decreased over the past decade. However, there is a steady increase in HIV cases in certain communities including the aboriginal communities. Reintroduction of MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis is possible in these susceptible communities, which in turn may pose serious public health situation. MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis are virtually untreatable using current anti-tubercular medication protocols. Thus, MDR/XDR tuberculosis presents a grave global public health threat. The unpredictable genetic mechanism involved in generating MDR/XDR resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may pose greater challenges in developing appropriate treatment strategies. In this article, we briefly review potential genetic mechanism of emerging NDM-1 bacterial strains and draw a rationale parallel to the underlying genetic mechanism of MDR/XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain development. PMID:23267308

  3. In ovo vaccination of commercial broilers with a glycoprotein J gene-deleted strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Anna; Riblet, Sylva M; Zavala, Guillermo; García, Maricarmen

    2013-06-01

    Conventional live attenuated vaccines have been used as the main tool worldwide for the control of infectious laryngotracheitis. However, their suboptimal attenuation combined with poor mass administration practices allowed chicken embryo origin vaccine-derived isolates to circulate in the field, regain virulence, and be the cause of continuous outbreaks of the disease. Previous studies indicated that stable attenuation of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) can be achieved by the deletion of individual viral genes that are not essential for viral replication in vitro. One of these genes is the glycoprotein J (gJ) gene. Its deletion provided significant attenuation to virulent ILTV strains from Europe and the United States. The objective of this study was to construct an attenuated gJ-deleted ILTV strain and evaluate its safety and efficacy for in ovo (IO) administration of commercial broilers. A novel gJ-deleted virus (N(delta)gJ) was constructed, and a 10(3) median tissue culture infective dose administered at 18 days of embryo age was considered safe because it did not affect hatchability or survivability of chickens during the first week posthatch. Broilers vaccinated IO and IO + eye drop at 14 days of age presented a significant reduction in clinical signs and reduction of virus loads after challenge, as compared with the nonvaccinated challenged group of chickens. Therefore, this study presents initial proof that the N(delta)gJ strain is a potential ILTV live-attenuated vaccine candidate suitable for IO vaccination of commercial broilers. PMID:23901771

  4. Establishing a Markerless Genetic Exchange System for Methanosarcina mazei Strain Gö1 for Constructing Chromosomal Mutants of Small RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Claudia; Jäger, Dominik; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2011-01-01

    A markerless genetic exchange system was successfully established in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 using the hpt gene coding for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. First, a chromosomal deletion mutant of the hpt gene was generated conferring resistance to the purine analog 8-aza-2,6-diaminopurine (8-ADP). The nonreplicating allelic exchange vector (pRS345) carrying the pac-resistance cassette for direct selection of chromosomal integration, and the hpt gene for counterselection was introduced into this strain. By a pop-in and ultimately pop-out event of the plasmid from the chromosome, allelic exchange is enabled. Using this system, we successfully generated a M. mazei deletion mutant of the gene encoding the regulatory non-coding RNA sRNA154. Characterizing M. mazeiΔsRNA154 under nitrogen limiting conditions demonstrated differential expression of at least three cytoplasmic proteins and reduced growth strongly arguing for a prominent role of sRNA154 in regulation of nitrogen fixation by posttranscriptional regulation. PMID:21941461

  5. Genetic analysis of attenuation markers of cold-adapted X-31 influenza live vaccine donor strain.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Jung, Eun-Ju; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Byun, Young Ho; Yang, Seung Won; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-03-01

    Cold-adapted live attenuated influenza vaccines (CAIVs) have been considered as a safe prophylactic measure to prevent influenza virus infections. The safety of a CAIV depends largely on genetic markers that confer specific attenuation phenotypes. Previous studies with other CAIVs reported that polymerase genes were primarily responsible for the attenuation. Here, we analyzed the genetic mutations and their phenotypic contribution in the X-31 ca strain, a recently developed alternative CAIV donor strain. During the cold-adaptation of its parental X-31 virus, various numbers of sequence changes were accumulated in all six internal genes. Phenotypic analysis with single-gene and multiple-gene reassortant viruses suggests that NP gene makes the largest contribution to the cold-adapted (ca) and temperature-sensitive (ts) characters, while the remaining other internal genes also impart attenuation characters with varying degrees. A balanced contribution of all internal genes to the attenuation suggests that X-31 ca could serve as an ideal master donor strain for CAIVs preventing influenza epidemics and pandemics. PMID:26851733

  6. Receptor usage and differential downregulation of CD46 by measles virus wild-type and vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schnorr, J J; Brinckmann, U; Dunster, L M; Baczko, K; Liebert, U G; Schneider-Schaulies, S; ter Meulen, V

    1995-04-25

    Recently, two cell surface molecules, CD46 and moesin, have been found to be functionally associated with measles virus (MV) infectivity of cells. We investigated the receptor usage of MV wild-type, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and vaccine strains and their effect on the down-regulation of CD46 after infection. We found that the infection of human cell lines with all 19 MV strains tested was inhibitable with antibodies against CD46. In contrast, not all strains of MV led to the downregulation of CD46 following infection. The group of CD46 non-downregulating strains comprised four lymphotropic wild-type isolates designated AB, DF, DL, and WTF. Since the downregulation of CD46 is caused by interaction with newly synthesized MV hemagglutinin (MV-H), we tested the capability of recombinant MV-H proteins to downregulate CD46. Recombinant MV-H proteins of MV strains Edmonston, Halle, and CM led to the down-regulation of CD46, whereas those of DL and WTF did not. This observed differential downregulation by different MV strains has profound consequences, since lack of CD46 on the cell surface leads to susceptibility of cells to complement lysis. These results suggest that lymphotropic wild-type strains of MV which do not downregulate CD46 may have an advantage for replication in vivo. The relatively weak immune response against attenuated vaccine strains of MV compared with wild-type strains might be related to this phenomenon. PMID:7732009

  7. Antibodies induced by vaccination with purified chick embryo cell culture vaccine (PCECV) cross-neutralize non-classical bat lyssavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Malerczyk, Claudius; Selhorst, Thomas; Tordo, Noël; Moore, Susan; Müller, Thomas

    2009-08-27

    Tissue-culture vaccines like purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV) have been shown to provide protection against classical rabies virus (RABV) via pre-exposure or post-exposure prophylaxis. A cross-neutralization study was conducted using a panel of 100 human sera, to determine, to what extent after vaccination with PCECV protection exists against non-classical bat lyssavirus strains like European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) type 1 and 2 and Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV). Virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) concentrations against the rabies virus variants CVS-11, ABLV, EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 were determined by using a modified rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. For ABLV and EBLV-2, the comparison to CVS-11 revealed almost identical results (100% adequate VNA concentrations >or=0.5 IU/mL; correlation coefficient r(2)=0.69 and 0.77, respectively), while for EBLV-1 more scattering was observed (97% adequate VNA concentrations; r(2)=0.50). In conclusion, vaccination with PCECV produces adequate VNA concentrations against classical RABV as well as non-classical lyssavirus strains ABLV, EBLV-1, and EBLV-2. PMID:19615958

  8. Serological profile of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) female calves vaccinated with standard Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine using rose bengal, 2-mercaptoethanol and complement fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Nardi, G Júnior; Ribeiro, M G; Jorge, A M; Megid, J; Silva, L M P

    2012-03-01

    The serological profiles of 21 female buffaloes vaccinated between 3 and 8 months of age using Brucella abortus strain 19 (S19) were evaluated by rose bengal (RBT), 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) and complement fixation (CFT) tests. The serum strains were collected in day zero, 15, 30, 45, 60th days and subsequently to each 30 months, until 720th day after vaccination. No animal showed reaction in day zero. In 15th day above 95% of animals revealed reaction in all tests. All the animals presented absence of reactions in CFT, RBT and 2ME tests at 270, 300 and 360 days after vaccination, respectively. Our finding highlighted early response in CFT compared than other conventional agglutination tests. None of animals presented oscillation of titers or reactions in any test after 360 day of study, which enables the use of these tests after this period without interference of antibodies from S19 vaccine origin between 3 and 8 months in buffalo heifers. PMID:22284623

  9. A Comprehensive Survey of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) across Mycobacterium bovis Strains and M. bovis BCG Vaccine Strains Refines the Genealogy and Defines a Minimal Set of SNPs That Separate Virulent M. bovis Strains and M. bovis BCG Strains▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Pelayo, M. Carmen; Uplekar, Swapna; Keniry, Andrew; Mendoza Lopez, Pablo; Garnier, Thierry; Nunez Garcia, Javier; Boschiroli, Laura; Zhou, Xiangmei; Parkhill, Julian; Smith, Noel; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Cole, Stewart T.; Gordon, Stephen V.

    2009-01-01

    To further unravel the mechanisms responsible for attenuation of the tuberculosis vaccine Mycobacterium bovis BCG, comparative genomics was used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that differed between sequenced strains of Mycobacterium bovis and M. bovis BCG. SNPs were assayed in M. bovis isolates from France and the United Kingdom and from different BCG vaccines in order to identify those that arose during the attenuation process which gave rise to BCG. Informative data sets were obtained for 658 SNPs from 21 virulent M. bovis strains and 13 BCG strains; these SNPs showed phylogenetic clustering that was consistent with the geographical origin of the strains and previous schemes for BCG genealogies. The data revealed a closer relationship between BCG Tice and BCG Pasteur than was previously appreciated, while we were able to position BCG Beijing within a grouping of BCG Denmark-derived strains. Only 186 SNPs were identified between virulent M. bovis strains and all BCG strains, with 115 nonsynonymous SNPs affecting important functions such as global regulators, transcriptional factors, and central metabolism, which might impact on virulence. We therefore refine previous genealogies of BCG vaccines and define a minimal set of SNPs between virulent M. bovis strains and the attenuated BCG strain that will underpin future functional analyses. PMID:19289514

  10. Horizontal transmission dynamics of a glycoprotein G deficient candidate vaccine strain of infectious laryngotracheitis virus and the effect of vaccination on transmission of virulent virus.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Joanne M; Hartley, Carol A; Gilkerson, James R; Coppo, Mauricio J C; Vaz, Paola; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Wells, Ben; Rubite, Ambrosio; Dhand, Navneet K; Browning, Glenn F

    2011-08-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes acute respiratory disease in chickens worldwide. The virus is horizontally transmitted and causes large outbreaks of disease. Recent studies have shown that a glycoprotein G deficient candidate vaccine strain of ILTV (ΔgG ILTV) is safe and protects birds from disease following challenge with virulent virus. This study examined the transmission dynamics of this candidate vaccine and of ILTV in field and experimental settings. The reproduction ratio (R₀, average number of secondary infectious cases from a typical infectious case) was calculated from the growth rate of disease epidemics in broiler flocks. Assuming a latent period of 2 days and an infectious period of 4 days R₀ was estimated to be 2.43 (95% CI 2.25-2.69). In experimental settings the transmission characteristics of ΔgG ILTV were similar to those of wildtype virus, and importantly ΔgG ILTV remained safe following one in vivo passage and subsequent infection via contact-exposure. There was minimal transmission of wildtype virus in vaccinated birds. The findings from this study further demonstrate the suitability of ΔgG ILTV for use as a live attenuated vaccine. Knowledge of the basic reproduction ratio of ILTV will be valuable for future studies that aim to improve disease control using vaccination programs. PMID:21689710

  11. Cross-reactive immune response induced by the Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccine against Salmonella Paratyphi strains.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, S H; Kantele, J M; Kantele, A

    2014-03-01

    There are no vaccines in clinical use against paratyphoid fever, caused by Salmonella Paratyphi A and B or, rarely, C. Oral Salmonella Typhi Ty21a typhoid vaccine elicits a significant cross-reactive immune response against S. Paratyphi A and B, and some reports suggest cross-protective efficacy against the disease. These findings are ascribed to the O-12 antigen shared between the strains. The Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine has been shown to elicit antibodies reactive with O-9,12. Twenty-five volunteers immunized with the parenteral Vi vaccine (Typherix(®) ) were explored for plasmablasts cross-reactive with paratyphoid strains; the responses were compared to those in 25 age- and gender-matched volunteers immunized with Ty21a (Vivotif(®) ). Before vaccination, 48/50 vaccinees had no plasmablasts reactive with the antigens. Seven days after vaccination, 15/25 and 22/25 Vi- and Ty21a-vaccinated volunteers had circulating plasmablasts producing antibodies cross-reactive with S. Paratyphi A, 18/25 and 23/25 with S. Paratyphi B and 16/25 and 9/25 with Paratyphi C, respectively. Compared to the Ty21a group, the Vi group showed significantly lower responses to S. Paratyphi A and B and higher to S. Paratyphi C. To conclude, the Vi vaccine elicited a cross-reactive plasmablast response to S. Paratyphi C (Vi antigen in common) and less marked responses to S. Paratyphi A and B than the Ty21a preparation. S. Paratyphi A and B both being Vi-negative, the result can be explained by trace amounts of bacterial cell wall O-12 antigen in the Vi preparation, despite purification. The clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined. PMID:24383914

  12. Antigenic differences among NDV strains of different genotypes used in vaccine formulation affects viral shedding after a virulent challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) can be separated into genotypes based on genome differences even though they are antigenically considered to be of a single serotype. It is widely recognized that an efficacious Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine made with any NDV does induce protection against ...

  13. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs. PMID:26685562

  14. Pigs immunized with Chinese highly pathogenic PRRS virus modified live vaccine are protected from challenge with North American PRRSV strain NADC-20.

    PubMed

    Galliher-Beckley, Amy; Li, Xiangdong; Bates, John T; Madera, Rachel; Waters, Andrew; Nietfeld, Jerome; Henningson, Jamie; He, Dongsheng; Feng, Wenhai; Chen, Ruiai; Shi, Jishu

    2015-07-01

    Modified live virus (MLV) vaccines developed to protect against PRRSV circulating in North America (NA) offer limited protection to highly pathogenic (HP) PRRSV strains that are emerging in Asia. MLV vaccines specific to HP-PRRSV strains commercially available in China provide protection to HP-PRRSV; however, the efficacy of these HP-PRRSV vaccines to current circulating NA PRRS viruses has not been reported. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pigs vaccinated with attenuated Chinese HP-PRRSV vaccine (JXA1-R) are protected from infection by NA PRRSV strain NADC-20. We found that pigs vaccinated with JXA1-R were protected from challenges with HV-PRRSV or NADC-20 as shown by fewer days of clinical fever, reduced lung pathology scores, and lower PRRS virus load in the blood. PRRSV-specific antibodies, as measured by IDEXX ELISA, appeared one week after vaccination and virus neutralizing antibodies were detected four weeks post vaccination. Pigs vaccinated with JXA1-R developed broadly neutralizing antibodies with high titers to NADC-20, JXA1-R, and HV-PRRSV. In addition, we also found that IFN-α and IFN-β occurred at higher levels in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with JXA1-R. Taken together, our studies provide the first evidence that JXA1-R can confer protection in pigs against the heterologous NA PRRSV strain NADC-20. PMID:26049004

  15. Challenge of Pigs with Classical Swine Fever Viruses after C-Strain Vaccination Reveals Remarkably Rapid Protection and Insights into Early Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Felicity J.; Johns, Helen L.; Sosan, Olubukola A.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Clifford, Derek J.; Steinbach, Falko; Drew, Trevor W.; Crooke, Helen R.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-emptive culling is becoming increasingly questioned as a means of controlling animal diseases, including classical swine fever (CSF). This has prompted discussions on the use of emergency vaccination to control future CSF outbreaks in domestic pigs. Despite a long history of safe use in endemic areas, there is a paucity of data on aspects important to emergency strategies, such as how rapidly CSFV vaccines would protect against transmission, and if this protection is equivalent for all viral genotypes, including highly divergent genotype 3 strains. To evaluate these questions, pigs were vaccinated with the Riemser® C-strain vaccine at 1, 3 and 5 days prior to challenge with genotype 2.1 and 3.3 challenge strains. The vaccine provided equivalent protection against clinical disease caused by for the two challenge strains and, as expected, protection was complete at 5 days post-vaccination. Substantial protection was achieved after 3 days, which was sufficient to prevent transmission of the 3.3 strain to animals in direct contact. Even by one day post-vaccination approximately half the animals were partially protected, and were able to control the infection, indicating that a reduction of the infectious potential is achieved very rapidly after vaccination. There was a close temporal correlation between T cell IFN-γ responses and protection. Interestingly, compared to responses of animals challenged 5 days after vaccination, challenge of animals 3 or 1 days post-vaccination resulted in impaired vaccine-induced T cell responses. This, together with the failure to detect a T cell IFN-γ response in unprotected and unvaccinated animals, indicates that virulent CSFV can inhibit the potent antiviral host defences primed by C-strain in the early period post vaccination. PMID:22235283

  16. Development of a cost-effective vaccine candidate with outer membrane vesicles of a tolA-disrupted Shigella boydii strain.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Soma; Sinha, Ritam; Mitobe, Jiro; Koley, Hemanta

    2016-04-01

    Our previous studies on outer membrane vesicles based vaccine development against shigellosis, revealed the inability of Shigella to release significant amount of vesicles naturally, during growth. Disruption of tolA, one of the genes of the Tol-Pal system of Gram negative bacterial membrane, has increased the vesicle release rate of a Shigella boydii type 4 strain to approximately 60% higher. We also noticed the vesicles, released from tolA-disrupted strain captured more OmpA protein and lipopolysaccharide, compared to the vesicles released from its wild type prototype. Six to seven weeks old BALB/c mice, immunized with 25μg of three oral doses of the vesicles, released by tolA mutant, conferred 100% protection against lethal homologous challenge through nasal route, compared to only 60% protection after the same dose of wild type immunogen. Mice, immunized with the vesicles from tolA-mutant, manifested significant secretion of mucosal IgG and IgA. A sharp and significant response of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ) were also observed in the lung lavage of these groups of mice, within 6h post challenge; but at 24h, these inflammatory cytokines showed the sign of subsidence and the system was taken over by the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Studies with naïve peritoneal macrophages, proved further, the potency of these vesicles to stimulate nitric oxide and TNF-α, IL-12p70, IL-6 and IL-10 productions in-vitro. The ability of these vesicles to trigger polarization of CD4(+) T cells toward Th1 adaptive immune response, had also been observed along with the presence of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the system. Our study demonstrated, the vesicles from tolA-disrupted Shigella were able to suppress Shigella-mediated inflammation in the host and could balance between inflammation and anti-inflammation, promoting better survival and health of the infected mice. Outer membrane vesicles from tolA-mutant, could be a potential

  17. Pigmentation restored in mutant laboratory strain of the lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata through dietary supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory colony of Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer), ye, selected for a pigmentation deficiency, was restored to near wild type cuticle coloration by adding crushed heads and wings of the red colored parental strain to the diet. While the wings and other colored portions of the cuticle regained th...

  18. Real-time PCR for differential quantification of CVI988 vaccine virus and virulent strains of Marek's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Baigent, Susan J; Nair, Venugopal K; Le Galludec, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    CVI988/Rispens vaccine, the 'gold standard' vaccine against Marek's disease in poultry, is not easily distinguishable from virulent strains of Marek's disease herpesvirus (MDV). Accurate differential measurement of CVI988 and virulent MDV is commercially important to confirm successful vaccination, to diagnose Marek's disease, and to investigate causes of vaccine failure. A real-time quantitative PCR assay to distinguish CVI988 and virulent MDV based on a consistent single nucleotide polymorphism in the pp38 gene, was developed, optimised and validated using common primers to amplify both viruses, but differential detection of PCR products using two short probes specific for either CVI988 or virulent MDV. Both probes showed perfect specificity for three commercial preparations of CVI988 and 12 virulent MDV strains. Validation against BAC-sequence-specific and US2-sequence-specific q-PCR, on spleen samples from experimental chickens co-infected with BAC-cloned pCVI988 and wild-type virulent MDV, demonstrated that CVI988 and virulent MDV could be quantified very accurately. The assay was then used to follow kinetics of replication of commercial CVI988 and virulent MDV in feather tips and blood of vaccinated and challenged experimental chickens. The assay is a great improvement in enabling accurate differential quantification of CVI988 and virulent MDV over a biologically relevant range of virus levels. PMID:26973285

  19. Evolutionary and bioinformatic analysis of the spike glycoprotein gene of H120 vaccine strain protectotype of infectious bronchitis virus from India.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Pillai, Aravind S; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Khulape, Sagar Aashok; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2016-01-01

    The infectious bronchitis virus is a causative agent of avian infectious bronchitis (AIB), and is is an important disease that produces severe economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. Recent AIB outbreaks in India have been associated with poor growth in broilers, drop in egg production, and thin egg shells in layers. The complete spike gene of Indian AIB vaccine strain was amplified and sequenced using a conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and is submitted to the GenBank (accession no KF188436). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the vaccine strain currently used belongs to H120 genotype, an attenuated strain of Massachusetts (Mass) serotype. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence comparisons have shown that the reported spike gene from Indian isolates have 71.8%-99% and 71.4%-96.9% genetic similarity with the sequenced H120 strain. The study identifies live attenuated IBV vaccine strain, which is routinely used for vaccination, for the first time. Based on nucleotide and amino acid relatedness studies of the vaccine strain with reported IBV sequences from India, it is shown that the current vaccine strain is efficient in controlling the IBV infection. Continuous monitoring of IBV outbreaks by sequencing for genotyping and in vivo cross protection studies for serotyping is not only important for epidemiological investigation but also for evaluation of efficacy of the current vaccine. PMID:25311758

  20. Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine immunogenicity test: Evaluation of three mice (BALB/c, Swiss and CD-1) and two challenge strains (544 and 2308).

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karina Leite; Dorneles, Elaine Maria Seles; Pauletti, Rebeca Barbosa; Poester, Fernando Padilla; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of different mouse strains (BALB/c, Swiss and CD-1) and different challenge strains (Brucella abortus 544 and 2308) in the study of B. abortus vaccine (S19 and RB51) immunogenicity test in the murine model. No significant difference in B. abortus vaccine potency assay was found with the use of B. abortus 544 or B. abortus 2308 as challenge strain. Results of variance analysis showed an interaction between treatment and mouse strain; therefore these parameters could not be compared separately. When CD-1 groups were compared, those vaccinated showed significantly lower counts than non-vaccinated ones (P<0.05), independently of the vaccine received (S19 or RB51). Similar results were observed on BALB/c groups. However, in Swiss mouse groups, S19 was more protective than RB51 (P<0.05), which showed protection when compared to the non-vaccinated group (P<0.05). In summary, data from the present study showed that CD-1, BALB/c and Swiss mice strains, as well as both challenge strains, B. abortus strains 544 and 2308, can be used in immunogenicity tests of S19 and RB51 vaccines. PMID:25498211

  1. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-09-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  2. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  3. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... help the body defend itself against foreign invaders. As the antigens invade the body's tissues, they attract ... the suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of ...

  4. An economical regimen of human diploid cell strain anti-rabies vaccine for post-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Warrell, M J; Warrell, D A; Suntharasamai, P; Viravan, C; Sinhaseni, A; Udomsakdi, D; Phanfung, R; Xueref, C; Vincent-Falquet, J C; Nicholson, K G; Bunnag, D; Harinasuta, T

    1983-08-01

    Vaccine regimens using 0.1 ml human diploid cell strain vaccine (HDCSV) given intradermally (id) in single and multiple sites, or with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant given subcutaneously (sc), were compared with the regimens of HDCSV and Semple vaccine currently suggested by WHO. Some groups were also given human rabies-immune globulin (HRIG). Neutralising antibody titres were monitored for 3 months. Antibody was detected earliest in subjects given 0.1 ml HDCSV id at each of eight sites. The highest antibody titres from day 14 onwards were found after intramuscular (im) administration of HDCSV, but the multiple-site id regimen, which requires only one quarter of the volume of vaccine required for the im regimen, gave similar results, provided that a booster was given on day 91. This finding suggests that a treatment schedule based on this regimen would be suitable for post-exposure prophylaxis. Adjuvanted vaccine gave similar results to the same amount of antigen given id. Semple vaccine produced the lowest titres. HRIG, given at the high dose of 40 IU per kg, suppressed the antibody response to some of the regimens. PMID:6135830

  5. Protection by novel vaccine candidates, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ΔmosR and ΔechA7, against challenge with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strain.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Sarah A; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-10-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects over two billion people, claiming around 1.5 million lives annually. The only vaccine approved for clinical use against this disease is the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Unfortunately, BCG has limited efficacy against the adult, pulmonary form of tuberculosis. This vaccine was developed from M. bovis with antigen expression and host specificity that differ from M. tuberculosis. To address these problems, we have designed two novel, live attenuated vaccine (LAV) candidates on an M. tuberculosis background: ΔmosR and ΔechA7. These targeted genes are important to M. tuberculosis pathogenicity during infection. To examine the efficacy of these strains, C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated subcutaneously with either LAV, BCG, or PBS. Both LAV strains persisted up to 16 weeks in the spleens or lungs of vaccinated mice, while eliciting minimal pathology prior to challenge. Following challenge with a selected, high virulence M. tuberculosis Beijing strain, protection was notably greater for both groups of LAV vaccinated animals as compared to BCG at both 30 and 60 days post-challenge. Additionally, vaccination with either ΔmosR or ΔechA7 elicited an immune response similar to BCG. Although these strains require further development to meet safety standards, this first evidence of protection by these two new, live attenuated vaccine candidates shows promise. PMID:26363381

  6. Brucella suis S2, brucella melitensis Rev. 1 and Brucella abortus S19 living vaccines: residual virulence and immunity induced against three Brucella species challenge strains in mice.

    PubMed

    Bosseray, N; Plommet, M

    1990-10-01

    Live attenuated Brucella suis S2 vaccine was compared to living vaccines B. abortus S19 and B. melitensis Rev. 1 in mice. Residual virulence was estimated by ability to multiply and persist in spleen and lymph nodes. Immunogenicity was estimated by spleen counts of control and vaccinated mice challenged either with the reference B. abortus 544 strain or with virulent B. melitensis H38 and B. suis 1330 strains. S2 vaccine had lower residual virulence; expressed as 50% recovery time, persistence was 4.3 weeks, compared to 7.1 and 9.0 weeks for S19 and Rev. 1 vaccines. Immunity induced by the three vaccines was similar 45 days after vaccination. At 150 days, immunity by S19 and Rev.1 was still similar against the three challenge strains. In contrast, immunity induced by S2 had declined against the B. melitensis strain. Thus, a recall vaccination may be required for vaccination of sheep to confer a long-lasting immunity. PMID:2123586

  7. Systematic mutagenesis method for enhanced production of bacitracin by Bacillus licheniformis Mutant Strain UV-MN-HN-6

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Ikram-ul-Haq; Baig, Shahjahan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was intended to obtain the enhanced production of bacitracin by Bacillus licheniformis through random mutagenesis and optimization of various parameters. Several isolates of Bacillus licheniformis were isolated from local habitat and isolate designated as GP-35 produced maximum bacitracin production (14±0.72 IU ml-1). Bacitracin production of Bacillus licheniformis GP-35 was increased to 23±0.69 IU ml-1 after treatment with ultraviolet (UV) radiations. Similarly, treatment of vegetative cells of GP-35 with chemicals like N-methyl N’-nitro N-nitroso guanidine (MNNG) and Nitrous acid (HNO2) increased the bacitracin production to a level of 31±1.35 IU ml-1 and 27±0.89 IU ml-1respectively. Treatment of isolate GP-35 with combined effect of UV and chemical treatment yield significantly higher titers of bacitracin with maximum bacitracin production of 41.6±0.92 IU ml-1. Production of bacitracin was further enhanced (59.1±1.35 IU ml-1) by optimization of different parameters like phosphate sources, organic acids as well as temperature and pH. An increase of 4.22 fold in the production of bacitracin after mutagenesis and optimization of various parameters was achieved in comparison to wild type. Mutant strain was highly stable and produced consistent yield of bacitracin even after 15 generations. On the basis of kinetic variables, notably Yp/s (IU/g substrate), Yp/x (IU/g cells), Yx/s(g/g), Yp/s, mutant strain B. licheniformis UV-MN-HN-6 was found to be a hyperproducer of bacitracin. PMID:24031806

  8. Reproductive performance of gilts following vaccination and subsequent heterologous challenge with European strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Scortti, Mariela; Prieto, Cinta; Simarro, Isabel; Castro, José Maria

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two commercially available modified live virus vaccines for preventing the reproductive and early postnatal consequences of infecting (challenging) pregnant gilts with virulent porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). For this purpose 21 crossbred gilts were allocated to one or another of four groups (Groups A-D). Group A comprised four gilts neither vaccinated nor challenged; Group B comprised five gilts that were challenged but not vaccinated; Group C comprised seven gilts that were vaccinated (AmervacPRRS) and challenged; Group D comprised five gilts that were vaccinated (Pyrsvac-183) and challenged. Vaccination was 24 days before conception, and challenge was at 90 days of gestation. Both vaccine viruses and the challenge virus were European strains but differed in part from one another on the basis of their genetic (nucleotide) sequence. After challenge PRRSV was isolated from five (100%), four (57%), and two (40%) of the gilts of Groups B, C and D, respectively. Although vaccination failed to prevent a detectable viremia in all of the gilts of Groups C and D after they were challenged (or congenital infection of some of their pigs), it did provide a statistically significant level of protection in regard to the incidence of congenital infection, reproductive performance, and pig health and viability. Namely, for Groups C and D the numbers of liveborn pigs/litter and healthy pigs/litter throughout the early postnatal period were similar to those of Group A (nonvaccinated and nonchallenged) and far exceeded those of Group B (nonvaccinated and challenged). PMID:16806451

  9. Differential induction of type I interferons in macaques by wild-type measles virus alone or with the hemagglutinin protein of the Edmonston vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen, Nguyen; Kato, Sei-Ich; Nagata, Kyosuke; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2016-07-01

    Measles vaccines are highly effective and safe; however, the mechanism(s) underlying their attenuation has not been well understood. In this study, type I IFNs (IFN-α and IFN-β) induction in macaques infected with measles virus (MV) strains was examined. Type I IFNs were not induced in macaques infected with wild-type MV. However, IFN-α was sharply induced in most macaques infected with recombinant wild-type MV bearing the hemagglutinin (H) protein of the Edmonston vaccine strain. These results indicate that the H protein of MV vaccine strains may have a role in MV attenuation. PMID:27278100

  10. A vaccine based on a mutant transferrin binding protein B of Haemophilus parasuis induces a strong T-helper 2 response and bacterial clearance after experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Sonia; Frandoloso, Rafael; Rodríguez-Ferri, Elías-Fernando; García-Iglesias, María-José; Pérez-Martínez, Claudia; Álvarez-Estrada, Álvaro; Gutiérrez-Martín, César-Bernardo

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to characterize the type of immune response induced by an experimental vaccine based on a mutant Haemophilus parasuis transferrin binding protein (Tbp) B (Y167A) defective in its ability to bind porcine transferrin. Clinical and pathological signs, bacterial clearance, antibody response and the cytokine profile in alveolar macrophages and spleen after the vaccination and challenge of twenty-two colostrum-deprived pigs with 10(8) CFU of H. parasuis were analysed. Pigs vaccinated with Y167A were compared to those vaccinated with native TbpB (nTbpB), those treated with a commercial bacterin (CB) against Glässer's disease, those unvaccinated challenged (CH) and those unvaccinated unchallenged (UNCH) pigs. The rectal temperatures of Y167A pigs resembled those of UNCH pigs and were significantly lower than those of the nTbpB, CB and CH animals. A major reduction in pathological changes of the challenged pigs was observed in the Y167A group. H. parasuis was cleared from 88.9% of the samples from Y167A pigs versus 60.0% and 55.6% from those of the CB and nTbpB groups, respectively. The antibody response elicited by Y167A by ELISA was notably higher than that observed for nTbpB and CB pigs and was capable of preventing the expression and secretion of IL-8. The expression of IL-4 and IL-5, which were associated with the specific antibody levels, suggests that the main mechanism of protection conferred by Y167A vaccine is based on a strong T-helper 2 response. PMID:27590421

  11. Rapid methodology for antigenic profiling of FMDV field strains and for the control of identity, purity and viral integrity in commercial virus vaccines using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seki, Cristina; Robiolo, Blanca; Periolo, Osvaldo; Iglesias, Marcela; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Maradei, Eduardo; Barros, Virginia; La Torre, José; Mattion, Nora

    2009-01-13

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) developed against different foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine strains were extensively used to study any possible antigenic variations during vaccine production in Argentine facilities. Additionally, a typing ELISA using strain specific MAbs was developed to detect potential cross contaminations among FMDV strains in master and working seeds with high specificity and sensitivity and to confirm strains identity in formulated vaccines. This assay was carried out for the South American strains currently in use in production facilities in Argentina (A24/Cruzeiro, A/Argentina/01, O1/Campos and C3/Indaial) and for the strain O/Taiwan, produced only for export to Asia. These non-cross reactive MAbs were also used to analyze the integrity of viral particles belonging to each one of the individual strains, following isolation of 140S virions by means of sucrose density gradients from the aqueous phase of commercial polyvalent vaccines. Antigenic profiles were defined for FMDV reference strains using panels of MAbs, and a coefficient of correlation of reactivity with these panels was calculated to establish consistent identity upon serial passages of master and production seeds. A comparison of vaccine and field strain antigenic profiles performed using coefficients of correlation allowed the rapid identification of two main groups of serotype A viruses collected during the last FMD epidemic in Argentina, whose reactivity matched closely to A/Argentina/2000 and A/Argentina/2001 strains. PMID:18774662

  12. Erythritol Metabolism in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Schizophyllum commune

    PubMed Central

    Braun, M. L.; Niederpruem, D. J.

    1969-01-01

    Erythritol uptake and metabolism were compared in wild-type mycelium and a dome morphological mutant of the wood-rotting mushroom Schizophyllum commune. Wild-type mycelium utilized glucose, certain hexitols, and pentitols including ribitol, as well as d-erythrose, erythritol, and glycerol as sole carbon sources for growth. The dome mutant utilized all of these compounds except d-erythrose and erythritol. Erythritol- or glycerol-grown wild-type mycelium incorporated erythritol into various cellular constituents, whereas glucose-grown cells lagged considerably before initiation of erythritol uptake. This acquisition was inhibited by cycloheximide. Dome mycelium showed behavior similar to wild-type in uptake of erythritol after growth on glucose or glycerol, except that erythritol was not further catabolized. Enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism were compared in cell extracts of glucose-cultured wild-type mycelium and dome. Enzymes of hexose monophosphate catabolism, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent sugar alcohol dehydrogenases, and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-coupled erythrose reductase were demonstrated in both. The occurrence of erythrose reductase was unaffected by the nature of the growth carbon source, showed optimal activity at pH 7, and generated NAD phosphate and erythritol as products of the reaction. Glycerol-, d-erythrose-, or erythritol-grown wild-type mycelium contained an NAD-dependent erythritol dehydrogenase absent in glucose cells. Erythritol dehydrogenase activity was optimal at pH 8.8 and produced erythrulose during NAD reduction. Glycerol-growth of dome mycelium induced the erythritol uptake system, but a functional erythritol dehydrogenase could not be demonstrated. Neither wild-type nor dome mycelium produced erythritol dehydrogenase during growth on ribitol. Erythritol metabolism in wild-type cells of S. commune, therefore, involves an NADPH-dependent reduction of d-erythrose to produce erythritol

  13. The MSHA strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa activated TLR pathway and enhanced HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2012-01-01

    The mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) has been shown to trigger naïve immune responses through the activation of monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells (NK cells) and antigen presenting cells (APCs). Based on the hypothesis that PA-MSHA activates natural immunity through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, we scanned several critical TLR pathway molecules in mouse splenocytes using high-throughput real-time QRT-PCR and co-stimulatory molecule in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) following in vitro stimulation by PA-MSHA. PA-MSHA enabled activation of the TLR pathway mediated by NF-κB and JNK signaling in splenocytes, and the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 was up-regulated in BMDCs. We then assessed the adjuvant effect of PA-MSHA for HIV-1 DNA vaccines. In comparison to DNA inoculation alone, co-inoculation with low dosage of PA-MSHA enhanced specific immunoreactivity against HIV-1 Env in both cellular and humoral responses, and promoted antibody avidity maturation. However, high doses of adjuvant resulted in an immunosuppressive effect; a two- or three-inoculation regimen yielded low antibody responses and the two-inoculation regimen exhibited only a slight cellular immunity response. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the utility of PA-MSHA as an adjuvant to a DNA vaccine. Further research is needed to investigate the exact mechanisms through which PA-MSHA achieves its adjuvant effects on innate immune responses, especially on dendritic cells. PMID:23077664

  14. Current status of vaccine development for tularemia preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kee-Jong; Park, Pil-Gu; Seo, Sang-Hwan; Rhie, Gi-eun

    2013-01-01

    Tularemia is a high-risk infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. Due to its high fatality at very low colony-forming units (less than 10), F. tularensis is considered as a powerful potential bioterrorism agent. Vaccine could be the most efficient way to prevent the citizen from infection of F. tularensis when the bioterrorism happens, but officially approved vaccine with both efficacy and safety is not developed yet. Research for the development of tularemia vaccine has been focusing on the live attenuated vaccine strain (LVS) for long history, still there are no LVS confirmed for the safety which should be an essential factor for general vaccination program. Furthermore the LVS did not show protection efficacy against high-risk subspecies tularensis (type A) as high as the level against subspecies holarctica (type B) in human. Though the subunit or recombinant vaccine candidates have been considered for better safety, any results did not show better prevention efficacy than the LVS candidate against F. tularensis infection. Currently there are some more trials to develop vaccine using mutant strains or nonpathogenic F. novicida strain, but it did not reveal effective candidates overwhelming the LVS either. Difference in the protection efficacy of LVS against type A strain in human and the low level protection of many subunit or recombinant vaccine candidates lead the scientists to consider the live vaccine development using type A strain could be ultimate answer for the tularemia vaccine development. PMID:23596588

  15. Intracellular and Extracellular Cyclic Nucleotides in Wild-Type and White Collar Mutant Strains of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Nicholas M.; Harding, Roy W.

    1987-01-01

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP were released into the growth medium of mycelia of Neurospora crassa wild-type strains St.L.74A and Em5297a and by white collar-1 and white collar-2 mutant strains. After growth for 6 days at 18°C, there were 2.19 (St.L.74A), 5.83 (Em5297a), 1.38 (white collar-1), and 1.10 (white collar-2) nanomoles of cyclic AMP per gram dry weight of mycelia in the growth medium. These values corresponded to concentrations of cyclic AMP of between approximately 10 and 50 nanomolar. The corresponding values for extracellular cyclic GMP were typically less than 6% of the values for cyclic AMP. Following transfer to fresh medium, cyclic AMP efflux was demonstrated for each of the strains, and the amount of cyclic AMP exported into the fresh medium was greater at 25°C than 6°C. Intracellular cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP were also measured in each of the strains. The values for cyclic AMP were in the same range as those in the literature (approximately 0.5 to 1.5 nanomoles per gram dry weight of mycelia). However, the corresponding intracellular cyclic GMP values were less than 1% of the cyclic AMP values, i.e. more than 50 times lower than the value previously reported for the St.L.74A wild-type. Transfer of mycelia after 6 days at 18°C to fresh media and incubation for 2 hours at 25°C or 6°C did not consistently affect the intracellular level of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP in the strains examined. We could detect no change in intracellular cyclic AMP when mycelia of the St.L.74A wild-type strain were irradiated with blue light for periods of up to 3.0 hours at 18°C, or in cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP for irradiation times of up to 1 minute at 6°C. We propose that the plasma membrane of Neurospora crassa is permeable to cyclic nucleotides, and the export of cyclic nucleotides into the growth medium may be a means of regulating intracellular levels. We conclude that three factors that affect carotenogenesis in Neurospora crassa (blue light, temperature, and

  16. Safety, efficacy and efficiency of laser-assisted IVF in subfertile mutant mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Wen; Kinchen, Kristy L; Vallelunga, Jadine M; Young, Diana L; Wright, Kaleb D K; Gorano, Lisa N; Wasson, Katherine; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2013-01-01

    In the present report we studied the safety, efficacy and efficiency of using an infrared laser to facilitate IVF by assessing fertilization, development and birth rates after laser-zona drilling (LZD) in 30 subfertile genetically modified (GM) mouse lines. We determined that LZD increased the fertilization rate four to ten times that of regular IVF, thus facilitating the derivation of 26 of 30 (86.7%) GM mouse lines. Cryopreserved two-cell stage embryos derived by LZD-assisted IVF were recovered and developed to blastocysts in vitro at the same rate as frozen–thawed embryos derived by regular IVF. Surprisingly after surgical transfer to pseudopregnant recipients the birth rate of embryos derived by LZD-assisted IVF was significantly lower than that of embryos derived by regular IVF. However this result could be completely mitigated by the addition of 0.25 M sucrose to the culture medium during LZD which caused the oocyte to shrink in volume relative to the perivitelline space. By increasing the distance from the laser target site on the zona pellucida, we hypothesize that the hyperosmotic effect of sucrose reduced the potential for laser-induced cytotoxic thermal damage to the underlying oocytes. With appropriate preparation and cautious application, our results indicate that LZD-assisted IVF is a safe, efficacious and efficient assisted reproductive technology for deriving mutant mouse lines with male factor infertility and subfertility caused by sperm–zona penetration defects. PMID:23315689

  17. Genetic stability of Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine strains by multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16).

    PubMed

    Dorneles, Elaine Maria Seles; de Faria, Ana Paula Paiva; Pauletti, Rebeca Barbosa; Santana, Jordana Almeida; Caldeira, George Afonso Vítor; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan; Titze-de-Almeida, Ricardo; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2013-10-01

    The aims of the present study were (i) to assess the in vitro genetic stability of S19 and RB51 Brucella abortus vaccines strains and (ii) to evaluate the ability of multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) as a tool to be used in the quality control of live vaccines against brucellosis. Sixty-three batches of commercial S19 (n=53) and RB51 (n=10) vaccines, produced between 2006 and 2009, were used in this study. S19 and RB51 vaccines were obtained from, respectively, seven and two different manufacturers. Ten in vitro serial passages were performed on reference strains and on selected batches of commercial vaccines. All batches, reference strains and strains of serial passages were typed by the MLVA16. The results demonstrated that B. abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine strains are genetically stable and very homogeneous in their respective groups. Anyway, batches of S19 from one manufacturer and batches of RB51 from another presented genotypes distincts from the reference vaccine strains. In both cases, differences were found on locus Bruce07, which had addition of one repeat unit in the case of S19 batches and the deletion of one repeat unit in the case of RB51 batches. In summary, MLVA16 proved to be a molecular tool capable of discriminating small genomic variations and should be included in in vitro official tests. PMID:23933375

  18. Genetic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strains carried by adolescents living in Milan, Italy: implications for vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Terranova, Leonardo; Montinaro, Valentina; Scala, Alessia; Ansuini, Valentina; Principi, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    Before a protein vaccine is introduced into a country, it is essential to evaluate its potential impact and estimate its benefits and costs. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis B (NmB) in the pharyngeal secretions of 1375 healthy adolescents aged 13-19 y living in Milan, Italy, in September 2012, and the possible protection offered by the two currently available NmB protein vaccines. Ninety-one subjects were Nm carriers (6.6%), 29 (31.9%) of whom carried the NmB capsular gene. The 29 identified strains belonged to eight clonal complexes (CCs), the majority of which were in the ST-41/44/Lin.3 CC (n = 11; 37.9%). All of the identified strains harboured ƒHbp alleles representing a total of 15 sub-variants: the gene for NHBA protein was found in all but three of the studied strains (10.3%) with 13 identified sub-variants. There were 15 porA sub-types, seven of which were identified in just one CC. The findings of this study seem to suggest that both of the protein vaccines proposed for the prevention of invasive disease due to NmB (the 4-protein and the 2-protein products) have a composition that can evoke a theoretically effective antibody response against the meningococcal strains currently carried by adolescents living in Northern Italy. The genetic characteristics of NmB strains can be easily evaluated by means of molecular methods, the results of which can provide an albeit approximate estimate of the degree of protection theoretically provided by the available vaccines, and the possible future need to change their composition. PMID:23880917

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. Results In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell

  20. Fitness cost, gyrB mutation, and absence of phosphotransferase system fructose specific IIABC component in novobiocin-resistant Streptococcus iniae vaccine strain ISNO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the fitness cost of novobiocin-resistance in an attenuated Streptococcus iniae vaccine strain ISNO compared to its virulent parent strain ISET0901, cell proliferation rate of the two strains were compared to each other. Our results revealed that the cell proliferation rates of ISNO wer...

  1. Constitutive synthesis of enzymes of the protocatechuate pathway and of the beta-ketoadipate uptake system in mutant strains of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Parke, D; Ornston, L N

    1976-01-01

    Mutant Pseudomonas putida strains that produce constitutive levels of the beta-ketoadipate uptake system are selected by the sequential transfer of cultures between mineral growth media supplemented with the noninducing growth substrate succinate and growth media containing beta-ketoadipate as the sole carbon and energy source. The mutant strains also produce constitutively three catabolic enzymes that give rise to beta-ketoadipate from the metabolic precursor beta-carboxy-cis, cis-muconate, and thus a single regulatory gene appears to govern the expression of the enzymes as well as the uptake system. The three enzymes that convert beta-carboxy-cis, cis-muconate to beta-ketoadipate are induced to higher levels when the orgainisms are grown with p-hydroxybenzoate (a compound that is catabolized via beta-ketoadipate); the beta-ketoadipate uptake system is partially repressed when the cells are grwon at the expense of p-hydroxybenzoate. The transferase that acts upon beta-ketoadipate remains inducible in the constitutive mutant strains. Thus a minimum of three biosynthetic controls must be exerted over the expression of the five genes. Since the regulatory mutation does not alter the expression of the gene for the transferase, the physiological target of the selection procedure appears to be mutant strains that produce the uptake system constitutively. Levels of the uptake system are higher in uninduced constitutive mutant cultures than in induced cultures of the wild type. Hence procedures analogous to the one we employed may be of general use in obtaining mutant strains that produce high levels of uptake systems. PMID:1262305

  2. Development of a novel vaccine against canine parvovirus infection with a clinical isolate of the type 2b strain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon Ah; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Hwi Yool; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In spite of an extensive vaccination program, parvoviral infections still pose a major threat to the health of dogs. Materials and Methods We isolated a novel canine parvovirus (CPV) strain from a dog with enteritis. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence analysis of the isolate showed that it is a novel type 2b CPV with asparagine at the 426th position and valine at the 555th position in VP2. To develop a vaccine against CPV infection, we passaged the isolate 4 times in A72 cells. Results The attenuated isolate conferred complete protection against lethal homologous CPV infection in dogs such that they did not develop any clinical symptoms, and their antibody titers against CPV were significantly high at 7-11 days post infection. Conclusion These results suggest that the virus isolate obtained after passaging can be developed as a novel vaccine against paroviral infection. PMID:23596579

  3. Mosaic vaccines elicit CD8+ T cell responses in monkeys that confer immune coverage of diverse HIV strains

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Will; Korber, Bette

    2009-01-01

    Creation of a successful HIV vaccine will require the development of a strategy to generate cellular immunity with sufficient cross-clade breadth to deal with the extreme genetic diversity of the virus. Polyvalent mosaic immunogens derived from in silica recombination of natural strains of HIV are designed to induce cellular immune responses that maximally cover the sequence diversity of circulating virus isolates. Immunization of rhesus monkeys with plasmid DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine constructs expressing either consensus immunogens or polyvalent mosaic immunogens elicited a CD4+ T lymphocyte-biased response with comparably broad epitope-specific total T lymphocyte specificities. However, immunization with the mosaic immunogens induced HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte responses with markedly greater depth and breadth. Therefore, the use of polyvalent mosaic immunogens is a promising strategy for a global vaccine for HIV.

  4. Scierai ectasia associated with hereditary retinal dysplasia in a mutant strain of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Shibuya, K; Nunoya, T; Tajima, M; Mizutani, M

    1997-01-01

    Ocular defects and age-related lesions in mutant (GUB strain) Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica), phenotypically characterised by silver plumage, are described. Grossly, a circular area of hypopigmentation in the posterior retina with thinning of the subjacent sciera was observed in all GUB quails. As the birds matured, the thinned sciera progressed to scierai ectasia. Histologically, the sciera at the ectatic area consisted of an outer fibrous layer and was devoid of the inner cartilaginous shell. Atypical differentiation and duplication of the retina with absence of the choroid was common at the ectatic area. The retina, choroid, ciliary body and iris were all poorly pigmented. With increasing age, the ectatic area became cystic, and the duplicated retina degenerated and atrophied. In addition, there were mononuclear cell infiltration in the stroma of the iris and ciliary body, anterior and posterior synechiae, cataract and/or glaucoma in aged GUB quails. These findings suggest that posterior scierai ectasia in the GUB strain of Japanese quails may have developed secondarily to a congenital structural defect of the posterior portion of sciera associating with general ocular defects. PMID:18483890

  5. Microbial conversion of ginsenoside Rd from Rb1 by the fungus mutant Aspergillus niger strain TH-10a.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Xu, Chunchun; Li, Zhuo; Li, Jing; Dai, Yulin; Han, Hongxiang; Yu, Shanshan; Liu, Shuying

    2016-05-18

    Ginsenoside Rd, one of the ginsenosides with significant pharmaceutical activities, is getting more and more attractions on its biotransformation. In this study, a novel fungus mutant, the Aspergillus niger strain TH-10a, which can efficiently convert ginsenoside Rd from Rb1, was obtained through screening survival library of LiCl and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The transformation product ginsenoside Rd, generated by removing the outer glucose residue from the position C20 of ginsenoside Rb1, was identified through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Factors for the microbial culture and biotransformation were investigated in terms of the carbon sources, the nitrogen sources, pH values, and temperatures. This showed that maximum mycelia growth could be obtained at 28°C and pH 6.0 with cellobiose and tryptone as the carbon source and the nitrogen source, respectively. The highest transformation rate (∼86%) has been achieved at 32°C and pH 5.0 with the feeding time of substrate 48 hr. Also, Aspergillus niger strain TH-10a could tolerate even 40 mg/mL ginseng root extract as substrate with 60% bioconversion rate after 72 hr of treatment at the optimal condition. Our results highlight a novel ginsenoside Rd transformation fungus and illuminate its potentially practical application in the pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25831478

  6. Full Genome Characterisation of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 6 from the Netherlands 2008 and Comparison to Other Field and Vaccine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Maan, Sushila; Maan, Narender S.; van Rijn, Piet A.; van Gennip, René G. P.; Sanders, Anna; Wright, Isabel M.; Batten, Carrie; Hoffmann, Bernd; Eschbaumer, Michael; Oura, Chris A. L.; Potgieter, Abraham C.; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Mertens, Peter P.C.

    2010-01-01

    In mid September 2008, clinical signs of bluetongue (particularly coronitis) were observed in cows on three different farms in eastern Netherlands (Luttenberg, Heeten, and Barchem), two of which had been vaccinated with an inactivated BTV-8 vaccine (during May-June 2008). Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection was also detected on a fourth farm (Oldenzaal) in the same area while testing for export. BTV RNA was subsequently identified by real time RT-PCR targeting genome-segment (Seg-) 10, in blood samples from each farm. The virus was isolated from the Heeten sample (IAH “dsRNA virus reference collection” [dsRNA-VRC] isolate number NET2008/05) and typed as BTV-6 by RT-PCR targeting Seg-2. Sequencing confirmed the virus type, showing an identical Seg-2 sequence to that of the South African BTV-6 live-vaccine-strain. Although most of the other genome segments also showed very high levels of identity to the BTV-6 vaccine (99.7 to 100%), Seg-10 showed greatest identity (98.4%) to the BTV-2 vaccine (RSAvvv2/02), indicating that NET2008/05 had acquired a different Seg-10 by reassortment. Although Seg-7 from NET2008/05 was also most closely related to the BTV-6 vaccine (99.7/100% nt/aa identity), the Seg-7 sequence derived from the blood sample of the same animal (NET2008/06) was identical to that of the Netherlands BTV-8 (NET2006/04 and NET2007/01). This indicates that the blood contained two different Seg-7 sequences, one of which (from the BTV-6 vaccine) was selected during virus isolation in cell-culture. The predominance of the BTV-8 Seg-7 in the blood sample suggests that the virus was in the process of reassorting with the northern field strain of BTV-8. Two genome segments of the virus showed significant differences from the BTV-6 vaccine, indicating that they had been acquired by reassortment event with BTV-8, and another unknown parental-strain. However, the route by which BTV-6 and BTV-8 entered northern Europe was not established. PMID:20428242

  7. Comparison of Genomes of Brucella melitensis M28 and the B. melitensis M5-90 Derivative Vaccine Strain Highlights the Translation Elongation Factor Tu Gene tuf2 as an Attenuation-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangkun; Qiao, Zujian; Hu, Sen; Liu, Wenxing; Zheng, Huajun; Liu, Sidang; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis causes brucellosis, a disease affecting sheep, cattle, and sometimes humans. Attenuated B. melitensis strain M5-90, derived from virulent strain M28, is widely used as a live vaccine in ruminants in China. Genetic differences between the strains may cast light on the mechanism of attenuation. We recently reported the complete genomic sequences of M28 and M5-90. Genome organization is highly conserved between these isolates, and also with virulent strains 16 M and ATCC 23457. Analysis revealed 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with consistent differences between M5-90 and the virulent strains. Notably, the tuf2 gene encoding translation elongation factor EF-Tu from M5-90 contained 50 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 9 gaps (indels) compared to tuf2 of M28 or of the other virulent strains. There were no changes in tuf1. To evaluate the potential role of EF-Tu in pathogenesis, tuf1 and tuf2 mutants of M28 and an M5-90 strain harboring wild-type tuf2 were constructed, and their virulence/attenuation was evaluated in vivo. We report that the tuf2 gene plays an important role in the attenuation of M5-90 virulence. PMID:23716607

  8. Construction of a Vibrio cholerae prototype vaccine strain O395-N1-E1 which accumulates cell-associated cholera toxin B subunit.

    PubMed

    Rhie, Gi-eun; Jung, Hae-Mi; Kim, Bong Su; Mekalanos, John J

    2008-10-01

    Because of its production and use in Vietnam, the most widely used oral cholera vaccine consists of heat- or formalin-killed Vibrio cholerae whole cells (WC). An earlier version of this type of vaccine called whole cell-recombinant B subunit vaccine (BS-WC) produced in Sweden also contained the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Both WC and BS-WC vaccines produced moderate levels of protection in field trials designed to evaluate their cholera efficacy. V. cholerae cells in these vaccines induce antibacterial immunity, and CTB contributes to the vaccine's efficacy presumably by stimulating production of anti-toxin neutralizing antibody. Although more effective than the WC vaccine, the BS-WC vaccine has not been adopted for manufacture by developing world countries primarily because the CTB component is difficult to manufacture and include in the vaccine in the doses needed to induce significant immune responses. We reasoned this was a technical problem that might be solved by engineering strains of V. cholerae that express cell-associated CTB that would co-purify with the bacterial cell fraction during the manufacture of WC vaccine. Here we report that construction of a V. cholerae O1 classical strain, O395-N1-E1, that has been engineered to accumulate CTB in the periplasmic fraction by disrupting the epsE gene of type II secretion pathway. O395-N1-E1 induces anti-CTB IgG and vibriocidal antibodies in mice immunized with two doses of formalin killed whole cells. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with O395-N1-E1 induced a significantly higher anti-CTB antibody response compared to that of the parental strain, O395-N1. Our results suggest that this prototype cholera vaccine candidate strain may assist in preparing improved and inexpensive oral BS-WC cholera vaccine without the need to purify CTB separately. PMID:18582519

  9. Establishment of a standard seed lot system of an Iranian Mumps virus strain; RS-12, for mass production of mumps and MMR vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Shahkarami, M K; Mokhtari Azad, T; Aghaiypour, K; Shafyi, A; Taqavian, M; Mohammadi, A

    2012-01-01

    Background At present the mumps virus strain used for production of mumps vaccine for our local use is Hoshino strain. However, according to our National public health policies, this strain should be replaced with a safer strain. Based on our previous data, the Iranian mumps strain; RS-12 has been proved to be the most suitable alternative to Hoshino strain with little or no adverse events following vaccination Methods The aim of the present study was to optimize propagation of RS-12 strain and prepare standard seeds for vaccine mass production. The virus was inoculated to cells using different methods and different multiplicity of infection (MOI). The viral suspensions were harvested using different methods. Quality control tests were run at different stages. Results Maximum viral yield was achieved when cell suspensions were inoculated at MOI of 1:10 and incubated at 36-37ºC for 48 hours, followed by replacement of the media and incubation at 33-34 ºC for 5-7 days. Filtration did not affect the viral titre. A standard seed lot system was successfully established and experimental batches of MMR vaccines were produced. Conclusion The established seed lot system has met all requirements of WHO regulations and could be used in mass production of safe and efficacious mumps and MMR vaccines. Clinical trials are in progress for this newly produced vaccine. PMID:23115712

  10. Protection against murine listeriosis by an attenuated recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain that secretes the naturally somatic antigen superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Hess, J; Dietrich, G; Gentschev, I; Miko, D; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H

    1997-04-01

    A recombinant (r)-Salmonella typhimurium aroA vaccine strain was constructed which secretes the naturally somatic protein of Listeria monocytogenes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), by the HlyB/HlyD/TolC export machinery. Vaccine efficacy of the SOD-bearing carrier strain was compared with that of the p60-secreting construct, S. typhimurium p60s (J. Hess, I. Gentschev, D. Miko, M. Welzel, C. Ladel, W. Goebel, and S. H. E. Kaufmann, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:1458-1463, 1996). Vaccination of mice with both constructs induced protection against a lethal challenge with the intracellular pathogen, L. monocytogenes. While the somatic listerial antigen, SOD, is immunologically uncharacterized, the naturally secreted protein of L. monocytogenes, p60, is known to be highly immunogenic. Our data emphasize the high vaccine potential of r-Salmonella constructs secreting antigens of somatic or secreted origin. Moreover, they suggest that the HlyB/HlyD/TolC-based antigen delivery system with attenuated Salmonella spp. as the carrier is capable of potentiating the immune response against foreign proteins independent from their immunogenicity in and display by the natural host. PMID:9119463

  11. Protection against murine listeriosis by an attenuated recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain that secretes the naturally somatic antigen superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, J; Dietrich, G; Gentschev, I; Miko, D; Goebel, W; Kaufmann, S H

    1997-01-01

    A recombinant (r)-Salmonella typhimurium aroA vaccine strain was constructed which secretes the naturally somatic protein of Listeria monocytogenes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), by the HlyB/HlyD/TolC export machinery. Vaccine efficacy of the SOD-bearing carrier strain was compared with that of the p60-secreting construct, S. typhimurium p60s (J. Hess, I. Gentschev, D. Miko, M. Welzel, C. Ladel, W. Goebel, and S. H. E. Kaufmann, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:1458-1463, 1996). Vaccination of mice with both constructs induced protection against a lethal challenge with the intracellular pathogen, L. monocytogenes. While the somatic listerial antigen, SOD, is immunologically uncharacterized, the naturally secreted protein of L. monocytogenes, p60, is known to be highly immunogenic. Our data emphasize the high vaccine potential of r-Salmonella constructs secreting antigens of somatic or secreted origin. Moreover, they suggest that the HlyB/HlyD/TolC-based antigen delivery system with attenuated Salmonella spp. as the carrier is capable of potentiating the immune response against foreign proteins independent from their immunogenicity in and display by the natural host. PMID:9119463

  12. A PfRH5-Based Vaccine Is Efficacious against Heterologous Strain Blood-Stage Plasmodium falciparum Infection in Aotus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Alexander D.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Lucas, Carmen M.; Lugo-Roman, Luis A.; Crosnier, Cécile; Bartholdson, S. Josefin; Diouf, Ababacar; Miura, Kazutoyo; Lambert, Lynn E.; Ventocilla, Julio A.; Leiva, Karina P.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Hjerrild, Kathryn A.; Alanine, Daniel G.W.; Turner, Alison V.; Moorhead, Jeromy T.; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Wu, Yimin; Long, Carole A.; Wright, Gavin J.; Lescano, Andrés G.; Draper, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Antigenic diversity has posed a critical barrier to vaccine development against the pathogenic blood-stage infection of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To date, only strain-specific protection has been reported by trials of such vaccines in nonhuman primates. We recently showed that P. falciparum reticulocyte binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5), a merozoite adhesin required for erythrocyte invasion, is highly susceptible to vaccine-inducible strain-transcending parasite-neutralizing antibody. In vivo efficacy of PfRH5-based vaccines has not previously been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate that PfRH5-based vaccines can protect Aotus monkeys against a virulent vaccine-heterologous P. falciparum challenge and show that such protection can be achieved by a human-compatible vaccine formulation. Protection was associated with anti-PfRH5 antibody concentration and in vitro parasite-neutralizing activity, supporting the use of this in vitro assay to predict the in vivo efficacy of future vaccine candidates. These data suggest that PfRH5-based vaccines have potential to achieve strain-transcending efficacy in humans. PMID:25590760

  13. Recombinant infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) H120 vaccine strain expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) protects chickens against IBV and NDV challenge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yingshun; Li, Jianan; Fu, Li; Ji, Gaosheng; Zeng, Fanya; Zhou, Long; Gao, Wenqian; Wang, Hongning

    2016-05-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) and Newcastle disease (ND) are common viral diseases of chickens, which are caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), respectively. Vaccination with live attenuated strains of IBV-H120 and NDV-LaSota are important for the control of IB and ND. However, conventional live attenuated vaccines are expensive and result in the inability to differentiate between infected and vaccinated chickens. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new efficacious vaccines. In this study, using a previously established reverse genetics system, we generated a recombinant IBV virus based on the IBV H120 vaccine strain expressing the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of NDV. The recombinant virus, R-H120-HN/5a, exhibited growth dynamics, pathogenicity and viral titers that were similar to those of the parental IBV H120, but it had acquired hemagglutination activity from NDV. Vaccination of SPF chickens with the R-H120-HN/5a virus induced a humoral response at a level comparable to that of the LaSota/H120 commercial bivalent vaccine and provided significant protection against challenge with virulent IBV and NDV. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the IBV H120 strain could serve as an effective tool for designing vaccines against IB and other infectious diseases, and the generation of IBV R-H120-HN/5a provides a solid foundation for the development of an effective bivalent vaccine against IBV and NDV. PMID:26873815

  14. Serological response to administration of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in beef and dairy heifers, using needle-free and standard needle-based injection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare immunologic responses of heifers vaccinated with 10**10 colony-forming units (CFU) of Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51) by standard needle-and-syringe system or a needle-free injection system. Heifers were randomly assigned to control and vaccination gro...

  15. Emergence of antigenic variants of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus serotype O in Ecuador and preliminary evaluation of a field strain as a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Maradei, Eduardo; Malirat, Viviana; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Espinoza, Ana María; Novo, Sabrina Galdo; Smitsaart, Eliana; Salgado, Gustavo; Mattion, Nora; Toledo, Jorge Rodriguez; Bergmann, Ingrid E

    2014-05-01

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus serotype O has been circulating regularly throughout most provinces of Ecuador, one of the two South American countries that still remain endemic, although satisfactory vaccination coverage was reported. This study concentrates in the characterization of isolates collected during 2008-2011, focusing particularly on the antigenic and immunogenic relationships of the field viruses with the O1/Campos vaccine strain in use in the region and with an experimental vaccine formulated with a representative strain of the 2010 epidemic. The results established that antigenically divergent variants poorly protected by the vaccine in use emerged and co-circulated in a limited period of time. A monovalent vaccine formulated with the representative 2010 strain elicited high antibody titers and protected against challenge with homologous virus. In addition, cross-reactive antibodies to predominant viruses in the region were established. In overall this study indicates the ability of the virus to diversify under field conditions in which a vaccine strain with poor match is applied, and the potential of the selected 2010 field virus as a vaccine candidate for incorporation into strategic antigen banks and/or for addition to current formulations for systematic vaccination, in order to prevent the emergence of even more divergent isolates in the future. PMID:24625343

  16. Cellular pertussis vaccine containing a Bordetella pertussis strain that produces a nontoxic pertussis toxin molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, I; Pizza, M; Giovannoni, F; Volpini, G; Bartalini, M; Olivieri, R; Rappuoli, R; Nencioni, L

    1992-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis 165-9K/129G, which produces a nontoxic form of pertussis toxin (PT), was used to prepare a whole-cell diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine. The in vivo potency and the serological response induced by this vaccine were comparable to those of the conventional DTP vaccine which contains active PT. The toxic activities induced by PT such as leukocytosis, histamine sensitivity, and potentiation of anaphylactic reactions, which are present in the conventional DTP vaccine, were absent in the new vaccine. These results suggest that the introduction of a whole-cell vaccine containing B. pertussis 165-9K/129G would induce the same immunity as the conventional vaccine and would avoid the administration of a harmful toxin to children. PMID:1541530

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram; Ozturk, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. PMID:27284151

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. PMID:27284151

  19. Vaccination of pigs with the S48 strain of Toxoplasma gondii--safer meat for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Burrells, Alison; Benavides, Julio; Cantón, German; Garcia, João L; Bartley, Paul M; Nath, Mintu; Thomson, Jackie; Chianini, Francesca; Innes, Elisabeth A; Katzer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    As clinical toxoplasmosis is not considered a problem in pigs, the main reason to implement a control strategy against Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) in this species is to reduce the establishment of T. gondii tissue cysts in pork, consequently reducing the risk of the parasite entering the human food chain. Consumption of T. gondii tissue cysts from raw or undercooked meat is one of the main sources of human infection, with infected pork being considered a high risk. This study incorporates a mouse bioassay with molecular detection of T. gondii DNA to study the effectiveness of vaccination (incomplete S48 strain) in its ability to reduce tissue cyst burden in pigs, following oocyst (M4 strain) challenge. Results from the mouse bioassay show that 100% of mice which had received porcine tissues from vaccinated and challenged pigs survived compared with 51.1% of mice which received tissues from non-vaccinated and challenged pigs. The presence (or absence) of T. gondii DNA from individual mouse brains also confirmed these results. This indicates a reduction in viable T. gondii tissue cysts within tissues from pigs which have been previously vaccinated with the S48 strain. In addition, the study demonstrated that the main predilection sites for the parasite were found to be brain and highly vascular muscles (such as tongue, diaphragm, heart and masseter) of pigs, while meat cuts used as human food such as chop, loin, left tricep and left semitendinosus, had a lower burden of T. gondii tissue cysts. These promising results highlight the potential of S48 strain tachyzoites for reducing the number of T. gondii tissues cysts in pork and thus improving food safety. PMID:25928856

  20. A Killed, Genetically Engineered Derivative of a Wild-Type Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli strain is a Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Thomas A.; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Genagon, Stacy A.; MacDonald, Ulrike; Cope, John J.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Johnston, Brian; Johnson, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Infections due to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) result in significant morbidity, mortality and increased healthcare costs. An efficacious vaccine against ExPEC would be desirable. In this report we explore the use of killed-whole E. coli as a vaccine immunogen. Given the diversity of capsule and O-antigens in ExPEC we have hypothesized that alternative targets are viable vaccine candidates. We have also hypothesized that immunization with a genetically engineered strain that is deficient in the capsule and O-antigen will generate a greater immune response against antigens other than the capsular and O-antigen epitopes than a wild-type strain. Lastly, we hypothesize that mucosal immunization with killed E. coli has the potential to generate a significant immune response. In this study we demonstrated that nasal immunization with a formalin-killed ExPEC derivative deficient in capsule and O-antigen results in a significantly greater overall humoral response compared to its wild-type derivative (which demonstrates that capsule and/or the O-antigen impede the development of an optimal humoral immune response) and a significantly greater immune response against non-capsular and O-antigen epitopes. These antibodies also bound to a subset of heterologous ExPEC strains and enhanced neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous and a heterologous strain. Taken together these studies support the concept that formalin-killed genetically engineered ExPEC derivatives are whole cell vaccine candidates to prevent infections due to ExPEC. PMID:17306426

  1. A variety of novel lipid A structures obtained from Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Ashley S; Cotter, Robert J; Vogel, Stefanie N; Inzana, Thomas J; Qureshi, Asaf A; Qureshi, Nilofer

    2012-04-01

    F. tularensis is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that causes tularemia. Its LPS has nominal biological activity. Currently, there is controversy regarding the structure of the lipid A obtained from F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS). Therefore, to resolve this controversy, the purification and structural identification of this LPS was crucial. To achieve this, LPS from F. tularensis LVS was acid hydrolyzed to obtain crude lipid A that was methylated and purified by HPLC and the fractions were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. The structure of the major lipid A species was composed of a glucosamine disaccharide backbone substituted with four fatty acyl groups and a phosphate (1-position) with a molecular mass of 1505. The major lipid A component contained 18:0[3-O(16:0)] in the distal subunit and two 18:0(3-OH) fatty acyl chains at the 2- or 3-positions of the reducing subunit. Additional variations in the lipid A species include: heterogeneity in fatty acyl groups, a phosphate or a phosphoryl galactosamine at the 1-position, and a hexose at the 4' or 6' position, some of which have not been previously described for F. tularensis LVS. This analysis revealed that lipid A from F. tularensis LVS is far more complex than originally believed. PMID:21709054

  2. [Distribution of emm genotypes and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pyogenes strains: analogy with the vaccine in development].

    PubMed

    Arslan, Uğur; Oryaşın, Erman; Eskin, Zeynep; Türk Dağı, Hatice; Fındık, Duygu; Tuncer, Inci; Bozdoğan, Bülent

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the most common bacterial pathogen causing pharyngotonsillitis, and also can lead to diseases such as otitis media, impetigo, necrotizing fasciitis, bacteremia, sepsis and toxic shock-like syndrome. M protein encoded by emm gene is an important virulence factor of S.pyogenes and it is used for genotyping in epidemiological studies. The aims of this study were to determine the M protein types of group A streptococci (GAS) by using emm gene sequence analysis method, to compare the M types in terms of analogy with the vaccine in development and to determine the antibiotic susceptibilities of the isolates. A total of 35 GAS strains isolated from various clinical specimens in our laboratory were included in the study. Strains growing in blood culture were considered as invasive, strains growing in throat and abscess cultures were considered as non-invasive. The isolates have been identified by conventional methods and 16S rRNA sequence analysis at species level. emm genotyping of strains identified as S.pyogenes, was performed by PCR method as proposed by the CDC. Amplicons were obtained and sequenced in 23 out of 35 isolates. The results were compared with CDC emm sequence database. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates was performed by agar dilution method and evaluated as recommended by CLSI. Twenty-three out of 35 isolates could be typed and 15 different emm genotypes were detected. The most common emm types were emm1 (22%), emm89 (13%), emm18 (9%) and emm19 (9%). The detection rate of other emm types (emm5, 12, 14, 17, 26, 29, 37, 74, 78, 92, 99) was 47%. Types emm1, 12, 19, 74, 89 and 99 were observed in strains isolated from blood cultures. It was detected that nine of the 15 (60%) emm types are within the contents of 26 valent vaccine (emm 1, 5, 12, 14, 18, 19, 29, 89, 92). It was also observed that 17 (74%) of the 23 cases were infected by vaccine types and the four emm types (emm1, 12, 19, 89) identified in blood samples were

  3. IL-10 Restrains IL-17 to Limit Lung Pathology Characteristics following Pulmonary Infection with Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Samantha R.; Monin, Leticia; Gopal, Radha; Avery, Lyndsay; Davis, Marci; Cleveland, Hillary; Oury, Tim D.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2014-01-01

    IL-10 production during intracellular bacterial infections is generally thought to be detrimental because of its role in suppressing protective T-helper cell 1 (Th1) responses. Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that activates both Th1 and Th17 protective immune responses. Herein, we report that IL-10–deficient mice (Il10−/−), despite having increased Th1 and Th17 responses, exhibit increased mortality after pulmonary infection with F. tularensis live vaccine strain. We demonstrate that the increased mortality observed in Il10−/−-infected mice is due to exacerbated IL-17 production that causes increased neutrophil recruitment and associated lung pathology. Thus, although IL-17 is required for protective immunity against pulmonary infection with F. tularensis live vaccine strain, its production is tightly regulated by IL-10 to generate efficient induction of protective immunity without mediating pathology. These data suggest a critical role for IL-10 in maintaining the delicate balance between host immunity and pathology during pulmonary infection with F. tularensis live vaccine strain. PMID:24007881

  4. Generation of an attenuated strain oral vaccine candidate using a novel double selection platform in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Yuan, Chaowen; Bao, Jun; Guan, Weikun; Zhao, Zhiteng; Li, Xingyue; Tang, Jie; Li, Dandan; Shi, Dongfang

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria delivered orally are interesting tools for mucosal immunization. The objective of this study was to construct a novel counter-selection platform based on an attenuated wild-type Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain and to utilize it for the delivery of LTR192G-STaA13Q fusion protein as an oral vaccine. First, a counter-selectable marker, namely, PRPL-Kil, was inserted into an attenuated wild-type E. coli strain through the use of the red and G-DOC homologous recombination systems to construct the counter-selection platform, and PRPL-Kil was subsequently replaced by the LT192-STa13 fusion gene to construct the oral vaccine O142 (yaiT::LT192-STa13) (ER-A). Subsequently, BALB/c mice were orogastrically inoculated with ER-A. Our results showed that ER-A could induce the production of specific IgA and IgG against fimbriae (F41) and enterotoxins (LT and STa), with neutralizing activity in BALB/c mice. In addition, assays of cellular immune responses showed that the stimulation index (SI) values of immunized mice were significantly higher than those of control mice (P<0.05), and revealed a marked shift toward Th2-mediated immunity. These findings suggest that ER-A is a suitable candidate for an oral vaccine strain to protect animals from enter toxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection. PMID:25301580

  5. Construction of a Vibrio cholerae Vaccine Candidate Strain O395-N1-E1 which Accumulates Cell-associated Cholera Toxin B Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Rhie, Gi-eun; Jung, Hae-Mi; Kim, Bong Su; Mekalanos, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its production and use in Vietnam, the most widely used oral cholera vaccine consists of heat- or formalin-killed Vibrio cholerae whole cells (WC). An earlier version of this type of vaccine called whole cell-recombinant B subunit vaccine (BS-WC) produced in Sweden also contained the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Both WC and BS-WC vaccines produced moderate levels of protection in field trials designed to evaluate their cholera efficacy. V. cholerae cells in these vaccines induce antibacterial immunity, and CTB contributes to the vaccine’s efficacy presumably by stimulating production of anti-toxin neutralizing antibody. Although more effective than the WC vaccine, the BS-WC vaccine has not been adopted for manufacture by developing world countries primarily because the CTB component is difficult to manufacture and include in the vaccine in the doses needed to induce significant immune responses. We reasoned this was technical problem that might be solved simply by engineering strains of V. cholerae that express cell-associated CTB that would co-purify with the bacterial cell fraction during manufacture of WC vaccine. Here we report that construction of a V. cholerae O1 classical strain, 0395-N1-E1, that has been engineered to accumulate CTB in the periplasmic fraction by disrupting the epsE gene of type II secretion pathway. 0395-N1-E1 induces anti-CTB IgG and vibriocidal antibodies in mice immunized with two doses of formalin killed whole cells. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with O395-N1-E1 induced a significantly higher anti-CTB antibody response compared to that of the parental strain, 0395-N1. Our results suggest that this type of cholera vaccine candidate strain may assist in preparing improved, effective, and inexpensive oral or parenteral cholera vaccine without the need to purify CTB separately. PMID:18582519

  6. Development and evaluation of an experimental vaccination program using a live avirulent Salmonella typhimurium strain to protect immunized chickens against challenge with homologous and heterologous Salmonella serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, J O; Curtiss, R

    1994-01-01

    A stable live avirulent, genetically modified delta cya delta crp Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain, chi 3985, was used in several vaccination strategies to evaluate its use in the control of Salmonella infection in chickens. Oral vaccination of chickens at 1 and at 14 days of age with 10(8) CFU of chi 3985 protected against invasion of spleen, ovary, and bursa of Fabricius and colonization of the ileum and cecum in chickens challenged with 10(6) CFU of virulent homologous Salmonella strains from group B. Chickens challenged with heterologous Salmonella strains from groups C, D, and E were protected against visceral invasion of spleen and ovary, while invasion of the bursa of Fabricius and colonization of ileum and cecum was reduced in vaccinated chickens. Oral vaccination at 2 and at 4 weeks of age induced an excellent protection against challenge with virulent group B Salmonella serotypes and very good protection against challenge with group D or E Salmonella serotypes, while protection against challenge with group C Salmonella serotypes was marginal but significant. Vaccination at 2 and at 4 weeks of age also protected vaccinated chickens against challenge with 10(8) CFU of highly invasive S. typhimurium or S. enteritidis strains. The protection of chickens vaccinated with chi 3985 against challenge with homologous and heterologous Salmonella serotypes is outstanding, and the complete protection against ovarian invasion in chickens challenged with 10(8) CFU of highly invasive S. typhimurium or S. enteritidis strains suggests that vaccination of chickens with chi 3985 can complement the present hygiene- and sanitation-based Salmonella control measures. This paper reports a breakthrough in the use of live avirulent vaccine to control Salmonella carriers in chickens. PMID:7960134

  7. Production of 1,3-PDO and butanol by a mutant strain of Clostridium pasteurianum with increased tolerance towards crude glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The production of biodiesel results in a concomitant production of crude glycerol (10% w/w). Clostridium pasteurianum can utilize glycerol as sole carbon source and converts it into 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, butanol, and CO2. Reduced growth and productivities on crude glycerol as compared to technical grade glycerol have previously been observed. In this study, we applied random mutagenesis mediated by ethane methyl sulfonate (EMS) to develop a mutant strain of C. pasteurianum tolerating high concentrations of crude glycerol. At an initial crude glycerol concentration of 25 g/l the amount of dry cell mass produced by the mutant strain was six times higher than the amount produced by the wild type. Growth of the mutant strain was even detected at an initial crude glycerol concentration of 105 g/l. A pH controlled reactor with in situ removal of butanol by gas-stripping was used to evaluate the performance of the mutant strain. Utilizing stored crude glycerol, the mutant strain showed significantly increased rates compared to the wild type. A maximum glycerol utilization rate of 7.59 g/l/h was observed along with productivities of 1.80 g/l/h and 1.21 g/l/h of butanol and 1,3-PDO, respectively. These rates are higher than what previously has been published for C. pasteurianum growing on technical grade glycerol in fed batch reactors. In addition, high yields of the main products (butanol and 1,3-PDO) were detected and these two products were efficiently separated in two steams using gas-stripping. PMID:22901717

  8. KRE5 Gene Null Mutant Strains of Candida albicans Are Avirulent and Have Altered Cell Wall Composition and Hypha Formation Properties

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Ana B.; Magnelli, Paula; Mansour, Michael K.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Bussey, Howard; Abeijon, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    The UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) is an endoplasmic reticulum sensor for quality control of glycoprotein folding. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the only eukaryotic organism so far described lacking UGGT-mediated transient reglucosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides. The only gene in S. cerevisiae with similarity to those encoding UGGTs is KRE5. S. cerevisiae KRE5 deletion strains show severely reduced levels of cell wall β-1,6-glucan polymer, aberrant morphology, and extremely compromised growth or lethality, depending on the strain background. Deletion of both alleles of the Candida albicans KRE5 gene gives rise to viable cells that are larger than those of the wild type (WT), tend to aggregate, have enlarged vacuoles, and show major cell wall defects. C. albicans kre5/kre5 mutants have significantly reduced levels of β-1,6-glucan and more chitin and β-1,3-glucan and less mannoprotein than the WT. The remaining β-1,6-glucan, about 20% of WT levels, exhibits a β-1,6-endoglucanase digestion pattern, including a branch point-to-linear stretch ratio identical to that of WT strains, suggesting that Kre5p is not a β-1,6-glucan synthase. C. albicans KRE5 is a functional homologue of S. cerevisiae KRE5; it partially complements both the growth defect and reduced cell wall β-1,6-glucan content of S. cerevisiae kre5 viable mutants. C. albicans kre5/kre5 homozygous mutant strains are unable to form hyphae in several solid and liquid media, even in the presence of serum, a potent inducer of the dimorphic transition. Surprisingly the mutants do form hyphae in the presence of N-acetylglucosamine. Finally, C. albicans KRE5 homozygous mutant strains exhibit a 50% reduction in adhesion to human epithelial cells and are completely avirulent in a mouse model of systemic infection. PMID:15590817

  9. Evaluation of the protection elicited by direct and indirect exposure to live attenuated infectious laryngotracheitis virus vaccines against a recent challenge strain from the United States.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Avila, Andrés; Oldoni, Ivomar; Riblet, Sylva; Garcia, Maricarmen

    2008-06-01

    In a recent study (Oldoni & García, 2007), some field strains of infectious laryngotracheitis viruses (ILTV) were characterized as genotypically different (group VI) from ILT vaccine strains. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protection elicited by one chicken embryo origin (CEO) and one tissue culture origin (TCO) vaccine against a field isolate from group VI after direct and indirect exposure to ILTV live attenuated vaccines. In phase 1 of the experiment, non-vaccinated chickens were placed into contact with the eye drop vaccinates for a period of four weeks after vaccination. Transmission of the vaccine virus to these in-contact birds was demonstrated by real time PCR and antibody production, although the in-contact birds did not become protected against disease when subsequently challenged in phase 2 of the experiment. This emphasized the importance of uniform vaccination to obtain adequate protection, both to avoid the occurrence of susceptible chickens, and to minimize the potential for reversion to virulence of live-attenuated vaccines. In phase 2, protection against challenge with a group VI field virus was assessed four weeks after vaccination by scoring clinical signs and mortality, and quantifying weight gain. Sentinel birds were added to the groups one day after challenge to assess shedding of challenge virus, using real time PCR and virus isolation, during the period 2 to 12 days post challenge. The results showed that the CEO and TCO eye drop-vaccinated chickens were protected against challenge with the group VI virus, even though it was genetically different from the vaccine strains, and that challenge virus was not transmitted from these protected birds to the sentinels. PMID:18568655

  10. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Landis, C; Miles, D G; Smith, R A; Saliki, J T; Ridpath, J F; Confer, A W; Neill, J D; Eberle, R; Clement, T J; Chase, C C L; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2016-06-24

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected from 114 cattle on initial BRD treatment. Processing included modified live virus (MLV) vaccination. Seven BRD necropsy cases were included for 121 total cases. Mean number of days on feed before first sample was 14.9 days. Swabs and tissue homogenates were tested by gel based PCR (G-PCR), quantitative-PCR (qPCR) and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and viral culture. There were 87/114 (76.3%) swabs positive for at least one virus by at least one test. All necropsy cases were positive for at least one virus. Of 121 cases, positives included 18/121 (14.9%) BoHV-1; 19/121 (15.7%) BVDV; 76/121 (62.8%) BoCV; 11/121 (9.1%) BRSV; and 10/121 (8.3%) PI3V. For nasal swabs, G-PCR (5 viruses) detected 44/114 (38.6%); q-PCR and qRT-PCR (4 viruses) detected 81/114 (71.6%); and virus isolation detected 40/114 (35.1%). Most were positive for only one or two tests, but not all three tests. Necropsy cases had positives: 5/7 G-PCR, 5/7 q-PCR and qRT-PCR, and all were positive by cell culture. In some cases, G-PCR and both real time PCR were negative for BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V in samples positive by culture. PCR did not differentiate field from vaccines strains of BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V. However based on sequencing and analysis, field and vaccine strains of culture positive BoHV-1, BoCV, BVDV, and PI3V, 11/18 (61.1%) of BoHV-1 isolates, 6/17 (35.3%) BVDV isolates, and 1/10 (10.0%) PI3V identified as vaccine. BRSV was only identified by PCR testing. Interpretation of laboratory tests is appropriate as molecular based tests and virus isolation cannot separate field from vaccine strains. Additional testing using sequencing appears appropriate for identifying vaccine

  11. Genomic Analysis, Phenotype, and Virulence of the Historical Brazilian Smallpox Vaccine Strain IOC: Implications for the Origins and Evolutionary Relationships of Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Medaglia, Maria Luiza G.; Moussatché, Nissin; Nitsche, Andreas; Dabrowski, Pjotr Wojtek; Li, Yu; Damon, Inger K.; Lucas, Carolina G. O.; Arruda, Luciana B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980 after an intensive vaccination program using different strains of vaccinia virus (VACV; Poxviridae). VACV strain IOC (VACV-IOC) was the seed strain of the smallpox vaccine manufactured by the major vaccine producer in Brazil during the smallpox eradication program. However, little is known about the biological and immunological features as well as the phylogenetic relationships of this first-generation vaccine. In this work, we present a comprehensive characterization of two clones of VACV-IOC. Both clones had low virulence in infected mice and induced a protective immune response against a lethal infection comparable to the response of the licensed vaccine ACAM2000 and the parental strain VACV-IOC. Full-genome sequencing revealed the presence of several fragmented virulence genes that probably are nonfunctional, e.g., F1L, B13R, C10L, K3L, and C3L. Most notably, phylogenetic inference supported by the structural analysis of the genome ends provides evidence of a novel, independent cluster in VACV phylogeny formed by VACV-IOC, the Brazilian field strains Cantagalo (CTGV) and Serro 2 viruses, and horsepox virus, a VACV-like virus supposedly related to an ancestor of the VACV lineage. Our data strongly support the hypothesis that CTGV-like viruses represent feral VACV that evolved in parallel with VACV-IOC after splitting from a most recent common ancestor, probably an ancient smallpox vaccine strain related to horsepox virus. Our data, together with an interesting historical investigation, revisit the origins of VACV and propose new evolutionary relationships between ancient and extant VACV strains, mainly horsepox virus, VACV-IOC/CTGV-like viruses, and Dryvax strain. IMPORTANCE First-generation vaccines used to eradicate smallpox had rates of adverse effects that are not acceptable by current health care standards. Moreover, these vaccines are genetically heterogeneous and consist of a pool of quasispecies of VACV

  12. Genome sequence comparison of two United States live attenuated vaccines of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV).

    PubMed

    Chandra, Yohanna Gita; Lee, Jeongyoon; Kong, Byung-Whi

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to identify unique nucleotide differences in two U.S. chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines [LT Blen (GenBank accession: JQ083493) designated as vaccine 1; Laryngo-Vac(®) (GenBank accession: JQ083494) designated as vaccine 2] of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) genomes compared to an Australian Serva vaccine reference ILTV genome sequence [Gallid herpesvirus 1 (GaHV-1); GenBank accession number: HQ630064]. Genomes of the two vaccine ILTV strains were sequenced using Illumina Genome Analyzer 2X of 36 cycles of single-end reads. Results revealed that few nucleotide differences (23 in vaccine 1; 31 in vaccine 2) were found and indicate that the US CEO strains are practically identical to the Australian Serva CEO strain, which is a European-origin vaccine. The sequence differences demonstrated the spectrum of variability among vaccine strains. Only eight amino acid differences were found in ILTV proteins including UL54, UL27, UL28, UL20, UL1, ICP4, and US8 in vaccine 1. Similarly, in vaccine 2, eight amino acid differences were found in UL54, UL27, UL28, UL36, UL1, ICP4, US10, and US8. Further comparison of US CEO vaccines to several ILTV genome sequences revealed that US CEO vaccines are genetically close to both the Serva vaccine and 63140/C/08/BR (GenBank accession: HM188407) and are distinct from the two Australian-origin CEO vaccines, SA2 (GenBank accession: JN596962) and A20 (GenBank accession: JN596963), which showed close similarity to each other. These data demonstrate the potential of high-throughput sequencing technology to yield insight into the sequence variation of different ILTV strains. This information can be used to discriminate between vaccine ILTV strains and further, to identify newly emerging mutant strains of field isolates. PMID:22382591

  13. Real-time RT-PCR assays to differentiate wild-type group A rotavirus strains from Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Rashi; Esona, Mathew D; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Ian Tam, Ka; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Two live-attenuated RVA vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq® are recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) for routine immunization of all infants. Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccines have substantially reduced RVA associated mortality but occasionally have been associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases identified in vaccinees and their contacts. High-throughput assays are needed to monitor the prevalence of vaccine strains in AGE cases and emergence of new vaccine-derived strains following RVA vaccine introduction. In this study, we have developed quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine components in stool samples. Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for vaccine specific targets in the genomes of Rotarix® (NSP2, VP4) and RotaTeq® (VP6, VP3-WC3, VP3-human) and validated on sequence confirmed stool samples containing vaccine strains, wild-type RVA strains, and RVA-negative stools. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Rotarix® NSP2 and VP4 qRT-PCR assays exhibited 92–100% sensitivity, 99–100% specificity, 94–105% efficiency, and a limit of detection of 2–3 copies per reaction. RotaTeq® VP6, VP3-WC3, and VP3-human qRT-PCR assays displayed 100% sensitivity, 94–100% specificity, 91–102% efficiency and limits of detection of 1 copy, 2 copies, and 140 copies, respectively. These assays permit rapid identification of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine components in stool samples from clinical and surveillance studies and will be helpful in determining the frequency of vaccine strain-associated AGE. PMID:24342877

  14. Real-time RT-PCR assays to differentiate wild-type group A rotavirus strains from Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine strains in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Rashi; Esona, Mathew D; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Ian Tam, Ka; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Two live-attenuated RVA vaccines, Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) are recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) for routine immunization of all infants. Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccines have substantially reduced RVA associated mortality but occasionally have been associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases identified in vaccinees and their contacts. High-throughput assays are needed to monitor the prevalence of vaccine strains in AGE cases and emergence of new vaccine-derived strains following RVA vaccine introduction. In this study, we have developed quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays for detection of Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine components in stool samples. Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for vaccine specific targets in the genomes of Rotarix(®) (NSP2, VP4) and RotaTeq(®) (VP6, VP3-WC3, VP3-human) and validated on sequence confirmed stool samples containing vaccine strains, wild-type RVA strains, and RVA-negative stools. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Rotarix(®) NSP2 and VP4 qRT-PCR assays exhibited 92-100% sensitivity, 99-100% specificity, 94-105% efficiency, and a limit of detection of 2-3 copies per reaction. RotaTeq(®) VP6, VP3-WC3, and VP3-human qRT-PCR assays displayed 100% sensitivity, 94-100% specificity, 91-102% efficiency and limits of detection of 1 copy, 2 copies, and 140 copies, respectively. These assays permit rapid identification of Rotarix(®) and RotaTeq(®) vaccine components in stool samples from clinical and surveillance studies and will be helpful in determining the frequency of vaccine strain-associated AGE. PMID:24342877

  15. A novel dengue virus serotype 1 vaccine candidate based on Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiqiang; Li, Zhushi; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Lina; Zeng, Xianwu; Wu, Yonglin; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    To develop a potential dengue vaccine candidate, a full-length cDNA clone of a novel chimeric virus was constructed using recombinant DNA technology, with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone, with its premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes substituted by their counterparts from dengue virus type 1 (DENV1). The chimeric virus (JEV/DENV1) was successfully recovered from primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells by transfection with the in vitro transcription products of JEV/DENV1 cDNA and was identified by complete genome sequencing and immunofluorescent staining. No neuroinvasiveness of this chimeric virus was observed in mice inoculated by the subcutaneous route (s.c.) or by the intraperitoneal route (i.p.), while some neurovirulence was displayed in mice that were inoculated directly by the intracerebral route (i.c.). The chimeric virus was able to stimulate high-titer production of antibodies against DENV1 and provided protection against lethal challenge with neuroadapted dengue virus in mice. These results suggest that the chimeric virus is a promising dengue vaccine candidate. PMID:26976137

  16. Experimental infection of nontarget species of rodents and birds with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Januszewski, M.C.; Olsen, S.C.; McLean, R.G.; Clark, L.; Rhyan, Jack C.

    2001-01-01

    The Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 (SRB51) is being considered for use in the management of bnucellosis in wild bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Area (USA). Evaluation of the vaccines safety in non-target species was considered necessary prior to field use. Between June 1998 and December 1999, ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii, n = 21), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus, n = 14), prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster, n = 21), and ravens (Corvus corax, n = 13) were orally inoculated with SRB51 or physiologic saline. Oral and rectal swabs and blood samples were collected for bacteriologic evaluation. Rodents were necropsied at 8 to 10 wk and 12 to 21 wk post inoculation (PI), and ravens at 7 and 11 wk PI. Spleen, liver and reproductive tissues were collected for bacteriologic and histopathologic evaluation. No differences in clinical signs, appetite, weight loss or gain, or activity were observed between saline- and SRB51-inoculated animals in all four species. Oral and rectal swabs from all species were negative throughout the study. In tissues obtained from SRB51-inoculated animals, the organism was isolated from six of seven (86%) ground squirrels, one of six (17%) deer mice, none of seven voles, and one of five (20%) ravens necropsied at 8, 8, 10, and 7 wk PI, respectively. Tissues from four of seven (57%) SRB51-inoculated ground squirrels were culture positive for the organism 12 wk PI; SRB51 was not recovered from deer mice, voles. or ravens necropsied 12, 21, or 11 wk, respectively, PI. SRB51 was not recovered from saline-inoculated ground squirrels, deer mice, or voles at any time but was recovered from one saline-inoculated raven at necropsy, 7 wk PI, likely attributable to contact with SRB51-inoculated ravens in an adjacent aviary room. Spleen was time primary tissue site of colonization in ground squirrels, followed by the liver and reproductive organs. The results indicate oral exposure to

  17. Reproducible and Quantitative Model of Infection of Dermacentor variabilis with the Live Vaccine Strain of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Jenifer; Maier, Tamara; Casey, Monika; Padmore, Lavinia; Sato, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen life cycles in mammalian hosts have been studied extensively, but studies with arthropod vectors represent considerable challenges. In part this is due to the difficulty of delivering a reproducible dose of bacteria to follow arthropod-associated replication. We have established reproducible techniques to introduce known numbers of Francisella tularensis strain LVS from mice into Dermacentor variabilis nymphs. Using this model infection system, we performed dose-response infection experiments and followed bacterial replication through the molt to adults and at later time points. During development to adults, bacteria replicate to high numbers and can be found associated with the gut tissues, salivary glands, and hemolymph of adult ticks. Further, we can transmit a mutant of LVS (LVS ΔpurMCD) that cannot replicate in macrophages in vitro or in mice to nymphs. Our data show that the LVS ΔpurMCD mutant cannot be transstadially transmitted from nymphs to adult ticks. We then show that a plasmid-complemented strain of this mutant is recoverable in adult ticks and necessary for bacterial replication during the molt. In a mixed-infection assay (ΔpurMCD mutant versus ΔpurMCD complement), 98% of the recovered bacteria retained the plasmid marker. These data suggest that the ΔpurMCD mutation cannot be rescued by the presence a complemented strain in a mixed infection. Importantly, our infection model provides a platform to test specific mutants for their replication in ticks, perform competition studies, and use other genetic techniques to identify F. tularensis genes that are expressed or required in this unique environment. PMID:25362054

  18. Influence of pre-existing hemagglutination inhibition titers against historical influenza strains on antibody response to inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine in adults 50–80 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ted M; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Spencer, Sarah M; Shay, David K; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Sundaram, Maria E; Friedrich, Thomas; Sauereisen, Sandy; Bloom, Chalise E; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Concerns about influenza vaccine effectiveness in older adults and the role of influenza strains encountered earlier in life led to this study. Methods: Antibody responses against antigens in the 2011–2012 influenza vaccine at 21 days post vaccination were analyzed in 264 individuals aged 50–80 years. At Days 0 and 21, sera were tested for hemagglutination-inhibition titers against these vaccine strains and at Day 0 against a panel of 15 historical seasonal strains. Results: The proportions of participants with seroprotective titers ≥1:40 to the vaccine strains at Days 0 and 21, respectively, were 37% and 66% for A(H1N1) and 28% and 63% for A(H3N2). An increasing number of responses ≥1:40 against historical strains was associated with seroprotective responses after vaccination among participants with a titer <1:40 at Day 0 for A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) vaccine strains (P < 0.01). In multivariable regression analyses among those with Day 0 titer <1:40, after controlling for age, sex, race, site and diabetes, Day 21 titers ≥ 1:40 for the vaccine A strains were significantly more likely as the number of seroprotective responses against historical strains increased (A(H1N1) odds ratio [OR] = 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09–1.82 and A(H3N2) OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.07–1.62). The likelihood of seroconversion was significantly higher with an increasing number of responses to historical strains for A(H3N2) only (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.01–1.52). Seroconversion was significantly less likely as Day 0 vaccine strain titers increased. Conclusions: Seroprotective titers after influenza vaccination increased as the number of responses to historical strains increased. PMID:24614078

  19. An Unusual Mutation Results in the Replacement of Diaminopimelate with Lanthionine in the Peptidoglycan of a Mutant Strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis†

    PubMed Central

    Consaul, Sandra A.; Wright, Lori F.; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Crick, Dean C.; Pavelka, Martin S.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterial peptidoglycan contains l-alanyl-d-iso-glutaminyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine peptides, with the exception of the peptidoglycan of Mycobacterium leprae, in which glycine replaces the l-alanyl residue. The third-position amino acid of the peptides is where peptidoglycan cross-linking occurs, either between the meso-diaminopimelate (DAP) moiety of one peptide and the penultimate d-alanine of another peptide or between two DAP residues. We previously described a collection of spontaneous mutants of DAP-auxotrophic strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis that can grow in the absence of DAP. The mutants are grouped into seven classes, depending on how well they grow without DAP and whether they are sensitive to DAP, temperature, or detergent. Furthermore, the mutants are hypersusceptible to β-lactam antibiotics when grown in the absence of DAP, suggesting that these mutants assemble an abnormal peptidoglycan. In this study, we show that one of these mutants, M. smegmatis strain PM440, utilizes lanthionine, an unusual bacterial metabolite, in place of DAP. We also demonstrate that the abilities of PM440 to grow without DAP and use lanthionine for peptidoglycan biosynthesis result from an unusual mutation in the putative ribosome binding site of the cbs gene, encoding cystathionine β-synthase, an enzyme that is a part of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. PMID:15716431

  20. High predicted strain coverage by the multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Waśko, Izabela; Hong, Eva; De Paola, Rosita; Stella, Maria; Moschioni, Monica; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Skoczyńska, Anna

    2016-01-20

    Neisseria meningitidis of serogroup B (MenB) is currently responsible for more than 70% of cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Poland and Europe as a whole. The aim of this study was to estimate strain coverage of a multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) in Poland; the meningococcal antigen typing system (MATS) was used to test a panel of 196 invasive MenB strains isolated in Poland in 2010 and 2011. The strains were also characterized by MLST and sequencing of porA, factor H-binding protein (fHbp), Neisserial heparin-binding antigen (nhba) and Neisserial adhesin A (nadA) genes. MATS and molecular data were analyzed independently and in combination. The MATS results predicted that 83.7% (95% CI: 78.6-91.0%) of isolates would be covered by the 4CMenB vaccine; 59.2% by one vaccine antigen, 19.9% by two and 4.6% by three antigens. Coverage by each antigen was as follows: fHbp 73.0% (95% CI: 68.9-77.5%), NHBA 28.6% (95% CI: 13.3-47.4%), NadA 1.0% (95% CI: 1.0-2.0%) and PorA 10.2%. Molecular analysis revealed that the most frequent clonal complexes (ccs) were cc32 (33.2%), cc18 (17.9%) and cc41/44 (15.8%) with estimated coverage of 98.5%, 88.6% and 93.5%, respectively. Consistent with findings for other European countries, our study predicts high coverage by the 4CMenB vaccine in Poland. PMID:26686998

  1. Phenotype microarray analysis of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium qseC mutant compared to a qseBC mutant and the wild-type strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium QseBC two-component system has previously been shown to regulate bacterial motility and colonization potential in the porcine gastrointestinal tract. A qseC mutant has decreased bacterial motility and decreased colonization in swine. However, in the absenc...

  2. Dataset of differentially regulated proteins in HUVECs challenged with wild type and UGM1 mutant Aspergillus fumigatus strains.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gabriela Westerlund Peixoto; Curty, Nathália; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula Helena; Fontaine, Thierry; Souza, Gustavo Henrique Martins Ferreira; Cunha, Marcel Lyra; Goldman, Gustavo H; Beauvais, Anne; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2016-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is the primary opportunistic invasive fungal infection described in neutropenic hematologic patients, caused by the angioinvasive pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. The molecular mechanisms associated with A. fumigatus infection in the vascular endothelium are poorly understood. In this context, we used a high-throughput proteomic approach to unveil the proteins modulated in HUVECs after interaction with a wild type strain and the UGM1 mutant (Δugm1) of A. fumigatus. The proteomic analysis was also performed in HUVECs challenged with a galactosaminogalactan (GAG) purified from A. fumigatus cell wall. The dataset presented here correspond to all proteins identified that fit a 2-fold change criteria (log 2 ratio ≥ 1 or ≤ -1), disregarding the statistical validation cut off, in order to supplement the research article entitled "Modifications to the composition of the hyphal outer layer of Aspergillus fumigatus modulates the HUVEC proteins associated with inflammatory and stress responses" (G.W.P. Neves, N.A. Curty, P.H. Kubitschek-Barreira, T. Fontaine, G.H.M.F. Souza, M. Lyra Cunha, G.H. Goldman, A. Beauvais, J.P. Latgé, L.M. Lopes-Bezerra, 2016) [1]. The mass spectrometry proteomic data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002823. PMID:27622208

  3. Systematic annotation and analysis of “virmugens” - virulence factors whose mutants can be used as live attenuated vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Racz, Rebecca; Chung, Monica; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2012-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines are usually generated by mutation of genes encoding virulence factors. “Virmugen” is coined here to represent a gene that encodes for a virulent factor of a pathogen and has been proven feasible in animal models to make a live attenuated vaccine by knocking out this gene. Not all virulence factors are virmugens. VirmugenDB is a web-based virmugen database (http://www.violinet.org/virmugendb). Currently, VirmugenDB includes 225 virmugens that have been verified to be valuable for vaccine development against 57 bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens. Bioinformatics analysis has revealed significant patterns in virmugens. For example, 10 Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial aroA genes are virmugens. A sequence analysis has revealed at least 50% of identities in the protein sequences of the 10 Gram-negative bacterial aroA virmugens. As a pathogen case study, Brucella virmugens were analyzed. Out of 15 verified Brucella virmugens, six are related to carbohydrate or nucleotide transport and metabolism, and two involving cell membrane biogenesis. In addition, 54 virmugens from 24 viruses and 12 virmugens from 4 parasites are also stored in VirmugenDB. Virmugens tend to involve metabolism of nutrients (e.g., amino acids, carbohydrates, and nucleotides) and cell membrane formation. Host genes whose expressions were regulated by virmugen mutation vaccines or wild type virulent pathogens have also been annotated and systematically compared. The bioinformatics annotation and analysis of virmugens helps elucidate enriched virmugen profiles and the mechanisms of protective immunity, and further supports rational vaccine design. PMID:23219434

  4. Disseminated vaccine-strain varicella as initial presentation of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maves, Ryan C; Tripp, Michael S; Dell, Trevor G; Bennett, Jason W; Ahluwalia, Jaspal S; Tamminga, Cindy; Baldwin, James C; Starr, Clarise Rivera; Grinkemeyer, Michael D; Dempsey, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections have declined in many industrialized countries due to vaccination with the attenuated Oka strain virus. Rare cases of severe, disseminated vaccine-strain VZV infection have occurred in the immunocompromised, although rarely in HIV-infected persons. We describe a man with previously-undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who received VZV vaccination and subsequently presented to a combat hospital in Afghanistan with disseminated varicella, respiratory failure, and sepsis. The patient recovered with ventilator and hemodynamic support, intravenous acyclovir, and empiric antibiotic therapy. DNA sequencing detected Oka strain virus from patient blood specimens. Although safe in most populations, the VZV vaccine may cause life-threatening disease in immunocompromised patients. Improved detection of HIV infection may be useful in preventing such cases. PMID:24257110

  5. Protection of Cattle against Rinderpest by Vaccination with Wild-Type but Not Attenuated Strains of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Barbara; Hodgson, Sophia; Logan, Nicola; Willett, Brian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although rinderpest virus (RPV) has been eradicated in the wild, efforts are still continuing to restrict the extent to which live virus is distributed in facilities around the world and to prepare for any reappearance of the disease, whether through deliberate or accidental release. In an effort to find an alternative vaccine which could be used in place of the traditional live attenuated RPV strains, we have determined whether cattle can be protected from rinderpest by inoculation with vaccine strains of the related morbillivirus, peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Cattle were vaccinated with wild-type PPRV or either of two established PPRV vaccine strains, Nigeria/75/1 or Sungri/96. All animals developed antibody and T cell immune responses to the inoculated PPRV. However, only the animals given wild-type PPRV were protected from RPV challenge. Animals given PPRV/Sungri/96 were only partially protected, and animals given PPRV/Nigeria/75/1 showed no protection against RPV challenge. While sera from animals vaccinated with the vaccine strain of RPV showed cross-neutralizing ability against PPRV, none of the sera from animals vaccinated with any strain of PPRV was able to neutralize RPV although sera from animals inoculated with wild-type PPRV were able to neutralize RPV-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus. IMPORTANCE Rinderpest virus has been eradicated, and it is only the second virus for which this is so. Significant efforts are still required to ensure preparedness for a possible escape of RPV from a laboratory or its deliberate release. Since RPV vaccine protects sheep and goats from PPRV, it is important to determine if the reverse is true as this would provide a non-RPV vaccine for dealing with suspected RPV outbreaks. This is probably the last in vivo study with live RPV that will be approved. PMID:26984722

  6. Comparison of three commercial one-dose porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccines in a herd with concurrent circulation of PCV2b and mutant PCV2b.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiwoon; Park, Changhoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Chae, Chanhee

    2015-05-15

    Porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) occurred in a farm where pigs had been routinely vaccinated with a commercial PCV2a vaccine. A mutant PCV2b (mPCV2b) was isolated from pigs with PCVAD, perhaps implying a perceived vaccine failure. The objective of this study was to determine and compare the efficacy of 3 one-dose PCV2a vaccines of varying antigen type and dose in the same pig farm with concurrent PCV2b and mPCV2b infection based on clinical (average daily weight gain; ADWG), virological (evidence of viremia), immunological (presence of PCV2-specific neutralizing antibody; NA and interferon-γ secreting cells; IFN-γ-SC), and pathological (lymphoid lesion and PCV2 antigen score within lesion) evaluation. Regardless of which commercial PCV2a vaccine was used, vaccinated animals improved ADWG, and reduced the amount of PCV2b and mPCV2b load in the blood compared to unvaccinated animals. The vaccination of piglets at 3 weeks of age effectively induced higher levels of PCV2b- and mPCV2b-specific NA and IFN-γ-SC compared to unvaccinated animals. A reduction in mPCV2b load in the blood coincided with the appearance of both mPCV2b-specific NA and IFN-γ-SC in the vaccinated animals. The microscopic lymphoid lesions and PCV2-antigen scores within the lymph nodes were significantly lower in vaccinated animals. The perceived vaccine failure could not be explained by incomplete protection of the commercial PCV2a vaccine against mPCV2b. The results of the present study demonstrated that currently available commercial PCV2a vaccines are protective against concurrent PCV2b and mPCV2b infection based on clinical, virological, immunological, and pathological evaluations under field conditions. PMID:25790733

  7. Rapid and Reliable Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Differentiation of Brucella Live Vaccine Strains from Field Strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brucellosis is a major zoonotic disease responsible for substantial social and economic problems, particularly in the developing world. One element that can implemented as part of control programs tackling animal disease is the use of one of the OIE recommended vaccines to protect against either Bru...

  8. Genomic sequence analysis of the United States infectious laryngotracheitis vaccine strains chicken embryo origin (CEO) and tissue culture origin (TCO).

    PubMed

    García, Maricarmen; Volkening, Jeremy; Riblet, Sylva; Spatz, Stephen

    2013-05-25

    The genomic sequences of low and high passages of the United States infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) vaccine strains CEO and TCO were determined using hybrid next generation sequencing in order to define genomic changes associated with attenuation and reversion to virulence. Phylogenetic analysis of available full genomes grouped strains into three major clades: TCO, CEO, and Australian. Comparative genomics revealed that TCO attenuation is likely the result of an ORF C truncation. Genes involved in attenuation are generally clade-specific, however four genes ORF C, UL27, UL28 and UL39 commonly contained various mutations across the CEO and TCO lineages. The Thr644 mutation in the UL27 gene encoding glycoprotein B was identified in all virulent US strains. The US10 gene was identified as a potential virulence factor for the TCO revertant 81658. The UL41 gene was responsible for the robust gain in virulence of CEO-Fowl Laryngotracheitis(®) after 20 passages in chickens. PMID:23537957

  9. Rapid, Sensitive, and Accurate Evaluation of Drug Resistant Mutant (NS5A-Y93H) Strain Frequency in Genotype 1b HCV by Invader Assay.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Satoshi; Ochi, Hidenori; Murakami, Eisuke; Uchida, Takuro; Kan, Hiromi; Akamatsu, Sakura; Hayes, C Nelson; Abe, Hiromi; Miki, Daiki; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Aikata, Hiroshi; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Daclatasvir and asunaprevir dual oral therapy is expected to achieve high sustained virological response (SVR) rates in patients with HCV genotype 1b infection. However, presence of the NS5A-Y93H substitution at baseline has been shown to be an independent predictor of treatment failure for this regimen. By using the Invader assay, we developed a system to rapidly and accurately detect the presence of mutant strains and evaluate the proportion of patients harboring a pre-treatment Y93H mutation. This assay system, consisting of nested PCR followed by Invader reaction with well-designed primers and probes, attained a high overall assay success rate of 98.9% among a total of 702 Japanese HCV genotype 1b patients. Even in serum samples with low HCV titers, more than half of the samples could be successfully assayed. Our assay system showed a better lower detection limit of Y93H proportion than using direct sequencing, and Y93H frequencies obtained by this method correlated well with those of deep-sequencing analysis (r = 0.85, P <0.001). The proportion of the patients with the mutant strain estimated by this assay was 23.6% (164/694). Interestingly, patients with the Y93H mutant strain showed significantly lower ALT levels (p=8.8 x 10-4), higher serum HCV RNA levels (p=4.3 x 10-7), and lower HCC risk (p=6.9 x 10-3) than those with the wild type strain. Because the method is both sensitive and rapid, the NS5A-Y93H mutant strain detection system established in this study may provide important pre-treatment information valuable not only for treatment decisions but also for prediction of disease progression in HCV genotype 1b patients. PMID:26083687

  10. Protective properties of rifampin-resistant rough mutants of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Adone, R; Ciuchini, F; Marianelli, C; Tarantino, M; Pistoia, C; Marcon, G; Petrucci, P; Francia, M; Riccardi, G; Pasquali, P

    2005-07-01

    Vaccination against Brucella infections in animals is usually performed by administration of live attenuated smooth B. abortus strain S19 and B. melitensis strain Rev1. They are proven effective vaccines against B. abortus in cattle and against B. melitensis and B. ovis in sheep and goats, respectively. However, both vaccines have the main drawback of inducing O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies that interfere with serologic diagnosis of disease. In addition, they retain residual virulence, being a cause of abortion in pregnant animals and infection in humans. To overcome these problems, one approach is to develop defined rough mutant Brucella strains lacking O antigen of lipopolysaccharide. B. abortus rough strain RB51, a rifampin-resistant mutant of virulent strain B. abortus 2308, is used as a vaccine against B. abortus infection in cattle in some countries. However, RB51 is not effective in sheep, and there is only preliminary evidence that it is effective in goats. In this study, we tested the efficacies of six rifampin-resistant rough strains of B. melitensis in protecting BALB/c mice exposed to B. melitensis infection. The protective properties, as well as both humoral and cellular immune responses, were assessed in comparison with those provided by B. melitensis Rev1 and B. abortus RB51 vaccines. The results indicated that these rough mutants were able to induce a very good level of protection against B. melitensis infection, similar to that provided by Rev1 and superior to that of RB51, without inducing antibodies to O antigen. In addition, all B. melitensis mutants were able to stimulate good production of gamma interferon. The characteristics of these strains encourage further evaluation of them as alternative vaccines to Rev1 in primary host species. PMID:15972510

  11. Molecular typing of Iranian field isolates Mycoplasma synoviae and their differentiation from the live commercial vaccine strain MS-H using vlhA gene.

    PubMed

    Bayatzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Pourbakhsh, Seyed Ali; Ashtari, Abass; Abtin, Ali Reza; Abdoshah, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    1. The single-copy domain of the N-terminal region of the vlhA gene of Mycoplasma synoviae was sequenced, analysed and verified and used to type Iranian field isolates of M. synoviae and the MS-H live vaccine strain. In addition, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method was developed to differentiate between field isolates of Iranian and MS-H vaccine strains. 2. All sequences were analysed and aligned; the percentage similarity of the DNA was calculated and dendrograms were constructed. Based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that existed in all field isolates in Iran, the PCR-RFLP method allowed the differentiation of all M. synoviae field isolates from the vaccine strain. 3. Using phylogenetic analysis, the isolates were assigned to 8 unique genotypes and, within each group, DNA had a high level of similarity. 4. DNA sequence analysis and PCR-RFLP of the amplicon based on percent similarity and evolutionary relationship appeared to be useful tools for strain differentiation whether M. synoviae clinical isolates from infected chickens were derived from the vaccine strain or wild-type strains. 5. This study confirms the potential value of strain typing for epidemiological purposes and suggests that phylogenetic studies are essential to understand the true relationships between strains. PMID:24405029

  12. Inactivated rabies vaccine produced from the Flury LEP strain of virus grown in BHK-21 suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Chapman, W G; Ramshaw, I A; Crick, J

    1973-12-01

    Suspension cultures of BHK-21 cells maintained at 32 to 33 C were infected with the Flury LEP strain of rabies virus. By using a cell concentration of 2.0 x 10(6) to 2.5 x 10(6) cells per ml infected at a multiplicity of 0.05, high titers of extracellular virus were reached in 96 to 120 h, and potent inactivated vaccines were prepared from culture fluids harvested between 96 to 168 h. The addition of 1% bovine serum to the maintenance medium resulted in an increase in virus yields and vaccine potency. Estimation of the number of infected cells by immunofluorescent procedures proved a rapid and reliable guide to the virus content of suspension cultures. PMID:4588193

  13. EBOLA VACCINE. VSV-EBOV rapidly protects macaques against infection with the 2014/15 Ebola virus outbreak strain.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Robertson, Shelly J; Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike; Hanley, Patrick W; Scott, Dana P; Strong, James E; Kobinger, Gary; Best, Sonja M; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-08-14

    The latest Ebola virus (EBOV) epidemic spread rapidly through Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, creating a global public health crisis and accelerating the assessment of experimental therapeutics and vaccines in clinical trials. One of those vaccines is based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the EBOV glycoprotein (VSV-EBOV), a live-attenuated vector with marked preclinical efficacy. Here, we provide the preclinical proof that VSV-EBOV completely protects macaques against lethal challenge with the West African EBOV-Makona strain. Complete and partial protection was achieved with a single dose given as late as 7 and 3 days before challenge, respectively. This indicates that VSV-EBOV may protect humans against EBOV infections in West Africa with relatively short time to immunity, promoting its use for immediate public health responses. PMID:26249231

  14. Characterization by restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of field and vaccine strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus involved in severe outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Jorge Luis; Mizuma, Matheus Y; Piantino Ferreira, Antonio J

    2010-12-01

    At the end of 2002 and throughout 2003, there was a severe outbreak of infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) in an intensive production area of commercial hens in the Sao Paulo State of Brazil. ILT virus was isolated from 28 flocks, and 21 isolates were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using four genes and eight restriction enzymes, and by partial sequencing of the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) and thymidine kinase (TK) genes. Three groups resulted from the combinations of PCR-RFLP patterns: 19 field isolates formed Group I, and the remaining two isolates together with the chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccine strains formed Group II. Group III comprised the tissue-culture origin (TCO) vaccine strain by itself. The PCR-RFLP results agreed with the sequencing results of two ICP4 gene fragments. The ICP4 gene sequence analysis showed that the 19 field isolates classified into Group I by RFLP-PCR were identical among themselves, but were different to the TCO and CEO vaccines. The two Group II isolates could not be distinguished from one of the CEO vaccines. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence analyses discriminated between the Brazilian and non-Brazilian isolates, as well as between the TCO and CEO vaccines. Sequence analysis of the TK gene enabled classification of the field isolates (Group I) as virulent and non-vaccine. This work shows that the severe ILT outbreak was caused by a highly virulent, non-vaccine strain. PMID:21154050

  15. Co-transmission of the non-transmissible South African Babesia bovis S24 vaccine strain during mixed infection with a field isolate.

    PubMed

    Combrink, M P; Troskie, P C; de Klerk, D G; Pienaar, R; Latif, A A; Mans, B J

    2015-03-01

    The South African Babesia bovis live blood vaccine, originating from a field isolate attenuated by 23 serial syringe passages in splenectomized calves, has lost the ability to infect the natural vector Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. In this study, infection with mixed parasites from the vaccine strain and a field isolate, resulted in transmission of both genotype populations. Comparing the field isolate and transmitted combination indicated no significant difference in their virulence, while challenge of vaccinated cattle with these isolates showed the ability of the vaccine to protect against both. Limiting dilution of the transmitted combination, followed by infection of splenectomized cattle (n=34) yielded no single infections for the vaccine strain genotype, seven clonal lines of the field isolate and one mixture of vaccine strain and field isolate. Only one of two field isolate clonal lines selected for vector transmission study was transmitted. Showing that B. bovis isolates can contain both tick transmissible and non-transmissible subpopulations. The findings of this study also indicate the probability of vaccine co-infection transmission occurring in the field, which may result in new genotype populations of B. bovis. However, the impact of this recombination with field isolates is considered negligible since a genotypically diverse population of B. bovis is already present in South Africa. PMID:25544307

  16. Effects of 6/85-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccination Alone at Ten Weeks of Age or in Conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays at 22 or 45 Weeks of Age on the Reproductive and Digestive....Hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay 6/85-strain M. gallisepticum (6/85MG) vaccination alone or in conjunction with time specific F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays on the gross reproductive and digestive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens...

  17. Effects of Time Specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays on Prelay ts-11-strain M. gallisepticum Vaccination on Digestive and Reproductive Organ Characteristics of Commercial Egg-Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay ts11-strain M. gallisepticum (ts11MG) vaccination alone or in conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays at 2 different age periods during lay on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commerci...

  18. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the novobiocin and rifampicin resistant Aeromonas hydrophila vaccine strain AL09-71 N+R compared to its virulent parent strain AL90-71

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the fitness cost of novobiocin- and rifampicin- resistance in an attenuated Aeromonas hydrophiila vaccine strain AL09-71 N+R compared to its virulent parent strain AL09-71, colony size, cell size, cell proliferation rate, chemotactic response, and the ability to invade catfish gill cel...

  19. Identification of gyrB and rpoB gene mutations and differentially expressed proteins between a novobiocin-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila catfish vaccine strain and its virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence comparison between the full-length 2412 bp DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB) gene of a novobiocin resistant Aeromonas hydrophila AH11NOVO vaccine strain and that of its virulent parent strain AH11P revealed 10 missense mutations. Similarly, sequence comparison between the full-length 4092 bp RNA ...

  20. Protection induced by a glycoprotein E-deleted bovine herpesvirus type 1 marker strain used either as an inactivated or live attenuated vaccine in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) is the causative agent of respiratory and genital tract infections; causing a high economic loss in all continents. Use of marker vaccines in IBR eradication programs is widely accepted since it allows for protection of the animals against the disease while adding the possibility of differentiating vaccinated from infected animals. The aim of the present study was the development and evaluation of safety and efficacy of a glycoprotein E-deleted (gE-) BoHV-1 marker vaccine strain (BoHV-1ΔgEβgal) generated by homologous recombination, replacing the viral gE gene with the β-galactosidase (βgal) gene. Results In vitro growth kinetics of the BoHV-1ΔgEβgal virus was similar to BoHV-1 LA. The immune response triggered by the new recombinant strain in cattle was characterized both as live attenuated vaccine (LAV) and as an inactivated vaccine. BoHV-1ΔgEβgal was highly immunogenic in both formulations, inducing specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Antibody titers found in animals vaccinated with the inactivated vaccine based on BoHV-1ΔgEβgal was similar to the titers found for the control vaccine (BoHV-1 LA). In the same way, titers of inactivated vaccine groups were significantly higher than any of the LAV immunized groups, independently of the inoculation route (p < 0.001). Levels of IFN-γ were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in those animals that received the LAV compared to those that received the inactivated vaccine. BoHV-1ΔgEβgal exhibited an evident attenuation when administered as a LAV; no virus was detected in nasal secretions of vaccinated or sentinel animals during the post-vaccination period. BoHV-1ΔgEβgal, when used in either formulation, elicited an efficient immune response that protected animals against challenge with virulent wild-type BoHV-1. Also, the deletion of the gE gene served as an immunological marker to differentiate vaccinated animals from infected animals. All