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Sample records for mutsa dna lesion

  1. DNA lesions: A thermodynamic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, G.E.; Breslauer, K.J.

    1994-12-31

    The studies described in this paper are part of an overall program project entitled {open_quotes}The Chemistry and Biology of Exocyclic DNA Adducts and Oxidative DNA Damage.{close_quotes}. Initially, all the project leaders discuss and agree on biologically interesting lesions to target for study. Then begins the process of developing the chemistry required to synthesize modified nucleosides that either correspond to or model the damage sites of interest. Such modified nucleotides then are incorporated into oligonucleotides that are hybridized to their complements, thereby forming lesion-containing duplex structures. In any given duplex, the identity of the lesion-opposing nucleoside on the complementary strand is systematically altered, thereby allowing us to evaluate the impact on duplex properties of the identity of the base opposite the lesion. For comparative purposes, the undamaged parent Watson-Crick duplex also is synthesized. Such families of DNA duplexes are then sent for independent physiochemical characterizations. Armed with an extensive body of biophysical data, one then searches for correlations between the physiochemical influences of the lesions on duplex properties and the biological consequences of each lesion. At this stage, our approach is highly empirical. Ultimately, we hope that our studies will reveal correlations between physiochemical properties and biological consequences such that we will develop predictive powers and gain insight into the mechanisms of recognition, repair, and mutagenesis.

  2. Surviving the sun: Repair and bypass of DNA UV lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Structural studies of UV-induced lesions and their complexes with repair proteins reveal an intrinsic flexibility of DNA at lesion sites. Reduced DNA rigidity stems primarily from the loss of base stacking, which may manifest as bending, unwinding, base unstacking, or flipping out. The intrinsic flexibility at UV lesions allows efficient initial lesion recognition within a pool of millions to billions of normal DNA base pairs. To bypass the damaged site by translesion synthesis, the specialized DNA polymerase η acts like a molecular “splint” and reinforces B-form DNA by numerous protein–phosphate interactions. Photolyases and glycosylases that specifically repair UV lesions interact directly with UV lesions in bent DNA via surface complementation. UvrA and UvrB, which recognize a variety of lesions in the bacterial nucleotide excision repair pathway, appear to exploit hysteresis exhibited by DNA lesions and conduct an ATP-dependent stress test to distort and separate DNA strands. Similar stress tests are likely conducted in eukaryotic nucleotide excision repair. PMID:21898645

  3. Biochemical reconstitution of abasic DNA lesion replication in Xenopus extracts

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shuren; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Yan, Hong

    2007-01-01

    Cellular DNA is under constant attack from numerous exogenous and endogenous agents. The resulting DNA lesions, if not repaired timely, could stall DNA replication, leading to genome instability. To better understand the mechanism of DNA lesion replication at the biochemical level, we have attempted to reconstitute this process in Xenopus egg extracts, the only eukaryotic in vitro system that relies solely on cellular proteins for DNA replication. By using a plasmid DNA that carries a site-specific apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) lesion as template, we have found that DNA replication is stalled one nucleotide before the lesion. The stalling is temporary and the lesion is eventually replicated by both an error-prone mechanism and an error-free mechanism. This is the first biochemical system that recapitulates efficiently and faithfully all major aspects of DNA lesion replication. It has provided the first direct evidence for the existence of an error-free lesion replication mechanism and also demonstrated that the error-prone mechanism is a major contributor to lesion replication. PMID:17702761

  4. Repair of DNA lesions associated with triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Chin, Joanna Y; Glazer, Peter M

    2009-04-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are gene targeting tools that can bind in the major groove of duplex DNA in a sequence-specific manner. When bound to DNA, TFOs can inhibit gene expression, can position DNA-reactive agents to specific locations in the genome, or can induce targeted mutagenesis and recombination. There is evidence that third strand binding, alone or with an associated cross-link, is recognized and metabolized by DNA repair factors, particularly the nucleotide excision repair pathway. This review examines the evidence for DNA repair of triplex-associated lesions. PMID:19072762

  5. CANCER BIOMARKERS IN HUMAN ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESIONS: DETECTION OF DNA ADDUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since somatic mutations are suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis not only of cancer but also of atherosclerotic plaques, we measured DNA adducts in the smooth muscle layer of atherosclerotic lesions in abnormal aorta specimens taken at surgery from seven patients. NA adduc...

  6. Human DNA Polymerase Kappa Encircles DNA: Implicatins for Mismatch Extension and Lesion Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Lone,S.; Townson, S.; Uljon, S.; Johnson, R.; Brahma, A.; Nair, D.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Aggarwal, A.

    2007-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase (Pol ) is a proficient extender of mispaired primer termini on undamaged DNAs and is implicated in the extension step of lesion bypass. We present here the structure of Pol catalytic core in ternary complex with DNA and an incoming nucleotide. The structure reveals encirclement of the DNA by a unique 'N-clasp' at the N terminus of Pol , which augments the conventional right-handed grip on the DNA by the palm, fingers, and thumb domains and the PAD and provides additional thermodynamic stability. The structure also reveals an active-site cleft that is constrained by the close apposition of the N-clasp and the fingers domain, and therefore can accommodate only a single Watson-Crick base pair. Together, DNA encirclement and other structural features help explain Pol 's ability to extend mismatches and to promote replication through various minor groove DNA lesions, by extending from the nucleotide incorporated opposite the lesion by another polymerase.

  7. Transcription bypass of DNA lesions enhances cell survival but attenuates transcription coupled DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Selvam, Kathiresan; Ko, Tengyu; Li, Shisheng

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) dedicated to rapid removal of DNA lesions in the transcribed strand of actively transcribed genes. The precise nature of the TCR signal and how the repair machinery gains access to lesions imbedded in stalled RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) complexes in eukaryotic cells are still enigmatic. RNAP II has an intrinsic capacity for transcription bypass of DNA lesions by incorporation or misincorporation of nucleotides across the lesions. It has been suggested that transcription bypass of lesions, which exposes the lesions, may be required for TCR. Here, we show that E1103G mutation of Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNAP II, which promotes transcription bypass of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), increases survival of UV irradiated yeast cells but attenuates TCR. The increased cell survival is independent of any NER subpathways. In contrast, G730D mutation of Rpb1, which impairs transcription bypass of CPDs, enhances TCR. Our results suggest that transcription bypass of lesions attenuates TCR but enhances cell tolerance to DNA lesions. Efficient stalling of RNAP II is essential for efficient TCR. PMID:25389266

  8. Replication across Regioisomeric Ethylated Thymidine Lesions by Purified DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nisana; Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Causal links exist between smoking cigarettes and cancer development. Some genotoxic agents in cigarette smoke are capable of alkylating nucleobases in DNA and higher levels of ethylated DNA lesions were observed in smokers than non-smokers. In this study, we examined comprehensively how the regioisomeric O2-, N3- and O4-ethylthymidine (O2-, N3- and O4-EtdT) perturb DNA replication mediated by purified human DNA polymerases (hPol) η, κ, and ι, yeast DNA polymerase ζ (yPol ζ), and the exonuclease-free Klenow fragment (Kf−) of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Our results showed that hPol η and Kf− could bypass all three lesions and generate full-length replication products, whereas hPol ι stalled after inserting a single nucleotide opposite the lesions. Bypass carried out by hPol κ and yPol ζ differed markedly amongst the three lesions: Consistent with its known capability in bypassing efficiently the minor-groove N2-substituted 2′-deoxyguanosine lesions, hPol κ was able to bypass O2-EtdT, though it experienced great difficulty in bypassing N3-EtdT and O4-EtdT; yPol ζ was only modestly blocked by O4-EtdT, but the polymerase was highly hindered by O2-EtdT and N3-EtdT. LC-MS/MS analysis of the replication products revealed that DNA synthesis opposite O4-EtdT was highly error-prone, with dGMP being preferentially inserted, while the presence of O2-EtdT and N3-EtdT in template DNA directed substantial frequencies of misincorporation of dGMP and, for hPol ι and Kf−, dTMP. Thus, our results suggested that O2-EtdT and N3-EtdT may also contribute to the AT→TA and AT→GC mutations observed in cells and tissues of animals exposed to ethylating agents. PMID:24134187

  9. Increased Sensitivity of DNA Damage Response-Deficient Cells to Stimulated Microgravity-Induced DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; An, Lili; Hang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG). In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES) and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR) defects. PMID:25915950

  10. Dynamic DNA binding licenses a repair factor to bypass roadblocks in search of DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Maxwell W.; Kim, Yoori; Williams, Gregory M.; Huck, John D.; Surtees, Jennifer A.; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins search for specific targets via facilitated diffusion along a crowded genome. However, little is known about how crowded DNA modulates facilitated diffusion and target recognition. Here we use DNA curtains and single-molecule fluorescence imaging to investigate how Msh2–Msh3, a eukaryotic mismatch repair complex, navigates on crowded DNA. Msh2–Msh3 hops over nucleosomes and other protein roadblocks, but maintains sufficient contact with DNA to recognize a single lesion. In contrast, Msh2–Msh6 slides without hopping and is largely blocked by protein roadblocks. Remarkably, the Msh3-specific mispair-binding domain (MBD) licences a chimeric Msh2–Msh6(3MBD) to bypass nucleosomes. Our studies contrast how Msh2–Msh3 and Msh2–Msh6 navigate on a crowded genome and suggest how Msh2–Msh3 locates DNA lesions outside of replication-coupled repair. These results also provide insights into how DNA repair factors search for DNA lesions in the context of chromatin. PMID:26837705

  11. The (6-4) Dimeric Lesion as a DNA Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Vendrell-Criado, Victoria; Rodríguez-Muñiz, Gemma M; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-07-01

    Based on our previous investigations into the photophysical properties of the 5-methyl-2-pyrimidone (Pyo) chromophore, we now extend our studies to the photobehavior of the dimeric (6-4) thymine photoproducts (6-4 PP) to evaluate their capability to act as instrinsic DNA photosensitizers. The lesion presents significant absorption in the UVB/UVA region, weak fluorescence emission, a singlet-excited-state energy of approximately 351 kJ mol(-1) , and a triplet-excited-state energy of 297 kJ mol(-1) . Its triplet transient absorption has a maximum at 420-440 nm, a lifetime of around 7 μs, and a high formation quantum yield, ΦISC =0.86. This species is efficiently quenched by thymidine. Its DNA photosensitizing properties are demonstrated by a series of experiments run on a pBR322 plasmid. The lesion photoinduces both single-strand breaks and the formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers. Altogether, these results show that, the substitution of the pyrimidone ring at C4 by a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine does not cancel out the photosensitization properties of the chromophore. PMID:26990589

  12. When DNA repair goes wrong: BER-generated DNA-protein crosslinks to oxidative lesions.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Jason Luis; Demple, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Free radicals generate an array of DNA lesions affecting all parts of the molecule. The damage to deoxyribose receives less attention than base damage, even though the former accounts for ∼20% of the total. Oxidative deoxyribose fragments (e.g., 3'-phosphoglycolate esters) are removed by the Ape1 AP endonuclease and other enzymes in mammalian cells to enable DNA repair synthesis. Oxidized abasic sites are initially incised by Ape1, thus recruiting these lesions into base excision repair (BER) pathways. Lesions such as 2-deoxypentos-4-ulose can be removed by conventional (single-nucleotide) BER, which proceeds through a covalent Schiff base intermediate with DNA polymerase β (Polβ) that is resolved by hydrolysis. In contrast, the lesion 2-deoxyribonolactone (dL) must be processed by multinucleotide ("long-patch") BER: attempted repair via the single-nucleotide pathway leads to a dead-end, covalent complex with Polβ cross- linked to the DNA by an amide bond. We recently detected these stable DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) between Polβ and dL in intact cells. The features of the DPC formation in vivo are exactly in keeping with the mechanistic properties seen in vitro: Polβ-DPC are formed by oxidative agents in line with their ability to form the dL lesion; they are not formed by non-oxidative agents; DPC formation absolutely requires the active-site lysine-72 that attacks the 5'-deoxyribose; and DPC formation depends on Ape1 to incise the dL lesion first. The Polβ-DPC are rapidly processed in vivo, the signal disappearing with a half-life of 15-30min in both mouse and human cells. This removal is blocked by inhibiting the proteasome, which leads to the accumulation of ubiquitin associated with the Polβ-DPC. While other proteins (e.g., topoisomerases) also form DPC under these conditions, 60-70% of the trapped ubiquitin depends on Polβ. The mechanism of ubiquitin targeting to Polβ-DPC, the subsequent processing of the expected 5'-peptidyl-dL, and the

  13. Quantification of 8-oxodGuo lesions in double-stranded DNA using a photoelectrochemical DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bintian; Guo, Liang-Hong; Greenberg, Marc M

    2012-07-17

    Exposure of DNA to oxidative stress conditions results in the generation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). 8-OxodGuo is genotoxic if left unrepaired. We quantified 8-oxodGuo lesions in double-stranded DNA films by using a photoelectrochemical DNA sensor in conjunction with a specific covalent labeling method. A lesion-containing DNA film was assembled on a SnO(2) nanoparticle modified indium tin oxide electrode through layer-by-layer electrostatic adsorption. The lesions were covalently labeled with a biotin conjugated spermine derivative, and ruthenium tris(bipyridine) labeled streptavidin was introduced as the signal reporter molecule. Photocurrent increased with the number of lesions in the strand and decreased as the film was diluted with intact DNA. Quantification of 8-oxodGuo was achieved with an estimated detection limit of ∼1 lesion in 650 bases or 1.6 fmol of 8-oxodGuo on the electrode. Incubation of the film with a DNA base excision repair enzyme, E. coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), resulted in complete loss of the signal, indicating efficient excision of the isolated lesions in the nucleotide. Oxidatively generated DNA damage to a double-stranded calf thymus DNA film by the Fenton reaction was then assessed. One 8-oxodGuo lesion in 520 bases was detected in DNA exposed to 50 μM Fe(2+)/200 μM H(2)O(2). Treatment with Fpg reduced the photocurrent by 50%, indicating only partial excision of 8-oxodGuo. This suggests that tandem lesions, which are resistant to Fpg excision, are generated by the Fenton reaction. Unlike repair enzyme dependent methods, the sensor recognizes 8-oxodGuo in tandem lesions and can avoid underestimating DNA damage. PMID:22746252

  14. Lesion search and recognition by thymine DNA glycosylase revealed by single molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Claudia N; Maiti, Atanu; Drohat, Alexander C; Tessmer, Ingrid

    2015-03-11

    The ability of DNA glycosylases to rapidly and efficiently detect lesions among a vast excess of nondamaged DNA bases is vitally important in base excision repair (BER). Here, we use single molecule imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) supported by a 2-aminopurine fluorescence base flipping assay to study damage search by human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG), which initiates BER of mutagenic and cytotoxic G:T and G:U mispairs in DNA. Our data reveal an equilibrium between two conformational states of hTDG-DNA complexes, assigned as search complex (SC) and interrogation complex (IC), both at target lesions and undamaged DNA sites. Notably, for both hTDG and a second glycosylase, hOGG1, which recognizes structurally different 8-oxoguanine lesions, the conformation of the DNA in the SC mirrors innate structural properties of their respective target sites. In the IC, the DNA is sharply bent, as seen in crystal structures of hTDG lesion recognition complexes, which likely supports the base flipping required for lesion identification. Our results support a potentially general concept of sculpting of glycosylases to their targets, allowing them to exploit the energetic cost of DNA bending for initial lesion sensing, coupled with continuous (extrahelical) base interrogation during lesion search by DNA glycosylases. PMID:25712093

  15. Integrating S-phase Checkpoint Signaling with Trans-Lesion Synthesis of Bulky DNA Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Barkley, Laura R.; Ohmori, Haruo; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Bulky adducts are DNA lesions generated in response to environmental agents including benzo[a]pyrene (a combustion product) and solar ultraviolet radiation. Error-prone replication of adducted DNA can cause mutations, which may result in cancer. To minimize the detrimental effects of bulky adducts and other DNA lesions, S-phase checkpoint mechanisms sense DNA damage and integrate DNA repair with ongoing DNA replication. The essential protein kinase Chk1 mediates the S-phase checkpoint, inhibiting initiation of new DNA synthesis and promoting stabilization and recovery of stalled replication forks. Here we review the mechanisms by which Chk1 is activated in response to bulky adducts and potential mechanisms by which Chk1 signaling inhibits the initiation stage of DNA synthesis. Additionally, we discuss mechanisms by which Chk1 signaling facilitates bypass of bulky lesions by specialized Y-family DNA polymerases, thereby attenuating checkpoint signaling and allowing resumption of normal cell cycle progression. PMID:17652783

  16. Identification of DNA lesions using a third base pair for amplification and nanopore sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Jan; Ding, Yun; Fleming, Aaron M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the genome is implicated in the progression of cancer and stress-induced diseases. DNA lesions exist in low levels, and cannot be amplified by standard PCR because they are frequently strong blocks to polymerases. Here, we describe a method for PCR amplification of lesion-containing DNA in which the site and identity could be marked, copied and sequenced. Critical for this method is installation of either the dNaM or d5SICS nucleotides at the lesion site after processing via the base excision repair process. These marker nucleotides constitute an unnatural base pair, allowing large quantities of marked DNA to be made by PCR amplification. Sanger sequencing confirms the potential for this method to locate lesions by marking, amplifying and sequencing a lesion in the KRAS gene. Detection using the α-hemolysin nanopore is also developed to analyse the markers in individual DNA strands with the potential to identify multiple lesions per strand. PMID:26542210

  17. A novel in vitro assay to study the mechanism by which DNA polymerases bypass blocking lesions to DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    We devised a simple gel assay to measure insertion kinetics for any dNTP substrate opposite a target site. Our ability to synthesize an abasic lesion and place it at a single site in synthetic oligonucleotides allows for an in vitro analysis of the mechanism by which DNA polymerases bypass blocking lesions to DNA replication and to identify E. coli polymerases and accessory proteins that allow for insertion and bypass of such lesions. Using this assay we examine the preferred insertion of dATP by Drosophila DNA polymerase {alpha} opposite the abasic lesion compared to dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP for all different nearest-neighbors. The preferred insertion of dATP is governed by a V{sub max} discrimination little affected by nearest-neighbors. A DNA polymerase activity was purified from E coli, deleted for DNA polymerase I, that appears to be part of the SOS response of E. coli since it cannot be induced in lexA(Ind{sup {minus}}) strains. This inducible polymerase is DNA polymerase II. In contrast to DNA polymerase III, DNA polymerase II efficiently incorporates nucleotides opposite the abasic lesion and continues DNA synthesis. We addressed the role of E. coli DNA polymerase I targeted SOS mutagenesis.

  18. The structure of an authentic spore photoproduct lesion in DNA suggests a basis for recognition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Isha; Jian, Yajun; Lian, Yajun; Li, Lei; Georgiadis, Millie M

    2014-03-01

    The spore photoproduct lesion (SP; 5-thymine-5,6-dihydrothymine) is the dominant photoproduct found in UV-irradiated spores of some bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis. Upon spore germination, this lesion is repaired in a light-independent manner by a specific repair enzyme: the spore photoproduct lyase (SP lyase). In this work, a host-guest approach in which the N-terminal fragment of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (MMLV RT) serves as the host and DNA as the guest was used to determine the crystal structures of complexes including 16 bp oligonucleotides with and without the SP lesion at 2.14 and 1.72 Å resolution, respectively. In contrast to other types of thymine-thymine lesions, the SP lesion retains normal Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding to the adenine bases of the complementary strand, with shorter hydrogen bonds than found in the structure of the undamaged DNA. However, the lesion induces structural changes in the local conformation of what is otherwise B-form DNA. The region surrounding the lesion differs significantly in helical form from B-DNA, and the minor groove is widened by almost 3 Å compared with that of the undamaged DNA. Thus, these unusual structural features associated with SP lesions may provide a basis for recognition by the SP lyase. PMID:24598744

  19. DNA Damage by Ionizing Radiation: Tandem Double Lesions by Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Wang, Dunyou; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation are the source of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, damage to the central nervous system, lowering of the immune response, as well as other radiation-induced damages to human health. Monte Carlo track simulations and kinetic modeling of radiation damages to the DNA employ available molecular and cellular data to simulate the biological effect of high and low LET radiation io the DNA. While the simulations predict single and double strand breaks and base damages, so far all complex lesions are the result of stochastic coincidence from independent processes. Tandem double lesions have not yet been taken into account. Unlike the standard double lesions that are produced by two separate attacks by charged particles or radicals, tandem double lesions are produced by one single attack. The standard double lesions dominate at the high dosage regime. On the other hand, tandem double lesions do not depend on stochastic coincidences and become important at the low dosage regime of particular interest to NASA. Tandem double lesions by hydroxyl radical attack of guanine in isolated DNA have been reported at a dosage of radiation as low as 10 Gy. The formation of two tandem base lesions was found to be linear with the applied doses, a characteristic of tandem lesions. However, tandem double lesions from attack by a charged particle have not been reported.

  20. DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to persistence of oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Peddi, Prakash; Loftin, Charles W.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Hair, Jessica M.; Burns, Kara J.; Aziz, Khaled; Francisco, Dave C.; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Sedelnikova, Olga A.; Bonner, William M.; Winters, Thomas A.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2010-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase involved in various DNA metabolic and damage signaling pathways contributing to the maintenance of genomic stability and prevention of cancer. In order to examine the role of DNA-PK in processing of non-DSB clustered DNA damage, we have used three different models of DNA-PK deficiency i.e. chemical inactivation of its kinase activity by novel inhibitors IC86621 and NU7026, knock-down and complete absence of the protein in human breast cancer (MCF-7) and glioblastoma cell lines (MO59-J/K). Compromised DNA-PK repair pathway has lead to accumulation of clustered DNA lesions induced by γ-rays. Tumor cells lacking protein expression or with inhibited kinase activity showed a marked decrease in their ability to process oxidatively-induced non-DSB clustered DNA lesions measured using a modified version of pulsed field gel electrophoresis or single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). In all cases, DNA-PK inactivation lead to a higher level of lesion persistence even after 24–72 hrs of repair. We suggest a model in which DNA-PK deficiency affects the processing of these clusters by first compromising base excision repair and second by the presence of catalytically inactive DNA-PK inhibiting the efficient processing of these lesions due to the failure of DNA-PK to disassociate from the DNA ends. The information rendered will be important not only for understating cancer etiology in the presence of a NHEJ deficiency but also lead to a better understanding of cancer treatments based on the induction of oxidative stress and inhibition of cluster repair. PMID:20193758

  1. In Vitro Lesion Bypass Studies of O(4)-Alkylthymidines with Human DNA Polymerase η.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nicole L; Wang, Pengcheng; Wu, Jiabin; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-04-18

    Environmental exposure and endogenous metabolism can give rise to DNA alkylation. Among alkylated nucleosides, O(4)-alkylthymidine (O(4)-alkyldT) lesions are poorly repaired in mammalian systems and may compromise the efficiency and fidelity of cellular DNA replication. To cope with replication-stalling DNA lesions, cells are equipped with translesion synthesis DNA polymerases that are capable of bypassing various DNA lesions. In this study, we assessed human DNA polymerase η (Pol η)-mediated bypass of various O(4)-alkyldT lesions, with the alkyl group being Me, Et, nPr, iPr, nBu, iBu, (R)-sBu, or (S)-sBu, in template DNA by conducting primer extension and steady-state kinetic assays. Our primer extension assay results revealed that human Pol η, but not human polymerases κ and ι or yeast polymerase ζ, was capable of bypassing all O(4)-alkyldT lesions and extending the primer to generate full-length replication products. Data from steady-state kinetic measurements showed that Pol η preferentially misincorporated dGMP opposite O(4)-alkyldT lesions with a straight-chain alkyl group. The nucleotide misincorporation opposite most lesions with a branched-chain alkyl group was, however, not selective, where dCMP, dGMP, and dTMP were inserted at similar efficiencies opposite O(4)-iPrdT, O(4)-iBudT, and O(4)-(R)-sBudT. These results provide important knowledge about the effects of the length and structure of the alkyl group in O(4)-alkyldT lesions on the fidelity and efficiency of DNA replication mediated by human Pol η. PMID:27002924

  2. Structure of a DNA glycosylase searching for lesions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anirban; Santos, Webster L; Verdine, Gregory L

    2006-02-24

    DNA glycosylases must interrogate millions of base pairs of undamaged DNA in order to locate and then excise one damaged nucleobase. The nature of this search process remains poorly understood. Here we report the use of disulfide cross-linking (DXL) technology to obtain structures of a bacterial DNA glycosylase, MutM, interrogating undamaged DNA. These structures, solved to 2.0 angstrom resolution, reveal the nature of the search process: The protein inserts a probe residue into the helical stack and severely buckles the target base pair, which remains intrahelical. MutM therefore actively interrogates the intact DNA helix while searching for damage. PMID:16497933

  3. In vitro packaging of phage DNA with defined lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.; Hays, J.B.

    1986-05-01

    In vitro packaging of undamaged phage lambda DNA at efficiencies in excess of 2% has been routinely achieved using slightly modified standard techniques. In order to test the ability of nicks and gaps to stimulate genetic recombination during homoimmune and lytic infections, DNA was randomly nicked by treatment with methidium-propyl-EDTA-Fe(II) (MPE), and the nicks expanded to gaps with exonuclease III. DNA with about 15 MPE nicks per lambda duplex or the same number of 30-nucleotide gaps was packaged with slightly reduced efficiency. Surprisingly, DNA irradiated at 254 nm, containing 50 cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers per lambda duplex (plus other photoproducts) was packaged as efficiently as unirradiated DNA. Thus, phage containing only minor 254 nm photoproducts can be prepared efficiently by irradiation, enzymatic photoreactivation, and packaging.

  4. Klenow Fragment Discriminates against the Incorporation of the Hyperoxidized dGTP Lesion Spiroiminodihydantoin into DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji; Yennie, Craig J; Delaney, Sarah

    2015-12-21

    Defining the biological consequences of oxidative DNA damage remains an important and ongoing area of investigation. At the foundation of understanding the repercussions of such damage is a molecular-level description of the action of DNA-processing enzymes, such as polymerases. In this work, we focus on a secondary, or hyperoxidized, oxidative lesion of dG that is formed by oxidation of the primary oxidative lesion, 2'-deoxy-8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxodG). In particular, we examine incorporation into DNA of the diastereomers of the hyperoxidized guanosine triphosphate lesion spiroiminodihydantoin-2'-deoxynucleoside-5'-triphosphate (dSpTP). Using kinetic parameters, we describe the ability of the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I lacking 3' → 5' exonuclease activity (KF(-)) to utilize (S)-dSpTP and (R)-dSpTP as building blocks during replication. We find that both diastereomers act as covert lesions, similar to a Trojan horse: KF(-) incorporates the lesion dNTP opposite dC, which is a nonmutagenic event; however, during the subsequent replication, it is known that dSp is nearly 100% mutagenic. Nevertheless, using kpol/Kd to define the nucleotide incorporation specificity, we find that the extent of oxidation of the dGTP-derived lesion correlates with its ability to be incorporated into DNA. KF(-) has the highest specificity for incorporation of dGTP opposite dC. The selection factors for incorporating 8-oxodGTP, (S)-dSpTP, and (R)-dSpTP are 1700-, 64000-, and 850000-fold lower, respectively. Thus, KF(-) is rigorous in its discrimination against incorporation of the hyperoxidized lesion, and these results suggest that the specificity of cellular polymerases provides an effective mechanism to avoid incorporating dSpTP lesions into DNA from the nucleotide pool. PMID:26572218

  5. Generation and Repair of AID-initiated DNA Lesions in B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangguo; Wang, Jing H.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates the secondary antibody diversification process in B lymphocytes. In mammalian B cells, this process includes somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), both of which require AID. AID induces U:G mismatch lesions in DNA that are subsequently converted into point mutations or DNA double stranded breaks during SHM/CSR. In a physiological context, AID targets immunoglobulin (Ig) loci to mediate SHM/CSR. However, recent studies reveal genome-wide access of AID to numerous non-Ig loci. Thus, AID poses a threat to the genome of B cells if AID-initiated DNA lesions cannot be properly repaired. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the specificity of AID targeting and the repair pathways responsible for processing AID-initiated DNA lesions. PMID:24748462

  6. Isolated and clustered DNA lesions induced by high-energy iron and carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, H.; Tanaka, R.; Nakaarai, Y.; Terato, H.; Furusawa, Y.

    During space flight astronauts are exposed to various types of radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays, the latter of which contain high-energy charged particles such as Fe and C ions. The radiation risk to astronauts toward such high-energy charged particles has been assessed by ground-based experiments. When irradiated by ionizing radiation, DNA molecules suffer from oxidation of bases and strand breaks. The distribution of these lesions along the DNA strand may differ significantly between densely ionizing high-energy Fe and C ions and sparsely ionizing radiation like 60Co gamma-rays. Among various types of DNA damage, bistranded clustered lesions comprised of multiple oxidized bases or strand breaks on opposite strands within a few helical turns are of particular interest since they are assumed to be resistant to repair or induce faulty repair, hence resulting in cell killing and mutations. In the present study, we have analyzed isolated and clustered DNA lesions generated by high-energy Fe and C ions to elucidate the nature of DNA lesions. Plasmid DNA (pDEL19) was irradiated in 10 mM Tris buffer (pH 7.5) by Fe (500 MeV/amu) and C (290 MeV/amu) ions and 60Co gamma-rays. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by analysis of conformational changes using agarose gel electrophoresis. For quantification of isolated and bistranded clustered base lesions, irradiated plasmid was exhaustively digested prior to agarose gel analysis by Endo III and Fpg that preferentially incise DNA at oxidative pyrimidine and purine lesions, respectively. The yield (site/Gy/nucleotide) of isolated damages (SSB and bases lesions) tended to decrease with increasing LET [gamma (0.2 keV/μ m) < C (13 keV/μ m) < Fe (200 keV/μ m)]. The yield of DSB was decreased similarly, but that of clustered base lesions was virtually constant. As a result, the spectra of clustered damage changed in an LET-dependent manner: the fraction of clustered base lesions in

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Solution Structure of DNA Featuring Clustered 2'-Deoxyribonolactone and 8-Oxoguanine Lesions.

    PubMed

    Zálešák, Jan; Constant, Jean-François; Jourdan, Muriel

    2016-07-19

    Ionizing radiation, free radicals, and reactive oxygen species produce hundreds of different DNA lesions. Clustered lesions are typical for ionizing radiation. They compromise the efficiency of the base excision repair (BER) pathway, and as a consequence, they are much more toxic and mutagenic than isolated lesions. Despite their biological relevance, e.g., in cancer radiotherapy and accidental exposure, they are not very well studied from a structural point of view, and while insights provided by structural studies contribute to the understanding of the repair process, only three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of DNA containing clusters of lesions were reported. Herein, we report the first NMR solution structure of two DNAs containing a bistranded cluster with the 2'-deoxyribonolactone and 8-oxoguanine lesions. Both DNA duplexes feature a 2'-deoxyribonolactone site in the middle of the sequence of one strand and differ by the relative position of the 8-oxoguanine, staggered 3' or 5' side on the complementary strand at a three-nucleotide distance. Depending on its relative position, the repair of the 8-oxoguanine lesion by the base excision repair protein Fpg is either almost complete or inhibited. We found that the structures of the two DNAs containing a bistranded cluster of two lesions are similar and do not deviate very much from the standard B-form. As no obvious structural deformations were observed between the two duplexes, we concluded that the differences in Fpg activity are not due to differences in their global conformation. PMID:27322640

  8. Crystal Structure of a Replicative DNA Polymerase Bound to the Oxidized Guanine Lesion Guanidinohydantoin

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Pierre; Ye, Yu; Wallace, Susan S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Doubli, Sylvie

    2010-04-12

    The oxidation of guanine generates one of the most common DNA lesions, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). The further oxidation of 8-oxoG can produce either guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in duplex DNA or spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) in nucleosides and ssDNA. Although Gh can be a strong block for replicative DNA polymerases such as RB69 DNA polymerase, this lesion is also mutagenic: DNA polymerases bypass Gh by preferentially incorporating a purine with a slight preference for adenine, which results in G {center_dot} C {yields} T {center_dot} A or G {center_dot} C {yields} C {center_dot} G transversions. The 2.15 {angstrom} crystal structure of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with DNA containing Gh reveals that Gh is extrahelical and rotated toward the major groove. In this conformation Gh is no longer in position to serve as a templating base for the incorporation of an incoming nucleotide. This work also constitutes the first crystallographic structure of Gh, which is stabilized in the R configuration in the two polymerase/DNA complexes present in the crystal asymmetric unit. In contrast to 8-oxoG, Gh is found in a high syn conformation in the DNA duplex and therefore presents the same hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pattern as thymine, which explains the propensity of DNA polymerases to incorporate a purine opposite Gh when bypass occurs.

  9. Kinetics of Mismatch Formation opposite Lesions by the Replicative DNA Polymerase from Bacteriophage RB69

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, Matthew; Rudnicki, Jean; Midkiff, John; Reha-Krantz, Linda; Doubli, Sylvie; Wallace, Susan S.

    2010-04-12

    The fidelity of DNA replication is under constant threat from the formation of lesions within the genome. Oxidation of DNA bases leads to the formation of altered DNA bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, commonly called 8-oxoG, and 2-hydroxyadenenine, or 2-OHA. In this work we have examined the incorporation kinetics opposite these two oxidatively derived lesions as well as an abasic site analogue by the replicative DNA polymerase from bacteriophage RB69. We compared the kinetic parameters for both wild type and the low fidelity L561A variant. While nucleotide incorporation rates (k{sub pol}) were generally higher for the variant, the presence of a lesion in the templating position reduced the ability of both the wild-type and variant DNA polymerases to form ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes. Thus, the L561A substitution does not significantly affect the ability of the RB69 DNA polymerase to recognize damaged DNA; instead, the mutation increases the probability that nucleotide incorporation will occur. We have also solved the crystal structure of the L561A variant forming an 8-oxoG {center_dot} dATP mispair and show that the propensity for forming this mispair depends on an enlarged polymerase active site.

  10. Clustered DNA Lesions Containing 5-Formyluracil and AP Site: Repair via the BER System

    PubMed Central

    Belousova, Ekaterina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Moor, Nina A.; Zatsepin, Timofey S.; Oretskaya, Tatiana S.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions in the DNA arise under ionizing irradiation conditions or various chemical oxidants as a single damage or as part of a multiply damaged site within 1–2 helical turns (clustered lesion). Here, we explored the repair opportunity of the apurinic/apyrimidinic site (AP site) composed of the clustered lesion with 5-formyluracil (5-foU) by the base excision repair (BER) proteins. We found, that if the AP site is shifted relative to the 5-foU of the opposite strand, it could be repaired primarily via the short-patch BER pathway. In this case, the cleavage efficiency of the AP site-containing DNA strand catalyzed by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (hAPE1) decreased under AP site excursion to the 3'-side relative to the lesion in the other DNA strand. DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase lambda was more accurate in comparison to the one catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta. If the AP site was located exactly opposite 5-foU it was expected to switch the repair to the long-patch BER pathway. In this situation, human processivity factor hPCNA stimulates the process. PMID:23936307

  11. Molecular Dynamics of 8-oxoguanine Lesioned B-DNA Molecule — Structure and Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinak, M.; O'Neill, P.; Fujimoto, H.; Nemoto, T.

    2004-04-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of DNA mutagenic oxidative lesion — 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), complexed with the repair enzyme — human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) was performed for 1 nanosecond (ns) in order to describe the dynamical process of DNA-enzyme complex formation. After 900 picoseconds of MD the lesioned DNA and enzyme formed a complex that lasted until the end of the simulation at 1 ns. The amino group of arginine 324 was located close to the phosphodiester bond of nucleotide with 8-oxoG enabling chemical reactions between amino acid and lesion. Phosphodiester bond at C5' of 8-oxoG was displaced to the position close to the amino group of arginine 324. In the background simulation of the identical molecular system with the native DNA, neither the complex nor the water mediated hydrogen bond network were observed. The electrostatic energy is supposed to be significant factor causing the disruption of DNA base stacking in DNA duplex and may also to serve as a signal toward the repair enzyme informing on the presence of the lesion.

  12. DNA repair and replication fork helicases are differentially affected by alkyl phosphotriester lesion.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Sommers, Joshua A; Yu, Stephen; Wu, Yuliang; Xu, Ting; Kelman, Zvi; Kaplan, Daniel L; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-06-01

    DNA helicases are directly responsible for catalytically unwinding duplex DNA in an ATP-dependent and directionally specific manner and play essential roles in cellular nucleic acid metabolism. It has been conventionally thought that DNA helicases are inhibited by bulky covalent DNA adducts in a strand-specific manner. However, the effects of highly stable alkyl phosphotriester (PTE) lesions that are induced by chemical mutagens and refractory to DNA repair have not been previously studied for their effects on helicases. In this study, DNA repair and replication helicases were examined for unwinding a forked duplex DNA substrate harboring a single isopropyl PTE specifically positioned in the helicase-translocating or -nontranslocating strand within the double-stranded region. A comparison of SF2 helicases (RecQ, RECQ1, WRN, BLM, FANCJ, and ChlR1) with a SF1 DNA repair helicase (UvrD) and two replicative helicases (MCM and DnaB) demonstrates unique differences in the effect of the PTE on the DNA unwinding reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. All of the SF2 helicases tested were inhibited by the PTE lesion, whereas UvrD and the replication fork helicases were fully tolerant of the isopropyl backbone modification, irrespective of strand. Sequestration studies demonstrated that RECQ1 helicase was trapped by the PTE lesion only when it resided in the helicase-translocating strand. Our results are discussed in light of the current models for DNA unwinding by helicases that are likely to encounter sugar phosphate backbone damage during biological DNA transactions. PMID:22500020

  13. Mechanism of RNA polymerase II bypass of oxidative cyclopurine DNA lesions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walmacq, Celine; Wang, Lanfeng; Chong, Jenny; Scibelli, Kathleen; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Gnatt, Averell; Brooks, Philip J.; Wang, Dong; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2015-01-20

    In human cells, the oxidative DNA lesion 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (CydA) induces prolonged stalling of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) followed by transcriptional bypass, generating both error-free and mutant transcripts with AMP misincorporated immediately downstream from the lesion. Here, we present biochemical and crystallographic evidence for the mechanism of CydA recognition. Pol II stalling results from impaired loading of the template base (5') next to CydA into the active site, leading to preferential AMP misincorporation. Such predominant AMP insertion, which also occurs at an abasic site, is unaffected by the identity of the 5´-templating base, indicating that it derives from nontemplated synthesismore » according to an A rule known for DNA polymerases and recently identified for Pol II bypass of pyrimidine dimers. Subsequent to AMP misincorporation, Pol II encounters a major translocation block that is slowly overcome. The translocation block combined with the poor extension of the dA.rA mispair reduce transcriptional mutagenesis. Moreover, increasing the active-site flexibility by mutation in the trigger loop, which increases the ability of Pol II to accommodate the bulky lesion, and addition of transacting factor TFIIF facilitate CydA bypass. Thus, blocking lesion entry to the active site, trans-lesion A rule synthesis, and translocation block are common features of transcription across different bulky DNA lesions.« less

  14. Mechanism of RNA polymerase II bypass of oxidative cyclopurine DNA lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Walmacq, Celine; Wang, Lanfeng; Chong, Jenny; Scibelli, Kathleen; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Gnatt, Averell; Brooks, Philip J.; Wang, Dong; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2015-01-20

    In human cells, the oxidative DNA lesion 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (CydA) induces prolonged stalling of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) followed by transcriptional bypass, generating both error-free and mutant transcripts with AMP misincorporated immediately downstream from the lesion. Here, we present biochemical and crystallographic evidence for the mechanism of CydA recognition. Pol II stalling results from impaired loading of the template base (5') next to CydA into the active site, leading to preferential AMP misincorporation. Such predominant AMP insertion, which also occurs at an abasic site, is unaffected by the identity of the 5´-templating base, indicating that it derives from nontemplated synthesis according to an A rule known for DNA polymerases and recently identified for Pol II bypass of pyrimidine dimers. Subsequent to AMP misincorporation, Pol II encounters a major translocation block that is slowly overcome. The translocation block combined with the poor extension of the dA.rA mispair reduce transcriptional mutagenesis. Moreover, increasing the active-site flexibility by mutation in the trigger loop, which increases the ability of Pol II to accommodate the bulky lesion, and addition of transacting factor TFIIF facilitate CydA bypass. Thus, blocking lesion entry to the active site, trans-lesion A rule synthesis, and translocation block are common features of transcription across different bulky DNA lesions.

  15. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-01-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. Images PMID:6960359

  16. Rapid identification of Leishmania species by specific hybridization of kinetoplast DNA in cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Wirth, D F; Pratt, D M

    1982-11-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) was isolated from various species of the protozoic parasite Leishmania and analyzed by nucleic acid hybridization to detect species-related heterogeneity of kDNA. Purified DNA isolated from L. mexicana and L. braziliensis displayed no homology in nucleic acid hybridization studies. These results confirmed that rapid kDNA sequence change and evolution is occurring in New World species of Leishmania and suggested that such isolated kDNA could be used as a specific hybridization probe for the rapid identification of Leishmania species by using whole organisms. This work further demonstrates that such species-specific identification is feasible on isolated Leishmania promastigotes and, more important, directly on tissue touch blots derived from the cutaneous lesion. Thus, specific hybridization of isolated kDNA provides the basis for a rapid, accurate method for the diagnosis of human leishmaniasis directly from infected tissue. PMID:6960359

  17. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  18. A dynamic checkpoint in oxidative lesion discrimination by formamidopyrimidine–DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoquan; Endutkin, Anton V.; Bergonzo, Christina; Campbell, Arthur J.; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Simmerling, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to proteins recognizing small-molecule ligands, DNA-dependent enzymes cannot rely solely on interactions in the substrate-binding centre to achieve their exquisite specificity. It is widely believed that substrate recognition by such enzymes involves a series of conformational changes in the enzyme–DNA complex with sequential gates favoring cognate DNA and rejecting nonsubstrates. However, direct evidence for such mechanism is limited to a few systems. We report that discrimination between the oxidative DNA lesion, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) and its normal counterpart, guanine, by the repair enzyme, formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), likely involves multiple gates. Fpg uses an aromatic wedge to open the Watson–Crick base pair and everts the lesion into its active site. We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the eversion free energy landscapes of oxoG and G by Fpg, focusing on structural and energetic details of oxoG recognition. The resulting energy profiles, supported by biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants disturbing the interactions along the proposed path, show that Fpg selectively facilitates eversion of oxoG by stabilizing several intermediate states, helping the rapidly sliding enzyme avoid full extrusion of every encountered base for interrogation. Lesion recognition through multiple gating intermediates may be a common theme in DNA repair enzymes. PMID:26553802

  19. A dynamic checkpoint in oxidative lesion discrimination by formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoquan; Endutkin, Anton V; Bergonzo, Christina; Campbell, Arthur J; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Simmerling, Carlos

    2016-01-29

    In contrast to proteins recognizing small-molecule ligands, DNA-dependent enzymes cannot rely solely on interactions in the substrate-binding centre to achieve their exquisite specificity. It is widely believed that substrate recognition by such enzymes involves a series of conformational changes in the enzyme-DNA complex with sequential gates favoring cognate DNA and rejecting nonsubstrates. However, direct evidence for such mechanism is limited to a few systems. We report that discrimination between the oxidative DNA lesion, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) and its normal counterpart, guanine, by the repair enzyme, formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), likely involves multiple gates. Fpg uses an aromatic wedge to open the Watson-Crick base pair and everts the lesion into its active site. We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the eversion free energy landscapes of oxoG and G by Fpg, focusing on structural and energetic details of oxoG recognition. The resulting energy profiles, supported by biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants disturbing the interactions along the proposed path, show that Fpg selectively facilitates eversion of oxoG by stabilizing several intermediate states, helping the rapidly sliding enzyme avoid full extrusion of every encountered base for interrogation. Lesion recognition through multiple gating intermediates may be a common theme in DNA repair enzymes. PMID:26553802

  20. Encounter and extrusion of an intrahelical lesion by a DNA repair enzyme.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yan; Spong, Marie C; Nam, Kwangho; Banerjee, Anirban; Jiralerspong, Sao; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L

    2009-12-10

    How living systems detect the presence of genotoxic damage embedded in a million-fold excess of undamaged DNA is an unresolved question in biology. Here we have captured and structurally elucidated a base-excision DNA repair enzyme, MutM, at the stage of initial encounter with a damaged nucleobase, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG), nested within a DNA duplex. Three structures of intrahelical oxoG-encounter complexes are compared with sequence-matched structures containing a normal G base in place of an oxoG lesion. Although the protein-DNA interfaces in the matched complexes differ by only two atoms-those that distinguish oxoG from G-their pronounced structural differences indicate that MutM can detect a lesion in DNA even at the earliest stages of encounter. All-atom computer simulations show the pathway by which encounter of the enzyme with the lesion causes extrusion from the DNA duplex, and they elucidate the critical free energy difference between oxoG and G along the extrusion pathway. PMID:20010681

  1. Flexible 5-Guanidino-4-nitroimidazole DNA Lesions: Structures and Thermodynamics †

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lei; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Shapiro, Robert; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Broyde, Suse

    2008-01-01

    5-Guanidino-4-nitroimidazole (NI), derived from guanine oxidation by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, contains an unusual flexible ring opened structure, with nitro and guanidino groups which possess multiple hydrogen bonding capabilities. In vitro primer extension experiments with bacterial and mammalian polymerases show that NI incorporates C as well as A and G opposite the lesion, depending on the polymerase. In order to elucidate structural and thermodynamic properties of the mutagenic NI lesion, we have investigated the structure of the modified base itself and the NI-containing nucleoside with high level quantum mechanical calculations, and have employed molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations in solution for the lesion in B-DNA duplexes with four partner bases opposite the NI. Our results show that the NI adopts a planar structure at the damaged-base level. However, in the nucleoside and in DNA duplexes, steric hindrance between the guanidino group and its linked sugar causes NI to be non-planar. The NI lesion can adopt both syn and anti conformations on the DNA duplex level, with the guanidino group positioned in the DNA major and minor grooves, respectively; the specific preference depends on the partner base. Based on hydrogen bonding and stacking interactions, groove dimensions, and bending, we find that the least distorted NI modified duplex contains partner C, consistent with incorporation of C opposite NI. However, hydrogen bonding interactions between NI with partner G or A are also found, which would be compatible with the observed mismatches. PMID:16716075

  2. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein Loads as a Separate Factor onto DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Suzanne; Volker, Marcel; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Nigg, Alex L.; Moné, Martijn J.; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main DNA repair pathway in mammals for removal of UV-induced lesions. NER involves the concerted action of more than 25 polypeptides in a coordinated fashion. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) has been suggested to function as a central organizer and damage verifier in NER. How XPA reaches DNA lesions and how the protein is distributed in time and space in living cells are unknown. Here we studied XPA in vivo by using a cell line stably expressing physiological levels of functional XPA fused to green fluorescent protein and by applying quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The majority of XPA moves rapidly through the nucleoplasm with a diffusion rate different from those of other NER factors tested, arguing against a preassembled XPA-containing NER complex. DNA damage induced a transient (∼5-min) immobilization of maximally 30% of XPA. Immobilization depends on XPC, indicating that XPA is not the initial lesion recognition protein in vivo. Moreover, loading of replication protein A on NER lesions was not dependent on XPA. Thus, XPA participates in NER by incorporation of free diffusing molecules in XPC-dependent NER-DNA complexes. This study supports a model for a rapid consecutive assembly of free NER factors, and a relatively slow simultaneous disassembly, after repair. PMID:12897146

  3. ASCIZ regulates lesion-specific Rad51 focus formation and apoptosis after methylating DNA damage.

    PubMed

    McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear Rad51 focus formation is required for homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but its regulation in response to non-DSB lesions is poorly understood. Here we report a novel human SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein termed ASCIZ that forms Rad51-containing foci in response to base-modifying DNA methylating agents but not in response to DSB-inducing agents. ASCIZ foci seem to form prior to Rad51 recruitment, and an ASCIZ core domain can concentrate Rad51 in focus-like structures independently of DNA damage. ASCIZ depletion dramatically increases apoptosis after methylating DNA damage and impairs Rad51 focus formation in response to methylating agents but not after ionizing radiation. ASCIZ focus formation and increased apoptosis in ASCIZ-depleted cells depend on the mismatch repair protein MLH1. Interestingly, ASCIZ foci form efficiently during G1 phase, when sister chromatids are unavailable as recombination templates. We propose that ASCIZ acts as a lesion-specific focus scaffold in a Rad51-dependent pathway that resolves cytotoxic repair intermediates, most likely single-stranded DNA gaps, resulting from MLH1-dependent processing of base lesions. PMID:15933716

  4. ASCIZ regulates lesion-specific Rad51 focus formation and apoptosis after methylating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Rad51 focus formation is required for homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but its regulation in response to non-DSB lesions is poorly understood. Here we report a novel human SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein termed ASCIZ that forms Rad51-containing foci in response to base-modifying DNA methylating agents but not in response to DSB-inducing agents. ASCIZ foci seem to form prior to Rad51 recruitment, and an ASCIZ core domain can concentrate Rad51 in focus-like structures independently of DNA damage. ASCIZ depletion dramatically increases apoptosis after methylating DNA damage and impairs Rad51 focus formation in response to methylating agents but not after ionizing radiation. ASCIZ focus formation and increased apoptosis in ASCIZ-depleted cells depend on the mismatch repair protein MLH1. Interestingly, ASCIZ foci form efficiently during G1 phase, when sister chromatids are unavailable as recombination templates. We propose that ASCIZ acts as a lesion-specific focus scaffold in a Rad51-dependent pathway that resolves cytotoxic repair intermediates, most likely single-stranded DNA gaps, resulting from MLH1-dependent processing of base lesions. PMID:15933716

  5. Prompt repair of hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA lesions prevents catastrophic chromosomal fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Mahaseth, Tulip; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Iron-dependent oxidative DNA damage in vivo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, HP) induces copious single-strand(ss)-breaks and base modifications. HP also causes infrequent double-strand DNA breaks, whose relationship to the cell killing is unclear. Since hydrogen peroxide only fragments chromosomes in growing cells, these double-strand breaks were thought to represent replication forks collapsed at direct or excision ss-breaks and to be fully reparable. We have recently reported that hydrogen peroxide kills Escherichia coli by inducing catastrophic chromosome fragmentation, while cyanide (CN) potentiates both the killing and fragmentation. Remarkably, the extreme density of CN+HP-induced chromosomal double-strand breaks makes involvement of replication forks unlikely. Here we show that this massive fragmentation is further amplified by inactivation of ss-break repair or base-excision repair, suggesting that unrepaired primary DNA lesions are directly converted into double-strand breaks. Indeed, blocking DNA replication lowers CN+HP-induced fragmentation only ∼2-fold, without affecting the survival. Once cyanide is removed, recombinational repair in E. coli can mend several double-strand breaks, but cannot mend ∼100 breaks spread over the entire chromosome. Therefore, double-strand breaks induced by oxidative damage happen at the sites of unrepaired primary one-strand DNA lesions, are independent of replication and are highly lethal, supporting the model of clustered ss-breaks at the sites of stable DNA-iron complexes. PMID:27078578

  6. [Detection of human papillomavirus (H.P.V.) DNA in genital lesions using molecular hybridization].

    PubMed

    Meguenni, S; el-Mehdaoui, S; Bandoui, D; Bouguermouh, A; Allouache, A; Bendib, A; Chouiter, A; Djenaoui, T; Lalliam, N; Bouhadef, A

    1992-01-01

    Detection of human papilloma virus in genitals lesions by molecular hybridization. Some H.P.V. types are sexually transmitted and infect genital organs. We have used molecular hybridization to examine the distribution of H.P.V. 6 or II and H.P.V. 16 in benign, premalignant and malignant genital lesions from 344 patients. The frequency of H.P.V. 16 positive cases increases as the cervical lesions progress to malignancy: 57/78 are positive (73%) in the carcinomas, 29/83 are positive (35%) in mild or moderate dysplasia. The majority of benign condylomata acuminata harbors DNA of other types, namely H.P.V. 6 and II. PMID:1339249

  7. Molecular basis of transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Da, Lintai; Plouffe, Steven W.; Chong, Jenny; Kool, Eric; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high transcriptional fidelity is essential for life. Some DNA lesions lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis. In particular, we will focus on the three key checkpoint steps of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity: insertion (specific nucleotide selection and incorporation), extension (differentiation of RNA transcript extension of a matched over mismatched 3'-RNA terminus), and proofreading (preferential removal of misincorporated nucleotides from the 3'-RNA end). We will also discuss some novel insights into the molecular basis and chemical perspectives of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity through structural, computational, and chemical biology approaches. PMID:24767259

  8. Excision of translesion synthesis errors orchestrates responses to helix-distorting DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Ferrás, Cristina; Pauw, Bea; Hendriks, Giel; Temviriyanukul, Piya; Carlée, Leone; Calléja, Fabienne; van Hees, Sandrine; Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Jansen, Jacob G.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to correcting mispaired nucleotides, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins have been implicated in mutagenic, cell cycle, and apoptotic responses to agents that induce structurally aberrant nucleotide lesions. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis for these responses by exposing cell lines with single or combined genetic defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER), postreplicative translesion synthesis (TLS), and MMR to low-dose ultraviolet light during S phase. Our data reveal that the MMR heterodimer Msh2/Msh6 mediates the excision of incorrect nucleotides that are incorporated by TLS opposite helix-distorting, noninstructive DNA photolesions. The resulting single-stranded DNA patches induce canonical Rpa–Atr–Chk1-mediated checkpoints and, in the next cell cycle, collapse to double-stranded DNA breaks that trigger apoptosis. In conclusion, a novel MMR-related DNA excision repair pathway controls TLS a posteriori, while initiating cellular responses to environmentally relevant densities of genotoxic lesions. These results may provide a rationale for the colorectal cancer tropism in Lynch syndrome, which is caused by inherited MMR gene defects. PMID:25869665

  9. Excision of translesion synthesis errors orchestrates responses to helix-distorting DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Ferrás, Cristina; Pauw, Bea; Hendriks, Giel; Temviriyanukul, Piya; Carlée, Leone; Calléja, Fabienne; van Hees, Sandrine; Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Jansen, Jacob G; de Wind, Niels

    2015-04-13

    In addition to correcting mispaired nucleotides, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins have been implicated in mutagenic, cell cycle, and apoptotic responses to agents that induce structurally aberrant nucleotide lesions. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis for these responses by exposing cell lines with single or combined genetic defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER), postreplicative translesion synthesis (TLS), and MMR to low-dose ultraviolet light during S phase. Our data reveal that the MMR heterodimer Msh2/Msh6 mediates the excision of incorrect nucleotides that are incorporated by TLS opposite helix-distorting, noninstructive DNA photolesions. The resulting single-stranded DNA patches induce canonical Rpa-Atr-Chk1-mediated checkpoints and, in the next cell cycle, collapse to double-stranded DNA breaks that trigger apoptosis. In conclusion, a novel MMR-related DNA excision repair pathway controls TLS a posteriori, while initiating cellular responses to environmentally relevant densities of genotoxic lesions. These results may provide a rationale for the colorectal cancer tropism in Lynch syndrome, which is caused by inherited MMR gene defects. PMID:25869665

  10. Impact of age-associated cyclopurine lesions on DNA repair helicases.

    PubMed

    Khan, Irfan; Suhasini, Avvaru N; Banerjee, Taraswi; Sommers, Joshua A; Kaplan, Daniel L; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline; Brosh, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    8,5' cyclopurine deoxynucleosides (cPu) are locally distorting DNA base lesions corrected by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and proposed to play a role in neurodegeneration prevalent in genetically defined Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients. In the current study, purified recombinant helicases from different classifications based on sequence homology were examined for their ability to unwind partial duplex DNA substrates harboring a single site-specific cPu adduct. Superfamily (SF) 2 RecQ helicases (RECQ1, BLM, WRN, RecQ) were inhibited by cPu in the helicase translocating strand, whereas helicases from SF1 (UvrD) and SF4 (DnaB) tolerated cPu in either strand. SF2 Fe-S helicases (FANCJ, DDX11 (ChlR1), DinG, XPD) displayed marked differences in their ability to unwind the cPu DNA substrates. Archaeal Thermoplasma acidophilum XPD (taXPD), homologue to the human XPD helicase involved in NER DNA damage verification, was impeded by cPu in the non-translocating strand, while FANCJ was uniquely inhibited by the cPu in the translocating strand. Sequestration experiments demonstrated that FANCJ became trapped by the translocating strand cPu whereas RECQ1 was not, suggesting the two SF2 helicases interact with the cPu lesion by distinct mechanisms despite strand-specific inhibition for both. Using a protein trap to simulate single-turnover conditions, the rate of FANCJ or RECQ1 helicase activity was reduced 10-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, by cPu in the translocating strand. In contrast, single-turnover rates of DNA unwinding by DDX11 and UvrD helicases were only modestly affected by the cPu lesion in the translocating strand. The marked difference in effect of the translocating strand cPu on rate of DNA unwinding between DDX11 and FANCJ helicase suggests the two Fe-S cluster helicases unwind damaged DNA by distinct mechanisms. The apparent complexity of helicase encounters with an unusual form of oxidative damage is likely to have important consequences in the

  11. DNA Lesions Caused by ROS and RNOS: A Review of Interactions and Reactions Involving Guanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    DNA is constantly attacked by a large number of endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen oxide species (RNOS), and alkylating agents which produce a wide variety of modifications of its constituents, particularly the bases. Some of these modifications (lesions) are hazardous to normal cell functioning, and are implicated in several lethal conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, atherosclerosis, aging, mutation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders, such as the Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  12. Determination of human DNA polymerase utilization for the repair of a model ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand break lesion in a defined vector substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, T. A.; Russell, P. S.; Kohli, M.; Dar, M. E.; Neumann, R. D.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase and DNA ligase utilization for the repair of a major class of ionizing radiation-induced DNA lesion [DNA single-strand breaks containing 3'-phosphoglycolate (3'-PG)] was examined using a novel, chemically defined vector substrate containing a single, site-specific 3'-PG single-strand break lesion. In addition, the major human AP endonuclease, HAP1 (also known as APE1, APEX, Ref-1), was tested to determine if it was involved in initiating repair of 3'-PG-containing single-strand break lesions. DNA polymerase beta was found to be the primary polymerase responsible for nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following excision of the 3'-PG blocking group. However, DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon was also capable of nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following 3'-PG excision. In addition, repair reactions catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta were found to be most effective in the presence of DNA ligase III, while those catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon appeared to be more effective in the presence of DNA ligase I. Also, it was demonstrated that the repair initiating 3'-PG excision reaction was not dependent upon HAP1 activity, as judged by inhibition of HAP1 with neutralizing HAP1-specific polyclonal antibody.

  13. Ultraviolet B radiation-induced DNA lesions in mouse epidermis: an assessment using a novel 32P-postlabelling technique.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, M L; Agarwal, R; Mukhtar, H

    1996-12-13

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) component of the sunlight is the major cause of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in humans. UVB is absorbed directly by cellular DNA and produces lesions that may cause mutation(s) in target gene(s) ultimately leading to cancer. Early detection of these lesions, therefore, may help to identify individuals at a high risk to develop NMSC, and devise approaches for the prevention of this common malignancy. Employing mouse skin as a model, we applied a 32P postlabelling method to detect UVB-induced DNA lesions in the epidermis in nanomole quantities. Autoradiography maps showed that epidermal DNA from UVB exposed mice at 24 h contain up to five DNA lesions; the quantitation of these lesions showed that their formation increased in a UVB dose-dependent manner. Treatment of DNA samples with the bacteriophage DNA repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V confirmed that four of these lesions are pyrimidine dimers. While, some of these lesions were repaired 18 h after UVB irradiation, 30% of them persisted even 48 h post-irradiation. Application of a sunscreen containing ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate or chemopreventive agent green tea polyphenols or silymarin to the skin of the mice prior to UVB exposure was found to prevent the formation of pyrimidine dimers. PMID:8954942

  14. DNA damage response in peripheral nervous system: coping with cancer therapy-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    In the absence of blood brain barrier (BBB) the DNA of peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons is exposed to a broader spectrum of endogenous and exogenous threats compared to that of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence, while CNS and PNS neurons cope with many similar challenges inherent to their high oxygen consumption and vigorous metabolism, PNS neurons are also exposed to circulating toxins and inflammatory mediators due to relative permeability of PNS blood nerve barrier (BNB). Consequently, genomes of PNS neurons incur greater damage and the question awaiting investigation is whether specialized repair mechanisms for maintenance of DNA integrity have evolved to meet the additional needs of PNS neurons. Here, I review data showing how PNS neurons manage collateral DNA damage incurred in the course of different anti-cancer treatments designed to block DNA replication in proliferating tumor cells. Importantly, while PNS neurotoxicity and concomitant chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are among major dose limiting barriers in achieving therapy goals, CIPN is partially reversible during post-treatment nerve recovery. Clearly, cell recovery necessitates mobilization of the DNA damage response and underscores the need for systematic investigation of the scope of DNA repair capacities in the PNS to help predict post-treatment risks to recovering neurons. PMID:23684797

  15. DNA Damage Response in Peripheral Nervous System: Coping with Cancer Therapy-Induced DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Ella W

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of blood brain barrier (BBB) the DNA of peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons is exposed to a broader spectrum of endogenous and exogenous threats compared to that of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence, while CNS and PNS neurons cope with many similar challenges inherent to their high oxygen consumption and vigorous metabolism, PNS neurons are also exposed to circulating toxins and inflammatory mediators due to relative permeability of PNS blood nerve barrier (BNB). Consequently, genomes of PNS neurons incur greater damage and the question awaiting investigation is whether specialized repair mechanisms for maintenance of DNA integrity have evolved to meet the additional needs of PNS neurons. Here, I review data showing how PNS neurons manage collateral DNA damage incurred in the course of different anti-cancer treatments designed to block DNA replication in proliferating tumor cells. Importantly, while PNS neurotoxicity and concomitant chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are among major dose limiting barriers in achieving therapy goals, CIPN is partially reversible during post-treatment nerve recovery. Clearly, cell recovery necessitates mobilization of the DNA damage response and underscores the need for systematic investigation of the scope of DNA repair capacities in the PNS to help predict post-treatment risks to recovering neurons. PMID:23684797

  16. Structure of Human DNL Polymerase k Inserting dATP Opposite an 8-OxoG DNA Lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez-Del Carpio, R.; Silverstein, T; Lone, S; Swan, M; Choudhury, J; Johnson, R; Pratkash, S; Aggarwal, A

    2009-01-01

    The structure we present here is the first for a eukaryotic translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase with an 8-oxoG:A base pair in the active site. The structure shows why Pol? is more efficient at inserting an A opposite the 8-oxoG lesion than a C. The structure also provides a basis for why Pol? is more efficient at inserting an A opposite the lesion than other Y-family DNA polymerases.

  17. Structural Basis for Bulky-Adduct DNA-Lesion Recognition by the Nucleotide Excision Repair Protein Rad14.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nina; Ebert, Charlotte; Schneider, Sabine

    2016-07-25

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines react with purine bases and result in bulky DNA adducts that cause mutations. Such structurally diverse lesions are substrates for the nucleotide excision repair (NER). It is thought that the NER machinery recognises and verifies distorted DNA conformations, also involving the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and C proteins (XPA, XPC) that act as a scaffold between the DNA substrate and several other NER proteins. Here we present the synthesis of DNA molecules containing the polycyclic, aromatic amine C8-guanine lesions acetylaminophenyl, acetylaminonaphthyl, acetylaminoanthryl, and acetylaminopyrenyl, as well as their crystal structures in complex with the yeast XPA homologue Rad14. This work further substantiates the indirect lesion-detection mechanism employed by the NER system that recognises destabilised and deformable DNA structures. PMID:27223336

  18. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis is maintained by Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA lesions in neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Regnell, Christine Elisabeth; Hildrestrand, Gunn Annette; Sejersted, Yngve; Medin, Tirill; Moldestad, Olve; Rolseth, Veslemøy; Krokeide, Silje Zandstra; Suganthan, Rajikala; Luna, Luisa; Bjørås, Magnar; Bergersen, Linda H

    2012-09-27

    Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. The major pathway for removal of oxidative DNA base lesions is base excision repair, which is initiated by DNA glycosylases. In mice, Neil3 is the main DNA glycosylase for repair of hydantoin lesions in single-stranded DNA of neural stem/progenitor cells, promoting neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis is crucial for maintenance of hippocampus-dependent functions involved in behavior. Herein, behavioral studies reveal learning and memory deficits and reduced anxiety-like behavior in Neil3(-/-) mice. Neural stem/progenitor cells from aged Neil3(-/-) mice show impaired proliferative capacity and reduced DNA repair activity. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons in Neil3(-/-) mice display synaptic irregularities. It appears that Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA damage in neural stem/progenitor cells is required for maintenance of adult neurogenesis to counteract the age-associated deterioration of cognitive performance. PMID:22959434

  19. Pre-steady-state kinetics shows differences in processing of various DNA lesions by Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Vladimir V.; Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Douglas, Kenneth T.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2004-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (Fpg pro tein, MutM) catalyses excision of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and other oxidatively damaged purines from DNA in a glycosylase/apurinic/apyrimidinic-lyase reaction. We report pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of Fpg action on oligonucleotide duplexes containing 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine, natural abasic site or tetrahydrofuran (an uncleavable abasic site analogue). Monitoring Fpg intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in stopped-flow experiments reveals multiple conformational transitions in the protein molecule during the catalytic cycle. At least four and five conformational transitions occur in Fpg during the interaction with abasic and 8-oxoG-containing substrates, respectively, within 2 ms to 10 s time range. These transitions reflect the stages of enzyme binding to DNA and lesion recognition with the mutual adjustment of DNA and enzyme structures to achieve catalytically competent conformation. Unlike these well-defined binding steps, catalytic stages are not associated with discernible fluorescence events. Only a single conformational change is detected for the cleavable substrates at times exceeding 10 s. The data obtained provide evidence that several fast sequential conformational changes occur in Fpg after binding to its substrate, converting the protein into a catalytically active conformation. PMID:14769949

  20. Atherosclerotic lesions and mitochondria DNA deletions in brain microvessels: implication in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Gasimov, Eldar; Obrenovich, Mark E; Fischbach, Kathryn; Shenk, Justin C; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis that is primarily responsible for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) appears to involve chronic hypoperfusion. We studied the ultrastructural features of vascular lesions and mitochondria in brain vascular wall cells from human AD biopsy samples and two transgenic mouse models of AD, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) and C57B6/SJL Tg (+), which overexpress human amyloid beta precursor protein (AbetaPP). In situ hybridization using probes for normal and 5 kb deleted human and mouse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was performed along with immunocytochemistry using antibodies against the Abeta peptide processed from AbetaPP, 8-hydroxy-2'-guanosine (8OHG), and cytochrome c oxidase (COX). More amyloid deposition, oxidative stress markers as well as mitochondrial DNA deletions and structural abnormalities were present in the vascular walls of the human AD samples and the AbetaPP-YAC and C57B6/SJL Tg (+) transgenic mice compared to age-matched controls. Ultrastructural damage in perivascular cells highly correlated with endothelial lesions in all samples. Therefore, pharmacological interventions, directed at correcting the chronic hypoperfusion state, may change the natural course of the development of dementing neurodegeneration. PMID:18827923

  1. Oxidative stress at low levels can induce clustered DNA lesions leading to NHEJ mediated mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard B; Chen, Ting-Huei; Herr, Natalie; Takeda, Shunichi; Sun, Wei; Swenberg, James A; Nakamura, Jun

    2016-05-01

    DNA damage and mutations induced by oxidative stress are associated with various different human pathologies including cancer. The facts that most human tumors are characterized by large genome rearrangements and glutathione depletion in mice results in deletions in DNA suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause gene and chromosome mutations through DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). However, the generation of DSBs at low levels of ROS is still controversial. In the present study, we show that H2O2 at biologically-relevant levels causes a marked increase in oxidative clustered DNA lesions (OCDLs) with a significant elevation of replication-independent DSBs. Although it is frequently reported that OCDLs are fingerprint of high-energy IR, our results indicate for the first time that H2O2, even at low levels, can also cause OCDLs leading to DSBs specifically in G1 cells. Furthermore, a reverse genetic approach revealed a significant contribution of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway in H2O2-induced DNA repair & mutagenesis. This genomic instability induced by low levels of ROS may be involved in spontaneous mutagenesis and the etiology of a wide variety of human diseases like chronic inflammation-related disorders, carcinogenesis, neuro-degeneration and aging. PMID:27015367

  2. DNA damage and external lesions in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from contaminated habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, X.; Meier, J.; Chang, L.; Rowan, M.; Baumann, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Comet assay was used to compare levels of DNA damage in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) collected from three known contaminated locations, the Cuyahoga River (OH, USA), Ashtabula River (OH, USA; both tributaries to Lake Erie, USA), and Ashumet Pond (Cape Cod, MA, USA), with brown bullheads collected from three paired reference sites, Old Woman Creek (OH, USA), Conneaut River (OH, USA; both tributaries to Lake Erie), and Great Herring Pond (mainland MA, USA), respectively. Blood was sampled from each fish, and the Comet assay was conducted on erythrocytes. The assay results demonstrate that fish from the three contaminated sites each suffered higher DNA damage compared with fish from their respective reference sites. The results also show that the genetic damage was associated with the occurrence of external lesions and deformities in fish. The Comet assay is sufficiently sensitive to detect exposure of natural fish populations to environmental levels of genotoxic contaminants. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  3. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways. PMID:23088767

  4. Oxidative DNA adducts and DNA-protein cross-links are the major DNA lesions induced by arsenite.

    PubMed

    Bau, Da-Tian; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Chung, Chiao-Hui; Wang, Alexander S S; Wang, Alexander S S; Jan, Kun-Yan

    2002-10-01

    Arsenic is recognized to be a nonmutagenic carcinogen because it induces DNA damage only at very high concentrations. However, many more DNA strand breaks could be detected by digesting the DNA of arsenite-treated cells with endonuclease III, formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, and proteinase K. By doing so, arsenite could be shown to induce DNA damage in human cells within a pathologically meaningful concentration range. Oxidized guanine products were detected in all arsenite-treated human cells examined. DNA-protein cross-links were also detected in arsenite-treated NB4 and HL60 cells. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the induction of oxidized guanine products by arsenite was sensitive to inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase but not to oxidant modulators, whereas the opposite result was obtained in vascular smooth muscle cells. On the other hand, the arsenite-induced oxidized guanine products and DNA-protein cross-links in NB4 and HL60 cells were sensitive to modulators of calcium, NO synthase, oxidant, and myeloperoxidase. Therefore, although oxidized guanine products were detected in all the human cells treated with arsenite, the pathways could be different in different cell types. Because the sensitivity and the mechanism of arsenic intoxication are cell specific, it is important that target tissues and target cells are used for investigations. It is also important that pathologically or pharmacologically meaningful concentrations of arsenic are used. This is because in most cases we are dealing with the chronic effect rather than acute toxicity. PMID:12426126

  5. Multiplexed DNA repair assays for multiple lesions and multiple doses via transcription inhibition and transcriptional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Zachary D; Margulies, Carrie M; Chaim, Isaac A; McRee, Siobhan K; Mazzucato, Patrizia; Ahmad, Anwaar; Abo, Ryan P; Butty, Vincent L; Forget, Anthony L; Samson, Leona D

    2014-05-01

    The capacity to repair different types of DNA damage varies among individuals, making them more or less susceptible to the detrimental health consequences of damage exposures. Current methods for measuring DNA repair capacity (DRC) are relatively labor intensive, often indirect, and usually limited to a single repair pathway. Here, we describe a fluorescence-based multiplex flow-cytometric host cell reactivation assay (FM-HCR) that measures the ability of human cells to repair plasmid reporters, each bearing a different type of DNA damage or different doses of the same type of DNA damage. FM-HCR simultaneously measures repair capacity in any four of the following pathways: nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, base excision repair, nonhomologous end joining, homologous recombination, and methylguanine methyltransferase. We show that FM-HCR can measure interindividual DRC differences in a panel of 24 cell lines derived from genetically diverse, apparently healthy individuals, and we show that FM-HCR may be used to identify inhibitors or enhancers of DRC. We further develop a next-generation sequencing-based HCR assay (HCR-Seq) that detects rare transcriptional mutagenesis events due to lesion bypass by RNA polymerase, providing an added dimension to DRC measurements. FM-HCR and HCR-Seq provide powerful tools for exploring relationships among global DRC, disease susceptibility, and optimal treatment. PMID:24757057

  6. Multiplexed DNA repair assays for multiple lesions and multiple doses via transcription inhibition and transcriptional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Zachary D.; Margulies, Carrie M.; Chaim, Isaac A.; McRee, Siobhan K.; Mazzucato, Patrizia; Ahmad, Anwaar; Abo, Ryan P.; Butty, Vincent L.; Forget, Anthony L.; Samson, Leona D.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to repair different types of DNA damage varies among individuals, making them more or less susceptible to the detrimental health consequences of damage exposures. Current methods for measuring DNA repair capacity (DRC) are relatively labor intensive, often indirect, and usually limited to a single repair pathway. Here, we describe a fluorescence-based multiplex flow-cytometric host cell reactivation assay (FM-HCR) that measures the ability of human cells to repair plasmid reporters, each bearing a different type of DNA damage or different doses of the same type of DNA damage. FM-HCR simultaneously measures repair capacity in any four of the following pathways: nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, base excision repair, nonhomologous end joining, homologous recombination, and methylguanine methyltransferase. We show that FM-HCR can measure interindividual DRC differences in a panel of 24 cell lines derived from genetically diverse, apparently healthy individuals, and we show that FM-HCR may be used to identify inhibitors or enhancers of DRC. We further develop a next-generation sequencing-based HCR assay (HCR-Seq) that detects rare transcriptional mutagenesis events due to lesion bypass by RNA polymerase, providing an added dimension to DRC measurements. FM-HCR and HCR-Seq provide powerful tools for exploring relationships among global DRC, disease susceptibility, and optimal treatment. PMID:24757057

  7. Whole-genome DNA methylation in skin lesions from patients with psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Ming; Liang, Gongping; Yin, Guangliang; Huang, Dan; Su, Fengxia; Zhai, Hanyue; Wang, Litao; Su, Yuwen; Lu, Qianjin

    2013-03-01

    Psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin disorder, is characterized by aberrant keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in the epidermis. Although the pathogenesis of psoriasis is still incompletely understood, both genetic susceptibilities and environmental triggers are known to act as key players in its development. Several studies have suggested that DNA methylation is involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the regulation and maintenance of the methylome as well as their relationship with this disease remain poorly characterized. Herein, we used methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) to characterize whole-genome DNA methylation patterns in involved and uninvolved skin lesions from patients with psoriasis. The results of our MeDIP-Seq analyses identified differentially methylated regions (DMRs) covering almost the entire genome with sufficient depth and high resolution, showing that the number of hypermethylated DMRs was considerably higher than that of hypomethylated DMRs in involved psoriatic skin samples. Moreover, gene ontology analysis of MeDIP-Seq data showed that the aberrantly methylated genes belonged to several different ontological domains, such as the immune system, cell cycle and apoptosis. The results of the bisulfite-sequencing experiments for the genes PDCD5 and TIMP2 confirmed the methylation status identified by MeDIP-Seq, and the mRNA expression levels of these two genes were consistent with their DNA methylation profiles. To our knowledge, the present study constitutes the first report on MeDIP-Seq in psoriasis. The identification of whole-genome DNA methylation patterns associated with psoriasis provides new insight into the pathogenesis of this complex disease and represents a promising avenue through which to investigate novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:23369618

  8. Persistent transcription-blocking DNA lesions trigger somatic growth attenuation associated with longevity

    PubMed Central

    Garinis, George A.; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Stachelscheid, Heike; Fousteri, Maria; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Breit, Timo M.; van Steeg, Harry; Mullenders, Leon H.F.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T.J.; Brüning, Jens C.; Niessen, Carien M.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Schumacher, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of stochastic DNA damage throughout organisms’ lifespan is thought to contribute to aging. Conversely, aging appears phenotypically reproducible and regulated through genetic pathways such as the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and growth hormone (GH) receptors, which are central mediators of the somatic growth axis. Here, we report that persistent DNA damage in primary cells elicits similar changes in global gene expression as those occurring in various organs of naturally aged animals. Importantly, we show that, as in aging animals, IGF-1 receptor and GH receptor expression is attenuated resulting in cellular IGF-1 resistance. This cell-autonomous attenuation is specifically induced by persistent lesions leading to RNA polymerase II stalling, in proliferating, quiescent and terminally differentiated cells, is exacerbated and prolonged in cells from progeroid mice and confers resistance to oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that DNA damage accumulation in transcribed genes in most if not all tissues, contributes to the aging-associated shift from growth to somatic maintenance that triggers stress resistance and is thought to promote longevity. PMID:19363488

  9. Glutathione Depletion and Carbon Ion Radiation Potentiate Clustered DNA Lesions, Cell Death and Prevent Chromosomal Changes in Cancer Cells Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape. This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and l-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  10. Evolution of MS lesions to black holes under DNA vaccine treatment.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; von Felten, Stefanie; Traud, Stefan; Rahman, Amena; Quan, Joanne; King, Robert; Garren, Hideki; Steinman, Lawrence; Cutter, Gary; Kappos, Ludwig; Radue, Ernst Wilhelm

    2012-07-01

    Persistent black holes (PBH) are associated with axonal loss and disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this work was to determine if BHT-3009, a DNA plasmid-encoding myelin basic protein (MBP), reduces the risk of new lesions becoming PBH, compared to placebo, and to test if pre-treatment serum anti-MBP antibody levels impact on the effect of BHT-3009 treatment. In this retrospective, blinded MRI study, we reviewed MRI scans of 155 MS patients from a double-blind, randomized, phase II trial with three treatment arms (placebo, 0.5 and 1.5 mg BHT-3009). New lesions at weeks 8 and 16 were tracked at week 48 and those appearing as T1-hypointense were classified as PBH. A subset of 46 patients with available pre-treatment serum anti-MBP IgM levels were analyzed separately. Overall, there was no impact of treatment on the risk for PBH. However, there was a significant interaction between anti-MBP antibodies and treatment effect: patients receiving 0.5 mg BHT-3009 showed a reduced risk of PBH with higher antibody levels compared to placebo (p < 0.01). Although we found no overall reduction of the risk for PBH in treated patients, there may be an effect of low-dose BHT-3009, depending on the patients' pre-treatment immune responses. PMID:22222856

  11. Neil3 and NEIL1 DNA Glycosylases Remove Oxidative Damages from Quadruplex DNA and Exhibit Preferences for Lesions in the Telomeric Sequence Context*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia; Liu, Minmin; Fleming, Aaron M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    The telomeric DNA of vertebrates consists of d(TTAGGG)n tandem repeats, which can form quadruplex DNA structures in vitro and likely in vivo. Despite the fact that the G-rich telomeric DNA is susceptible to oxidation, few biochemical studies of base excision repair in telomeric DNA and quadruplex structures have been done. Here, we show that telomeric DNA containing thymine glycol (Tg), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), guanidinohydantoin (Gh), or spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) can form quadruplex DNA structures in vitro. We have tested the base excision activities of five mammalian DNA glycosylases (NEIL1, NEIL2, mNeil3, NTH1, and OGG1) on these lesion-containing quadruplex substrates and found that only mNeil3 had excision activity on Tg in quadruplex DNA and that the glycosylase exhibited a strong preference for Tg in the telomeric sequence context. Although Sp and Gh in quadruplex DNA were good substrates for mNeil3 and NEIL1, none of the glycosylases had activity on quadruplex DNA containing 8-oxoG. In addition, NEIL1 but not mNeil3 showed enhanced glycosylase activity on Gh in the telomeric sequence context. These data suggest that one role for Neil3 and NEIL1 is to repair DNA base damages in telomeres in vivo and that Neil3 and Neil1 may function in quadruplex-mediated cellular events, such as gene regulation via removal of damaged bases from quadruplex DNA. PMID:23926102

  12. Processing of abasic site damaged lesions by APE1 enzyme on DNA adsorbed over normal and organomodified clay.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Bhavini; Banerjee, Shib Shankar; Singh, Vandana; Das, Prolay; Bhowmick, Anil K

    2014-10-01

    The efficiency of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) DNA repair enzyme in the processing of abasic site DNA damage lesions at precise location in DNA oligomer duplexes that are adsorbed on clay surfaces was evaluated. Three different forms of clay namely montmorillonite, quaternary ammonium salt modified montmorillonite and its boiled counterpart i.e. partially devoid of organic moiety were used for a comparative study of adsorption, desorption and DNA repair efficiency on their surfaces. The interaction between the DNA and the clay was analysed by X-ray diffraction, Atomic force microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and Infrared spectroscopy. The abasic site cleavage efficiency of APE1 enzyme was quantitatively evaluated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Apart from the difference in the DNA adsorption or desorption capacity of the various forms of clay, substantial variation in the repair efficiency of abasic sites initiated by the APE1 enzyme on the clay surfaces was observed. The incision efficiency of APE1 enzyme at abasic sites was found to be greatly diminished, when the DNA was adsorbed over organomodified montmorillonite. The reduced repair activity indicates an important role of the pendant surfactant groups on the clay surfaces in directing APE1 mediated cleavage of abasic site DNA damage lesions. PMID:25048946

  13. UV light-induced DNA lesions cause dissociation of yeast RNA polymerases-I and establishment of a specialized chromatin structure at rRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Maxime; Charton, Romain; Wittner, Manuel; Levasseur, Geneviève; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Conconi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of UV light-induced DNA lesions results from their interference with transcription and replication. DNA lesions arrest elongating RNA polymerases, an event that triggers transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Since arrested RNA polymerases reduce the accessibility of repair factors to DNA lesions, they might be displaced. The fate of arrested RNA polymerases-II at DNA lesions has been extensively studied, yielding partially contradictory results. Considerably less is known about RNA polymerases-I that transcribe nucleosomes-depleted rRNA genes at very high rate. To investigate the fate of arrested RNA polymerases-I at DNA lesions, chromatin-immunoprecipitation, electron microscopy, transcription run-on, psoralen-cross-linking and chromatin-endogenous cleavage were employed. We found that RNA polymerases-I density increased at the 5′-end of the gene, likely due to continued transcription initiation followed by elongation and pausing/release at the first DNA lesion. Most RNA polymerases-I dissociated downstream of the first DNA lesion, concomitant with chromatin closing that resulted from deposition of nucleosomes. Although nucleosomes were deposited, the high mobility group-box Hmo1 (component of actively transcribed rRNA genes) remained associated. After repair of DNA lesions, Hmo1 containing chromatin might help to restore transcription elongation and reopening of rRNA genes chromatin. PMID:24097442

  14. Staggered AID-dependent DNA double strand breaks are the predominant DNA lesions targeted to S mu in Ig class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Rush, James S; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Schatz, David G

    2004-04-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) is the process whereby B cells alter the effector properties of their Ig molecules. Whilst much is known about the cellular regulation of this process, many of the molecular details remain elusive. Recent evidence suggests that CSR involves blunt DNA double strand breaks (dsbs), and that formation of these dsbs requires the function of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We sought to characterize the structural properties and kinetics of induction of the DNA lesions associated with CSR. Using ligation-mediated PCR, we found that AID-dependent DNA dsbs were specifically induced in the S mu region of murine B cells stimulated to undergo CSR. While blunt dsbs were detected, they were only a minor species, with staggered breaks being more than an order of magnitude more abundant. In addition, these breaks could be detected at equal frequency at upstream and downstream portions of S mu, and were induced prior to expression of newly switched isotypes. Collectively, these results provide direct evidence that staggered, S mu-targeted AID-dependent dsbs are the predominant DNA lesion associated with CSR, with important implications for the mechanisms by which CSR DNA lesions are made and processed. PMID:15039385

  15. Impeded repair of abasic site damaged lesions in DNA adsorbed over functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rina; Mondal, Titash; Bhowmick, Anil K; Das, Prolay

    2016-06-01

    The processing of abasic site DNA damage lesions in extracellular DNA in the presence of engineered carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) is demonstrated. The efficacy of the apurinic-apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in the cleavage of abasic site lesions in the presence of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH) and graphene oxide (GO) are compared. The CNMs were found to perturb the incision activity of APE1. The reason for such perturbation process was anticipated to take place either by the non-specific adsorption of APE1 over the free surface of the CNMs or steric hindrance offered by the CNM-DNA complex. Accordingly, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selectively utilized to block the free surface of the CNM-DNA hybrid material. Further treatment of the CNM-DNA-BSA complex with APE1 resulted in a marginal increase in APE1 efficiency. This indicates that APE1 in solution is unable to process the abasic sites on DNA adsorbed over the CNMs. However, the cleavage activity of APE1 was restored in the presence of non-ionic surfactant (Tween 20) that inhibits adsorption of the DNA on the surface of the CNMs. The conformational deformation of the DNA, along with steric hindrance induced by the CNMs resulted in the inhibition of abasic site DNA repair by APE1. Moreover, appreciable changes in the secondary structure of APE1 adsorbed over the CNMs were observed that contribute further to the repair refractivity of the abasic sites. From a toxicological viewpoint, these findings can be extended to the study of the effect of engineered nanoparticles in the intracellular DNA repair process. PMID:27265379

  16. Clearance of persistent HPV infection and cervical lesion by therapeutic DNA vaccine in CIN3 patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jin; Jin, Hyun-Tak; Hur, Soo-Young; Yang, Hyun Gul; Seo, Yong Bok; Hong, Sung Ran; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Suhyeon; Woo, Jung-Won; Park, Ki Seok; Hwang, Youn-Young; Park, Jaehan; Lee, In-Ho; Lim, Kyung-Taek; Lee, Ki-Heon; Jeong, Mi Seon; Surh, Charles D.; Suh, You Suk; Park, Jong Sup; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that electroporation-enhanced immunization with a rationally designed HPV DNA vaccine (GX-188E), preferentially targeting HPV antigens to dendritic cells, elicits a significant E6/E7-specific IFN-γ-producing T-cell response in all nine cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) patients. Importantly, eight out of nine patients exhibit an enhanced polyfunctional HPV-specific CD8 T-cell response as shown by an increase in cytolytic activity, proliferative capacity and secretion of effector molecules. Notably, seven out of nine patients display complete regression of their lesions and viral clearance within 36 weeks of follow up. GX-188E administration does not elicit serious vaccine-associated adverse events at all administered doses. These findings indicate that the magnitude of systemic polyfunctional CD8 T-cell response is the main contributing factor for histological, cytological and virological responses, providing valuable insights into the design of therapeutic vaccines for effectively treating persistent infections and cancers in humans. PMID:25354725

  17. Clearance of persistent HPV infection and cervical lesion by therapeutic DNA vaccine in CIN3 patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jin; Jin, Hyun-Tak; Hur, Soo-Young; Yang, Hyun Gul; Seo, Yong Bok; Hong, Sung Ran; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Suhyeon; Woo, Jung-Won; Park, Ki Seok; Hwang, Youn-Young; Park, Jaehan; Lee, In-Ho; Lim, Kyung-Taek; Lee, Ki-Heon; Jeong, Mi Seon; Surh, Charles D; Suh, You Suk; Park, Jong Sup; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that electroporation-enhanced immunization with a rationally designed HPV DNA vaccine (GX-188E), preferentially targeting HPV antigens to dendritic cells, elicits a significant E6/E7-specific IFN-γ-producing T-cell response in all nine cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) patients. Importantly, eight out of nine patients exhibit an enhanced polyfunctional HPV-specific CD8 T-cell response as shown by an increase in cytolytic activity, proliferative capacity and secretion of effector molecules. Notably, seven out of nine patients display complete regression of their lesions and viral clearance within 36 weeks of follow up. GX-188E administration does not elicit serious vaccine-associated adverse events at all administered doses. These findings indicate that the magnitude of systemic polyfunctional CD8 T-cell response is the main contributing factor for histological, cytological and virological responses, providing valuable insights into the design of therapeutic vaccines for effectively treating persistent infections and cancers in humans. PMID:25354725

  18. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  19. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-12-15

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  20. Quantitative measurement of transcriptional inhibition and mutagenesis induced by site-specifically incorporated DNA lesions in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant transcription induced by DNA damage may confer risk for the development of cancer and other human diseases. Traditional methods for measuring lesion-induced transcriptional alterations often involve extensive colony screening and DNA sequencing procedures. Here we describe a protocol for the quantitative assessment of the effects of DNA lesions on the efficiency and fidelity of transcription in vitro and in mammalian cells. The method is also amenable to investigating the influence of specific DNA repair proteins on the biological response toward DNA damage during transcription by manipulating their gene expression. Specifically, we present detailed, step-by-step procedures, including DNA template preparation, in vitro and in vivo transcription, RNA purification, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and restriction digestion of RT-PCR products. Analyses of restriction fragments of interest are performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The entire procedure described in this protocol can be completed in 15-20 d. PMID:26292071

  1. The DNA glycosylase AlkD uses a non-base-flipping mechanism to excise bulky lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Shi, Rongxin; Parsons, Zachary D.; Yuen, Philip K.; David, Sheila S.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2015-11-01

    Threats to genomic integrity arising from DNA damage are mitigated by DNA glycosylases, which initiate the base excision repair pathway by locating and excising aberrant nucleobases. How these enzymes find small modifications within the genome is a current area of intensive research. A hallmark of these and other DNA repair enzymes is their use of base flipping to sequester modified nucleotides from the DNA helix and into an active site pocket. Consequently, base flipping is generally regarded as an essential aspect of lesion recognition and a necessary precursor to base excision. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, DNA glycosylase mechanism that does not require base flipping for either binding or catalysis. Using the DNA glycosylase AlkD from Bacillus cereus, we crystallographically monitored excision of an alkylpurine substrate as a function of time, and reconstructed the steps along the reaction coordinate through structures representing substrate, intermediate and product complexes. Instead of directly interacting with the damaged nucleobase, AlkD recognizes aberrant base pairs through interactions with the phosphoribose backbone, while the lesion remains stacked in the DNA duplex. Quantum mechanical calculations revealed that these contacts include catalytic charge-dipole and CH-π interactions that preferentially stabilize the transition state. We show in vitro and in vivo how this unique means of recognition and catalysis enables AlkD to repair large adducts formed by yatakemycin, a member of the duocarmycin family of antimicrobial natural products exploited in bacterial warfare and chemotherapeutic trials. Bulky adducts of this or any type are not excised by DNA glycosylases that use a traditional base-flipping mechanism. Hence, these findings represent a new model for DNA repair and provide insights into catalysis of base excision.

  2. The DNA glycosylase AlkD uses a non-base-flipping mechanism to excise bulky lesions.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Shi, Rongxin; Parsons, Zachary D; Yuen, Philip K; David, Sheila S; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Eichman, Brandt F

    2015-11-12

    Threats to genomic integrity arising from DNA damage are mitigated by DNA glycosylases, which initiate the base excision repair pathway by locating and excising aberrant nucleobases. How these enzymes find small modifications within the genome is a current area of intensive research. A hallmark of these and other DNA repair enzymes is their use of base flipping to sequester modified nucleotides from the DNA helix and into an active site pocket. Consequently, base flipping is generally regarded as an essential aspect of lesion recognition and a necessary precursor to base excision. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, DNA glycosylase mechanism that does not require base flipping for either binding or catalysis. Using the DNA glycosylase AlkD from Bacillus cereus, we crystallographically monitored excision of an alkylpurine substrate as a function of time, and reconstructed the steps along the reaction coordinate through structures representing substrate, intermediate and product complexes. Instead of directly interacting with the damaged nucleobase, AlkD recognizes aberrant base pairs through interactions with the phosphoribose backbone, while the lesion remains stacked in the DNA duplex. Quantum mechanical calculations revealed that these contacts include catalytic charge-dipole and CH-π interactions that preferentially stabilize the transition state. We show in vitro and in vivo how this unique means of recognition and catalysis enables AlkD to repair large adducts formed by yatakemycin, a member of the duocarmycin family of antimicrobial natural products exploited in bacterial warfare and chemotherapeutic trials. Bulky adducts of this or any type are not excised by DNA glycosylases that use a traditional base-flipping mechanism. Hence, these findings represent a new model for DNA repair and provide insights into catalysis of base excision. PMID:26524531

  3. A transposon-derived DNA polymerase from Entamoeba histolytica displays intrinsic strand displacement, processivity and lesion bypass.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Palacios, Guillermo; López-Ramírez, Varinia; Cardona-Felix, Cesar S; Brieba, Luis G

    2012-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica encodes four family B2 DNA polymerases that vary in amino acid length from 813 to 1279. These DNA polymerases contain a N-terminal domain with no homology to other proteins and a C-terminal domain with high amino acid identity to archetypical family B2 DNA polymerases. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that these family B2 DNA polymerases are grouped with DNA polymerases from transposable elements dubbed Polintons or Mavericks. In this work, we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of the smallest family B2 DNA polymerase from E. histolytica. To facilitate its characterization we subcloned its 660 amino acids C-terminal region that comprises the complete exonuclease and DNA polymerization domains, dubbed throughout this work as EhDNApolB2. We found that EhDNApolB2 displays remarkable strand displacement, processivity and efficiently bypasses the DNA lesions: 8-oxo guanosine and abasic site.Family B2 DNA polymerases from T. vaginalis, G. lambia and E. histolytica contain a Terminal Region Protein 2 (TPR2) motif twice the length of the TPR2 from φ29 DNA polymerase. Deletion studies demonstrate that as in φ29 DNA polymerase, the TPR2 motif of EhDNApolB2 is solely responsible of strand displacement and processivity. Interestingly the TPR2 of EhDNApolB2 is also responsible for efficient abasic site bypass. These data suggests that the 21 extra amino acids of the TPR2 motif may shape the active site of EhDNApolB2 to efficiently incorporate and extended opposite an abasic site. Herein we demonstrate that an open reading frame derived from Politons-Mavericks in parasitic protozoa encode a functional enzyme and our findings support the notion that the introduction of novel motifs in DNA polymerases can confer specialized properties to a conserved scaffold. PMID:23226232

  4. Proliferation markers Ki-67 and p105 in soft-tissue lesions. Correlation with DNA flow cytometric characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, S. A.; Brooks, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Frozen tissue immunoreactivity with Ki-67, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a nuclear antigen in nonresting or proliferating cells, was compared to DNA flow cytometry results (from fresh tissue) in a diverse group of 60 soft-tissue lesions. Both DNA index and Ki-67 score were independently reported to be associated with grade and prognosis in sarcomas, but no direct comparison of these two variables was made. It was attempted to measure proliferative activity in fixed paraffin-embedded tissues immunohistochemically in a subset of lesions using an antibody to another nuclear proliferation antigen, p105. Lesions were given a grade according to lesion category (reactive, 1; benign, 2; low-grade malignant, 3; and high-grade malignant, 4). Ki-67 reactivity correlated relatively well with this grading system (r = 0.59); benign lesions usually exhibited a low Ki-67 score and malignant lesions usually but not always exhibited a high score. For example, some malignant fibrous histiocytomas contained only rare positive cells. Some disparity between Ki-67 score and grade and within histologic types indicates some independence from these features, a fact that may be important when correlation with prognosis is performed. However Ki-67 did not correlate well with flow data such as percentage S phase (r = 0.30), percentage S + G2M phases (r = 0.37), or DNA index (r = 0.39). This probably is due to the fact that Ki-67 also marks cells in the G1 phase, whereas these are excluded in flow data analyses. Anti-p105 highlighted almost all nuclei in all cases tested, including fibromatosis, and did not correlate with Ki-67 score, histologic grade or DNA flow cytometric data. Results with p105 could not be favorably affected by titration experiments. It is reasonable to conclude that the Ki-67 score is a variable related to but independent of histologic grade, histologic type, and DNA flow values. Whether it is prognostically important in human sarcomas, as has been suggested

  5. Differential Roles for DNA Polymerases Eta, Zeta, and REV1 in Lesion Bypass of Intrastrand versus Interstrand DNA Cross-Links▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, J. Kevin; Chute, Colleen L.; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Ragland, Ryan L.; Howlett, Niall G.; Guéranger, Quentin; Glover, Thomas W.; Canman, Christine E.

    2010-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) is a process whereby specialized DNA polymerases are recruited to bypass DNA lesions that would otherwise stall high-fidelity polymerases. We provide evidence that TLS across cisplatin intrastrand cross-links is performed by multiple translesion DNA polymerases. First, we determined that PCNA monoubiquitination by RAD18 is necessary for efficient bypass of cisplatin adducts by the TLS polymerases eta (Polη), REV1, and zeta (Polζ) based on the observations that depletion of these proteins individually leads to decreased cell survival, cell cycle arrest in S phase, and activation of the DNA damage response. Second, we showed that in addition to PCNA monoubiquitination by RAD18, the Fanconi anemia core complex is also important for recruitment of REV1 to stalled replication forks in cisplatin treated cells. Third, we present evidence that REV1 and Polζ are uniquely associated with protection against cisplatin and mitomycin C-induced chromosomal aberrations, and both are necessary for the timely resolution of DNA double-strand breaks associated with repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. Together, our findings indicate that REV1 and Polζ facilitate repair of interstrand cross-links independently of PCNA monoubiquitination and Polη, whereas RAD18 plus Polη, REV1, and Polζ are all necessary for replicative bypass of cisplatin intrastrand DNA cross-links. PMID:20028736

  6. Single-molecule imaging of UvrA and UvrB recruitment to DNA lesions in living Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stracy, Mathew; Jaciuk, Marcin; Uphoff, Stephan; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Nowotny, Marcin; Sherratt, David J; Zawadzki, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes chemically diverse DNA lesions in all domains of life. In Escherichia coli, UvrA and UvrB initiate NER, although the mechanistic details of how this occurs in vivo remain to be established. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to provide a comprehensive characterization of the lesion search, recognition and verification process in living cells. We show that NER initiation involves a two-step mechanism in which UvrA scans the genome and locates DNA damage independently of UvrB. Then UvrA recruits UvrB from solution to the lesion. These steps are coordinated by ATP binding and hydrolysis in the 'proximal' and 'distal' UvrA ATP-binding sites. We show that initial UvrB-independent damage recognition by UvrA requires ATPase activity in the distal site only. Subsequent UvrB recruitment requires ATP hydrolysis in the proximal site. Finally, UvrA dissociates from the lesion complex, allowing UvrB to orchestrate the downstream NER reactions. PMID:27562541

  7. Single-molecule imaging of UvrA and UvrB recruitment to DNA lesions in living Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stracy, Mathew; Jaciuk, Marcin; Uphoff, Stephan; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.; Nowotny, Marcin; Sherratt, David J.; Zawadzki, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes chemically diverse DNA lesions in all domains of life. In Escherichia coli, UvrA and UvrB initiate NER, although the mechanistic details of how this occurs in vivo remain to be established. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to provide a comprehensive characterization of the lesion search, recognition and verification process in living cells. We show that NER initiation involves a two-step mechanism in which UvrA scans the genome and locates DNA damage independently of UvrB. Then UvrA recruits UvrB from solution to the lesion. These steps are coordinated by ATP binding and hydrolysis in the ‘proximal' and ‘distal' UvrA ATP-binding sites. We show that initial UvrB-independent damage recognition by UvrA requires ATPase activity in the distal site only. Subsequent UvrB recruitment requires ATP hydrolysis in the proximal site. Finally, UvrA dissociates from the lesion complex, allowing UvrB to orchestrate the downstream NER reactions. PMID:27562541

  8. Thermodynamics of the multi-stage DNA lesion recognition and repair by formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase using pyrrolocytosine fluorescence—stopped-flow pre-steady-state kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2012-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, Fpg protein from Escherichia coli, initiates base excision repair in DNA by removing a wide variety of oxidized lesions. In this study, we perform thermodynamic analysis of the multi-stage interaction of Fpg with specific DNA-substrates containing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG), or tetrahydrofuran (THF, an uncleavable abasic site analog) and non-specific (G) DNA-ligand based on stopped-flow kinetic data. Pyrrolocytosine, highly fluorescent analog of the natural nucleobase cytosine, is used to record multi-stage DNA lesion recognition and repair kinetics over a temperature range (10–30°C). The kinetic data were used to obtain the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of the specific stages using van’t Hoff approach. The data suggest that not only enthalpy-driven exothermic oxoG recognition, but also the desolvation-accompanied entropy-driven enzyme-substrate complex adjustment into the catalytically active state play equally important roles in the overall process. PMID:22584623

  9. Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Jenny; Vare, Daniel; Motwani, Hitesh V; Jenssen, Dag; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration-time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration×cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at a rate of 0.08±0.01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study. PMID:27402481

  10. End modification of a linear DNA duplex enhances NER-mediated excision of an internal Pt(II)-lesion.

    PubMed

    Mason, Tracey McGregor; Smeaton, Michael B; Cheung, Joyce C Y; Hanakahi, Les A; Miller, Paul S

    2008-05-01

    The study of DNA repair has been facilitated by the development of extract-based in vitro assay systems and the use of synthetic DNA duplexes that contain site-specific lesions as repair substrates. Unfortunately, exposed DNA termini can be a liability when working in crude cell extracts because they are targets for DNA end-modifying enzymes and binding sites for proteins that recognize DNA termini. In particular, the double-strand break repair protein Ku is an abundant DNA end-binding protein that has been shown to interfere with nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro. To facilitate the investigation of NER in whole-cell extracts, we explored ways of modifying the exposed ends of synthetic repair substrates to prevent Ku binding and improve in vitro NER efficiency. Replacement of six contiguous phosphodiester linkages at the 3'-ends of the duplex repair substrate with nuclease-resistant nonionic methylphosphonate linkages resulted in a 280-fold decrease in binding affinity between Ku and the modified duplex. These results are consistent with the published crystal structure of a Ku/DNA complex [Walker et al. (2001) Nature 412, 607-614] and show that the 3'-terminal phosphodiester linkages of linear DNA duplexes are important determinants in DNA end-binding by Ku. Using HeLa whole-cell extracts and a 149-base pair DNA duplex repair substrate, we tested the effects of modification of exposed DNA termini on NER-mediated in vitro excision of a 1,3-GTG-Pt(II) intrastrand cross-link. Methylphosphonate modification at the 3'-ends of the repair substrate resulted in a 1.6-fold increase in excision. Derivatization of the 5'-ends of the duplex with biotin and subsequent conjugation with streptavidin to block Ku binding resulted in a 2.3-fold increase excision. By combining these modifications, we were able to effectively reduce Ku-derived interference of NER excision in vitro and observed a 4.4-fold increase in platinum lesion excision. These modifications are easy to

  11. Thermodynamic and mechanistic insights into translesion DNA synthesis catalyzed by Y-family DNA polymerase across a bulky double-base lesion of an antitumor platinum drug.

    PubMed

    Brabec, Viktor; Malina, Jaroslav; Margiotta, Nicola; Natile, Giovanni; Kasparkova, Jana

    2012-11-26

    To determine how the Y-family translesion DNA polymerase η (Polη) processes lesions remains fundamental to understanding the molecular origins of the mutagenic translesion bypass. We utilized model systems employing a DNA double-base lesion derived from 1,2-GG intrastrand cross-links of a new antitumor Pt(II) complex containing a bulky carrier ligand, namely [PtCl(2)(cis-1,4-dach)] (DACH=diaminocyclohexane). The catalytic efficiency of Polη for the insertion of correct dCTP, with respect to the other incorrect nucleotides, opposite the 1,2-GG cross-link was markedly reduced by the DACH carrier ligand. This reduced efficiency of Polη to incorporate the correct dCTP could be due to a more extensive DNA unstacking and deformation of the minor groove induced in the DNA by the cross-link of bulky [PtCl(2)(cis-1,4-dach)]. The major products of the bypass of this double-base lesion produced by [PtCl(2)(cis-1,4-dach)] by Polη resulted from misincorporation of dATP opposite the platinated G residues. The results of the present work support the thesis that this misincorporation could be due to sterical effects of the bulkier 1,4-DACH ligand hindering the formation of the Polη-DNA-incoming nucleotide complex. Calorimetric analysis suggested that thermodynamic factors may contribute to the forces that governed enhanced incorporation of the incorrect dATP by Polη as well. PMID:23065963

  12. Efficient and Reliable Production of Vectors for the Study of the Repair, Mutagenesis, and Phenotypic Consequences of Defined DNA Damage Lesions in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Lucy; Gran, Christine; Bjoras, Magnar; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells are constantly and unavoidably exposed to DNA damage from endogenous and exogenous sources, frequently to the detriment of genomic integrity and biological function. Cells acquire a large number of chemically diverse lesions per day, and each can have a different genetic fate and biological consequences. However, our knowledge of how and when specific lesions are repaired or how they may compromise the fidelity of DNA replication or transcription and lead to deleterious biological endpoints in mammalian cells is limited. Studying individual lesions requires technically challenging approaches for the targeted introduction of defined lesions into relevant DNA sequences of interest. Here, we present a systematic analysis of factors influencing yield and an improved, efficient and reliable protocol for the production of mammalian expression phagemid vectors containing defined DNA base modifications in any sequence position of either complementary DNA strand. We applied our improved protocol to study the transcriptional mutagenesis-mediated phenotypic consequences of the common oxidative lesion 5-hydroxyuracil, placed in the G12 mutational hotspot of the KRAS oncogene. 5-OHU induced sustained oncogenic signaling in Neil1-/-Neil2-/- mouse cells. The resulting advance in technology will have broad applicability for investigation of single lesion DNA repair, mutagenesis, and DNA damage responses in mammalian cells. PMID:27362559

  13. Repair of lesions and initiation of DNA replication in vertebrate cells. Progress report, 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the search for sequences in Xenopus DNA that serve as origins for replication; (2) preparation of a partial library of Xenopus genomic DNA and search for other origins; and (3) base pair mismatch correction and DNA methylation. (ACR)

  14. DNA-PK triggers histone ubiquitination and signaling in response to DNA double-strand breaks produced during the repair of transcription-blocking topoisomerase I lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cristini, Agnese; Park, Joon-Hyung; Capranico, Giovanni; Legube, Gaëlle; Favre, Gilles; Sordet, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Although defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to neurodegenerative diseases, the processes underlying their production and signaling in non-replicating cells are largely unknown. Stabilized topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1cc) by natural compounds or common DNA alterations are transcription-blocking lesions whose repair depends primarily on Top1 proteolysis and excision by tyrosyl–DNA phosphodiesterase-1 (TDP1). We previously reported that stabilized Top1cc produce transcription-dependent DSBs that activate ATM in neurons. Here, we use camptothecin (CPT)-treated serum-starved quiescent cells to induce transcription-blocking Top1cc and show that those DSBs are generated during Top1cc repair from Top1 peptide-linked DNA single-strand breaks generated after Top1 proteolysis and before excision by TDP1. Following DSB induction, ATM activates DNA-PK whose inhibition suppresses H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and the later assembly of activated ATM into nuclear foci. Inhibition of DNA-PK also reduces Top1 ubiquitination and proteolysis as well as resumption of RNA synthesis suggesting that DSB signaling further enhances Top1cc repair. Finally, we show that co-transcriptional DSBs kill quiescent cells. Together, these new findings reveal that DSB production and signaling by transcription-blocking Top1 lesions impact on non-replicating cell fate and provide insights on the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as SCAN1 and AT syndromes, which are caused by TDP1 and ATM deficiency, respectively. PMID:26578593

  15. Effects of Twelve Germline Missense Variations on DNA Lesion and G-Quadruplex Bypass Activities of Human DNA Polymerase REV1.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Mina; Kim, In-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Kwon; Kang, KyeongJin; Eoff, Robert L; Guengerich, F Peter; Choi, Jeong-Yun

    2016-03-21

    The Y-family DNA polymerase REV1 is involved in replicative bypass of damaged DNA and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA. In addition to a scaffolding role in the replicative bypass, REV1 acts in a catalytic role as a deoxycytidyl transferase opposite some replication stall sites, e.g., apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, N(2)-guanyl lesions, and G4 sites. We characterized the biochemical properties of 12 reported germline missense variants of human REV1, including the N373S variant associated with high risk of cervical cancer, using the recombinant REV1 (residues 330-833) proteins and DNA templates containing a G, AP site, N(2)-CH2(2-naphthyl)G (N(2)-NaphG), or G4. In steady-state kinetic analyses, the F427L, R434Q, M656V, D700N, R704Q, and P831L variants displayed 2- to 8-fold decreases in kcat/Km for dCTP insertion opposite all four templates, compared to that of wild-type, while the N373S, M407L, and N497S showed 2- to 3-fold increases with all four and the former three or two templates, respectively. The F427L, R434Q, M656V, and R704Q variants also had 2- to 3-fold lower binding affinities to DNA substrates containing G, an AP site, and/or N(2)-NaphG than wild-type. Distinctively, the N373S variant had a 3-fold higher binding affinity to G4 DNA than the wild-type, as well as a 2-fold higher catalytic activity opposite the first tetrad G, suggesting a facilitating effect of this variation on replication of G4 DNA sequences in certain human papillomavirus genomes. Our results suggest that the catalytic function of REV1 is moderately or slightly altered by at least nine genetic variations, and the G4 DNA processing function of REV1 is slightly enhanced by the N373S variation, which might provide the possibility that certain germline missense REV1 variations affect the individual susceptibility to carcinogenesis by modifying the capability of REV1 for replicative bypass past DNA lesions and G4 motifs derived from chemical and viral carcinogens. PMID:26914252

  16. Atherosclerotic lesions and mitochondria DNA deletions in brain microvessels: Implication in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Gasimov, Eldar; Obrenovich, Mark E; Fischbach, Kathryn; Shenk, Justin C; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis that is primarily responsible for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) appears to involve chronic hypoperfusion. We studied the ultrastructural features of vascular lesions and mitochondria in brain vascular wall cells from human AD biopsy samples and two transgenic mouse models of AD, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) and C57B6/SJL Tg (+), which overexpress human amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP). In situ hybridization using probes for normal and 5 kb deleted human and mouse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was performed along with immunocytochemistry using antibodies against the Aβ peptide processed from AβPP, 8-hydroxy-2’-guanosine (8OHG), and cytochrome c oxidase (COX). More amyloid deposition, oxidative stress markers as well as mitochondrial DNA deletions and structural abnormalities were present in the vascular walls of the human AD samples and the AβPP-YAC and C57B6/SJL Tg (+) transgenic mice compared to age-matched controls. Ultrastructural damage in perivascular cells highly correlated with endothelial lesions in all samples. Therefore, pharmacological interventions, directed at correcting the chronic hypoperfusion state, may change the natural course of the development of dementing neurodegeneration. PMID:18827923

  17. DNA methylation in human papillomavirus-infected cervical cells is elevated in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ki-Heon; So, Kyeong A; Hong, Sung Ran; Hwang, Chang-Sun; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Rhee, Jee Eun; Kang, Chun; Hur, Soo Young; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Objective DNA methylation has been shown to be a potential biomarker for early cancer detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate DNA methylation profiles according to liquid-based Pap (LBP) test results and to assess their diagnostic value in a Korean population. Methods A total of 205 patients with various Papanicolaou test results were enrolled to this study (negative, 26; atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, 39; low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, 44; high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), 48; and cancer, 48). DNA methylation analysis of four genes, ADCYAP1, PAX1, MAL, and CADM1, was performed on residual cervical cells from LBP samples using a quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing method. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of the four methylated genes for cancer detection, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn. Sensitivities and specificities were also tested at cutoffs determined from the ROC curves. Results Cervical cancer cells showed dramatically increased methylation levels for the four genes analyzed. ADCYAP1 and PAX1 also trended toward elevated methylation levels in HSIL samples, although the levels were much lower than those in cancer cells. The sensitivities of methylated ADCYAP1, PAX1, MAL, and CADM1 for the detection of cancer were 79.2%, 75.0%, 70.8%, and 52.1%, and the specificities were 92.0%, 94.0%, 94.7%, and 94.0%, respectively. Methylated ADCYAP1 and PAX1 demonstrated relatively better discriminatory ability than did methylated MAL and CADM1 (area under the curves 0.911 and 0.916 vs. 0.854 and 0.756, respectively). Conclusion DNA methylation status, especially in the ADCYAP1 and PAX1 genes, showed relatively good specificity, ranging from 90% to 94%. The possible additive and complementary roles of DNA methylation testing with respect to conventional cervical cancer screening programs will need to be validated in prospective population-based studies. PMID:26768780

  18. Repriming by PrimPol is critical for DNA replication restart downstream of lesions and chain-terminating nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Guilliam, Thomas A; Tsuda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Junpei; Bailey, Laura J; Iwai, Shigenori; Takeda, Shunichi; Doherty, Aidan J; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-08-01

    PrimPol is a DNA damage tolerance enzyme possessing both translesion synthesis (TLS) and primase activities. To uncover its potential role in TLS-mediated IgVλ hypermutation and define its interplay with other TLS polymerases, PrimPol(-/-) and PrimPol(-/-)/Polη(-/-)/Polζ (-/-) gene knockouts were generated in avian cells. Loss of PrimPol had no significant impact on the rate of hypermutation or the mutation spectrum of IgVλ. However, PrimPol(-/-) cells were sensitive to methylmethane sulfonate, suggesting that it may bypass abasic sites at the IgVλ segment by repriming DNA synthesis downstream of these sites. PrimPol(-/-) cells were also sensitive to cisplatin and hydroxyurea, indicating that it assists in maintaining / restarting replication at a variety of lesions. To accurately measure the relative contribution of the TLS and primase activities, we examined DNA damage sensitivity in PrimPol(-/-) cells complemented with polymerase or primase-deficient PrimPol. Polymerase-defective, but not primase-deficient, PrimPol suppresses the hypersensitivity of PrimPol(-/-) cells. This indicates that its primase, rather than TLS activity, is pivotal for DNA damage tolerance. Loss of TLS polymerases, Polη and Polζ has an additive effect on the sensitivity of PrimPol(-/-) cells. Moreover, we found that PrimPol and Polη-Polζ redundantly prevented cell death and facilitated unperturbed cell cycle progression. PrimPol(-/-) cells also exhibited increased sensitivity to a wide variety of chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs). PrimPol could perform close-coupled repriming downstream of CTNAs and oxidative damage in vitro. Together, these results indicate that PrimPol's repriming activity plays a central role in reinitiating replication downstream from CTNAs and other specific DNA lesions. PMID:27230014

  19. Repriming by PrimPol is critical for DNA replication restart downstream of lesions and chain-terminating nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Guilliam, Thomas A.; Tsuda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Junpei; Bailey, Laura J.; Iwai, Shigenori; Takeda, Shunichi; Doherty, Aidan J.; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PrimPol is a DNA damage tolerance enzyme possessing both translesion synthesis (TLS) and primase activities. To uncover its potential role in TLS-mediated IgVλ hypermutation and define its interplay with other TLS polymerases, PrimPol−/− and PrimPol−/−/Polη−/−/Polζ −/− gene knockouts were generated in avian cells. Loss of PrimPol had no significant impact on the rate of hypermutation or the mutation spectrum of IgVλ. However, PrimPol−/− cells were sensitive to methylmethane sulfonate, suggesting that it may bypass abasic sites at the IgVλ segment by repriming DNA synthesis downstream of these sites. PrimPol−/− cells were also sensitive to cisplatin and hydroxyurea, indicating that it assists in maintaining / restarting replication at a variety of lesions. To accurately measure the relative contribution of the TLS and primase activities, we examined DNA damage sensitivity in PrimPol−/− cells complemented with polymerase or primase-deficient PrimPol. Polymerase-defective, but not primase-deficient, PrimPol suppresses the hypersensitivity of PrimPol−/− cells. This indicates that its primase, rather than TLS activity, is pivotal for DNA damage tolerance. Loss of TLS polymerases, Polη and Polζ has an additive effect on the sensitivity of PrimPol−/− cells. Moreover, we found that PrimPol and Polη-Polζ redundantly prevented cell death and facilitated unperturbed cell cycle progression. PrimPol−/− cells also exhibited increased sensitivity to a wide variety of chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs). PrimPol could perform close-coupled repriming downstream of CTNAs and oxidative damage in vitro. Together, these results indicate that PrimPol's repriming activity plays a central role in reinitiating replication downstream from CTNAs and other specific DNA lesions. PMID:27230014

  20. Protection of DNA From Ionizing Radiation-Induced Lesions by Asiaticoside.

    PubMed

    Joy, Jisha; Alarifi, Saud; Alsuhaibani, Entissar; Nair, Cherupally K Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether asiaticoside, a triterpene glycoside, can afford protection to DNA from alterations induced by gamma radiation under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. In vitro studies were done on plasmid pBR322 DNA, ex vivo studies were done on cellular DNA of human peripheral blood leukocytes, and in vivo investigations were conducted on cellular DNA of spleen and bone marrow cells of mice exposed to whole-body gamma radiation. The supercoiled form of the plasmid pBR322 DNA upon exposure to the radiation was converted into relaxed open circular form due to induction of strand breaks. Presence of asiaticoside along with the DNA during irradiation prevented the relaxation of the supercoiled form to the open circular form. When human peripheral blood leukocytes were exposed to gamma radiation, the cellular DNA suffered strand breaks as evidenced by the increased comet parameters in an alkaline comet assay. Asiaticoside, when present along with blood during irradiation ex vivo, prevented the strand breaks and the comet parameters were closer to that of the controls. Whole-body exposure of mice to gamma radiation resulted in a significant increase in comet parameters of DNA of bone marrow and spleen cells of mice as a result of radiation-induced strand breaks in DNA. Administration of asiaticoside prior to whole-body radiation exposure of the mice prevented this increase in radiation-induced increase in comet parameters, which could be the result of protection to DNA under in vivo conditions of radiation exposure. Thus, it can be concluded from the results that asiaticoside can offer protection to DNA from radiation-induced alterations under in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo conditions. PMID:26756427

  1. Binding discrimination of MutS to a set of lesions and compound lesions (base damage and mismatch) reveals its potential role as a cisplatin-damaged DNA sensing protein.

    PubMed

    Fourrier, Laurence; Brooks, Peter; Malinge, Jean-Marc

    2003-06-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a critical role in sensitizing both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to the clinically potent anticancer drug cisplatin. It is thought to mediate cytotoxicity through recognition of cisplatin DNA lesions. This drug generates a range of lesions that may also give rise to compound lesions resulting from the misincorporation of a base during translesion synthesis. Using gel mobility shift competition assays and surface plasmon resonance, we have analyzed the interaction of Escherichia coli MutS protein with site-specifically modified DNA oligonucleotides containing each of the four cisplatin cross-links or a set of compound lesions. The major 1,2-d(GpG) cisplatin intrastrand cross-link was recognized with only a 1.5-fold specificity, whereas a 47-fold specificity was found with a natural G/T containing DNA substrate. The rate of association, kon, for binding to the 1,2-d(GpG) adduct was 3.1 x 104 m-1 s-1 and the specificity of binding was essentially dependent on koff. DNA duplexes containing a single 1,2-d(ApG), 1,3-d(GpCpG) adduct, and an interstrand cross-link of cisplatin were not preferentially recognized. Among 12 DNA substrates, each containing a different cisplatin compound lesion derived from replicative misincorporation of one base opposite either of the 1,2-intrastrand adducts, 10 were specifically recognized including those that are more likely formed in vivo based on cisplatin mutation spectra. Moreover, among these lesions, two compound lesions formed when an adenine was misincorporated opposite a 1,2-d(GpG) adduct were not substrates for the MutY-dependent mismatch repair pathway. The ability of MutS to sense differentially various platinated DNA substrates suggests that cisplatin compound lesions formed during misincorporation of a base opposite either adducted base of both 1,2-intrastrand cross-links are more plausible critical lesions for MMR-mediated cisplatin cytotoxicity. PMID:12654906

  2. A prior administration of heavy metals reduces thymus lymphocyte DNA lesions and lipid peroxidation in gamma-irradiated mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, A. N.; Ryabchenko, N. I.; Ivannik, B. P.; Dzikovskaya, L. A.; Ryabchenko, V. I.; Kolomijtseva, G. Ya.

    2003-05-01

    In the present work we report that a prior injection of Pb, Cd or Zn salt solutions in SHK male mice decreases the effect followed γ-irradiation on thymus lymphocyte DNA structure and level of lipid peroxidation. It is assumed that the observed phenomenon is caused by activation of protective mechanisms of cells, expression of the genes of antioxidant proteins such as the metallothioneins, etc. Indeed the measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) in blood plasma showed that the injection of metal salt solutions at median lethal doses a half hour before γ-irradiation (1 Gy) causes the decrease of the MDA contents at 48 h after irradiation on 100% (Zn), 70% (Cd) and 20% (Pb). However we found that combined exposure of the mice also results to significant decrease of the thymus lymphocytes total number of as compared to the irradiation without metals. The elimination of the cells with high level of DNA lesions and existence at least a subset of cells which would survive the current oxidative stress (γ-irradiation) possibly represents one path-way of the survival of individual organism facing stress. ln turn the observed decrease of the lesion levels may be reflection of the cell number change.

  3. The SRS2 suppressor of rad6 mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae acts by channeling DNA lesions into the RAD52 DNA repair pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Schiestl, R.H.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L. )

    1990-04-01

    rad6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are defective in the repair of damaged DNA, DNA damage induced mutagenesis, and sporulation. In order to identify genes that can substitute for RAD6 function, the authors have isolated genomic suppressors of the UV sensitivity of rad6 deletion (rad6{Delta}) mutations and show that they also suppress the {gamma}-ray sensitivity but not the UV mutagenesis or sporulation defects of rad6. The suppressors show semidominance for suppression of UV sensitivity and dominance for suppression of {gamma}-ray sensitivity. The six suppressor mutations they isolated are all alleles of the same locus and are also allelic to a previously described suppressor of the rad6-1 nonsense mutation, SRS2. They show that suppression of rad6{Delta} is dependent on the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway since suppression is not observed in the rad6{Delta} SRS2 strain containing an additional mutation in either the RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55 or RAD57 genes. Possible mechanisms by which SRS2 may channel unrepaired DNA lesions into the RAD52 DNA repair pathway are discussed.

  4. DNA DAMAGE AND EXTERNAL LESIONS IN BROWN BULLHEAD FROM CONTAMINATED HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The single cell gel electrophoresis ("Comet") assay was used to compare levels of DNA damage in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) collected from three known contaminated locations, the Cuyahoga River, Ashtabula River, and Ashumet Pond (Cape Cod), with brown bullheads collected...

  5. Synthesis of DNA Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Site-Specific 1,3-Butadiene- Deoxyadenosine Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wickramaratne, Susith; Seiler, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Post-oligomerization synthesis is a useful technique for preparing site-specifically modified DNA oligomers. This approach involves site-specific incorporation of inherently reactive halogenated nucleobases into DNA strands using standard solid phase synthesis, followed by post-oligomerization nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reactions with carcinogen-derived synthons. In these reactions, the inherent reactivities of DNA and carcinogen-derived species are reversed: the modified DNA nucleobase acts as an electrophile, while the carcinogen-derived species acts as a nucleophile. In the present protocol, we describe the use of the post-oligomerization approach to prepare DNA strands containing site- and stereospecific N6-adenine and N1, N6-adenine adducts induced by epoxide metabolites of the known human and animal carcinogen, 1,3-butadiene (BD). The resulting oligomers containing site specific, structurally defined DNA adducts can be used in structural and biological studies to reveal the roles of specific BD adducts in carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. PMID:26344227

  6. Determination of apurinic/apyrimidinic lesions in DNA with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth P; Sobrino, Justin A; Payton, Julie; Mason, Lavinnia B; Turesky, Robert J

    2006-02-01

    A new method has been developed to accurately measure apurinic and apyrimidinic (AP) DNA damage sites, which are lesions in DNA formed by loss of a nucleobase from oxidative stress or carcinogen adducts. If AP sites are left unrepaired (or if improperly repaired), these sites can lead to DNA mutations that may ultimately result in the formation of cancer. Hence, detection of AP sites may provide a useful indicator of exposure and susceptibility to chemical carcinogens and oxidative stress. AP detection is currently accomplished by immunodetection methods using an aldehyde reactive probe [Nakamura, J., Walker, V. E., Upton, P. B., Chiang, S.-Y., Kow, Y. W., and Swenberg, J. A. (1998) Cancer Res. 58, 222-225; Atamna, H., Cheung, I., and Ames, B. N. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 686-691]; however, these approaches lack the specificity required for unequivocal identification of the AP site. Therefore, we have developed an accurate method based on mass spectrometry detection of AP sites from AP DNA that have been prelabeled with O-4-nitrobenzylhydroxylamine (NBHA). Once labeled and once the excess labeling agent has been removed, enzymatic digestion of DNA to monomeric subunits can be accomplished, followed by isolation and detection with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Optimization and validation of the experimental procedures and detection limits have been established using a model DNA oligomer (11-mer) containing uracil. Enzymatic removal of uracil with uracil glycosylase generates well-defined AP sites in both single- and double-stranded DNA. The addition of NBHA labels the AP site in the oligomer, creating a labeled 11-mer. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in the negative ionization mode was used to monitor and confirm binding of NBHA to the AP oligomer. The NBHA-tagged oligomer underwent endo- and exonuclease digestion to the 5'-deoxyribose monophosphate (5'-dRp) level, thereby releasing

  7. Reduced contribution of thermally labile sugar lesions to DNA double strand break formation after exposure to heavy ions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In cells exposed to low linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing-radiation (IR), double-strand-breaks (DSBs) form within clustered-damage-sites (CDSs) from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that all DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected by the cellular DNA-damage-response (DDR) apparatus. However, there is evidence that the pool of DSBs detected by physical methods, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), comprises not only promptly forming DSBs (prDSBs) but also DSBs developing during lysis at high temperatures from thermally-labile sugar-lesions (TLSLs). We recently demonstrated that conversion of TLSLs to DNA breaks and ultimately to DSBs also occurs in cells during the first hour of post-irradiation incubation at physiological temperatures. Thus, TLSL-dependent DSBs (tlDSBs) are not an avoidable technique-related artifact, but a reality the cell always faces. The biological consequences of tlDSBs and the dependence of their formation on LET require in-depth investigation. Heavy-ions (HI) are a promising high-LET radiation modality used in cancer treatment. HI are also encountered in space and generate serious radiation protection problems to prolonged space missions. Here, we study, therefore, the effect of HI on the yields of tlDSBs and prDSBs. We report a reduction in the yield of tlDBSs stronger than that earlier reported for neutrons, and with pronounced cell line dependence. We conclude that with increasing LET the complexity of CDSs increases resulting in a commensurate increase in the yield prDSBs and a decrease in tlDSBs. The consequences of these effects to the relative biological effectiveness are discussed. PMID:23547740

  8. Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by γ-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 μM) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 μM ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

  9. From bacteria to humans: lessons learned from a reductionist's view of ultraviolet light-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Trosko, J E

    2001-01-01

    What follows is a personal remembrance of how Dr. Richard Setlow influenced me as a young postdoctoral fellow at Oak Ridge National laboratory between 1963 and 1966. The narrative tries to place my "maturation" as a young, inexperienced scientist in the context of the cultural upheaval caused by the Vietnam war, of a Northerner facing a "culture-shock" living in the South and in a revolution in molecular and radiation biology taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory at that time. The unique historic juxtaposition of Dr. Setlow's contribution of the discovery of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in bacterial DNA, being potentially the molecular lesion responsible for cell killing and mutagenesis, occurring as I was at Oak Ridge, and the wonderful working relationship I had with William Carrier, his technician, led to our discovery with James Regan that normal human cells repaired these lesion from their DNA. Amazingly, because of Dr. Setlow's challenge to me about my thoughts of the implications of his findings in bacteria, the chance visit to Oak Ridge National Laboratory by Dr. James Cleaver and my background as a human geneticist provided me the extraordinary opportunity to carry out a collaboration to test if human cancer prone syndromes might be deficient in the repair of these UV-induced DNA lesions. With our finding that the direct demonstration of a lack of repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in cells from the skin cancer prone syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, opened up a new paradigm for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis of both radiation and chemical carcinogenesis. From this investigator's vantage point in the history of the understanding of carcinogenesis, which has led us to the present point of "oncogenes" and "tumor suppressor genes", the old adage by Newton, "I only saw further because I stood on the shoulder of giants", is so applicable here. Dr. Setlow's shoulders were indeed among those of all of us that have made

  10. Immunological lesions in human uracil DNA glycosylase: association with Bloom syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, G; Brech, K; Karp, S J; Cool, B L; Sirover, M A

    1988-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies that react with uracil DNA glycosylase of normal human placenta were tested to determine whether one of the antibodies could be used as a negative marker for Bloom syndrome. As defined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, monoclonal antibody 40.10.09, which reacts with normal human glycosylase, neither recognized nor inhibited native uracil DNA glycosylase from any of five separate Bloom syndrome cell strains. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the denatured glycosylase protein from all five Bloom syndrome cell strains was immunoreactive with the 40.10.09 antibody. Further, each native enzyme was immunoreactive with two other anti-human placental uracil DNA glycosylase monoclonal antibodies. In contrast, ELISA reactivity was observed with all three monoclonal antibodies in reactions of glycosylases from 5 normal human cell types and 13 abnormal human cell strains. These results experimentally verify the specificity of the aberrant reactivity of the Bloom syndrome uracil DNA glycosylase. The possibility arises that determination of the lack of immunoreactivity with antibody 40.10.09 may have value in the early diagnosis of Bloom syndrome. Images PMID:3353381

  11. DNA DAMAGE AND EXTERNAL LESIONS IN BROWN BULLHEADS FROM CONTAMINATED HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Comet assay was used to compare levels of DNA damage in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) collected from three known contaminated locations, the Cuyahoga River, Ashtabula River, and Ashumet Pond (Cape Cod), with brown bullheads collected from three paired reference sites, ...

  12. Influence of serotonin on fraction of lesions in DNA induced by ultraviolet light and roentgen irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E.V.; Fraikin, G.Ya.

    1986-02-20

    The influence of serotonin on the yield of thymine dimers and rupture of the N-glycoside bond (the yield of thymine in DNA irradiated with ultraviolet light and roentgen irradiation) was studied by means of two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. It was found that serotonin bound to DNA decreases the formation of UV-induced thymine dimers, but has no effect on the number of breaks in the N-glycoside bond in thymidine residues induced by roentgen irradiation. The data obtained are discussed in terms of the question of the mechanisms of the protective effect of serotonin in the photoprotection of yeast cells against the lethal action of UV- and roentgen radiation.

  13. A switch between DNA polymerases δ and λ promotes error-free bypass of 8-oxo-G lesions.

    PubMed

    Markkanen, Enni; Castrec, Benoît; Villani, Giuseppe; Hübscher, Ulrich

    2012-12-11

    7,8-Dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) is a highly abundant and mutagenic lesion. Replicative DNA polymerases (pols) are slowed down at 8-oxo-G and insert both correct cytosine (C) and incorrect adenine (A) opposite 8-oxo-G, but they preferentially extend A:8-oxo-G mispairs. Nevertheless, 8-oxo-G bypass is fairly accurate in vivo. Thus, the question how correct bypass of 8-oxo-G lesions is accomplished despite the poor extension of C:8-oxo-G base pairs by replicative pols remains unanswered. Here we show that replicative pol δ pauses in front of 8-oxo-G and displays difficulties extending from correct C:8-oxo-G in contrast to extension from incorrect A:8-oxo-G. This leads to stalling of pol δ at 8-oxo-G after incorporation of correct C. This stalling at C:8-oxo-G can be overcome by a switch from pol δ to pols λ, β, or η, all of which are able to assist pol δ in 8-oxo-G bypass by translesion synthesis (TLS). Importantly, however, only pol λ selectively catalyzes the correct TLS past 8-oxo-G, whereas pols β and η show no selectivity and even preferentially enhance incorrect TLS. The selectivity of pol λ to promote the correct bypass depends on its N-terminal domain. Furthermore, pol λ(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast extracts display reduced 8-oxo-G TLS. Finally, the correct bypass of 8-oxo-G in gapped plasmids in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HeLa cells is promoted in the presence of pol λ. Our findings suggest that even though 8-oxo-G is not a blocking lesion per se, correct replication over 8-oxo-G is promoted by a pol switch between pols δ and λ. PMID:23175785

  14. Direct assay of radiation-induced DNA base lesions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Adenine (Ade), 2'-deoxyadenosine (dAdo), 5'-deoxyadenosine monophosphate (dAUT), single stranded poly adenylic acid [poly (dA)], double stranded deoxyadenylic-thymidylic acid [ds poly (dA-T)] and salmon testis DNA were irradiated with 500 Gy under oxic and anoxic conditions. The major damage products were analyzed by BPLC with optical detection and quantitated in terms of the percentage of the adenosine in each model compound found as a specific damage product. Outside of the Ade free base, 8-OH-dAdo was the major oxic damage product from each model compound. The type and quantity of the major damage products depended on the sequence and conformation of the model compounds under anoxic conditions. When dAdo and dAMP were irradiated under anoxic conditions, the major damage product was either the R or S isomer of 8,5'cdAdo and little Ade or [alpha]-dAdo was observed. However, when poly(dA), poly(dA-dT), and salmon testis DNA were [gamma]-irradiated under nitrogen, the major deoxyadenosine damage product was identified as the [alpha]-anomer of deoxyadenosine. No [alpha]-deoxyadenosine was detected after irradiation under oxic conditions. The presence of nucleotides with the [alpha]-configuration at the anomeric carbon atom in the DNA chain may have a significant effect on its tertiary structure and possibly modify its biological activity.

  15. Mechanisms of Programmed DNA Lesions and Genomic Instability in the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Frederick W.; Zhang, Yu; Meng, Fei-Long; Guo, Chunguang; Schwer, Bjoern

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving antigen receptor loci are common in lymphoid malignancies. Translocations require DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at two chromosomal sites, their physical juxtaposition, and their fusion by end joining. Ability of lymphocytes to generate diverse repertoires of antigen receptors and effector antibodies derives from programmed genomic alterations that produce DSBs. We discuss these lymphocyte-specific processes, with a focus on mechanisms that provide requisite DSB target specificity and mechanisms that suppress DSB translocation. We also discuss recent work that provides new insights into DSB repair pathways and influences of three-dimensional genome organization on physiological processes and cancer genomes. PMID:23374339

  16. Hybrid detectors improved time-lapse confocal microscopy of PML and 53BP1 nuclear body colocalization in DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Foltánková, Veronika; Matula, Pavel; Sorokin, Dmitry; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva

    2013-04-01

    We used hybrid detectors (HyDs) to monitor the trajectories and interactions of promyelocytic leukemia (GFP-PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) and mCherry-53BP1-positive DNA lesions. 53BP1 protein accumulates in NBs that occur spontaneously in the genome or in γ-irradiation-induced foci. When we induced local DNA damage by ultraviolet irradiation, we also observed accumulation of 53BP1 proteins into discrete bodies, instead of the expected dispersed pattern. In comparison with photomultiplier tubes, which are used for standard analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy, HyDs significantly eliminated photobleaching of GFP and mCherry fluorochromes during image acquisition. The low laser intensities used for HyD-based confocal analysis enabled us to observe NBs for the longer time periods, necessary for studies of the trajectories and interactions of PML and 53BP1 NBs. To further characterize protein interactions, we used resonance scanning and a novel bioinformatics approach to register and analyze the movements of individual PML and 53BP1 NBs. The combination of improved HyD-based confocal microscopy with a tailored bioinformatics approach enabled us to reveal damage-specific properties of PML and 53BP1 NBs. PMID:23410959

  17. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue.

    PubMed

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  18. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  19. Assay of excised oxidative DNA lesions: isolation of 8-oxoguanine and its nucleoside derivatives from biological fluids with a monoclonal antibody column.

    PubMed Central

    Park, E M; Shigenaga, M K; Degan, P; Korn, T S; Kitzler, J W; Wehr, C M; Kolachana, P; Ames, B N

    1992-01-01

    An immunoaffinity column is described that facilitates the analysis of oxidative damage products of DNA and RNA in urine, blood plasma, and medium isolated from cultures of Escherichia coli. In intact animals, lesions (adducts) excised from DNA are transported from the cell through the circulation and excreted in urine. In bacteria, DNA adducts are excreted directly into the medium. In either case, the adducts can be assayed as a measure of oxidative damage to DNA. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (oxo8dG;8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), a bio-marker of oxidative damage to DNA, has been isolated, and its substrate binding properties have been characterized. The relative binding affinities of this monoclonal antibody for oxo8dG, unmodified nucleosides, or derivatives of Gua made it suitable for the preparation of immunoaffinity columns that greatly facilitate the isolation of oxo8dG, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine from various biological fluids. Quantitative analysis of these adducts in urine of rats fed a nucleic acid-free diet and in the medium from cultures of E. coli suggests that oxo8-7,8-dihydroguanine is the principal repair product from oxo8-dG in DNA of both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The results support our previous estimate of about 10(5) oxidative lesions to DNA being formed and excised in an average rat cell per day. PMID:1565629

  20. The simultaneous detection of mitochondrial DNA damage from sun-exposed skin of three whale species and its association with UV-induced microscopic lesions and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Amy; Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Gendron, Diane; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    Due to life history and physiological constraints, cetaceans (whales) are unable to avoid prolonged exposure to external environmental insults, such as solar ultraviolet radiation (UV). The majority of studies on the effects of UV on skin are restricted to humans and laboratory animals, but it is important to develop tools to understand the effects of UV damage on large mammals such as whales, as these animals are long-lived and widely distributed, and can reflect the effects of UV across a large geographical range. We and others have used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a reliable marker of UV-induced damage particularly in human skin. UV-induced mtDNA strand breaks or lesions accumulate throughout the lifespan of an individual, thus constituting an excellent biomarker for cumulative exposure. Based on our previous studies in human skin, we have developed for the first time in the literature a quantitative real-time PCR methodology to detect and quantify mtDNA lesions in skin from sun-blistered whales. Furthermore the methodology allows for simultaneous detection of mtDNA damage in different species. Therefore using 44 epidermal mtDNA samples collected from 15 blue whales, 10 fin whales, and 19 sperm whales from the Gulf of California, Mexico, we quantified damage across 4.3 kilobases, a large region of the ~16,400 base pair whale mitochondrial genome. The results show a range of mtDNA damage in the skin of the three different whale species. This previously unreported observation was correlated with apoptotic damage and microscopic lesions, both of which are markers of UV-induced damage. As is the case in human studies, this suggests the potential use of mtDNA as a biomarker for measuring the effect of cumulative UV exposure in whales and may provide a platform to help understand the effects of changing global environmental conditions. PMID:23583579

  1. In vitro phenotype of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) fibroblast strains: clues to the nature of the ''AT DNA lesion'' and the molecular defect in AT

    SciTech Connect

    Shiloh, Y.; Tabor, E.; Becker, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the in vitro phenotype of a series of AT strains established in Israel revealed the following features: premature senescence and increased demands for growth factors, normal sensitivity to the cytotoxic effect of alkylating agents, hypersensitivity to agents that damage the deoxyribose moiety of DNA via a ''targeted'' free radical attack (this hypersensitivity is coupled with reduced inhibition of DNA synthesis compared to normal cells), varying degrees of intermediate hypersensitivity to the same agents in AT heterozygous cells, lack of potentially lethal damage repair and sublethal damage repair in AT homozygous cells following treatment with free radical-producing agents. We conclude that AT involves a DNA repair defect and that the AT DNA lesion is probably a gap with the 3'-phosphate or 3'-phosphoglycolate end left in the DNA following sugar destruction.

  2. Comparison of the binding of the therapeutically active nucleosides to DNA molecules with different level of lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglova, E. B.; Gladkovskaya, N. A.

    2002-12-01

    Recently we have shown that DNA molecules extracted from epididymis of the Wistar male rats exposed to low doses of gamma radiation interact with some pyrimidine nucleosides. The bindign affinities of NUC to control DNA molecules are unessential. Comparing the UV melting curves for the various DNA sammples we show that observed differences are related to conformational chagnes in the DNA double helix. The samples of the damaged DNA have been obtained by partial denaturation of the calf thymus DNA in the salt-free aqueous solutions. The level of DNA damages in the model DNA smplase depends on the DNA concentration. It was shown that damages in the DNA molecules lead to changes of the melting curves of DNA-NUC mixtures that are similar to those for the DNA samples extracted from irradiated tissues. ALso it has been found that the binding mechanisms to cytosine arabinoside and 6-azacytosine to DNA molecuels having modifeid secondary structures are different.

  3. Are dinucleoside monophosphates relevant models for the study of DNA intrastrand cross-link lesions? The example of g[8-5m]T.

    PubMed

    Garrec, Julian; Dumont, Elise

    2014-07-21

    Oxidatively generated tandem lesions such as G[8-5m]T pose a potent threat to genome integrity. Direct experimental studies of the kinetics and thermodynamics of a specific lesion within DNA are very challenging, mostly due to the variety of products that can be formed in oxidative conditions. Dinucleoside monophosphates (DM) involving only the reactive nucleobases in water represent appealing alternative models on which most physical chemistry and structural techniques can be applied. However, it is not yet clear how relevant these models are. Here, we present QM/MM MD simulations of the cyclization step involved in the formation of G[8-5m]T from the guanine-thymine (GpT) DM in water, with the aim of comparing our results to our previous investigation of the same reaction in DNA ( Garrec , J. , Patel , C. , Rothlisberger , U. , and Dumont , E. ( 2012 ) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134 , 2111 - 2119 ). We show that, despite the different levels of preorganization of the two systems, the corresponding reactions share many energetic and structural characteristics. The main difference lies in the angle between the G and T bases, which is slightly higher in the transition state (TS) and product of the reaction in water than in the reaction in DNA. This effect is due to the Watson-Crick H-bonds, which are absent in the {GpT+water} system and restrain the relative positioning of the reactive nucleobases in DNA. However, since the lesion is accommodated easily in the DNA macromolecule, the induced energetic penalty is relatively small. The high similarity between the two reactions strongly supports the use of GpT in water as a model of the corresponding reaction in DNA. PMID:24911289

  4. Detection of bulky endogenous oxidative DNA lesions derived from 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine by 32P-postlabeling assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guo-Dong; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2015-01-01

    8,5’-Cyclopurine-2’-deoxynucleotides represent a class of oxidative DNA lesions that are specifically repaired by nucleotide excision repair but not by base excision repair or direct enzymatic reversion. 32P-postlabeling assay is an ultrasensitive method that has been extensively used for the detection of carcinogen-DNA adducts in laboratory animal and epidemiological studies. This assay under modified chromatographic conditions is also a suitable and sensitive method for the detection of 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (cA). After enzymatic digestion of DNA, and enrichment of the oxidative products from the DNA digest, four dinucleotides containing cA, i.e. Ap-cAp, Cp-cAp, Gp-cAp, and Tp-cAp, are 5’-labeled with 32P-orthophosphate form [γ-32P]ATP mediated by polynucleotide kinase (PNK). The 32P-labeled cA products are separated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and quantified by Instant Imager or by a scintillation counter. The assay only requires 1–10 µg of DNA sample and is capable of detecting cA lesions as low as 1 in 1010 normal nucleotides. PMID:26344223

  5. [Direct assay of radiation-induced DNA base lesions to mammalian cells]. Final progress report, September 1, 1991--November 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    We have successfully developed the GC/MS technique so that an assessment of base damage in mammalian cells can be accomplished. The technique now has a sensitivity that will allow one to perform research in the low dose region suitable for hazards evaluation. The research on the hydrated DNA molecule has been seminal in generating a better understanding of the mechanisms by which low LET radiation induces DNA damage in mammalian cells. Also reported here are (1) the methodology for hydrating and irradiating DNA has been developed, (2) the procedures for identifying and quantitating radiation-induced DNA damage by HPLC and GC/MS have been mastered, (3) an hypotheses that radiation-induced damage in closely associated water molecules can result in DNA damage which is indistinguishable from that caused by direct ionization of the DNA has been generated and supported by experimental data, and (4) mathematical expressions that relate DNA lesion formation to the important parameters in the above hypotheses have been constructed so that the predictions of the hypotheses can now be tested.

  6. Cytotoxicity and DNA lesions produced by mitomycin C and porfiromycin in hypoxic and aerobic EMT6 and Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, P M; Sartorelli, A C

    1986-08-01

    Solid neoplasms may contain deficient or poorly functional vascular beds, a property that leads to the formation of hypoxic tumor cells, which form a therapeutically resistant cell population within the tumor that is difficult to eradicate by ionizing irradiation and most existing chemotherapeutic agents. As an approach to the therapeutic attack of hypoxic cells, we have measured the cytotoxicity and DNA lesions produced by the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C and porfiromycin, two structurally similar antibiotics, in oxygen-deficient and aerobic cells. Mitomycin C and porfiromycin were preferentially cytotoxic to hypoxic EMT6 cells in culture, with porfiromycin producing a greater differential kill of hypoxic EMT6 cells relative to their oxygenated counterparts than did mitomycin C. Chinese hamster ovary cells were more resistant to these quinone antibiotics; although in this cell line, porfiromycin was significantly more cytotoxic to hypoxic cells than to aerobic cells, and the degree of oxygenation did not affect the toxicity of mitomycin C. Alkaline elution methodology was utilized to study the formation of DNA single-strand breaks and DNA interstrand cross-links produced by mitomycin C and porfiromycin in both EMT6 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. A negligible quantity of DNA single-strand breaks and DNA interstrand cross-links were produced in hypoxic and aerobic Chinese hamster ovary cells by exposure to mitomycin C or porfiromycin, a finding consistent with the considerably lower sensitivity of this cell line to these agents. In EMT6 tumor cells, no single-strand breaks appeared to be produced by these antitumor antibiotics under both hypoxic and aerobic conditions; however, a significant number of DNA interstrand cross-links were formed in this cell line following drug treatment, with substantially more DNA interstrand cross-linking being produced under hypoxic conditions. Mitomycin C and porfiromycin caused the same amount of cross-linking under

  7. Presence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotype and Human Immunodeficiency Virus DNA in Anal High-Grade and Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chin-Yuan; Agsalda-Garcia, Melissa; Nagata, Ian; Milne, Cris; Zhu, Xuemei; Killeen, Jeffrey; Berry, J. Michael; Goodman, Marc T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-infected individuals are at risk for anal cancer, which is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). The relationship between HIV and HPV that leads to anal cancer remains unclear. Recent data, however, suggest that the continued persistence of HIV DNA in patients treated with combined antiretroviral therapy leads to progression of HIV disease and other HIV-associated complications. Therefore, we investigated the relationship among anal low- and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL/HGSIL), high-risk HPV genotypes, and high HIV DNA copy numbers. Anal cytology specimens were assayed for HPV genotype and HIV DNA copy number. High-risk HPV genotypes (odds ratio OR: 3.73; 95% confidence interval CI: 1.08–12.91; p=0.04) and high HIV DNA copy numbers (ORper 100 HIV DNA copies: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.01–1.27, p=0.04) were both associated with LGSIL/HGSIL. When considering both high-risk HPV genotypes and HIV DNA copy numbers in predicting LGSIL/HGSIL, HIV DNA copy number was significant (ORper 100 HIV DNA copies: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.96–1.23, p=0.04) but not high-risk HPV genotypes (OR: 2.30, p=0.28), which did not change when adjusted for nadir CD4 cell count and HIV RNA levels. The findings warrant further investigation of HIV DNA and its relationship with HPV in LGSIL/HGSIL pathogenesis. PMID:22816619

  8. Microhomology-mediated end joining is the principal mediator of double-strand break repair during mitochondrial DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tadi, Satish Kumar; Sebastian, Robin; Dahal, Sumedha; Babu, Ravi K.; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are associated with various mitochondrial disorders. The deletions identified in humans are flanked by short, directly repeated mitochondrial DNA sequences; however, the mechanism of such DNA rearrangements has yet to be elucidated. In contrast to nuclear DNA (nDNA), mtDNA is more exposed to oxidative damage, which may result in double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although DSB repair in nDNA is well studied, repair mechanisms in mitochondria are not characterized. In the present study, we investigate the mechanisms of DSB repair in mitochondria using in vitro and ex vivo assays. Whereas classical NHEJ (C-NHEJ) is undetectable, microhomology-mediated alternative NHEJ efficiently repairs DSBs in mitochondria. Of interest, robust microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) was observed with DNA substrates bearing 5-, 8-, 10-, 13-, 16-, 19-, and 22-nt microhomology. Furthermore, MMEJ efficiency was enhanced with an increase in the length of homology. Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and protein inhibition assays suggest the involvement of CtIP, FEN1, MRE11, and PARP1 in mitochondrial MMEJ. Knockdown studies, in conjunction with other experiments, demonstrated that DNA ligase III, but not ligase IV or ligase I, is primarily responsible for the final sealing of DSBs during mitochondrial MMEJ. These observations highlight the central role of MMEJ in maintenance of mammalian mitochondrial genome integrity and is likely relevant for deletions observed in many human mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26609070

  9. Lesion-Induced Mutation in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Its Avoidance by the Y-Family DNA Polymerase Dbh.

    PubMed

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2015-10-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaea offer certain advantages as models of genome replication, and Sulfolobus Y-family polymerases Dpo4 (S. solfataricus) and Dbh (S. acidocaldarius) have been studied intensively in vitro as biochemical and structural models of trans-lesion DNA synthesis (TLS). However, the genetic functions of these enzymes have not been determined in the native context of living cells. We developed the first quantitative genetic assays of replication past defined DNA lesions and error-prone motifs in Sulfolobus chromosomes and used them to measure the efficiency and accuracy of bypass in normal and dbh(-) strains of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Oligonucleotide-mediated transformation allowed low levels of abasic-site bypass to be observed in S. acidocaldarius and demonstrated that the local sequence context affected bypass specificity; in addition, most erroneous TLS did not require Dbh function. Applying the technique to another common lesion, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG), revealed an antimutagenic role of Dbh. The efficiency and accuracy of replication past 8-oxo-dG was higher in the presence of Dbh, and up to 90% of the Dbh-dependent events inserted dC. A third set of assays, based on phenotypic reversion, showed no effect of Dbh function on spontaneous -1 frameshifts in mononucleotide tracts in vivo, despite the extremely frequent slippage at these motifs documented in vitro. Taken together, the results indicate that a primary genetic role of Dbh is to avoid mutations at 8-oxo-dG that occur when other Sulfolobus enzymes replicate past this lesion. The genetic evidence that Dbh is recruited to 8-oxo-dG raises questions regarding the mechanism of recruitment, since Sulfolobus spp. have eukaryotic-like replisomes but no ubiquitin. PMID:26224736

  10. Accelerated processing of solitary and clustered abasic site DNA damage lesions by APE1 in the presence of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Bhavini; DAS, Prolay; Kumari, Rekha

    2016-06-01

    The stimulatory effect of the aqueous extract of G. lucidum, a basidiomycetes class fungus in the APE1-enzyme-mediated processing of solitary and bistranded clustered abasic sites DNA damages is presented. Abasic sites are considered the most common type of DNA damage lesions. Our study shows enhanced activity of APE1 in the processing of abasic sites in the presence of the polysaccharides fraction of G. lucidum. Remarkable increase in the amount of single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) from solitary and bistranded clustered abasic sites respectively with APE1 in the presence of the extract was found. This trend is maintained when abasic sites in DNA oligomers are exposed to fibroblast cell extracts in the presence of the extract. While DNA conformational alteration is negligible, APE1 enzyme shows characteristic changes in the alpha helix and beta strand ratio after incubation with G. lucidum extract. The enhanced reactivity of APE1 at the molecular level in the presence of G. lucidium is attributed to this effect. This study potentially amplifies the scope of the use of G. lucidum, which was earlier shown to have only reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging properties with regards to DNA damage inhibition. PMID:27240987

  11. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  12. Viral DNA load of high-risk human papilloma virus is closely associated with the grade of cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guqun; Cheng, Jingxin; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    This study is to explore the correlation between the viral load of high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and the degree of cervical lesions, as well as the follow-up monitoring role of high-risk HPV measurements in the treatment of patients with cervical lesions. Hybrid capture-2 method was used to measure the amount of high-risk HPV load of 361 patients who were enrolled from January 2009 to December 2010 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, including 76 cases of cervical squamous carcinoma, 119 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 166 cases of cervicitis. The correlation between the viral load of high-risk HPV and the degree of cervical lesions was analyzed using correlation analysis. Patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical squamous carcinoma were followed up until December 2013, with the follow-up time being 37-60 months. Statistically significant differences in the high-risk HPV load existed between cervicitis group, CIN group and cervical squamous carcinoma group (P = 0.000). In addition, the viral load was increased with the increase of the severity of cervical lesions, showing a positive correlation (r = 0.436, P = 0.000). During the follow-up, 6 cases of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia, 3 cases of recurrence CIN and 1 case of vaginal squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were found, which were shown to relate with the continuing high-risk HPV infection in vagina. Viral load of high-risk HPV were positively correlated with the severity of cervical lesions, playing an important role in the monitoring of patients with cervical lesions after treatment. PMID:25664114

  13. Quantification of oxidative DNA lesions in tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon rats by capillary high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with stable isotope-dilution method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Yuan, Bifeng; Guerrero, Candace; Bahde, Ralf; Gupta, Sanjeev; Wang, Yinsheng

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of our study was to develop suitable methods to quantify oxidative DNA lesions in the setting of transition metal-related diseases. Transition metal-driven Fenton reactions constitute an important endogenous source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In genetic diseases with accumulation of transition metal ions, excessive ROS production causes pathophysiological changes, including DNA damage. Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder with copper toxicosis due to deficiency of ATP7B protein needed for excreting copper into bile. The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat bears a deletion in Atp7b gene and serves as an excellent model for hepatic Wilson's disease. We used a sensitive capillary liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS/MS) method in conjunction with the stable isotope-dilution technique to quantify several types of oxidative DNA lesions in the liver and brain of LEC rats. These lesions included 5-formyl-2'-deoxyuridine, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine, and the 5'R and 5'S diastereomers of 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine. Moreover, the levels of these DNA lesions in the liver and brain increased with age and correlated with age-dependent regulation of the expression of DNA repair genes in LEC rats. These results provide significant new knowledge for better understanding the implications of oxidative DNA lesions in transition metal-induced diseases, such as Wilson's disease, as well as in aging and aging-related pathological conditions. PMID:21323344

  14. Manganese-induced oxidative DNA damage in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells: attenuation of thymine base lesions by glutathione and N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Adrienne P; Schneider, Jeffrey A; Nelson, Bryant C; Atha, Donald H; Jain, Ashok; Soliman, Karam F A; Aschner, Michael; Mazzio, Elizabeth; Renee Reams, R

    2013-04-26

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element required for normal function and development. However, exposure to this metal at elevated levels may cause manganism, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with neurological symptoms similar to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). Elevated body burdens of Mn from exposure to parental nutrition, vapors in mines and smelters and welding fumes have been associated with neurological health concerns. The underlying mechanism of Mn neurotoxicity remains unclear. Accordingly, the present study was designed to investigate the toxic effects of Mn(2+) in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Mn(2+) caused a concentration dependent decrease in SH-SY5Y cellular viability compared to controls. The LD50 value was 12.98 μM Mn(2+) (p<0.001 for control vs. 24h Mn treatment). Both TUNEL and annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis assays confirmed the induction of apoptosis in the cells following exposure to Mn(2+) (2 μM, 62 μM or 125 μM). In addition, Mn(2+) induced both the formation and accumulation of DNA single strand breaks (via alkaline comet assay analysis) and oxidatively modified thymine bases (via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis). Pre-incubation of the cells with characteristic antioxidants, either 1mM N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or 1mM glutathione (GSH) reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and the formation of thymine base lesions, suggesting protection against oxidative cellular damage. Our findings indicate that (1) exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to Mn promotes both the formation and accumulation of oxidative DNA damage, (2) SH-SY5Y cells with accumulated DNA damage are more likely to die via an apoptotic pathway and (3) the accumulated levels of DNA damage can be abrogated by the addition of exogenous chemical antioxidants. This is the first known report of Mn(2+)-induction and antioxidant protection of thymine lesions in this SH-SY5Y cell line and contributes new information to the potential use of antioxidants

  15. Role of shielding in modulating the effects of solar particle events: Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose and DNA complex lesions in different organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; De Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Zankl, M.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    Distributions of absorbed dose and DNA clustered damage yields in various organs and tissues following the October 1989 solar particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a voxel model), with the main aim of quantifying the role of the shielding features in modulating organ doses. The phantoms, which were assumed to be in deep space, were inserted into a shielding box of variable thickness and material and were irradiated with the proton spectra of the October 1989 event. Average numbers of DNA lesions per cell in different organs were calculated by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting of integrating into "condensed-history" Monte Carlo transport codes--such as FLUKA--yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. More specifically, the yields of "Complex Lesions" (or "CL", defined and calculated as a clustered DNA damage in a previous work) per unit dose and DNA mass (CL Gy-1 Da-1) due to the various beam components, including those derived from nuclear interactions with the shielding and the human body, were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of CL/cell yields in different organs, as well as distributions of absorbed doses. The contributions of primary protons and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, and the simulations were repeated for values of Al shielding thickness ranging between 1 and 20 g/cm2. Slight differences were found between the two phantom types. Skin and eye lenses were found to receive larger doses with respect to internal organs; however, shielding was more effective for skin and lenses. Secondary particles arising from nuclear interactions were found to have a minor role, although their relative contribution was found to be larger for the Complex Lesions than for the

  16. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Qiuling; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping; Mu, Jinjun; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen

    2013-01-01

    8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was paralleled by increased debris of cells. ► Oxidative DNA damage of PMNs is associated with arsenic-related skin lesions.

  17. Increased BrdU incorporation reflecting DNA repair, neuronal de-differentiation or possible neurogenesis in the adult cochlear nucleus following bilateral cochlear lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwen; Begum, Shaeza; Zhang, Chu; Fleming, Kirk; Masumura, Chisako; Zhang, Ming; Smith, Paul; Darlington, Cynthia

    2011-05-01

    Neurogenesis is known to occur in response to injury in the brain, for example, as a result of neurodegenerative diseases. However, there have been few investigations into how the brain responds to damage to peripheral sensory nerves, in other areas such as the brainstem. Here, we report that bilateral surgical lesions of the cochlea result in increased incorporation of the DNA replication marker, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), in cells of the brainstem cochlear nucleus (CN) of the adult rat, suggesting either cell proliferation or DNA repair. Some of the BrdU-labelled cells colabelled for the mature neuron marker, NeuN and the GABAergic enzyme GAD-65, suggesting the possibility that neurogenesis might have occurred and resulted in the generation of new neurons with a GABAergic phenotype. However, some of the mature neurons also re-expressed immature neuronal intermediate filament and microtuble-associated proteins, without apoptotic neuronal death, which suggests that the colabelling of BrdU with NeuN and GAD-65 may not be a true reflection of neurogenesis, but injury-stimulated neuronal dedifferentiation. These results suggest the possibility that DNA repair, neuronal de-differentiation or possible neurogenesis occurs in the cochlear nucleus, in response to damage to the peripheral auditory system. PMID:21104237

  18. Recurrent Chromosomal Imbalances Detected in Biopsy Material from Oral Premalignant and Malignant Lesions by Combined Tissue Microdissection, Universal DNA Amplification, and Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ruthild G.; Scheer, Martin; Born, I. Antonio; Joos, Stefan; Cobbers, J. M. J. Ludwig; Hofele, Christof; Reifenberger, Guido; Zöller, Joachim E.; Lichter, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Biopsies routinely performed for the histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial lesions before treatment were screened for chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization. Comparative genomic hybridization was performed on 12 oral premalignant lesions (OPLs; dysplasias and carcinomas in situ) and 14 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). Eight biopsies displayed areas of different histopathological appearance, so that OPLs and OSCCs from the same patient were analyzed. To avoid contamination with nonneoplastic cells, defined cell populations were isolated by micromanipulation with a glass needle. Before comparative genomic hybridization analysis, universal DNA amplification was performed using the DOP-polymerase chain reaction protocol. In the 14 OSCCs examined, the average number of chromosomal imbalances was significantly higher than in the 12 OPLs (mean ± SEM: 11.9 ± 1.9 versus 3.2 ± 1.2; P = 0.003). The DNA copy number changes identified in more than one OPL were gains on 8q (3 of 12) and 16p (2 of 12), as well as losses on 3p (5 of 12); 5q (4 of 12); 13q (3 of 12); and 4q, 8p, and 9p (2 of 12 each). In more than 30% of OSCCs, gains of chromosomal material were identified on 20q (8 of 14); 8q, 11q, 22q (7 of 14 each); 3q, 15q, and 17p (6 of 14 each); and 14q, 17q, and 20p (5 of 14 each), and losses were identified on 3p and 4q (9 of 14 each), 5q (7 of 14), 13q (6 of 14), and 2q and 9p (5 of 14 each). These results were validated by positive and negative control comparative genomic hybridization experiments and microsatellite analysis for the detection of allelic loss. The vast majority of genomic alterations found in OPLs were again identified in OSCCs from the same biopsy, supporting the hypothesis that multiple lesions in the same patient are clonally related. In summary, we show that comprehensive information on the genomic alterations in oral epithelial lesions can be obtained from small biopsies. Such data may identify prognostic

  19. Single Qdot-labeled glycosylase molecules use a wedge amino acid to probe for lesions while scanning along DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Andrew R.; Kad, Neil M.; Nelson, Shane R.; Warshaw, David M.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Within the base excision repair (BER) pathway, the DNA N-glycosylases are responsible for locating and removing the majority of oxidative base damages. Endonuclease III (Nth), formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (Nei) are members of two glycosylase families: the helix–hairpin–helix (HhH) superfamily and the Fpg/Nei family. The search mechanisms employed by these two families of glycosylases were examined using a single molecule assay to image quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled glycosylases interacting with YOYO-1 stained λ-DNA molecules suspended between 5 µm silica beads. The HhH and Fpg/Nei families were found to have a similar diffusive search mechanism described as a continuum of motion, in keeping with rotational diffusion along the DNA molecule ranging from slow, sub-diffusive to faster, unrestricted diffusion. The search mechanism for an Fpg variant, F111A, lacking a phenylalanine wedge residue no longer displayed slow, sub-diffusive motion compared to wild type, suggesting that Fpg base interrogation may be accomplished by Phe111 insertion. PMID:21666255

  20. Exploration of cellular DNA lesion, DNA-binding and biocidal ordeal of novel curcumin based Knoevenagel Schiff base complexes incorporating tryptophan: Synthesis and structural validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Thiravidamani; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    A few novel Schiff base transition metal complexes of general formula [MLCl] (where, L = Schiff base, obtained by the condensation reaction of Knoevenagel condensate of curcumin, L-tryptophan and M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II)), were prepared by stencil synthesis. They were typified using UV-vis, IR, EPR spectral techniques, micro analytical techniques, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity. Geometry of the metal complexes was examined and recognized as square planar. DNA binding and viscosity studies revealed that the metal(II) complexes powerfully bound via an intercalation mechanism with the calf thymus DNA. Gel-electrophoresis technique was used to investigate the DNA cleavage competence of the complexes and they establish to approve the cleavage of pBR322 DNA in presence of oxidant H2O2. This outcome inferred that the synthesized complexes showed better nuclease activity. Moreover, the complexes were monitored for antimicrobial activities. The results exposed that the synthesized compounds were forceful against all the microbes under exploration.

  1. Exploration of cellular DNA lesion, DNA-binding and biocidal ordeal of novel curcumin based Knoevenagel Schiff base complexes incorporating tryptophan: Synthesis and structural validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Thiravidamani; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    A few novel Schiff base transition metal complexes of general formula [MLCl] (where, L = Schiff base, obtained by the condensation reaction of Knoevenagel condensate of curcumin, L-tryptophan and M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II)), were prepared by stencil synthesis. They were typified using UV-vis, IR, EPR spectral techniques, micro analytical techniques, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity. Geometry of the metal complexes was examined and recognized as square planar. DNA binding and viscosity studies revealed that the metal(II) complexes powerfully bound via an intercalation mechanism with the calf thymus DNA. Gel-electrophoresis technique was used to investigate the DNA cleavage competence of the complexes and they establish to approve the cleavage of pBR322 DNA in presence of oxidant H2O2. This outcome inferred that the synthesized complexes showed better nuclease activity. Moreover, the complexes were monitored for antimicrobial activities. The results exposed that the synthesized compounds were forceful against all the microbes under exploration.

  2. Bixin protects hepatocytes against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced genotoxicity but does not suppress DNA damage and pre-neoplastic lesions in the colon of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; de Andrade, Kelly Jacqueline Barbosa; Paula, Marcela Cristina Ferreira; Oliveira Acésio, Nathália; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Borges, Priscilla Scalon Freitas; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2014-01-01

    Bixin is a carotenoid found in the seeds of Bixa orellana L., a plant native to tropical America that is used in the food industry. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bixin on DNA damage and pre-neoplastic lesions induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in the liver and colon of Wistar rats. The animals received bixin at daily doses of 0.1, 1.0 and 10mg/kg body weight (bw) by gavage. For the assessment of DNA damage in hepatocytes and colon cells with the comet assay, the administration of bixin was for 7 days. The animals received a single subcutaneous injection of 25mg/kg bw of DMH, and were euthanized 4h later. For the evaluation of the frequency of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), the animals were treated with the different doses of bixin for 4 weeks. Four doses of 40mg/kg bw DMH, two doses in the first week and two doses in the second week, were administered and euthanasia occurred at 4 weeks after the beginning of treatment. Bixin reduced the frequency of DNA damage in hepatocytes at the highest two doses tested (1.0 and 10mg/kg bw). On the other hand, no differences in the frequency of DNA damage in colon cells were observed between animals treated with bixin plus DMH and those treated with DMH alone. In addition, the frequency of ACF did not differ significantly between the group treated with bixin plus DMH and the DMH group. The results suggest that bixin does not suppress the formation of ACF, indicating the absence of a protective effect against colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24246722

  3. From non-covalent binding to irreversible DNA lesions: nile blue and nile red as photosensitizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Gattuso, Hugo; Besancenot, Vanessa; Grandemange, Stéphanie; Marazzi, Marco; Monari, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We report a molecular modeling study, coupled with spectroscopy experiments, on the behavior of two well known organic dyes, nile blue and nile red, when interacting with B-DNA. In particular, we evidence the presence of two competitive binding modes, for both drugs. However their subsequent photophysical behavior is different and only nile blue is able to induce DNA photosensitization via an electron transfer mechanism. Most notably, even in the case of nile blue, its sensitization capabilities strongly depend on the environment resulting in a single active binding mode: the minor groove. Fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the presence of competitive interaction modes for both sensitizers, while the sensitization via electron transfer, is possible only in the case of nile blue. PMID:27329409

  4. Epigenetic Modifications and Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Oral Lichen Planus Lesions Presenting Poor Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dillenburg, Caroline S.; Martins, Marco A.T.; Almeida, Luciana O.; Meurer, Luise; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Martins, Manoela D.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epigenetics refers to changes in cell characteristics that occur independently of modifications to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence. Alterations mediated by epigenetic mechanisms are important factors in cancer progression. Although an exciting prospect, the identification of early epigenetic markers associated with clinical outcome in premalignant and malignant disorders remains elusive. We examined alterations in chromatin acetylation in oral lichen planus (OLP) with distinct clinical behavior and compared the alterations to the levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We analyzed 42 OLP patients, who had different responses to therapy, for acetyl-histone H3 at lys9 (H3K9ac), which is associated with enhanced transcription and nuclear decondensation, and the presence of DSBs, as determined by accumulation of phosphorylated γH2AX foci. Patients with high levels of H3K9ac acetylation failed to respond to therapy or experienced disease recurrence shortly after therapy. Similar to H3K9ac, patients who responded poorly to therapy had increased accumulation of DNA DSB, indicating genomic instability. These findings suggest that histone modifications occur in OLP, and H3K9ac and γH2AX histones may serve as epigenetic markers for OLP recurrence. PMID:26222871

  5. Purification and characterization of a novel UV lesion-specific DNA glycosylase/AP lyase from Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, D A; Nyaga, S G; Lloyd, R S

    2000-05-31

    The purification and characterization of a pyrimidine dimer-specific glycosylase/AP lyase from Bacillus sphaericus (Bsp-pdg) are reported. Bsp-pdg is highly specific for DNA containing the cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, displaying no detectable activity on oligonucleotides with trans-syn I, trans-syn II, (6-4), or Dewar photoproducts. Like other glycosylase/AP lyases that sequentially cleave the N--glycosyl bond of the 5' pyrimidine of a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, and the phosphodiester backbone, this enzyme appears to utilize a primary amine as the attacking nucleophile. The formation of a covalent enzyme-DNA imino intermediate is evidenced by the ability to trap this protein-DNA complex by reduction with sodium borohydride. Also consistent with its AP lyase activity, Bsp-pdg was shown to incise an AP site-containing oligonucleotide, yielding beta- and delta-elimination products. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of this 26 kDa protein revealed little amino acid homology to any previously reported protein. This is the first report of a glycosylase/AP lyase enzyme from Bacillus sphaericus that is specific for cis-syn pyrimidine dimers. PMID:10844244

  6. Epigenetic Modifications and Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Oral Lichen Planus Lesions Presenting Poor Response to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dillenburg, Caroline S; Martins, Marco A T; Almeida, Luciana O; Meurer, Luise; Squarize, Cristiane H; Martins, Manoela D; Castilho, Rogerio M

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetics refers to changes in cell characteristics that occur independently of modifications to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence. Alterations mediated by epigenetic mechanisms are important factors in cancer progression. Although an exciting prospect, the identification of early epigenetic markers associated with clinical outcome in premalignant and malignant disorders remains elusive. We examined alterations in chromatin acetylation in oral lichen planus (OLP) with distinct clinical behavior and compared the alterations to the levels of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We analyzed 42 OLP patients, who had different responses to therapy, for acetyl-histone H3 at lys9 (H3K9ac), which is associated with enhanced transcription and nuclear decondensation, and the presence of DSBs, as determined by accumulation of phosphorylated γH2AX foci. Patients with high levels of H3K9ac acetylation failed to respond to therapy or experienced disease recurrence shortly after therapy. Similar to H3K9ac, patients who responded poorly to therapy had increased accumulation of DNA DSB, indicating genomic instability. These findings suggest that histone modifications occur in OLP, and H3K9ac and γH2AX histones may serve as epigenetic markers for OLP recurrence. PMID:26222871

  7. HPV16-E2 induces prophase arrest and activates the cellular DNA damage response in vitro and in precursor lesions of cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuezhen; Toh, Shen Yon; He, Pingping; Lim, Thimothy; Lim, Diana; Pang, Chai Ling; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Thierry, Françoise

    2015-10-27

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and is the precursor to cervical carcinoma. The completion of the HPV productive life cycle depends on the expression of viral proteins which further determines the severity of the cervical neoplasia. Initiation of the viral productive replication requires expression of the E2 viral protein that cooperates with the E1 viral DNA helicase. A decrease in the viral DNA replication ability and increase in the severity of cervical neoplasia is accompanied by simultaneous elevated expression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Here we reveal a novel and important role for the HPV16-E2 protein in controlling host cell cycle during malignant transformation. We showed that cells expressing HPV16-E2 in vitro are arrested in prophase alongside activation of a sustained DDR signal. We uncovered evidence that HPV16-E2 protein is present in vivo in cells that express both mitotic and DDR signals specifically in CIN3 lesions, immediate precursors of cancer, suggesting that E2 may be one of the drivers of genomic instability and carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:26474276

  8. HPV16-E2 induces prophase arrest and activates the cellular DNA damage response in vitro and in precursor lesions of cervical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuezhen; Toh, Shen Yon; He, Pingping; Lim, Thimothy; Lim, Diana; Pang, Chai Ling; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Thierry, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and is the precursor to cervical carcinoma. The completion of the HPV productive life cycle depends on the expression of viral proteins which further determines the severity of the cervical neoplasia. Initiation of the viral productive replication requires expression of the E2 viral protein that cooperates with the E1 viral DNA helicase. A decrease in the viral DNA replication ability and increase in the severity of cervical neoplasia is accompanied by simultaneous elevated expression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Here we reveal a novel and important role for the HPV16-E2 protein in controlling host cell cycle during malignant transformation. We showed that cells expressing HPV16-E2 in vitro are arrested in prophase alongside activation of a sustained DDR signal. We uncovered evidence that HPV16-E2 protein is present in vivo in cells that express both mitotic and DDR signals specifically in CIN3 lesions, immediate precursors of cancer, suggesting that E2 may be one of the drivers of genomic instability and carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:26474276

  9. Novel repair activities of AlkA (3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II) and endonuclease VIII for xanthine and oxanine, guanine lesions induced by nitric oxide and nitrous acid

    PubMed Central

    Terato, Hiroaki; Masaoka, Aya; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Honsho, Akiko; Ohyama, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Toshinori; Yamada, Masaki; Makino, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ide, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Nitrosation of guanine in DNA by nitrogen oxides such as nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid leads to formation of xanthine (Xan) and oxanine (Oxa), potentially cytotoxic and mutagenic lesions. In the present study, we have examined the repair capacity of DNA N-glycosylases from Escherichia coli for Xan and Oxa. The nicking assay with the defined substrates containing Xan and Oxa revealed that AlkA [in combination with endonuclease (Endo) IV] and Endo VIII recognized Xan in the tested enzymes. The activity (Vmax/Km) of AlkA for Xan was 5-fold lower than that for 7-methylguanine, and that of Endo VIII was 50-fold lower than that for thymine glycol. The activity of AlkA and Endo VIII for Xan was further substantiated by the release of [3H]Xan from the substrate. The treatment of E.coli with N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine increased the Xan-excising activity in the cell extract from alkA+ but not alkA– strains. The alkA and nei (the Endo VIII gene) double mutant, but not the single mutants, exhibited increased sensitivity to nitrous acid relative to the wild type strain. AlkA and Endo VIII also exhibited excision activity for Oxa, but the activity was much lower than that for Xan. PMID:12434002

  10. Synthesis, DNA binding, cellular DNA lesion and cytotoxicity of a series of new benzimidazole-based Schiff base copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anup; Anbu, Sellamuthu; Sharma, Gunjan; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Koch, Biplob; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-12-14

    A series of new benzimidazole containing compounds 2-((1-R-1-H-benzimidazol-2-yl)phenyl-imino)naphthol HL(1-3) (R = methyl, ethyl or propyl, respectively) have been synthesized by Schiff base condensation of 2-(1-R-1-H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)aniline and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde. The reactions of HL(1-3) with Cu(NO3)2·2.5H2O led to the corresponding copper(II) complexes [Cu(L)(NO3)] 1-3. All the compounds were characterized by conventional analytical techniques and, for 1 and 3, also by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The interactions of complexes 1-3 with calf thymus DNA were studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques and the calculated binding constants (K(b)) are in the range of 3.5 × 10(5) M(-1)-3.2 × 10(5) M(-1). Complexes 1-3 effectively bind DNA through an intercalative mode, as proved by molecular docking studies. The binding affinity of the complexes decreases with the size increase of the N-alkyl substituent, in the order of 1 > 2 > 3, which is also in accord with the calculated LUMO(complex) energies. They show substantial in vitro cytotoxic effect against human lung (A-549), breast (MDA-MB-231) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. Complex 1 exhibits a significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the A-549 cancer cells. The antiproliferative efficacy of 1 has also been analysed by a DNA fragmentation assay, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and nuclear morphology using a fluorescence microscope. The possible mode for the apoptosis pathway of 1 has also been evaluated by a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation study. PMID:26523453

  11. DNA lesion can facilitate base ionization: vertical ionization energies of aqueous 8-oxoguanine and its nucleoside and nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Palivec, Vladimír; Pluhařová, Eva; Unger, Isaak; Winter, Bernd; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-01

    8-Oxoguanine is one of the key products of indirect radiation damage to DNA by reactive oxygen species. Here, we describe ionization of this damaged nucleobase and the corresponding nucleoside and nucleotide in aqueous phase, modeled by the nonequilibrium polarizable continuum model, establishing their lowest vertical ionization energies of 6.8-7.0 eV. We thus confirm that 8-oxoguanine has even lower ionization energy than the parental guanine, which is the canonical nucleobase with the lowest ionization energy. Therefore, it can act as a trap for the cationic hole formed by ionizing radiation and thus protect DNA from further radiation damage. We also model using time-dependent density functional theory and measure by liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy the valence photoelectron spectrum of 8-oxoguanine in water. We show that the calculated higher lying ionization states match well the experiment which, however, is not sensitive enough to capture the electron signal corresponding to the lowest ionization process due to the low solubility of 8-oxoguanine in water. PMID:25390766

  12. Identification of Malassezia species in the facial lesions of Chinese seborrhoeic dermatitis patients based on DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lian, C-h; Shen, L-l; Gao, Q-y; Jiang, M; Zhao, Z-j; Zhao, J-j

    2014-12-01

    The genus Malassezia is important in the aetiology of facial seborrhoeic dermatitis (FSD), which is the most common clinical type. The purpose of this study was to analyse the distribution of Malassezia species in the facial lesions of Chinese seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) patients and healthy individuals. Sixty-four isolates of Malassezia were isolated from FSD patients and 60 isolates from healthy individuals. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was used to identify the isolates. The most frequently identified Malassezia species associated with FSD was M. furfur (76.56%), followed by M. sympodialis (12.50%) and M. japonica (9.38%). The most frequently isolated species in healthy individuals were M. furfur (61.67%), followed by M. sympodialis (25.00%), M. japonica (6.67%), M. globosa (3.33%), and M. obtusa (3.33%). Overall, our study revealed that while M. furfur is the predominant Malassezia species in Chinese SD patients, there is no significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between Chinese SD patients and healthy individuals. PMID:25124656

  13. A limited autoimmunity to p185neu elicited by DNA and allogeneic cell vaccine hampers the progression of preneoplastic lesions in HER-2/NEU transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lo Iacono, M; Cavallo, F; Quaglino, E; Rolla, S; Iezzi, M; Pupa, S M; De Giovanni, C; Lollini, P-L; Musiani, P; Forni, G; Calogero, R A

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of the progression of precancerous lesions by vaccines is virtually uncharted territory. Their potential, however, is being assessed in transgenic mice which develop autochthonous tumors with defined stages of progression. In this paper we show that the DNA micro-array technology significantly helps assessment of the preventive efficacy of a combined DNA and cell vaccine. All female rat Her-2/neu transgenic BALB/c (BALB-neuT) mice develop an invasive carcinoma in each of their mammary glands within 25 weeks of age. This is elicited by the activated transforming rat Her-2/neu oncogene embedded in their genome. We have previously shown that vaccination of mice bearing multiple in situ carcinomas with DNA plasmids which code for the extracellular and transmembrane domain of rat p185neu, the product of the rat Her-2/neu oncogene, followed by a boost with rat p185neu+ allogeneic cells engineered to secrete interferon-gamma, keeps 48% of mice tumor free until week 32. We have now extended our follow-up until mice reach one year of age and show that protection vanishes as time progresses. This observation suggests that the accuracy of the results studying immunotherapy against life-threatening tumors is a function of the length of the follow-up. The application of microarrays, and the concordance of morphologic and gene expression data led us to identify antibody as the main mechanism induced by vaccination. Protection is associated with a break of tolerance and a limited autoimmunity against the endogenous mouse p185neu. PMID:15888257

  14. Reduced repair capacity of a DNA clustered damage site comprised of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 2-deoxyribonolactone results in an increased mutagenic potential of these lesions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cunniffe, Siobhan; O’Neill, Peter; Greenberg, Marc M.; Lomax, Martine E.

    2014-04-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites. Non-double strand break (DSB) clustered damage has been shown to compromise the base excision repair pathway, extending the lifetimes of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions. This increases the likelihood the lesions persist to replication and thus increasing the mutagenic potential of the lesions within the cluster. Lesions formed by ionizing radiation include 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and 2-deoxyribonolactone (dL). dL poses an additional challenge to the cell as it is not repaired by the short-patch base excision repair pathway. Here we show recalcitrant dL repairmore » is reflected in mutations observed when DNA containing it and a proximal 8-oxodGuo is replicated in Escherichia coli. 8-oxodGuo in close proximity to dL on the opposing DNA strand results in an enhanced frequency of mutation of the lesions within the cluster and a 20 base sequence flanking the clustered damage site in an E. coli based plasmid assay. In vitro repair of a dL lesion is reduced when compared to the repair of an abasic (AP) site and a tetrahydrofuran (THF), and this is due mainly to a reduction in the activity of polymerase β, leading to retarded FEN1 and ligase 1 activities. This study has given insights in to the biological effects of clusters containing dL.« less

  15. Age and lesioned-induced increases of GDNF transgene expression in brain following intracerebral injections of DNA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yurek, DM; Hasselrot, U; Cass, WA; Sesenoglu-Laird, O; Padegimas, L; Cooper, MJ

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies that used compacted DNA nanoparticles (DNP) to transfect cells in the brain, we observed higher transgene expression in the denervated striatum when compared to transgene expression in the intact striatum. We also observed that long term transgene expression occurred in astrocytes as well as neurons. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the higher transgene expression observed in the denervated striatum may be a function of increased gliosis. Several aging studies have also reported an increase of gliosis as a function of normal aging. In this study we used DNPs that encoded for human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hGDNF) and either a non-specific human polyubiquitin C (UbC) or an astrocyte-specific human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. The DNPs were injected intracerebrally into the denervated or intact striatum of young, middle-aged or aged rats, and GDNF transgene expression was subsequently quantified in brain tissue samples. The results of our studies confirmed our earlier finding that transgene expression was higher in the denervated striatum when compared to intact striatum for DNPs incorporating either promoter. In addition, we observed significantly higher transgene expression in the denervated striatum of old rats when compared to young rats following injections of both types of DNPs. Stereological analysis of GFAP+ cells in the striatum confirmed an increase of GFAP+ cells in the denervated striatum when compared to the intact striatum and also an age-related increase; importantly, increases in GFAP+ cells closely matched the increases in GDNF transgene levels. Thus neurodegeneration and aging may lay a foundation that is actually beneficial for this particular type of gene therapy while other gene therapy techniques that target neurons are actually targeting cells that are decreasing as the disease progresses. PMID:25453772

  16. Age and lesion-induced increases of GDNF transgene expression in brain following intracerebral injections of DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yurek, D M; Hasselrot, U; Cass, W A; Sesenoglu-Laird, O; Padegimas, L; Cooper, M J

    2015-01-22

    In previous studies that used compacted DNA nanoparticles (DNP) to transfect cells in the brain, we observed higher transgene expression in the denervated striatum when compared to transgene expression in the intact striatum. We also observed that long-term transgene expression occurred in astrocytes as well as neurons. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the higher transgene expression observed in the denervated striatum may be a function of increased gliosis. Several aging studies have also reported an increase of gliosis as a function of normal aging. In this study we used DNPs that encoded for human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hGDNF) and either a non-specific human polyubiquitin C (UbC) or an astrocyte-specific human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. The DNPs were injected intracerebrally into the denervated or intact striatum of young, middle-aged or aged rats, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) transgene expression was subsequently quantified in brain tissue samples. The results of our studies confirmed our earlier finding that transgene expression was higher in the denervated striatum when compared to intact striatum for DNPs incorporating either promoter. In addition, we observed significantly higher transgene expression in the denervated striatum of old rats when compared to young rats following injections of both types of DNPs. Stereological analysis of GFAP+ cells in the striatum confirmed an increase of GFAP+ cells in the denervated striatum when compared to the intact striatum and also an age-related increase; importantly, increases in GFAP+ cells closely matched the increases in GDNF transgene levels. Thus neurodegeneration and aging may lay a foundation that is actually beneficial for this particular type of gene therapy while other gene therapy techniques that target neurons are actually targeting cells that are decreasing as the disease progresses. PMID:25453772

  17. Comparison of Onclarity Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay with Hybrid Capture II HPV DNA Assay for Detection of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2 and 3 Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sideri, M.; Gulmini, C.; Igidbashian, S.; Tricca, A.; Casadio, C.; Carinelli, S.; Boveri, S.; Ejegod, D.; Bonde, J.; Sandri, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical and clinical performance validation is essential before introduction of a new human papillomavirus (HPV) assay into clinical practice. This study compares the new BD Onclarity HPV assay, which detects E6/E7 DNA from 14 high-risk HPV types, to the Hybrid Capture II (HC2) HPV DNA test, to concurrent cytology and histology results, in order to evaluate its performance in detecting high-grade cervical lesions. A population of 567 women, including 325 with ≥ASCUS (where ASCUS stands for atypical cells of undetermined significance) and any HC2 result and 242 with both negative cytology and negative HC2 results, were prospectively enrolled for the study. The overall agreement between Onclarity and HC2 was 94.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 92.3% to 96.2%). In this population with a high prevalence of disease, the relative sensitivities (versus adjudicated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 and 3 [CIN2+] histology endpoints) of the Onclarity and HC2 tests were 95.2% (95% CI, 90.7% to 97.5%) and 96.9% (95% CI, 92.9% to 98.7%), respectively, and the relative specificities were 50.3% (95% CI, 43.2% to 57.4%) for BD and 40.8% (95% CI, 33.9%, 48.1%) for HC2. These results indicate that the BD Onclarity HPV assay has sensitivity comparable to that of the HC2 assay, with a trend to an increased specificity. Moreover, as Onclarity gives the chance to discriminate between the different genotypes, we calculated the genotype prevalence and the absolute risk of CIN2+: HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype (19.8%) with an absolute risk of CIN2+ of 77.1%. PMID:25903574

  18. Comparison of Onclarity Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay with Hybrid Capture II HPV DNA Assay for Detection of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2 and 3 Lesions.

    PubMed

    Bottari, F; Sideri, M; Gulmini, C; Igidbashian, S; Tricca, A; Casadio, C; Carinelli, S; Boveri, S; Ejegod, D; Bonde, J; Sandri, M T

    2015-07-01

    Analytical and clinical performance validation is essential before introduction of a new human papillomavirus (HPV) assay into clinical practice. This study compares the new BD Onclarity HPV assay, which detects E6/E7 DNA from 14 high-risk HPV types, to the Hybrid Capture II (HC2) HPV DNA test, to concurrent cytology and histology results, in order to evaluate its performance in detecting high-grade cervical lesions. A population of 567 women, including 325 with ≥ASCUS (where ASCUS stands for atypical cells of undetermined significance) and any HC2 result and 242 with both negative cytology and negative HC2 results, were prospectively enrolled for the study. The overall agreement between Onclarity and HC2 was 94.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 92.3% to 96.2%). In this population with a high prevalence of disease, the relative sensitivities (versus adjudicated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 and 3 [CIN2+] histology endpoints) of the Onclarity and HC2 tests were 95.2% (95% CI, 90.7% to 97.5%) and 96.9% (95% CI, 92.9% to 98.7%), respectively, and the relative specificities were 50.3% (95% CI, 43.2% to 57.4%) for BD and 40.8% (95% CI, 33.9%, 48.1%) for HC2. These results indicate that the BD Onclarity HPV assay has sensitivity comparable to that of the HC2 assay, with a trend to an increased specificity. Moreover, as Onclarity gives the chance to discriminate between the different genotypes, we calculated the genotype prevalence and the absolute risk of CIN2+: HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype (19.8%) with an absolute risk of CIN2+ of 77.1%. PMID:25903574

  19. Chemical repair activity of free radical scavenger edaravone: reduction reactions with dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts and suppression of base lesions and AP sites on irradiated plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Fu, Haiying; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) with deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) hydroxyl radical adducts were investigated by pulse radiolysis technique. Edaravone was found to reduce the dGMP hydroxyl radical adducts through electron transfer reactions. The rate constants of the reactions were greater than 4 × 108 dm3 mol−1 s−1 and similar to those of the reactions of ascorbic acid, which is a representative antioxidant. Yields of single-strand breaks, base lesions, and abasic sites produced in pUC18 plasmid DNA by gamma ray irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–1000 μmol dm−3) of edaravone were also quantified, and the chemical repair activity of edaravone was estimated by a method recently developed by the authors. By comparing suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, it was found that base lesions and abasic sites were suppressed by the chemical repair activity of edaravone, although the suppression of single-strand breaks was not very effective. This phenomenon was attributed to the chemical repair activity of edaravone toward base lesions and abasic sites. However, the chemical repair activity of edaravone for base lesions was lower than that of ascorbic acid. PMID:25212600

  20. Decreased expression of DNA repair genes (XRCC1, ERCC1, ERCC2, and ERCC4) in squamous intraepithelial lesion and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Deepti; Banerjee, Ayan; Pathak, Sujata; Jain, Sunesh K; Singh, Neeta

    2013-05-01

    Reduced DNA repair might affect the risk of progression from infection with carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), the etiologic agent for cervical cancer (CC), to persistent HPV infection, and hence to cervical pre-cancer and cancer. We assessed the variation in baseline expression of base excision repair gene XRCC1 and three nucleotide excision repair genes ERCC1, ERCC2, and ERCC4 and the risk of developing cervical cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was designed with 50 invasive cervical cancer patients, 40 squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) patients and 85 controls subjects. RT-qPCR and Western blotting was used to quantitate in vitro the mRNA and protein levels in fresh CC, SIL and normal cervix tissue. The levels of XRCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, and ERCC1 transcripts and their respective proteins were lower in cervical cancer and SILs as compared to controls (p ≤ 0.001, 0.001, 0.001, and 0.025, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression analysis (adjusting for parity, age at first child birth, use of oral contraceptives, smoking status), low expression of XRCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, and ERCC1 was associated with a significant increased risk for CC and SIL. Our results suggest that individuals whose expression of XRCC1, ERCC4, ERCC2, and ERCC1 are reduced may be at a higher risk of developing SIL which eventually leads to invasive cervical carcinoma. Moreover, independently also the reduced expression of these genes can directly lead to cervical cancer progression. PMID:23435956

  1. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  2. Induction of different morphologic features of malignant melanoma and pigmented lesions after transformation of murine melanocytes with bFGF-cDNA and H-ras, myc, neu, and E1a oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Ramon y Cajal, S.; Suster, S.; Halaban, R.; Filvaroff, E.; Dotto, G. P.

    1991-01-01

    Malignant melanomas show a remarkable degree of heterogeneity because of different morphologic features, biologic behavior, and prognosis. In this communication, the authors attempted to correlate morphologic heterogeneity of melanomas with transformation by different activated oncogenes; they studied the histologic features of melanocytic lesions induced by murine melanocytes transformed by basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF-cDNA) or H-ras, neu, myc, and E1a oncogenes, and the lesions were compared with those observed in human pathology. Tumors formed after grafting onto syngenic mice or subcutaneous injections in nude mice were studied. In syngenic mice, benign melanocytic lesions reminiscent of intradermal nevus were observed with melanocytes transformed with b-FGF-cDNA, and myc and E1a oncogenes. Benign lesions were also formed by neu-transformed melanocytes when they were grafted concomitantly with keratinocytes, whereas malignant tumors were formed by the same cells when grafted alone or together with fibroblasts. In contrast, H-ras melanocytes always formed malignant tumors. In nude mice, b-FGF-transformed melanocytes induced benign lesions, whereas transformed melanocytes by the other oncogenes formed malignant tumors with distinctive and homogeneous morphologic features that depended on the transforming oncogene. Melanomas with either epithelioid cell, spindle cell, small round cell, and anaplastic cell growth patterns could be distinguished after transformation with H-ras, neu, E1a, and myc oncogenes, respectively. These various histologic types are analogous to those that may be observed in human melanomas, even within the same tumor. These studies suggest a possible molecular mechanism for tumor heterogeneity in which distinct oncogenes or oncogenelike activities can be activated in different tumors or discrete parts of the same tumor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1992762

  3. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  4. A comet assay study reveals that aluminium induces DNA damage and inhibits the repair of radiation-induced lesions in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lankoff, Anna; Banasik, Anna; Duma, Anna; Ochniak, Edyta; Lisowska, Halina; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Góźdź, Stanisław; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2006-02-01

    Although it is known that many metals induce DNA damage and inhibit DNA repair, information regarding aluminium (Al) is scarce. The aim of this study was to analyze the level of DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes treated with Al and the impact of Al on the repair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. Cells were treated with different doses of aluminium chloride (1, 2, 5, 10 and 25 microg/ml AlCl(3)) for 72 h. The level of DNA damage and of apoptosis was determined by the comet assay. The level of oxidative damage was determined by the application of endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. The results on apoptosis were confirmed by flow cytometry. Based on the fluorescence intensity, cells were divided into cohorts of different relative DNA content that corresponds to G(1), S and G(2) phases of the cell cycle. Our results revealed that Al induces DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner, however, at the dose of 25 microg/ml the level of damage declined. This decline was accompanied by a high level of apoptosis indicating selective elimination of damaged cells. Cells pre-treated with Al showed a decreased repair capacity indicating that Al inhibits DNA repair. The possible mechanisms by which Al induces DNA damage and inhibits the repair are discussed. PMID:16139969

  5. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  6. Imperfect DNA lesion repair in the semiconservative quasispecies model: Derivation of the Hamming class equations and solution of the single-fitness peak landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Sherley, James L.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2004-12-01

    This paper develops a Hamming class formalism for the semiconservative quasispecies equations with imperfect lesion repair, first presented and analytically solved in Y. Brumer and E.I. Shakhnovich (q-bio.GN/0403018, 2004). Starting from the quasispecies dynamics over the space of genomes, we derive an equivalent dynamics over the space of ordered sequence pairs. From this set of equations, we are able to derive the infinite sequence length form of the dynamics for a class of fitness landscapes defined by a master genome. We use these equations to solve for a generalized single-fitness-peak landscape, where the master genome can sustain a maximum number of lesions and remain viable. We determine the mean equilibrium fitness and error threshold for this class of landscapes, and show that when lesion repair is imperfect, semiconservative replication displays characteristics from both conservative replication and semiconservative replication with perfect lesion repair. The work presented here provides a formulation of the model which greatly facilitates the analysis of a relatively broad class of fitness landscapes, and thus serves as a convenient springboard into biological applications of imperfect lesion repair.

  7. Comparison of the In Vitro Replication of the 7-(2-Oxoheptyl)-1,N2-etheno-2′-deoxyguanosine and 1,N2-Etheno-2′-deoxyguanosine Lesions by Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4)

    PubMed Central

    Christov, Plamen P.; Petrova, Katya V.; Shanmugam, Ganesh; Kozekov, Ivan D.; Kozekova, Albena; Guengerich, F. Peter; Stone, Michael P.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.

    2010-01-01

    Oligonucleotides were synthesized containing the 7-(2-oxoheptyl)-etheno-dGuo adduct, which is derived from the reaction of dGuo and the lipid peroxidation product 4-oxo-2-nonenal. The in vitro replication of 7-(2-oxoheptyl)-etheno-dGuo by the model Y-family polymerase Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4) was examined in two sequences. The extension products were sequenced using an improved LC-ESI-MS/MS protocol developed in our laboratories and the results were compared to that of the 1,N2-etheno-dGuo adduct in the same sequence contexts. Both etheno adducts were highly miscoding when situated in a 5′-TXG-3′ local sequence contexts with <4% of the extension products being derived from error-free bypass. The major extension products resulted from the misinsertion of Ade opposite the adduct and a one-base deletion. The major extension products from replication of the etheno lesions in a 5′-CXG-3′ local sequence context were the result of misinsertion of Ade, a one-base deletion, and error-free bypass. Other minor extension products were also identified. The 7-(2-oxoheptyl)-etheno-dGuo lesion resulted in a larger frequency of misinsertion of Ade, whereas the 1,N2-etheno-dGuo gave more of the one-base deletion product. Conformational studies of duplex DNA containing the 7-(2-oxoheptyl)-etheno-dGuo in a 5′-TXG-3′ sequence context by NMR indicated the presence of a pH-dependent conformational transition, likely involving the glycosyl bond at the adducted guanosine; the pKa for this transition was lower than that observed for the 1,N2-ε-dGuo lesion. However, the 7-(2-oxoheptyl)-etheno-dGuo lesion, the complementary Cyt, and both flanking base pairs remained disordered at all pH values, which is attributed to the presence of the hydrophobic heptyl group of the 7-(2-oxoheptyl)-etheno-dGuo lesion. The altered pKa value and the structural disorder at the 7-(2-oxoheptyl)-etheno-dGuo lesion site, as compared to the same sequence containing the 1,N2

  8. The Oxidatively-Induced DNA Lesions 8,5′-Cyclo-2′-Deoxyadenosine and 8-Hydroxy-2′-Deoxyadenosine Are Strongly Resistant to Acid-Induced Hydrolysis of the Glycosidic Bond

    PubMed Central

    Theruvathu, Jacob A.; Jaruga, Pawel; Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2007-01-01

    The 8,5’-cyclopurine-2’-deoxynucleosides (cPu) are unique oxidatively-induced DNA lesions in that they are specifically repaired by NER. In the absence of NER, a possible mechanism for cPu removal is spontaneous glycosidic bond hydrolysis followed by enzymic processing. Such a mechanism could be significant if the glycosidic bond in cPu were substantially destabilized, as shown for other DNA lesions. Therefore, we investigated the stability of the glycosidic bond in a cPu, 8,5’(S)-cyclo-dA (S-cdA) against acid hydrolysis. For comparison, we also studied 8-OH-dA. We found that the glycosidic bond in S-cdA is ≈40 fold more resistant to glycosidic bond hydrolysis compared to dA. Interestingly, under the same conditions, the glycosidic bond in 8-OH-dA was even more stable than in S-cdA. These studies effectively rule out any mechanism for the removal of S-cdA or 8-OH-dA from DNA that requires spontaneous glycosidic bond hydrolysis, and further support the proposed role of cPu in the neurodegeneration observed in xeroderma pigmentosum patients who lack NER. Of broader significance, since NER does not function in non-transcribed DNA sequences of terminally differentiated cells, including neurons, cPu are expected to accumulate in such sequences even in individuals with normal NER, which could be important in the ageing process. PMID:17692895

  9. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  10. Cloned Genomic DNA of Type 2 Porcine Circovirus Is Infectious When Injected Directly into the Liver and Lymph Nodes of Pigs: Characterization of Clinical Disease, Virus Distribution, and Pathologic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fenaux, M.; Halbur, P. G.; Haqshenas, G.; Royer, R.; Thomas, P.; Nawagitgul, P.; Gill, M.; Toth, T. E.; Meng, X. J.

    2002-01-01

    Infection of animals with a molecular viral clone is critical to study the genetic determinants of viral replication and virulence in the host. Type 2 porcine circovirus (PCV2) has been incriminated as the cause of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), an emerging disease in pigs. We report here for the first time the construction and use of an infectious molecular DNA clone of PCV2 to characterize the disease and pathologic lesions associated with PCV2 infection by direct in vivo transfection of pigs with the molecular clone. The PCV2 molecular clone was generated by ligating two copies of the complete PCV2 genome in tandem into the pBluescript SK (pSK) vector and was shown to be infectious in vitro when transfected into PK-15 cells. Forty specific-pathogen-free pigs at 4 weeks of age were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 each. Group 1 pigs served as uninoculated controls. Pigs in group 2 were each inoculated intranasally with about 1.9 × 105 50% tissue culture infective doses of a homogeneous PCV2 live virus stock derived from the molecular clone. Pigs in group 3 were each injected intrahepatically with 200 μg of the cloned PCV2 plasmid DNA, and pigs in group 4 were each injected into the superficial iliac lymph nodes with 200 μg of the cloned PCV2 plasmid DNA. Animals injected with the cloned PCV2 plasmid DNA developed infection resembling that induced by intranasal inoculation with PCV2 live virus stock. Seroconversion to PCV2-specific antibody was detected in the majority of pigs from the three inoculated groups at 35 days postinoculation (DPI). Viremia, beginning at 14 DPI and lasting 2 to 4 weeks, was detected in the majority of the pigs from all three inoculated groups. There were no remarkable clinical signs of PMWS in control or any of the inoculated pigs. Gross lesions in pigs of the three inoculated groups were similar and were characterized by systemically enlarged, tan lymph nodes and lungs that failed to collapse

  11. Rad18 is required for functional interactions between FANCD2, BRCA2, and Rad51 to repair DNA topoisomerase 1-poisons induced lesions and promote fork recovery

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Mani, Chinnadurai; Clark, David W; Palle, Komaraiah

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and its analogues are chemotherapeutic agents that covalently and reversibly link DNA Topoisomerase I to its nicked DNA intermediate eliciting the formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) during replication. The repair of these DSB involves multiple DNA damage response and repair proteins. Here we demonstrate that CPT-induced DNA damage promotes functional interactions between BRCA2, FANCD2, Rad18, and Rad51 to repair the replication-associated DSB through homologous recombination (HR). Loss of any of these proteins leads to equal disruption of HR repair, causes chromosomal aberrations and sensitizes cells to CPT. Rad18 appears to function upstream in this repair pathway as its downregulation prevents activation of FANCD2, diminishes BRCA2 and Rad51 protein levels, formation of nuclear foci of all three proteins and recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks in response to CPT. Taken together this work further elucidates the complex interplay of DNA repair proteins in the repair of replication-associated DSB. PMID:26871286

  12. Direct assay of radiation-induced DNA base lesions in mammalian cells. Technical progress report, November 1, 1989--September 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Adenine (Ade), 2`-deoxyadenosine (dAdo), 5`-deoxyadenosine monophosphate (dAUT), single stranded poly adenylic acid [poly (dA)], double stranded deoxyadenylic-thymidylic acid [ds poly (dA-T)] and salmon testis DNA were irradiated with 500 Gy under oxic and anoxic conditions. The major damage products were analyzed by BPLC with optical detection and quantitated in terms of the percentage of the adenosine in each model compound found as a specific damage product. Outside of the Ade free base, 8-OH-dAdo was the major oxic damage product from each model compound. The type and quantity of the major damage products depended on the sequence and conformation of the model compounds under anoxic conditions. When dAdo and dAMP were irradiated under anoxic conditions, the major damage product was either the R or S isomer of 8,5`cdAdo and little Ade or {alpha}-dAdo was observed. However, when poly(dA), poly(dA-dT), and salmon testis DNA were {gamma}-irradiated under nitrogen, the major deoxyadenosine damage product was identified as the {alpha}-anomer of deoxyadenosine. No {alpha}-deoxyadenosine was detected after irradiation under oxic conditions. The presence of nucleotides with the {alpha}-configuration at the anomeric carbon atom in the DNA chain may have a significant effect on its tertiary structure and possibly modify its biological activity.

  13. Effect of the Spiroiminodihydantoin Lesion on Nucleosome Stability and Positioning.

    PubMed

    Norabuena, Erika M; Barnes Williams, Sara; Klureza, Margaret A; Goehring, Liana J; Gruessner, Brian; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Jamieson, Elizabeth R; Núñez, Megan E

    2016-04-26

    DNA is constantly under attack by oxidants, generating a variety of potentially mutagenic covalently modified species, including oxidized guanine base products. One such product is spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), a chiral, propeller-shaped lesion that strongly destabilizes the DNA helix in its vicinity. Despite its unusual shape and thermodynamic effect on double-stranded DNA structure, DNA duplexes containing the Sp lesion form stable nucleosomes upon being incubated with histone octamers. Indeed, among six different combinations of lesion location and stereochemistry, only two duplexes display a diminished ability to form nucleosomes, and these only by ∼25%; the other four are statistically indistinguishable from the control. Nonetheless, kinetic factors also play a role: when the histone proteins have less time during assembly of the core particle to sample both lesion-containing and normal DNA strands, they are more likely to bind the Sp lesion DNA than during slower assembly processes that better approximate thermodynamic equilibrium. Using DNase I footprinting and molecular modeling, we discovered that the Sp lesion causes only a small perturbation (±1-2 bp) on the translational position of the DNA within the nucleosome. Each diastereomeric pair of lesions has the same effect on nucleosome positioning, but lesions placed at different locations behave differently, illustrating that the location of the lesion and not its shape serves as the primary determinant of the most stable DNA orientation. PMID:27074396

  14. Formation of isodialuric acid lesion within DNA oligomers via one-electron oxidation of 5-hydroxyuracil: characterization, stability and excision repair.

    PubMed

    Simon, Philippe; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Favier, Alain; Cadet, Jean

    2006-01-01

    5-Hydroxyuracil is a major oxidized nucleobase that can be generated by the action of (*)OH radical and one-electron oxidants. The latter modified base that exhibits a low ionization potential is highly susceptible to further degradation upon exposure to various oxidants. Emphasis was placed in this work on the formation and characterization of one-electron oxidation products of 5-hydroxyuracil within DNA fragments of defined sequence. For this purpose, 5-hydroxyuracil containing single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides of various lengths were synthesized and then exposed to the oxidizing action of iridium salts. Isodialuric acid was found to be formed almost quantitatively by a one-electron oxidation mechanism for which relevant information was inferred from a freeze-quenched ESR study. Information on the stability of isodialuric acid thus formed and its conversion products in aqueous solutions was also gained from experiments performed at acidic, neutral and alkali pH's. Moreover, biochemical features dealing with the substrate specificity of several bacterial and yeast base excision repair enzymes to remove isodialuric acid from site-specifically modified DNA fragments were determined. PMID:16885239

  15. Formation of isodialuric acid lesion within DNA oligomers via one-electron oxidation of 5-hydroxyuracil: characterization, stability and excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Philippe; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Favier, Alain; Cadet, Jean

    2006-01-01

    5-Hydroxyuracil is a major oxidized nucleobase that can be generated by the action of •OH radical and one-electron oxidants. The latter modified base that exhibits a low ionization potential is highly susceptible to further degradation upon exposure to various oxidants. Emphasis was placed in thiswork on the formation and characterization of one-electron oxidation products of 5-hydroxyuracil within DNA fragments of defined sequence. For this purpose, 5-hydroxyuracil containing single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides of various lengths were synthesized and then exposed to the oxidizing action of iridium salts. Isodialuric acid was found to be formed almost quantitatively by a one-electron oxidation mechanism for which relevant information was inferred from a freeze-quenched ESR study. Information on the stability of isodialuric acid thus formed and its conversion products in aqueous solutions was also gained from experiments performed at acidic, neutral and alkali pH’s. Moreover, biochemical features dealing with the substrate specificity of several bacterial and yeast base excision repair enzymes to remove isodialuric acid from site-specifically modified DNA fragments were determined. PMID:16885239

  16. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  17. Somatic cell mutagenesis in Drosophila: recovery of genetic damage in relation to the types of DNA lesions induced in mutationally unstable and stable X-chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Vogel, E W

    1989-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a study on the genotoxic activities of 12 mutagens and clastogens of widely differing mode of action in somatic cells in vivo, i.e., in the eye primordia of Drosophila larvae. After emergence, adult flies were monitored for aberrantly colored sectors in the compound eyes of the following genotypes: UZ males and females (zeste) carrying a genetically unstable transposable element, SZ males and females (zeste) carrying a partial duplication of the w+ locus plus a transposon insert, white-coral/white (wco/w) females, w+/w females and w+ males. The UZ and SZ marker sets make it possible to monitor shifts from zeste to red (scored as mosaic red spots, RS) and for loss of the white locus (light spots, LS). wco/w+ females were scored for mosaic twin spots (TS) and LS, w+ genotypes for just LS. The genotoxins analyzed were methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and ethylnitrosourea (ENU) (alkylating), adriamycin (AM) and daunomycin (DM) (intercalating), Trenimon, Thio-TEPA and cisplatin (DDP) (cross-linking), bleomycin (strand-breaking), 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DA) (bulky monoadducts) and cytosine arabinofuranoside (inhibition of DNA synthesis). The relative mutabilities with frequencies of mosaic light spots (LS) in w+/w female as the standard (relative mutability = 1) vs. genotypes UZ (RS in male) vs. SZ (RS in male) vs. w+ (LS in male) were 1:0.6:0.2:0.3 for MMS, 1:0.09:0.05:0.7 for DDP, and 1:1.6:0.2:1.0 for ENU, ENU showed exceptional behavior in that it was the only compound for which mutational response, measured by the induction of red spots, was highest with the UZ marker set. Occurrence of large light spots (LS) in male but not in female genotypes was negatively correlated with efficiency of agents for chromosomal damage, suggesting that in the hemizygous condition, as in males, selection of damaged cells and mitotic delay may have played a significant role. In general

  18. Translesion DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Alexandra; McDonald, John P.; Woodgate, Roger

    2014-01-01

    All living organisms are continually exposed to agents that damage their DNA, which threatens the integrity of their genome. As a consequence, cells are equipped with a plethora of DNA repair enzymes to remove the damaged DNA. Unfortunately, situations nevertheless arise where lesions persist, and these lesions block the progression of the cell’s replicase. Under these situations, cells are forced to choose between recombination-mediated “damage avoidance” pathways, or use a specialized DNA polymerase (pol) to traverse the blocking lesion. The latter process is referred to as Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS). As inferred by its name, TLS not only results in bases being (mis)incorporated opposite DNA lesions, but also downstream of the replicase-blocking lesion, so as to ensure continued genome duplication and cell survival. Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium possess five DNA polymerases, and while all have been shown to facilitate TLS under certain experimental conditions, it is clear that the LexA-regulated and damage-inducible pols II, IV and V perform the vast majority of TLS under physiological conditions. Pol V can traverse a wide range of DNA lesions and performs the bulk of mutagenic TLS, whereas pol II and pol IV appear to be more specialized TLS polymerases. PMID:26442823

  19. Simultaneous Detection of 3-Nitrotyrosine and 3-Nitro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic Acid in Human Urine by Online SPE LC-MS/MS and Their Association with Oxidative and Methylated DNA Lesions.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mu-Rong; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Hung-Hsin; Lin, Jia-Hong; Hu, Chiung-Wen

    2015-05-18

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can modify proteins at tyrosine and tryptophan residues, and they are involved in the pathogenesis of various human diseases. In this study, we present the first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method that enables the simultaneous measurement of urinary 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NTYR) and its metabolite 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (NHPA). After the addition of stable isotope-labeled internal standards, urine samples were purified and enriched using manual solid-phase extraction (SPE) and HPLC fractionation followed by online SPE LC-MS/MS analysis. The limits of quantification in urine were 3.1 and 2.5 pg/mL for 3-NTYR and NHPA, respectively. Inter- and intraday imprecision was <15%. The mean relative recoveries of 3-NTYR and NHPA in urine were 89-98% and 90-98%, respectively. We further applied this method to 65 urinary samples from healthy subjects. Urinary samples were also analyzed for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) as well as oxidative and methylated DNA lesions, namely, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua), 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo), N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG), and N3-methyladenine (N3-MeA), using reported LC-MS/MS methods. Urinary 3-NTYR and NHPA levels were measured at concentrations of 63.2 ± 51.5 and 77.4 ± 60.8 pg/mL, respectively. Urinary 3-NTYR and NHPA levels were highly correlated with each other and with 8-oxoGua and 8-oxodGuo. Our findings demonstrated that a relationship exists between oxidative and nitrative stress. However, 3-NTYR and NHPA were correlated with N7-MeG and N3-MeA but not with NDMA, suggesting that NDMA may not be a representative biomarker of N-nitroso compounds that are induced by RNS. PMID:25825822

  20. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  1. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  2. Association of Malassezia species with psoriatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Honnavar, Prasanna; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Dogra, Sunil; Singh, Pankaj; Handa, Sanjeev

    2014-08-01

    The aetiology of psoriasis remains elusive. Among multiple factors hypothesised, association of Malassezia spp. is supported by response to topical antifungals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of Malassezia spp. with psoriatic lesion. The subjects included 50 consecutive patients with psoriasis, and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Samples were collected using scotch tape over one square inch area from the lesional and non-lesional sites. The isolated Malassezia spp. were identified by phenotypic methods and confirmed by ITS2 PCR-RFLP and sequencing of D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA. Psoriatic lesions were seen commonly on scalp (28%, 14), chest (22%, 11) and arms (16%, 8). Majority of cases presented with chronic plaque form (76%, 38; P < 0.05). From psoriatic lesions, most frequently isolated Malassezia species was M. furfur (70.6%, 24), followed by M. japonica (11.8%, 4) and M. globosa (8.8%, 3). From healthy individuals M. furfur, M. sympodialis, mixture of M. furfur and M. globosa was isolated in 73.3%, 10% and 16.7% (22, 3 and 5) of cases respectively. The average number of colonies isolated from scalp lesions of the patients was significantly higher (P = 0.03) than healthy areas. Although no strong association of Malassezia species was formed with psoriatic lesion in general, the fungi may play a role in exacerbation of scalp psoriasis. PMID:24655111

  3. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  4. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  5. DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Psakhye, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Accurate chromosomal DNA replication is fundamental for optimal cellular function and genome integrity. Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance pathways, which are crucial to complete genome duplication as well as to prevent formation of deleterious double strand breaks. Cells use two general strategies to tolerate lesions: recombination to a homologous template, and trans-lesion synthesis with specialized polymerases. While key players of these processes have been outlined, much less is known on their choreography and regulation. Recent advances have uncovered principles by which DNA damage tolerance is regulated locally and temporally - in relation to replication timing and cell cycle stage -, and are beginning to elucidate the DNA dynamics that mediate lesion tolerance and influence chromosome structure during replication. PMID:27060551

  6. Noninfectious penile lesions.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Sea, Jason; Thompson, Ian M; Elston, Dirk M

    2010-01-15

    Family physicians commonly diagnose and manage penile cutaneous lesions. Noninfectious lesions may be classified as inflammatory and papulosquamous (e.g., psoriasis, lichen sclerosus, angiokeratomas, lichen nitidus, lichen planus), or as neoplastic (e.g., carcinoma in situ, invasive squamous cell carcinoma). The clinical presentation and appearance of the lesions guide the diagnosis. Psoriasis presents as red or salmon-colored plaques with overlying scales, often with systemic lesions. Lichen sclerosus presents as a phimotic, hypopigmented prepuce or glans penis with a cellophane-like texture. Angiokeratomas are typically asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, red or blue papules, whereas lichen nitidus usually produces asymptomatic pinhead-sized, hypopigmented papules. The lesions of lichen planus are pruritic, violaceous, polygonal papules that are typically systemic. Carcinoma in situ should be suspected if the patient has velvety red or keratotic plaques of the glans penis or prepuce, whereas invasive squamous cell carcinoma presents as a painless lump, ulcer, or fungating irregular mass. Some benign lesions, such as psoriasis and lichen planus, can mimic carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma. Biopsy is indicated if the diagnosis is in doubt or neoplasm cannot be excluded. The management of benign penile lesions usually involves observation or topical corticosteroids; however, neoplastic lesions generally require surgery. PMID:20082512

  7. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  8. Epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions: Products from the improper chemical repair of 2-deoxyribose radicals.

    PubMed

    Amato, Nicholas J; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-04-21

    Genomic integrity is constantly challenged by DNA damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consequently, DNA damage can compromise the fidelity and efficiency of essential DNA metabolic processes, including replication and transcription, which may contribute significantly to the etiology of many human diseases. Here, we review one family of DNA lesions, the epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions, which arise from the improper chemical repair of the 2-deoxyribose radicals. Unlike most other DNA lesions, the epimeric 2-deoxyribose lesions are indistinguishable from their corresponding unmodified nucleosides in both molecular mass and chemical reactivity. We placed our emphasis of discussion on the formation of these lesions, their impact on the structure and stability of duplex DNA, their biological consequences, their potential therapeutic relevance, and future research directions about these modified nucleosides. PMID:24517165

  9. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  10. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  11. Extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, James; Galea, Samuel; Galea, Joseph; Schembri, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man on warfarin for aortic valve replacement presented with recurrent episodes of melaena. An initial oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) was normal, as were red cell scanning and colonoscopy. It was a third OGD that revealed the cause of the melaena—a vascular lesion in the duodenum, at the junction between D1 and D2. An extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion was diagnosed, and the lesion was injected with epinephrine and tattooed. Over the following months, episodes of bleeding recurred despite further attempts at injection. Percutaneous radiologically assisted embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery, and eventually duodenotomy and oversuturing of the lesion were performed to no avail. The patient has undergone over 10 endoscopies, and has received over 70 units of packed red cells to date, since his initial presentation 6 years ago. Attempts to stop the bleeding permanently have been difficult, highlighting the complexity of managing such a lesion. PMID:25216921

  12. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  13. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  14. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  15. Analysis of alcohol-induced DNA damage in Escherichia coli by visualizing single genomic DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujin; Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Jisoo; Oh, Yeeun; Kim, Dogeun; Lee, Jungyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-07-21

    Consumption of alcohol injures DNA, and such damage is considered to be a primary cause for the development of cancer and many other diseases essentially due to reactive oxygen species generated from alcohol. To sensitively detect alcohol-induced DNA lesions in a biological system, we introduced a novel analytical platform for visualization of single genomic DNA molecules using E. coli. By fluorescently labelling the DNA lesions, our approach demonstrated, with the highest sensitivity, that we could count the number of DNA lesions induced by alcohol metabolism in a single bacterial cell. Moreover, our results showed a linear relationship between ethanol concentration and the number of DNA lesions: 0.88 lesions per 1% ethanol. Using this approach, we quantitatively analysed the DNA damage induced by exposure to alcoholic beverages such as beer (5% ethanol), rice wine (13%), soju (20%), and whisky (40%). PMID:27186604

  16. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  17. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy . Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and ...

  18. Hypervascular liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Maturen, Katherine E; Tye, Grace A; Liu, Yueyi I; Parti, Naveen N; Desser, Terry S

    2009-10-01

    Hypervascular hepatocellular lesions include both benign and malignant etiologies. In the benign category, focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma are typically hypervascular. In addition, some regenerative nodules in cirrhosis may be hypervascular. Malignant hypervascular primary hepatocellular lesions include hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrolamellar carcinoma, and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Vascular liver lesions often appear hypervascular because they tend to follow the enhancement of the blood pool; these include hemangiomas, arteriovenous malformations, angiosarcomas, and peliosis. While most gastrointestinal malignancies that metastasize to the liver will appear hypovascular on arterial and portal-venous phase imaging, certain cancers such as metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, carcinoid, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors) tend to produce hypervascular metastases due to the greater recruitment of arterial blood supply. Finally, rare hepatic lesions such as glomus tumor and inflammatory pseudotumor may have a hypervascular appearance. PMID:19842564

  19. Evaluation of Parotid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a parotid lesion is broad, and the otolaryngologist must consider inflammatory, neoplastic, autoimmune, traumatic, infectious, or congenital causes. A comprehensive history and physical examination, in conjunction with judicious use of radiographic imaging (MRI, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine studies), laboratory studies, and pathologic analysis (fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, incisional biopsy), facilitates making an accurate diagnosis. This article reviews the key history and physical elements and adjunctive diagnostic tools available for working up parotid lesions. PMID:26902978

  20. Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Several systemic diseases initially present with various oral manifestations. Investigation of these oral symptoms may at times lead to the diagnosis of grave underlying life-threatening conditions. We present one such case, where the patient manifested with gross enlargement of the mandible, along with lesions in the lower limbs. These lesions were the initial manifestation and on further investigations the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:24516769

  1. Petrous Apex Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in treating 69 patients over the past 6 years with pathologic processes involving the petrous apex. These included 25 (36%) primary petrous apex lesions, 40 (58%) lesions that involved the petrous apex by direct invasion from an adjacent region, and four (6%) lesions that were the result of metastatic spread from a distant site. Although lesions of the petrous apex are uncommon, they may present significant morbidity to the patient. The symptoms elicited by these lesions are usually vague and nonlocalizing in the early stages but may progress to include multiple cranial neuropathies. Successful results are contingent on early diagnosis, which requires a high index of suspicion and use of appropriate imaging modalities. Thorough preoperative assessment with use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and carotid arteriography is essential to plan the surgical approach. We present this collection of patients in order to aid in the further preoperative characterization of the differences in primary and secondary lesions of the petrous apex. PMID:17170919

  2. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  3. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known ‘restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these ‘bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase–DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly. PMID:26675048

  4. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-12-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known `restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these `bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase-DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly.

  5. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  6. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  7. Genital lesions following bestiality.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Shenoi, S D; Kumar, K B; Sharma, P V

    2000-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with painful genital lesions with history of bestiality and abnor-mal sexual behaviour. Examination revealed multiple irregular tender ulcers and erosions, with phimosis and left sided tender inguinal adenopathy. VDRL, TPHA, HIV-ELISA were negative. He was treated with ciprofloxacin 500mg b.d. along with saline compresses with complete resolution. PMID:20877040

  8. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors.

    PubMed

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-12-14

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  9. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  10. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  11. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  12. Use of Human Papillomavirus DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 Immunocytochemistry to Detect and Predict anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Keelawat, Somboon; Pankam, Tippawan; Barisri, Jiranuwat; Triratanachat, Surang; Deesua, Amornrat; Rodbamrung, Piyanee; Wongsabut, Jiratchaya; Tantbirojn, Patou; Numto, Saranya; Ruangvejvorachai, Preecha; Phanuphak, Praphan; Palefsky, Joel M.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Kerr, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of having anal cancer. Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) is the precursor of anal cancer. We explored the use of different biomarkers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-mediated cell transformation to detect and predict HSIL among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 123 HIV-positive and 123 HIV-negative MSM were enrolled and followed for 12 months. High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) with biopsies were performed at every visit along with anal sample collection for cytology, high-risk HPV DNA genotyping, HPV E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry. Performance characteristics and area under the receiver operator characteristics curve were calculated for these biomarkers at baseline, and Cox regression compared the usefulness of these biomarkers in predicting incident HSIL. High-risk HPV DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry each identified 43–46% of MSM whose baseline test positivity would trigger HRA referral. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity (64.7%) and correctly classified the highest number of prevalent HSIL cases. With the exception of p16 immunochemistry, most tests showed significant increases in sensitivity but decreases specificity versus anal cytology, while the overall number of correctly classified cases was not significantly different. Baseline or persistent type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA was the only test significantly predicting incident histologic HSIL within 12 months in models adjusted for HIV status and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions at baseline. Conclusions/Significance Countries with a high HIV prevalence among MSM and limited HRA resources may consider using biomarkers to identify individuals at high risk of HSIL. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity for prevalent HSIL detection regardless of HIV status, whereas type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA performed best in predicting development of

  13. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  14. Novel lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Longbottom, C; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A

    2009-01-01

    Several non-invasive and novel aids for the detection of (and in some cases monitoring of) caries lesions have been introduced in the field of 'caries diagnostics' over the last 15 years. This chapter focusses on those available to dentists at the time of writing; continuing research is bound to lead to further developments in the coming years. Laser fluorescence is based on measurements of back-scattered fluorescence of a 655-nm light source. It enhances occlusal and (potentially) approximal lesion detection and enables semi-quantitative caries monitoring. Systematic reviews have identified false-positive results as a limitation. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence is another sensitive method to quantitatively detect and measure mineral loss both in enamel and some dentine lesions; again, the trade-offs with lower specificity when compared with clinical visual detection must be considered. Subtraction radiography is based on the principle of digitally superimposing two radiographs with exactly the same projection geometry. This method is applicable for approximal surfaces and occlusal caries involving dentine but is not yet widely available. Electrical caries measurements gather either site-specific or surface-specific information of teeth and tooth structure. Fixed-frequency devices perform best for occlusal dentine caries but the method has also shown promise for lesions in enamel and other tooth surfaces with multi-frequency approaches. All methods require further research and further validation in well-designed clinical trials. In the future, they could have useful applications in clinical practice as part of a personalized, comprehensive caries management system. PMID:19494675

  15. Improving diagnosis of atraumatic splenic lesions, part I: nonneoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Rozenblit, Alla M; Kaul, Bindu; Stein, Marjorie W; Mazzariol, Fernanda S

    2016-01-01

    Focal atraumatic splenic lesions often pose a diagnostic challenge on cross-sectional imaging. They can be categorized based on etiology as nonneoplastic (reviewed in Part I), benign neoplastic, and malignant neoplastic lesions. Lesions can also be characterized based on prevalence as common, uncommon, and rare. Familiarity with pertinent clinical parameters, etiology, pathology, prevalence, and ancillary features such as splenomegaly, concomitant hepatic involvement, and extrasplenic findings, in addition to knowledge of imaging spectra of these lesions, can improve diagnostic confidence. Since the nonneoplastic lesions are usually easily recognized, it is critical that the radiologist identifies them avoiding unnecessary work up. PMID:27317223

  16. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses. PMID:27261346

  17. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  18. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  19. Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dhakad, Urmila; Das, Siddharth K

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged male patient developed acute back pain and a lumbar vertebral lesion following trivial physical trauma. The lesion was considered as tuberculous on vertebral x-rays and MRI. After biopsy of the lesion and spinal fixation, the patient was kept on empirical antituberculous treatment (ATT) to which he did not respond. On re-evaluation he was diagnosed to have an Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). ATT was stopped and he was successfully managed by rest, steroids, methotrexate and sulfasalazine. A careful look at the patient's plain x-ray spine and awareness about the lesion can avoid misdiagnosis of this characteristic vertebral lesion found in AS. PMID:23559648

  20. Focal lesions in normal liver.

    PubMed

    Semelka, Richard C; Martin, Diego R; Balci, N Cem

    2005-10-01

    A variety of lesions occur in the normal liver. This review will describe the most common benign, malignant, and infectious lesions. Illustration will be made of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the most common of these. Due to the high accuracy for liver lesion detection and characterization, and the intrinsic safety of the modality, MR should be considered the primary imaging tool to investigate liver diseases. PMID:16174062

  1. UV damage in DNA promotes nucleosome unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2010-08-20

    The association of DNA with histones in chromatin impedes DNA repair enzymes from accessing DNA lesions. Nucleosomes exist in a dynamic equilibrium in which portions of the DNA molecule spontaneously unwrap, transiently exposing buried DNA sites. Thus, nucleosome dynamics in certain regions of chromatin may provide the exposure time and space needed for efficient repair of buried DNA lesions. We have used FRET and restriction enzyme accessibility to study nucleosome dynamics following DNA damage by UV radiation. We find that FRET efficiency is reduced in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the presence of UV photoproducts enhances spontaneous unwrapping of DNA from histones. Furthermore, this UV-induced shift in unwrapping dynamics is associated with increased restriction enzyme accessibility of histone-bound DNA after UV treatment. Surprisingly, the increased unwrapping dynamics is even observed in nucleosome core particles containing a single UV lesion at a specific site. These results highlight the potential for increased "intrinsic exposure" of nucleosome-associated DNA lesions in chromatin to repair proteins. PMID:20562439

  2. Pigmented lesion of buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  3. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  4. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  5. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease. PMID:26442438

  6. Oxidative Glial Cell Damage Associated with White Matter Lesions in the Aging Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mashhadi, Sufana; Simpson, Julie E.; Heath, Paul R.; Dickman, Mark; Forster, Gillian; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul G.; Wharton, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are common in brain aging and are associated with dementia. We aimed to investigate whether oxidative DNA damage and occur in WML and in apparently normal white matter in cases with lesions. Tissue from WML and control white matter from brains with lesions (controls lesional) and without lesions (controls non-lesional) were obtained, using post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging-guided sampling, from the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. Oxidative damage was assessed by immunohistochemistry to 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxoguanosine (8-OHdG) and Western blotting for malondialdehyde. DNA response was assessed by phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), p53, senescence markers and by quantitative Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) panel for candidate DNA damage-associated genes. 8-OHdG was expressed in glia and endothelium, with increased expression in both WML and controls lesional compared with controls non-lesional (P < 0.001). γH2Ax showed a similar, although attenuated difference among groups (P = 0.03). Expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16 suggested induction of senescence mechanisms in glia. Oxidative DNA damage and a DNA damage response are features of WML pathogenesis and suggest candidate mechanisms for glial dysfunction. Their expression in apparently normal white matter in cases with WML suggests that white matter dysfunction is not restricted to lesions. The role of this field-effect lesion pathogenesis and cognitive impairment are areas to be defined. PMID:25311358

  7. Early Events of DNA Photodamage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a leading external hazard to the integrity of DNA. Exposure to UV radiation triggers a cascade of chemical reactions, and many molecular products (photolesions) have been isolated that are potentially dangerous for the cellular system. The early steps that take place after UV absorption by DNA have been studied by ultrafast spectroscopy. The review focuses on the evolution of excited electronic states, the formation of photolesions, and processes suppressing their formation. Emphasis is placed on lesions involving two thymine bases, such as the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, the (6-4) lesion, and its Dewar valence isomer.

  8. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  9. [The biological effect of Y-family DNA polymerases on the translesion synthesis].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Yang, Jin

    2013-02-01

    A common DNA polymerase can replicate DNA which functions normally. However, if DNA suffers damage, the genome can not be replicated by a common DNA polymerase because DNA lesions will block the replication apparatus. Another kind of DNA polymerases in organism, Y-family DNA polymerases which is also called translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases, can deal with this problem. Their main functions are bypassing the lesions in DNA, replicating the genome and saving the dying cells. This thesis presents a historical review of the literature pertinent to the structure, functions and roles of Y-family DNA polymerases. PMID:23488167

  10. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms of its work-up, and yet there is none. This stems in part from the fact that there is no preventive campaign involving the early detection of liver tumors other than for patients with known liver cirrhosis and oncological patients. The work-up (detection and differential diagnosis) of liver tumors comprises theoretical considerations, history, physical examination, laboratory tests, standard ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound techniques, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as image-guided biopsy. CEUS techniques have proved to be the most pertinent method; these techniques became part of the clinical routine about 10 years ago in Europe and Asia and are used for a variety of indications in daily clinical practice. CEUS is in many cases the first and also decisive technical intervention for detecting and characterizing liver tumors. This development is reflected in many CEUS guidelines, e.g., in the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) guidelines 2004, 2008 and 2012 as well as the recently published World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology-EFSUMB guidelines 2012. This article sets out considerations for making a structured work-up of incidental liver tumors feasible. PMID:23745019

  11. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Summary In contrast to the relatively uniform pathology and the unyielding dismal outcome associated with infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, cystic lesions have a broad spectrum of gross and microscopic pathologies, and a range of clinical outcomes. The common cystic lesions of the pancreas are reviewed with emphasis on practical tips for distinguishing between the main entities. PMID:20953247

  12. Nonsurgical management of periapical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Periapical lesions develop as sequelae to pulp disease. They often occur without any episode of acute pain and are discovered on routine radiographic examination. The incidence of cysts within periapical lesions varies between 6 and 55%. The occurrence of periapical granulomas ranges between 9.3 and 87.1%, and of abscesses between 28.7 and 70.07%. It is accepted that all inflammatory periapical lesions should be initially treated with conservative nonsurgical procedures. Studies have reported a success rate of up to 85% after endodontic treatment of teeth with periapical lesions. A review of literature was performed by using electronic and hand searching methods for the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions. Various methods can be used in the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions: the conservative root canal treatment, decompression technique, active nonsurgical decompression technique, aspiration-irrigation technique, method using calcium hydroxide, Lesion Sterilization and Repair Therapy, and the Apexum procedure. Monitoring the healing of periapical lesions is essential through periodic follow-up examinations. PMID:21217952

  13. Hamartomatous tongue lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Kreiger, Portia A; Ernst, Linda M; Elden, Lisa M; Kazahaya, Ken; Alawi, Faizan; Russo, Pierre A

    2007-08-01

    The incidence and spectrum of tongue lesions in children, in particular tongue hamartomas, is relatively unknown. We report a retrospective review of all tongue lesions seen at a major tertiary care children's hospital over an 18-year period with an emphasis on describing tongue hamartomas. A total of 135 tongue lesions were identified. Vascular/lymphatic lesions (36/135) were the most common followed by mucus extravasation phenomenon (22/135). Interestingly, hamartomatous lesions (18/135) were the third most common lesion category identified. Lingual hamartomas were predominantly submucosal in location and were classified histologically by tissue composition as follows: neurovascular (2/18), smooth muscle predominant (5/18), fat predominant (1/18), and smooth muscle and fat containing (10/18). All 5 smooth muscle predominant hamartomas also contained vasculature, and 1 case additionally contained salivary gland tissue. The single fat predominant hamartoma additionally contained vessels and salivary gland. The final 10 hamartomas contained varying amounts of both smooth muscle and fat, and also admixed combinations of vessels, nerves, and salivary glands. Two of these 10 cases additionally contained foci of choristomatous elements, including cutaneous adnexal structures and cartilage. Most patients with hamartomatous lesions were young, 2 years or less. Eight cases were congenital in origin. Females outnumbered males by 2:1. The majority of lesions (16/18) were dorsal in location, and 4 patients had a syndromic association, all oral-facial-digital syndrome. PMID:17667541

  14. Protein oxidation, UVA and human DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Brem, Reto

    2016-08-01

    Solar UVB is carcinogenic. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) counteracts the carcinogenicity of UVB by excising potentially mutagenic UVB-induced DNA lesions. Despite this capacity for DNA repair, non-melanoma skin cancers and apparently normal sun-exposed skin contain huge numbers of mutations that are mostly attributable to unrepaired UVB-induced DNA lesions. UVA is about 20-times more abundant than UVB in incident sunlight. It does cause some DNA damage but this does not fully account for its biological impact. The effects of solar UVA are mediated by its interactions with cellular photosensitizers that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative stress. The proteome is a significant target for damage by UVA-induced ROS. In cultured human cells, UVA-induced oxidation of DNA repair proteins inhibits DNA repair. This article addresses the possible role of oxidative stress and protein oxidation in determining DNA repair efficiency - with particular reference to NER and skin cancer risk. PMID:27324272

  15. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) of the nonpalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Zgajnar, J; Hocevar, M; Frkovic-Grazio, S; Hertl, K; Schweiger, E; Besic, N

    2004-01-01

    Standard localization techniques of the nonpalpable breast lesions (guide wire, carbon, skin marking) have several disadvantages. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) was recently proposed as a better alternative resulting in wider surgical margins and lower average specimen weight. The aim of our study was to compare ROLL to our previously published series of the standard guidewire localization, performed at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. ROLL was performed in 110 nonpalpable breast lesions. Human serum albumin macroaggregats, marked with 1.8-5.5 MBq 99mTc was injected in the nonpalpable lesion. During surgery the radioactive breast tissue was excised using hand held gamma probe. Nonpalpable breast lesions were excised in all 110 patients. The definitive histology revealed 32 invasive carcinomas, 19 DCIS, 5 LCIS in and 54 benign breast lesions. Mean specimen weight was 40 g which is less in comparison to 53 g of the guidewire series (p=0.002). Surgical margins were clear in 36/51 (70%) invasive breast cancer or DCIS patients and close or involved in 15/51 (30%) patients. Compared to the guidewire series, where 41/92 (44%) margins were clear and 51/92 (56%) were close or involved, the difference was statistically significant (p=0.005). ROLL proved to be superior to guidewire localization in our series, allowing excision of the nonpalpable breast lesion with wider surgical margins despite lower average specimen weight. PMID:15640944

  16. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25596348

  17. Covalent carcinogenic O6-methylguanosine lesions in DNA. Structural studies of the O6 meG X A and O6meG X G interactions in dodecanucleotide duplexes.

    PubMed

    Patel, D J; Shapiro, L; Kozlowski, S A; Gaffney, B L; Jones, R A

    1986-04-20

    High-resolution proton and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance studies are reported on the self-complementary d(C1-G2-N3-G4-A5-A6-T7-T8-C9-O6meG10-C11-G12) duplexes (henceforth called O6meG X A 12-mer when N3 = A3 and O6meG X G 12-mer when N3 = G3), which contain symmetry-related A3 X O6meG10 and G3 X O6meG10 interactions in the interior of the helices. We observe inter-base-pair nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) between the base protons at the N3 X O6meG10 modification site and protons of flanking G2 X C11 and G4 X C9 base-pairs, indicative of the stacking of N3 and O6meG10 bases in both O6meG X A 12-mer and O6meG X G 12-mer duplexes. We have assigned all the base and a majority of the sugar protons from two-dimensional proton-correlated and nuclear Overhauser effect experiments on the O6meG X A 12-mer duplex and O6meG X G 12-mer duplex in solution. The observed NOEs establish that the A3 and O6meG10 at the modification site and all other residues adopt the anti configuration about the glycosidic bond, and that the O6meG X A 12-mer forms a right-handed duplex. The interaction between the bulky purine A3 and O6meG10 residues in the anti orientation results in large proton chemical shift perturbations at the (G2-A3-G4) X (C9-O6meG10-C11) segments of the helix. By contrast, we demonstrate that the O6meG10 residue adopts a syn configuration, while all other bases adopt an anti configuration about the glycosidic bond in the right-handed O6meG X G 12-mer duplex. This results in altered NOE patterns between the base protons of O6meG10 and the base and sugar protons of flanking C9 and C11 residues in the O6meG X G 12-mer duplex. The phosphorus backbone is perturbed at the modification site in both duplexes, since the phosphorus resonances are dispersed over 2 parts per million in the O6meG X A 12-mer and over 1 part per million in the O6meG X G 12-mer compared to a 0.5 part per million dispersion for an unperturbed DNA helix. We propose tentative pairing schemes for the

  18. Spectrum of prostatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate gland of male reproductive system is about the size of walnut and surrounds the urethra. Most frequently encountered diseases affecting prostate are Prostatitis, Benign prostatic hyperplasia and Prostatic cancer .Our objective of study was to evaluate the spectrum and correlation of prostatic lesions with presenting complaints of patient. Methods It was a cross-sectional study conducted in Pathology Department of Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences during the period of 1st January 2010 to December 2012. Pathology department of Dow Medical College collected specimens from both Civil Hospital and Lyari General Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. Specimens were taken through transurethral resection of prostate (TURP), simple prostatectomy and radical prostatectomy. A questionnaire was made and information including name, age, ward name of hospital, laboratory number, clinical diagnosis and symptoms were noted in it. Data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Result During the targeted months, 48 prostatic specimens were received with a mean age of 65.7 + -7.6 years. Common presenting complains were urinary retention in 23(47.9%) patients, followed by dribbling in 12(25%). Out of 48 patients, 42 have Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and 6 have Prostatic Adenocarcinoma. Both Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Prostatic Adenocarcinoma were more prevalent in the age group of 60-70 years. Conclusion Frequency of prostatic cancer is on the rise and measures should be taken for its early detection. Screening protocols and awareness programs need to be introduced. Screening programs should be focused on level of androgens and molecular pathogenesis. PMID:24063260

  19. Dentition and lesion history.

    PubMed

    Eggertsson, H; Ferreira-Zandona, A

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries is a process that typically keeps recurring throughout life, and the consequences are too often seen as irreversible damage to the dentition. At various stages of life, different parts of the dentition are affected, and the effects continue to be seen in the dentition long after the events took place. They bear witness to previous occurrences of this process throughout the lifetime of an individual. This chapter reviews the linkage between the caries process and the dental caries lesion history of the human dentition. The prevalence and distribution of the caries burden are very variable and closely tied to cultural aspects. In the primary dentition, income and education have been found to be inversely associated with: (1) any early childhood caries and (2) the maxillary incisor caries pattern. A positive association between these caries patterns and minority ethnicity/race status was also identified. These patterns are different from those of the permanent dentition. Well-documented changes in caries prevalence have been observed throughout history, most closely tied to availability and amount of refined sugar consumed. Changes in caries rates are also well documented in the 20th century, mainly with the advent of fluoride in several forms, first as a steep decline and recently as being relatively unchanged. It is likely that there will be dramatic changes in the rates and distribution of dental caries in the future, due to changes in behavioural factors and therapeutic measures. The description drawn is based on the dental caries pattern experienced in modern western societies. PMID:19494678

  20. Sensitive diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis by lesion swab sampling coupled to qPCR.

    PubMed

    Adams, Emily R; Gomez, Maria Adelaida; Scheske, Laura; Rios, Ruby; Marquez, Ricardo; Cossio, Alexandra; Albertini, Audrey; Schallig, Henk; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2014-12-01

    Variation in clinical accuracy of molecular diagnostic methods for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is commonly observed depending on the sample source, the method of DNA recovery and the molecular test. Few attempts have been made to compare these variables. Two swab and aspirate samples from lesions of patients with suspected CL (n = 105) were evaluated alongside standard diagnosis by microscopic detection of amastigotes or culture of parasites from lesion material. Three DNA extraction methods were compared: Qiagen on swab and aspirate specimens, Isohelix on swabs and Boil/Spin of lesion aspirates. Recovery of Leishmania DNA was evaluated for each sample type by real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of parasitic 18S rDNA, and the diagnostic accuracy of the molecular method determined. Swab sampling combined with Qiagen DNA extraction was the most efficient recovery method for Leishmania DNA, and was the most sensitive (98%; 95% CI: 91-100%) and specific (84%; 95% CI: 64-95%) approach. Aspirated material was less sensitive at 80% (95% CI: 70-88%) and 61% (95% CI: 50-72%) when coupled to Qiagen or Boil-Spin DNA extraction, respectively. Swab sampling of lesions was painless, simple to perform and coupled with standardized DNA extraction enhances the feasibility of molecular diagnosis of CL. PMID:25111885

  1. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  2. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  3. Synthesis of site-specific DNA-protein conjugates and their effects on DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jung Eun; Wickramaratne, Susith; Khatwani, Santoshkumar; Wang, Yen-Chih; Vervacke, Jeffrey; Distefano, Mark D; Tretyakova, Natalia Y

    2014-08-15

    DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) are bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions that form in the genome upon exposure to common antitumor drugs, environmental/occupational toxins, ionizing radiation, and endogenous free-radical-generating systems. As a result of their considerable size and their pronounced effects on DNA-protein interactions, DPCs can interfere with DNA replication, transcription, and repair, potentially leading to mutagenesis, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity. However, the biological consequences of these ubiquitous lesions are not fully understood due to the difficulty of generating DNA substrates containing structurally defined, site-specific DPCs. In the present study, site-specific cross-links between the two biomolecules were generated by copper-catalyzed [3 + 2] Huisgen cycloaddition (click reaction) between an alkyne group from 5-(octa-1,7-diynyl)-uracil in DNA and an azide group within engineered proteins/polypeptides. The resulting DPC substrates were subjected to in vitro primer extension in the presence of human lesion bypass DNA polymerases η, κ, ν, and ι. We found that DPC lesions to the green fluorescent protein and a 23-mer peptide completely blocked DNA replication, while the cross-link to a 10-mer peptide was bypassed. These results indicate that the polymerases cannot read through the larger DPC lesions and further suggest that proteolytic degradation may be required to remove the replication block imposed by bulky DPC adducts. PMID:24918113

  4. Cleaving DNA with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Nir; Balkhi, Shameelah R.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    1998-03-01

    A DNA structure is described that can cleave single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides in the presence of ionic copper. This ``deoxyribozyme'' can self-cleave or can operate as a bimolecular complex that simultaneously makes use of duplex and triplex interactions to bind and cleave separate DNA substrates. Bimolecular deoxyribozyme-mediated strand scission proceeds with a kobs of 0.2 min-1, whereas the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction could not be detected. The duplex and triplex recognition domains can be altered, making possible the targeted cleavage of single-stranded DNAs with different nucleotide sequences. Several small synthetic DNAs were made to function as simple ``restriction enzymes'' for the site-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA.

  5. Increased HIV-1 activity in anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions compared with unaffected anal mucosa in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Pollakis, Georgios; Richel, Olivier; Vis, Joost D; Prins, Jan M; Paxton, William A; de Vries, Henry J C

    2014-06-01

    We studied 3 patients with focal intra-anal tissue high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs). All had increased human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA in lesions compared with that in healthy mucosa. HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 episomal DNA were indicative of ongoing viral replication, more so in anal HSILs. PMID:24604897

  6. Response of the bacteriophage T4 replisome to non-coding lesions and regression of a stalled replication fork

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is constantly damaged by endogenous and exogenous agents. The resulting DNA lesions have the potential to halt the progression of the replisome, possibly leading to replication fork collapse. Here, we examine the effect of a non-coding DNA lesion in either the leading or lagging strand template on the bacteriophage T4 replisome. A damaged base in the lagging strand template does not affect the progression of the replication fork. Instead, the stalled lagging strand polymerase recycles from the lesion and initiates synthesis of the new Okazaki fragment upstream from the damaged base. In contrast, when the replisome encounters a blocking lesion in the leading strand template, the replication fork only travels approximately 1 kb beyond the point of the DNA lesion before complete replication fork collapse. The primosome and lagging strand polymerase remain active during this period and an Okazaki fragment is synthesized beyond the point of the leading strand lesion. There is no evidence for a new priming event on the leading strand template. Instead, the DNA structure that is produced by the stalled replication fork is a substrate for the DNA repair helicase, UvsW. UvsW catalyzes the regression of a stalled replication fork into a “chicken foot” structure that has been postulated to be an intermediate in an error-free lesion bypass pathway. PMID:20600127

  7. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  8. MRI of Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Albiin, Nils

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, MRI has more advantages than ultrasound, computed tomography, CT, positron emission tomography, PET, or any other imaging modality in diagnosing focal hepatic masses. With a combination of basic T1 and T2 weighted sequences, diffusion weighted imaging, DWI, and hepatobiliary gadolinium contrast agents, that is gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB), most liver lesions can be adequately diagnosed. Benign lesions, as cyst, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH or adenoma, can be distinguished from malignant lesions. In a non-cirrhotic liver, the most common malignant lesions are metastases which may be hypovascular or hypervascular. In the cirrhotic liver hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC, is of considerable importance. Besides, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and other less common malignancies has to be assessed. In this review, the techniques and typical MRI features are presented as well as the new algorithm issued by American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD). PMID:23049491

  9. Widespread telomere instability in prostatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tu, LiRen; Huda, Nazmul; Grimes, Brenda R; Slee, Roger B; Bates, Alison M; Cheng, Liang; Gilley, David

    2016-05-01

    A critical function of the telomere is to disguise chromosome ends from cellular recognition as double strand breaks, thereby preventing aberrant chromosome fusion events. Such chromosome end-to-end fusions are known to initiate genomic instability via breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Telomere dysfunction and other forms of genomic assault likely result in misregulation of genes involved in growth control, cell death, and senescence pathways, lowering the threshold to malignancy and likely drive disease progression. Shortened telomeres and anaphase bridges have been reported in a wide variety of early precursor and malignant cancer lesions including those of the prostate. These findings are being extended using methods for the analysis of telomere fusions (decisive genetic markers for telomere dysfunction) specifically within human tissue DNA. Here we report that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and prostate cancer (PCa) prostate lesions all contain similarly high frequencies of telomere fusions and anaphase bridges. Tumor-adjacent, histologically normal prostate tissue generally did not contain telomere fusions or anaphase bridges as compared to matched PCa tissues. However, we found relatively high levels of telomerase activity in this histologically normal tumor-adjacent tissue that was reduced but closely correlated with telomerase levels in corresponding PCa samples. Thus, we present evidence of high levels of telomere dysfunction in BPH, an established early precursor (PIN) and prostate cancer lesions but not generally in tumor adjacent normal tissue. Our results suggest that telomere dysfunction may be a common gateway event leading to genomic instability in prostate tumorigenesis. . PMID:25917938

  10. Benign Pediatric Salivary Gland Lesions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric R; Ord, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland lesions are rare in pediatric patients. In addition, the types of salivary gland tumors are different in their distribution in specific sites in the major and minor salivary glands in children compared with adults. This article reviews benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic salivary gland disorders in pediatric patients to help clinicians to develop an orderly differential diagnosis that will lead to expedient treatment of pediatric patients with salivary gland lesions. PMID:26614702