Science.gov

Sample records for mutual mobile membranes

  1. Mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    The generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is used, together with the two-dimensional pressure equation, to analyze mutual diffusion in concentrated membrane systems. These equations can be used to investigate the role that both direct and hydrodynamic interactions play in determining diffusive behavior. Here only direct interactions are explicitly incorporated into the theory at high densities; however, both direct and hydrodynamic interactions are analyzed for some dilute solutions. We look at diffusion in the presence of weak attractions, soft repulsions, and hard-core repulsions. It is found that, at low densities, attractions retard mutual diffusion while repulsions enhance it. Mechanistically, attractions tend to tether particles together and oppose the dissipation of gradients or fluctuations in concentration, while repulsions provide a driving force that pushes particles apart. At higher concentrations, changes in the structure of the fluid enhance mutual diffusion even in the presence of attractions. It is shown that the theoretical description of postelectrophoresis relaxation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments must be modified if interacting systems are studied. The effects of interactions on mutual diffusion coefficients have probably already been seen in postelectrophoresis relaxation experiments. PMID:2775829

  2. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein-protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  3. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein–protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  4. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  5. Membrane species mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu-Kai; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2016-08-17

    Processing and managing cell membrane proteins for characterization while maintaining their intact structure is challenging. Hydrodynamic flow has been used to transport membrane species in supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) where the hydrophobic cores of the membrane species can be protected during processing. However, the forced convection mechanism of species embedded in lipid bilayers is still unclear. Developing a controlled SLB platform with a practical model to predict the membrane species mobility in the platform under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is imperative to ensure the practical applicability of SLBs in processing and managing membrane species with various geometrical properties. The mobility of membrane species is affected by the driving force from the aqueous environment in addition to the frictions from the lipid bilayer, in which both lipid leaflets may exhibit different speeds relative to that of the moving species. In this study, we developed a model, based on the applied driving force and the possible frictional resistances that the membrane species encounter, to predict how the mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is influenced by the sizes of the species' hydrophilic portion in the aqueous environment and the hydrophobic portion embedded in the membrane. In addition, we used a microfluidic device for controlling the flow to arrange the lipid membrane and the tested membrane species in the desirable locations in order to obtain a SLB platform which can provide clear mobility responses of the species without disturbance from the species dispersion effect. The model predictions were consistent with the experimental observations, with the sliding friction coefficient between the upper leaflet and the hydrophilic portion of the species as the only regressed parameter. The result suggests that not only the lateral drag frictions from the lipid layers but also the sliding frictions between the species and the lipid layer planes

  6. Microbial fuel cells and osmotic membrane bioreactors have mutual benefits for wastewater treatment and energy production.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dianxun; Lu, Lu; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and osmotic membrane bioreactors (OMBRs) can be mutually beneficial when integrated together for wastewater treatment. When connecting MFCs with OMBRs, the solute buildup increased conductivity and buffer capacity, which greatly increased MFC power density from 3 W/m(3) up to 11.5 W/m(3). In turn, the MFCs conditioned and reduced sludge production and therefore reduced forward osmosis (FO) membrane fouling. The MFC-OMBR equipped with new thin-film composite (TFC) membrane showed excellent organic (>95%) and phosphorus removal (>99%) and therefore maintained effluent sCOD below 20 mg/L. However, the nitrogen removal was limited due to the negative surface charge of the thin-film composite membrane and solution chemistry, which led to higher flux of ammonium toward the OMBR draw solution. Further studies are needed to improve nitrogen removal, reduce fouling, and optimize system integration. PMID:27105032

  7. Hybrid Online Mobile Laser Scanner Calibration Through Image Alignment by Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miled, Mourad; Soheilian, Bahman; Habets, Emmanuel; Vallet, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes an hybrid online calibration method for a laser scanner mounted on a mobile platform also equipped with an imaging system. The method relies on finding the calibration parameters that best align the acquired points cloud to the images. The quality of this intermodal alignment is measured by Mutual information between image luminance and points reflectance. The main advantage and motivation is ensuring pixel accurate alignment of images and point clouds acquired simultaneously, but it is also much more flexible than traditional laser calibration methods.

  8. Mobility of membrane-trapped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    The translation or diffusion of particles along membranes or interfaces is of interest because it is a model system for describing basic features of interfacial hydrodynamics. It is also important in cellular signalling in biology and biophysics, and it can be used to deduce the rheological properties of surface films. Here, we consider the translational mobility of spherical and oblate spheroidal particles protruding into the surrounding subphase liquid. Both the subphase and surface film contribute to the resistance experienced by the particle, which is calculated as a function of the degree of protrusion as well as the viscosity contrast between the surface film and the surrounding fluid. The calculations are based on a combination of a perturbation expansion involving the particle shape and the Lorentz reciprocal theorem. It appears that just considering one term of the expansions is in very good agreement with available analytical and numerical results.

  9. Mobility of calcium channels in the presynaptic membrane.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Romy; Hosy, Eric; Kohl, Johannes; Klueva, Julia; Choquet, Daniel; Thomas, Ulrich; Voigt, Andreas; Heine, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Unravelling principles underlying neurotransmitter release are key to understand neural signaling. Here, we describe how surface mobility of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) modulates release probabilities (P(r)) of synaptic vesicles (SVs). Coupling distances of <10 to >100 nm have been reported for SVs and VDCCs in different synapses. Tracking individual VDCCs revealed that within hippocampal synapses, ∼60% of VDCCs are mobile while confined to presynaptic membrane compartments. Intracellular Ca(2+) chelation decreased VDCC mobility. Increasing VDCC surface populations by co-expression of the α2δ1 subunit did not alter channel mobility but led to enlarged active zones (AZs) rather than higher channel densities. VDCCs thus scale presynaptic scaffolds to maintain local mobility. We propose that dynamic coupling based on mobile VDCCs supports calcium domain cooperativity and tunes neurotransmitter release by equalizing Pr for docked SVs within AZs. PMID:25892305

  10. Stability of DNA-Tethered Lipid Membranes with Mobile Tethers

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Minsub; Boxer, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    We recently introduced two approaches for tethering planar lipid bilayers as membrane patches to either a supported lipid bilayer or DNA-functionalized surface using DNA hybridization (Chung, M., Lowe, R. D., Chan, Y-H. M., Ganesan, P. V., Boxer, S. G. J. Struct. Biol. 2009, 168, 190–9). When mobile DNA tethers are used, the tethered bilayer patches become unstable, while they are stable if the tethers are fixed on the surface. Because the mobile tethers between a patch and a supported lipid bilayer offer a particularly interesting architecture for studying the dynamics of membrane-membrane interactions, we have investigated the sources of instability, focusing on membrane composition. The most stable patches were made with a mixture of saturated lipids and cholesterol, suggesting an important role for membrane stiffness. Other factors such as the effect of tether length, lateral mobility and patch membrane edge were also investigated. Based on these results, a model for the mechanism of patch destruction is developed. PMID:21452847

  11. Modulation of Membrane Protein Lateral Mobility by Polyphosphates and Polyamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Melvin; Koppel, Dennis E.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    1980-03-01

    The lateral mobility of fluorescein-labeled membrane glycoproteins was measured in whole unlysed erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts by the technique of ``fluorescence redistribution after fusion.'' Measurements were made on polyethylene glycol-fused cell pairs in which only one member of the couplet was initially fluorescently labeled. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the rate of fluorescence redistribution determined from successive scans with a focused laser beam across individual fused pairs. This technique allows for the analysis of diffusion within cell membranes without the possible damaging photochemical events caused by photobleaching. It was found that lateral mobility of erythrocyte proteins can be increased by the addition of polyphosphates (i.e., ATP and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and decreased by the addition of organic polyamines (i.e., neomycin and spermine). This control is exerted by these molecules only when they contact the cytoplasmic side of the membrane and is not dependent upon high-energy phosphates. Microviscosity experiments employing diphenylhexatriene demonstrated no changes in membrane lipid state as a function of these reagents. Our results, in conjunction with data on the physical interactions of cytoskeletal proteins, suggest that the diffusion effector molecules alter the lateral mobility of erythrocyte membrane proteins through modifications of interactions in the shell, which is composed of spectrin, actin, and component 4.1.

  12. Professional Mobility and the Mutual Recognition of Qualifications in the European Union: Two Institutional Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blitz, Brad K.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of transnational institutions (particularly the European Commission and committees of the European Parliament) in facilitating the mutual recognition of professional qualifications among members of the European Economic Community (EEC). Discusses relevant EEC directives, varying compliance among nations, and six cases of citizen…

  13. Regulation of protein mobility via thermal membrane undulations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Frank L H

    2003-02-01

    The in-plane diffusivelike motion of membrane bound proteins on the surface of cells is considered. We suggest, on the basis of theoretical arguments and simulation, that thermally excited undulations of the lipid bilayer may serve as a mechanism for proteins to hop between adjacent regions on the cell surface separated by barriers composed of internal cellular structure (e.g., the cytoskeleton). We specifically investigate the mobility of band 3 dimer on the surface of red blood cells where the spectrin cytoskeletal meshwork defines a series of "corrals" on the cell surface known to hinder protein motion. Previous models of this system have postulated that the cytoskeleton must deform to allow passage of membrane bound proteins out of these corral regions and have ignored fluctuations of the bilayer. Our model provides a complementary mechanism and we posit that the mobility of real proteins in real cells is likely the result of several mechanisms acting in parallel. PMID:12547768

  14. Alkaline Anion-Exchange Membranes Containing Mobile Ion Shuttles.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaolin; He, Yubin; Guiver, Michael D; Wu, Liang; Ran, Jin; Yang, Zhengjin; Xu, Tongwen

    2016-05-01

    A new class of alkaline anion-exchange membranes containing mobile ion shuttles is developed. It is achieved by threading ionic linear guests into poly(crown ether) hosts via host-guest molecular interaction. The thermal- and pH-triggered shuttling of ionic linear guests remarkably increases the solvation-shell fluctuations in inactive hydrated hydroxide ion complexes (OH(-) (H2 O)4 ) and accelerates the OH(-) transport. PMID:26972938

  15. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  16. Particle mobility between two planar elastic membranes: Brownian motion and membrane deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Guckenberger, Achim; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We study the motion of a solid particle immersed in a Newtonian fluid and confined between two parallel elastic membranes possessing shear and bending rigidity. The hydrodynamic mobility depends on the frequency of the particle motion due to the elastic energy stored in the membrane. Unlike the single-membrane case, a coupling between shearing and bending exists. The commonly used approximation of superposing two single-membrane contributions is found to give reasonable results only for motions in the parallel direction, but not in the perpendicular direction. We also compute analytically the membrane deformation resulting from the motion of the particle, showing that the presence of the second membrane reduces deformation. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem we compute the Brownian motion of the particle, finding a long-lasting subdiffusive regime at intermediate time scales. We finally assess the accuracy of the employed point-particle approximation via boundary-integral simulations for a truly extended particle. They are found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical predictions.

  17. Investigation of humidity control via membrane separation for advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbold, D. D.; Ray, R. J.; Pledger, W. A.; Mccray, S. B.; Brown, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a membrane-based process for dehumidifying the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). The membrane process promises to be smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient than the other technologies for dehumidification. The dehydration membranes were tested for 90 days at conditions expected to be present in the EMU. The results of these tests indicate that membrane-based technology can effectively control humidity in the EMU.

  18. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Integration with the ISS Extravehicular Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margiott, Victoria; Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA has developed a Solid Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) to provide cooling for the next generation spacesuit. One approach to increasing the TRL of the system is to incorporate this hardware with the existing EMU. Several integration issues were addressed to support a potential demonstration of the SWME with the existing EMU. Systems analysis was performed to assess the capability of the SWME to maintain crewmember cooling and comfort as a replacement for sublimation. The materials of the SWME were reviewed to address compatibility with the EMU. Conceptual system placement and integration with the EMU via an EVA umbilical system to ensure crew mobility and Airlock egress were performed. A concept of operation for EVA use was identified that is compatible with the existing system. This concept is extensible as a means to provide cooling for the existing EMU. The cooling system of one of the EMUs on orbit has degraded, with the root cause undetermined. Should there be a common cause resident on ISS, this integration could provide a means to recover cooling capability for EMUs on orbit.

  19. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  20. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  1. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  2. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  3. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  4. Independent mobility of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nenninger, Anja; Mastroianni, Giulia; Robson, Alexander; Lenn, Tchern; Xue, Quan; Leake, Mark C; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2014-06-01

    Fluidity is essential for many biological membrane functions. The basis for understanding membrane structure remains the classic Singer-Nicolson model, in which proteins are embedded within a fluid lipid bilayer and able to diffuse laterally within a sea of lipid. Here we report lipid and protein diffusion in the plasma membrane of live cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli, using Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to measure lateral diffusion coefficients. Lipid and protein mobility within the membrane were probed by visualizing an artificial fluorescent lipid and a simple model membrane protein consisting of a single membrane-spanning alpha-helix with a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) tag on the cytoplasmic side. The effective viscosity of the lipid bilayer is strongly temperature-dependent, as indicated by changes in the lipid diffusion coefficient. Surprisingly, the mobility of the model protein was unaffected by changes in the effective viscosity of the bulk lipid, and TIRF microscopy indicates that it clusters in segregated, mobile domains. We suggest that this segregation profoundly influences the physical behaviour of the protein in the membrane, with strong implications for bacterial membrane function and bacterial physiology. PMID:24735432

  5. Lateral mobility of proteins in liquid membranes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambin, Y.; Lopez-Esparza, R.; Reffay, M.; Sierecki, E.; Gov, N. S.; Genest, M.; Hodges, R. S.; Urbach, W.

    2006-02-01

    The biological function of transmembrane proteins is closely related to their insertion, which has most often been studied through their lateral mobility. For >30 years, it has been thought that hardly any information on the size of the diffusing object can be extracted from such experiments. Indeed, the hydrodynamic model developed by Saffman and Delbrück predicts a weak, logarithmic dependence of the diffusion coefficient D with the radius R of the protein. Despite widespread use, its validity has never been thoroughly investigated. To check this model, we measured the diffusion coefficients of various peptides and transmembrane proteins, incorporated into giant unilamellar vesicles of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) or in model bilayers of tunable thickness. We show in this work that, for several integral proteins spanning a large range of sizes, the diffusion coefficient is strongly linked to the protein dimensions. A heuristic model results in a Stokes-like expression for D, (D 1/R), which fits literature data as well as ours. Diffusion measurement is then a fast and fruitful method; it allows determining the oligomerization degree of proteins or studying lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions within bilayers. bilayers | transmembrane proteins | diffusion | peptides | sponge phase


  6. The petrogenesis of anorogenic felsic magmas and AMCG suites: Insights on element mobility and mutual cryptic contamination from polythermal experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert F.

    2012-10-01

    The close association of mantle-derived mafic rocks and crust-derived felsic rocks in AMCG suites the world over is now interpreted in terms of delamination of the lithospheric keel of an orogen within a short time after the cessation of a major collision. The stage is set for the ascent of an asthenospheric diapir, which is accompanied by the ascent of a stream of H2O-CO2 representing regional degassing of the mantle in the ensuing extensional setting. The crust gets variably metasomatized prior to melting, and this episode of melting seems to involve almost complete melting rather than the expected films of leucosome. Results of polythermal experiments with a large array of target rocks (pulverized) + H2O show that it is possible to mobilize the major elements K, Na, Al, Si and Fe such that the transported fractions resembles an A-type granite or syenite. The open-system process increases in efficiency with increasing temperature and increasing pressure. A stream of such fluid interacting with gabbro or basic magma could create anorthositic and ultrabasic assemblages that are candidates for contamination of pools of basic magma in the uppermost mantle and lower crust. The same stream continues its buoyant rise and makes over the sterile granulitic lower and middle crust into a geochemically fertile protolith for the generation of A-type felsic magmas by wholesale anatexis.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Self-Association and Mobility of Annexin A4 at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Kevin C.; Postma, Marten; Hink, Mark A.; Zeelenberg, Christiaan H.C.; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J.W.; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Annexins, found in most eukaryotic species, are cytosolic proteins that are able to bind negatively-charged phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner. Annexin A4 (AnxA4) has been implicated in diverse cellular processes, including the regulation of exocytosis and ion-transport; however, its precise mechanistic role is not fully understood. AnxA4 has been shown to aggregate on lipid layers upon Ca2+ binding in vitro, a characteristic that may be critical for its function. We have utilized advanced fluorescence microscopy to discern details on the mobility and self-assembly of AnxA4 after Ca2+ influx at the plasma membrane in living cells. Total internal reflection microscopy in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer reveals that there is a delay between initial plasma membrane binding and the beginning of self-assembly and this process continues after the cytoplasmic pool has completely relocated. Number-and-brightness analysis suggests that the predominant membrane bound mobile form of the protein is trimeric. There also exists a pool of AnxA4 that forms highly immobile aggregates at the membrane. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching suggests that the relative proportion of these two forms varies and is correlated with membrane morphology. PMID:23663830

  8. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Nature's fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5's active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  9. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  10. Influence of receptor lateral mobility on adhesion strengthening between membranes containing LFA-3 and CD2.

    PubMed

    Chan, P Y; Lawrence, M B; Dustin, M L; Ferguson, L M; Golan, D E; Springer, T A

    1991-10-01

    We have used an in vitro model system of glass-supported planar membranes to study the effects of lateral mobility of membrane-bound receptors on cell adhesion. Egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers were reconstituted with two anchorage isoforms of the adhesion molecule lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3). The diffusion coefficient of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored LFA-3 approached that of phospholipids in the bilayers, whereas the transmembrane (TM)-anchored isoform of LFA-3 was immobile. Both static and laminar flow assays were used to quantify the strength of adherence to the lipid bilayers of the T lymphoma cell line Jurkat that expresses the counter-receptor CD2. Cell adhesion was dependent on LFA-3 density and was more efficient on membranes containing the GPI isoform than the TM isoform. Kinetic measurements demonstrated an influence of contact time on the strength of adhesion to the GPI isoform at lower site densities (25-50 sites/microns2), showing that the mobility of LFA-3 is important in adhesion strengthening. At higher site densities (1,500 sites/microns2) and longer contact times (20 min), Jurkat cell binding to the TM and GPI isoforms of LFA-3 showed equivalent adhesion strengths, although adhesion strength of the GPI isoform developed twofold more rapidly than the TM isoform. Reduction of CD2 mobility on Jurkat cells at 5 degrees C greatly decreased the rate of adhesion strengthening with the TM isoform of LFA-3, resulting in a 30-fold difference between the two LFA-3 isoforms. Our results demonstrate that the ability of a membrane receptor and its membrane-bound counter-receptor to diffuse laterally enhances cell adhesion both by allowing accumulation of ligands in the cell contact area and by increasing the rate of receptor-ligand bond formation. PMID:1717480

  11. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  12. Transport Modeling of Membrane Extraction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon from Water for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Yongzhai; Feng, Zhili; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry (ME-IMS) is a feasible technique for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. This work studies theoretically the time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of trichloroethylene (TCE). The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a transport gas flowing through the membrane tube into IMS analyzer. The theoretical study is based on a two-dimensional transient fluid flow and mass transport model. The model describes the TCE mixing in the water, permeation through the membrane layer, and convective diffusion in the air flow inside membrane tube. The effect of various transport gas flow rates on temporal profiles of IMS signal intensity is investigated. The results show that fast time response and high transport yield can be achieved for ME-IMS by controlling the flow rate in the extraction membrane tube. These modeled time-response profiles are important for determining duty cycles of field-deployable sensors for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  13. Surface plasmon resonance as detection tool for lipids lateral mobility in biomimetic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Giancarlo; D’Agostino, Riccardo; Becucci, Lucia; Guidelli, Rolando; Tiribilli, Bruno; Del Rosso, Mario

    2012-01-01

    A procedure based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is proposed to monitor the lateral mobility of lipid molecules in solid-supported bilayer lipid membranes (ssBLMs), an essential prerequisite for the formation of important microdomains called lipid rafts (LRs). The procedure relies on the marked tendency of the ganglioside GM1 to be recruited by LRs and to act as a specific receptor of the beta-subunit of the cholera toxin (ChTB). In the presence of both GM1 and ChTB, spontaneous formation of lipid rafts domains in mobile ssBLMs is accompanied by an appreciable increase in the amount of adsorbed ChTB, as monitored by SPR. PMID:23243563

  14. Aqueous-filled polymer microcavity arrays: versatile & stable lipid bilayer platforms offering high lateral mobility to incorporated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Basit, Hajra; Gaul, Vinnie; Maher, Sean; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-05-01

    A key prerequisite in an ideal supported lipid bilayer based cell membrane model is that the mobility of both the lipid matrix and its components are unhindered by the underlying support. This is not trivial and with the exception of liposomes, many of even the most advanced approaches, although accomplishing lipid mobility, fail to achieve complete mobility of incorporated membrane proteins. This is addressed in a novel platform comprising lipid bilayers assembled over buffer-filled, arrays of spherical cap microcavities formed from microsphere template polydimethoxysilane. Prior to bilayer assembly the PDMS is rendered hydrophilic by plasma treatment and the lipid bilayer prepared using Langmuir Blodgett assembly followed by liposome/proteoliposome fusion. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy confirmed the pore suspended lipid bilayer exhibits diffusion coefficients comparable to free-standing vesicles in solution. The bilayer modified arrays are highly reproducible and stable over days. As the bilayers are suspended over deep aqueous reservoirs, reconstituted membrane proteins experience an aqueous interface at both membrane interfaces and attain full lateral mobility. Their utility as membrane protein platforms was exemplified in two case studies with proteins of different dimensions in their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains reconstituted into DOPC lipid bilayers; Glycophorin A, and Integrin αIIbβ3. In both cases, the proteins exhibited 100% mobility with high lateral diffusion coefficients. PMID:25798456

  15. The Human ABCG1 Transporter Mobilizes Plasma Membrane and Late Endosomal Non-Sphingomyelin-Associated-Cholesterol for Efflux and Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Edward B.; O’Brien, Katherine; Walts, Avram D.; Stonik, John A.; Malide, Daniela; Combs, Christian A.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that GFP-tagged human ABCG1 on the plasma membrane (PM) and in late endosomes (LE) mobilizes sterol on both sides of the membrane lipid bilayer, thereby increasing cellular cholesterol efflux to lipid surfaces. In the present study, we examined ABCG1-induced changes in membrane cholesterol distribution, organization, and mobility. ABCG1-GFP expression increased the amount of mobile, non-sphingomyelin(SM)-associated cholesterol at the PM and LE, but not the amount of SM-associated-cholesterol or SM. ABCG1-mobilized non-SM-associated-cholesterol rapidly cycled between the PM and LE and effluxed from the PM to extracellular acceptors, or, relocated to intracellular sites of esterification. ABCG1 increased detergent-soluble pools of PM and LE cholesterol, generated detergent-resistant, non-SM-associated PM cholesterol, and increased resistance to both amphotericin B-induced (cholesterol-mediated) and lysenin-induced (SM-mediated) cytolysis, consistent with altered organization of both PM cholesterol and SM. ABCG1 itself resided in detergent-soluble membrane domains. We propose that PM and LE ABCG1 residing at the phase boundary between ordered (Lo) and disordered (Ld) membrane lipid domains alters SM and cholesterol organization thereby increasing cholesterol flux between Lo and Ld, and hence, the amount of cholesterol available for removal by acceptors on either side of the membrane bilayer for either efflux or esterification. PMID:25485894

  16. Electric field-induced lateral mobility of photosystem I in the photosynthetic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brumfeld, Vlad; Miller, Israel R.; Korenstein, Rafi

    1989-01-01

    Electrophoretic movement of photosystem I (PS I) along the photosynthetic membrane of hypotonically swollen thylakoid vesicles was studied by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (electrophotoluminescence) emitted from PS I. The electrophoretic mobility was inferred from the differences in electrophotoluminescence (EPL) of the photosynthetic vesicles in presence and absence of trains of low amplitude (<80 V/cm) prepulses of 1 ms duration at 4 ms spacing. The average apparent electric mobility, determined from the time course of EPL increase on one hemisphere or its decrease on the other one, as function of prepulse length and intensity was of the order of 3 · 10-5 cm2V-1s-1. The assymetric distribution of the PS I reached a steady state when the diffusional, electrostatic, and elastic forces balanced the electrophoretic driving force. A lateral diffusion coefficient of ∼5 · 10-9 cm2s-1 was found for the PS I complex from the diffusional relaxation after cessation of the electric field pulse train. Experimental conditions such as concentration, temperature, and viscosity of the aqueous solution were not critical for the effect. Between 23 and 150 electron charges per moving particle were estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. PMID:19431746

  17. Effect of integral membrane proteins on the lateral mobility of plastoquinone in phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Mary F.; Whitmarsh, John

    1990-01-01

    Pyrene fluorescence quenching by plastoquinone was used to estimate the rate of plastoquinone lateral diffusion in soybean phosphatidylcholine proteoliposomes containing the following integral membrane proteins: gramicidin D, spinach cytochrome bf complex, spinach cytochrome f, reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, and beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. The measured plastoquinone lateral diffusion coefficient varied between 1 and 3 · 10-7 cm2 s-1 in control liposomes that lacked protein. When proteins were added, these values decreased: a 10-fold decrease was observed when 16-26% of the membrane surface area was occupied by protein for all the proteins but gramicidin. The larger protein complexes (cytochrome bf, Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers, cytochrome bc1, and cytochrome oxidase), whose hydrophobic volumes were 15-20 times as large as that of cytochrome f and the gramicidin transmembrane dimer, were 15-20 times as effective in decreasing the lateral-diffusion coefficient over the range of concentrations studied. These proteins had a much stronger effect than that observed for bacteriorhodopsin in fluorescence photobleaching recovery measurements. The effect of high-protein concentrations in gramicidin proteoliposomes was in close agreement with fluorescence photobleaching measurements. The results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models of lateral mobility as a function of integral membrane concentration. PMID:19431774

  18. Low Charge and Reduced Mobility of Membrane Protein Complexes Has Implications for Calibration of Collision Cross Section Measurements.

    PubMed

    Allison, Timothy M; Landreh, Michael; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-06-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry of integral membrane proteins provides valuable insights into their architecture and stability. Here we show that, due to their lower charge, the average mobility of native-like membrane protein ions is approximately 30% lower than that of soluble proteins of similar mass. This has implications for drift time measurements, made on traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometers, which have to be calibrated to extract collision cross sections (Ω). Common calibration strategies employ unfolded or native-like soluble protein standards with masses and mobilities comparable to the protein of interest. We compare Ω values for membrane proteins, derived from standard calibration protocols using soluble proteins, to values measured using an RF-confined drift tube. Our results demonstrate that, while common calibration methods underestimate Ω for native-like or unfolded membrane protein complexes, higher mass soluble calibration standards consistently yield more accurate Ω values. These findings enable us to obtain directly structural information for highly charge-reduced complexes by traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry. PMID:27153188

  19. Differential mobility of pigment-protein complexes in granal and agranal thylakoid membranes of C₃ and C₄ plants.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Helmut; Sharpe, Richard M; Herbstova, Miroslava; Yarbrough, Robert; Edwards, Gerald E

    2013-01-01

    The photosynthetic performance of plants is crucially dependent on the mobility of the molecular complexes that catalyze the conversion of sunlight to metabolic energy equivalents in the thylakoid membrane network inside chloroplasts. The role of the extensive folding of thylakoid membranes leading to structural differentiation into stacked grana regions and unstacked stroma lamellae for diffusion-based processes of the photosynthetic machinery is poorly understood. This study examines, to our knowledge for the first time, the mobility of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in unstacked thylakoid regions in the C₃ plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and agranal bundle sheath chloroplasts of the C₄ plants sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and maize (Zea mays) by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In unstacked thylakoid membranes, more than 50% of the protein complexes are mobile, whereas this number drops to about 20% in stacked grana regions. The higher molecular mobility in unstacked thylakoid regions is explained by a lower protein-packing density compared with stacked grana regions. It is postulated that thylakoid membrane stacking to form grana leads to protein crowding that impedes lateral diffusion processes but is required for efficient light harvesting of the modularly organized photosystem II and its light-harvesting antenna system. In contrast, the arrangement of the photosystem I light-harvesting complex I in separate units in unstacked thylakoid membranes does not require dense protein packing, which is advantageous for protein diffusion. PMID:23148078

  20. Lateral and Rotational Mobilities of Lipids in Specific Cellular Membranes of Eucalyptus gunnii Cultivars Exhibiting Different Freezing Tolerance 1

    PubMed Central

    Leborgne, Nathalie; Dupou-Cézanne, Laurence; Teulières, Chantal; Canut, Hervé; Tocanne, Jean-François; Boudet, Alain M.

    1992-01-01

    Two cell lines of Eucalyptus gunnii have been shown to keep their differential frost tolerance at the cellular level after long-term culture. They have been used to investigate the fluidity of specific cell membranes in relation with frost tolerance. Protoplasts and isolated vacuoles were obtained from both cell lines. In addition, purified plasma membrane and tonoplast (the vacuolar membrane) were separated from a crude microsomal fraction through free-flow electrophoresis. The lateral and rotational mobilities of lipids in these different membranes were studied by two biophysical techniques: fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence polarization. After labeling the vacuoles isolated from the frost-sensitive cells with 1-oleoyl-2-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benz-oxadiazol-4-yl)aminocaproyl phosphatidylcholine, a single mobile component was observed with a diffusion coefficient of 2.4 × 10−9 cm2 s−1 and a mobile fraction close to 100% at a temperature of 23°C. When using isolated vacuoles from the frost tolerant line, a higher lateral diffusion of tonoplast lipids was found with a diffusion coefficient of 3.2 × 10−9 cm2 s−1, still with a mobile fraction close to 100%. No convincing data were obtained when performing fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments on protoplasts. Fluorescence polarization experiments confirmed the differential behavior of the two cell lines for tonoplast and also for plasma membrane. In addition, they showed that intrinsically tonoplast exhibited a higher fluidity than plasma membrane. Our results provide the first information on the fluidity of tonoplast and on the compared properties of two important plant membranes—tonoplast and plasma membrane—through the use of two complementary biophysical approaches. In addition, they suggest there is a correlation between membrane fluidity and cold tolerance. The potential interest of plant vacuole as a natural model system in membrane studies is emphasized

  1. Excimer fluorescence compared to depolarization in the flow cytometric characterization of lateral membrane mobility in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, Gregor; Schaefer, Buerk; Wimmer, Martin S.; Schmitz, Gerd

    1998-04-01

    An altered cellular membrane fluidity secondary to changes of cholesterol metabolism is a potentially important mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Especially in blood platelets an increased sensitivity for stimulation dependent aggregation which is a risk factor for thrombosis has been experimentally linked to disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The goal of this study was the development of a flow cytometric assay for the direct analysis of cellular membrane microviscosity in correlation to activation associated phenotypic changes of platelets in vitro. The analysis of fluorescence polarization following the staining of hydrophobic lipid regions of cell membranes with the fluorescent dye 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) is a well established method for the analysis of membrane fluidity. The extent of fluorescence anisotropy dependent on the rotational mobility of this fluorochrome is indirectly proportional to the microviscosity of the stained membrane subcompartment. In this study, an alternative and more simple method based on the diffusion dependent excimer formation of pyrenedecanoic acid (PDA) (J. Immunol. Methods 96:225-31, 1987) was characterized in comparison to the DPH method as a reference. Human platelets showed a rapid uptake of both DPH and PDA resulting in the staining primarily of the plasma membrane after up to 30 min of incubation. Staining analyzed at 351 nm excitation resulted in a saturation of the depolarization coefficient of DPH at 20 (mu) M but an increase of the excimer to monomer ratio of PDA with increasing dye concentration. A 'membrane fluidity coefficient' which saturated at 5 (mu) M PDA was calculated as the excimer fluorescence divided through the square of monomer fluorescence thereby correcting for the influence of dye concentration on excimer formation. The temperature dependent changes of membrane viscosity were further used as a model for the comparison of both methods. Cells analyzed at temperatures

  2. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  3. Distribution and mobility of murine histocompatibility H-2Kk antigen in the cytoplasmic membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Damjanovich, S; Trón, L; Szöllösi, J; Zidovetzki, R; Vaz, W L; Regateiro, F; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    1983-01-01

    The topographical distributions and mobilities of the murine histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk and of concanavalin A (Con A) binding sites have been studied on a murine lymphoma cell line. The spatial distribution of H-2Kk antigens, the average distance between H-2Kk antigens and Con A binding sites, and the separation of different determinants on the H-2Kk antigen itself were determined by using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer measurements with a dual-laser flow sorter. From the lack of energy transfer between bound monoclonal anti-H-2Kk antibodies conjugated with fluorescein (donor) and rhodamine (acceptor), we conclude that the H-2Kk antigen exists without appreciable clustering on the cell surface. Substantial energy transfer between appropriately labeled Con A and antibodies bound to the H-2Kk antigen shows that the two populations are interspersed. Donor/acceptor pairs of monoclonal antibodies binding to different determinants on the same H-2Kk antigen exhibited a degree of energy transfer indicative of a mean separation of 8.6 nm between the sites. Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy measurements with anti-H-2Kk antibodies labeled with eosin or erythrosin yielded rotational mobility information for the antigen-antibody complexes on the cell membrane. The rotational correlation time of 10-20 mus and the finite residual anisotropy are compatible with an uniaxial mode of rotation of monomeric antigen around its transmembrane portion and, thus, provide additional evidence for an unclustered distribution. Capping by rabbit anti-mouse IgG immobilized the antigen-antibody complex. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was used to calculate an apparent lateral diffusion coefficient of 5 +/- 3 X 10(-10) cm2 . s-1 for the H-2Kk antigen labeled with fluoresceinated IgG or its corresponding Fab fragment. PMID:6351071

  4. On the mobility, membrane location and functionality of mechanosensitive channels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Jonas; Galbiati, Heloisa; Rasmussen, Akiko; Miller, Samantha; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels protect cells from structural damage during hypoosmotic shock. MscS, MscL and MscK are the most abundant channels in E. coli and arguably the most important ones in osmoprotection. By combining physiological assays with quantitative photo-activated localization microscopy (qPALM), we find an almost linear relationship between channel abundance and cell survival. A minimum of 100 MscL (or MscS) channels is needed for protection when a single type of channel is expressed. Under native-like conditions MscL, MscS as well as MscK distribute homogeneously over the cytoplasmic membrane and the lateral diffusion of the channels is in accordance with their relative protein mass. However, we observe cluster formation and a reduced mobility of MscL when the majority of the subunits of the pentameric channel contain the fluorescent mEos3.2 protein. These data provide new insights into the quantitative biology of mechanosensitive channels and emphasizes the need for care in analysing protein complexes even when the fluorescent tag has been optimized for monomeric behaviour. PMID:27596282

  5. On the mobility, membrane location and functionality of mechanosensitive channels in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Jonas; Galbiati, Heloisa; Rasmussen, Akiko; Miller, Samantha; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels protect cells from structural damage during hypoosmotic shock. MscS, MscL and MscK are the most abundant channels in E. coli and arguably the most important ones in osmoprotection. By combining physiological assays with quantitative photo-activated localization microscopy (qPALM), we find an almost linear relationship between channel abundance and cell survival. A minimum of 100 MscL (or MscS) channels is needed for protection when a single type of channel is expressed. Under native-like conditions MscL, MscS as well as MscK distribute homogeneously over the cytoplasmic membrane and the lateral diffusion of the channels is in accordance with their relative protein mass. However, we observe cluster formation and a reduced mobility of MscL when the majority of the subunits of the pentameric channel contain the fluorescent mEos3.2 protein. These data provide new insights into the quantitative biology of mechanosensitive channels and emphasizes the need for care in analysing protein complexes even when the fluorescent tag has been optimized for monomeric behaviour. PMID:27596282

  6. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Integration with the ISS Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margiott, Victoria; Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA has developed a Solid Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) to provide cooling for the next generation spacesuit. The current spacesuit team has looked at this technology from the standpoint of using the ISS EMU to demonstrate the SWME technology while EVA, and from the standpoint of augmenting EMU cooling in the case of a fouled EMU cooling system. One approach to increasing the TRL of the system is to incorporate this hardware with the existing EMU. Several integration issues were addressed to support a potential demonstration of the SWME with the existing EMU. Systems analysis was performed to assess the capability of the SWME to maintain crewmember cooling and comfort as a replacement for sublimation. The materials of the SWME were reviewed to address compatibility with the EMU. Conceptual system placement and integration with the EMU via an EVA umbilical system to ensure crew mobility and Airlock egress were performed. A concept of operation for EVA use was identified that is compatible with the existing system. This concept is extensible as a means to provide cooling for the existing EMU. The cooling system of one of the EMUs on orbit has degraded, with the root cause undetermined. Should there be a common cause resident on ISS, this integration could provide a means to recover cooling capability for EMUs on orbit.

  7. In vitro evaluation of high mobility group box 1 protein removal with various membranes for continuous hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Miho; Nishida, Osamu; Moriyama, Kazuhiro; Shimomura, Yasuyo; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Kuriyama, Naohide; Hara, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Shingo

    2011-08-01

    The high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is an alarmin that plays an important role in sepsis and has been recognized as a promising target with a wide therapeutic window; however, no drugs and devices are currently in practical use. We hypothesized that hemofilters composed of porous membranes or cytokine-adsorbing membranes could remove HMGB1 from the blood. We performed experimental hemofiltration in vitro using four types of hemofilters composed of different membranes specifically designed for continuous hemofiltration. The test solution was a 1000-mL substitution fluid containing 100 µg of HMGB1 and 35 g of bovine serum albumin. Experimental hemofiltration was conducted for 360 min in a closed loop circulation system. Among the four membranes, surface-treated polyacrylonitrile (AN69ST) showed the highest capacity to adsorb HMGB1; it adsorbed nearly 100 µg of HMGB1 in the initial 60 min and showed a markedly high clearance rate (60.8 ± 5.0 mL/min) at 15 min. The polymethylmethacrylate membrane had half of the adsorption capacity of the AN69ST membrane. Although the highest sieving coefficient for HMGB1 was obtained with the high cut-off polyarylethersulfone membrane, which correlated with a constant filtrate clearance rate, albumin loss was observed. However, no such removal of both HMGB1 and albumin was observed with the polysulfone membrane and tubing. We conclude that continuous hemofiltration using the AN69ST membrane is a promising approach for HMGB1-related sepsis. PMID:21884474

  8. Lateral mobility of integrin alpha IIb beta 3 (glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) in the plasma membrane of a human megakaryocyte.

    PubMed

    Schootemeijer, A; van Willigen, G; van der Vuurst, H; Tertoolen, L G; De Laat, S W; Akkerman, J W

    1997-01-01

    The migration of integrins to sites of cell-cell and cell-matrix contact is thought to be important for adhesion strengthening. We studied the lateral diffusion of integrin alpha IIb beta 3 (glycoprotein IIb/IIIa) in the plasma membrane of a cultured human megakaryocyte by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of FITC-labelled monovalent Fab fragments directed against the beta 3 subunit. The diffusion of beta 3 on the unstimulated megakaryocyte showed a lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of 0.37 x 10(-9) cm2/s and a mobile fraction of about 50%. Stimulation with ADP (20 microM) or alpha-thrombin (10 U/ml) at 22 degrees C induced transient decreases in both parameters reducing D to 0.21 x 10(-9) cm2/s and the mobile fraction to about 25%. The fall in D was observed within 1 min after stimulation but the fall in mobile fraction showed a lag phase of 5 min. The lag phase was absent in the presence of Calpain I inhibitor, where-as cytochalasin D completely abolished the decreased in mobile fraction. The data are compatible with the concept that cell activation induces anchorage of 50% of the mobile alpha IIb beta 3 (25% of the whole population of receptor) to the cytoplasmic actin filaments, although, as discussed, other rationals are not ruled out. PMID:9031465

  9. Analytical Investigation and Improvement of Performance of a Proton Exchange Membrane (Pem) Fuel Cell in Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaee, I.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell in mobile applications is investigated analytically. At present the main use and advantages of fuel cells impact particularly strongly on mobile applications such as vehicles, mobile computers and mobile telephones. Some external parameters such as the cell temperature (Tcell ) , operating pressure of gases (P) and air stoichiometry (λair ) affect the performance and voltage losses in the PEM fuel cell. Because of the existence of many theoretical, empirical and semi-empirical models of the PEM fuel cell, it is necessary to compare the accuracy of these models. But theoretical models that are obtained from thermodynamic and electrochemical approach, are very exact but complex, so it would be easier to use the empirical and smi-empirical models in order to forecast the fuel cell system performance in many applications such as mobile applications. The main purpose of this study is to obtain the semi-empirical relation of a PEM fuel cell with the least voltage losses. Also, the results are compared with the existing experimental results in the literature and a good agreement is seen.

  10. Development of a Low-Cost, Durable Membrane and Membrane Electrode Assemby for Stationary and Mobile Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Michel Foure; Gaboury, Scott; Goldbach, Jim; Mountz, David; Yi, Jung

    2008-01-31

    The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. (formerly Atofina, Inc.) to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the Fuel Cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted in using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® (Arkema trade name for PVDF) provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix. In a first phase, Arkema demonstrated the feasibility of the concept with the M31 membrane generation. After MEA optimization, it was shown that the beginning-of-life (BOL) performance of M31 MEAs was essentially on a par with that of PFSA MEAs at 60ºC under fully humidified conditions. On the other hand, long-term durability studies showed a high decay rate of 45µV/h over a 2100 hr. test. Arkema then designed several families of polyelectrolyte candidates, which, in principle, could not undergo the same failure mechanisms. A new membrane candidate was developed: M41. It offered the same generally good mechanical, ex-situ conductivity and gas barrier properties as M31. In addition, ex-situ accelerated testing suggested a several orders of magnitude improvement in chemical stability. M41 based MEAs showed comparable BOL performance with that of PFSA (80ºC, 100% RH). M41 MEAs were further shown to be able to withstand several hours temperature excursions at 120ºC without apparent damage. Accelerated studies were carried out using the DOE and/or US Fuel Cell Council

  11. Membrane-based continuous remover of trifluoroacetic acid in mobile phase for LC-ESI-MS analysis of small molecules and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigui; Zhang, Jialing; Xing, Jiawei; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-07-01

    We developed a "continuous" trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) remover based on electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for online coupling of liquid chromatography (LC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) using TFA containing mobile phase. With the TFA remover as an interface, the TFA anion in the mobile phase was removed based on electrodialysis mechanism, and meanwhile, the anion exchange membrane was self-regenerated by the hydroxide ions produced by the bipolar membrane. So the remover could continuously work without any additional regeneration process. The established LC-TFA remover-MS system has been successfully applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of small molecules as well as proteins. PMID:22528206

  12. Membrane-Based Continuous Remover of Trifluoroacetic Acid in Mobile Phase for LC-ESI-MS Analysis of Small Molecules and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhigui; Zhang, Jialing; Xing, Jiawei; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-07-01

    We developed a "continuous" trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) remover based on electrodialysis with bipolar membrane for online coupling of liquid chromatography (LC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) using TFA containing mobile phase. With the TFA remover as an interface, the TFA anion in the mobile phase was removed based on electrodialysis mechanism, and meanwhile, the anion exchange membrane was self-regenerated by the hydroxide ions produced by the bipolar membrane. So the remover could continuously work without any additional regeneration process. The established LC-TFA remover-MS system has been successfully applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of small molecules as well as proteins.

  13. Activity and Ca2+ regulate the mobility of TRPV1 channels in the plasma membrane of sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Senning, Eric N; Gordon, Sharona E

    2015-01-01

    TRPV1 channels are gated by a variety of thermal, chemical, and mechanical stimuli. We used optical recording of Ca2+ influx through TRPV1 to measure activity and mobility of single TRPV1 molecules in isolated dorsal root ganglion neurons and cell lines. The opening of single TRPV1 channels produced sparklets, representing localized regions of elevated Ca2+. Unlike sparklets reported for L-type Ca2+ channels, TRPV4 channels, and AchR channels, TRPV1 channels diffused laterally in the plasma membrane as they gated. Mobility was highly variable from channel-to-channel and, to a smaller extent, from cell to cell. Most surprisingly, we found that mobility decreased upon channel activation by capsaicin, but only in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. We propose that decreased mobility of open TRPV1 could act as a diffusion trap to concentrate channels in cell regions with high activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03819.001 PMID:25569155

  14. Anisotropy measurements of intrinsic fluorescence of prenyllipids reveal much higher mobility of plastoquinol than alpha-tocopherol in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Jemioła-Rzemińska, Małgorzata; Kruk, Jerzy; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2003-04-01

    As an alternative to a fluorescent probe approach, the intrinsic fluorescence of reduced forms of prenylquinones has been exploited, which offers a convenient means of determining directly motional properties of these molecules. The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements of plastoquinols (PQH(2)) and alpha-tocopherol (alpha-Toc) incorporated into phospholipid liposomes have been performed. The effect of prenyllipid concentration, PQH(2) side chain length and the composition of the membranes has been studied. For the data interpretation, the fundamental anisotropy of alpha-Toc, PQH(2), ubiquinol-10 and alpha-tocopherolquinol, as well as the angles between the absorption and emission transition moments have been also determined. It was concluded that alpha-Toc shows very low mobility in the lipid bilayer, whereas PQH(2)-9 displays significant motional freedom in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles and even higher in egg yolk lecithin membranes. PMID:12691855

  15. Electric field-induced lateral mobility of photosystem I in the photosynthetic membrane: A study by electrophotoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Brumfeld, V; Miller, I R; Korenstein, R

    1989-09-01

    Electrophoretic movement of photosystem I (PS I) along the photosynthetic membrane of hypotonically swollen thylakoid vesicles was studied by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (electrophotoluminescence) emitted from PS I. The electrophoretic mobility was inferred from the differences in electrophotoluminescence (EPL) of the photosynthetic vesicles in presence and absence of trains of low amplitude (<80 V/cm) prepulses of 1 ms duration at 4 ms spacing. The average apparent electric mobility, determined from the time course of EPL increase on one hemisphere or its decrease on the other one, as function of prepulse length and intensity was of the order of 3 . 10(-5) cm(2)V(-1)s(-1). The assymetric distribution of the PS I reached a steady state when the diffusional, electrostatic, and elastic forces balanced the electrophoretic driving force. A lateral diffusion coefficient of approximately 5 . 10(-9) cm(2)s(-1) was found for the PS I complex from the diffusional relaxation after cessation of the electric field pulse train. Experimental conditions such as concentration, temperature, and viscosity of the aqueous solution were not critical for the effect. Between 23 and 150 electron charges per moving particle were estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. PMID:19431746

  16. Separation study of cadmium through an emulsion liquid membrane using triisooctylamine as mobile carrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Q M; Liu, Q; Zhang, Q F; Wei, X J; Guo, J Z

    1998-08-01

    A study of the transport of Cd(2+) ions through a triisooctylamine (TIOA)-sorbitan monooleate (Span 80)-dimethylbenzene liquid membrane has been performed with varying concentrations of HCl, KI, TIOA, Span 80 and NaOH in the feed, membrane and stripping solutions. Maximum transport was observed with 0.025 M HCl, 0.01 M KI, 0.02 M TIOA, 3% (w/v) Span 80 and 0.05 M NaOH. With this system cadmium could be completely separated with Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+), Cr(3+) and Al(3+). The transport mechanism of this metal ions through the membrane has been discussed. PMID:18967215

  17. Differential Mobility of Pigment-Protein Complexes in Granal and Agranal Thylakoid Membranes of C3 and C4 Plants1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, Helmut; Sharpe, Richard M.; Herbstova, Miroslava; Yarbrough, Robert; Edwards, Gerald E.

    2013-01-01

    The photosynthetic performance of plants is crucially dependent on the mobility of the molecular complexes that catalyze the conversion of sunlight to metabolic energy equivalents in the thylakoid membrane network inside chloroplasts. The role of the extensive folding of thylakoid membranes leading to structural differentiation into stacked grana regions and unstacked stroma lamellae for diffusion-based processes of the photosynthetic machinery is poorly understood. This study examines, to our knowledge for the first time, the mobility of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in unstacked thylakoid regions in the C3 plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and agranal bundle sheath chloroplasts of the C4 plants sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and maize (Zea mays) by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In unstacked thylakoid membranes, more than 50% of the protein complexes are mobile, whereas this number drops to about 20% in stacked grana regions. The higher molecular mobility in unstacked thylakoid regions is explained by a lower protein-packing density compared with stacked grana regions. It is postulated that thylakoid membrane stacking to form grana leads to protein crowding that impedes lateral diffusion processes but is required for efficient light harvesting of the modularly organized photosystem II and its light-harvesting antenna system. In contrast, the arrangement of the photosystem I light-harvesting complex I in separate units in unstacked thylakoid membranes does not require dense protein packing, which is advantageous for protein diffusion. PMID:23148078

  18. Evolution of mutualism between species

    SciTech Connect

    Post, W.M.; Travis, C.C.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on mutualism, the interaction between species populations that is mutually beneficial, is reviewed. Several ecological facts that should be addressed in the construction of dynamic models for mutualism are examined. Basic terminology is clarified. (PSB)

  19. Rapid mobilization of membrane lipids in wheat leaf-sheathes during incompatible interactions with hessian fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) is a biotrophic parasitic insect that interacts with wheat on a typical gene-for-gene basis. In this study, we systematically profiled changes in membrane lipids in two isogenic wheat lines: a susceptible line and its backcrossed offspring containing resistance ge...

  20. Behavioral Ecology: Manipulative Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David P

    2015-09-21

    A new study reveals that an apparent mutualism between lycaenid caterpillars and their attendant ants may not be all it seems, as the caterpillars produce secretions that modify the brains and behavior of their attendant ants. PMID:26394105

  1. [Detection of 1,4-dioxane in water by membrane extraction-gas chromiatgraphy/differential mobility spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xixi; Chen, Chuang; Wang, Weiguo; Li, Haiyang

    2014-08-01

    The method of detecting trace 1,4-dioxane in water using membrane extraction coupled with gas chromatography/differential mobility spectrometry (GC/DMS) was developed. The parameters including radio frequency voltage, sampling flow rate, permeation time and trapping time were optimized to 1000 V, 50 mL/min, 30 min and 150 s, respectively. The linear range for dioxane was obtained from 2.0 μg/L to 20.0 μg/L. The LOD was found to be 0. 67 μg/L. The specificity towards 1,4-dioxane in the presence of five chlorinated hydrocarbons was improved by using two-dimensional GC separation with optimized DMS compensation voltage. This method paves a way for developing field-deployable sensors for real-time monitoring contaminants in groundwater. PMID:25434119

  2. Enhanced ionic liquid mobility induced by confinement in 1D CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrod, Q.; Ferdeghini, F.; Judeinstein, P.; Genevaz, N.; Ramos, R.; Fournier, A.; Dijon, J.; Ollivier, J.; Rols, S.; Yu, D.; Mole, R. A.; Zanotti, J.-M.

    2016-04-01

    Water confined within carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibits tremendous enhanced transport properties. Here, we extend this result to ionic liquids (IL) confined in vertically aligned CNT membranes. Under confinement, the IL self-diffusion coefficient is increased by a factor 3 compared to its bulk reference. This could lead to high power battery separators.Water confined within carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibits tremendous enhanced transport properties. Here, we extend this result to ionic liquids (IL) confined in vertically aligned CNT membranes. Under confinement, the IL self-diffusion coefficient is increased by a factor 3 compared to its bulk reference. This could lead to high power battery separators. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01445c

  3. Survival, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities of freshwater planarian, Dugesia japonica, exposed to synthetic and natural surfactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Surfactants are a major class of emerging pollutants widely used in large quantities in everyday life and commonly found in surface waters worldwide. Freshwater planarian was selected to examine the effects of different surfactants by measuring mortality, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities. Among the 10 surfactants tested, the acute toxicities of betaine and polyethylene glycol (PEG-200) to planarians were relatively low, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) greater than 10,000 mg/L. The toxicity to planarians of the other eight surfactants based on 48-h LC50 could be arranged in the descending order of cetylpyridinum chloride (CPC) > 4-tert-octylphenol (4-tert-OP) > ammonium lauryl sulfate > benzalkonium chloride > saponin > sodium lauroylsarcosinate > dioctyl sulfosuccinate > dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). Both CPC and 4-tert-OP were very toxic to planarians, with 48-h LC50 values <1 mg/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of planarian mobility were in the 0.1 to 50 mg/L range and were in the same range as the 24-h LC50 of planarians exposed to different surfactants, except for DTAB. In addition, significant inhibition of cholinesterase activity activities was found in planarians exposed to 4-tert-OP at 2.5 and 5 mg/L and to saponin at 10 mg/L after 2-h treatments. This result suggests that planarian mobility responses can be used as an alternative indicator for acute toxicity of surfactants after a very short exposure period. PMID:22278771

  4. Fluorescence of nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids in model membranes is connected not to lipid mobility but to probe location.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Mariana; Filipe, Hugo A L; Prates Ramalho, J P; Hof, Martin; Loura, Luís M S

    2016-03-14

    Nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids are popular fluorescent membrane probes. However, the understanding of important aspects of the photophysics of NBD remains incomplete, including the observed shift in the emission spectrum of NBD-lipids to longer wavelengths following excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum (red-edge excitation shift or REES). REES of NBD-lipids in membrane environments has been previously interpreted as reflecting restricted mobility of solvent surrounding the fluorophore. However, this requires a large change in the dipole moment (Δμ) of NBD upon excitation. Previous calculations of the value of Δμ of NBD in the literature have been carried out using outdated semi-empirical methods, leading to conflicting values. Using up-to-date density functional theory methods, we recalculated the value of Δμ and verified that it is rather small (∼2 D). Fluorescence measurements confirmed that the value of REES is ∼16 nm for 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine-N-(NBD) (NBD-PS) in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles. However, the observed shift is independent of both the temperature and the presence of cholesterol and is therefore insensitive to the mobility and hydration of the membrane. Moreover, red-edge excitation leads to an increased contribution of the decay component with a shorter lifetime, whereas time-resolved emission spectra of NBD-PS displayed an atypical blue shift following excitation. This excludes restrictions to solvent relaxation as the cause of the measured REES and TRES of NBD, pointing instead to the heterogeneous transverse location of probes as the origin of these effects. The latter hypothesis was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, from which the calculated heterogeneity of the hydration and location of NBD correlated with the measured fluorescence lifetimes/REES. Globally, our combination of theoretical and experiment-based techniques has led to a considerably improved understanding of

  5. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  6. Mutual Adaptaion in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siskin, Leslie Santee

    2016-01-01

    Building on an expanded concept of mutual adaptation, this chapter explores a distinctive and successful aspect of International Baccalaureate's effort to scale up, as they moved to expand their programs and support services in Title I schools. Based on a three-year, mixed-methods study, it offers a case where we see not only local adaptations…

  7. First experience with the ultra compact mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system Cardiohelp in interhospital transport.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Alois; Arlt, Matthias; Amann, Matthias; Lunz, Dirk; Müller, Thomas; Hilker, Michael; Graf, Bernhard; Schmid, Christof

    2011-06-01

    In patients with severe cardiopulmonary failure extracorporeal assist devices are to support patients during resuscitation, for transportation, until organ recovery, and as bridge to further therapeutic modalities. We report on our first experience with the new Cardiohelp system for interhospital transfer of cardiopulmonarily compromised patients. The Cardiohelp system was used for transportation and in-house treatment in six male patients with a mean age of 41±17 years. Five patients suffered respiratory failure; one patient with acute myocardial infarction was in profound cardiogenic shock. Accordingly, the Cardiohelp system was implanted as a venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in five patients and as a venoarterial system in one patient. The preECMO ventilation time was 0.5-4 days. The patients were transported to our institution by car (n=1) or helicopter (n=5) over a distance of 80-5850 km. The subsequent in-house ECMO support was continued with the Cardiohelp and lasted for 5-13 days. PostECMO ventilation was one to 25 days. A 100% survival was achieved. The portable Cardiohelp system allows location-independent stabilization of cardiopulmonary compromised patients with consecutive interhospital transfer and in-house treatment. The integrated sensors, which register arterial and venous line pressure, blood temperature, hemoglobin as well as SvO(2), greatly alleviate its management and considerably increase safety. PMID:21388980

  8. Dielectric spectroscopy as a sensor of membrane headgroup mobility and hydration.

    PubMed Central

    Klösgen, B; Reichle, C; Kohlsmann, S; Kramer, K D

    1996-01-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy is based on the response of the permanent dipoles to a driving electric field. The phospholipid membrane systems of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine can be prepared as samples of multilamellar liposomes with a well known amount of interlamellar water. For optimal resolution in dielectric spectroscopy one has to design the experimental set-up so that the direction of the permanent headgroup dipole moment is mostly parallel to the field vector of the external radio frequency (rf) electric field in this layered system. A newly developed coaxial probe technique makes it possible to sweep the measuring frequency between 1 and 1000 MHz in the temperature range 286-323 K. The response yields both the dispersion (epsilon') and the absorption part (epsilon") of the complex dielectric permittivity, which are attributed to the rotational diffusions of the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine headgroup and the hydration water, respectively. Although the contributions of the headgroup and the hydration dipole moments to the dielectric relaxation are found to be situated close together, we succeeded in separating them. In the language of the Debye description, we propose to assign the lower frequency portion of the signal response to the relaxation contributed by the headgroups. The respective relaxation frequency is a discrete value in the range of 15-100 MHz and it shows normal temperature dependence. The contribution of the hydration water molecules exhibits a similar behavior in the range of 100-500 MHz but with the attributed relaxation frequency as the center of an asymmetric distribution of frequencies in analogy to simulation models known from the literature. Activation energies are derived for each of these relaxation processes from the Arrhenius plots of the temperature-dependent relaxation frequencies. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8968595

  9. Mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, S.

    2002-08-01

    After a brief review of the notion of a full set of mutually unbiased bases in an N-dimensional Hilbert space, we summarize the work of Wootters and Fields (W K Wootters and B C Fields, Ann. Phys. 191, 363 (1989)) which gives an explicit construction for such bases for the case N=pr, where p is a prime. Further, we show how, by exploiting certain freedom in the Wootters-Fields construction, the task of explicitly writing down such bases can be simplified for the case when p is an odd prime. In particular, we express the results entirely in terms of the character vectors of the cyclic group G of order p. We also analyse the connection between mutually unbiased bases and the representations of G.

  10. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Wilkes, Robert; Kuehnel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the Generation 4 Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (Gen4 SWME). The SWME offers several advantages when compared with prior crewmember cooling technologies, including the ability to reject heat at increased atmospheric pressures, reduced loop infrastructure, and higher tolerance to fouling. Like its predecessors, Gen4 SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Test results from the backup cooling system which is based on a similar design and the subject of a companion paper, suggested that further volume reductions could be achieved through fiber density optimization. Testing was performed with four fiber bundle configurations ranging from 35,850 fibers to 41,180 fibers. The optimal configuration reduced the Gen4 SWME envelope volume by 15% from that of Gen3 while dramatically increasing the performance margin of the system. A rectangular block design was chosen over the Gen3 cylindrical design, for packaging configurations within the AEMU PLSS envelope. Several important innovations were made in the redesign of the backpressure valve which is used to control evaporation. A twin-port pivot concept was selected from among three low profile valve designs for superior robustness, control and packaging. The backpressure valve motor, the thermal control valve, delta pressure sensors and temperature sensors were incorporated into the manifold endcaps, also for packaging considerations. Flight-like materials including a titanium housing were used for all components. Performance testing

  11. Covariant mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The connection between maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space and finite phase-space geometries is well known. In this article, we classify MUBs according to their degree of covariance with respect to the natural symmetries of a finite phase-space, which are the group of its affine symplectic transformations. We prove that there exist maximal sets of MUBs that are covariant with respect to the full group only in odd prime-power dimensional spaces, and in this case, their equivalence class is actually unique. Despite this limitation, we show that in dimension 2r covariance can still be achieved by restricting to proper subgroups of the symplectic group, that constitute the finite analogues of the oscillator group. For these subgroups, we explicitly construct the unitary operators yielding the covariance.

  12. International Mutual Recognition: Progress and Prospects. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    Increasing the mobility of service providers, including professionals, via mutual recognition (of regulatory systems) agreements (MRAs) has become a significant issue worldwide. Despite increasing interest in MRAs, it may be argued that MRAs are but one of a larger range of major developments that have fueled current interest in occupational…

  13. Proton transfer dynamics at the membrane/water interface: dependence on the fixed and mobile pH buffers, on the size and form of membrane particles, and on the interfacial potential barrier.

    PubMed

    Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Junge, Wolfgang; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y

    2004-02-01

    Crossing the membrane/water interface is an indispensable step in the transmembrane proton transfer. Elsewhere we have shown that the low dielectric permittivity of the surface water gives rise to a potential barrier for ions, so that the surface pH can deviate from that in the bulk water at steady operation of proton pumps. Here we addressed the retardation in the pulsed proton transfer across the interface as observed when light-triggered membrane proton pumps ejected or captured protons. By solving the system of diffusion equations we analyzed how the proton relaxation depends on the concentration of mobile pH buffers, on the surface buffer capacity, on the form and size of membrane particles, and on the height of the potential barrier. The fit of experimental data on proton relaxation in chromatophore vesicles from phototropic bacteria and in bacteriorhodopsin-containing membranes yielded estimates for the interfacial potential barrier for H(+)/OH(-) ions of approximately 120 meV. We analyzed published data on the acceleration of proton equilibration by anionic pH buffers and found that the height of the interfacial barrier correlated with their electric charge ranging from 90 to 120 meV for the singly charged species to >360 meV for the tetra-charged pyranine. PMID:14747306

  14. The Evolution of Interspecific Mutualisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doebeli, Michael; Knowlton, Nancy

    1998-07-01

    Interspecific mutualisms are widespread, but how they evolve is not clear. The Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma is the main theoretical tool to study cooperation, but this model ignores ecological differences between partners and assumes that amounts exchanged cannot themselves evolve. A more realistic model incorporating these features shows that strategies that succeed with fixed exchanges (e.g., Tit-for-Tat) cannot explain mutualism when exchanges vary because the amount exchanged evolves to 0. For mutualism to evolve, increased investments in a partner must yield increased returns, and spatial structure in competitive interactions is required. Under these biologically plausible assumptions, mutualism evolves with surprising ease. This suggests that, contrary to the basic premise of past theoretical analyses, overcoming a potential host's initial defenses may be a bigger obstacle for mutualism than the subsequent recurrence and spread of noncooperative mutants.

  15. Estimating mutual information.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y), from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density mu(x,y). In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M(X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if mu(x,y)=mu(x)mu(y). This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y. In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation. PMID:15244698

  16. [Biological mutualism, concepts and models].

    PubMed

    Perru, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mutualism is a biological association for a mutual benefit between two different species. In this paper, firstly, we examine the history and signification of mutualism in relation to symbiosis. Then, we consider the link between concepts and models of mutualism. Models of mutualism depend on different concepts we use: If mutualism is situated at populations' level, it will be expressed by Lotka-Volterra models, concerning exclusively populations' size. If mutualism is considered as a resources' exchange or a biological market increasing the fitness of these organisms, it will be described at an individual level by a cost-benefit model. Our analysis will be limited to the history and epistemology of Lotka-Volterra models and we hypothesize that these models are adapted at first to translate dynamic evolutions of mutualism. They render stability or variations of size and assume that there are clear distinctions and a state of equilibrium between populations of different species. Italian mathematician Vito Volterra demonstrated that biological associations consist in a constant relation between some species. In 1931 and 1935, Volterra described the general form of antagonistic or mutualistic biological associations by the same differential equations. We recognize that these equations have been more used to model competition or prey-predator interactions, but a simple sign change allows describing mutualism. The epistemological problem is the following: Volterra's equations help us to conceptualize a global phenomenon. However, mutualistic interactions may have stronger effects away from equilibrium and these effects may be better understood at individual level. We conclude that, between 1985 and 2000, some researchers carried on working and converting Lotka-Volterra models but this description appeared as insufficient. So, other researchers adopted an economical viewpoint, considering mutualism as a biological market. PMID:22288336

  17. Grief and Palliative Care: Mutuality

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Grief and palliative care are interrelated and perhaps mutually inclusive. Conceptually and practically, grief intimately relates to palliative care, as both domains regard the phenomena of loss, suffering, and a desire for abatement of pain burden. Moreover, the notions of palliative care and grief may be construed as being mutually inclusive in terms of one cueing the other. As such, the discussions in this article will center on the conceptualizations of the mutuality between grief and palliative care related to end-of-life circumstances. Specifically, the complementarity of grief and palliative care, as well as a controvertible view thereof, will be considered. PMID:25278758

  18. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or...-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual... insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on an...

  19. Reduced Volume Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; A Next-Generation Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Janice V.; Anchondo, Ian; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Colunga, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the reduced volume prototype (RVP) spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME). The RVP SWME is the third generation of hollow fiber SWME hardware. Like its predecessors, RVP SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Major design improvements, including a 36% reduction in volume, reduced weight, and a more flight-like backpressure valve, facilitate the packaging of RVP SWME in the AEMU PLSS envelope. The development of these evaporative cooling systems will contribute to a more robust and comprehensive AEMU PLSS.

  20. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling Systems for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean.; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Petty, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator - Baseline heat rejection technology for the Portable Life Support System of the Advanced EMU center dot Replaces sublimator in the current EMU center dot Contamination insensitive center dot Can work with Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator in Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to reject heat and reuse evaporated water The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is being developed to replace the sublimator for future generation spacesuits. Water in LCVG absorbs body heat while circulating center dot Warm water pumped through SWME center dot SWME evaporates water vapor, while maintaining liquid water - Cools water center dot Cooled water is then recirculated through LCVG. center dot LCVG water lost due to evaporation (cooling) is replaced from feedwater The Independent TCV Manifold reduces design complexity and manufacturing difficulty of the SWME End Cap. center dot The offset motor for the new BPV reduces the volume profile of the SWME by laying the motor flat on the End Cap alongside the TCV.

  1. How Do Professional Mutual Recognition Agreements Affect Higher Education? Examining Regional Policy in North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa, Creso; Gaviria, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Professional mutual recognition agreements (MRAs) are one of the policy instruments employed in global and regional trade agreements to facilitate the mobility of skilled labour. While such agreements have been noted in the literature examining cross-border academic mobility, little is known about how they impact higher education. This paper…

  2. Hierarchical clustering using mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraskov, A.; Stögbauer, H.; Andrzejak, R. G.; Grassberger, P.

    2005-04-01

    We present a conceptually simple method for hierarchical clustering of data called mutual information clustering (MIC) algorithm. It uses mutual information (MI) as a similarity measure and exploits its grouping property: The MI between three objects X, Y, and Z is equal to the sum of the MI between X and Y, plus the MI between Z and the combined object (XY). We use this both in the Shannon (probabilistic) version of information theory and in the Kolmogorov (algorithmic) version. We apply our method to the construction of phylogenetic trees from mitochondrial DNA sequences and to the output of independent components analysis (ICA) as illustrated with the ECG of a pregnant woman.

  3. Biological membrane modeling with a liquid/liquid interface. Probing mobility and environment with total internal reflection excited fluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, L E; Weber, G

    1987-01-01

    Total internal reflection of exciting light, in combination with fluorescence intensity and polarization measurements, was used to selectively study fluorescent compounds adsorbed to the interface region between two immiscible liquids. A fluorometer was constructed which provided excitation at variable angles of incidence and allowed sensitive detection of polarized fluorescence emitted from the interface. The compound 4,4'-bis-1-phenylamino-8-naphthalenesulfonate (bis-ANS) was examined at a decalin/water interface and was found to possess remarkable affinity for the interface region with the bulk of the adsorbed molecule residing in the decalin phase. The adsorbed fluorophore displayed an apparent hindered rotation in the plane of the interface with a rotational diffusion coefficient 3- to 12-fold lower than that expected for bis-ANS in solution. While other dyes examined were not found to be significantly surface active, the addition of cationic surfactant sufficed to induce adsorption of the anionic fluorophore 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid. This fluoropore was found to reside in an aqueous environment when bound to the interface, and it also exhibited hindered rotation in the plane of the interface. As the concentrations of the dyes were increased, both adsorbed dyes exhibited polarization reductions consistent with excitation energy transfer. Adsorption of bis-ANS was reversed by addition of bovine serum albumin. The membrane protein cytochrome b5 was found not to bind at the decalin/water interface, indicating that interaction with lipid is required for its adherence to biological membranes. PMID:3651556

  4. Mutual Gains Means Everyone Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Bernard L.

    1997-01-01

    Mutual gains negotiation is an innovative system that emphasizes interests instead of positions and problem solving instead of preconceived solutions. The process can reverse social disintegration, reverse worker alienation, and address a shifting educational environment. It can resolve difficult labor-management problems such as contracting out,…

  5. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  6. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on...

  7. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on...

  8. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on...

  9. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on...

  10. Mutual impedance computation between printed dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, N. G.; Rana, I. E.

    1981-01-01

    The mutual impedance between microstrip dipoles printed on a grounded substrate is computed. Results for the microstrip dipoles in broadside, collinear, and echelon arrangements are presented. The significance of surface wave to mutual coupling is discussed.

  11. Pluto-charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, R.P. )

    1989-11-01

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained.

  12. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  13. Parents Helping Parents: Mutual Parenting Network Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkinson, Charles H.; Redmond, Robert F.

    Guidelines for mutual parenting are provided in this handbook. "Mutual parenting" means that everyone in the community shares the responsibility for the safety and well-being of the community's youngsters. Several topics are discussed in the 15 brief chapters of the handbook. Chapters 1 through 3 focus on the formation of a mutual parenting…

  14. Long-range mutual information and topological uncertainty principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Chao-Ming; Kim, Isaac; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    Ordered phases in Landau paradigm can be diagnosed by a local order parameter, whereas topologically ordered phases cannot be detected in such a way. In this paper, we propose long-range mutual information (LRMI) as a unified diagnostic for both conventional long-range order and topological order. Using the LRMI, we characterize orders in n +1D gapped systems as m-membrane condensates with 0 <= m <= n-1. The familiar conventional order and 2 +1D topological orders are respectively identified as 0-membrane and 1-membrane condensates. We propose and study the topological uncertainty principle, which describes the non-commuting nature of non-local order parameters in topological orders.

  15. Mobile membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometry for on-the-fly measurements and adaptive sampling of VOCs around oil and gas projects in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogh, E.; Gill, C.; Bell, R.; Davey, N.; Martinsen, M.; Thompson, A.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The release of hydrocarbons into the environment can have significant environmental and economic consequences. The evolution of smaller, more portable mass spectrometers to the field can provide spatially and temporally resolved information for rapid detection, adaptive sampling and decision support. We have deployed a mobile platform membrane introduction mass spectrometer (MIMS) for the in-field simultaneous measurement of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. In this work, we report instrument and data handling advances that produce geographically referenced data in real-time and preliminary data where these improvements have been combined with high precision ultra-trace VOCs analysis to adaptively sample air plumes near oil and gas operations in Alberta, Canada. We have modified a commercially available ion-trap mass spectrometer (Griffin ICX 400) with an in-house temperature controlled capillary hollow fibre polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer membrane interface and in-line permeation tube flow cell for a continuously infused internal standard. The system is powered by 24 VDC for remote operations in a moving vehicle. Software modifications include the ability to run continuous, interlaced tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments for multiple contaminants/internal standards. All data are time and location stamped with on-board GPS and meteorological data to facilitate spatial and temporal data mapping. Tandem MS/MS scans were employed to simultaneously monitor ten volatile and semi-volatile analytes, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), reduced sulfur compounds, halogenated organics and naphthalene. Quantification was achieved by calibrating against a continuously infused deuterated internal standard (toluene-d8). Time referenced MS/MS data were correlated with positional data and processed using Labview and Matlab to produce calibrated, geographical Google Earth data-visualizations that enable adaptive sampling protocols

  16. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marjorie G; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-11-18

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity. PMID:25349406

  17. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marjorie G.; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity. PMID:25349406

  18. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca2+ signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders. PMID:26296072

  19. Mutual information in classical spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Johannes; Troyer, Matthias; Verstraete, Frank

    2011-10-01

    The total many-body correlations present in finite temperature classical spin systems are studied using the concept of mutual information. As opposed to zero-temperature quantum phase transitions, the total correlations are not maximal at the phase transition, but reach a maximum in the high-temperature paramagnetic phase. The Shannon mutual information and the Renyi mutual information in both Ising and Potts models in two dimensions are calculated numerically by combining matrix product state algorithms and Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  20. Mutual enhancement of diverse terminologies

    PubMed Central

    Hardiker, Nicholas R.; Casey, Anne; Coenen, Amy; Konicek, Debra

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) nursing diagnoses to the International Classification for Nursing Practice Version 1.0 (ICNP®) and to compare the resulting representations and relationships to those within SNOMED® Clinical Terms (CT). Independent reviewers reached agreement on 25 (i.e. 64%) of the 39 parent-child relationships identified via the mappings between NANDA entities. Other parent-child relationships were more questionable and are in need of further discussion. This work does not seek to promote one terminology over any other. Rather, this collaborative effort has the potential to mutually enhance all three terminologies involved in the study: ICNP®, SNOMED® CT and NANDA. In doing so it provides an example of the type of collaborative effort that is needed to facilitate the development of tools to support interoperability at a global level. PMID:17238355

  1. Entanglement in Mutually Unbiased Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesniak, Marcin; Paterek, Tomasz; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-03-01

    Higher-dimensional Hilbert spaces are still not fully explored. One issue concerns mutually unbiased bases (MUBs). For primes and their powers (e.g.), full sets of MUBs are known. The question of existence of all MUBs in composite dimensions is still open. We show that for all full sets of MUBs of a given dimension a certain entanglement measure of the bases is constant. This fact could be an argument either for or against the existence of full sets of MUBs in some dimensions and tells us that almost all MUBs are maximally entangled for high-dimensional composite systems, whereas this is not the case for prime dimensions. We present a new construction of MUBs in squared prime dimensions. We use only one entangling operation, which simplifies possible experiments. The construction gives only product states and maximally entangled states. Research supported by ERC Advanced Grant QIT4QAD and FWF SFB-grant F4007 of the Austrian Science Fund.

  2. The Competitive Strategy of Mutual Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelner, Stephen P.; Slavin, Lois

    1998-01-01

    Defines and discusses mutual learning in organizations. Suggests that the idea of people and companies sharing knowledge is becoming a competitive strategy because mutual learning enables executives and employees to increase their capacity to work together, accelerate organizational learning, and avoid mistakes. (JOW)

  3. Victimization within Mutually Antipathetic Peer Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Noel A.; Hodges, Ernest V. E.

    2007-01-01

    Children's victimization experiences within relationships characterized by mutual animosity were examined among 210 6th- and 7th-grade boys and girls. Participants reported that a greater proportion of mutual antipathies, relative to other peers, victimized them. Moreover, the receipt of victimization within antipathetic relationships was greater…

  4. [Maintaining solidarity: is mutuality the solution?].

    PubMed

    Gevers, J K M; Ploem, M C

    2013-01-01

    Solidarity is essentially the willingness to contribute to the community and its demands, which may even involve contributing more than one is expecting to receive. Another principle is mutuality: this refers to a balance between rights and obligations or between mutual obligations. In its advisory document 'The importance of mutuality......solidarity takes work!', The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care underlines the importance of ensuring solidarity within the Dutch health care system, e.g. by encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health, possibly by introducing elements of mutuality. In our contribution, we comment on the Council's advice. Although we fully agree with the overall conclusion that solidarity should be maintained within the system, we do not see how the introduction of increased mutuality will contribute to this goal. PMID:23945438

  5. Mutual Orbits of Transneptunian Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Noll, K. S.; Roe, H. G.; Porter, S. B.; Trujillo, C. A.; Benecchi, S. D.; Buie, M. W.

    2012-10-01

    We report the latest results from a program of high spatial resolution imaging to resolve the individual components of binary transneptunian objects. These observations use Hubble Space Telescope and also laser guide star adaptive optics systems on Keck and Gemini telescopes on Mauna Kea. From relative astrometry over multiple epochs, we determine the mutual orbits of the components, and thus the total masses of the systems. Accurate masses anchor subsequent detailed investigations into the physical characteristics of these systems. For instance, dynamical masses enable computation of bulk densities for systems where the component sizes can be estimated from other measurements. Additionally, patterns in the ensemble characteristics of binary orbits offer clues to circumstances in the protoplanetary nebula when these systems formed, as well as carrying imprints of various subsequent dynamical evolution processes. The growing ensemble of known orbits shows intriguing patterns that can shed light on the evolution of this population of distant objects. This work has been supported by an NSF Planetary Astronomy grant and by several Hubble Space Telescope and NASA Keck data analysis grants. The research makes use of data from the Gemini Observatory obtained through NOAO survey program 11A-0017, from a large number of Hubble Space Telescope programs, and from several NASA Keck programs.

  6. Disrupting Microtubules Network Immobilizes Amoeboid Chemotactic Receptor in the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    de Keijzer, S.; Galloway, J.; Harms, G.S.; Devreotes, P.N.; Iglesias, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Signaling cascades are initiated in the plasma membrane via activation of one molecule by another. The interaction depends on the mutual availability of the molecules to each other and this is determined by their localization and lateral diffusion in the cell membrane. The cytoskeleton plays a very important role in this process by enhancing or restricting the possibility of the signaling partners to meet in the plasma membrane. In this study we explored the mode of diffusion of the cAMP receptor, cAR1, in the plasma membrane of Dictyostelium discoideum cells and how this is regulated by the cytoskeleton. Single-particle tracking of fluorescently labeled cAR1 using total internal reflection microscopy showed that 70% of the cAR1 molecules were mobile. These receptors showed directed motion and we demonstrate that this is not because of tracking along the actin cytoskeleton. Instead, destabilization of the microtubules abolished cAR1 mobility in the plasma membrane and this was confirmed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. As a result of microtubule stabilization, one of the first downstream signaling events, the jump of the PH domain of CRAC, was decreased. These results suggest a role for microtubules in cAR1 dynamics and in the ability of cAR1 molecules to interact with their signaling partners. PMID:21334306

  7. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  8. Generalized mutual information and Tsirelson's bound

    SciTech Connect

    Wakakuwa, Eyuri; Murao, Mio

    2014-12-04

    We introduce a generalization of the quantum mutual information between a classical system and a quantum system into the mutual information between a classical system and a system described by general probabilistic theories. We apply this generalized mutual information (GMI) to a derivation of Tsirelson's bound from information causality, and prove that Tsirelson's bound can be derived from the chain rule of the GMI. By using the GMI, we formulate the 'no-supersignalling condition' (NSS), that the assistance of correlations does not enhance the capability of classical communication. We prove that NSS is never violated in any no-signalling theory.

  9. 76 FR 71437 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC or Committee) formerly administered by the Office of... of and challenges facing mutual savings associations. The OCC is seeking nominations of...

  10. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  11. Phenological shifts and the fate of mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Nicole E.; CaraDonna, Paul J.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing of life history events in a wide array of species, many of which are involved in mutualistic interactions. Because many mutualisms can form only if partner species are able to locate each other in time, differential phenological shifts are likely to influence their strength, duration and outcome. At the extreme, climate change-driven shifts in phenology may result in phenological mismatch: the partial or complete loss of temporal overlap of mutualistic species. We have a growing understanding of how, when, and why phenological change can alter one type of mutualism–pollination. However, as we show here, there has been a surprising lack of attention to other types of mutualism. We generate a set of predictions about the characteristics that may predispose mutualisms in general to phenological mismatches. We focus not on the consequences of such mismatches but rather on the likelihood that mismatches will develop. We explore the influence of three key characteristics of mutualism: 1) intimacy, 2) seasonality and duration, and 3) obligacy and specificity. We predict that the following characteristics of mutualism may increase the likelihood of phenological mismatch: 1) a non-symbiotic life history in which co-dispersal is absent; 2) brief, seasonal interactions; and 3) facultative, generalized interactions. We then review the limited available data in light of our a priori predictions and point to mutualisms that are more and less likely to be at risk of becoming phenologically mismatched, emphasizing the need for research on mutualisms other than plant–pollinator interactions. Future studies should explicitly focus on mutualism characteristics to determine whether and how changing phenologies will affect mutualistic interactions. PMID:25883391

  12. Certainty relations, mutual entanglement, and nondisplaceable manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchała, Zbigniew; Rudnicki, Łukasz; Chabuda, Krzysztof; Paraniak, Mikołaj; Życzkowski, Karol

    2015-09-01

    We derive explicit bounds for the average entropy characterizing measurements of a pure quantum state of size N in L orthogonal bases. Lower bounds lead to novel entropic uncertainty relations, while upper bounds allow us to formulate universal certainty relations. For L =2 the maximal average entropy saturates at logN because there exists a mutually coherent state, but certainty relations are shown to be nontrivial for L ≥3 measurements. In the case of a prime power dimension, N =pk , and the number of measurements L =N +1 , the upper bound for the average entropy becomes minimal for a collection of mutually unbiased bases. An analogous approach is used to study entanglement with respect to L different splittings of a composite system linked by bipartite quantum gates. We show that, for any two-qubit unitary gate U ∈U(4 ) there exist states being mutually separable or mutually entangled with respect to both splittings (related by U ) of the composite system. The latter statement follows from the fact that the real projective space R P3⊂C P3 is nondisplaceable by a unitary transformation. For L =3 splittings the maximal sum of L entanglement entropies is conjectured to achieve its minimum for a collection of three mutually entangled bases, formed by two mutually entangling gates.

  13. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  14. Mutual learning and reverse innovation–where next?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a clear and evident need for mutual learning in global health systems. It is increasingly recognized that innovation needs to be sourced globally and that we need to think in terms of co-development as ideas are developed and spread from richer to poorer countries and vice versa. The Globalization and Health journal’s ongoing thematic series, “Reverse innovation in global health systems: learning from low-income countries” illustrates how mutual learning and ideas about so-called "reverse innovation" or "frugal innovation" are being developed and utilized by researchers and practitioners around the world. The knowledge emerging from the series is already catalyzing change and challenging the status quo in global health. The path to truly “global innovation flow”, although not fully established, is now well under way. Mobilization of knowledge and resources through continuous communication and awareness raising can help sustain this movement. Global health learning laboratories, where partners can support each other in generating and sharing lessons, have the potential to construct solutions for the world. At the heart of this dialogue is a focus on creating practical local solutions and, simultaneously, drawing out the lessons for the whole world. PMID:24673828

  15. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3 Section 575.3 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize...

  16. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3 Section 575.3 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize...

  17. 78 FR 64600 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC will be held... mutual savings associations and other issues of concern to the existing mutual savings...

  18. 75 FR 77048 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the... Thrift Supervision has determined that the renewal of the ] Charter of the OTS Mutual Savings Association... facing mutual savings associations. DATES: The Charter of the OTS Mutual Savings Association...

  19. Group Differences in the Mutual Gaze of Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Kim A.; Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Tomonaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Costall, Alan; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2005-01-01

    A comparative developmental framework was used to determine whether mutual gaze is unique to humans and, if not, whether common mechanisms support the development of mutual gaze in chimpanzees and humans. Mother-infant chimpanzees engaged in approximately 17 instances of mutual gaze per hour. Mutual gaze occurred in positive, nonagonistic…

  20. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Federal mutual savings association bylaws. 544.5 Section 544.5 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Bylaws § 544.5 Federal mutual savings association bylaws. (a) General. A Federal mutual...

  1. 12 CFR 144.1 - Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Federal mutual charter. 144.1 Section 144.1 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Charter § 144.1 Federal mutual charter. A Federal mutual savings association shall have a charter in the following...

  2. 12 CFR 544.1 - Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Federal mutual charter. 544.1 Section 544.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Charter § 544.1 Federal mutual charter. A Federal mutual savings association shall have a charter in the following...

  3. 12 CFR 144.1 - Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Federal mutual charter. 144.1 Section 144.1 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Charter § 144.1 Federal mutual charter. A Federal mutual savings association shall have a charter in the following...

  4. 12 CFR 544.1 - Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Federal mutual charter. 544.1 Section 544.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Charter § 544.1 Federal mutual charter. A Federal mutual savings association shall have a charter in the following...

  5. Mutualisms in a changing world: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Toby Kiers, E; Palmer, Todd M; Ives, Anthony R; Bruno, John F; Bronstein, Judith L

    2010-12-01

    Ecology Letters (2010) 13: 1459-1474 ABSTRACT: There is growing concern that rapid environmental degradation threatens mutualistic interactions. Because mutualisms can bind species to a common fate, mutualism breakdown has the potential to expand and accelerate effects of global change on biodiversity loss and ecosystem disruption. The current focus on the ecological dynamics of mutualism under global change has skirted fundamental evolutionary issues. Here, we develop an evolutionary perspective on mutualism breakdown to complement the ecological perspective, by focusing on three processes: (1) shifts from mutualism to antagonism, (2) switches to novel partners and (3) mutualism abandonment. We then identify the evolutionary factors that may make particular classes of mutualisms especially susceptible or resistant to breakdown and discuss how communities harbouring mutualisms may be affected by these evolutionary responses. We propose a template for evolutionary research on mutualism resilience and identify conservation approaches that may help conserve targeted mutualisms in the face of environmental change. PMID:20955506

  6. Mutual inductance between piecewise-linear loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristina Barroso, Ana; Silva, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    We consider a current-carrying wire loop made out of linear segments of arbitrary sizes and directions in three-dimensional space. We develop expressions to calculate its vector potential and magnetic field at all points in space. We then calculate the mutual inductance between two such (non-intersecting) piecewise-linear loops. As simple applications, we consider in detail the mutual inductance between two square wires of equal length that either lie in the same plane or lie in parallel horizontal planes with their centers on the same vertical axis. Our expressions can also be used to obtain approximations to the mutual inductance between wires of arbitrary three-dimensional shapes.

  7. Mutual information and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, A.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the metastable, symmetry-breaking ground states of quantum many-body Hamiltonians have vanishing quantum mutual information between macroscopically separated regions and are thus the most classical ones among all possible quantum ground states. This statement is obvious only when the symmetry-breaking ground states are simple product states, e.g., at the factorization point. On the other hand, symmetry-breaking states are in general entangled along the entire ordered phase, and to show that they actually feature the least macroscopic correlations compared to their symmetric superpositions is highly nontrivial. We prove this result in general, by considering the quantum mutual information based on the two-Rényi entanglement entropy and using a locality result stemming from quasiadiabatic continuation. Moreover, in the paradigmatic case of the exactly solvable one-dimensional quantum X Y model, we further verify the general result by considering also the quantum mutual information based on the von Neumann entanglement entropy.

  8. Mutual information rate and bounds for it.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Murilo S; Rubinger, Rero M; Viana, Emilson R; Sartorelli, José C; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators. PMID:23112809

  9. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    71 I. 71 II. 72 III. 73 IV. 74 V. 74 74 References 74 SUMMARY: Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle. PMID:26414800

  10. Distribution of Mutual Information in Multipartite States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziero, Jonas

    2014-06-01

    Using the relative entropy of total correlation, we derive an expression relating the mutual information of n-partite pure states to the sum of the mutual informations and entropies of its marginals and analyze some of its implications. Besides, by utilizing the extended strong subadditivity of von Neumann entropy, we obtain generalized monogamy relations for the total correlation in three-partite mixed states. These inequalities lead to a tight lower bound for this correlation in terms of the sum of the bipartite mutual informations. We use this bound to propose a measure for residual three-partite total correlation and discuss the non-applicability of this kind of quantifier to measure genuine multiparty correlations.

  11. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual...

  12. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual...

  13. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual...

  14. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual...

  15. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or...

  16. Conceptual Alignment: How Brains Achieve Mutual Understanding.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Verhagen, Lennart; Toni, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    We share our thoughts with other minds, but we do not understand how. Having a common language certainly helps, but infants' and tourists' communicative success clearly illustrates that sharing thoughts does not require signals with a pre-assigned meaning. In fact, human communicators jointly build a fleeting conceptual space in which signals are a means to seek and provide evidence for mutual understanding. Recent work has started to capture the neural mechanisms supporting those fleeting conceptual alignments. The evidence suggests that communicators and addressees achieve mutual understanding by using the same computational procedures, implemented in the same neuronal substrate, and operating over temporal scales independent from the signals' occurrences. PMID:26792458

  17. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, Mark S.; Shlomo, Golan; Anderson, Marc A.

    1994-01-01

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

  18. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... Thrift Supervision, 1700 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20552, by fax to (202) 906-6518, or by e-mail to...'s Office, Office of Thrift Supervision, 1700 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20552....

  19. Mutual diffusion in a binary isotopic mixture.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; Tankeshwar, K

    2010-11-17

    The mass dependence of the mutual diffusion coefficient, in a binary equimolar mixture of Lennard-Jones fluids, is studied within Mori's memory function formalism. A phenomenological form of the memory function is used to study the time evolution of the self- and relative velocity correlation functions. The diffusion coefficients are calculated from the relevant velocity correlation functions using the Green-Kubo integral formula. Like the self-diffusion coefficient, the mutual diffusion coefficient is also found to be weakly dependent on the mass ratio. The present study shows that the minimum value that the mutual diffusion coefficient in an equimolar mixture of isotopic fluids can have is √(1/2) times the self-diffusion coefficient of any of the species when in isolation. Further, the contribution of the dynamic/distinct cross correlations to the mutual diffusion coefficient is found to be small and positive for the whole range of the mass ratio which is consistent with earlier molecular dynamics results. PMID:21339621

  20. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  1. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  2. Supported double membranes

    PubMed Central

    Murray, David H.; Tamm, Lukas K.; Kiessling, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Planar model membranes, like supported lipid bilayers and surface-tethered vesicles, have been proven to be useful tools for the investigation of complex biological functions in a significantly less complex membrane environment. In this study, we introduce a supported double membrane system that should be useful for studies that target biological processes in the proximity of two lipid bilayers such as the periplasm of bacteria and mitochondria or the small cleft between pre-and postsynaptic neuronal membranes. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) were tethered to a preformed supported bilayer by a biotin-streptavidin tether. We show from single particle tracking (SPT) experiments that these vesicle are mobile above the plane of the supported membrane. At higher concentrations, the tethered vesicles fuse to form a second continuous bilayer on top of the supported bilayer. The distance between the two bilayers was determined by fluorescence interference contrast (FLIC) microscopy to be between 16 and 24 nm. The lateral diffusion of labeled lipids in the second bilayer was very similar to that in supported membranes. SPT experiments with reconstituted syntaxin-1A show that the mobility of transmembrane proteins was not improved when compared with solid supported membranes. PMID:19236921

  3. Site-specific Proteolysis Mobilizes TorsinA from the Membrane of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) in Response to ER Stress and B Cell Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenguang; Brown, Rebecca S H; Tang, Chih-Hang Anthony; Hu, Chih-Chi Andrew; Schlieker, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Torsin ATPases are the only representatives of the AAA+ ATPase family that reside in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and nuclear envelope. Two of these, TorsinA and TorsinB, are anchored to the ER membrane by virtue of an N-terminal hydrophobic domain. Here we demonstrate that the imposition of ER stress leads to a proteolytic cleavage event that selectively removes the hydrophobic domain from the AAA+ domain of TorsinA, which retains catalytic activity. Both the pharmacological inhibition profile and the identified cleavage site between two juxtaposed cysteine residues are distinct from those of presently known proteases, suggesting that a hitherto uncharacterized, membrane-associated protease accounts for TorsinA processing. This processing occurs not only in stress-exposed cell lines but also in primary cells from distinct organisms including stimulated B cells, indicating that Torsin conversion in response to physiologically relevant stimuli is an evolutionarily conserved process. By establishing 5-nitroisatin as a cell-permeable inhibitor for Torsin processing, we provide the methodological framework for interfering with Torsin processing in a wide range of primary cells without the need for genetic manipulation. PMID:26953341

  4. Priming of the neutrophil NADPH oxidase activation: role of p47phox phosphorylation and NOX2 mobilization to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne

    2008-07-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in host defense against microbial pathogens and in the inflammatory reaction. Upon activation, neutrophils produce superoxide anion (O*2), which generates other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (OH*) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), together with microbicidal peptides and proteases. The enzyme responsible for O2* production is called the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase or respiratory burst oxidase. This multicomponent enzyme system is composed of two trans-membrane proteins (p22phox and gp91phox/NOX2, which form the cytochrome b558), three cytosolic proteins (p47phox, p67phox, p40phox) and a GTPase (Rac1 or Rac2), which assemble at membrane sites upon cell activation. NADPH oxidase activation in phagocytes can be induced by a large number of soluble and particulate factors. Three major events accompany NAPDH oxidase activation: (1) protein phosphorylation, (2) GTPase activation, and (3) translocation of cytosolic components to the plasma membrane to form the active enzyme. Actually, the neutrophil NADPH oxidase exists in different states: resting, primed, activated, or inactivated. The resting state is found in circulating blood neutrophils. The primed state can be induced by neutrophil adhesion, pro-inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide, and other agents and has been characterized as a "ready to go" state, which results in a faster and higher response upon exposure to a second stimulus. The active state is found at the inflammatory or infection site. Activation is induced by the pathogen itself or by pathogen-derived formylated peptides and other agents. Finally, inactivation of NADPH oxidase is induced by anti-inflammatory agents to limit inflammation. Priming is a "double-edged sword" process as it contributes to a rapid and efficient elimination of the pathogens but can also induce the generation of large quantities of toxic ROS by hyperactivation of

  5. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  6. Automotive radar - investigation of mutual interference mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goppelt, M.; Blöcher, H.-L.; Menzel, W.

    2010-09-01

    In the past mutual interference between automotive radar sensors has not been regarded as a major problem. With an increasing number of such systems, however, this topic is receiving more and more attention. The investigation of mutual interference and countermeasures is therefore one topic of the joint project "Radar on Chip for Cars" (RoCC) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). RoCC's goal is to pave the way for the development of high-performance, low-cost 79 GHz radar sensors based on Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs). This paper will present some generic interference scenarios and report on the current status of the analysis of interference mechanisms.

  7. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  8. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  9. Recovery of synthetic dye from simulated wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane process containing tri-dodecyl amine as a mobile carrier.

    PubMed

    Othman, N; Zailani, S N; Mili, N

    2011-12-30

    The extraction of Red 3BS reactive dye from aqueous solution was studied using emulsion liquid membrane (ELM). ELM is one of the processes that have very high potential in treating industrial wastewater consisting of dyes. In this research, Red 3BS reactive dye was extracted from simulated wastewater using tridodecylamine (TDA) as the carrier agent, salicyclic acid (SA) to protonate TDA, sodium chloride as the stripping agent, kerosene as the diluent and SPAN 80 as emulsifier. Experimental parameters investigated were salicyclic acid concentration, extraction time, SPAN 80 concentration, sodium chloride concentration, TDA concentration, agitation speed, homogenizer speed, emulsifying time and treat ratio. The results show almost 100% of Red 3BS was removed and stripped in the receiving phase at the optimum condition in this ELM system. High voltage coalesce was applied to break the emulsion hence, enables recovery of Red 3BS in the receiving phase. PMID:22023906

  10. Mutual information analysis of JPEG2000 contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Karam, Lina J.

    2003-05-01

    Context-based arithmetic coding has been widely adopted in image and video compression and is a key component of the new JPEG2000 image compression standard. In this paper, the contexts used in JPEG2000 are analyzed using the mutual information, which has a direct link with the compression performance. We first show that, when combining the contexts, the mutual information between the contexts and the encoded data will decrease unless the conditional probability distributions of the combined contexts are the same. Given I, the initial number of contexts, and F, the final desired number of contexts, there are S(I, F) possible context classification schemes where S(I, F) is called the Stirling number of the second kind. The optimal classification scheme is the one that gives the maximum mutual information. Instead of exhaustive search, the optimal classification scheme can be obtained through a modified Generalized Lloyd algorithm with the relative entropy as the distortion metric. For binary arithmetic coding, the search complexity can be reduced by using the dynamic programming. Our experimental results show that the JPEG2000 contexts capture very well the correlations among the wavelet coefficients. At the same time, the number of contexts used as part of the standard can be reduced without loss in the coding performance.

  11. Observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, C.; Di Martino, M.; Ferreri, W.; Osservatorio Astronomico, Turin )

    1989-07-01

    As part of the planned 'Pluto-Charon Mutual Eclipse Season Campaign', one mutual event was observed at the ESO Observatory on July 10, 1986 and seven mutual events were observed at the Serra La Nave stellar station of Catania Astrophysical Observatory from April 29 to July 21, 1987. At ESO the measurements were performed at the 61-cm Bochum telescope equipped with a photon-counting system and U, B, V, filters; at Serra La Nave the Cassegrain focus of the 91-cm reflector was equipped with a photon-counting system and B and V filters. The observed light losses and contact times do not show relevant systematic deviations from the predicted ones. An examination of the behavior of the B and V light curves gives slight indications of a different slope of the B and V light loss of the same event for a superior or an inferior event, and shows that the superior events are shallower at wavelengths longer than B. 6 refs.

  12. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in...

  13. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in...

  14. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in...

  15. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in...

  16. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in section 593(a)....

  17. 78 FR 26424 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC will be held... savings associations, and other issues of concern to the existing mutual savings associations. On the...

  18. 77 FR 74052 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC or Committee). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC... 8:30 a.m. EST. Agenda items include a discussion of the status of the mutual savings...

  19. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measured by confocal microscopy as a tool for the analysis of vesicular lipid transport and plasma membrane mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Gerd; Goetz, Alexandra; Orso, Evelyn; Rothe, Gregor

    1998-04-01

    The vesicular transport of lipids from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi apparatus affects the composition of the plasma membrane. The purpose of our study was to develop an in vitro test system for characterization of vesicular lipid transport kinetics by using confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Fibroblasts from two patients homozygous for the hypercatabolic HDL deficiency syndrome Tangier disease and 4 control subjects were pulsed with the C6-NBD-ceramide for 30 minutes. Chase incubation at room temperature resulted in the metabolic accumulation of fluorescent C6-NBD-sphingolyelin and C6-NBD-glycosylceramides in the medial- and trans-Golgi region. Cells were analyzed with an inverted Leica TCS microscope. Calibration was performed through the analysis of diffusion of 50 nm microparticles embedded in media of different viscosity. An acousto optical tunable filter (AOTF) was used for the selective bleaching of the medial- and trans- Golgi region followed by analysis of the fluorescence recovery for 4 minutes. Post-bleach fluorescence recovery through the trans-Golgi-oriented transport of NBD-sphingomyelin was calculated from 2-dimensional scans. Tangier fibroblasts displayed a retarded recovery of fluorescence in the trans- Golgi region. This suggests that the vesicular transport of sphingomyelin and cholesterol is disturbed in Tangier disease confirming data from our laboratory generated with radiometabolites on whole cells. Our data suggest that FRAP analysis allows a sensitive kinetic and spatially resolved analysis of disturbances of vesicular lipid transport.

  20. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  1. Partner selection in the mycorrhizal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Kiers, E Toby

    2015-03-01

    Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is thought to be a key factor stabilising the mutualism. Both plant hosts and mycorrhizal fungi have been shown to preferentially allocate resources to higher quality partners. This can help maintain underground cooperation, although it is likely that different plant species vary in the spatial precision with which they can select partners. Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is presumably context-dependent and can be mediated by factors like (relative) resource abundance and resource fluctuations, competition among mycorrhizas, arrival order and cultivation history. Such factors complicate our current understanding of the importance of partner selection and its effectiveness in stimulating mutualistic cooperation. PMID:25421912

  2. Arithmetic, mutually unbiased bases and complementary observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppeard, M. D.

    2010-02-01

    Complementary observables in quantum mechanics may be viewed as Frobenius structures in a dagger monoidal category, such as the category of finite dimensional Hilbert spaces over the complex numbers. On the other hand, their properties crucially depend on the discrete Fourier transform and its associated quantum torus, requiring only the finite fields that underlie mutually unbiased bases. In axiomatic topos theory, the complex numbers are difficult to describe and should not be invoked unnecessarily. This paper surveys some fundamentals of quantum arithmetic using finite field complementary observables, with a view considering more general axiom systems.

  3. Motion vision for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrb, Matthieu

    The problem of using computer vision in mobile robots is dealt with. The datacube specialized cards and a parallel machine using a transputer network are studied. The tracking and localization of a three dimensional object in a sequence of images is examined, using first order prediction of the motion in the image plane and verification by a maximal clique search in the graph of mutually compatible matchings. A dynamic environment modeling module, using numerical fusion between trinocular stereovision and tracking of stereo matched primitives is presented. The integration of this perception system in the control architecture of a mobile robot is examined to achieve various functions, such as vision servo motion and environment modeling. The functional units implementing vision tasks and the data exchanged with other units are outlined. Experiments realized with the mobile robot Hilare 1.5 allowed the proposed algorithms and concepts to be validated.

  4. Generalized mutual information of quantum critical chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, F. C.; Rajabpour, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    We study the generalized mutual information I˜n of the ground state of different critical quantum chains. The generalized mutual information definition that we use is based on the well established concept of the Rényi divergence. We calculate this quantity numerically for several distinct quantum chains having either discrete Z (Q ) symmetries (Q -state Potts model with Q =2 ,3 ,4 and Z (Q ) parafermionic models with Q =5 ,6 ,7 ,8 and also Ashkin-Teller model with different anisotropies) or the U (1 ) continuous symmetries (Klein-Gordon field theory, X X Z and spin-1 Fateev-Zamolodchikov quantum chains with different anisotropies). For the spin chains these calculations were done by expressing the ground-state wave functions in two special bases. Our results indicate some general behavior for particular ranges of values of the parameter n that defines I˜n. For a system, with total size L and subsystem sizes ℓ and L -ℓ , the I˜n has a logarithmic leading behavior given by c/˜n4 log[L/π sin(π/ℓ L ) ] where the coefficient c˜n is linearly dependent on the central charge c of the underlying conformal field theory describing the system's critical properties.

  5. Mobile electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, V.J.; Bloomfield, D.P.; Johnson, B.Q.

    1992-01-30

    Analytic Power has proven the feasibility of a mobile electric power unit in the form of a hydride fueled ion-exchange membrane (IEM) fuel cell stack. We have over 5 years experience building and testing IEM fuel cells. The power section of a 350 watt fuel cell stack weighs 4.65 pounds based on our five cell sub-stack component weights. The composite stack structure is fabricated from two components; a unitized flow field and catalyzed membrane. The lightweight unitized flow field concept was proven in the first three months of the contract. A single unit flow field weighs 0.155 pounds and can seal to 60 psi. The single cell catalyzed Nafion membrane exceeded our performance goal of 0.6 volts at 100 ASF. Stack performance points were 0.42 volts at 113 ASF and .75 volts at 96 asf.

  6. Battery utilizing ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

    1994-08-30

    A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

  7. Nutrient loading alters the performance of key nutrient exchange mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Shantz, Andrew A; Lemoine, Nathan P; Burkepile, Deron E

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient exchange mutualisms between phototrophs and heterotrophs, such as plants and mycorrhizal fungi or symbiotic algae and corals, underpin the functioning of many ecosystems. These relationships structure communities, promote biodiversity and help maintain food security. Nutrient loading may destabilise these mutualisms by altering the costs and benefits each partner incurs from interacting. Using meta-analyses, we show a near ubiquitous decoupling in mutualism performance across terrestrial and marine environments in which phototrophs benefit from enrichment at the expense of their heterotrophic partners. Importantly, heterotroph identity, their dependence on phototroph-derived C and the type of nutrient enrichment (e.g. nitrogen vs. phosphorus) mediated the responses of different mutualisms to enrichment. Nutrient-driven changes in mutualism performance may alter community organisation and ecosystem processes and increase costs of food production. Consequently, the decoupling of nutrient exchange mutualisms via alterations of the world's nitrogen and phosphorus cycles may represent an emerging threat of global change. PMID:26549314

  8. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  9. Mutual Contextualization in Tripartite Graphs of Folksonomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Ching-Man Au; Gibbins, Nicholas; Shadbolt, Nigel

    The use of tags to describe Web resources in a collaborative manner has experienced rising popularity among Web users in recent years. The product of such activity is given the name folksonomy, which can be considered as a scheme of organizing information in the users' own way. This research work attempts to analyze tripartite graphs - graphs involving users, tags and resources - of folksonomies and discuss how these elements acquire their semantics through their associations with other elements, a process we call mutual contextualization. By studying such process, we try to identify solutions to problems such as tag disambiguation, retrieving documents of similar topics and discovering communities of users. This paper describes the basis of the research work, mentions work done so far and outlines future plans.

  10. Mutually unbiased bases and bound entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.; Löffler, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    In this contribution we relate two different key concepts: mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and entanglement. We provide a general toolbox for analyzing and comparing entanglement of quantum states for different dimensions and numbers of particles. In particular we focus on bound entanglement, i.e. highly mixed states which cannot be distilled by local operations and classical communications. For a certain class of states—for which the state-space forms a ‘magic’ simplex—we analyze the set of bound entangled states detected by the MUB criterion for different dimensions d and number of particles n. We find that the geometry is similar for different d and n, consequently the MUB criterion opens possibilities to investigate the typicality of positivity under partial transposition (PPT)-bound and multipartite bound entanglement more deeply and provides a simple experimentally feasible tool to detect bound entanglement.

  11. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  12. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  13. Concurrent behavior: Are the interpretations mutually exclusive?

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David O.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental literature is replete with examples of behavior which occur concurrently with a schedule of reinforcement. These concurrent behaviors, often with similar topographies and occurring under like circumstances, may be interpreted as functionally autonomous, collateral, adjunctive, superstitious or mediating behavior. The degree to which the interaction of concurrent and schedule controlled behavior is used in the interpretation of behavior illustrated the importance of distinguishing among these interpretations by experimental procedure. The present paper reviews the characteristics of these interpretations, and discusses the experimental procedures necessary to distinguish among them. The paper concludes that the interpretations are mutually exclusive and refer to distinct behaviors, but that the distinction between any two of the interpretations requires more than one experimental procedure. PMID:22478568

  14. Detecting Generalized Synchrony Through Mutual Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven J.; So, Paul

    1996-03-01

    Detection of synchrony in the nervous system has traditionally relied on linear methods such as cross correlation and coherence. Neurons are floridly nonlinear, however, and neuronal interactions may be inadequately described if it is assumed that ensemble behavior is a linear combination of neuronal activities. We develop an approach to detecting generalized synchrony using mutual nonlinear prediction. Multivariate surrogate data will be employed to establish statistical confidence that synchrony is nonlinear. These results will be applied to an experimental preparation - the motoneuron pool from the spinal cord stretch reflex. The interrelationships between individual neurons, between single neurons and the population of neurons, and between intracellular synaptic currents and single neurons will be examined, and the case for the existence of generalized synchrony made.

  15. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  16. Using Mutual Information to capture Major Concerns of Postural Control in a Tossing activity

    PubMed Central

    Gazula, Harshvardhan; Chang, Chien Chi; Lu, Ming-Lun; Hsiang, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    Human body motion for load-tossing activity was partitioned into three phases using four critical events based on the load position viz. lift-off, closest to body, peak and release. For each phase, three objective functions values, viz. mobilization, stabilization and muscular torque utilization, used to control the motion patterns, were then calculated. We hypothesize that the relationships between different objective functions can be extracted using information theory. The kinematic data obtained with 36 treatment combinations (2 tossing distances, 2 tossing heights, 3 weights, and 3 target clearances) was used to estimate the mutual information between each pair of objective functions and construct Chow-Liu trees. Results from this research indicate that there was no dominant concern in the first two phases of the activity; however, torque utilization and mobilization were found to be important factors in the third phase of the load tossing activity. PMID:25680297

  17. Molecular insights into seed dispersal mutualisms driving plant population recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Cristina; Grivet, Delphine

    2011-11-01

    Most plant species require mutualistic interactions with animals to fulfil their demographic cycle. In this regard frugivory (i.e., the intake of fruits by animals) enhances natural regeneration by mobilizing a large amount of seeds from source trees to deposition sites across the landscape. By doing so, frugivores move propagules, and the genotypes they harbour creating the spatial, ecological, and genetic environment under which subsequent recruitment proceeds. Recruitment patterns can be envisioned as the result of two density- and distance-dependent processes: seed dispersal and seed/seedling survival (the Janzen-Connell model). Population genetic studies add another layer of complexity for understanding the fate of dispersed propagules: the genetic relatedness among neighbouring seeds within a seed clump, a major outcome of frugivore activity, modifies their chances of germinating and surviving. Yet, we virtually ignore how the spatial distribution of maternal progenies and recruitment patterns relate with each other in frugivore-generated seed rains. Here we focus on the critical role of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal in shaping the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in the seed rain. We first examine which genetic mechanisms underlying recruitment are influenced by the spatial distribution of maternal progenies. Next, we examine those studies depicting the spatial distribution of maternal progenies in a frugivore-generated seed rain. In doing so, we briefly review the most suitable analytical approaches applied to track the contribution of fruiting trees to the seed rain based on molecular data. Then we look more specifically at the role of distinct frugivore guilds in determining maternal genetic correlations and their expected consequences for recruitment patterns. Finally we posit some general conclusions and suggest future research directions that would provide a more comprehensive understanding of the ecological and evolutionary consequences

  18. Higher Education and Foster Grandparent Programs: Exploring Mutual Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, James R.; O'Quin, Jo Ann

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight ways in which programs within institutions of higher education and Foster Grandparent Programs can interact to their mutual benefit. Given federal and state initiatives to develop linkages between institutions of higher education and community service sites, mutual benefits exist at the program level for…

  19. Social Climate Comparison of Mutual Help and Psychotherapy Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Paul A.; Rappaport, Julian

    In recent years, mutual help groups have been formed to address problems in substance abuse, chronic physical illness, mental illness, marital disruption, and child abuse. Despite the proliferation of these groups, little research has been conducted to assess their efficacy or what happens in them. The nature of mutual help groups (N=32) was…

  20. Use of the Mutual Exclusivity Assumption by Young Word Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markman, Ellen M.; Wasow, Judith L.; Hansen, Mikkel B.

    2003-01-01

    A critical question about early word learning is whether word learning constraints such as mutual exclusivity exist and foster early language acquisition. It is well established that children will map a novel label to a novel rather than a familiar object. Evidence for the role of mutual exclusivity in such indirect word learning has been…

  1. 76 FR 35084 - Mutual to Stock Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual to Stock Conversion Application AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision... following information collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual to Stock Conversion Application. OMB Number... of all information furnished in the application in order to determine the safety and soundness of...

  2. Mutuality, Self-Silencing, and Disordered Eating in College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Lisa S.; Riggs, Shelley A.; Stabb, Sally D.; Marshall, David M.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined patterns of association among mutuality, self-silencing, and disordered eating in an ethnically diverse sample of college women (N = 149). Partner mutuality and overall self-silencing were negatively correlated and together were associated with six disordered eating indices. All four self-silencing subscales were…

  3. 77 FR 73115 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of... has determined that the renewal of the charter of the OCC Mutual Savings Association Advisory... savings associations, the regulatory changes or other steps the OCC may be able to take to ensure...

  4. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Affine constellations without mutually unbiased counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigert, Stefan; Durt, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    It has been conjectured that a complete set of mutually unbiased bases in a space of dimension d exists if and only if there is an affine plane of order d. We introduce affine constellations and compare their existence properties with those of mutually unbiased constellations. The observed discrepancies make a deeper relation between the two existence problems unlikely.

  6. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563.74 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS... having a preference or priority over an outstanding class or classes of mutual capital certificates;...

  7. MreB-Dependent Organization of the E. coli Cytoplasmic Membrane Controls Membrane Protein Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Felix; Varadarajan, Aravindan; Lill, Holger; Peterman, Erwin J G; Bollen, Yves J M

    2016-03-01

    The functional organization of prokaryotic cell membranes, which is essential for many cellular processes, has been challenging to analyze due to the small size and nonflat geometry of bacterial cells. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and three-dimensional quantitative analyses in live Escherichia coli to demonstrate that its cytoplasmic membrane contains microdomains with distinct physical properties. We show that the stability of these microdomains depends on the integrity of the MreB cytoskeletal network underneath the membrane. We explore how the interplay between cytoskeleton and membrane affects trans-membrane protein (TMP) diffusion and reveal that the mobility of the TMPs tested is subdiffusive, most likely caused by confinement of TMP mobility by the submembranous MreB network. Our findings demonstrate that the dynamic architecture of prokaryotic cell membranes is controlled by the MreB cytoskeleton and regulates the mobility of TMPs. PMID:26958890

  8. Exploratory study of the impacts of Mutual Health Organizations on social dynamics in Benin.

    PubMed

    Ridde, Valery; Haddad, Slim; Yacoubou, Moussa; Yacoubou, Ismaelou

    2010-08-01

    The primary aim of Mutual Health Organizations (MHOs) is the financial protection of their members. However, given their community-based, participative and voluntary nature, it is conceivable that MHOs, as social organizations, would affect social dynamics. In an exploratory study in Benin, we studied social dynamics related to mutual aid, relationships of trust, and empowerment. Four MHOs, as contrasted cases, were selected from among the 11 in the region. Focus groups (n = 20) and individual interviews (n = 29) were conducted with members, non-members, and elected leaders of the four MHOs, and with professionals from the health facilities concerned. We carried out a qualitative thematic analysis of the content. Mutual aid practices, which pre-date MHOs, can be mobilized to promote MHO membership. Mutual aid practices are based on relationships of trust. The primary reason for joining an MHO is to improve financial accessibility to health services. Non-members see that members have a strong sense of empowerment in this regard, based on a high level of trust in MHOs and their elected leaders, even if their trust in health professionals is not as strong. Non-members share these feelings of confidence in MHOs and their leadership, although they trust health professionals somewhat less than do the members. The MHOs' low penetration rate therefore cannot be explained by lack of trust, as this study shows that, even with some distrust of the professionals, the overall level of trust in MHOs is high and MHOs and their leaders function as intermediaries with health professionals. Other explanatory factors are the lack of information available to villagers and, most especially, the problems they face in being able to pay the MHO premiums. PMID:20580857

  9. [Human cerebral image registration using generalized mutual information].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingzhou; Li, Ting; Zhang, Jia

    2008-12-01

    Medical image registration is a highlight of actual research on medical image processing. Based onsimilarity measure of Shannon entropy, a new generalized distance measurement based on Rényi entropy applied to image rigid registration is introduced and is called here generalized mutual information (GMI). It is used in three dimensional cerebral image registration experiments. The simulation results show that generalized distance measurement and Shannon entropy measurement apply to different areas; that the registration measure based o n generalized distance is a natural extension of mutual information of Shannon entropy. The results prove that generalized mutual information uses less time than simple mutual information does, and the new similarity measure manifests higher degree of consistency between the two cerebral registration images. Also, the registration results provide the clinical diagnoses with more important references. In conclusion, generalized mutual information has satisfied the demands of clinical application to a wide extent. PMID:19166197

  10. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  11. [Mutual inhibition between positive and negative emotions].

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, A

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between positive and negative emotions. In study 1, 62 emotional items were selected in order to measure subjective emotional experiences. In study 2, comics, photos and poems were randomly presented to 1,220 college students to induce emotion. Subjects were asked to rate their momentary emotional intensity on two set of 5-point scales (general emotional intensity scale and 62 specific emotional intensity scale). In analysis 1, positive correlations were suggested between general emotional intensity scale and some of the specific emotional intensity scales which were activated by stimuli. In analysis 2, 10 positive and 10 negative emotional items were extracted from 62 items by factor analysis. In analysis 3, 4 and 5, it became clear that the distribution of frequency of correlations of 10 positive x 10 negative items changed according to the general emotional intensity scale. That is, from low to moderate levels of GEIS, the two kinds of emotion had no or slightly positive correlation, but at high level they became to be negatively correlated. From the facts described above, it is concluded that positive and negative emotions is not always independent, but show mutual inhibition in case of high intensity level of one of each emotions. PMID:8201808

  12. Membrane tethering

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Membrane trafficking depends on transport vesicles and carriers docking and fusing with the target organelle for the delivery of cargo. Membrane tethers and small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) mediate the docking of transport vesicles/carriers to enhance the efficiency of the subsequent SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor)-mediated fusion event with the target membrane bilayer. Different classes of membrane tethers and their specific intracellular location throughout the endomembrane system are now well defined. Recent biochemical and structural studies have led to a deeper understanding of the mechanism by which membrane tethers mediate docking of membrane carriers as well as an appreciation of the role of tethers in coordinating the correct SNARE complex and in regulating the organization of membrane compartments. This review will summarize the properties and roles of membrane tethers of both secretory and endocytic systems. PMID:25343031

  13. Transient Cholesterol Effects on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Cell-Surface Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Almarza, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Francisco; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    To what extent do cholesterol-rich lipid platforms modulate the supramolecular organization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR)? To address this question, the dynamics of AChR particles at high density and its cholesterol dependence at the surface of mammalian cells were studied by combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking. AChR particles tagged with a monovalent ligand, fluorescent α-bungarotoxin (αBTX), exhibited two mobile pools: i) a highly mobile one undergoing simple Brownian motion (16%) and ii) one with restricted motion (∼50%), the rest being relatively immobile (∼44%). Depletion of membrane cholesterol by methyl-α-cyclodextrin increased the fraction of the first pool to 22% and 33% after 15 and 40 min, respectively; the pool undergoing restricted motion diminished from 50% to 44% and 37%, respectively. Monoclonal antibody binding results in AChR crosslinking-internalization after 2 h; here, antibody binding immobilized within minutes ∼20% of the totally mobile AChR. This proportion dramatically increased upon cholesterol depletion, especially during the initial 10 min (83.3%). Thus, antibody crosslinking and cholesterol depletion exhibited a mutually synergistic effect, increasing the average lifetime of cell-surface AChRs∼10 s to ∼20 s. The instantaneous (microscopic) diffusion coefficient D2–4 of the AChR obtained from the MSD analysis diminished from ∼0.001 µm2 s−1 to ∼0.0001–0.00033 µm2 s−1 upon cholesterol depletion, ∼30% of all particles falling into the stationary mode. Thus, muscle-type AChR exhibits heterogeneous motional regimes at the cell surface, modulated by the combination of intrinsic (its supramolecular organization) and extrinsic (membrane cholesterol content) factors. PMID:24971757

  14. Free Volume in Membranes: Viscosity or Tension?

    PubMed Central

    Markin, V. S.; Sachs, F.

    2016-01-01

    Many papers have used fluorescent probe diffusion to infer membrane viscosity but the measurement is actually an assay of the free volume of the membrane. The free volume is also related to the membrane tension. Thus, changes in probe mobility refer equally well to changes in membrane tension. In complicated structures like cell membranes, it appears more intuitive to consider variations in free volume as referring to the effect of domains structures and interactions with the cytoskeleton than changes in viscosity since tension is a state variable and viscosity is not.

  15. Mutual information between SSH and SST fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le goff, Clément; Chapron, Bertrand; Fablet, Ronan; Tandeo, Pierre; Autret, Emmanuelle; Ailliot, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Mutual information between SST and SSH Investigations to relate satellite SST and SSH measurements in the Agulhas return current region are presented. In this study, we focus on the use of SSH and SST maps obtained during the year 2004, corresponding to a particularly well-sampled period for altimetry. The SST and SSH anomalies are then obtained as high-pass filtered fields, to analyze scales smaller than approximately 300km. As revealed, we clearly distinguish different regimes. During the winter months, a marked strong correlation between fields of SSH and SST anomalies is clearly revealed. During the summer months, a much lower correlation is found. Further conditioning the analysis to separate the areas of positive and negative SSH anomalies, it is then obtained, for both summer and winter periods, that aeras of negative SSH anomalies always correspond with areas of negative SST anomalies. This high correspondance also applies in winter but only for areas of positive SSH anomalies, which indeed well match with areas of positive SST anomalies. In summer, this high correspondance is lost, and areas with positive SSH anomalies do not necessarily correspond to positive SST anomalies. Accordingly, such an effect affects and weakens the overall SST/SSH correlation during the summer months. Yet, the areas of positive SSH anomalies are not fully disconnected from the areas of positive SST anomalies. For these cases, observations and results demonstrate a systematic spatial shift between them. This suggests the influence of the mixed layer depth and wind speed to control the spatial correspondance between SST and SSH anomalies, especially below regions of positive SSH anomalies. In such cases, the upper layer SST anomalies are certainly advected by the interior flow to also provide means to relate surface observations and interior dynamics.

  16. Glacier Surface Monitoring by Maximizing Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, E.; Rossi, C.; Hajnsek, I.

    2012-07-01

    The contribution of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) images compared with the single-channel SAR in terms of temporal scene characterization has been found and described to add valuable information in the literature. However, despite a number of recent studies focusing on single polarized glacier monitoring, the potential of polarimetry to estimate the surface velocity of glaciers has not been explored due to the complex mechanism of polarization through glacier/snow. In this paper, a new approach to the problem of monitoring glacier surface velocity is proposed by means of temporal PolSAR images, using a basic concept from information theory: Mutual Information (MI). The proposed polarimetric tracking method applies the MI to measure the statistical dependence between temporal polarimetric images, which is assumed to be maximal if the images are geometrically aligned. Since the proposed polarimetric tracking method is very powerful and general, it can be implemented into any kind of multivariate remote sensing data such as multi-spectral optical and single-channel SAR images. The proposed polarimetric tracking is then used to retrieve surface velocity of Aletsch glacier located in Switzerland and of Inyltshik glacier in Kyrgyzstan with two different SAR sensors; Envisat C-band (single polarized) and DLR airborne L-band (fully polarimetric) systems, respectively. The effect of number of channel (polarimetry) into tracking investigations demonstrated that the presence of snow, as expected, effects the location of the phase center in different polarization, such as glacier tracking with temporal HH compared to temporal VV channels. Shortly, a change in polarimetric signature of the scatterer can change the phase center, causing a question of how much of what I am observing is motion then penetration. In this paper, it is shown that considering the multi-channel SAR statistics, it is possible to optimize the separate these contributions.

  17. Mutually connected component of networks of networks with replica nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the emergence of the giant mutually connected component in networks of networks in which each node has a single replica node in any layer and can be interdependent only on its replica nodes in the interdependent layers. We prove that if, in these networks, all the nodes of one network (layer) are interdependent on the nodes of the same other interconnected layer, then, remarkably, the mutually connected component does not depend on the topology of the network of networks. This component coincides with the mutual component of the fully connected network of networks constructed from the same set of layers, i.e., a multiplex network.

  18. Spatial Mutual Information Based Hyperspectral Band Selection for Classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The amount of information involved in hyperspectral imaging is large. Hyperspectral band selection is a popular method for reducing dimensionality. Several information based measures such as mutual information have been proposed to reduce information redundancy among spectral bands. Unfortunately, mutual information does not take into account the spatial dependency between adjacent pixels in images thus reducing its robustness as a similarity measure. In this paper, we propose a new band selection method based on spatial mutual information. As validation criteria, a supervised classification method using support vector machine (SVM) is used. Experimental results of the classification of hyperspectral datasets show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate results. PMID:25918742

  19. Quantum Conditional Mutual Information, Reconstructed States, and State Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Strelchuk, Sergii

    2015-07-31

    We give two strengthenings of an inequality for the quantum conditional mutual information of a tripartite quantum state recently proved by Fawzi and Renner, connecting it with the ability to reconstruct the state from its bipartite reductions. Namely, we show that the conditional mutual information is an upper bound on the regularized relative entropy distance between the quantum state and its reconstructed version. It is also an upper bound for the measured relative entropy distance of the state to its reconstructed version. The main ingredient of the proof is the fact that the conditional mutual information is the optimal quantum communication rate in the task of state redistribution. PMID:26274402

  20. Controlled mutual quantum entity authentication using entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Sung, Kang; Chang-Ho, Hong; Jino, Heo; Jong-In, Lim; Hyung-Jin, Yang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we suggest a controlled mutual quantum entity authentication protocol by which two users mutually certify each other on a quantum network using a sequence of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)-like states. Unlike existing unidirectional quantum entity authentication, our protocol enables mutual quantum entity authentication utilizing entanglement swapping; moreover, it allows the managing trusted center (TC) or trusted third party (TTP) to effectively control the certification of two users using the nature of the GHZ-like state. We will also analyze the security of the protocol and quantum channel. Project supported by the Research Foundation of Korea University.

  1. Scientists' Social Mobility and Problems of Its Regulation by the State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erokhina, K. S.

    2009-01-01

    The present era is characterized by scientists' high level of mobility, which is due to the characteristics of science work and its dynamic nature. Scientific activity knows no boundaries, and mobility is a vital factor of the mutual cultural and professional enrichment of scientific communities. The international migration of scientists is…

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stability of macroion-decorated lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Sylvio

    2005-08-01

    Adsorption of macroions such as colloidal particles, proteins, or other rigid biopolymers onto oppositely charged, mixed lipid membranes is a ubiquitous phenomenon encountered in biotechnology, drug delivery, and cellular biology. The softness and self-assembled nature of the membrane enable the macroion-membrane complex to laterally reorganize via forming macroion clusters, lipid domains, or separate phases, and to exhibit curvature modulations or even morphological transitions. Almost always, the lateral organization of the membrane and associated macroion layer mutually depend on each other so that neither of the two extreme views—macroion-induced membrane domain formation or membrane-mediated macroion clustering—strictly accounts for the underlying energetics. We review and discuss some recent efforts to describe the lateral organization and stability of macroion-decorated lipid membranes using different levels of mean-field electrostatics, thereby focusing on binary membranes and the destabilizing role of compositional gradients.

  3. Liquid membrane potential in nonisothermal systems.

    PubMed Central

    Scibona, G; Fabiani, C; Scuppa, B; Danesi, P R

    1976-01-01

    Electrical membrane potential equations for liquid ion exchange membranes, characterized by the presence of uncharged associated species and by exclusion of co-ions (no electrolyte uptake) have been derived. The irreversible thermodynamic theories already developed for solid membranes with fixed charged site density have been extended to include the different physicochemical aspects of the liquid membranes. To this purpose the dissipation function has been written with reference to the fluxes of all the species present in the membrane. It has been found that the mobile charged site, the counterions, and the uncharged associated species contribute to the electrical membrane potential through their phenomenological coefficients. The electrical membrane potential equations have been integrated in isothermal and nonisothermal conditions for monoionic and biionic systems. The theoretical predictions have been experimentally tested by studying the electrical potential of liquid membranes formed with solutions of tetraheptylammonium salts in omicron-dichlorobenzene. PMID:1276391

  4. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the current research, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature in air. Based on these measurements, the charge carrier concentration, net acceptor dopant concentration, activation energy of conduction and mobility were estimated. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature have been completed and reported previously. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affects the mechanical properties. To study the effect of temperature on the membranes when exposed to an inert environment, the membranes (LAFT and Dual phase) were heat treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} atmosphere and hardness and fracture toughness of the membranes were studied after the treatment. The indentation method was used to find the fracture toughness and the effect of the heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the membranes. Further results on the investigation of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appears to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model will serve to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  5. Entanglement patterns in mutually unbiased basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Jay

    2011-08-15

    A few simply stated rules govern the entanglement patterns that can occur in mutually unbiased basis sets (MUBs) and constrain the combinations of such patterns that can coexist in full complements of MUBs. We consider Hilbert spaces of prime power dimensions (D=p{sup N}), as realized by systems of N prime-state particles, where full complements of D+1 MUBs are known to exist, and we assume only that MUBs are eigenbases of generalized Pauli operators, without using any particular construction. The general rules include the following: (1) In any MUB, a given particle appears either in a pure state or totally entangled and (2) in any full MUB complement, each particle is pure in (p+1) bases (not necessarily the same ones) and totally entangled in the remaining (p{sup N}-p). It follows that the maximum number of product bases is p+1 and, when this number is realized, all remaining (p{sup N}-p) bases in the complement are characterized by the total entanglement of every particle. This ''standard distribution'' is inescapable for two-particle systems (of any p), where only product and generalized Bell bases are admissible MUB types. This and the following results generalize previous results for qubits [Phys. Rev. A 65. 032320 (2002); Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)] and qutrits [Phys. Rev. A 70, 012302 (2004)], drawing particularly upon [Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)]. With three particles there are three MUB types, and these may be combined in (p+2) different ways to form full complements. With N=4, there are 6 MUB types for p=2, but new MUB types become possible with larger p, and these are essential to realizing full complements. With this example, we argue that new MUB types that show new entanglement patterns should enter with every step in N and, also, when N is a prime plus 1, at a critical p value, p=N-1. Such MUBs should play critical roles in filling complements.

  6. 29 CFR 553.105 - Mutual aid agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... into a mutual aid agreement related to fire protection, a firefighter employed by Town A who also is a volunteer firefighter for Town B will not have his or her hours of volunteer service for Town B counted...

  7. [Community financing for health care in Africa: mutual health insurance].

    PubMed

    Richard, V

    2005-01-01

    Health care in sub-Saharan Africa is increasingly financed by direct payments from the population. Mutual health insurance plans are developing to ensure better risk sharing. However mutual health insurance cannot fully resolve all equity issues. The low resources available for contribution and the limited availability of care services especially in the public sector cannot guarantee the quality of care necessary for the development of mutual health insurance. National governments must not forget their responsibility especially for defining and ensuring basic services that must be accessible to all. Will mutual health insurance plans be a stepping-stone to universal health care coverage and can these plans be successfully implemented in the context of an informal economy? PMID:15903084

  8. 29 CFR 553.105 - Mutual aid agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... into a mutual aid agreement related to fire protection, a firefighter employed by Town A who also is a volunteer firefighter for Town B will not have his or her hours of volunteer service for Town B counted...

  9. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  10. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  11. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  12. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  13. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  14. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  15. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  16. Nonlinear pattern analysis of ventricular premature beats by mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yokoshima, T.; Kishida, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) has been related to the risk of mortality. However, little is known about the temporal pattern of occurrence of VPBs and its relationship to autonomic activity. Hence, we applied a general correlation measure, mutual information, to quantify how VPBs are generated over time. We also used mutual information to determine the correlation between VPB production and heart rate in order to evaluate effects of autonomic activity on VPB production. We examined twenty subjects with more than 3000 VPBs/day and simulated random time series of VPB occurrence. We found that mutual information values could be used to characterize quantitatively the temporal patterns of VPB generation. Our data suggest that VPB production is not random and VPBs generated with a higher value of mutual information may be more greatly affected by autonomic activity.

  17. Parasponia: a novel system for studying mutualism stability.

    PubMed

    Behm, Jocelyn E; Geurts, Rene; Kiers, E Toby

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how mutualistic interactions are stabilized in the presence of cheaters is a major question in evolutionary biology. The legume-rhizobia mutualism has become a model system for studying how plants control cheating partners. However, the generality and evolutionary origins of these control mechanisms are intensely debated. In this Opinion article, we argue that a novel system--the Parasponia-rhizobia mutualism--will significantly advance research in mutualism stability. Parasponia is the only non-legume lineage to have evolved a rhizobial symbiosis, which provides an evolutionary replicate to test how rhizobial exploitation is controlled. Evidence also suggests that this symbiosis is young. This allows studies at an earlier evolutionary stage in mutualisms, so the origin of control mechanisms can be better understood. PMID:25239777

  18. Mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Geary, N. H.

    1975-01-01

    The mutual impedance expressions for parallel dipoles in terms of sine-integrals and cosine-integrals have been published by King (1957). The investigation reported provides analogous expressions for nonparallel dipoles. The expressions presented are most useful when the monopoles are close together. The theory of moment methods shows an approach for employing the mutual impedance of filamentary sinusoidal dipoles to calculate the impedance and scattering properties of straight and bent wires with small but finite diameter.

  19. Mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Geary, N. H.

    1974-01-01

    The mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles is presented as a summation of several exponential integrals with complex arguments. Mathematical models are developed to show the near-zone field of the sinusoidal dipole. The mutual impedance of coupled dipoles is expressed as the sum of four monopole-mobopole impedances to simplify the analysis procedure. The subroutines for solving the parameters of the dipoles are discussed.

  20. Quantum process reconstruction based on mutually unbiased basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pérez, A.; Klimov, A. B.; Saavedra, C.

    2011-05-01

    We study a quantum process reconstruction based on the use of mutually unbiased projectors (MUB projectors) as input states for a D-dimensional quantum system, with D being a power of a prime number. This approach connects the results of quantum-state tomography using mutually unbiased bases with the coefficients of a quantum process, expanded in terms of MUB projectors. We also study the performance of the reconstruction scheme against random errors when measuring probabilities at the MUB projectors.

  1. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2004-09-07

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  2. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Sadler, Mary E; Greiner, Anthony D; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Min, Kyungnan; Zhang, Kai; Arabi, Sara; Burbano, Marie S; Kent, Fraser; Shoaf, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2014, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, fixed film and anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:26420079

  3. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Burbano, Marie S; Sadler, Mary E; Diamond, Jason; Baker, Simon; Greiner, Anthony D; Arabi, Sara; Wong, Joseph; Doody, Alexandra; Padhye, Lokesh P; Sears, Keith; Kistenmacher, Peter; Kent, Fraser; Tootchi, Leila; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Saddredini, Sara; Schilling, Bill; Min, Kyungnan; McCandless, Robert; Danker, Bryce; Gamage, Neranga P; Wang, Sunny; Aerts, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2015, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:27620084

  4. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  5. Rethinking mutualism stability: cheaters and the evolution of sanctions.

    PubMed

    Frederickson, Megan E

    2013-12-01

    How cooperation originates and persists in diverse species, from bacteria to multicellular organisms to human societies, is a major question in evolutionary biology. A large literature asks: what prevents selection for cheating within cooperative lineages? In mutualisms, or cooperative interactions between species, feedback between partners often aligns their fitness interests, such that cooperative symbionts receive more benefits from their hosts than uncooperative symbionts. But how do these feedbacks evolve? Cheaters might invade symbiont populations and select for hosts that preferentially reward or associate with cooperators (often termed sanctions or partner choice); hosts might adapt to variation in symbiont quality that does not amount to cheating (e.g., environmental variation); or conditional host responses might exist before cheaters do, making mutualisms stable from the outset. I review evidence from yucca-yucca moth, fig-fig wasp, and legume-rhizobium mutualisms, which are commonly cited as mutualisms stabilized by sanctions. Based on the empirical evidence, it is doubtful that cheaters select for host sanctions in these systems; cheaters are too uncommon. Recognizing that sanctions likely evolved for functions other than retaliation against cheaters offers many insights about mutualism coevolution, and about why mutualism evolves in only some lineages of potential hosts. PMID:24552098

  6. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection. PMID:27505645

  7. Adding biotic complexity alters the metabolic benefits of mutualism.

    PubMed

    Harcombe, William R; Betts, Alex; Shapiro, Jason W; Marx, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature and plays an integral role in most communities. To predict the eco-evolutionary dynamics of mutualism it is critical to extend classic pair-wise analysis to include additional species. We investigated the effect of adding a third species to a pair-wise mutualism in a spatially structured environment. We tested the hypotheses that selection for costly excretions in a focal population (i) decreases when an exploiter is added (ii) increases when a third mutualist is added relative to the pair-wise scenario. We assayed the selection acting on Salmonella enterica when it exchanges methionine for carbon in an obligate mutualism with an auxotrophic Escherichia coli. A third bacterium, Methylobacterium extorquens, was then added and acted either as an exploiter of the carbon or third obligate mutualist depending on the nitrogen source. In the tripartite mutualism M. extorquens provided nitrogen to the other species. Contrary to our expectations, adding an exploiter increased selection for methionine excretion in S. enterica. Conversely, selection for cooperation was lower in the tripartite mutualism relative to the pair-wise system. Genome-scale metabolic models helped identify the mechanisms underlying these changes in selection. Our results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and eco-evolutionary dynamics. PMID:27272242

  8. Mutuality and the social regulation of neural threat responding

    PubMed Central

    Coan, James A.; Kasle, Shelley; Jackson, Alice; Schaefer, Hillary S.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the presence of a caring relational partner can attenuate neural responses to threat. Here we report reanalyzed data from Coan, Schaefer, and Davidson (2006), investigating the role of relational mutuality in the neural response to threat. Mutuality reflects the degree to which couple members show mutual interest in the sharing of internal feelings, thoughts, aspirations, and joys – a vital form of responsiveness in attachment relationships. We predicted that wives who were high (versus low) in perceived mutuality, and who attended the study session with their husbands, would show reduced neural threat reactivity in response to mild electric shocks. We also explored whether this effect would depend on physical contact (handholding). As predicted, we observed that higher mutuality scores corresponded with decreased neural threat responding in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor cortex. These effects were independent of hand-holding condition. These findings suggest that higher perceived mutuality corresponds with decreased self-regulatory effort and attenuated preparatory motor activity in response to threat cues, even in the absence of direct physical contact with social resources. PMID:23547803

  9. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  10. Social Mobility and Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    Social mobility is generally studied in three different ways: stratum mobility, intergenerational social mobility, and intragenerational or career mobility. This paper deals with the first two types of mobility and more with intergenerational mobility than with stratum mobility. The working hypothesis of both discussions is that, in general, a…

  11. Mutually exclusive redox forms of HMGB1 promote cell recruitment or proinflammatory cytokine release

    PubMed Central

    Venereau, Emilie; Casalgrandi, Maura; Schiraldi, Milena; Antoine, Daniel J.; Cattaneo, Angela; De Marchis, Francesco; Liu, Jaron; Antonelli, Antonella; Preti, Alessandro; Raeli, Lorenzo; Shams, Sara Samadi; Yang, Huan; Varani, Luca; Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J.; Bachi, Angela; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia

    2012-01-01

    Tissue damage causes inflammation, by recruiting leukocytes and activating them to release proinflammatory mediators. We show that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) orchestrates both processes by switching among mutually exclusive redox states. Reduced cysteines make HMGB1 a chemoattractant, whereas a disulfide bond makes it a proinflammatory cytokine and further cysteine oxidation to sulfonates by reactive oxygen species abrogates both activities. We show that leukocyte recruitment and activation can be separated. A nonoxidizable HMGB1 mutant in which serines replace all cysteines (3S-HMGB1) does not promote cytokine production, but is more effective than wild-type HMGB1 in recruiting leukocytes in vivo. BoxA, a HMGB1 inhibitor, interferes with leukocyte recruitment but not with activation. We detected the different redox forms of HMGB1 ex vivo within injured muscle. HMGB1 is completely reduced at first and disulfide-bonded later. Thus, HMGB1 orchestrates both key events in sterile inflammation, leukocyte recruitment and their induction to secrete inflammatory cytokines, by adopting mutually exclusive redox states. PMID:22869893

  12. Mutually exclusive redox forms of HMGB1 promote cell recruitment or proinflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Venereau, Emilie; Casalgrandi, Maura; Schiraldi, Milena; Antoine, Daniel J; Cattaneo, Angela; De Marchis, Francesco; Liu, Jaron; Antonelli, Antonella; Preti, Alessandro; Raeli, Lorenzo; Shams, Sara Samadi; Yang, Huan; Varani, Luca; Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J; Bachi, Angela; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Bianchi, Marco E

    2012-08-27

    Tissue damage causes inflammation, by recruiting leukocytes and activating them to release proinflammatory mediators. We show that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) orchestrates both processes by switching among mutually exclusive redox states. Reduced cysteines make HMGB1 a chemoattractant, whereas a disulfide bond makes it a proinflammatory cytokine and further cysteine oxidation to sulfonates by reactive oxygen species abrogates both activities. We show that leukocyte recruitment and activation can be separated. A nonoxidizable HMGB1 mutant in which serines replace all cysteines (3S-HMGB1) does not promote cytokine production, but is more effective than wild-type HMGB1 in recruiting leukocytes in vivo. BoxA, a HMGB1 inhibitor, interferes with leukocyte recruitment but not with activation. We detected the different redox forms of HMGB1 ex vivo within injured muscle. HMGB1 is completely reduced at first and disulfide-bonded later. Thus, HMGB1 orchestrates both key events in sterile inflammation, leukocyte recruitment and their induction to secrete inflammatory cytokines, by adopting mutually exclusive redox states. PMID:22869893

  13. Augmenting Surface Interaction through Context-Sensitive Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olwal, Alex

    We discuss the benefits of using a mobile device to expand and improve the interactions on a large touch-sensitive surface. The mobile device’s denser arrangement of pixels and touch-sensor elements, and its rich set of mechanical on-board input controls, can be leveraged for increased expressiveness, visual feedback and more precise direct-manipulation. We also show how these devices can support unique input from multiple simultaneous users in collaborative scenarios. Handheld mobile devices and large interactive surfaces can be mutually beneficial in numerous ways, while their complementary nature allows them to preserve the behavior of the original user interface.

  14. Relaxation dynamics of two-component fluid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Kanemori, Yuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the relaxation dynamics of a nearly flat binary lipid bilayer membrane by taking into account the membrane tension, hydrodynamics of the surrounding fluid, inter-monolayer friction and mutual diffusion. Mutual diffusion is the collective irreversible process that leads to homogenization of the density difference between the two lipid species. We find that two relaxation modes associated with the mutual diffusion appear in addition to the three previously discussed relaxation modes reflecting the bending and compression of the membrane. Because of the symmetry, only one of the two diffusive modes is coupled to the bending mode. The two diffusive modes are much slower than the bending and compression modes in the entire realistic wave number range. This means that the long time relaxation behavior is dominated by the mutual diffusion in binary membranes. The two diffusive modes become even slower in the vicinity of the unstable region towards phase separation, while the other modes are almost unchanged. In short time scales, on the other hand, the lipid composition heterogeneity induces in-plane compression and bending of the bilayer. PMID:27145960

  15. Mutuality: clinical and metapsychological potentials of a failed experiment.

    PubMed

    Castillo Mendoza, Carlos Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis are often dismissed, without acknowledging the results obtained from them and his own cautionary remarks about their limits. Though ultimately failed, Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis were a source of clinical and metapsychological knowledge, despite the fact that he was unable to elaborate them in his lifetime. In this paper I connect mutuality to the development of the psyche, especially to the constitutive core of the intrapsychic. To understand the latter, it is necessary to take into account, among others, issues such as the common attribute, the mutual flux between the unconsciouses, the dialogue of unconsciouses, the maternal profundity, the primal relationship with the mother, and, above all, the primal unity between mother and child, which are fundamental for the emergence and development of the primary psychic forces. Incidences of rupture, distortion of the core of mutuality in the psychic life, its loss and disadjustment, by means of external traumatizing forces, and some clinical implications are described. PMID:22398886

  16. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  17. Mutualism Disruption Threatens Global Plant Biodiversity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Clare E.; Zavaleta, Erika S.; Tershy, Bernie; Croll, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Background As global environmental change accelerates, biodiversity losses can disrupt interspecific interactions. Extinctions of mutualist partners can create “widow” species, which may face reduced ecological fitness. Hypothetically, such mutualism disruptions could have cascading effects on biodiversity by causing additional species coextinctions. However, the scope of this problem – the magnitude of biodiversity that may lose mutualist partners and the consequences of these losses – remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic review and synthesis of data from a broad range of sources to estimate the threat posed by vertebrate extinctions to the global biodiversity of vertebrate-dispersed and -pollinated plants. Though enormous research gaps persist, our analysis identified Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and global oceanic islands as geographic regions at particular risk of disruption of these mutualisms; within these regions, percentages of plant species likely affected range from 2.1–4.5%. Widowed plants are likely to experience reproductive declines of 40–58%, potentially threatening their persistence in the context of other global change stresses. Conclusions Our systematic approach demonstrates that thousands of species may be impacted by disruption in one class of mutualisms, but extinctions will likely disrupt other mutualisms, as well. Although uncertainty is high, there is evidence that mutualism disruption directly threatens significant biodiversity in some geographic regions. Conservation measures with explicit focus on mutualistic functions could be necessary to bolster populations of widowed species and maintain ecosystem functions. PMID:23840571

  18. 12 CFR 575.12 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding... MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.12 Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. (a) Conversion—(1) Generally. A mutual holding company may convert to the stock form in accordance with the...

  19. 26 CFR 1.822-5 - Mutual insurance company taxable income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mutual insurance company taxable income. 1.822-5... Premium Deposits) § 1.822-5 Mutual insurance company taxable income. (a) Mutual insurance company taxable income defined. Section 822(a) defines the term “mutual insurance company taxable income” for purposes...

  20. 12 CFR 239.24 - Issuances of stock by subsidiary holding companies of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... companies of mutual holding companies. 239.24 Section 239.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION... mutual holding companies. (a) Requirements. No subsidiary holding company of a mutual holding company...

  1. 12 CFR 239.24 - Issuances of stock by subsidiary holding companies of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... companies of mutual holding companies. 239.24 Section 239.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION... mutual holding companies. (a) Requirements. No subsidiary holding company of a mutual holding company...

  2. 12 CFR 333.4 - Conversions from mutual to stock form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... case of a savings bank subsidiary of a mutual holding company, all such plans are approved by a majority of stockholders other than its parent mutual holding company prior to implementation at a duly... insured mutual state savings banks to the mutual holding company form of ownership. As determined by...

  3. Mobile satellite systems. A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, J. L.; Breithaupt, R. W.

    The advantages of a mobile satellite system have been recognized worldwide, and after the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) identified spectrum in the 806 to 890 MHz band for region 2, the Canadian Government quickly took steps to provide mobile satellite services for all of Canada including the 200 mile offshore ocean territorial limits. A comprehensive set of technical, economic, and policy studies have been completed in Canada to determine the viability of a mobile service to satisfy Canada's requirements. This paper will present an overall review of these studies, give a rationale as to why narrowband technologies are necessary for the commercial viability of this service, and the approach taken in the development of these technologies. A brief review of activities and proposed mobile satellite systems in other areas besides North America is also given. The effect of an early entry by commercial interests (Telesat in Canada) will be examined including system parameters which require careful coordination within Canada and the U.S. operations in order to assure commercial viability in both countries. A review of some common requirements in the Canadian and U.S. systems will be discussed in order to standardize the system and equipment approaches for each country and provide mutual back-up in the event of a spacecraft anomaly. The trade-offs between the use of UHF (800 MHz) and L-Band (1.5 GHz) when used for true mobile applications are discussed. A hybrid system design is explored which would make the most appropriate use of both bands.

  4. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.

  5. Cellular calcium mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In vascular and other smooth muscles, occurrence of intracellular Ca stores which can be mobilized to support contraction may be a general phenomenon. The Ca stores are characterized by the requirement for release by high concentrations of agonists acting on plasma membrane receptors, by the failure of the released Ca2+ to recycle to the store, by the occurrence of rapid refilling of the store from the extracellular space, and by disappearance of the store when the plasma membrane is made leaky by saponin. In contrast to agonist-released Ca stores, those released by caffeine to support contraction in Ca2+-free solutions are more slowly lost and refilled, are not always emptied when the agonist-related store is emptied, and do not disappear after saponin treatment. Stores released by agonists have been suggested to be in the endoplasmic reticulum near the plasma membrane or at the inner aspect of the plasma membrane related to high affinity, pH-dependent Ca-binding sites. Caffeine-released stores are assumed to be in endoplasmic reticulum. Continued exposure of some tissues to Ca2+-free solutions unmasks what is considered to be a recycling Ca store releasable by agonists. Release of Ca2+ and its reaccumulation in this store appear to be slower than at the nonrecycling store. The contractions which persist for many hours in Ca2+-free solution are inhibited temporarily by Ca2+ restoration. Existence of a recycling store of releasable Ca2+ requires occurrence of mechanisms to abolish Ca2+ extrusion or leak-out of the cell and to ensure recycling to the same store.

  6. Membranes, mechanics, and intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-10-01

    Cellular membranes are remarkable materials -- self-assembled, flexible, two-dimensional fluids. Understanding how proteins manipulate membrane curvature is crucial to understanding the transport of cargo in cells, yet the mechanical activities of trafficking proteins remain poorly understood. Using an optical-trap based assay involving dynamic deformation of biomimetic membranes, we have examined the behavior of Sar1, a key component of the COPII family of transport proteins. We find that Sar1 from yeast (S. cerevisiae) lowers membrane rigidity by up to 100% as a function of its concentration, thereby lowering the energetic cost of membrane deformation. Human Sar1 proteins can also lower the mechanical rigidity of the membranes to which they bind. However, unlike the yeast proteins, the rigidity is not a monotonically decreasing function of concentration but rather shows increased rigidity and decreased mobility at high concentrations that implies interactions between proteins. In addition to describing this study of membrane mechanics, I'll also discuss some topics relevant to a range of biophysical investigations, such as the insights provided by imaging methods and open questions in the dynamics of multicellular systems.

  7. Sparse Bayesian learning for DOA estimation with mutual coupling.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jisheng; Hu, Nan; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2015-01-01

    Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise. PMID:26501284

  8. Graph-state formalism for mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, Christoph; Kraus, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    A pair of orthonormal bases is called mutually unbiased if all mutual overlaps between any element of one basis and an arbitrary element of the other basis coincide. In case the dimension, d, of the considered Hilbert space is a power of a prime number, complete sets of d+1 mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) exist. Here we present a method based on the graph-state formalism to construct such sets of MUBs. We show that for n p-level systems, with p being prime, one particular graph suffices to easily construct a set of pn+1 MUBs. In fact, we show that a single n-dimensional vector, which is associated with this graph, can be used to generate a complete set of MUBs and demonstrate that this vector can be easily determined. Finally, we discuss some advantages of our formalism regarding the analysis of entanglement structures in MUBs, as well as experimental realizations.

  9. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  10. Homosexual mutuality: variation on a theme by Erik Erikson.

    PubMed

    Sohier, R

    The exploratory descriptive study described here was conducted in order to produce the initial empirical evidence to support reformulation of the theoretical construct of heterosexual mutuality (Erikson, 1975). Six persons were interviewed in depth on tape in order to locate them on one of four identity statuses constructed by Marcia (1964, 1966, 1973). The tool was modified and extended to meet the purposes of the study. The questions are directed toward illumination of conflictual moments in the life cycle when the ability to make appropriate decisions engenders character growth, and supports the personality integration of adulthood. An ability to make decisions results in personality integration. The small study provides evidence that there exists a homosexual mutuality (contrary to Erikson's position) which is no less valuable than heterosexual mutuality, and forms an equal basis for adult personality integration. PMID:3835200