Science.gov

Sample records for mutual replacement reactions

  1. Mineral replacement reactions and element mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Christine V.; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Hövelmann, Jörn; Renard, François

    2016-04-01

    When a mineral is out of equilibrium with an aqueous fluid, reactions will take place in an attempt to reach a new equilibrium. Commonly in the Earth dissolution at a mineral-fluid interface initiates a coupled reaction involving dissolution and precipitation (Ruiz-Agudo et al., 2014). This is a ubiquitous reaction during such processes as metamorphism, metasomatism and weathering. When rock-forming minerals such as feldspars, olivine, pyroxenes are in contact with aqueous fluids (typically NaCl-rich) resultant new phases are formed and elements present in the parent mineral are released to the fluid and therefore mobilized for transport elsewhere. This has been shown in a number of systems such as the albitisation of feldspars (Hövelmann et al., 2010) when a Ca-bearing plagioclase is replaced by albite (NaAlSi3O8). However during this reaction not only is Ca released to the fluid but most other minor elements, such as Mg, Pb, rare earth elements amongst others, are almost totally mobilized and removed in solution. This interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction has many implications for the redistributon of elements in the crust of the Earth. It is also of note that albitisation occurs often in areas of high mineralization, such as in the Curnamona Province in S. Australia (Au-Cu and Ag-Pb-Zn deposits) and the Bamble District of S. Norway. Secondly atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image these reactions at a nanoscale, especially at the calcite-fluid interface, such as the formation of apatite from phosphate-bearing solutions, and the sequestration of toxic elements, eg., Se and As. References Ruiz-Agudo E., Putnis C.V., Putnis A. (2014) Coupled dissolution and precipitation at mineral-fluid interfaces. Chemical Geology, 383, 132-146. Putnis C.V. and Ruiz-Agudo E. (2013) The mineral-water interface: where minerals react with the environment. Elements, 9, 177-182. Hövelmann J., Putnis A., Geisler T., Schmidt B.C., Golla-Schindler U. (2009

  2. Reaction induced fracturing during replacement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, Bjørn; Putnis, Christine V.; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Replacement processes are common transformation mechanisms in minerals and rocks at a variety of conditions and scales. The underlying mechanisms are, in general, poorly understood, but both mechanical and chemical processes are thought to be important. Replacement of leucite (KAlSi2O6) by analcime (NaAlSi2O6 .H2O) is common in silica-poor igneous rocks. A 10% increase in volume is associated with the replacement process, and this generates stresses that eventually cause fracturing of the reacting leucite. Experimentally reacted leucite samples display characteristic fracturing patterns that include both spalling of concentric ‘onion-skin’-like layers near the reacting interface and the formation of cross-cutting, often hierarchically arranged, sets of fractures that divide the remaining leucite into progressively smaller domains. These structures may explain the ‘patchy’ alteration patterns observed in natural leucite samples and similar, so-called, mesh-textures associated with the serpentinization of olivine grains during hydration of mafic or ultramafic rocks. They are also strikingly similar to larger scale patterns formed during spheroidal weathering processes. A simple discrete element model illustrates the mechanics that control the formation of such systems, and shows how these replacement processes may be accelerated due to the generation of new reactive surface area by hierarchical fracturing processes.

  3. Reaction-driven fracturing during replacement processes and metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Austrheim, H.; Raufaste, C.; Royne, A.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.

    2008-12-01

    Hydration reactions involving igneous or high-grade metamorphic rocks often cause a significant increase in local volume at the site of reaction. Because such volatilization reactions are triggered by infiltration of external fluids and occur relatively far from thermodynamic equilibrium, they are often fast enough to produce sufficient stress perturbations to drive local fracturing. Microstructural studies show numerous examples of such small scale reaction-driven fracturing both within the reacting mineral grains and in the surrounding rock matrix. Small scale fractures often link up to form fracture networks that promotes further fluid infiltration, more reaction, more stress build up, more fracturing etc. etc. We believe that such self-accelerating coupling between reactions, fracturing, and fluid migration provides a first-order control on the rate of hydration of the Earth's crust both during metamorphism and during lower-temperature processes such as weathering. We present experimental studies that constrain under what conditions replacement reactions may cause fracturing near the reacting interface, both in synthetic and natural materials. Examples of natural reaction- driven fracturing at a wide range of scales will be presented with focus on serpentinization. Finally, a simple mechanical model will be presented to illustrate the most pertinent features of the hierarchical fragmentation process that arise from reaction-driven fracturing and demonstrate how this process may cause an overall acceleration of the hydration process. Relevant references Iyer, K., Jamtveit, B., Mathiesen, J., Malthe- Sørenssen, A., and Feder, J., 2007. Reaction-assisted hierarchical fracturing during serpentinization. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 267, 503-516. Jamtveit, B, Austrheim, H., and Malthe-Sørensen, A., 2000. Accelerated hydration of the Earth's deep crust induced by stress perturbations. Nature, 408, 75-79 Jamtveit, B., Malthe-Sørenssen, A., and Kostenko, O

  4. Mutual effect of vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in viscous multitemperature flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustova, E. V.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    We study coupling of vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in nonequilibrium viscous multitemperature flows. A general theoretical model is proposed on the basis of the Chapman-Enskog method modified for strongly nonequilibrium reacting flows; the model differs from models commonly used in computational fluid dynamics since it is able to capture additional cross-coupling terms arising in viscous flow due to compressibility and mutual influence of all nonequilibrium processes occurring in a mixture. The set of fluid dynamic equations is derived starting from the Boltzmann equation; the relaxation terms in these equations are described using the kinetic transport theory formalism. Reaction and relaxation rates depend on the distribution function and thus differ in the zero-order and first-order approximations of the Chapman-Enskog method. An algorithm for the calculation of multitemperature reaction and relaxation rates in both inviscid and viscous flows is proposed for the harmonic oscillator model. This algorithm is applied to estimate the mutual effect of vibrational relaxation and dissociation in binary mixtures of N2 and N, and O2 and O, under various nonequilibrium conditions. It is shown that modification of the Landau-Teller expression for the VT relaxation term works rather well in nitrogen, whereas it fails to predict correctly the relaxation rate in oxygen at high temperatures. In oxygen (in contrast to nitrogen), the first-order cross effects of dissociation and VT relaxation are found to be significant. A method for calculation of vibrational relaxation time based on the kinetic theory definition is suggested. Two-temperature dissociation rate coefficients are calculated in the zero- and first-order approximations and compared to other models.

  5. Mutual effect of vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in viscous multitemperature flows.

    PubMed

    Kustova, E V; Oblapenko, G P

    2016-03-01

    We study coupling of vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in nonequilibrium viscous multitemperature flows. A general theoretical model is proposed on the basis of the Chapman-Enskog method modified for strongly nonequilibrium reacting flows; the model differs from models commonly used in computational fluid dynamics since it is able to capture additional cross-coupling terms arising in viscous flow due to compressibility and mutual influence of all nonequilibrium processes occurring in a mixture. The set of fluid dynamic equations is derived starting from the Boltzmann equation; the relaxation terms in these equations are described using the kinetic transport theory formalism. Reaction and relaxation rates depend on the distribution function and thus differ in the zero-order and first-order approximations of the Chapman-Enskog method. An algorithm for the calculation of multitemperature reaction and relaxation rates in both inviscid and viscous flows is proposed for the harmonic oscillator model. This algorithm is applied to estimate the mutual effect of vibrational relaxation and dissociation in binary mixtures of N(2) and N, and O(2) and O, under various nonequilibrium conditions. It is shown that modification of the Landau-Teller expression for the VT relaxation term works rather well in nitrogen, whereas it fails to predict correctly the relaxation rate in oxygen at high temperatures. In oxygen (in contrast to nitrogen), the first-order cross effects of dissociation and VT relaxation are found to be significant. A method for calculation of vibrational relaxation time based on the kinetic theory definition is suggested. Two-temperature dissociation rate coefficients are calculated in the zero- and first-order approximations and compared to other models. PMID:27078467

  6. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; Wang, Tiefeng

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO₂ for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO₂, Mo₂C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo₂C could be completely regenerated by H₂ treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Nimore » modified Mo₂C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo₂C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO₂. Compared to Pd/SiO₂, both Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.« less

  7. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; Wang, Tiefeng

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO₂ for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO₂, Mo₂C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo₂C could be completely regenerated by H₂ treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo₂C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO₂. Compared to Pd/SiO₂, both Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.

  8. Self-Generated Electrokinetic Fluid Flows during Pseudomorphic Mineral Replacement Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kar, Abhishek; McEldrew, Michael; Stout, Robert F; Mays, Benjamin E; Khair, Aditya; Velegol, Darrell; Gorski, Christopher A

    2016-05-31

    Pseudomorphic mineral replacement reactions involve one mineral phase replacing another, while preserving the original mineral's size and texture. Macroscopically, these transformations are driven by system-wide equilibration through dissolution and precipitation reactions. It is unclear, however, how replacement occurs on the molecular scale and what role dissolved ion transport plays. Here, we develop a new quantitative framework to explain the pseudomorphic replacement of KBr crystal in a saturated KCl solution through a combination of microscopic, spectroscopic, and modeling techniques. Our observations reveal that pseudomorphic mineral replacement (pMRR) is transport-controlled for this system and that convective fluid flows, caused by diffusioosmosis, play a key role in the ion transport process across the reaction-induced pores in the product phase. Our findings have important implications for understanding mineral transformations in natural environments and suggest that replacement could be exploited in commercial and laboratory applications. PMID:27196633

  9. Flowing afterglow measurements of the density dependence of gas-phase ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2013-05-28

    We have studied the dependence of several ion-ion mutual neutralization (MN) reactions on helium density in the range from 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} at 300 K, using the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry method. The rate coefficients of the reactions Ar{sup +}+ Br{sub 2}{sup -}, Ar{sup +}+ SF{sub 6}{sup -}, and Ar{sup +}+ C{sub 7}F{sub 14}{sup -} were found to be independent of gas density over the range studied, in disagreement with earlier observations that similar MN reactions are strongly enhanced at the same gas densities. The cause of the previous enhancement with density is traced to the use of 'orbital-motion-limit' theory to infer ion densities from the currents collected by ion-attracting Langmuir probes in a region where it is not applicable.

  10. Agents for replacement of NAD+/NADH system in enzymatic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Fish, Richard H.; Kerr, John B.; Lo, Christine H.

    2004-04-06

    Novel agents acting as co-factors for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H co-enzyme systems in enzymatic oxido-reductive reactions. Agents mimicking the action of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system in enzymatic oxidation/reduction of substrates into reduced or oxidized products. A method for selection and preparation of the mimicking agents for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system and a device comprising co-factors for replacement of NAD(P).sup.+ /NAD(P)H system.

  11. Escape from the destruction of the galvanic replacement reaction for solid --> hollow --> solid conversion process in one pot reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Ming-Fong; Shanmugam, Vijayakumar; Sardar, Kripasindhu; Huang, Cheng-Liang; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2013-04-01

    Based on the difference in the redox potentials between two metal species, the galvanic replacement reaction is known to create an irreversible process to generate hollow nanostructures in a wide range of shapes. In the context of galvanic replacement reaction, continuing etching leads to the general collapse of the hollow structures because of the excess amount of oxidizing agent. We demonstrate the growth of solid nanostructures from a hollow frame-like architecture in the course of a galvanic replacement reaction without any morphology destruction. We report the successful composition transformation of solid Ag with a wide range of shapes, such as plate, decahedron, rod, prism, sphere, and foil, from as thin as <10 nm up to 5 μm and with an area of ~4 mm2, to their solid Au counterparts using straightforward chemical reactions. The successful conversion process relies on a decrease in the reduction rate of the metallic precursor to initiate dissolution of Ag in the first stage (a galvanic replacement reaction), then a subsequent backfilling of Au into the hollowed-out structures. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant, a key parameter, interacts with metal salt precursor to form a complex species that retards metal reduction. In addition, we demonstrate conversion of solid nano-Ag to solid nano-Pd as well as of Cu foil (10 μm thick) to shiny Au foil.Based on the difference in the redox potentials between two metal species, the galvanic replacement reaction is known to create an irreversible process to generate hollow nanostructures in a wide range of shapes. In the context of galvanic replacement reaction, continuing etching leads to the general collapse of the hollow structures because of the excess amount of oxidizing agent. We demonstrate the growth of solid nanostructures from a hollow frame-like architecture in the course of a galvanic replacement reaction without any morphology destruction. We report the successful composition transformation of

  12. Development of Ag dendrites-reduced graphene oxide composite catalysts via galvanic replacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li; Sokiransky, Mika Matsunaka; Wang, James; Lai, Guosong; Yu, Aimin

    2016-09-01

    Silver dendrites/reduced graphene oxide (AgD/RGO) composites were synthesized via a facile galvanic replacement method. The successful formation of Ag dendrites and the graphene oxide reduction were proved by a series of characterization techniques. The possible formation mechanism of Ag dendrites during the galvanic replacement reaction was discussed. The catalytic activity of the as-synthesized AgD/RGO composite was evaluated by its performance on the chemical reduction of an organic dye methylene blue. The AgD/RGO composite showed a much higher catalytic performance and stability than that of Ag dendrites.

  13. Thermo-stoichiometric behavior of aluminum-nickel nanoheater particles fabricated by galvanic replacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Jacqueline L.

    2010-03-01

    Al-Ni reactive nano-structures are gaining interest for various applications in aerospace, nano-manufacturing, and biomedical fields. However, nano-material behavior can vary from macro-scale. There has been no systematic study of Al-Ni exothermic reaction and intermetallic formation for nano-scale reactants. Therefore, this study aims to investigate deviations from the established Al-Ni phase diagram, with the premise that the intermetallic formation temperatures are expected to be lower for nano-reactants due to higher surface energy. Additionally, it is important to gain better understanding and control of the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) fabrication method, which, in terms of producing Al-Ni bi-metallic nanoparticles, is a completely novel scheme. With an adapted phase diagram, intermetallic product and heat output of nanoparticles from any given stage of GRR process can be predicted. Al-Ni nanoparticles having ignitable Al-Ni ratios were fabricated via GRR method. Effects of composition and temperature on intermetallic formation were studied by in-situ XRD analysis. Effects of environment and heating rate on the Al-Ni exothermic reaction were also investigated.

  14. Kinetically Controlled Growth of Fine Gold Nanofractals from Au(I) via Indirect Galvanic Replacement Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yao; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2015-09-30

    Two of the most important features of Au nanostructures, size and shape, are significantly affected by the reduction kinetics of the relevant metal precursors. Because of the high standard oxidative potential of gold ionic species, AuCl4(-) in particular, Au fractals formed via various chemical or electrochemical approaches often have very coarse branches with diameters varying from tens of nanometers to submicrometers, even though extensive chemicals and/or complicated processes have been deployed to control the reduction kinetics. Herein we report an indirect galvanic replacement (IGR) strategy where the electrons generated in a galvanic replacement reaction from anode oxidation are channeled out to a separate conducting film on which the cathodic metal can be deposited. Reduction of Au(I) ionic species with relatively low standard oxidative potential has been conducted with the IGR experimental setting. 2D finely hyperbranched Au fractals (4.0 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length) with high structural integrity were produced. Controls over the deposition density, location, and microfeatures of Au nanofractals were demonstrated through a mechanistic study. In addition, the thus-prepared Au nanofractals were also thoroughly tested in electrochemical sensing of H2O2. PMID:26360961

  15. Ozone-initiated terpene reaction products in five European offices: replacement of a floor cleaning agent.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, A W; Kofoed-Sørensen, V; Mandin, C; Ventura, G; Mabilia, R; Perreca, E; Cattaneo, A; Spinazzè, A; Mihucz, V G; Szigeti, T; de Kluizenaar, Y; Cornelissen, H J M; Trantallidi, M; Carrer, P; Sakellaris, I; Bartzis, J; Wolkoff, P

    2014-11-18

    Cleaning agents often emit terpenes that react rapidly with ozone. These ozone-initiated reactions, which occur in the gas-phase and on surfaces, produce a host of gaseous and particulate oxygenated compounds with possible adverse health effects in the eyes and airways. Within the European Union (EU) project OFFICAIR, common ozone-initiated reaction products were measured before and after the replacement of the regular floor cleaning agent with a preselected low emitting floor cleaning agent in four offices located in four EU countries. One reference office in a fifth country did not use any floor cleaning agent. Limonene, α-pinene, 3-carene, dihydromyrcenol, geraniol, linalool, and α-terpineol were targeted for measurement together with the common terpene oxidation products formaldehyde, 4-acetyl-1-methylcyclohexene (4-AMCH), 3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanal (IPOH), 6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one, (6-MHO), 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), and dihydrocarvone (DHC). Two-hour air samples on Tenax TA and DNPH cartridges were taken in the morning, noon, and in the afternoon and analyzed by thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and HPLC/UV analysis, respectively. Ozone was measured in all sites. All the regular cleaning agents emitted terpenes, mainly limonene and linalool. After the replacement of the cleaning agent, substantially lower concentrations of limonene and formaldehyde were observed. Some of the oxidation product concentrations, in particular that of 4-OPA, were also reduced in line with limonene. Maximum 2 h averaged concentrations of formaldehyde, 4-AMCH, 6-MHO, and IPOH would not give rise to acute eye irritation-related symptoms in office workers; similarly, 6-AMCH, DHC and 4-OPA would not result in airflow limitation to the airways. PMID:25299176

  16. In situ liquid-cell electron microscopy of silver-palladium galvanic replacement reactions on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sutter, E; Jungjohann, K; Bliznakov, S; Courty, A; Maisonhaute, E; Tenney, S; Sutter, P

    2014-01-01

    Galvanic replacement reactions provide an elegant way of transforming solid nanoparticles into complex hollow morphologies. Conventionally, galvanic replacement is studied by stopping the reaction at different stages and characterizing the products ex situ. In situ observations by liquid-cell electron microscopy can provide insight into mechanisms, rates and possible modifications of galvanic replacement reactions in the native solution environment. Here we use liquid-cell electron microscopy to investigate galvanic replacement reactions between silver nanoparticle templates and aqueous palladium salt solutions. Our in situ observations follow the transformation of the silver nanoparticles into hollow silver-palladium nanostructures. While the silver-palladium nanocages have morphologies similar to those obtained in ex situ control experiments the reaction rates are much higher, indicating that the electron beam strongly affects the galvanic-type process in the liquid-cell. By using scavengers added to the aqueous solution we identify the role of radicals generated via radiolysis by high-energy electrons in modifying galvanic reactions. PMID:25208691

  17. In situ liquid-cell electron microscopy of silver-palladium galvanic replacement reactions on silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, E.; Jungjohann, K.; Bliznakov, S.; Courty, A.; Maisonhaute, E.; Tenney, S.; Sutter, P.

    2014-09-01

    Galvanic replacement reactions provide an elegant way of transforming solid nanoparticles into complex hollow morphologies. Conventionally, galvanic replacement is studied by stopping the reaction at different stages and characterizing the products ex situ. In situ observations by liquid-cell electron microscopy can provide insight into mechanisms, rates and possible modifications of galvanic replacement reactions in the native solution environment. Here we use liquid-cell electron microscopy to investigate galvanic replacement reactions between silver nanoparticle templates and aqueous palladium salt solutions. Our in situ observations follow the transformation of the silver nanoparticles into hollow silver-palladium nanostructures. While the silver-palladium nanocages have morphologies similar to those obtained in ex situ control experiments the reaction rates are much higher, indicating that the electron beam strongly affects the galvanic-type process in the liquid-cell. By using scavengers added to the aqueous solution we identify the role of radicals generated via radiolysis by high-energy electrons in modifying galvanic reactions.

  18. Escape from the destruction of the galvanic replacement reaction for solid → hollow → solid conversion process in one pot reaction.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Ming-Fong; Shanmugam, Vijayakumar; Sardar, Kripasindhu; Huang, Cheng-Liang; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2013-05-01

    Based on the difference in the redox potentials between two metal species, the galvanic replacement reaction is known to create an irreversible process to generate hollow nanostructures in a wide range of shapes. In the context of galvanic replacement reaction, continuing etching leads to the general collapse of the hollow structures because of the excess amount of oxidizing agent. We demonstrate the growth of solid nanostructures from a hollow frame-like architecture in the course of a galvanic replacement reaction without any morphology destruction. We report the successful composition transformation of solid Ag with a wide range of shapes, such as plate, decahedron, rod, prism, sphere, and foil, from as thin as <10 nm up to 5 μm and with an area of ∼4 mm(2), to their solid Au counterparts using straightforward chemical reactions. The successful conversion process relies on a decrease in the reduction rate of the metallic precursor to initiate dissolution of Ag in the first stage (a galvanic replacement reaction), then a subsequent backfilling of Au into the hollowed-out structures. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant, a key parameter, interacts with metal salt precursor to form a complex species that retards metal reduction. In addition, we demonstrate conversion of solid nano-Ag to solid nano-Pd as well as of Cu foil (10 μm thick) to shiny Au foil. PMID:23525096

  19. The role of macrophages in the biological reaction to wear debris from joint replacements

    PubMed Central

    Nich, Christophe; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2015-01-01

    Normal usage of total joint replacements results in the production of wear debris and other byproducts. In particular, polyethylene (PE) particles are heavily involved in the stimulation of local and systemic biological reactions resulting in chronic inflammation, periprosthetic bone resorption (osteolysis), and, eventually, implant loosening. As sentinels of the innate immune system, cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage initiate the inflammatory cascade that lead to osteolysis. The biological processes involved are complex, based on the unique properties of the monocytes/macrophages, including sensing, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and adaptive stimulation. The interaction with wear debris triggers the release of pro-inflammatory factors, such as TNF-α, IL-1, and others, pro-osteoclastic factors such as RANKL, and chemokines, such as MCP-1 and MIP-1, all being crucial to the recruitment, migration, differentiation and ultimately activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts. In parallel, other distinct macrophage populations inhibit inflammation and mitigate its consequences on the bone-implant interface. Here, the role of the monocyte/macrophage cell lineage in the initiation and maintenance of the host inflammatory response to wear debris and subsequent periprosthetic osteolysis is presented. PMID:25747029

  20. Potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements: OH reaction rate constants between 250 and 315 K and infrared absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, N.L.; Medhurst, L.J.; Nelson, H.H.

    1993-12-20

    The authors measured the rate constant for reactions of the OH radical with several potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements over the temperature range 251-314 K using laser photolysis laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The compounds studied and Arrhenius parameters determined from fits to the measured rate constants are as follows: CHF{sub 2}OCHF{sub 2} (E 134), k(T) = (5.4 {+-} 3.5) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}3.1 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 3} (FC 236fa), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}1.8 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CHFCHF{sub 2} (FC 236ea), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.0 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; and CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CH{sub 2}F (FC 236cb), k(T) = (2.6 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.2 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]. The measured activation energies (2-3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) are consistent with a mechanism of H atom abstraction. The tropospheric lifetimes, estimated from the measured OH reaction rates, and measured integrated infrared absorption cross sections over the range 770 to 1430 cm{sup {minus}1} suggest that E 134 and FC 236fa may have significant global warming potential, while FC 236ea and FC 236cb do not. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Adiabatic versus diabatic approach to multichannel Coulomb scattering for mutual neutralisation reaction H+ +H- → H2∗ →H (1) +H (n)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, M. V.; Yakovlev, S. L.; Yarevsky, E. A.; Elander, N.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper it is demonstrated that the split-potential driven Schrödinger approach to two-body Coulomb multichannel quantum scattering in a diabatic framework presented by us in a previous paper (Volkov et al., 2011) also can be formulated within an adiabatic framework. The new formulation of the theory is numerically realised using finite element discrete variable representation. The method is applied to a realistic model of the fundamental mutual neutralisation reaction H+ +H- → H2∗ →H (1) +H (n) described in terms of the seven lowest 1 Σg+ electronic states of the H2 molecule. The obtained cross sections are in good agreement with other methods applied to the same model.

  2. Experimental and theoretical study of the ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions Ar(+)+SF(n)- (n=6, 5, and 4).

    PubMed

    Bopp, Joseph C; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, Albert A; Troe, Jürgen

    2008-08-21

    The ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions Ar(+)+SF(n) (-)-->Ar+SF(n) (n=6, 5, and 4) have been studied in a flowing afterglow-Langmuir probe (FALP) apparatus at 300 K and 1 Torr of He buffer gas. Electron concentrations and product ion fractions were measured, and neutralization rate constants of 4.0 x 10(-8), 3.8 x 10(-8), and 4 x 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1) for SF(6) (-), SF(5) (-), and SF(4) (-), respectively, were derived, with uncertainties of +/-25% (+/-35% for SF(4) (-)). During the neutralization process, excited neutrals are generated that are able to dissociate to neutral fragments. In the case of SF(6), the formation of SF(5) and SF(4), and similarly in the case of SF(5), the formation of SF(4) and SF(3) were observed and quantified. The mechanism of primary and secondary reaction was analyzed in detail, and rate constants for the dissociative electron attachments e(-)+SF(5)-->F(-)+SF(4) (k=3 x 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1),+/-40%) and e(-)+SF(3)-->F(-)+SF(2) (k=2 x 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1),+400%,-75%) were also derived. The experimental ion-ion neutralization rate constants were found to be in good agreement with estimates from an optimum two-state double-passage Landau-Zener model. It was also found that energy partitioning in the neutralization is related to the extent of electronic excitation of Ar generated by the electron transfer processes. PMID:19044768

  3. Experimental and theoretical study of the ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions Ar{sup +}+SF{sub n}{sup -} (n=6, 5, and 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, Joseph C.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Troe, Juergen

    2008-08-21

    The ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions Ar{sup +}+SF{sub n}{sup -}{yields}Ar+SF{sub n} (n=6, 5, and 4) have been studied in a flowing afterglow-Langmuir probe (FALP) apparatus at 300 K and 1 Torr of He buffer gas. Electron concentrations and product ion fractions were measured, and neutralization rate constants of 4.0x10{sup -8}, 3.8x10{sup -8}, and 4x10{sup -8} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for SF{sub 6}{sup -}, SF{sub 5}{sup -}, and SF{sub 4}{sup -}, respectively, were derived, with uncertainties of {+-}25% ({+-}35% for SF{sub 4}{sup -}). During the neutralization process, excited neutrals are generated that are able to dissociate to neutral fragments. In the case of SF{sub 6}, the formation of SF{sub 5} and SF{sub 4}, and similarly in the case of SF{sub 5}, the formation of SF{sub 4} and SF{sub 3} were observed and quantified. The mechanism of primary and secondary reaction was analyzed in detail, and rate constants for the dissociative electron attachments e{sup -}+SF{sub 5}{yields}F{sup -}+SF{sub 4} (k=3x10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1},{+-}40%) and e{sup -}+SF{sub 3}{yields}F{sup -}+SF{sub 2} (k=2x10{sup -8} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1},+400%,-75%) were also derived. The experimental ion-ion neutralization rate constants were found to be in good agreement with estimates from an optimum two-state double-passage Landau-Zener model. It was also found that energy partitioning in the neutralization is related to the extent of electronic excitation of Ar generated by the electron transfer processes.

  4. The Symmetry of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions in Patients with Bilateral Simultaneous and Sequential ASR Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Rami; Hussey, Daniel K; Donahue, Gabrielle S; Potter, Hollis G; Wallace, Robert; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Malchau, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements have symmetric adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) at follow-up. An MRI of both hips was performed at a mean time of six years after surgery in 43 patients. The prevalence and severity of ALTRs were found to be similar in simultaneous hips but differences were observed in sequential hips. The order and timing of sequential hip arthroplasties did not affect the severity of ALTRs. Thus, in addition to metal ion exposure from an earlier MoM implant other factors may also play a role in the progression of ALTRs. Bilateral implants should be given special consideration in risk stratification algorithms for management of patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. PMID:26055146

  5. Quantification of mutual trans influence of ligands in Pd(II) complexes: a combined approach using isodesmic reactions and AIM analysis.

    PubMed

    Sajith, P K; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2010-01-21

    Isodesmic reactions of the type Pd(II)Cl(2)X + Pd(II)Cl(3) --> Pd(II)Cl(2) + Pd(II)Cl(3)X have been designed to study the trans influence of a variety of 'X' ligands (X = H(2)O, NH(3), Py, CO, SMe(2), C(2)H(4), AsH(3), PH(3), AsMe(3), PMe(3), PEt(3), ONO(-), F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), N(3)(-), NO(2)(-), OH(-), CN(-), Ph(-), H(-), CH(3)(-), SiH(3)(-)) using density functional theory (MPWB1K) and COSMO continuum solvation model. We find that the isodesmic reaction energy E(1) is a good quantitative measure of the trans influence of X. E(1) showed good linear relationships to trans Pd-Cl bond length and the electron density rho(r) at the (3, -1) bond critical point of the trans Pd-Cl bond. On the basis of E(1) values, ligands are classified into three trans influencing groups, viz. strong, moderate, and weak. Isodesmic reactions of the type Pd(II)Cl(2)X + Pd(II)Cl(2)Y --> Pd(II)Cl(2) + Pd(II)Cl(2)X(Y) with ligands 'X' and 'Y' in the trans positions are also modelled to obtain the energy of the reaction E(2). E(2) is a measure of the mutual trans influence of X and Y and the highest (99.65 kcal mol(-1)) and the lowest (-3.95 kcal mol(-1)) E(2) are observed for X = Y = SiH(3)(-) and X = Y = H(2)O, respectively. Using the E(1) values of X (E(1X)) and Y (E(1Y)), the empirical equation 0.02026(E(1X) + (E(1Y)/radical2))(2) is derived for predicting the E(2) values (standard error = 2.33 kcal mol(-1)). Further, using the rho(r) of the trans Pd-Cl bond in [Pd(II)Cl(3)X](n-) (rho(1X)) and [Pd(II)Cl(3)Y](n-) (rho(1Y)), and a multiple linear regression (MLR) approach with rho(1X), rho(1Y), and rho(1X)rho(1Y) as variables, accurate prediction is made for predicting E(2) of any combination of X and Y (standard error = 2.20 kcal mol(-1)). We also find that the contribution of trans influence to the bond dissociation energy of ligands X or Y in complexes of the type [Pd(II)Cl(2)X(Y)](n-) can be quantified in terms of E(1X) and E(1Y) or the corresponding rho(1X) and rho(1Y). The calculated

  6. Electron Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centers with the Photoactive Bacteriopheophytin Replaced by a Bacteriochlorophyll through Coordinating Ligand Substitution.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Saer, Rafael; Lin, Su; Beatty, J Thomas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2016-09-01

    The influence of amino acid substitutions at position M214 (M-subunit, residue 214) on the rate and pathway of electron transfer involving the bacteriopheophytin cofactor, HA, in a bacterial photosynthetic reaction center has been explored in a series of Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants. The M214 leucine (L) residue of the wild type was replaced with histidine (H), glutamine (Q), and asparagine (N), creating the mutants M214LH, M214LQ, and M214LN, respectively. As has been reported previously for M214LH, each of these mutations resulted in a bacteriochlorophyll molecule in place of a bacteriopheophytin in the HA pocket, forming so-called β-type mutants (in which the HA cofactor is called βA). In addition, these mutations changed the properties of the surrounding protein environment in terms of charge distribution and the amino acid side chain volume. Electron transfer reactions from the excited primary donor P to the acceptor QA were characterized using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic techniques. Similar to that of the previously characterized M214LH (β mutant), the strong energetic mixing of the P(+)BA(-) and P(+)βA(-) states (the mixed anion is denoted I(-)) increased the rate of charge recombination between P(+) and I(-) in competition with the I(-) → QA forward reaction. This reduced the overall yield of charge separation forming the P(+)QA(-) state. While the kinetics of the primary electron transfer forming P(+)I(-) were essentially identical in all three β mutants, the rates of the βA(-) (I(-)) → QA electron transfer in M214LQ and M214LH were very similar but quite different from that of the M214LN mutant. The observed yield changes and the differences in kinetics are correlated more closely with the volume of the mutated amino acid than with their charge characteristics. These results are consistent with those of previous studies of a series of M214 mutants with different sizes of amino acid side chains that did not alter the HA

  7. Are periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after revision of total disc replacement comparable to the reactions observed after total hip or knee revision surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Punt, Ilona M.; Austen, Shennah; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.; Kurtz, Steven M.; ten Broeke, René H.M.; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Willems, Paul C.; van Ooij, André

    2011-01-01

    Study design Comparative study. Objective To compare periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after total disc replacement (TDR), total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. Summary of background data Prosthetic wear debris leading to particle disease, followed by osteolysis, is often observed after THA and TKA. Although the presence of polyethylene (PE) particles and periprosthetic inflammation after TDR has been proven recently, osteolysis is rarely observed. The clinical relevance of PE wear debris in the spine remains poorly understood. Methods Number, size and shape of PE particles, as well as quantity and type of inflammatory cells in periprosthetic tissue retrieved during Charité TDR (n=22), THA (n=10) and TKA (n=4) revision surgery were compared. Tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and examined by using light microscopy with bright field and polarized light. Results After THA, large numbers of PE particles <6 µm were observed, which were mainly phagocytosed by macrophages. The TKA group had a broad size range with many larger PE particles and more giant cells. In TDR, the size range was similar to that observed in TKA. However, the smallest particles were the most prevalent with 75% of the particles being <6 µm, as seen in revision THA. In TDR, both macrophages and giant cells were present with a higher number of macrophages. Conclusions Both small and large PE particles are present after TDR revision surgery compatible with both THA and TKA wear patterns. The similarities between periprosthetic tissue reactions in the different groups may give more insight in the clinical relevance of PE particles and inflammatory cells in the lumbar spine. The current findings may help to improve TDR design as applied from technologies previously developed in THA and TKA with the goal of a longer survival of TDR. PMID:21336235

  8. Thermal replacement reaction: a novel route for synthesizing eco-friendly ZnO@γ-In2Se3 hetero-nanostructures by replacing cadmium with indium and their photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic performances.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Choi, Mingi; Baek, Minki; Yong, Kijung

    2015-05-21

    A novel route called thermal replacement reaction was demonstrated for synthesizing eco-friendly ZnO@γ-In2Se3 hetero-structural nanowires on FTO glass by replacing the element cadmium with indium for the first time. The indium layer was coated on the surface of the ZnO nanowires beforehand, then CdSe quantum dots were deposited onto the coated indium layer, and finally the CdSe quantum dots were converted to γ-In2Se3 quantum dots by annealing under vacuum at 350 °C for one hour. The prepared ZnO@γ-In2Se3 hetero-nanostructures exhibit stable photoelectrochemical properties that can be ascribed to the protection of the In2O3 layer between the ZnO nanowire and γ-In2Se3 quantum dots and better photocatalytic performance in the wide wavelength region from 400 nm to nearly 750 nm. This strategy for preparing the ZnO@γ-In2Se3 hetero-nanostructures not only enriches our understanding of the single replacement reaction where the active element cadmium can be replaced with indium, but also opens a new way for the in situ conversion of cadmium-based to eco-friendly indium-based nano-devices. PMID:25902878

  9. Thermal replacement reaction: a novel route for synthesizing eco-friendly ZnO@γ-In2Se3 hetero-nanostructures by replacing cadmium with indium and their photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Choi, Mingi; Baek, Minki; Yong, Kijung

    2015-05-01

    A novel route called thermal replacement reaction was demonstrated for synthesizing eco-friendly ZnO@γ-In2Se3 hetero-structural nanowires on FTO glass by replacing the element cadmium with indium for the first time. The indium layer was coated on the surface of the ZnO nanowires beforehand, then CdSe quantum dots were deposited onto the coated indium layer, and finally the CdSe quantum dots were converted to γ-In2Se3 quantum dots by annealing under vacuum at 350 °C for one hour. The prepared ZnO@γ-In2Se3 hetero-nanostructures exhibit stable photoelectrochemical properties that can be ascribed to the protection of the In2O3 layer between the ZnO nanowire and γ-In2Se3 quantum dots and better photocatalytic performance in the wide wavelength region from 400 nm to nearly 750 nm. This strategy for preparing the ZnO@γ-In2Se3 hetero-nanostructures not only enriches our understanding of the single replacement reaction where the active element cadmium can be replaced with indium, but also opens a new way for the in situ conversion of cadmium-based to eco-friendly indium-based nano-devices.

  10. Reaction mechanism for the replacement of calcite by dolomite and siderite: implications for geochemistry, microstructure and porosity evolution during hydrothermal mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark A.; Timms, Nicholas E.; Hough, Robert M.; Cleverley, James S.

    2013-10-01

    Carbonate reactions are common in mineral deposits due to CO2-rich mineralising fluids. This study presents the first in-depth, integrated analysis of microstructure and microchemistry of fluid-mediated carbonate reaction textures at hydrothermal conditions. In doing so, we describe the mechanisms by which carbonate phases replace one another, and the implications for the evolution of geochemistry, rock microstructures and porosity. The sample from the 1.95 Moz Junction gold deposit, Western Australia, contains calcite derived from carbonation of a metamorphic amphibole—plagioclase assemblage that has further altered to siderite and dolomite. The calcite is porous and contains iron-rich calcite blebs interpreted to have resulted from fluid-mediated replacement of compositionally heterogeneous amphiboles. The siderite is polycrystalline but nucleates topotactically on the calcite. As a result, the boundaries between adjacent grains are low-angle boundaries (<10°), which are geometrically similar to those formed by crystal-plastic deformation and recovery. Growth zoning within individual siderite grains shows that the low-angle boundaries are growth features and not due to deformation. Low-angle boundaries develop due to the propagation of defects at grain faces and zone boundaries and by impingement of grains that nucleated with small misorientations relative to each other during grain growth. The cores of siderite grains are aligned with the twin planes in the parent calcite crystal showing that the reactant Fe entered the crystal along the twin boundaries. Dolomite grains, many of which appear to in-fill space generated by the siderite replacement, also show alignment of cores along the calcite twin planes, suggesting that they did not grow into space but replaced the calcite. Where dolomite is seen directly replacing calcite, it nucleates on the Fe-rich calcite due to the increased compatibility of the Fe-bearing calcite lattice relative to the pure calcite

  11. Monitoring of galvanic replacement reaction between silver nanowires and HAuCl4 by in situ transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yugang; Wang, Yuxin

    2011-10-12

    Galvanic replacement reaction between silver nanowires and an aqueous solution of HAuCl(4) has been successfully monitored in real time by using in situ transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) in combination with a flow cell reactor. The in situ observations clearly show the morphological evolution of the solid silver nanowires to hollow gold nanotubes in the course of the reaction. Careful analysis of the images reveals that the galvanic replacement reaction on the silver nanowires involves multiple steps: (i) local initiation of pitting process; (ii) anisotropic etching of the silver nanowires and uniform deposition of the resulting gold atoms on the surfaces of the nanowires; and (iii) reconstruction of the nanotube walls via an Ostwald ripening process. The in situ TXM represents a promising approach for studying dynamic processes involved in the growth and chemical transformation of nanomaterials in solutions, in particular for nanostructures with dimensions larger than 50 nm. PMID:21894944

  12. Real-Time Dynamics of Galvanic Replacement Reactions of Silver Nanocubes and Au Studied by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shu Fen; Lin, Guanhua; Bosman, Michel; Mirsaidov, Utkur; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-08-23

    We study the galvanic replacement reaction of silver nanocubes in dilute, aqueous ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA)-capped gold aurate solutions using in situ liquid-cell electron microscopy. Au/Ag etched nanostructures with concave faces are formed via (1) etching that starts from the faces of the nanocubes, followed by (2) the deposition of an Au layer as a result of galvanic replacement, and (3) Au deposition via particle coalescence and monomer attachment where small nanoparticles are formed during the reaction as a result of radiolysis. Analysis of the Ag removal rate and Au deposition rate provides a quantitative picture of the growth process and shows that the morphology and composition of the final product are dependent on the stoichiometric ratio between Au and Ag. PMID:27389989

  13. Moderation and absorption effects on hot replacement reactions of sup 38 Cl atoms in mixtures of o-dichlorobenzene and hexafluorobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Berei, K.; Gado, J.; Kereszturi, A.; Szatmary, Z.; Vass, Sz. )

    1990-03-22

    Conditions are given for the equivalence of the Estrup-Wolfgang description of the hot atom reaction kinetics with the first-order Hurwitz approximation in the neutron slowing down theory. Conclusions are drawn for the applicability of this approach for describing hot atom replacement processes in reactive mixtures. Analytical and numerical calculations were carried out to explain an unusual concentration dependence of {sup 38}Cl-for-Cl substitution, found experimentally in liquid binary mixtures of o-dichlorobenzene and hexafluorobenzene.

  14. Evolution of mutualism between species

    SciTech Connect

    Post, W.M.; Travis, C.C.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on mutualism, the interaction between species populations that is mutually beneficial, is reviewed. Several ecological facts that should be addressed in the construction of dynamic models for mutualism are examined. Basic terminology is clarified. (PSB)

  15. Behavioral Ecology: Manipulative Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David P

    2015-09-21

    A new study reveals that an apparent mutualism between lycaenid caterpillars and their attendant ants may not be all it seems, as the caterpillars produce secretions that modify the brains and behavior of their attendant ants. PMID:26394105

  16. A new era for homolytic aromatic substitution: replacing Bu3SnH with efficient light-induced chain reactions.

    PubMed

    Gurry, Michael; Aldabbagh, Fawaz

    2016-04-28

    Herein is a pertinent review of recent photochemical homolytic aromatic substitution (HAS) literature. Issues with using the reductant Bu3SnH in an oxidative process where the net loss of a hydrogen atom occurs is discussed. Nowadays more efficient light-induced chain reactions are used resulting in HAS becoming a synthetic mechanism of choice rivaling organometallic, transition-metal and electrophilic aromatic substitution protocols. The review includes aromatic substitution as part of a tandem or cascade reaction, Pschorr reaction, as well as HAS facilitated by ipso-substitution, and Smiles rearrangement. Recently visible-light photoredox catalysis, which is carried out at room temperature has become one of the most important means of aromatic substitution. The main photoredox catalysts used are polypyridine complexes of Ru(ii) and Ir(iii), although eosin Y is an alternative allowing metal-free HAS. Other radical initiator-free aromatic substitutions have used 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium ion and N,N-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)perylene-3,4,9,10-bis(dicarboximide) as the photoredox catalyst, UV-light, photoinduced electron-transfer, zwitterionic semiquinone radical anions, and Barton ester intermediates. PMID:27056571

  17. Large-scale fluid movement through crustal rocks by transition porosity generation: Feldspar replacement reactions within the Larvik Plutonic Complex, SE-Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Karin; Verberne, Rick; Plümper, Oliver; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Austrheim, Håkon

    2014-05-01

    Fluid flow through rocks transports heat and mass across the grain to tectonic plate scale. Fluids promote mineral reactions, redistribute elements to form ore deposits, cool the planet and form habitats for life. A fundamental understanding of fluid flow through rocks is central to interpreting geodynamic and geochemical interactions between the geosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Some geological systems are open to fluids, but the majority are nearly impermeable. Surprisingly though, even in rocks that are impermeable, evidence for widespread fluid-rock interactions are observed leading to the question: How can fluids migrate through vast amounts of initially impermeable rocks? Here we present work on the Larvik Plutonic Complex (SE-Norway) that provides an ideal natural laboratory to study fluid movement and feldspar re-equilibration reactions. The Larvik Plutonic Complex shows fluid-rock interactions on tens of kilometres. In the field, this is observed as a colour change: the blue larvikite rock is (partly) replaced by red tønsbergite. On the grain scale, mineral replacement is visible as porous crystals surrounding larvikite feldspar relicts. Chemical analysis shows that the alteration is zoned, from non-porous larvikite feldspar at the core to porous albite and orthoclase at the rim. A possible explanation would be infiltration of several fluids; another possibility is a changing fluid activity for Na+ and K+, resulting in a front which shifts during the reaction. The mineral replacement looks pervasive, starting with fluid flowing around the grain boundaries over a long distance. This is followed by slower consumption of the old mineral; the degree of alteration varies throughout the area of interest. Locally, alteration is related to fracture zones with pseudotachylites, which are overprinted by fluids in the vicinity of feldspars. Fluid flow and element mobilisation is controlled by an interaction between grain boundary diffusion and reaction front

  18. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  19. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  20. Aniline-Promoted Cyclization-Replacement Cascade Reactions of 2-Hydroxycinnamaldehydes with Various Carbonic Nucleophiles through In Situ Formed N,O-Acetals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chenguang; Huang, He; Li, Xiangmin; Zhang, Yueteng; Li, Hao; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-27

    In this study, we report the harnessing of new reactivity of N,O-acetals in an aminocatalytic fashion for organic synthesis. Unlike widely used strategies requiring the use of acids and/or elevated temperatures, direct replacement of the amine component of the N,O-acetals by carbon-centered nucleophiles for C-C bond formation is realized under mild reaction conditions. Furthermore, without necessary preformation of the N,O-acetals, an amine-catalyzed in situ formation of N,O-acetals is developed. Coupling both reactions into a one-pot operation enables the achievement of a catalytic process. We demonstrate the employment of simple anilines as promoters for the cyclization-substitution cascade reactions of trans-2-hydroxycinnamaldehydes with various carbonic nucleophiles including indoles, pyrroles, naphthols, phenols, and silyl enol ethers. The process offers an alternative approach to structurally diverse, "privileged" 2-substituted 2H-chromenes. The synthetic power of the new process is furthermore shown by its application in a 2-step synthesis of the natural product candenatenin E and for the facile installation of 2-substituted 2H-chromene moieties into biologically active indoles. PMID:27230417

  1. Atmospheric Chemistry of Six Methyl-perfluoroheptene-ethers Used as Heat Transfer Fluid Replacement Compounds: Measured OH Radical Reaction Rate Coefficients, Atmospheric Lifetimes, and Global Warming Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubb, A. M.; Gierczak, T.; Baasandorj, M.; Waterland, R. L.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Mixtures of methyl-perfluoroheptene-ethers (C7F13OCH3, MPHEs) are currently in use as a replacement for perfluorinated alkane (PFC) and polyether mixtures (both persistent greenhouse gases with atmospheric lifetimes >1000 years) used as heat transfer fluids. Currently, the atmospheric fate of the MPHE isomers are not well characterized, however, reaction with the OH radical is expected to be a dominant tropospheric loss process for these compounds. In order to assess the atmospheric lifetimes and environmental implications of MPHE use, rate coefficients for MPHE isomers' reaction with OH radicals are desired. In the work presented here, rate coefficients, k, for the gas-phase reaction of the OH radical with six MPHEs commonly used in commercial mixtures (isomers and stereoisomers) and their deuterated analogs (d3-MPHE) were determined at 296 K using a relative rate method with combined gas-chromatography/IR spectroscopy detection. A range of OH rate coefficient values was observed, up to a factor of 20× different, between the MPHE isomers with the (E)-stereoisomers exhibiting the greatest reactivity. The measured OH reaction rate coefficients for the d3-MPHE isomers were lower than the observed MPHE values although a large range of k values between isomers was still observed. The reduction in reactivity with deuteration signifies that the MPHE + OH reaction proceeds via both addition to the olefinic C=C bond and H-abstraction from the methyl ester group. OH addition to the C=C bond was determined to be the primary reaction channel. Atmospheric lifetimes with respect to the OH reaction for the six MPHE isomers were found to be in the range of days to months. The short lifetimes indicate that MPHE use will primarily impact tropospheric local and regional air quality. A MPHE atmospheric degradation mechanism will be presented. As part of this work, radiative efficiencies and global warming potentials (GWPs) for the MPHE isomers were estimated based on measured

  2. Mutually Exclusive, Complementary, or . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schloemer, Cathy G.

    2016-01-01

    Whether students are beginning their study of probability or are well into it, distinctions between complementary sets and mutually exclusive sets can be confusing. Cathy Schloemer writes in this article that for years she used typical classroom examples but was not happy with the student engagement or the level of understanding they produced.…

  3. Mutual Adaptaion in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siskin, Leslie Santee

    2016-01-01

    Building on an expanded concept of mutual adaptation, this chapter explores a distinctive and successful aspect of International Baccalaureate's effort to scale up, as they moved to expand their programs and support services in Title I schools. Based on a three-year, mixed-methods study, it offers a case where we see not only local adaptations…

  4. Tandem laser ablation synthesis in solution-galvanic replacement reaction (LASiS-GRR) for the production of PtCo nanoalloys as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Sheng; Tian, Mengkun; Ribeiro, Erick L.; Duscher, Gerd; Mukherjee, Dibyendu

    2016-02-01

    We have developed tandem laser ablation synthesis in solution-galvanic replacement reaction (LASiS-GRR) technique as a facile, green yet, efficient route to synthesize spherical PtCo NAs with varied sizes, compositions and degrees of alloying. The transformative concept here is the ability to design these nanostructured alloys by tuning the high-energy physico-chemical conditions emerging from liquid-confined, laser-induced plasma, and the solution-phase reaction pathways dictated by pH conditions and precursor salt concentrations. The resultant NAs exhibit uniformly alloyed cores with a Pt-rich shell of a few nanometers, as demonstrated by the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping. Such core-shell structure along with high degrees of alloying in these PtCo NAs promote their outstanding electrocatalytic ORR activities in acid electrolytes. Specifically, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts, the PtCo NAs with Co molar ratio of 22.1% indicate a c.a. 3 and 6-fold increase in mass and specific activities respectively. Such enhanced ORR activities are attributed to the efficacy of tandem LASiS-GRR route to rationally tune size distributions/compositional ratios and alloying degrees of the NAs without the use of any surfactants or reducing agents that are otherwise indispensable in chemical synthesis methods, but harmful for catalytic performances.

  5. In situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry of copper stained on the gold label after galvanic replacement reaction enlargement for ultrasensitive immunoassay of proteins.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoli; Xu, Aigui; Wang, Linchun; Liu, Ling; Chao, Long; He, Fang; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Xie, Qingji

    2016-05-15

    We report a new protocol for ultrasensitive electrochemical sandwich-type immunosensing, on the basis of signal amplification by gold-label/copper-staining, galvanic replacement reactions (GRRs), and in situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) after an enhanced cathodic preconcentration of copper. First, a sandwich-type immuno-structure is appropriately assembled at a glassy carbon electrode. Second, copper is selectively stained on the catalytic surfaces of second antibody-conjugated Au nanoparticles through CuSO4-ascorbic acid redox reaction, and the GRRs between HAuCl4 and the stained copper are used to amplify the quantity of copper. Finally, the corresponding antigen is determined based on simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-preconcentration of copper for in-situ ASV analysis directly at the immunoelectrode. Cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance and scanning electron microscopy are used for film characterization and/or process monitoring. Under optimized conditions, ultrasensitive analyses of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) are achieved. The limits of detection are 0.3 fg mL(-1) (equivalent to 7 IgG molecules in the 6 μL sample employed) for IgG (S/N=3) and 1.3 nU mL(-1) for CA125 (S/N=3), respectively, which are amongst the best reported to date for the two proteins. The theoretical feasibility of such a single-molecule-level amperometric immunoassay is also discussed based on the immunological reaction thermodynamics. PMID:26802573

  6. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  7. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from your hip joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. A hip replacement can Relieve pain Help your hip joint work better Improve walking and other movements The ...

  8. Mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, S.

    2002-08-01

    After a brief review of the notion of a full set of mutually unbiased bases in an N-dimensional Hilbert space, we summarize the work of Wootters and Fields (W K Wootters and B C Fields, Ann. Phys. 191, 363 (1989)) which gives an explicit construction for such bases for the case N=pr, where p is a prime. Further, we show how, by exploiting certain freedom in the Wootters-Fields construction, the task of explicitly writing down such bases can be simplified for the case when p is an odd prime. In particular, we express the results entirely in terms of the character vectors of the cyclic group G of order p. We also analyse the connection between mutually unbiased bases and the representations of G.

  9. Label-free SERS study of galvanic replacement reaction on silver nanorod surface and its application to detect trace mercury ion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaohui; Wen, Guiqing; Ye, Lingling; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    It is significant to explore a rapid and highly sensitive galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method for detection of trace mercury ions. This article was reported a new GRR SERS analytical platform for detecting Hg(II) with label-free molecular probe Victoria blue B (VBB). In HAc-NaCl-silver nanorod (AgNR) substrate, the molecular probe VBB exhibited a strong SERS peak at 1609 cm−1. Upon addition of Hg(II), the GRR occurred between the AgNR and Hg(II), and formed a weak SERS activity of Hg2Cl2 that deposited on the AgNR surfaces to decrease the SERS intensity at 1609 cm−1. The decreased SERS intensity was linear to Hg(II) concentration in the range of 1.25–125 nmol/L, with a detection limit of 0.2 nmol/L. The GRR was studied by SERS, transmission electron microscopy and other techniques, and the GRR mechanism was discussed. PMID:26792071

  10. Large-scale low temperature fabrication of SnO2 hollow/nanoporous nanostructures: the template-engaged replacement reaction mechanism and high-rate lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuan-Li; Wen, Yuren; van Aken, Peter A.; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2014-09-01

    The morphology-controlled synthesis of SnO2 hollow/nanoporous nanostructures (nanotubes, urchin-like morphologies and nanospheres) was achieved via a template-engaged replacement reaction at a mild temperature (lower than 80 °C). The formation mechanism of hollow interior and nanoporous walls for the obtained SnO2 nanostructures (SnO2 nanotubes were used as an example) was investigated based on TEM and HRTEM observations during different reaction stages. It is found that bridge voids firstly form at the MnO2/SnO2 interface, followed by the inward development of voids before the MnO2 core is completely consumed. Two types of short-circuited galvanic cells, MnO2/Mn2+|SnO2/Sn2+ and concentration cell-SnO2/Sn2+ (interior)|SnO2/Sn2+ (exterior), are probably responsible for the formation of SnO2 nanotubes and outward growth of SnO2 along MnO2. Moreover, the calculation result of the outer diameter of SnO2 nanotubes is in good agreement with the observation results by SEM and TEM. When evaluated as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the three SnO2 nanostructures exhibit superior rate capability and cycling performance. Especially, SnO2 nanotubes present the best rate capability: specific capacities of above 800 mA h g-1 at 200 mA g-1 and about 500 mA h g-1 at 4000 mA g-1 were achieved, respectively. Importantly, the 1D morphology of SnO2 nanotubes can be well preserved after prolonged cycling at a relatively high current density, indicating good structural stability of the resulting nanotubes during the Li+ insertion/extraction process. These results indicate that the obtained SnO2 hollow/nanoporous nanostructures would be promising anode materials for next-generation LIBs.The morphology-controlled synthesis of SnO2 hollow/nanoporous nanostructures (nanotubes, urchin-like morphologies and nanospheres) was achieved via a template-engaged replacement reaction at a mild temperature (lower than 80 °C). The formation mechanism of hollow interior and nanoporous walls

  11. Large-scale low temperature fabrication of SnO2 hollow/nanoporous nanostructures: the template-engaged replacement reaction mechanism and high-rate lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan-Li; Wen, Yuren; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2014-10-01

    The morphology-controlled synthesis of SnO2 hollow/nanoporous nanostructures (nanotubes, urchin-like morphologies and nanospheres) was achieved via a template-engaged replacement reaction at a mild temperature (lower than 80 °C). The formation mechanism of hollow interior and nanoporous walls for the obtained SnO2 nanostructures (SnO2 nanotubes were used as an example) was investigated based on TEM and HRTEM observations during different reaction stages. It is found that bridge voids firstly form at the MnO2/SnO2 interface, followed by the inward development of voids before the MnO2 core is completely consumed. Two types of short-circuited galvanic cells, MnO2/Mn(2+)∣SnO2/Sn(2+) and concentration cell-SnO2/Sn(2+) (interior)∣SnO2/Sn(2+) (exterior), are probably responsible for the formation of SnO2 nanotubes and outward growth of SnO2 along MnO2. Moreover, the calculation result of the outer diameter of SnO2 nanotubes is in good agreement with the observation results by SEM and TEM. When evaluated as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the three SnO2 nanostructures exhibit superior rate capability and cycling performance. Especially, SnO2 nanotubes present the best rate capability: specific capacities of above 800 mA h g(-1) at 200 mA g(-1) and about 500 mA h g(-1) at 4000 mA g(-1) were achieved, respectively. Importantly, the 1D morphology of SnO2 nanotubes can be well preserved after prolonged cycling at a relatively high current density, indicating good structural stability of the resulting nanotubes during the Li(+) insertion/extraction process. These results indicate that the obtained SnO2 hollow/nanoporous nanostructures would be promising anode materials for next-generation LIBs. PMID:25148613

  12. Covariant mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The connection between maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space and finite phase-space geometries is well known. In this article, we classify MUBs according to their degree of covariance with respect to the natural symmetries of a finite phase-space, which are the group of its affine symplectic transformations. We prove that there exist maximal sets of MUBs that are covariant with respect to the full group only in odd prime-power dimensional spaces, and in this case, their equivalence class is actually unique. Despite this limitation, we show that in dimension 2r covariance can still be achieved by restricting to proper subgroups of the symplectic group, that constitute the finite analogues of the oscillator group. For these subgroups, we explicitly construct the unitary operators yielding the covariance.

  13. Shoulder replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the opening at the end of the shoulder blade, called the socket. This type of joint allows ... head. The socket part (glenoid) of your shoulder blade will be replaced with a smooth plastic shell ( ...

  14. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not helping you anymore. When you have a total knee replacement, the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone ...

  15. The Evolution of Interspecific Mutualisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doebeli, Michael; Knowlton, Nancy

    1998-07-01

    Interspecific mutualisms are widespread, but how they evolve is not clear. The Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma is the main theoretical tool to study cooperation, but this model ignores ecological differences between partners and assumes that amounts exchanged cannot themselves evolve. A more realistic model incorporating these features shows that strategies that succeed with fixed exchanges (e.g., Tit-for-Tat) cannot explain mutualism when exchanges vary because the amount exchanged evolves to 0. For mutualism to evolve, increased investments in a partner must yield increased returns, and spatial structure in competitive interactions is required. Under these biologically plausible assumptions, mutualism evolves with surprising ease. This suggests that, contrary to the basic premise of past theoretical analyses, overcoming a potential host's initial defenses may be a bigger obstacle for mutualism than the subsequent recurrence and spread of noncooperative mutants.

  16. Estimating mutual information.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y), from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density mu(x,y). In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M(X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if mu(x,y)=mu(x)mu(y). This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y. In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation. PMID:15244698

  17. [Biological mutualism, concepts and models].

    PubMed

    Perru, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mutualism is a biological association for a mutual benefit between two different species. In this paper, firstly, we examine the history and signification of mutualism in relation to symbiosis. Then, we consider the link between concepts and models of mutualism. Models of mutualism depend on different concepts we use: If mutualism is situated at populations' level, it will be expressed by Lotka-Volterra models, concerning exclusively populations' size. If mutualism is considered as a resources' exchange or a biological market increasing the fitness of these organisms, it will be described at an individual level by a cost-benefit model. Our analysis will be limited to the history and epistemology of Lotka-Volterra models and we hypothesize that these models are adapted at first to translate dynamic evolutions of mutualism. They render stability or variations of size and assume that there are clear distinctions and a state of equilibrium between populations of different species. Italian mathematician Vito Volterra demonstrated that biological associations consist in a constant relation between some species. In 1931 and 1935, Volterra described the general form of antagonistic or mutualistic biological associations by the same differential equations. We recognize that these equations have been more used to model competition or prey-predator interactions, but a simple sign change allows describing mutualism. The epistemological problem is the following: Volterra's equations help us to conceptualize a global phenomenon. However, mutualistic interactions may have stronger effects away from equilibrium and these effects may be better understood at individual level. We conclude that, between 1985 and 2000, some researchers carried on working and converting Lotka-Volterra models but this description appeared as insufficient. So, other researchers adopted an economical viewpoint, considering mutualism as a biological market. PMID:22288336

  18. Grief and Palliative Care: Mutuality

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Grief and palliative care are interrelated and perhaps mutually inclusive. Conceptually and practically, grief intimately relates to palliative care, as both domains regard the phenomena of loss, suffering, and a desire for abatement of pain burden. Moreover, the notions of palliative care and grief may be construed as being mutually inclusive in terms of one cueing the other. As such, the discussions in this article will center on the conceptualizations of the mutuality between grief and palliative care related to end-of-life circumstances. Specifically, the complementarity of grief and palliative care, as well as a controvertible view thereof, will be considered. PMID:25278758

  19. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; ...

  20. 25 CFR 700.53 - Dwelling, replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General..., mutual self-help housing or other federally assisted housing programs. (c) Is in an area not subjected to... person if, after he receives a replacement housing payment and any available housing assistance...

  1. 25 CFR 700.53 - Dwelling, replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General..., mutual self-help housing or other federally assisted housing programs. (c) Is in an area not subjected to... person if, after he receives a replacement housing payment and any available housing assistance...

  2. 25 CFR 700.53 - Dwelling, replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General..., mutual self-help housing or other federally assisted housing programs. (c) Is in an area not subjected to... person if, after he receives a replacement housing payment and any available housing assistance...

  3. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or...-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual... insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on an...

  4. Molecular replacement.

    PubMed

    Toth, Eric A

    2007-01-01

    As more protein structures are solved, the likelihood that current structural investigations will involve proteins for which there exists no homologous structure continually decreases. The extraction of phase information from diffraction experiments is one of several great barriers that crystallographers must overcome on the path to structure solution. One means to overcome this obstacle, the technique of molecular replacement, uses the structural similarity between proteins with similar sequences to give a good first estimate of the phases for the diffraction data of the protein of interest. The programs that execute this technique currently come in many flavors, from traditional Patterson-based methods, to stochastic searches in greater than three dimensions, to maximum likelihood-enhanced molecular replacement, each possessing unique advantages that can shake loose a recalcitrant solution. As crystallographers aim to solve larger macromolecular complexes that more faithfully depict the actors in cellular events, having existing phase information for parts of those biological machines will reinforce the technological advancements in data collection and structure solution that have already produced mammoth structures like the ribosome, yielding an ever-clearer picture of the inner workings of biology. PMID:17172763

  5. Development of Mutual Responsiveness Between Parents and Their Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Aksan, Nazan

    2004-01-01

    This comprehensive study of mutual responsiveness examined 102 mothers and 102 fathers interacting with their children at 7 and 15 months. Responsiveness was studied from developmental and individual differences perspectives, and assessed using macroscopic ratings and microscopic event coding. The latter captured parents' reactions to children's…

  6. Hierarchical clustering using mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraskov, A.; Stögbauer, H.; Andrzejak, R. G.; Grassberger, P.

    2005-04-01

    We present a conceptually simple method for hierarchical clustering of data called mutual information clustering (MIC) algorithm. It uses mutual information (MI) as a similarity measure and exploits its grouping property: The MI between three objects X, Y, and Z is equal to the sum of the MI between X and Y, plus the MI between Z and the combined object (XY). We use this both in the Shannon (probabilistic) version of information theory and in the Kolmogorov (algorithmic) version. We apply our method to the construction of phylogenetic trees from mitochondrial DNA sequences and to the output of independent components analysis (ICA) as illustrated with the ECG of a pregnant woman.

  7. Evaluation of selected benzoquinones, naphthoquinones, and anthraquinones as replacements for phylloquinone in the A sub 1 acceptor site of the photosystem I reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Biggins, J. )

    1990-08-07

    Selected substituted 1,4-benzoquinones, 1,4-naphthoquinones, and 9,10-anthraquinones were investigated as possible replacement quinones in spinach photosystem I (PSI) preparations that had been depleted of endogenous phylloquinone by extraction with hexane/methanol. As a criterion for successful biochemical reconstitution, the restoration of electron transfer was determined by measuring P-430 turnover at room temperature from flash-induced absorbance transients. Restoration of complete electron transfer between A{sub 0}{sup {minus}} and P-430 (terminal iron-sulfur centers, F{sub A}F{sub B}) was demonstrated by using phylloquinone, 2-methyl-3-decyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-3-(isoprenyl){sub 2}-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 2-methyl-3-(isoprenyl){sub 4}-1,4-naphthoquinone. All other quinones tested did not restore P-430 turnover but acted as electron acceptors and oxidized A{sub 0}{sup {minus}}. It is concluded that the specificity of the replacement quinone for interaction with the primary acceptor, A{sub 0}{sup {minus}}, is low but additional structural constraints are required for the quinone occupying the A{sub 1} site to donate to the iron-sulfur center, F{sub x}. It is suggested that the 3-phytyl side chain of phylloquinone and the 3-alkyl tails of the three naphthoquinones that restored P-430 turnover may be required for interaction with a hydrophobic domain of the A{sub 1} site in the PSI core to promote electron transfer to F{sub x} and then to F{sub A}F{sub B}.

  8. Mutual Gains Means Everyone Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Bernard L.

    1997-01-01

    Mutual gains negotiation is an innovative system that emphasizes interests instead of positions and problem solving instead of preconceived solutions. The process can reverse social disintegration, reverse worker alienation, and address a shifting educational environment. It can resolve difficult labor-management problems such as contracting out,…

  9. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  10. Desensitization and immune tolerance induction in children with severe factor IX deficiency; inhibitors and adverse reactions to replacement therapy: a case-report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bon, Andrea; Morfini, Massimo; Dini, Alessandro; Mori, Francesca; Barni, Simona; Gianluca, Sottilotta; de Martino, Maurizio; Novembre, Elio

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia B is a rare X-linked recessive disorder with plasma factor IX (FIX) deficiency. 1-3% of patients treated with exogenous FIX-containing products develop inhibitors (i.e. polyclonal high affinity immunoglobulins) that neutralize the procoagulant activity of a specific coagulation factor. Although the incidence of inhibitors in hemophilia B patients is low, most are "high titer" and frequently associated with the development of severe allergic or anaphylactic reactions. Immune tolerance induction as a strategy for inhibitor eradication was first described in 1984. Unfortunately, the overall reported success of immune tolerance induction in FIX deficiency with inhibitors is approximately 25-40%.We report the case of a 2-year-old boy with hemophilia B severe FIX deficiency (<1%), inhibitor antibodies to FIX development, and a history of adverse reactions to FIX infusions, who underwent a successful desensitization and immune tolerance induction with a daily FIX infusion. With this regimen the inhibitor titer decreased with effective bleeding prevention. PMID:25887512

  11. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on...

  12. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on...

  13. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on...

  14. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... Companies § 1.831-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance...) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign insurance companies not carrying on...

  15. Mutual impedance computation between printed dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, N. G.; Rana, I. E.

    1981-01-01

    The mutual impedance between microstrip dipoles printed on a grounded substrate is computed. Results for the microstrip dipoles in broadside, collinear, and echelon arrangements are presented. The significance of surface wave to mutual coupling is discussed.

  16. Pluto-charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Binzel, R.P. )

    1989-11-01

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained.

  17. Parents Helping Parents: Mutual Parenting Network Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkinson, Charles H.; Redmond, Robert F.

    Guidelines for mutual parenting are provided in this handbook. "Mutual parenting" means that everyone in the community shares the responsibility for the safety and well-being of the community's youngsters. Several topics are discussed in the 15 brief chapters of the handbook. Chapters 1 through 3 focus on the formation of a mutual parenting…

  18. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  19. Molecular dynamics study of the primary charge separation reactions in Photosystem I: effect of the replacement of the axial ligands to the electron acceptor A₀.

    PubMed

    Milanovsky, Georgy E; Ptushenko, Vasily V; Golbeck, John H; Semenov, Alexey Yu; Cherepanov, Dmitry A

    2014-09-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations, a semi-continuum (SC) approach, and quantum chemistry (QC) calculations were employed together to investigate the molecular mechanics of ultrafast charge separation reactions in Photosystem I (PS I) of Thermosynechococcus elongatus. A molecular model of PS I was developed with the aim to relate the atomic structure with electron transfer events in the two branches of cofactors. A structural flexibility map of PS I was constructed based on MD simulations, which demonstrated its rigid hydrophobic core and more flexible peripheral regions. The MD model permitted the study of atomic movements (dielectric polarization) in response to primary and secondary charge separations, while QC calculations were used to estimate the direct chemical effect of the A(0A)/A(0B) ligands (Met or Asn in the 688/668 position) on the redox potential of chlorophylls A(0A)/A(0B) and phylloquinones A(1A)/A(1B). A combination of MD and SC approaches was used to estimate reorganization energies λ of the primary (λ₁) and secondary (λ₂ ) charge separation reactions, which were found to be independent of the active branch of electron transfer; in PS I from the wild type, λ₁ was estimated to be 390 ± 20mV, while λ₂ was estimated to be higher at 445 ± 15mV. MD and QC approaches were used to describe the effect of substituting Met688(PsaA)/Met668(PsaB) by Asn688(PsaA)/Asn668(PsaB) on the energetics of electron transfer. Unlike Met, which has limited degrees of freedom in the site, Asn was found to switch between two relatively stable conformations depending on cofactor charge. The introduction of Asn and its conformation flexibility significantly affected the reorganization energy of charge separation and the redox potentials of chlorophylls A(0A)/A(0B) and phylloquinones A(1A)/A(1B), which may explain the experimentally observed slowdown of secondary electron transfer in the M688N(PsaA) variant. This article is part of a special issue entitled

  20. Patients with Intolerance Reactions to Total Knee Replacement: Combined Assessment of Allergy Diagnostics, Periprosthetic Histology, and Peri-implant Cytokine Expression Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter; von der Helm, Christine; Schopf, Christoph; Mazoochian, Farhad; Frommelt, Lars; Gollwitzer, Hans; Schneider, Josef; Flaig, Michael; Krenn, Veit; Thomas, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We performed a combined approach to identify suspected allergy to knee arthroplasty (TKR): patch test (PT), lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), histopathology (overall grading; T- and B-lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils), and semiquantitative Real-time-PCR-based periprosthetic inflammatory mediator analysis (IFNγ, TNFα, IL1-β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL17, and TGFβ). We analyzed 25 TKR patients with yet unexplained complications like pain, effusion, and reduced range of motion. They consisted of 20 patients with proven metal sensitization (11 with PT reactions; 9 with only LTT reactivity). Control specimens were from 5 complicated TKR patients without metal sensitization, 12 OA patients before arthroplasty, and 8 PT patients without arthroplasty. Lymphocytic infiltrates were seen and fibrotic (Type IV membrane) tissue response was most frequent in the metal sensitive patients, for example, in 81% of the PT positive patients. The latter also had marked periprosthetic IFNγ expression. 8/9 patients with revision surgery using Ti-coated/oxinium based implants reported symptom relief. Our findings demonstrate that combining allergy diagnostics with histopathology and periprosthetic cytokine assessment could allow us to design better diagnostic strategies. PMID:25866822

  1. Development of mutual responsiveness between parents and their young children.

    PubMed

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Aksan, Nazan

    2004-01-01

    This comprehensive study of mutual responsiveness examined 102 mothers and 102 fathers interacting with their children at 7 and 15 months. Responsiveness was studied from developmental and individual differences perspectives, and assessed using macroscopic ratings and microscopic event coding. The latter captured parents' reactions to children's negative, positive, and physical bids, and children's reactions to parents' social-interactive bids, mood regulation attempts, and influence attempts. Responsiveness depended on bid type and child age, and reflected developmental changes in children, parents, and relationships. Mothers were more responsive than fathers; children were equally responsive to both parents and coherent in their responsiveness. Ratings revealed dyadic mutuality and longitudinal continuity of responsiveness. Parent-child responsiveness from 7 to 15 months was consistent with assumptions of a parent-driven process. PMID:15566371

  2. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marjorie G; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-11-18

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity. PMID:25349406

  3. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marjorie G.; Agrawal, Anurag A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity. PMID:25349406

  4. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate coefficients as a function of temperature and IR absorption cross sections for CF3CH=CH2 (HFO-1243zf), potential replacement of CF3CH2F (HFC-134a).

    PubMed

    González, Sergio; Jiménez, Elena; Ballesteros, Bernabé; Martínez, Ernesto; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    CF3CH=CH2 (hydrofluoroolefin, HFO-1243zf) is a potential replacement of high global-warming potential (GWP) hydrofluorocarbon (HFC-134a, CF3CFH2). Both the atmospheric lifetime and the radiative efficiency of HFO-1243zf are parameters needed for estimating the GWP of this species. Therefore, the aim of this work is (i) to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of HFO-1243zf from the reported OH rate coefficients, k OH, determined under tropospheric conditions and (ii) to calculate its radiative efficiency from the reported IR absorption cross sections. The OH rate coefficient at 298 K also allows the estimation of the photochemical ozone creation potential (ε(POCP)). The pulsed laser photolysis coupled to a laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to determine k OH for the reaction of OH radicals with HFO-1243zf as a function of pressure (50-650 Torr of He) and temperature (263-358 K). Gas-phase IR spectra of HFO-1243zf were recorded at room temperature using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer between 500 and 4,000 cm(-1). At all temperatures, k OH did not depend on bath gas concentration (i.e., on the total pressure between 50 and 650 Torr of He). A slight but noticeable T dependence of k OH was observed in the temperature range investigated. The observed behavior is well described by the following Arrhenius expression: k OH(T) = (7.65 ± 0.26) × 10(-13) exp [(165 ± 10) / T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Negligible IR absorption of HFO-1243zf was observed at wavenumbers greater than 1,700 cm(-1). Therefore, IR absorption cross sections, [Formula: see text], were determined in the 500-1,700 cm(-1) range. Integrated [Formula: see text] were determined between 650 and 1,800 cm(-1) for comparison purposes. The main diurnal removal pathway for HFO-1243zf is the reaction with OH radicals, which accounts for 64% of the overall loss by homogeneous reactions at 298 K. Globally, the lifetime due to OH reaction (τ OH) was estimated to be 8.7 days under

  5. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm Hip joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip joint replacement is surgery to replace all or part ...

  6. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  7. Prevalence of Failure due to Adverse Reaction to Metal Debris in Modern, Medium and Large Diameter Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements – The Effect of Novel Screening Methods: Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reito, Aleksi; Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements were used for almost a decade before adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) were found to be a true clinical problem. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the usefulness of systematic screening for ARMD. We implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish the prevalence of revision confirmed ARMD stratified by the use of different screening protocols in patients with MoM hip replacements. Five levels of screening were identified: no screening (level 0), targeted blood metal ion measurement and/or cross-sectional imaging (level 1), metal ion measurement without imaging (level 2), metal ion measurement with targeted imaging (level 3) and comprehensive screening (both metal ions and imaging for all; level 4). 122 studies meeting our eligibility criteria were included in analysis. These studies included 144 study arms: 100 study arms with hip resurfacings, 33 study arms with large-diameter MoM total hip replacements (THR), and 11 study arms with medium-diameter MoM THRs. For hip resurfacing, the lowest prevalence of ARMD was seen with level 0 screening (pooled prevalence 0.13%) and the highest with level 4 screening (pooled prevalace 9.49%). Pooled prevalence of ARMD with level 0 screening was 0.29% and with level 4 screening 21.3% in the large-diameter MoM THR group. In metaregression analysis of hip resurfacings, level 4 screening was superior with regard to prevalence of ARMD when compared with other levels. In the large diameter THR group level 4 screening was superior to screening 0,2 and 3. These outcomes were irrespective of follow-up time or study publication year. With hip resurfacings, routine cross-sectional imaging regardless of clinical findings is advisable. It is clear, however, that targeted metal ion measurement and/or imaging is not sufficient in the screening for ARMD in any implant concepts. However, economic aspects should be weighed when choosing the preferred screening level

  8. Prevalence of Failure due to Adverse Reaction to Metal Debris in Modern, Medium and Large Diameter Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements--The Effect of Novel Screening Methods: Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reito, Aleksi; Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements were used for almost a decade before adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) were found to be a true clinical problem. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the usefulness of systematic screening for ARMD. We implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish the prevalence of revision confirmed ARMD stratified by the use of different screening protocols in patients with MoM hip replacements. Five levels of screening were identified: no screening (level 0), targeted blood metal ion measurement and/or cross-sectional imaging (level 1), metal ion measurement without imaging (level 2), metal ion measurement with targeted imaging (level 3) and comprehensive screening (both metal ions and imaging for all; level 4). 122 studies meeting our eligibility criteria were included in analysis. These studies included 144 study arms: 100 study arms with hip resurfacings, 33 study arms with large-diameter MoM total hip replacements (THR), and 11 study arms with medium-diameter MoM THRs. For hip resurfacing, the lowest prevalence of ARMD was seen with level 0 screening (pooled prevalence 0.13%) and the highest with level 4 screening (pooled prevalace 9.49%). Pooled prevalence of ARMD with level 0 screening was 0.29% and with level 4 screening 21.3% in the large-diameter MoM THR group. In metaregression analysis of hip resurfacings, level 4 screening was superior with regard to prevalence of ARMD when compared with other levels. In the large diameter THR group level 4 screening was superior to screening 0,2 and 3. These outcomes were irrespective of follow-up time or study publication year. With hip resurfacings, routine cross-sectional imaging regardless of clinical findings is advisable. It is clear, however, that targeted metal ion measurement and/or imaging is not sufficient in the screening for ARMD in any implant concepts. However, economic aspects should be weighed when choosing the preferred screening level

  9. Mutual information in classical spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Johannes; Troyer, Matthias; Verstraete, Frank

    2011-10-01

    The total many-body correlations present in finite temperature classical spin systems are studied using the concept of mutual information. As opposed to zero-temperature quantum phase transitions, the total correlations are not maximal at the phase transition, but reach a maximum in the high-temperature paramagnetic phase. The Shannon mutual information and the Renyi mutual information in both Ising and Potts models in two dimensions are calculated numerically by combining matrix product state algorithms and Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  10. Mutual enhancement of diverse terminologies

    PubMed Central

    Hardiker, Nicholas R.; Casey, Anne; Coenen, Amy; Konicek, Debra

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) nursing diagnoses to the International Classification for Nursing Practice Version 1.0 (ICNP®) and to compare the resulting representations and relationships to those within SNOMED® Clinical Terms (CT). Independent reviewers reached agreement on 25 (i.e. 64%) of the 39 parent-child relationships identified via the mappings between NANDA entities. Other parent-child relationships were more questionable and are in need of further discussion. This work does not seek to promote one terminology over any other. Rather, this collaborative effort has the potential to mutually enhance all three terminologies involved in the study: ICNP®, SNOMED® CT and NANDA. In doing so it provides an example of the type of collaborative effort that is needed to facilitate the development of tools to support interoperability at a global level. PMID:17238355

  11. Entanglement in Mutually Unbiased Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesniak, Marcin; Paterek, Tomasz; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-03-01

    Higher-dimensional Hilbert spaces are still not fully explored. One issue concerns mutually unbiased bases (MUBs). For primes and their powers (e.g.), full sets of MUBs are known. The question of existence of all MUBs in composite dimensions is still open. We show that for all full sets of MUBs of a given dimension a certain entanglement measure of the bases is constant. This fact could be an argument either for or against the existence of full sets of MUBs in some dimensions and tells us that almost all MUBs are maximally entangled for high-dimensional composite systems, whereas this is not the case for prime dimensions. We present a new construction of MUBs in squared prime dimensions. We use only one entangling operation, which simplifies possible experiments. The construction gives only product states and maximally entangled states. Research supported by ERC Advanced Grant QIT4QAD and FWF SFB-grant F4007 of the Austrian Science Fund.

  12. 77 FR 73700 - Mutual of America Life Insurance Company, et al;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Vanguard International Portfolio (``Replacement International Fund'') of the Vanguard Variable Insurance... Fund'') of the DWS Variable Series I (``DWS Fund''), and (b) the Mutual of America Bond Fund... Bond Fund'') of the DWS Fund, under certain variable life insurance and annuity contracts issued by...

  13. Refining and Mutual Separation of Rare Earths Using Biomass Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2013-10-01

    Two different types of adsorption gels were prepared from biomass wastes. The first gel was produced from astringent persimmon peel rich in persimmon tannin, a polyphenol compound, which was prepared by means of simple dehydration condensation reaction using concentrated sulfuric acid for crosslinking. This adsorption gel was intended to be employed for the removal of radioactive elements, uranium (U(VI)) and thorium (Th(IV)), from rare earths. The second gel was prepared from chitosan, a basic polysaccharide, produced from shells of crustaceans such as crabs, shrimps, prawns, and other biomass wastes generated in marine product industry, by immobilizing functional groups of complexanes such as ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid and diethylentriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This gel was developed for the mutual separation of rare earths. Of the two adsorption gels evaluated, the DTPA immobilized chitosan exhibited the most effective mutual separation among light rare earths.

  14. The Competitive Strategy of Mutual Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelner, Stephen P.; Slavin, Lois

    1998-01-01

    Defines and discusses mutual learning in organizations. Suggests that the idea of people and companies sharing knowledge is becoming a competitive strategy because mutual learning enables executives and employees to increase their capacity to work together, accelerate organizational learning, and avoid mistakes. (JOW)

  15. Victimization within Mutually Antipathetic Peer Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Noel A.; Hodges, Ernest V. E.

    2007-01-01

    Children's victimization experiences within relationships characterized by mutual animosity were examined among 210 6th- and 7th-grade boys and girls. Participants reported that a greater proportion of mutual antipathies, relative to other peers, victimized them. Moreover, the receipt of victimization within antipathetic relationships was greater…

  16. [Maintaining solidarity: is mutuality the solution?].

    PubMed

    Gevers, J K M; Ploem, M C

    2013-01-01

    Solidarity is essentially the willingness to contribute to the community and its demands, which may even involve contributing more than one is expecting to receive. Another principle is mutuality: this refers to a balance between rights and obligations or between mutual obligations. In its advisory document 'The importance of mutuality......solidarity takes work!', The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care underlines the importance of ensuring solidarity within the Dutch health care system, e.g. by encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health, possibly by introducing elements of mutuality. In our contribution, we comment on the Council's advice. Although we fully agree with the overall conclusion that solidarity should be maintained within the system, we do not see how the introduction of increased mutuality will contribute to this goal. PMID:23945438

  17. Mutual Orbits of Transneptunian Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Noll, K. S.; Roe, H. G.; Porter, S. B.; Trujillo, C. A.; Benecchi, S. D.; Buie, M. W.

    2012-10-01

    We report the latest results from a program of high spatial resolution imaging to resolve the individual components of binary transneptunian objects. These observations use Hubble Space Telescope and also laser guide star adaptive optics systems on Keck and Gemini telescopes on Mauna Kea. From relative astrometry over multiple epochs, we determine the mutual orbits of the components, and thus the total masses of the systems. Accurate masses anchor subsequent detailed investigations into the physical characteristics of these systems. For instance, dynamical masses enable computation of bulk densities for systems where the component sizes can be estimated from other measurements. Additionally, patterns in the ensemble characteristics of binary orbits offer clues to circumstances in the protoplanetary nebula when these systems formed, as well as carrying imprints of various subsequent dynamical evolution processes. The growing ensemble of known orbits shows intriguing patterns that can shed light on the evolution of this population of distant objects. This work has been supported by an NSF Planetary Astronomy grant and by several Hubble Space Telescope and NASA Keck data analysis grants. The research makes use of data from the Gemini Observatory obtained through NOAO survey program 11A-0017, from a large number of Hubble Space Telescope programs, and from several NASA Keck programs.

  18. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  19. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  20. Generalized mutual information and Tsirelson's bound

    SciTech Connect

    Wakakuwa, Eyuri; Murao, Mio

    2014-12-04

    We introduce a generalization of the quantum mutual information between a classical system and a quantum system into the mutual information between a classical system and a system described by general probabilistic theories. We apply this generalized mutual information (GMI) to a derivation of Tsirelson's bound from information causality, and prove that Tsirelson's bound can be derived from the chain rule of the GMI. By using the GMI, we formulate the 'no-supersignalling condition' (NSS), that the assistance of correlations does not enhance the capability of classical communication. We prove that NSS is never violated in any no-signalling theory.

  1. Elbow replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Total elbow arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic elbow replacement - discharge ... You had surgery to replace your elbow joint with artificial joint parts (prosthetics). The surgeon made a cut (incision) in the back of your upper or lower arm and ...

  2. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  3. Nicotine replacement therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... If wearing the patch at night causes odd dreams, try sleeping without the patch. People who smoke ... cessation - nicotine replacement; Tobacco - nicotine replacement therapy References American Cancer Society. Guide to quitting smoking. Last revised ...

  4. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Most people recover quickly and have much less pain than they did before surgery. People who have a partial knee replacement recover faster than those who have a total knee replacement. Many people are able to walk ...

  5. 76 FR 71437 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC or Committee) formerly administered by the Office of... of and challenges facing mutual savings associations. The OCC is seeking nominations of...

  6. Mutual electron detachment in collisions between negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, R.; Melchert, F.; Krüdener, S.; Meuser, S.; Petri, S.; Benner, M.; Salzborn, E.

    1992-10-01

    Employing the crossed-beams technique, we have measured absolute cross sections for mutual electron detachment in collisions between two negative ions H-+X-→H0+X0+2e-(X-:B-, H-,Cu-,O-,Au-,F-) in the CM-energy range between a few keV and about 100 keV. The results obtained appear not to obey a simple scaling with negative ion binding energies. For H-+H--collisions also the single detachment reaction H-+H-→H0+... has been investigated.

  7. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  8. Phenological shifts and the fate of mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Nicole E.; CaraDonna, Paul J.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing of life history events in a wide array of species, many of which are involved in mutualistic interactions. Because many mutualisms can form only if partner species are able to locate each other in time, differential phenological shifts are likely to influence their strength, duration and outcome. At the extreme, climate change-driven shifts in phenology may result in phenological mismatch: the partial or complete loss of temporal overlap of mutualistic species. We have a growing understanding of how, when, and why phenological change can alter one type of mutualism–pollination. However, as we show here, there has been a surprising lack of attention to other types of mutualism. We generate a set of predictions about the characteristics that may predispose mutualisms in general to phenological mismatches. We focus not on the consequences of such mismatches but rather on the likelihood that mismatches will develop. We explore the influence of three key characteristics of mutualism: 1) intimacy, 2) seasonality and duration, and 3) obligacy and specificity. We predict that the following characteristics of mutualism may increase the likelihood of phenological mismatch: 1) a non-symbiotic life history in which co-dispersal is absent; 2) brief, seasonal interactions; and 3) facultative, generalized interactions. We then review the limited available data in light of our a priori predictions and point to mutualisms that are more and less likely to be at risk of becoming phenologically mismatched, emphasizing the need for research on mutualisms other than plant–pollinator interactions. Future studies should explicitly focus on mutualism characteristics to determine whether and how changing phenologies will affect mutualistic interactions. PMID:25883391

  9. Certainty relations, mutual entanglement, and nondisplaceable manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchała, Zbigniew; Rudnicki, Łukasz; Chabuda, Krzysztof; Paraniak, Mikołaj; Życzkowski, Karol

    2015-09-01

    We derive explicit bounds for the average entropy characterizing measurements of a pure quantum state of size N in L orthogonal bases. Lower bounds lead to novel entropic uncertainty relations, while upper bounds allow us to formulate universal certainty relations. For L =2 the maximal average entropy saturates at logN because there exists a mutually coherent state, but certainty relations are shown to be nontrivial for L ≥3 measurements. In the case of a prime power dimension, N =pk , and the number of measurements L =N +1 , the upper bound for the average entropy becomes minimal for a collection of mutually unbiased bases. An analogous approach is used to study entanglement with respect to L different splittings of a composite system linked by bipartite quantum gates. We show that, for any two-qubit unitary gate U ∈U(4 ) there exist states being mutually separable or mutually entangled with respect to both splittings (related by U ) of the composite system. The latter statement follows from the fact that the real projective space R P3⊂C P3 is nondisplaceable by a unitary transformation. For L =3 splittings the maximal sum of L entanglement entropies is conjectured to achieve its minimum for a collection of three mutually entangled bases, formed by two mutually entangling gates.

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 in which Fe2+ was replaced by Cu2+. Determination of hyperfine interactions and exchange and dipole-dipole interactions between Cu2+ and QA-.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, R; Passeggi, M C; Isaacson, R A; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1990-01-01

    We report electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments in frozen solutions of unreduced and reduced photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 in which Fe2+ has been chemically replaced by the isotope 65Cu2+. Samples in which the primary quinone acceptor QA is unreduced (Cu2+QA:RCs) give a powder EPR spectrum typical for Cu2+ having axial symmetry, corresponding to a d(x2 - y2) ground state orbital, with g values g parallel = 2.314 +/- 0.001 and g perpendicular = 2.060 +/- 0.003. The spectrum shows a hyperfine structure for the nuclear spin of copper (65I = 3/2) with A parallel = (-167 +/- 1) x 10(-4) cm-1 and /A perpendicular/ = (16 +/- 2) x 10(-4) cm-1, and hyperfine couplings with three nitrogen ligands. This has been verified in samples containing the naturally occurring 14N isotope (l = 1), and in samples where the nitrogen ligands to copper were replaced by the isotope 15N (l = 1/2). We introduce a model for the electronic structure at the position of the metal ion which reflects the recently determined three-dimensional structure of the RCs of Rb. sphaeroides (Allen, J. P., G. Feher, T. O. Yeates, H. Komiya, and D. C. Rees. 1987. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 84:5730: Allen, J. P., G. Feher, T. O. Yeates, H. Komiya, and D. C. Rees. 1988. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 85:8487) as well as our EPR results. In this model the copper ion is octahedrally coordinated to three nitrogens from histidine residues and to one carboxylate oxygen from a glutamic acid, forming a distorted square in the plane of the d(x2 = y2) ground state orbital. It is also bound to a nitrogen of another histidine and to the other carboxylate oxygen of the same glutamic acid residue, in a direction approximately normal to this plane. The EPR spectrum changes drastically when the quinone acceptor QA is chemically reduced (Cu2+QA-:RCs); the change is due to the exchange and dipole-dipole interactions between the Cu2+ and QA- spins. A model spin Hamiltonian

  11. Ion replacement electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Willit, J.L.; Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    We are developing a two-step electrochemical process for purifying and separating metals called ion replacement electrorefining. In each step, metal cations formed by oxidation at an electrode replace other metal cations that are reduced at another elecmae. Using this approach, we have separated or purified uranium, dysprosium, and lanthanum on a laboratory scale. This paper explains the ion replacement concept and presents results of these demonstration experiments.

  12. 78 FR 64600 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC will be held... mutual savings associations and other issues of concern to the existing mutual savings...

  13. 75 FR 77048 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the... Thrift Supervision has determined that the renewal of the ] Charter of the OTS Mutual Savings Association... facing mutual savings associations. DATES: The Charter of the OTS Mutual Savings Association...

  14. Group Differences in the Mutual Gaze of Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Kim A.; Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Tomonaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Costall, Alan; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2005-01-01

    A comparative developmental framework was used to determine whether mutual gaze is unique to humans and, if not, whether common mechanisms support the development of mutual gaze in chimpanzees and humans. Mother-infant chimpanzees engaged in approximately 17 instances of mutual gaze per hour. Mutual gaze occurred in positive, nonagonistic…

  15. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3 Section 575.3 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize...

  16. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3 Section 575.3 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize...

  17. 12 CFR 144.1 - Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Federal mutual charter. 144.1 Section 144.1 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Charter § 144.1 Federal mutual charter. A Federal mutual savings association shall have a charter in the following...

  18. 12 CFR 544.1 - Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Federal mutual charter. 544.1 Section 544.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Charter § 544.1 Federal mutual charter. A Federal mutual savings association shall have a charter in the following...

  19. 12 CFR 144.1 - Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Federal mutual charter. 144.1 Section 144.1 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Charter § 144.1 Federal mutual charter. A Federal mutual savings association shall have a charter in the following...

  20. 12 CFR 544.1 - Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Federal mutual charter. 544.1 Section 544.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Charter § 544.1 Federal mutual charter. A Federal mutual savings association shall have a charter in the following...

  1. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Federal mutual savings association bylaws. 544.5 Section 544.5 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-CHARTER AND BYLAWS Bylaws § 544.5 Federal mutual savings association bylaws. (a) General. A Federal mutual...

  2. Dealing with an Angry Public: The Mutual Gains Approach to Resolving Disputes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susskind, Lawrence; Field, Patrick

    Public anger is a typical reaction to governments' or companies' attempts to cover up mistakes, conceal evidence of risks, make misleading statements, or lie. Many times, this anger leads to an entrenched resistance to public or private initiatives. Ways in which this resistance can be overcome by a mutual gains approach, which involves…

  3. Online Counseling: Prioritizing Psychoeducation, Self-Help, and Mutual Help for Counseling Psychology Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This reaction article extends the research and practice recommendations for online counseling from the Major Contribution to the November 2005 issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" by prioritizing research and practice in online psychoeducation, self-help, and mutual help. Research suggests that tens of millions of Americans use the Internet for…

  4. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  5. Mutualisms in a changing world: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Toby Kiers, E; Palmer, Todd M; Ives, Anthony R; Bruno, John F; Bronstein, Judith L

    2010-12-01

    Ecology Letters (2010) 13: 1459-1474 ABSTRACT: There is growing concern that rapid environmental degradation threatens mutualistic interactions. Because mutualisms can bind species to a common fate, mutualism breakdown has the potential to expand and accelerate effects of global change on biodiversity loss and ecosystem disruption. The current focus on the ecological dynamics of mutualism under global change has skirted fundamental evolutionary issues. Here, we develop an evolutionary perspective on mutualism breakdown to complement the ecological perspective, by focusing on three processes: (1) shifts from mutualism to antagonism, (2) switches to novel partners and (3) mutualism abandonment. We then identify the evolutionary factors that may make particular classes of mutualisms especially susceptible or resistant to breakdown and discuss how communities harbouring mutualisms may be affected by these evolutionary responses. We propose a template for evolutionary research on mutualism resilience and identify conservation approaches that may help conserve targeted mutualisms in the face of environmental change. PMID:20955506

  6. Mutual information and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, A.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the metastable, symmetry-breaking ground states of quantum many-body Hamiltonians have vanishing quantum mutual information between macroscopically separated regions and are thus the most classical ones among all possible quantum ground states. This statement is obvious only when the symmetry-breaking ground states are simple product states, e.g., at the factorization point. On the other hand, symmetry-breaking states are in general entangled along the entire ordered phase, and to show that they actually feature the least macroscopic correlations compared to their symmetric superpositions is highly nontrivial. We prove this result in general, by considering the quantum mutual information based on the two-Rényi entanglement entropy and using a locality result stemming from quasiadiabatic continuation. Moreover, in the paradigmatic case of the exactly solvable one-dimensional quantum X Y model, we further verify the general result by considering also the quantum mutual information based on the von Neumann entanglement entropy.

  7. Mutual information rate and bounds for it.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Murilo S; Rubinger, Rero M; Viana, Emilson R; Sartorelli, José C; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators. PMID:23112809

  8. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    71 I. 71 II. 72 III. 73 IV. 74 V. 74 74 References 74 SUMMARY: Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle. PMID:26414800

  9. Mutual inductance between piecewise-linear loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristina Barroso, Ana; Silva, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    We consider a current-carrying wire loop made out of linear segments of arbitrary sizes and directions in three-dimensional space. We develop expressions to calculate its vector potential and magnetic field at all points in space. We then calculate the mutual inductance between two such (non-intersecting) piecewise-linear loops. As simple applications, we consider in detail the mutual inductance between two square wires of equal length that either lie in the same plane or lie in parallel horizontal planes with their centers on the same vertical axis. Our expressions can also be used to obtain approximations to the mutual inductance between wires of arbitrary three-dimensional shapes.

  10. Distribution of Mutual Information in Multipartite States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziero, Jonas

    2014-06-01

    Using the relative entropy of total correlation, we derive an expression relating the mutual information of n-partite pure states to the sum of the mutual informations and entropies of its marginals and analyze some of its implications. Besides, by utilizing the extended strong subadditivity of von Neumann entropy, we obtain generalized monogamy relations for the total correlation in three-partite mixed states. These inequalities lead to a tight lower bound for this correlation in terms of the sum of the bipartite mutual informations. We use this bound to propose a measure for residual three-partite total correlation and discuss the non-applicability of this kind of quantifier to measure genuine multiparty correlations.

  11. Mutual colliding impact fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2014-09-01

    It is proposed to apply the well established colliding beam technology of high energy physics to the fast hot spot ignition of a highly compressed DT (deuterium-tritium) target igniting a larger D (deuterium) burn, by accelerating a small amount of solid deuterium, and likewise a small amount of tritium, making a head-on collision in the center of the target, projecting them through conical ducts situated at the opposite side of the target and converging in its center. In their head-on collision, the relative collision velocity is 5/3 times larger compared to the collision velocity of a stationary target. The two pieces have for this reason to be accelerated to a smaller velocity than would otherwise be needed to reach upon impact the same temperature. Since the velocity distribution of the two head-on colliding projectiles is with its two velocity peaks non-Maxwellian, the maximum cross section velocity product turns out to be substantially larger than the maximum if averaged over a Maxwellian. The D and T projectiles would have to be accelerated with two sabots driven by powerful particle or laser beams, permitting a rather large acceleration length. With the substantially larger cross section-velocity product by virtue of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution, a further advantage is that the head-on collision produces a large magnetic field by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, enhancing propagating burn. With this concept, the ignition of the neutron-less hydrogen-boron (HB11) reaction might even be possible in a heterogeneous assembly of the hydrogen and the boron to reduce the bremsstrahlung-losses, resembling the heterogeneous assembly in a graphite-natural uranium reactor, there to reduce the neutron losses.

  12. Mutual colliding impact fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2014-09-15

    It is proposed to apply the well established colliding beam technology of high energy physics to the fast hot spot ignition of a highly compressed DT (deuterium-tritium) target igniting a larger D (deuterium) burn, by accelerating a small amount of solid deuterium, and likewise a small amount of tritium, making a head-on collision in the center of the target, projecting them through conical ducts situated at the opposite side of the target and converging in its center. In their head-on collision, the relative collision velocity is 5/3 times larger compared to the collision velocity of a stationary target. The two pieces have for this reason to be accelerated to a smaller velocity than would otherwise be needed to reach upon impact the same temperature. Since the velocity distribution of the two head-on colliding projectiles is with its two velocity peaks non-Maxwellian, the maximum cross section velocity product turns out to be substantially larger than the maximum if averaged over a Maxwellian. The D and T projectiles would have to be accelerated with two sabots driven by powerful particle or laser beams, permitting a rather large acceleration length. With the substantially larger cross section-velocity product by virtue of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution, a further advantage is that the head-on collision produces a large magnetic field by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, enhancing propagating burn. With this concept, the ignition of the neutron-less hydrogen-boron (HB{sup 11}) reaction might even be possible in a heterogeneous assembly of the hydrogen and the boron to reduce the bremsstrahlung-losses, resembling the heterogeneous assembly in a graphite-natural uranium reactor, there to reduce the neutron losses.

  13. Replacement of olivine by serpentine in the Queen Alexandra Range 93005 carbonaceous chondrite (CM2): Reactant-product compositional relations, and isovolumetric constraints on reaction stoichiometry and elemental mobility during aqueous alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velbel, Michael A.; Tonui, Eric K.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Isovolumetric replacement of euhedral and anhedral olivine by serpentine produced both centripetal and meshwork textures in the CM2 chondrites ALH 81002 and Nogoya. The compositions of these textural varieties of serpentine are uniform within narrow limits within each previously studied meteorite, independent of the composition of olivine being replaced, and different between the two meteorites. In QUE 93005 (CM2), coarse olivines of widely varying compositions (Fo<76-99) are replaced in a texturally similar manner by compositionally uniform serpentine (Mg0.73±0.05Fe0.27±0.05)3Si2O5(OH)4. The narrow compositional range of serpentine replacing coarse olivine indicates that the aqueous solution from which the serpentine formed was compositionally uniform on scales at least as large as the meteorite (∼2.5 cm in longest dimension). Isovolumetric textures and compositional observations constrain elemental redistribution from coarse olivine to serpentine and to surrounding phases during serpentinization. Regardless of olivine's composition, isovolumetric replacement of coarse olivines by serpentine of the observed composition released more Mg and Si from olivine than was required to form the serpentine. Excess Mg and Si released by olivine destruction and not retained in serpentine were exported from the replaced volume. Olivines with different Fa/Fo proportions contributed different amounts of Fe and Mg to the serpentine. Ferroan olivines released more Fe than required to form the serpentines replacing them, so some of the Fe released from ferroan olivine was exported from the replaced volumes. Forsteritic olivines released less Fe than required to form the serpentines replacing them, so some Fe was imported into the replaced volumes augmenting the small amount of Fe released from forsteritic olivine. In QUE 93005 Fo83.8 is the threshold composition between Fe-exporting and Fe-importing behavior in individual olivine-serpentine pairs, which released exactly the

  14. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  15. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual...

  16. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual...

  17. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual...

  18. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual...

  19. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or... companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or...

  20. Conceptual Alignment: How Brains Achieve Mutual Understanding.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Verhagen, Lennart; Toni, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    We share our thoughts with other minds, but we do not understand how. Having a common language certainly helps, but infants' and tourists' communicative success clearly illustrates that sharing thoughts does not require signals with a pre-assigned meaning. In fact, human communicators jointly build a fleeting conceptual space in which signals are a means to seek and provide evidence for mutual understanding. Recent work has started to capture the neural mechanisms supporting those fleeting conceptual alignments. The evidence suggests that communicators and addressees achieve mutual understanding by using the same computational procedures, implemented in the same neuronal substrate, and operating over temporal scales independent from the signals' occurrences. PMID:26792458

  1. In-Flight Position Calibration of the Cassini Articulated Reaction Wheel Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's long-lived Cassini-Huygens spacecraft is currently in its 14th year of flight and in the midst of its second, and final, extended mission. Cassini is a massive interplanetary spacecraft that is three axis stabilized and can maintain attitude control using either its reaction control system thrusters or using reaction wheel control. Cassini has four identical reaction wheels, of which three are mutually orthogonal and have a fixed orientation. The fourth reaction wheel has an articulation motor that allows this reaction wheel to be aligned with the momentum direction of any of the other three fixed reaction wheels. The articulation motor allows this reaction wheel to be used as a replacement for any of the other three wheels without any performance degradation. However, due to limitations in the design of this backup system, there are few telemetric indications of the orientation of this reaction wheel following an articulation. This investigation serves to outline the procedures that have been developed by the Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem to calibrate the position of the articulated reaction wheel assembly in the event that the momentum direction of this reaction wheel must be reoriented.

  2. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... Thrift Supervision, 1700 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20552, by fax to (202) 906-6518, or by e-mail to...'s Office, Office of Thrift Supervision, 1700 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20552....

  3. Mutual diffusion in a binary isotopic mixture.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; Tankeshwar, K

    2010-11-17

    The mass dependence of the mutual diffusion coefficient, in a binary equimolar mixture of Lennard-Jones fluids, is studied within Mori's memory function formalism. A phenomenological form of the memory function is used to study the time evolution of the self- and relative velocity correlation functions. The diffusion coefficients are calculated from the relevant velocity correlation functions using the Green-Kubo integral formula. Like the self-diffusion coefficient, the mutual diffusion coefficient is also found to be weakly dependent on the mass ratio. The present study shows that the minimum value that the mutual diffusion coefficient in an equimolar mixture of isotopic fluids can have is √(1/2) times the self-diffusion coefficient of any of the species when in isolation. Further, the contribution of the dynamic/distinct cross correlations to the mutual diffusion coefficient is found to be small and positive for the whole range of the mass ratio which is consistent with earlier molecular dynamics results. PMID:21339621

  4. Mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    The generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is used, together with the two-dimensional pressure equation, to analyze mutual diffusion in concentrated membrane systems. These equations can be used to investigate the role that both direct and hydrodynamic interactions play in determining diffusive behavior. Here only direct interactions are explicitly incorporated into the theory at high densities; however, both direct and hydrodynamic interactions are analyzed for some dilute solutions. We look at diffusion in the presence of weak attractions, soft repulsions, and hard-core repulsions. It is found that, at low densities, attractions retard mutual diffusion while repulsions enhance it. Mechanistically, attractions tend to tether particles together and oppose the dissipation of gradients or fluctuations in concentration, while repulsions provide a driving force that pushes particles apart. At higher concentrations, changes in the structure of the fluid enhance mutual diffusion even in the presence of attractions. It is shown that the theoretical description of postelectrophoresis relaxation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments must be modified if interacting systems are studied. The effects of interactions on mutual diffusion coefficients have probably already been seen in postelectrophoresis relaxation experiments. PMID:2775829

  5. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  6. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  7. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... a hip replacement and need antibiotics before any dental work. When to Call Your Doctor Call your health care provider if you have: A sudden increase in pain Chest pain or shortness of breath Frequent urination ...

  8. Replacing Arizona's Roofs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Arizona statewide mandate to spend $500 million to repair or replace roofs in its public school system. Data from the state's evaluation process are provided, including how the state will fund the project. (GR)

  9. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    The results of a total knee replacement are often excellent. The operation relieves pain for most people. Most people do not need help walking after they fully recover. Most artificial knee joints last 10 ...

  10. Hip joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100006.htm Hip joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The hip joint is made up of two major parts: the ...

  11. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... majority of patients with clefts will require full orthodontic treatment, especially if the cleft has passed through ... later replacement of the missing lateral incisor. During orthodontic treatment, an artificial tooth may be attached to ...

  12. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal end of the femur ( ...

  13. Kidney Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... their function with either dialysis or a transplant. Dialysis Dialysis, the more common form of kidney-replacement ... the result of diabetes, not of hemodialysis. Peritoneal dialysis Another form of dialysis is called peritoneal dialysis. ...

  14. Artificial Disc Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat this condition, alternatives to disc replacement include fusion, nonoperative care or no treatment. Typically, surgery is ... operative treatment for disc pain has been spinal fusion. This is a surgical procedure in which disc ...

  15. Mutualism fails when climate response differs between interacting species.

    PubMed

    Warren, Robert J; Bradford, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Successful species interactions require that both partners share a similar cue. For many species, spring warming acts as a shared signal to synchronize mutualist behaviors. Spring flowering plants and the ants that disperse their seeds respond to warming temperatures so that ants forage when plants drop seeds. However, where warm-adapted ants replace cold-adapted ants, changes in this timing might leave early seeds stranded without a disperser. We investigate plant seed dispersal south and north of a distinct boundary between warm- and cold-adapted ants to determine if changes in the ant species influence local plant dispersal. The warm-adapted ants forage much later than the cold-adapted ants, and so we first assess natural populations of early and late blooming plants. We then transplant these plants south and north of the ant boundary to test whether distinct ant climate requirements disrupt the ant-plant mutualism. Whereas the early blooming plant's inability to synchronize with the warm-adapted ant leaves its populations clumped and patchy and its seedlings clustered around the parents in natural populations, when transplanted into the range of the cold-adapted ant, effective seed dispersal recovers. In contrast, the mutualism persists for the later blooming plant regardless of location because it sets seed later in spring when both warm- and cold-adapted ant species forage, resulting in effective seed dispersal. These results indicate that the climate response of species interactions, not just the species themselves, is integral in understanding ecological responses to a changing climate. Data linking phenological synchrony and dispersal are rare, and these results suggest a viable mechanism by which a species' range is limited more by biotic than abiotic interactions - despite the general assumption that biotic influences are buried within larger climate drivers. These results show that biotic partner can be as fundamental a niche requirement as abiotic

  16. Amino acid replacements can selectively affect the interaction energy of autonomous folding units in the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Rambo, R; Matthews, C R

    1992-03-01

    Amino acid replacements were made at the interface between two autonomous folding units in the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase from Salmonella typhimurium to test their mutual interaction energy. The results of equilibrium studies of the urea-induced unfolding reaction of the wild-type and mutant proteins in which phenylalanine 22 is replaced by leucine, isoleucine, and valine can be understood in terms of a selective decrease in the interaction energy between the two folding units; the intrinsic stability of each folding unit is not significantly altered. Kinetic studies of the rate-limiting step in unfolding show that the interaction energy appears in the transition state preceding the native conformation. Comparisons of the individual effects of these nonpolar side chains show that both hydrophobic and steric effects play important roles in the interaction energy between the folding units. The implication of these results is that the high cooperativity observed in the folding of many globular proteins may be reduced by appropriate amino acid replacements. PMID:1540577

  17. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  18. Automotive radar - investigation of mutual interference mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goppelt, M.; Blöcher, H.-L.; Menzel, W.

    2010-09-01

    In the past mutual interference between automotive radar sensors has not been regarded as a major problem. With an increasing number of such systems, however, this topic is receiving more and more attention. The investigation of mutual interference and countermeasures is therefore one topic of the joint project "Radar on Chip for Cars" (RoCC) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). RoCC's goal is to pave the way for the development of high-performance, low-cost 79 GHz radar sensors based on Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs). This paper will present some generic interference scenarios and report on the current status of the analysis of interference mechanisms.

  19. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  20. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  1. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  2. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  3. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  4. Mutual synchronization of weakly coupled gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rozental, R. M.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2015-09-15

    The processes of synchronization of two weakly coupled gyrotrons are studied within the framework of non-stationary equations with non-fixed longitudinal field structure. With the allowance for a small difference of the free oscillation frequencies of the gyrotrons, we found a certain range of parameters where mutual synchronization is possible while a high electronic efficiency is remained. It is also shown that synchronization regimes can be realized even under random fluctuations of the parameters of the electron beams.

  5. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  6. Observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, C.; Di Martino, M.; Ferreri, W.; Osservatorio Astronomico, Turin )

    1989-07-01

    As part of the planned 'Pluto-Charon Mutual Eclipse Season Campaign', one mutual event was observed at the ESO Observatory on July 10, 1986 and seven mutual events were observed at the Serra La Nave stellar station of Catania Astrophysical Observatory from April 29 to July 21, 1987. At ESO the measurements were performed at the 61-cm Bochum telescope equipped with a photon-counting system and U, B, V, filters; at Serra La Nave the Cassegrain focus of the 91-cm reflector was equipped with a photon-counting system and B and V filters. The observed light losses and contact times do not show relevant systematic deviations from the predicted ones. An examination of the behavior of the B and V light curves gives slight indications of a different slope of the B and V light loss of the same event for a superior or an inferior event, and shows that the superior events are shallower at wavelengths longer than B. 6 refs.

  7. Mutual information analysis of JPEG2000 contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Karam, Lina J.

    2003-05-01

    Context-based arithmetic coding has been widely adopted in image and video compression and is a key component of the new JPEG2000 image compression standard. In this paper, the contexts used in JPEG2000 are analyzed using the mutual information, which has a direct link with the compression performance. We first show that, when combining the contexts, the mutual information between the contexts and the encoded data will decrease unless the conditional probability distributions of the combined contexts are the same. Given I, the initial number of contexts, and F, the final desired number of contexts, there are S(I, F) possible context classification schemes where S(I, F) is called the Stirling number of the second kind. The optimal classification scheme is the one that gives the maximum mutual information. Instead of exhaustive search, the optimal classification scheme can be obtained through a modified Generalized Lloyd algorithm with the relative entropy as the distortion metric. For binary arithmetic coding, the search complexity can be reduced by using the dynamic programming. Our experimental results show that the JPEG2000 contexts capture very well the correlations among the wavelet coefficients. At the same time, the number of contexts used as part of the standard can be reduced without loss in the coding performance.

  8. Quantitative analysis of the effects of the exotic Argentine ant on seed-dispersal mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cabal, Mariano A.; Stuble, Katharine L.; Nuñez, Martin A.; Sanders, Nathan J.

    2009-01-01

    Although it is increasingly clear that exotic invasive species affect seed-dispersal mutualisms, a synthetic examination of the effect of exotic invasive species on seed-dispersal mutualisms is lacking. Here, we review the impacts of the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) on seed dispersal. We found that sites with L. humile had 92 per cent fewer native ant seed dispersers than did sites where L. humile was absent. In addition, L. humile did not replace native seed dispersers, as rates of seed removal and seedling establishment were all lower in the presence of L. humile than in its absence. We conclude that potential shifts in plant diversity and concomitant changes in ecosystem function may be a consequence of Argentine ant invasions, as well as invasions by other ant species. Because very few studies have examined the effects of non-ant invasive species on seed-dispersal mutualisms, the prevalence of disruption of seed-dispersal mutualisms by invasive species is unclear. PMID:19465575

  9. Toxicology of chlorofluorocarbon replacements.

    PubMed Central

    Dekant, W

    1996-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are stable in the atmosphere and may reach the stratosphere. They are cleaved by UV-radiation in the stratosphere to yield chlorine radicals, which are thought to interfere with the catalytic cycle of ozone formation and destruction and deplete stratospheric ozone concentrations. Due to potential adverse health effects of ozone depletion, chlorofluorocarbon replacements with much lower or absent ozone depleting potential are developed. The toxicology of these compounds that represent chlorofluorohydrocarbons (HCFCs) or fluorohydrocarbons (HFCs) has been intensively studied. All compounds investigated (1, 1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane [HCFC-141b], 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane [HFC-134a], pentafluoroethane [HFC-125], 1-chloro- 1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane [HCFC-124], and 1,1-dichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane [HCFC-123]) show only a low potential for skin and eye irritation. Chronic adverse effects on the liver (HCFC-123) and the testes (HCFC-141b and HCFC-134a), including tumor formation, were observed in long-term inhalation studies in rodents using very high concentrations of these CFC replacements. All CFC replacements are, to varying extents, biotransformed in the organism, mainly by cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of C-H bonds. The formed acyl halides are hydrolyzed to give excretable carboxylic acids; halogenated aldehydes that are formed may be further oxidized to halogenated carboxylic acids or reduced to halogenated alcohols, which are excretory metabolites in urine from rodents exposed experimentally to CFC replacements. The chronic toxicity of the CFC replacements studied is unlikely to be of relevance for humans exposed during production and application of CFC replacements. PMID:8722112

  10. 78 FR 26424 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC will be held... savings associations, and other issues of concern to the existing mutual savings associations. On the...

  11. 77 FR 74052 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee (MSAAC or Committee). DATES: A public meeting of the MSAAC... 8:30 a.m. EST. Agenda items include a discussion of the status of the mutual savings...

  12. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in...

  13. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in...

  14. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in...

  15. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in...

  16. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in section 593(a)....

  17. Python import replacement

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-10-01

    SmartImport.py is a Python source-code file that implements a replacement for the standard Python module importer. The code is derived from knee.py, a file in the standard Python diestribution , and adds functionality to improve the performance of Python module imports in massively parallel contexts.

  18. Replacing America's Job Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  19. Partner selection in the mycorrhizal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Kiers, E Toby

    2015-03-01

    Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is thought to be a key factor stabilising the mutualism. Both plant hosts and mycorrhizal fungi have been shown to preferentially allocate resources to higher quality partners. This can help maintain underground cooperation, although it is likely that different plant species vary in the spatial precision with which they can select partners. Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is presumably context-dependent and can be mediated by factors like (relative) resource abundance and resource fluctuations, competition among mycorrhizas, arrival order and cultivation history. Such factors complicate our current understanding of the importance of partner selection and its effectiveness in stimulating mutualistic cooperation. PMID:25421912

  20. Arithmetic, mutually unbiased bases and complementary observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppeard, M. D.

    2010-02-01

    Complementary observables in quantum mechanics may be viewed as Frobenius structures in a dagger monoidal category, such as the category of finite dimensional Hilbert spaces over the complex numbers. On the other hand, their properties crucially depend on the discrete Fourier transform and its associated quantum torus, requiring only the finite fields that underlie mutually unbiased bases. In axiomatic topos theory, the complex numbers are difficult to describe and should not be invoked unnecessarily. This paper surveys some fundamentals of quantum arithmetic using finite field complementary observables, with a view considering more general axiom systems.

  1. ARRANGEMENT FOR REPLACING FILTERS

    DOEpatents

    Blomgren, R.A.; Bohlin, N.J.C.

    1957-08-27

    An improved filtered air exhaust system which may be continually operated during the replacement of the filters without the escape of unfiltered air is described. This is accomplished by hermetically sealing the box like filter containers in a rectangular tunnel with neoprene covered sponge rubber sealing rings coated with a silicone impregnated pneumatic grease. The tunnel through which the filters are pushed is normal to the exhaust air duct. A number of unused filters are in line behind the filters in use, and are moved by a hydraulic ram so that a fresh filter is positioned in the air duct. The used filter is pushed into a waiting receptacle and is suitably disposed. This device permits a rapid and safe replacement of a radiation contaminated filter without interruption to the normal flow of exhaust air.

  2. Celotex (Registered) Replacement Study

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, S; Hafner, R

    2002-10-01

    The AL-R8 is the pit storage container in most widespread use at Pantex. The AL-R8 container family consists of standard 20-in.-diameter steel drums, 30 to 60 in. in height, with insulation inserts made of Celotex{reg_sign}--a fiberboard product made from processed sugar cane. Celotex is an acceptable material for inserts in many radioactive material shipping and storage containers. It is a good shock mitigator/insulator, does a fair job in fire protection (when oxygen is excluded), shielding, and criticality, and is inexpensive and easily available. However, the fiberboard absorbs water in humid environments which, when combined with chemical residues in the fiberboard, forms corrosive compounds that can shorten the life of the container and affect container contents. To protect the contents from this potentially damaging environment, the AL-R8 SI was developed to isolate the contents within a sealed stainless steel vessel inside the AL-R8. Although the SI protected the contents, corrosion studies indicated the SI lid bolts might corrode over time and surveillance showed that areas of the outer drum were still subject to corrosion. To address this potential problem, DOE/Albuquerque sponsored bolt and Celotex replacement studies. The bolt replacement study was assigned to Mason and Hanger's Pantex Facility and this Celotex Replacement Study to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Celotex Replacement Study evaluated options for replacing Celotex with a material that is chemically compatible with the AL-R8 SI container. The evaluation was limited to materials either used previously in nuclear materials shipping and storage containers or materials with known properties in a low-radiation environment. This limitation was set to ensure that the long-term aging effect on the new material is known a priori. Initial material evaluations narrowed the material choices to foam and cork. Although cork performed better than foam in some tests, cork was considered a less

  3. NARC Rayon Replacement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Kenneth P.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the search for a replacement product for the aerospace grade rayon formerly used in the reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM). The rayon used in RSRMs is no longer produced by the North American Rayon Corporation (NARC), though NASA has stockpiled rayon to be used until a suitable replacement is found to be used in the RSRM nozzle carbon cloth phenolic (CCP). The primary considerations are performance, process ability, variability, long term availability, and cost. The preference will be given to commercial off-the-shelf products as opposed to those which are custom made. The candidate materials have been tested in previous phases of this selection process, and Enka Textile Rayon has emerged as a possible fabric, though its availability is still in question.

  4. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients' clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the "Tower of Babel" of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  5. Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric). The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology. PMID:26918174

  6. Mineral replacement front propagation in deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel; Kelka, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Fluid migrations are a major agent of contaminant transport leading to mineral replacement in rocks, impacting their properties as porosity, permeability, and rheology. Understanding the physical and chemical mechanisms that govern mineralogical replacement during and after deformation is required to better understand complex interplays between fluid and rocks that are involved in faulting, seismic cycle, and resource distribution in the upper crust. Dolomitization process related to hydrothermal fluid flow is one of the most studied and debated replacement processes in earth sciences. Dolomitization of limestone is of economic importance as well, as it stands as unconventional oil reservoirs and is systematically observed in Mississippian-Valley Type ore deposit. Despite recent breakthrough about dolomitization processes at large-scale, the small-scale propagation of the reaction front remains unclear. It is poorly documented in the occurrence of stylolites and fractures in the medium while pressure-solution and fracture network development are the most efficient deformation accomodation mechanism in limestone from early compaction to layer-parallel shortening. Thus, the impact of such network on geometry of replaced bodies and on replacement front propagation deserves specific attention. This contribution illustrates the role of fracture and stylolites on the propagation of a reaction front. In a 2 dimensional numerical model we simulate the dolomitization front propagation in a heterogeneous porous medium. The propagation of the reaction front is governed by the competition between advection and diffusion processes, and takes into account reaction rates, disorder in the location of the potential replacement seeds, and permeability heterogeneities. We add stylolites and fractures that can act as barriers or drains to fluid flow according to their orientation and mineralogical content, which can or cannot react with the contaminant. The patterns produced from

  7. Generalized mutual information of quantum critical chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, F. C.; Rajabpour, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    We study the generalized mutual information I˜n of the ground state of different critical quantum chains. The generalized mutual information definition that we use is based on the well established concept of the Rényi divergence. We calculate this quantity numerically for several distinct quantum chains having either discrete Z (Q ) symmetries (Q -state Potts model with Q =2 ,3 ,4 and Z (Q ) parafermionic models with Q =5 ,6 ,7 ,8 and also Ashkin-Teller model with different anisotropies) or the U (1 ) continuous symmetries (Klein-Gordon field theory, X X Z and spin-1 Fateev-Zamolodchikov quantum chains with different anisotropies). For the spin chains these calculations were done by expressing the ground-state wave functions in two special bases. Our results indicate some general behavior for particular ranges of values of the parameter n that defines I˜n. For a system, with total size L and subsystem sizes ℓ and L -ℓ , the I˜n has a logarithmic leading behavior given by c/˜n4 log[L/π sin(π/ℓ L ) ] where the coefficient c˜n is linearly dependent on the central charge c of the underlying conformal field theory describing the system's critical properties.

  8. Discrete phase-space structure of n-qubit mutually unbiased bases

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, A.B.; Romero, J.L.; Bjoerk, G.; Sanchez-Soto, L.L.

    2009-01-15

    We work out the phase-space structure for a system of n qubits. We replace the field of real numbers that label the axes of the continuous phase space by the finite field GF(2{sup n}) and investigate the geometrical structures compatible with the notion of unbiasedness. These consist of bundles of discrete curves intersecting only at the origin and satisfying certain additional properties. We provide a simple classification of such curves and study in detail the four- and eight-dimensional cases, analyzing also the effect of local transformations. In this way, we provide a comprehensive phase-space approach to the construction of mutually unbiased bases for n qubits.

  9. Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) associated with corrosion products in metal-on-metal and dual modular neck total hip replacements is associated with upregulation of interferon gamma-mediated chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kolatat, Kritti; Perino, Giorgio; Wilner, Gabrielle; Kaplowitz, Elianna; Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Boettner, Friedrich; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Jerabek, Seth A; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward

    2015-10-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR) associated with tribocorrosion following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have become a significant clinical concern in recent years. In particular, implants featuring metal-on-metal bearing surfaces and modular femoral stems have been reported to result in elevated rates of ALTR. These tribocorrosion-related tissue reactions are characterized by marked necrosis and lymphocytic infiltration, which contrasts sharply with the macrophagic and foreign body giant cell inflammation associated with polyethylene wear particle induced peri-implant osteolysis. In this study, we characterize tribocorrosion-associated ALTR at a molecular level. Gene expression profiling of peri-implant tissue around failing implants identifies upregulation of numerous inflammatory mediators in ALTR, including several interferon gamma inducible factors, most notably the chemokines MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10. This expression profile is distinct from that associated with polyethylene wear induced osteolysis, which is characterized by induction of markers of alternative macrophage activation, such as chitotriosidase (CHIT-1). Importantly, MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10 are also elevated at the protein level in the synovial fluid and, albeit more moderately, the serum, of ALTR patients, raising the possibility that these factors may serve as circulating biomarkers for the early detection of ALTR in at-risk patients. PMID:25940887

  10. Mutual neutralization in low-energy H{sup +} +F{sup -} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mezei, J. Zs.; Roos, J. B.; Elander, N.; Larson, A.; Shilyaeva, K.

    2011-07-15

    The cross section for mutual neutralization in collisions between H{sup +} and F{sup -} ions at low energies (E{<=}10 eV) is calculated using a molecular close-coupling approach. Two different representations of the quasidiabatic potentials and couplings of HF are used. The effect of autoionization on the cross section is investigated. The coupled Schroedinger equation for the nuclear motion is solved using a numerical integration of the corresponding matrix Riccati equation and the cross section for mutual neutralization is computed from the asymptotic value of the logarithmic derivative of the radial wave function. The magnitude of the cross section for mutual neutralization in this reaction is small compared to other systems. This can be understood by the lack of avoided crossings at large internuclear distances. Resonant structures are found in the cross section and these are assigned with dominant angular momentum quantum number. The cross section for mutual neutralization in collisions of D{sup +} and F{sup -} ions is also calculated.

  11. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiersinga, W M

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than 100 years in the treatment of hypothyroidism, and there is no doubt about its overall efficacy. Desiccated thyroid contains both thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)); serum T(3) frequently rises to supranormal values in the absorption phase, associated with palpitations. Liothyronine (T(3)) has the same drawback and requires twice-daily administration in view of its short half-life. Synthetic levothyroxine (L-T(4)) has many advantages: in view of its long half-life, once-daily administration suffices, the occasional missing of a tablet causes no harm, and the extrathyroidal conversion of T(4) into T(3) (normally providing 80% of the daily T(3) production rate) remains fully operative, which may have some protective value during illness. Consequently, L-T(4) is nowadays preferred, and its long-term use is not associated with excess mortality. The mean T(4) dose required to normalize serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is 1.6 microg/kg per day, giving rise to serum free T(4) (fT(4)) concentrations that are slightly elevated or in the upper half of the normal reference range. The higher fT(4) values are probably due to the need to generate from T(4) the 20% of the daily T(3) production rate that otherwise is derived from the thyroid gland itself. The daily maintenance dose of T(4) varies widely between 75 and 250 microg. Assessment of the appropriate T(4) dose is by assay of TSH and fT(4), preferably in a blood sample taken before ingestion of the subsequent T(4) tablet. Dose adjustments can be necessary in pregnancy and when medications are used that are known to interfere with the absorption or metabolism of T(4). A new equilibrium is reached after approximately 6 weeks, implying that laboratory tests should not be done earlier. With a stable maintenance dose, an annual check-up usually suffices. Accumulated experience with L-T(4) replacement has identified some areas of concern. First, the

  12. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular trifluoromethylarylation of alkenes: mutual activation of arylboronic acid and CF3+ reagent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Dinghai; Mu, Xin; Chen, Pinhong; Liu, Guosheng

    2014-07-23

    A novel copper-catalyzed intermolecular trifluoromethylarylation of alkenes is developed using less active ether-type Togni's reagent under mild reaction conditions. Various alkenes and diverse arylboronic acids are compatible with these conditions. Preliminary mechanistic studies reveal that a mutual activation process between arylboronic acid and CF3(+) reagent is essential. In addition, the reaction might involve a rate-determining transmetalation, and the final aryl C-C bond is derived from reductive elimination of the aryl(alkyl)Cu(III) intermediate. PMID:24983408

  13. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Ricci, Zaccaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a cornerstone in the clinical management of patients with acute kidney injury. Results from different studies agree that early renal support therapy (aimed to support the residual kidney function during early phases of organ dysfunction) may reduce mortality with respect to late RRT (aimed to substitute the complete loss of function during the advanced kidney insufficiency). Although it seems plausible that a timely initiation of RRT may be associated with improved renal and nonrenal outcomes in these patients, there is scarce evidence in literature to exactly identify the most adequate onset timing for RRT. PMID:26410148

  14. Immediate total tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Garber, D A; Salama, M A; Salama, H

    2001-03-01

    Successful implant placement at the time of extraction has been documented. Implant placement at the time of extraction was initially performed as a two-stage procedure often with barrier membranes and sophisticated second-stage surgical uncoverings. The authors describe the next generation of this technique, including atraumatic tooth removal with simultaneous root form, implant placement, and temporization at one appointment. This technique of "Immediate Total Tooth Replacement" allows for the maintenance of the bony housing and soft-tissue form that existed before extraction, while at the same time establishing a root form anchor in the bone for an esthetic restoration. PMID:11913258

  15. Nutrient loading alters the performance of key nutrient exchange mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Shantz, Andrew A; Lemoine, Nathan P; Burkepile, Deron E

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient exchange mutualisms between phototrophs and heterotrophs, such as plants and mycorrhizal fungi or symbiotic algae and corals, underpin the functioning of many ecosystems. These relationships structure communities, promote biodiversity and help maintain food security. Nutrient loading may destabilise these mutualisms by altering the costs and benefits each partner incurs from interacting. Using meta-analyses, we show a near ubiquitous decoupling in mutualism performance across terrestrial and marine environments in which phototrophs benefit from enrichment at the expense of their heterotrophic partners. Importantly, heterotroph identity, their dependence on phototroph-derived C and the type of nutrient enrichment (e.g. nitrogen vs. phosphorus) mediated the responses of different mutualisms to enrichment. Nutrient-driven changes in mutualism performance may alter community organisation and ecosystem processes and increase costs of food production. Consequently, the decoupling of nutrient exchange mutualisms via alterations of the world's nitrogen and phosphorus cycles may represent an emerging threat of global change. PMID:26549314

  16. Co-development, innovation and mutual learning--or how we need to turn the world upside down.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Nigel

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the scope for mutual learning and the sharing of innovation between different parts of the world. It argues that the top-down concept of international development--with its connotations that low income countries need to develop in ways that emulate progress in richer more "developed" ones needs to be replaced with the idea of co-development and learning and sharing together. Similarly, it advocates for replacing the term of "reverse innovation" with the concept of global sourcing of innovation. PMID:26699347

  17. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  18. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  19. Concurrent behavior: Are the interpretations mutually exclusive?

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, David O.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental literature is replete with examples of behavior which occur concurrently with a schedule of reinforcement. These concurrent behaviors, often with similar topographies and occurring under like circumstances, may be interpreted as functionally autonomous, collateral, adjunctive, superstitious or mediating behavior. The degree to which the interaction of concurrent and schedule controlled behavior is used in the interpretation of behavior illustrated the importance of distinguishing among these interpretations by experimental procedure. The present paper reviews the characteristics of these interpretations, and discusses the experimental procedures necessary to distinguish among them. The paper concludes that the interpretations are mutually exclusive and refer to distinct behaviors, but that the distinction between any two of the interpretations requires more than one experimental procedure. PMID:22478568

  20. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  1. Mutual Contextualization in Tripartite Graphs of Folksonomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Ching-Man Au; Gibbins, Nicholas; Shadbolt, Nigel

    The use of tags to describe Web resources in a collaborative manner has experienced rising popularity among Web users in recent years. The product of such activity is given the name folksonomy, which can be considered as a scheme of organizing information in the users' own way. This research work attempts to analyze tripartite graphs - graphs involving users, tags and resources - of folksonomies and discuss how these elements acquire their semantics through their associations with other elements, a process we call mutual contextualization. By studying such process, we try to identify solutions to problems such as tag disambiguation, retrieving documents of similar topics and discovering communities of users. This paper describes the basis of the research work, mentions work done so far and outlines future plans.

  2. Mutually unbiased bases and bound entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.; Löffler, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    In this contribution we relate two different key concepts: mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and entanglement. We provide a general toolbox for analyzing and comparing entanglement of quantum states for different dimensions and numbers of particles. In particular we focus on bound entanglement, i.e. highly mixed states which cannot be distilled by local operations and classical communications. For a certain class of states—for which the state-space forms a ‘magic’ simplex—we analyze the set of bound entangled states detected by the MUB criterion for different dimensions d and number of particles n. We find that the geometry is similar for different d and n, consequently the MUB criterion opens possibilities to investigate the typicality of positivity under partial transposition (PPT)-bound and multipartite bound entanglement more deeply and provides a simple experimentally feasible tool to detect bound entanglement.

  3. Detecting Generalized Synchrony Through Mutual Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven J.; So, Paul

    1996-03-01

    Detection of synchrony in the nervous system has traditionally relied on linear methods such as cross correlation and coherence. Neurons are floridly nonlinear, however, and neuronal interactions may be inadequately described if it is assumed that ensemble behavior is a linear combination of neuronal activities. We develop an approach to detecting generalized synchrony using mutual nonlinear prediction. Multivariate surrogate data will be employed to establish statistical confidence that synchrony is nonlinear. These results will be applied to an experimental preparation - the motoneuron pool from the spinal cord stretch reflex. The interrelationships between individual neurons, between single neurons and the population of neurons, and between intracellular synaptic currents and single neurons will be examined, and the case for the existence of generalized synchrony made.

  4. Cadmium plating replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  5. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  6. Cadmium plating replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Mary J.; Groshart, Earl C.

    1995-01-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  7. Power Plant Replacement Study

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  8. Power Plant Replacement Study

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University's aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  9. Total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. PMID:24412045

  10. Power Plant Replacement Study

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self‐funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty‐three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  11. Knee joint replacement prosthesis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging.

  12. NRL attacks halon replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Baturin, D.

    1994-07-01

    In November 1992, as a result of the International Montreal Protocol Treaty and its addenda, it was announced that worldwide production of halons would halt by January 1994. Research has shown that halons, with the component bromine, would likely be more damaging to the ozone layer than chlorofluorocarbons. Today, while other researchers are looking at ways to limit the use of or to recycle halogenated fire suppressants, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is conducting active programs aimed at developing replacement agents. The program includes laboratory-scale screening of candidate agents, intermediate-scale chamber tests, and full-scale shipboard discharge fire tests. A substantial research effort is underway on the measurement of the effectiveness of alternate, nonhalogen-containing suppressants; the elucidation of the chemical and physical mechanisms by which they suppress fires; and the development of theory and models on the relationship of chemical structures to suppressive behavior.

  13. Aerocoat 7 Replacement Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center has used Aerocoat 7 (AR-7) to protect stainless-steel flex hoses at Launch Complex (LC-39) and hydraulic lines of the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) because it provides excellent corrosion protection in low-temperature applications. The Sovereign Company produced AR-7 exclusively for NASA but discontinued production because the coating released high levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and had a significant environmental impact. The purpose of this project was to select and evaluate potential replacement coatings for AR-7 that would be more environmentally sound. The physical and mechanical properties of commercially available coatings were investigated through the Internet. The ideal coating would be fluid enough to penetrate the outer mesh of a stainless-steel flex hose and coat the inner hose, and flexible enough to withstand the movement of the hose, as well as the expansion and contraction of its metal caused by changes in temperature.

  14. Antenna grout replacement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An epoxy grout suitable for use in mounting and positioning bearing runner plates used in hydrostatic bearing assemblies for rotatably mounting large radio telescope structures to stationary support pedestals is described. The epoxy grout may be used in original mountings or may be used as part of a replacement system for repairing cavities in existing grout resulting from grout deterioration. The epoxy grout has a relatively short work life and cure time even in the presence of hydraulic oil. The epoxy grout cures without shrinking or sagging to form a grout which is sufficiently strong and durable to provide a grout especially well suited for use under the high pressure loading and close tolerance requirements of large hydrostatic bearing assemblies.

  15. Rate Constant in Far-from-Equilibrium States of a Replicating System with Mutually Catalyzing Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Yukawa, Satoshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2006-02-01

    As a first step to study reaction dynamics in far-from-equilibrium open systems, we propose a stochastic protocell model in which two mutually catalyzing chemicals are replicating depending on the external flow of energy resources J. This model exhibits an Arrhenius type reaction; furthermore, it produces a non-Arrhenius reaction that exhibits a power-law reaction rate with regard to the activation energy. These dependences are explained using the dynamics of J; the asymmetric random walk of J results in the Arrhenius equation and conservation of J results in a power-law dependence. Further, we find that the discreteness of molecules results in the power change. Effects of cell divisions are also discussed in our model.

  16. Short stem shoulder replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N.; Coghlan, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: It is agreed that it is important to anatomically reproduce the proximal humeral anatomy when performing a prosthetic shoulder replacement. This can be difficult with a long stemmed prosthesis, in particular if there is little relationship of the metaphysis to the humeral shaft. The ‘short stem’ prosthesis can deal with this problem. Aims: A prospective study assessed the results of total shoulder arthroplasty using a short stem humeral prosthesis, a ceramic humeral head, and a pegged cemented polyethylene glenoid. Materials and methods: Patients with primary shoulder osteoarthritis were recruited into this prospective trial and pre-operatively had the ASES, Constant, SPADI, and DASH scores recorded. The patients were clinically reviewed at the two weeks, eight weeks, one year, and two year mark with completion of a data form. Radiological evaluation was at the eight week, one year and two year follow-up. At the one and two year follow-up the satisfaction rating, the range of passive and active motion, Constant, ASES, SPADI, DASH and pain results were recorded and analysed with SPPS 20. Results: During the study period 97 short stem, ceramic head total shoulder replacements were carried out. At the time of follow-up 12 were two years from operation and 38 one year from operation. Active elevation was overall mean 160 degrees. Constant scores were 76 at 1 year, and 86 at 2 years, ASES 88 and 93, and satisfaction 96% and 98% respectively at one and 2 year follow up. There were no problems during insertion of the humeral prosthesis, or any radiolucent lines or movement of the prosthesis on later radiographs. Conclusion: The short stem prosthesis had no complications, and on follow up radiographs good bone fixation. These fairly short term clinical results were overall good. PMID:25258497

  17. Assessing ecological specialization of an ant-seed dispersal mutualism through a wide geographic range.

    PubMed

    Manzaneda, Antonio J; Rey, Pedro J

    2009-11-01

    Specialization in species interactions is of central importance for understanding the ecological structure and evolution of plant-animal mutualisms. Most plant-animal mutualisms are facultative and strongly asymmetric. In particular, myrmecochory (seed dispersal by ants) has been regarded as a very generalized interaction. Although some recent studies have suggested that only a few ant species are really important for dispersal, no rigorous measurement of the specialization in ant-seed dispersal mutualisms has been performed. Here, we use individual plants as basic units for replication to investigate the generalization-specialization of the herb Helleborus foetidus on its ant dispersers over a considerable part of its geographical range. We define generalization in terms of diversity components (species richness and evenness) of the ant visitor that realizes dispersal by removing diaspores. We obtain truly comparable values of ant visitor diversity, distinguishing among different functional groups of visitors and identifying incidental visitors and real ant dispersers. Using null model approaches, we test the null hypothesis that ant-mediated dispersal is a generalized mutualism. At least two premises should be confirmed to validate the hypothesis: (1) diaspores are dispersed by multiple ant-visitor species, and (2) diaspore dispersal is significantly equitable. Though up to 37 ant species visited diaspores across 10 populations, only two large formicines, Camponotus cruentatus and Formica lugubris, were responsible for the vast majority of visits resulting in dispersal in most populations and years, which strongly suggests that ant seed dispersal in H. foetidus is ecologically specialized. Interestingly, specialization degree was unrelated to dispersal success across populations. Our study offers new insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of myrmecochory. We propose the existence of an alternative scenario to extensive generalization. In this new scenario

  18. Mutually Exclusive Expression of Virulence Genes by Malaria Parasites Is Regulated Independently of Antigen Production

    PubMed Central

    Dzikowski, Ron; Frank, Matthias; Deitsch, Kirk

    2006-01-01

    The primary virulence determinant of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite–infected cells is a family of heterogeneous surface receptors collectively referred to as PfEMP1. These proteins are encoded by a large, polymorphic gene family called var. The family contains approximately 60 individual genes, which are subject to strict, mutually exclusive expression, with the single expressed var gene determining the antigenic, cytoadherent, and virulence phenotype of the infected cell. The mutually exclusive expression pattern of var genes is imperative for the parasite's ability to evade the host's immune response and is similar to the process of “allelic exclusion” described for mammalian Ig and odorant receptor genes. In mammalian systems, mutually exclusive expression is ensured by negative feedback inhibition mediated by production of a functional protein. To investigate how expression of the var gene family is regulated, we have created transgenic lines of parasites in which expression of individual var loci can be manipulated. Here we show that no such negative feedback system exists in P. falciparum and that this process is dependent solely on the transcriptional regulatory elements immediately adjacent to each gene. Transgenic parasites that are selected to express a var gene in which the PfEMP1 coding region has been replaced by a drug-selectable marker silence all other var genes in the genome, thus effectively knocking out all PfEMP1 expression and indicating that the modified gene is still recognized as a member of the var gene family. Mutually exclusive expression in P. falciparum is therefore regulated exclusively at the level of transcription, and a functional PfEMP1 protein is not necessary for viability or for proper gene regulation in cultured parasites. PMID:16518466

  19. Comparison of co-expression measures: mutual information, correlation, and model based indices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Co-expression measures are often used to define networks among genes. Mutual information (MI) is often used as a generalized correlation measure. It is not clear how much MI adds beyond standard (robust) correlation measures or regression model based association measures. Further, it is important to assess what transformations of these and other co-expression measures lead to biologically meaningful modules (clusters of genes). Results We provide a comprehensive comparison between mutual information and several correlation measures in 8 empirical data sets and in simulations. We also study different approaches for transforming an adjacency matrix, e.g. using the topological overlap measure. Overall, we confirm close relationships between MI and correlation in all data sets which reflects the fact that most gene pairs satisfy linear or monotonic relationships. We discuss rare situations when the two measures disagree. We also compare correlation and MI based approaches when it comes to defining co-expression network modules. We show that a robust measure of correlation (the biweight midcorrelation transformed via the topological overlap transformation) leads to modules that are superior to MI based modules and maximal information coefficient (MIC) based modules in terms of gene ontology enrichment. We present a function that relates correlation to mutual information which can be used to approximate the mutual information from the corresponding correlation coefficient. We propose the use of polynomial or spline regression models as an alternative to MI for capturing non-linear relationships between quantitative variables. Conclusion The biweight midcorrelation outperforms MI in terms of elucidating gene pairwise relationships. Coupled with the topological overlap matrix transformation, it often leads to more significantly enriched co-expression modules. Spline and polynomial networks form attractive alternatives to MI in case of non-linear relationships

  20. 76 FR 35084 - Mutual to Stock Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual to Stock Conversion Application AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision... following information collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual to Stock Conversion Application. OMB Number... of all information furnished in the application in order to determine the safety and soundness of...

  1. Mutuality, Self-Silencing, and Disordered Eating in College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Lisa S.; Riggs, Shelley A.; Stabb, Sally D.; Marshall, David M.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined patterns of association among mutuality, self-silencing, and disordered eating in an ethnically diverse sample of college women (N = 149). Partner mutuality and overall self-silencing were negatively correlated and together were associated with six disordered eating indices. All four self-silencing subscales were…

  2. 77 FR 73115 - Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Mutual Savings Association Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of... has determined that the renewal of the charter of the OCC Mutual Savings Association Advisory... savings associations, the regulatory changes or other steps the OCC may be able to take to ensure...

  3. 7 CFR 550.13 - Mutuality of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutuality of interest. 550.13 Section 550.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT.... Mutual interest exists when both parties benefit in the same qualitative way from the objectives of...

  4. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Affine constellations without mutually unbiased counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigert, Stefan; Durt, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    It has been conjectured that a complete set of mutually unbiased bases in a space of dimension d exists if and only if there is an affine plane of order d. We introduce affine constellations and compare their existence properties with those of mutually unbiased constellations. The observed discrepancies make a deeper relation between the two existence problems unlikely.

  5. Social Climate Comparison of Mutual Help and Psychotherapy Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Paul A.; Rappaport, Julian

    In recent years, mutual help groups have been formed to address problems in substance abuse, chronic physical illness, mental illness, marital disruption, and child abuse. Despite the proliferation of these groups, little research has been conducted to assess their efficacy or what happens in them. The nature of mutual help groups (N=32) was…

  6. Use of the Mutual Exclusivity Assumption by Young Word Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markman, Ellen M.; Wasow, Judith L.; Hansen, Mikkel B.

    2003-01-01

    A critical question about early word learning is whether word learning constraints such as mutual exclusivity exist and foster early language acquisition. It is well established that children will map a novel label to a novel rather than a familiar object. Evidence for the role of mutual exclusivity in such indirect word learning has been…

  7. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563.74 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS... having a preference or priority over an outstanding class or classes of mutual capital certificates;...

  8. Higher Education and Foster Grandparent Programs: Exploring Mutual Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, James R.; O'Quin, Jo Ann

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight ways in which programs within institutions of higher education and Foster Grandparent Programs can interact to their mutual benefit. Given federal and state initiatives to develop linkages between institutions of higher education and community service sites, mutual benefits exist at the program level for…

  9. Replacement, reduction and refinement.

    PubMed

    Flecknell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In 1959, William Russell and Rex Burch published "The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique". They proposed that if animals were to be used in experiments, every effort should be made to Replace them with non-sentient alternatives, to Reduce to a minimum the number of animals used, and to Refine experiments which used animals so that they caused the minimum pain and distress. These guiding principles, the "3 Rs" of animal research, were initially given little attention. Gradually, however, they have become established as essential considerations when animals are used in research. They have influenced new legislation aimed at controlling the use of experimental animals, and in the United Kingdom they have become formally incorporated into the Animal (Scientific) Procedures Act. The three principles, of Replacement, Reduction and Refinement, have also proven to be an area of common ground for research workers who use animals, and those who oppose their use. Scientists, who accept the need to use animals in some experiments, would also agree that it would be preferable not to use animals. If animals were to be used, as few as possible should be used and they should experience a minimum of pain or distress. Many of those who oppose animal experimentation, would also agree that until animal experimentation is stopped, Russell and Burch's 3Rs provide a means to improve animal welfare. It has also been recognised that adoption of the 3Rs can improve the quality of science. Appropriately designed experiments that minimise variation, provide standardised optimum conditions of animals care and minimise unnecessary stress or pain, often yield better more reliable data. Despite the progress made as a result of attention to these principles, several major problems have been identified. When replacing animals with alternative methods, it has often proven difficult to formally validate the alternative. This has proven a particular problem in regulatory toxicology

  10. [Human cerebral image registration using generalized mutual information].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingzhou; Li, Ting; Zhang, Jia

    2008-12-01

    Medical image registration is a highlight of actual research on medical image processing. Based onsimilarity measure of Shannon entropy, a new generalized distance measurement based on Rényi entropy applied to image rigid registration is introduced and is called here generalized mutual information (GMI). It is used in three dimensional cerebral image registration experiments. The simulation results show that generalized distance measurement and Shannon entropy measurement apply to different areas; that the registration measure based o n generalized distance is a natural extension of mutual information of Shannon entropy. The results prove that generalized mutual information uses less time than simple mutual information does, and the new similarity measure manifests higher degree of consistency between the two cerebral registration images. Also, the registration results provide the clinical diagnoses with more important references. In conclusion, generalized mutual information has satisfied the demands of clinical application to a wide extent. PMID:19166197

  11. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca2+ signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders. PMID:26296072

  12. [Mutual inhibition between positive and negative emotions].

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, A

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between positive and negative emotions. In study 1, 62 emotional items were selected in order to measure subjective emotional experiences. In study 2, comics, photos and poems were randomly presented to 1,220 college students to induce emotion. Subjects were asked to rate their momentary emotional intensity on two set of 5-point scales (general emotional intensity scale and 62 specific emotional intensity scale). In analysis 1, positive correlations were suggested between general emotional intensity scale and some of the specific emotional intensity scales which were activated by stimuli. In analysis 2, 10 positive and 10 negative emotional items were extracted from 62 items by factor analysis. In analysis 3, 4 and 5, it became clear that the distribution of frequency of correlations of 10 positive x 10 negative items changed according to the general emotional intensity scale. That is, from low to moderate levels of GEIS, the two kinds of emotion had no or slightly positive correlation, but at high level they became to be negatively correlated. From the facts described above, it is concluded that positive and negative emotions is not always independent, but show mutual inhibition in case of high intensity level of one of each emotions. PMID:8201808

  13. Reuse, replace, recycle

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Michael A.; Thorner, Jeremy W.

    2015-01-01

    Septins are guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that form hetero-oligomeric complexes, which assemble into filaments and higher-order structures at sites of cell division and morphogenesis in eukaryotes. Dynamic changes in the organization of septin-containing structures occur concomitantly with progression through the mitotic cell cycle and during cell differentiation. Septins also undergo stage-specific post-translational modifications, which have been implicated in regulating their dynamics, in some cases via purported effects on septin turnover. In our recent study, the fate of two of the five septins expressed in mitotic cells of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was tracked using two complementary fluorescence-based methods for pulse-chase analysis. During mitotic growth, previously-made molecules of both septins (Cdc10 and Cdc12) persisted through multiple successive divisions and were incorporated equivalently with newly synthesized molecules into hetero-oligomers and higher-order structures. Similarly, in cells undergoing meiosis and the developmental program of sporulation, pre-existing copies of Cdc10 were incorporated into new structures. In marked contrast, Cdc12 was irreversibly excluded from septin complexes and replaced by another septin, Spr3. Here, we discuss the broader implications of these results and related findings with regard to how septin dynamics is coordinated with the mitotic cell cycle and in the yeast life cycle, and how these observations may relate to control of the dynamics of other complex multi-subunit assemblies. PMID:19164941

  14. Antenna Controller Replacement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Roger Y.; Morgan, Scott C.; Strain, Martha M.; Rockwell, Stephen T.; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Tehrani, Barzia J.; Kwok, Jaclyn H.; Tuazon-Wong, Michelle; Valtier, Henry; Nalbandi, Reza; Wert, Michael; Leung, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The Antenna Controller Replacement (ACR) software accurately points and monitors the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-m and 34-m high-efficiency (HEF) ground-based antennas that are used to track primarily spacecraft and, periodically, celestial targets. To track a spacecraft, or other targets, the antenna must be accurately pointed at the spacecraft, which can be very far away with very weak signals. ACR s conical scanning capability collects the signal in a circular pattern around the target, calculates the location of the strongest signal, and adjusts the antenna pointing to point directly at the spacecraft. A real-time, closed-loop servo control algorithm performed every 0.02 second allows accurate positioning of the antenna in order to track these distant spacecraft. Additionally, this advanced servo control algorithm provides better antenna pointing performance in windy conditions. The ACR software provides high-level commands that provide a very easy user interface for the DSN operator. The operator only needs to enter two commands to start the antenna and subreflector, and Master Equatorial tracking. The most accurate antenna pointing is accomplished by aligning the antenna to the Master Equatorial, which because of its small size and sheltered location, has the most stable pointing. The antenna has hundreds of digital and analog monitor points. The ACR software provides compact displays to summarize the status of the antenna, subreflector, and the Master Equatorial. The ACR software has two major functions. First, it performs all of the steps required to accurately point the antenna (and subreflector and Master Equatorial) at the spacecraft (or celestial target). This involves controlling the antenna/ subreflector/Master-Equatorial hardware, initiating and monitoring the correct sequence of operations, calculating the position of the spacecraft relative to the antenna, executing the real-time servo control algorithm to maintain the correct position, and

  15. Glacier Surface Monitoring by Maximizing Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, E.; Rossi, C.; Hajnsek, I.

    2012-07-01

    The contribution of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) images compared with the single-channel SAR in terms of temporal scene characterization has been found and described to add valuable information in the literature. However, despite a number of recent studies focusing on single polarized glacier monitoring, the potential of polarimetry to estimate the surface velocity of glaciers has not been explored due to the complex mechanism of polarization through glacier/snow. In this paper, a new approach to the problem of monitoring glacier surface velocity is proposed by means of temporal PolSAR images, using a basic concept from information theory: Mutual Information (MI). The proposed polarimetric tracking method applies the MI to measure the statistical dependence between temporal polarimetric images, which is assumed to be maximal if the images are geometrically aligned. Since the proposed polarimetric tracking method is very powerful and general, it can be implemented into any kind of multivariate remote sensing data such as multi-spectral optical and single-channel SAR images. The proposed polarimetric tracking is then used to retrieve surface velocity of Aletsch glacier located in Switzerland and of Inyltshik glacier in Kyrgyzstan with two different SAR sensors; Envisat C-band (single polarized) and DLR airborne L-band (fully polarimetric) systems, respectively. The effect of number of channel (polarimetry) into tracking investigations demonstrated that the presence of snow, as expected, effects the location of the phase center in different polarization, such as glacier tracking with temporal HH compared to temporal VV channels. Shortly, a change in polarimetric signature of the scatterer can change the phase center, causing a question of how much of what I am observing is motion then penetration. In this paper, it is shown that considering the multi-channel SAR statistics, it is possible to optimize the separate these contributions.

  16. Mutual information between SSH and SST fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le goff, Clément; Chapron, Bertrand; Fablet, Ronan; Tandeo, Pierre; Autret, Emmanuelle; Ailliot, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Mutual information between SST and SSH Investigations to relate satellite SST and SSH measurements in the Agulhas return current region are presented. In this study, we focus on the use of SSH and SST maps obtained during the year 2004, corresponding to a particularly well-sampled period for altimetry. The SST and SSH anomalies are then obtained as high-pass filtered fields, to analyze scales smaller than approximately 300km. As revealed, we clearly distinguish different regimes. During the winter months, a marked strong correlation between fields of SSH and SST anomalies is clearly revealed. During the summer months, a much lower correlation is found. Further conditioning the analysis to separate the areas of positive and negative SSH anomalies, it is then obtained, for both summer and winter periods, that aeras of negative SSH anomalies always correspond with areas of negative SST anomalies. This high correspondance also applies in winter but only for areas of positive SSH anomalies, which indeed well match with areas of positive SST anomalies. In summer, this high correspondance is lost, and areas with positive SSH anomalies do not necessarily correspond to positive SST anomalies. Accordingly, such an effect affects and weakens the overall SST/SSH correlation during the summer months. Yet, the areas of positive SSH anomalies are not fully disconnected from the areas of positive SST anomalies. For these cases, observations and results demonstrate a systematic spatial shift between them. This suggests the influence of the mixed layer depth and wind speed to control the spatial correspondance between SST and SSH anomalies, especially below regions of positive SSH anomalies. In such cases, the upper layer SST anomalies are certainly advected by the interior flow to also provide means to relate surface observations and interior dynamics.

  17. Controlled mutual quantum entity authentication using entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Sung, Kang; Chang-Ho, Hong; Jino, Heo; Jong-In, Lim; Hyung-Jin, Yang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we suggest a controlled mutual quantum entity authentication protocol by which two users mutually certify each other on a quantum network using a sequence of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)-like states. Unlike existing unidirectional quantum entity authentication, our protocol enables mutual quantum entity authentication utilizing entanglement swapping; moreover, it allows the managing trusted center (TC) or trusted third party (TTP) to effectively control the certification of two users using the nature of the GHZ-like state. We will also analyze the security of the protocol and quantum channel. Project supported by the Research Foundation of Korea University.

  18. Spatial Mutual Information Based Hyperspectral Band Selection for Classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The amount of information involved in hyperspectral imaging is large. Hyperspectral band selection is a popular method for reducing dimensionality. Several information based measures such as mutual information have been proposed to reduce information redundancy among spectral bands. Unfortunately, mutual information does not take into account the spatial dependency between adjacent pixels in images thus reducing its robustness as a similarity measure. In this paper, we propose a new band selection method based on spatial mutual information. As validation criteria, a supervised classification method using support vector machine (SVM) is used. Experimental results of the classification of hyperspectral datasets show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate results. PMID:25918742

  19. Quantum Conditional Mutual Information, Reconstructed States, and State Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Harrow, Aram W; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Strelchuk, Sergii

    2015-07-31

    We give two strengthenings of an inequality for the quantum conditional mutual information of a tripartite quantum state recently proved by Fawzi and Renner, connecting it with the ability to reconstruct the state from its bipartite reductions. Namely, we show that the conditional mutual information is an upper bound on the regularized relative entropy distance between the quantum state and its reconstructed version. It is also an upper bound for the measured relative entropy distance of the state to its reconstructed version. The main ingredient of the proof is the fact that the conditional mutual information is the optimal quantum communication rate in the task of state redistribution. PMID:26274402

  20. Mutually connected component of networks of networks with replica nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the emergence of the giant mutually connected component in networks of networks in which each node has a single replica node in any layer and can be interdependent only on its replica nodes in the interdependent layers. We prove that if, in these networks, all the nodes of one network (layer) are interdependent on the nodes of the same other interconnected layer, then, remarkably, the mutually connected component does not depend on the topology of the network of networks. This component coincides with the mutual component of the fully connected network of networks constructed from the same set of layers, i.e., a multiplex network.

  1. Using your shoulder after replacement surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Joint replacement surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder replacement surgery - after ... You have had shoulder replacement surgery to replace the bones of your shoulder joint with artificial parts. The parts include a stem made ...

  2. On total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Berg, Svante

    2011-02-01

    Low back pain consumes a large part of the community's resources dedicated to health care and sick leave. Back disorders also negatively affect the individual leading to pain suffering, decreased quality-of-life and disability. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) due to degenerative disc disease (DDD) is today often treated with fusion when conservative treatment has failed and symptoms are severe. This treatment is as successful as arthroplasty is for hip arthritis in restoring the patient's quality of life and reducing disability. Even so, there are some problems with this treatment, one of these being recurrent CLBP from an adjacent segment (ASD) after primarily successful surgery. This has led to the development of alternative surgical treatments and devices that maintain or restore mobility, in order to reduce the risk for ASD. Of these new devices, the most frequently used are the disc prostheses used in Total Disc Replacement (TDR). This thesis is based on four studies comparing total disc replacement with posterior fusion. The studies are all based on a material of 152 patients with DDD in one or two segments, aged 20-55 years that were randomly treated with either posterior fusion or TDR. The first study concerned clinical outcome and complications. Follow-up was 100% at both one and two years. It revealed that both treatment groups had a clear benefit from treatment and that patients with TDR were better in almost all outcome scores at one-year follow-up. Fusion patients continued to improve during the second year. At two-year follow-up there was a remaining difference in favour of TDR for back pain. 73% in the TDR group and 63% in the fusion group were much better or totally pain-free (n.s.), while twice as many patients in the TDR group were totally pain free (30%) compared to the fusion group (15%). Time of surgery and total time in hospital were shorter in the TDR group. There was no difference in complications and reoperations, except that seventeen of the

  3. Replacement Cost of Domestic Crude

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-01

    The DEEPWATER model forecasts the replacement cost of domestic crude oil for 13 offshore regions in the lower 48 states. The replacement cost of domestic crude oil is the constant or levelized selling price that will recover the full expense of exploration, development, and productions with a reasonable return on capital.

  4. Entanglement patterns in mutually unbiased basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Jay

    2011-08-15

    A few simply stated rules govern the entanglement patterns that can occur in mutually unbiased basis sets (MUBs) and constrain the combinations of such patterns that can coexist in full complements of MUBs. We consider Hilbert spaces of prime power dimensions (D=p{sup N}), as realized by systems of N prime-state particles, where full complements of D+1 MUBs are known to exist, and we assume only that MUBs are eigenbases of generalized Pauli operators, without using any particular construction. The general rules include the following: (1) In any MUB, a given particle appears either in a pure state or totally entangled and (2) in any full MUB complement, each particle is pure in (p+1) bases (not necessarily the same ones) and totally entangled in the remaining (p{sup N}-p). It follows that the maximum number of product bases is p+1 and, when this number is realized, all remaining (p{sup N}-p) bases in the complement are characterized by the total entanglement of every particle. This ''standard distribution'' is inescapable for two-particle systems (of any p), where only product and generalized Bell bases are admissible MUB types. This and the following results generalize previous results for qubits [Phys. Rev. A 65. 032320 (2002); Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)] and qutrits [Phys. Rev. A 70, 012302 (2004)], drawing particularly upon [Phys. Rev. A 72, 062310 (2005)]. With three particles there are three MUB types, and these may be combined in (p+2) different ways to form full complements. With N=4, there are 6 MUB types for p=2, but new MUB types become possible with larger p, and these are essential to realizing full complements. With this example, we argue that new MUB types that show new entanglement patterns should enter with every step in N and, also, when N is a prime plus 1, at a critical p value, p=N-1. Such MUBs should play critical roles in filling complements.

  5. Biomaterials in total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Katti, Kalpana S

    2004-12-10

    The current state of materials systems used in total hip replacement is presented in this paper. An overview of the various material systems used in total hip replacement reported in literature is presented in this paper. Metals, polymers, ceramics and composites are used in the design of the different components of hip replacement implants. The merits and demerits of these material systems are evaluated in the context of mechanical properties most suitable for total joint replacement such as a hip implant. Current research on advanced polymeric nanocomposites and biomimetic composites as novel materials systems for bone replacement is also discussed. This paper examines the current research in the materials science and the critical issues and challenges in these materials systems that require further research before application in biomedical industry. PMID:15556342

  6. Experimental study of the replacement of calcite by calcium sulphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Hövelmann, J.; Álvarez-Lloret, P.; Ibáñez-Velasco, A.; Putnis, A.

    2015-05-01

    Among the most relevant mineral replacement reactions are those involving sulphates and carbonates, which have important geological and technological implications. Here it is shown experimentally that during the interaction of calcite (CaCO3) cleavage surfaces with sulphate-bearing acidic solutions, calcite is ultimately replaced by gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4), depending on the reaction temperature. Observations suggest that this occurs most likely via an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction, in which the substrate is replaced pseudomorphically by the product. At 120 and 200 °C gypsum and/or bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O) form as precursor phases for the thermodynamically stable anhydrite. Salinity promotes the formation of less hydrated precursor phases during the replacement of calcite by anhydrite. The reaction stops before equilibrium with respect to calcite is reached and during the course of the reaction most of the bulk solutions are undersaturated with respect to the precipitating phase(s). A mechanism consisting of the dissolution of small amounts of solid in a thin layer of fluid at the mineral-fluid interface and the subsequent precipitation of the product phase from this layer is in agreement with these observations. PHREEQC simulations performed in the framework of this mechanism highlight the relevance of transport and surface reaction kinetics on the volume change associated with the CaCO3-CaSO4 replacement. Under our experimental conditions, this reaction occurs with a positive volume change, which ultimately results in passivation of the unreacted substrate before calcite attains equilibrium with respect to the bulk solution.

  7. 29 CFR 553.105 - Mutual aid agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... into a mutual aid agreement related to fire protection, a firefighter employed by Town A who also is a volunteer firefighter for Town B will not have his or her hours of volunteer service for Town B counted...

  8. 29 CFR 553.105 - Mutual aid agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... into a mutual aid agreement related to fire protection, a firefighter employed by Town A who also is a volunteer firefighter for Town B will not have his or her hours of volunteer service for Town B counted...

  9. [Community financing for health care in Africa: mutual health insurance].

    PubMed

    Richard, V

    2005-01-01

    Health care in sub-Saharan Africa is increasingly financed by direct payments from the population. Mutual health insurance plans are developing to ensure better risk sharing. However mutual health insurance cannot fully resolve all equity issues. The low resources available for contribution and the limited availability of care services especially in the public sector cannot guarantee the quality of care necessary for the development of mutual health insurance. National governments must not forget their responsibility especially for defining and ensuring basic services that must be accessible to all. Will mutual health insurance plans be a stepping-stone to universal health care coverage and can these plans be successfully implemented in the context of an informal economy? PMID:15903084

  10. Nonlinear pattern analysis of ventricular premature beats by mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaka, M.; Saitoh, H.; Yokoshima, T.; Kishida, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs) has been related to the risk of mortality. However, little is known about the temporal pattern of occurrence of VPBs and its relationship to autonomic activity. Hence, we applied a general correlation measure, mutual information, to quantify how VPBs are generated over time. We also used mutual information to determine the correlation between VPB production and heart rate in order to evaluate effects of autonomic activity on VPB production. We examined twenty subjects with more than 3000 VPBs/day and simulated random time series of VPB occurrence. We found that mutual information values could be used to characterize quantitatively the temporal patterns of VPB generation. Our data suggest that VPB production is not random and VPBs generated with a higher value of mutual information may be more greatly affected by autonomic activity.

  11. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  12. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  13. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  14. 47 CFR 27.321 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for WCS § 27.321... Commission's rules governing the Wireless Communications Services involved. The Commission uses the general procedures in this section for processing mutually exclusive applications in the Wireless...

  15. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  16. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  17. 47 CFR 101.45 - Mutually exclusive applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Processing of Applications § 101.45 Mutually... fixed point-to-point microwave applications for authorization under this part will be entitled...

  18. Parasponia: a novel system for studying mutualism stability.

    PubMed

    Behm, Jocelyn E; Geurts, Rene; Kiers, E Toby

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how mutualistic interactions are stabilized in the presence of cheaters is a major question in evolutionary biology. The legume-rhizobia mutualism has become a model system for studying how plants control cheating partners. However, the generality and evolutionary origins of these control mechanisms are intensely debated. In this Opinion article, we argue that a novel system--the Parasponia-rhizobia mutualism--will significantly advance research in mutualism stability. Parasponia is the only non-legume lineage to have evolved a rhizobial symbiosis, which provides an evolutionary replicate to test how rhizobial exploitation is controlled. Evidence also suggests that this symbiosis is young. This allows studies at an earlier evolutionary stage in mutualisms, so the origin of control mechanisms can be better understood. PMID:25239777

  19. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2004-09-07

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  20. Quantum process reconstruction based on mutually unbiased basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pérez, A.; Klimov, A. B.; Saavedra, C.

    2011-05-01

    We study a quantum process reconstruction based on the use of mutually unbiased projectors (MUB projectors) as input states for a D-dimensional quantum system, with D being a power of a prime number. This approach connects the results of quantum-state tomography using mutually unbiased bases with the coefficients of a quantum process, expanded in terms of MUB projectors. We also study the performance of the reconstruction scheme against random errors when measuring probabilities at the MUB projectors.

  1. Mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Geary, N. H.

    1975-01-01

    The mutual impedance expressions for parallel dipoles in terms of sine-integrals and cosine-integrals have been published by King (1957). The investigation reported provides analogous expressions for nonparallel dipoles. The expressions presented are most useful when the monopoles are close together. The theory of moment methods shows an approach for employing the mutual impedance of filamentary sinusoidal dipoles to calculate the impedance and scattering properties of straight and bent wires with small but finite diameter.

  2. Mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Geary, N. H.

    1974-01-01

    The mutual impedance of nonplanar-skew sinusoidal dipoles is presented as a summation of several exponential integrals with complex arguments. Mathematical models are developed to show the near-zone field of the sinusoidal dipole. The mutual impedance of coupled dipoles is expressed as the sum of four monopole-mobopole impedances to simplify the analysis procedure. The subroutines for solving the parameters of the dipoles are discussed.

  3. Rethinking mutualism stability: cheaters and the evolution of sanctions.

    PubMed

    Frederickson, Megan E

    2013-12-01

    How cooperation originates and persists in diverse species, from bacteria to multicellular organisms to human societies, is a major question in evolutionary biology. A large literature asks: what prevents selection for cheating within cooperative lineages? In mutualisms, or cooperative interactions between species, feedback between partners often aligns their fitness interests, such that cooperative symbionts receive more benefits from their hosts than uncooperative symbionts. But how do these feedbacks evolve? Cheaters might invade symbiont populations and select for hosts that preferentially reward or associate with cooperators (often termed sanctions or partner choice); hosts might adapt to variation in symbiont quality that does not amount to cheating (e.g., environmental variation); or conditional host responses might exist before cheaters do, making mutualisms stable from the outset. I review evidence from yucca-yucca moth, fig-fig wasp, and legume-rhizobium mutualisms, which are commonly cited as mutualisms stabilized by sanctions. Based on the empirical evidence, it is doubtful that cheaters select for host sanctions in these systems; cheaters are too uncommon. Recognizing that sanctions likely evolved for functions other than retaliation against cheaters offers many insights about mutualism coevolution, and about why mutualism evolves in only some lineages of potential hosts. PMID:24552098

  4. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection. PMID:27505645

  5. Adding biotic complexity alters the metabolic benefits of mutualism.

    PubMed

    Harcombe, William R; Betts, Alex; Shapiro, Jason W; Marx, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Mutualism is ubiquitous in nature and plays an integral role in most communities. To predict the eco-evolutionary dynamics of mutualism it is critical to extend classic pair-wise analysis to include additional species. We investigated the effect of adding a third species to a pair-wise mutualism in a spatially structured environment. We tested the hypotheses that selection for costly excretions in a focal population (i) decreases when an exploiter is added (ii) increases when a third mutualist is added relative to the pair-wise scenario. We assayed the selection acting on Salmonella enterica when it exchanges methionine for carbon in an obligate mutualism with an auxotrophic Escherichia coli. A third bacterium, Methylobacterium extorquens, was then added and acted either as an exploiter of the carbon or third obligate mutualist depending on the nitrogen source. In the tripartite mutualism M. extorquens provided nitrogen to the other species. Contrary to our expectations, adding an exploiter increased selection for methionine excretion in S. enterica. Conversely, selection for cooperation was lower in the tripartite mutualism relative to the pair-wise system. Genome-scale metabolic models helped identify the mechanisms underlying these changes in selection. Our results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and eco-evolutionary dynamics. PMID:27272242

  6. Mutuality and the social regulation of neural threat responding

    PubMed Central

    Coan, James A.; Kasle, Shelley; Jackson, Alice; Schaefer, Hillary S.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the presence of a caring relational partner can attenuate neural responses to threat. Here we report reanalyzed data from Coan, Schaefer, and Davidson (2006), investigating the role of relational mutuality in the neural response to threat. Mutuality reflects the degree to which couple members show mutual interest in the sharing of internal feelings, thoughts, aspirations, and joys – a vital form of responsiveness in attachment relationships. We predicted that wives who were high (versus low) in perceived mutuality, and who attended the study session with their husbands, would show reduced neural threat reactivity in response to mild electric shocks. We also explored whether this effect would depend on physical contact (handholding). As predicted, we observed that higher mutuality scores corresponded with decreased neural threat responding in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor cortex. These effects were independent of hand-holding condition. These findings suggest that higher perceived mutuality corresponds with decreased self-regulatory effort and attenuated preparatory motor activity in response to threat cues, even in the absence of direct physical contact with social resources. PMID:23547803

  7. Invasive species management restores a plant-pollinator mutualism in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanna, Cause; Foote, David; Kremen, Claire

    2013-01-01

    1.The management and removal of invasive species may give rise to unanticipated changes in plant–pollinator mutualisms because they can alter the composition and functioning of plant–pollinator interactions in a variety of ways. To utilize a functional approach for invasive species management, we examined the restoration of plant–pollinator mutualisms following the large-scale removal of an invasive nectar thief and arthropod predator, Vespula pensylvanica. 2.We reduced V. pensylvanica populations in large plots managed over multiple years to examine the response of plant–pollinator mutualisms and the fruit production of a functionally important endemic Hawaiian tree species, Metrosideros polymorpha. To integrate knowledge of the invader's behaviour and the plant's mating system, we determined the efficacy of V. pensylvanica as a pollinator of M. polymorpha and quantified the dependence of M. polymorpha on animal pollination (e.g. level of self-compatibility and pollen limitation). 3.The reduction of V. pensylvanica in managed sites, when compared to unmanaged sites, resulted in a significant increase in the visitation rates of effective bee pollinators (e.g. introduced Apis mellifera and native Hylaeus spp.) and in the fruit production of M. polymorpha. 4.Apis mellifera, following the management of V. pensylvanica, appears to be acting as a substitute pollinator for M. polymorpha, replacing extinct or threatened bird and bee species in our study system. 5.Synthesis and applications. Fruit production of the native M. polymorpha was increased after management of the invasive pollinator predator V. pensylvanica; however, the main pollinators were no longer native but introduced. This research thus demonstrates the diverse impacts of introduced species on ecological function and the ambiguous role they play in restoration. We recommend incorporating ecological function and context into invasive species management as this approach may enable conservation

  8. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  9. When to Replace a Prosthesis

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Fundraise Connect Contact Us Materiales en español Amputee Coalition Navigation HOME WHO WE ARE About Us ... Advisory Committee Connect With Us! STORE CALENDAR SEARCH Amputee Coalition > Limb Loss Resource Center > When to Replace ...

  10. Mutually exclusive redox forms of HMGB1 promote cell recruitment or proinflammatory cytokine release

    PubMed Central

    Venereau, Emilie; Casalgrandi, Maura; Schiraldi, Milena; Antoine, Daniel J.; Cattaneo, Angela; De Marchis, Francesco; Liu, Jaron; Antonelli, Antonella; Preti, Alessandro; Raeli, Lorenzo; Shams, Sara Samadi; Yang, Huan; Varani, Luca; Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J.; Bachi, Angela; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia

    2012-01-01

    Tissue damage causes inflammation, by recruiting leukocytes and activating them to release proinflammatory mediators. We show that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) orchestrates both processes by switching among mutually exclusive redox states. Reduced cysteines make HMGB1 a chemoattractant, whereas a disulfide bond makes it a proinflammatory cytokine and further cysteine oxidation to sulfonates by reactive oxygen species abrogates both activities. We show that leukocyte recruitment and activation can be separated. A nonoxidizable HMGB1 mutant in which serines replace all cysteines (3S-HMGB1) does not promote cytokine production, but is more effective than wild-type HMGB1 in recruiting leukocytes in vivo. BoxA, a HMGB1 inhibitor, interferes with leukocyte recruitment but not with activation. We detected the different redox forms of HMGB1 ex vivo within injured muscle. HMGB1 is completely reduced at first and disulfide-bonded later. Thus, HMGB1 orchestrates both key events in sterile inflammation, leukocyte recruitment and their induction to secrete inflammatory cytokines, by adopting mutually exclusive redox states. PMID:22869893

  11. Mutually exclusive redox forms of HMGB1 promote cell recruitment or proinflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Venereau, Emilie; Casalgrandi, Maura; Schiraldi, Milena; Antoine, Daniel J; Cattaneo, Angela; De Marchis, Francesco; Liu, Jaron; Antonelli, Antonella; Preti, Alessandro; Raeli, Lorenzo; Shams, Sara Samadi; Yang, Huan; Varani, Luca; Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J; Bachi, Angela; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Bianchi, Marco E

    2012-08-27

    Tissue damage causes inflammation, by recruiting leukocytes and activating them to release proinflammatory mediators. We show that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) orchestrates both processes by switching among mutually exclusive redox states. Reduced cysteines make HMGB1 a chemoattractant, whereas a disulfide bond makes it a proinflammatory cytokine and further cysteine oxidation to sulfonates by reactive oxygen species abrogates both activities. We show that leukocyte recruitment and activation can be separated. A nonoxidizable HMGB1 mutant in which serines replace all cysteines (3S-HMGB1) does not promote cytokine production, but is more effective than wild-type HMGB1 in recruiting leukocytes in vivo. BoxA, a HMGB1 inhibitor, interferes with leukocyte recruitment but not with activation. We detected the different redox forms of HMGB1 ex vivo within injured muscle. HMGB1 is completely reduced at first and disulfide-bonded later. Thus, HMGB1 orchestrates both key events in sterile inflammation, leukocyte recruitment and their induction to secrete inflammatory cytokines, by adopting mutually exclusive redox states. PMID:22869893

  12. Prioritization Methodology for Chemical Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruit, W.; Schutzenhofer, S.; Goldberg, B.; Everhart, K.

    1993-01-01

    This project serves to define an appropriate methodology for effective prioritization of efforts required to develop replacement technologies mandated by imposed and forecast legislation. The methodology used is a semiquantitative approach derived from quality function deployment techniques (QFD Matrix). This methodology aims to weigh the full environmental, cost, safety, reliability, and programmatic implications of replacement technology development to allow appropriate identification of viable candidates and programmatic alternatives. The results are being implemented as a guideline for consideration for current NASA propulsion systems.

  13. Wafer Replacement Cluster Tool (Presentation);

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, H. M.

    2008-04-01

    This presentation on wafer replacement cluster tool discusses: (1) Platform for advanced R and D toward SAI 2015 cost goal--crystal silicon PV at area costs closer to amorphous Si PV, it's 15% efficiency, inexpensive substrate, and moderate temperature processing (<800 C); (2) Why silicon?--industrial and knowledge base, abundant and environmentally benign, market acceptance, and good efficiency; and (3) Why replace wafers?--expensive, high embedded energy content, and uses 50-100 times more silicon than needed.

  14. Chimney renovation versus chimney replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Porthouse, R.A.

    1999-11-01

    Chimneys are an integral part of a fossil fueled generating station and perhaps one of the most commonly neglected and misunderstood structures at the plant. Structural damage caused by wind, earthquake, corrosive operating conditions, inadequate design, ever changing operating conditions, or years of neglect can render the structure unsafe and result in the need to perform major renovations or replace the entire chimney. The decision to renovate or replace an existing chimney is complex and should consider the following factors: (1) Age and condition of shell; (2) Type and condition of lining; (3) New operating conditions; (4) Cost of renovation vs replacement; (5) Unit outage time required; and (6) Cost for replacement power during outage. Information needed to make an informed decision regarding renovation or replacement, which most often involves several million dollars, can be best obtained from experienced chimney contractors and engineering specialists. This paper addresses four projects that utilized unique renovation techniques in lieu of partial or complete replacement of the structure.

  15. Semantic Factors Predict the Rate of Lexical Replacement of Content Words

    PubMed Central

    Vejdemo, Susanne; Hörberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The rate of lexical replacement estimates the diachronic stability of word forms on the basis of how frequently a proto-language word is replaced or retained in its daughter languages. Lexical replacement rate has been shown to be highly related to word class and word frequency. In this paper, we argue that content words and function words behave differently with respect to lexical replacement rate, and we show that semantic factors predict the lexical replacement rate of content words. For the 167 content items in the Swadesh list, data was gathered on the features of lexical replacement rate, word class, frequency, age of acquisition, synonyms, arousal, imageability and average mutual information, either from published databases or gathered from corpora and lexica. A linear regression model shows that, in addition to frequency, synonyms, senses and imageability are significantly related to the lexical replacement rate of content words–in particular the number of synonyms that a word has. The model shows no differences in lexical replacement rate between word classes, and outperforms a model with word class and word frequency predictors only. PMID:26820737

  16. Semantic Factors Predict the Rate of Lexical Replacement of Content Words.

    PubMed

    Vejdemo, Susanne; Hörberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The rate of lexical replacement estimates the diachronic stability of word forms on the basis of how frequently a proto-language word is replaced or retained in its daughter languages. Lexical replacement rate has been shown to be highly related to word class and word frequency. In this paper, we argue that content words and function words behave differently with respect to lexical replacement rate, and we show that semantic factors predict the lexical replacement rate of content words. For the 167 content items in the Swadesh list, data was gathered on the features of lexical replacement rate, word class, frequency, age of acquisition, synonyms, arousal, imageability and average mutual information, either from published databases or gathered from corpora and lexica. A linear regression model shows that, in addition to frequency, synonyms, senses and imageability are significantly related to the lexical replacement rate of content words-in particular the number of synonyms that a word has. The model shows no differences in lexical replacement rate between word classes, and outperforms a model with word class and word frequency predictors only. PMID:26820737

  17. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  18. Mutuality: clinical and metapsychological potentials of a failed experiment.

    PubMed

    Castillo Mendoza, Carlos Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis are often dismissed, without acknowledging the results obtained from them and his own cautionary remarks about their limits. Though ultimately failed, Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis were a source of clinical and metapsychological knowledge, despite the fact that he was unable to elaborate them in his lifetime. In this paper I connect mutuality to the development of the psyche, especially to the constitutive core of the intrapsychic. To understand the latter, it is necessary to take into account, among others, issues such as the common attribute, the mutual flux between the unconsciouses, the dialogue of unconsciouses, the maternal profundity, the primal relationship with the mother, and, above all, the primal unity between mother and child, which are fundamental for the emergence and development of the primary psychic forces. Incidences of rupture, distortion of the core of mutuality in the psychic life, its loss and disadjustment, by means of external traumatizing forces, and some clinical implications are described. PMID:22398886

  19. Mutualism Disruption Threatens Global Plant Biodiversity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Clare E.; Zavaleta, Erika S.; Tershy, Bernie; Croll, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Background As global environmental change accelerates, biodiversity losses can disrupt interspecific interactions. Extinctions of mutualist partners can create “widow” species, which may face reduced ecological fitness. Hypothetically, such mutualism disruptions could have cascading effects on biodiversity by causing additional species coextinctions. However, the scope of this problem – the magnitude of biodiversity that may lose mutualist partners and the consequences of these losses – remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic review and synthesis of data from a broad range of sources to estimate the threat posed by vertebrate extinctions to the global biodiversity of vertebrate-dispersed and -pollinated plants. Though enormous research gaps persist, our analysis identified Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and global oceanic islands as geographic regions at particular risk of disruption of these mutualisms; within these regions, percentages of plant species likely affected range from 2.1–4.5%. Widowed plants are likely to experience reproductive declines of 40–58%, potentially threatening their persistence in the context of other global change stresses. Conclusions Our systematic approach demonstrates that thousands of species may be impacted by disruption in one class of mutualisms, but extinctions will likely disrupt other mutualisms, as well. Although uncertainty is high, there is evidence that mutualism disruption directly threatens significant biodiversity in some geographic regions. Conservation measures with explicit focus on mutualistic functions could be necessary to bolster populations of widowed species and maintain ecosystem functions. PMID:23840571

  20. 26 CFR 1.822-5 - Mutual insurance company taxable income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mutual insurance company taxable income. 1.822-5... Premium Deposits) § 1.822-5 Mutual insurance company taxable income. (a) Mutual insurance company taxable income defined. Section 822(a) defines the term “mutual insurance company taxable income” for purposes...

  1. 12 CFR 575.12 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding... MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.12 Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. (a) Conversion—(1) Generally. A mutual holding company may convert to the stock form in accordance with the...

  2. 12 CFR 239.24 - Issuances of stock by subsidiary holding companies of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... companies of mutual holding companies. 239.24 Section 239.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION... mutual holding companies. (a) Requirements. No subsidiary holding company of a mutual holding company...

  3. 12 CFR 239.24 - Issuances of stock by subsidiary holding companies of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... companies of mutual holding companies. 239.24 Section 239.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION... mutual holding companies. (a) Requirements. No subsidiary holding company of a mutual holding company...

  4. 12 CFR 333.4 - Conversions from mutual to stock form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... case of a savings bank subsidiary of a mutual holding company, all such plans are approved by a majority of stockholders other than its parent mutual holding company prior to implementation at a duly... insured mutual state savings banks to the mutual holding company form of ownership. As determined by...

  5. Prioritization methodology for chemical replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruit, Wendy; Goldberg, Ben; Schutzenhofer, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Since United States of America federal legislation has required ozone depleting chemicals (class 1 & 2) to be banned from production, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and industry have been required to find other chemicals and methods to replace these target chemicals. This project was initiated as a development of a prioritization methodology suitable for assessing and ranking existing processes for replacement 'urgency.' The methodology was produced in the form of a workbook (NASA Technical Paper 3421). The final workbook contains two tools, one for evaluation and one for prioritization. The two tools are interconnected in that they were developed from one central theme - chemical replacement due to imposed laws and regulations. This workbook provides matrices, detailed explanations of how to use them, and a detailed methodology for prioritization of replacement technology. The main objective is to provide a GUIDELINE to help direct the research for replacement technology. The approach for prioritization called for a system which would result in a numerical rating for the chemicals and processes being assessed. A Quality Function Deployment (QFD) technique was used in order to determine numerical values which would correspond to the concerns raised and their respective importance to the process. This workbook defines the approach and the application of the QFD matrix. This technique: (1) provides a standard database for technology that can be easily reviewed, and (2) provides a standard format for information when requesting resources for further research for chemical replacement technology. Originally, this workbook was to be used for Class 1 and Class 2 chemicals, but it was specifically designed to be flexible enough to be used for any chemical used in a process (if the chemical and/or process needs to be replaced). The methodology consists of comparison matrices (and the smaller comparison components) which allow replacement technology

  6. Homologous gene replacement in Physarum

    SciTech Connect

    Burland, T.G.; Pallotta, D.

    1995-01-01

    The protist Physarum polycephalum is useful for analysis of several aspects of cellular and developmental biology. To expand the opportunities for experimental analysis of this organism, we have developed a method for gene replacement. We transformed Physarum amoebae with plasmid DNA carrying a mutant allele, ardD{Delta}1, of the ardD actin gene; ardD{Delta}1 mutates the critical carboxy-terminal region of the gene product. Because ardD is not expressed in the amoeba, replacement of ardD{sup +} with ardD{Delta}1 should not be lethal for this cell type. Transformants were obtained only when linear plasmid DNA was used. Most transformants carried one copy of ardD{Delta}1 in addition to ardD{sup +}, but in two (5%), ardD{sup +} was replaced by a single copy of ardD{Delta}1. This is the first example of homologous gene replacement in Physarum. ardD{Delta}1 was stably maintained in the genome through growth, development and meiosis. We found no effect of ardD{Delta}l on viability, growth, or development of any of the various cell types of Physarum. Thus, the carboxy-terminal region of the ardD product appears not to perform a unique essential role in growth or development. Nevertheless, this method for homologous gene replacement can be applied to analyze the function of any cloned gene. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Optimization of station battery replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancauskas, J. R.; Shook, D. A.

    1994-08-01

    During a loss of ac power at a nuclear generating station (including diesel generators), batteries provide the source of power which is required to operate safety-related components. Because traditional lead-acid batteries have a qualified life of 20 years, the batteries must be replaced a minimum of once during a station's lifetime, twice if license extension is pursued, and more often depending on actual in-service dates and the results of surveillance tests. Replacement of batteries often occurs prior to 20 years as a result of systems changes caused by factors such as Station Blackout Regulations, control system upgrades, incremental load growth, and changes in the operating times of existing equipment. Many of these replacement decisions are based on the predictive capabilities of manual design basis calculations. The inherent conservatism of manual calculations may result in battery replacements occurring before actually required. Computerized analysis of batteries can aid in optimizing the timing of replacements as well as in interpreting service test data. Computerized analysis also provides large benefits in maintaining the as-configured load profile and corresponding design margins, while also providing the capability to quickly analyze proposed modifications and respond to internal and external audits.

  8. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  9. Homosexual mutuality: variation on a theme by Erik Erikson.

    PubMed

    Sohier, R

    The exploratory descriptive study described here was conducted in order to produce the initial empirical evidence to support reformulation of the theoretical construct of heterosexual mutuality (Erikson, 1975). Six persons were interviewed in depth on tape in order to locate them on one of four identity statuses constructed by Marcia (1964, 1966, 1973). The tool was modified and extended to meet the purposes of the study. The questions are directed toward illumination of conflictual moments in the life cycle when the ability to make appropriate decisions engenders character growth, and supports the personality integration of adulthood. An ability to make decisions results in personality integration. The small study provides evidence that there exists a homosexual mutuality (contrary to Erikson's position) which is no less valuable than heterosexual mutuality, and forms an equal basis for adult personality integration. PMID:3835200

  10. Graph-state formalism for mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, Christoph; Kraus, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    A pair of orthonormal bases is called mutually unbiased if all mutual overlaps between any element of one basis and an arbitrary element of the other basis coincide. In case the dimension, d, of the considered Hilbert space is a power of a prime number, complete sets of d+1 mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) exist. Here we present a method based on the graph-state formalism to construct such sets of MUBs. We show that for n p-level systems, with p being prime, one particular graph suffices to easily construct a set of pn+1 MUBs. In fact, we show that a single n-dimensional vector, which is associated with this graph, can be used to generate a complete set of MUBs and demonstrate that this vector can be easily determined. Finally, we discuss some advantages of our formalism regarding the analysis of entanglement structures in MUBs, as well as experimental realizations.

  11. Lessons learned from two peer-led mutual support groups.

    PubMed

    Viverito, Kristen M; Cardin, Scott A; Johnson, Leigh Ann; Owen, Richard R

    2013-10-01

    This case report and analysis describe the formation of two peer-led mutual support groups conducted within the context of a Veterans Administration Medical Center. Based on our assessment of the success of one of these groups and the failure of the other, we offer several recommendations and suggestions to help promote this modality. More specifically, we hypothesize that such groups are more likely to be successful (1) if participants are transferred en masse from another group, (2) that, at least initially, housing the group in the same context as formal clinician-led groups or overlapping clinician-led and peer-led groups may help smooth the transition from authority-led treatment to a mutual peer support format, and finally, (3) that prior experiences in interpersonal process groups may promote the skills and cohesion to promote successful transition to mutual support. PMID:24004015

  12. Thermalization of mutual information in hyperscaling violating backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanhayi, M. Reza

    2016-03-01

    We study certain features of scaling behaviors of the mutual information during a process of thermalization, more precisely we extend the time scaling behavior of mutual information which has been discussed in [1] to time-dependent hyperscaling violating geometries. We use the holographic description of entanglement entropy for two disjoint system consisting of two parallel strips whose widths are much larger than the separation between them. We show that during the thermalization process, the dynamical exponent plays a crucial rule in reading the general time scaling behavior of mutual information (e.g., at the pre-local-equilibration regime). It is shown that the scaling violating parameter can be employed to define an effective dimension.

  13. Accelerated evolution as a consequence of transitions to mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Lutzoni, François; Pagel, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Differential rates of nucleotide substitutions among taxa are a common observation in molecular phylogenetic studies, yet links between rates of DNA evolution and traits or behaviors of organisms have proved elusive. Likelihood ratio testing is used here for the first time to evaluate specific hypotheses that account for the induction of shifts in rates of DNA evolution. A molecular phylogenetic investigation of mutualist (lichen-forming fungi and fungi associated with liverworts) and nonmutualist fungi revealed four independent transitions to mutualism. We demonstrate a highly significant association between mutualism and increased rates of nucleotide substitutions in nuclear ribosomal DNA, and we demonstrate that a transition to mutualism preceded the rate acceleration of nuclear ribosomal DNA in these lineages. Our results suggest that the increased rate of evolution after the adoption of a mutualist lifestyle is generalized across the genome of these mutualist fungi. PMID:11038586

  14. Sparse Bayesian learning for DOA estimation with mutual coupling.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jisheng; Hu, Nan; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2015-01-01

    Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise. PMID:26501284

  15. Sparse Bayesian Learning for DOA Estimation with Mutual Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jisheng; Hu, Nan; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2015-01-01

    Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise. PMID:26501284

  16. Empirical study of the tails of mutual fund size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzkopf, Yonathan; Farmer, J. Doyne

    2010-06-01

    The mutual fund industry manages about a quarter of the assets in the U.S. stock market and thus plays an important role in the U.S. economy. The question of how much control is concentrated in the hands of the largest players is best quantitatively discussed in terms of the tail behavior of the mutual fund size distribution. We study the distribution empirically and show that the tail is much better described by a log-normal than a power law, indicating less concentration than, for example, personal income. The results are highly statistically significant and are consistent across fifteen years. This contradicts a recent theory concerning the origin of the power law tails of the trading volume distribution. Based on the analysis in a companion paper, the log-normality is to be expected, and indicates that the distribution of mutual funds remains perpetually out of equilibrium.

  17. Rényi generalizations of the conditional quantum mutual information

    SciTech Connect

    Berta, Mario; Seshadreesan, Kaushik P.; Wilde, Mark M.

    2015-02-15

    The conditional quantum mutual information I(A; B|C) of a tripartite state ρ{sub ABC} is an information quantity which lies at the center of many problems in quantum information theory. Three of its main properties are that it is non-negative for any tripartite state, that it decreases under local operations applied to systems A and B, and that it obeys the duality relation I(A; B|C) = I(A; B|D) for a four-party pure state on systems ABCD. The conditional mutual information also underlies the squashed entanglement, an entanglement measure that satisfies all of the axioms desired for an entanglement measure. As such, it has been an open question to find Rényi generalizations of the conditional mutual information, that would allow for a deeper understanding of the original quantity and find applications beyond the traditional memoryless setting of quantum information theory. The present paper addresses this question, by defining different α-Rényi generalizations I{sub α}(A; B|C) of the conditional mutual information, some of which we can prove converge to the conditional mutual information in the limit α → 1. Furthermore, we prove that many of these generalizations satisfy non-negativity, duality, and monotonicity with respect to local operations on one of the systems A or B (with it being left as an open question to prove that monotonicity holds with respect to local operations on both systems). The quantities defined here should find applications in quantum information theory and perhaps even in other areas of physics, but we leave this for future work. We also state a conjecture regarding the monotonicity of the Rényi conditional mutual informations defined here with respect to the Rényi parameter α. We prove that this conjecture is true in some special cases and when α is in a neighborhood of one.

  18. Interdependent networks with identical degrees of mutually dependent nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Shere, Nathaniel W.; Cwilich, Gabriel A.

    2011-01-01

    We study a problem of failure of two interdependent networks in the case of identical degrees of mutually dependent nodes. We assume that both networks (A and B) have the same number of nodes N connected by the bidirectional dependency links establishing a one-to-one correspondence between the nodes of the two networks in a such a way that the mutually dependent nodes have the same number of connectivity links; i.e., their degrees coincide. This implies that both networks have the same degree distribution P(k). We call such networks correspondently coupled networks (CCNs). We assume that the nodes in each network are randomly connected. We define the mutually connected clusters and the mutual giant component as in earlier works on randomly coupled interdependent networks and assume that only the nodes that belong to the mutual giant component remain functional. We assume that initially a 1-p fraction of nodes are randomly removed because of an attack or failure and find analytically, for an arbitrary P(k), the fraction of nodes μ(p) that belong to the mutual giant component. We find that the system undergoes a percolation transition at a certain fraction p=pc, which is always smaller than pc for randomly coupled networks with the same P(k). We also find that the system undergoes a first-order transition at pc>0 if P(k) has a finite second moment. For the case of scale-free networks with 2<λ⩽3, the transition becomes a second-order transition. Moreover, if λ<3, we find pc=0, as in percolation of a single network. For λ=3 we find an exact analytical expression for pc>0. Finally, we find that the robustness of CCN increases with the broadness of their degree distribution.

  19. The mutuality metaphor: understanding healthcare provision in NHS Scotland.

    PubMed

    Howieson, Brian

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Better Health, Better Care Action Plan (Scottish Government, 2007) sets out how the Scottish Government intends to strengthen public ownership of the National Health Service in Scotland. The purpose of this paper is to advance extant knowledge by understanding how a state-led mutual health policy may be interpreted, and importantly, communicated. Design/methodology/approach - The definitional problem of mutuality will be discussed and analysed in terms of how it is (or perhaps should be) communicated? will be offered. Findings - It actually may be more instructive to think of, and communicate, mutuality as a metaphor to aid understanding of the openness and fluidity found in NHS Scotland. Research limitations/implications - The existence of paradox and ambiguity does not, however, negate the usefulness of the term "mutuality". Quite the opposite in fact: it is precisely by examining healthcare and its delivery through the lens of mutuality (rather than rejecting its complexity as a failure) that this amorphousness can be better appreciated. Practical implications - There is a need for more public, professional, and academic debate to explore and clarify its implementation, and how it is to be led. This must be provided whilst recognising the daily imperatives that NHS leaders must face. This would suggest, therefore, that a dual development path may help. Originality/value - Although Better Health, Better Care Action Plan was published in 2007, some eight years on there is still confusion and misunderstanding as to what mutuality in healthcare is, not only in policy and theory, but also in practice. It is hoped that this analysis will help address, in part, some of this confusion and misunderstanding. PMID:27296885

  20. Separability criteria via sets of mutually unbiased measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli

    2015-01-01

    Mutually unbiased measurements (MUMs) are generalized from the concept of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) and include the complete set of MUBs as a special case, but they are superior to MUBs as they do not need to be rank one projectors. We investigate entanglement detection using sets of MUMs and derive separability criteria for multipartite qudit systems, arbitrary high-dimensional bipartite systems of a d1-dimensional subsystem and a d2-dimensional subsystem, and multipartite systems of multi-level subsystems. These criteria are of the advantages of more effective and wider application range than previous criteria. They provide experimental implementation in detecting entanglement of unknown quantum states. PMID:26278628

  1. Mutual neutralization in collisions of Li+ and F-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, S. M.; Nurzia, P.; Larson, Å.

    2015-11-01

    Mutual neutralization in collisions of Li+ and F- is driven by an avoided crossing between the two lowest 1Σ+ electronic states of the LiF system. These electronic states are computed using the multi-reference configuration interaction method. We investigate how the adiabatic potential energy curves and the non-adiabatic coupling element depend on the choice of the reference configurations as well as the basis set. Using diabatic states, the total and differential cross sections for mutual neutralization are computed.

  2. Mutual exclusivity and exclusion: Converging evidence from two contrasting traditions

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Kenneth R.; Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    1993-01-01

    Mutual exclusivity and exclusion are two terms used by cognitive psychologists and behavior analysts, respectively, to identify essentially the same phenomenon. While cognitive psychologists view mutual exclusivity in terms of a hypothesis that individuals use intuitively while acquiring language, behavior analysts regard exclusion as a derived stimulus relation that bears upon the acquisition and elaboration of verbal behavior. Each research tradition, though at odds with respect to accounting for the phenomenon, employs similar procedures to answer comparable questions. Insofar as both cognitive and behavioral psychologists are studying the same phenomenon, the ground work is established for collaboration between them. PMID:22477081

  3. Cobra Probes Containing Replaceable Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John; Redding, Adam

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the basic design of cobra probes provides for relatively easy replacement of broken thermocouples. Cobra probes are standard tube-type pressure probes that may also contain thermocouples and that are routinely used in wind tunnels and aeronautical hardware. They are so named because in side views, they resemble a cobra poised to attack. Heretofore, there has been no easy way to replace a broken thermocouple in a cobra probe: instead, it has been necessary to break the probe apart and then rebuild it, typically at a cost between $2,000 and $4,000 (2004 prices). The modified design makes it possible to replace the thermocouple, in minimal time and at relatively low cost, by inserting new thermocouple wire in a tube.

  4. Molecular replacement: tricks and treats

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, Chantal

    2013-11-01

    To be successful, molecular replacement relies on the quality of the model and of the crystallographic data. Some tricks that could be applied to the models or to the crystal to increase the success rate of MR are discussed here. Molecular replacement is the method of choice for X-ray crystallographic structure determination provided that suitable structural homologues are available in the PDB. Presently, there are ∼80 000 structures in the PDB (8074 were deposited in the year 2012 alone), of which ∼70% have been solved by molecular replacement. For successful molecular replacement the model must cover at least 50% of the total structure and the C{sub α} r.m.s.d. between the core model and the structure to be solved must be less than 2 Å. Here, an approach originally implemented in the CaspR server (http://www.igs.cnrs-mrs.fr/Caspr2/index.cgi) based on homology modelling to search for a molecular-replacement solution is discussed. How the use of as much information as possible from different sources can improve the model(s) is briefly described. The combination of structural information with distantly related sequences is crucial to optimize the multiple alignment that will define the boundaries of the core domains. PDB clusters (sequences with ≥30% identical residues) can also provide information on the eventual changes in conformation and will help to explore the relative orientations assumed by protein subdomains. Normal-mode analysis can also help in generating series of conformational models in the search for a molecular-replacement solution. Of course, finding a correct solution is only the first step and the accuracy of the identified solution is as important as the data quality to proceed through refinement. Here, some possible reasons for failure are discussed and solutions are proposed using a set of successful examples.

  5. Mutual Cooperation in the Formal Allyl Alcohol Nucleophilic Substitution and Hydration of Alkynes for the Construction of γ-Substituted Ketones.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kaimeng; Wang, Hongkai; Liu, Lingyan; Chang, Weixing; Li, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Mutual cooperation in the formal allyl alcohol nucleophilic substitution reaction and hydration of an alkyne has been utilized in the presence of a gold catalyst to give a series of γ-functionalized ketones with high to excellent yields. This reaction actually involved an intramolecular O-H insertion cyclization of an alkyne to form the dihydrofuran intermediate, which was followed by the nucleophilic addition ring-opening of a dihydrofuran to give the target compound. PMID:26946315

  6. HST Replacement Battery Initial Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krol, Stan; Waldo, Greg; Hollandsworth, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) original Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) batteries were replaced during the Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) after 19 years and one month on orbit.The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the findings from the assessment of the initial sm4 replacement battery performance. The batteries are described, the 0 C capacity is reviewed, descriptions, charts and tables reviewing the State Of Charge (SOC) Performance, the Battery Voltage Performance, the battery impedance, the minimum voltage performance, the thermal performance, the battery current, and the battery system recharge ratio,

  7. Prioritization methodology for chemical replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ben; Cruit, Wendy; Schutzenhofer, Scott

    1995-01-01

    This methodology serves to define a system for effective prioritization of efforts required to develop replacement technologies mandated by imposed and forecast legislation. The methodology used is a semi quantitative approach derived from quality function deployment techniques (QFD Matrix). QFD is a conceptual map that provides a method of transforming customer wants and needs into quantitative engineering terms. This methodology aims to weight the full environmental, cost, safety, reliability, and programmatic implications of replacement technology development to allow appropriate identification of viable candidates and programmatic alternatives.

  8. Crystal growth of apatite by replacement of an aragonite precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasioptas, Argyrios; Geisler, Thorsten; Putnis, Christine V.; Perdikouri, Christina; Putnis, Andrew

    2010-08-01

    The replacement of aragonite by apatite is a process that occurs naturally during diagenesis, chemical weathering and natural hydrothermal reactions and is artificially promoted in medical sciences for use of the product material as a bone implant. We have investigated the mechanism and the kinetics of this replacement by using biogenic aragonite (cuttlebone of the Sepia officinalis) as a starting material and reacting it with di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate solution. Isothermal experiments were carried out over a range of temperatures up to 190 °C. Quantification of each solid phase, for different reaction times, was obtained by the Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray diffraction patterns. An empirical activation energy was calculated by using two different approaches to analyze the data. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the fine structure of the cuttlebone was perfectly retained even after aragonite had been completely converted to apatite. We present a detailed investigation of the kinetics of a reaction that involves interaction of a solid phase with an aqueous fluid and leads to a pseudomorphic replacement of the initial solid phase by a new, chemically different, phase. This replacement process is described in terms of an interface-coupled dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism.

  9. Replaceable Microfluidic Cartridges for a PCR Biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Kevin; Sullivan, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts a replaceable microfluidic cartridge that is a component of a miniature biosensor that detects target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences. The biosensor utilizes (1) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to multiply the amount of DNA to be detected, (2) fluorogenic polynucleotide probe chemicals for labeling the target DNA sequences, and (3) a high-sensitivity epifluorescence-detection optoelectronic subsystem. Microfluidics is a relatively new field of device development in which one applies techniques for fabricating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to miniature systems for containing and/or moving fluids. Typically, microfluidic devices are microfabricated, variously, from silicon or polymers. The development of microfluidic devices for applications that involve PCR and fluorescence-based detection of PCR products poses special challenges

  10. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Martin H.; Mehta, Vivek A.; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  11. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Mehta, Vivek A; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  12. [Volume replacement in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Nohé, B; Ploppa, A; Schmidt, V; Unertl, K

    2011-05-01

    Volume substitution represents an essential component of intensive care medicine. The amount of fluid administered, the composition and the timing of volume replacement seem to affect the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Although restrictive volume strategies bear the risk of tissue hypoperfusion and tissue hypoxia in hemodynamically unstable patients liberal strategies favour the development of avoidable hypervolemia with edema and resultant organ dysfunction. However, neither strategy has shown a consistent benefit. In order to account for the heavily varying oxygen demand of critically ill patients, a goal-directed, demand-adapted volume strategy is proposed. Using this strategy, volume replacement should be aligned to the need to restore tissue perfusion and the evidence of volume responsiveness. As the efficiency of volume resuscitation for correction of tissue hypoxia is time-dependent, preload optimization should be completed in the very first hours. Whether colloids or crystalloids are more suitable for this purpose is still controversially discussed. Nevertheless, a temporally limited use of colloids during the initial stage of tissue hypoperfusion appears to represent a strategy which uses the greater volume effect during hypovolemia while minimizing the risks for adverse reactions. PMID:21350879

  13. Replaceable Sleeve Protects Welder Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. L.; Simpson, C., E.

    1983-01-01

    New replaceable carbon insert for deflection coil in electron-beam welder promises to decrease maintenance costs. Inserts made from materials other than carbon (not yet tried) are less expensive, thus reducing costs even further. With carbon insert, deflection coils last longer and are easier to maintain.

  14. Developing High Quality Replacement Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional approaches for postweaning development of replacement heifers used during the last several decades have primarily focused on feeding heifers to achieve or exceed an appropriate target weight, and thereby maximize heifer pregnancy rates. However, substantial changes in cattle genetics and...

  15. Will peanut hulls replace oil

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    A low-cost, fast-curing wood adhesive has been recently developed by the University of Georgia, in which up to 80% of the petroleum ingredients can be replaced with a substance extracted from peanut hulls. An outline of the process is given.

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone replacement in addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, S S; Brody, K H

    2001-07-01

    Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder which can be life-threatening. It can also interfere with the normal development of adrenarche, resulting in the absence of pubic and axillary hair growth. We report a case of satisfactory restoration of adrenarche through DHEA administered in conjunction with the standard glucocortisone and fluorocortisone replacement. PMID:11435018

  17. Testing of Replacement Bag Material

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    Recently, the FB-Line bagout material was changed to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible.The results of the strength tests and the outgassing measurements and calculations demonstrate that the proposed replacement nylon bag materials (HRMP and orange anti-static material) are acceptable substitutes for LDPE and the original nylon with respect to mechanical properties.

  18. Institutionalized Mutuality in Canada-China Management Education Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Shuguang; Liu, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the Canada-China Management Education Program (CCMEP, 1983-1996) between the University of Toronto (UT) and Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). In this paper, we create a "Three Levels/Four Parameters" analytical framework, based on the concept of mutuality from Johan Galtung (1980) and the concept…

  19. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  20. The subtraction of mutually displaced Gaussian Schell-model beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sande, J. Carlos G.; Santarsiero, Massimo; Piquero, Gemma; Gori, Franco

    2015-12-01

    Using recently derived results about the difference of two cross-spectral densities, we consider a source whose correlation function is the difference of two mutually displaced Gaussian Schell-model cross-spectral densities. We examine the main features of this new cross-spectral density in terms of coherence and intensity distribution, both across the source plane and after free propagation.

  1. No effect of diffraction on Pluto-Charon mutual events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, D. J.; Hubbard, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    Mulholland and Gustafson (1987) made the interesting suggestion that observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events might show significant dependence on both wavelength and telescope aperture because of diffraction effects. In this letter, observations are presented that show the predicted effects to be absent and demonstrate that the parameters of the system are such that the events can be accurately analyzed with geometrical optics.

  2. Circumstances for Pluto-Charon mutual events in 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.; Buie, Marc W.

    1988-01-01

    Circumstances for 90 Pluto-Charon mutual events occurring during the 1989 opposition are presented. It is found that the deepest and longest events will occur near postopposition quadrature in early August. Two new stars are selected as comparison stars for events occurring before opposition in 1989, and it is noted that the 1988 comparison stars should be used for events occurring after opposition.

  3. The Effects of Perceived Mutual Understanding in Interpersonal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ron

    To investigate the effects of mutual perceived understanding on the communicators, 86 undergraduate students in a speech communication course were asked to use a 382 item checklist to identify those feelings and sensations that described their own experiences of intense communication. Analysis of subjects' responses showed that 63 items were…

  4. 76 FR 20459 - Mutual to Stock Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual to Stock Conversion Application AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. 3507. The Office of Thrift Supervision within the Department of... Thrift Supervision, 1700 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20552; send a facsimile transmission to (202)...

  5. 12 CFR 163.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... capital requirements under part 167 of this chapter if a Federal savings association or 12 CFR part 390... a Federal savings association or 12 CFR part 390, subpart Z if a state savings association; And... parity with another class of mutual capital certificates; or (F) Action is sought which would...

  6. A Swedish Mutual Support Society of Problem Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binde, Per

    2012-01-01

    Mutual support societies for problem gamblers have existed in Sweden for 20 years. They have helped more people with gambling problems than any other institution inside or outside the Swedish health care system. This paper outlines the background of these societies and describes the meetings of one of them. Data come from interviews with members…

  7. Mutually Beneficial Collective Bargaining in a Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Stuart

    Collective bargaining is a bilateral decision-making process where representatives of the faculty and of the college must come to some mutual agreement on items that are listed in the body of the contract. Typically, the adversarial or competitive bargaining approach is used to resolve differences between the two sides, but there are some mutually…

  8. Mutual Intercultural Relations among University Students in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gui, Yongxia; Safdar, Saba; Berry, John

    2016-01-01

    The current study examies the views of both international and domestic students in Canada using the conceptual and empirical framework from the MIRIPS (Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies) project (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/research/mirips). Two hypotheses were examined. First is the "multiculturalism hypothesis"…

  9. Quantum correlation in degenerate optical parametric oscillators with mutual injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Kenta; Marandi, Alireza; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically and numerically study the quantum dynamics of two degenerate optical parametric oscillators with mutual injections. The cavity mode in the optical coupling path between the two oscillator facets is explicitly considered. Stochastic equations for the oscillators and mutual injection path based on the positive P representation are derived. The system of two gradually pumped oscillators with out-of-phase mutual injections is simulated, and its quantum state is investigated. When the incoherent loss of the oscillators other than the mutual injections is small, the squeezed quadratic amplitudes p ̂ in the oscillators are positively correlated near the oscillation threshold. It indicates finite quantum correlation, estimated via Gaussian quantum discord, and the entanglement between the intracavity subharmonic fields. When the loss in the injection path is low, each oscillator around the phase transition point forms macroscopic superposition even under a small pump noise. It suggests that the squeezed field stored in the low-loss injection path weakens the decoherence in the oscillators.

  10. Conflict Management: A Premarital Training Program in Mutual Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridley, Carl A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of a structured educational program to train premarital couples in communication and mutual problem-solving skills. Couples (N=26) participated in a problem-solving training program, while similar couples (N=28) participated in a relationship discussion group. The problem-solving group showed a greater increase in…

  11. The Mutual Influence of Parenting and Boys' Externalizing Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Colder, Craig R.; Lochman, John E.; Wells, Karen C.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined the mutual influence of parenting and boys' externalizing behavior from 4th to 8th grade, how these relationships change as children develop, and the stability of parenting and child behavior in a sample of 122 boys. Child behavior predicted poor parental monitoring at 6th and 7th grade and inconsistent discipline at all…

  12. The Environment of Classification: The Concept of Mutual Exclusivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kevin P.

    1973-01-01

    Classification is interpreted so as to incorporate all attempts at the imposition of order upon our observations of the universe. In this article, the fundamental bases of classification are examined: in particular the alien notions of mutual exclusivity and the use of inflexible structures to mirror a dynamic universe. (26 references) (Author/KE)

  13. Mutual Aid: A Key to Survival for Black Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Alex J.

    1977-01-01

    In the Brotherhood Crusade, a black mutual aid, self-help organization, Los Angeles blacks joined together to effect independence within the professions and the social service delivery systems, rejecting incorporation into the United Way, the major L.A. fund-raising organization. This article presents findings of a study of Crusade participants.…

  14. 77 FR 48566 - The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc., et al.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... the Act to invest in certain financial instruments. Applicants: The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc., The... (iv) is also eligible to invest in securities (as defined in section 2(a)(36) of the Act) in reliance on rule 12d1-2 under the Act (each a ``Fund of Funds''), to also invest, to the extent...

  15. Mutual information area laws for thermal free fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernigau, H.; Kastoryano, M. J.; Eisert, J.

    2015-02-01

    We provide a rigorous and asymptotically exact expression of the mutual information of translationally invariant free fermionic lattice systems in a Gibbs state. In order to arrive at this result, we introduce a novel framework for computing determinants of Töplitz operators with smooth symbols, and for treating Töplitz matrices with system size dependent entries. The asymptotically exact mutual information for a partition of the 1D lattice satisfies an area law, with a prefactor which we compute explicitly. As examples, we discuss the fermionic XX model in one dimension and free fermionic models on the torus in higher dimensions in detail. Special emphasis is put on the discussion of the temperature dependence of the mutual information, scaling like the logarithm of the inverse temperature, hence confirming an expression suggested by conformal field theory. We also comment on the applicability of the formalism to treat open systems driven by quantum noise. In the appendix, we derive useful bounds to the mutual information in terms of purities. Finally, we provide a detailed error analysis for finite system sizes. This analysis is valuable in its own right for the abstract theory of Töplitz determinants.

  16. Language Experience Shapes the Development of the Mutual Exclusivity Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston-Price, Carmel; Caloghiris, Zoe; Raviglione, Eleonora

    2010-01-01

    Halberda (2003) demonstrated that 17-month-old infants, but not 14- or 16-month-olds, use a strategy known as mutual exclusivity (ME) to identify the meanings of new words. When 17-month-olds were presented with a novel word in an intermodal preferential looking task, they preferentially fixated a novel object over an object for which they already…

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of fluctuating populations with strong mutualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David

    2013-03-01

    Evolutionary game theory with finite interacting populations is receiving increased attention, including subtle phenomena associated with number fluctuations, i.e., ``genetic drift.'' Models of cooperation and competition often utilize a simplified Moran model, with a strictly fixed total population size. We explore a more general evolutionary model with independent fluctuations in the numbers of two distinct species, in a regime characterized by ``strong mutualism.'' The model has two absorbing states, each corresponding to fixation of one of the two species, and allows exploration of the interplay between growth, competition, and mutualism. When mutualism is favored, number fluctuations eventually drive the system away from a stable fixed point, characterized by cooperation, to one of the absorbing states. Well-mixed populations will thus be taken over by a single species in a finite time, despite the bias towards cooperation. We calculate both the fixation probability and the mean fixation time as a function of the initial conditions and carrying capacities in the strong mutualism regime, using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Our results are compared to computer simulations.

  18. Using Mutual Information for Adaptive Item Comparison and Student Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chao-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The author analyzes properties of mutual information between dichotomous concepts and test items. The properties generalize some common intuitions about item comparison, and provide principled foundations for designing item-selection heuristics for student assessment in computer-assisted educational systems. The proposed item-selection strategies…

  19. International Mutual Recognition: Progress and Prospects. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Paul

    Increasing the mobility of service providers, including professionals, via mutual recognition (of regulatory systems) agreements (MRAs) has become a significant issue worldwide. Despite increasing interest in MRAs, it may be argued that MRAs are but one of a larger range of major developments that have fueled current interest in occupational…

  20. Fourth-order mutual coherence function in oceanic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-04-10

    We have recently expressed the structure constant of atmospheric turbulence in terms of the oceanic turbulence parameters, which are the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum, rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, rate of dissipation of the mean-squared temperature, wavelength, Kolmogorov microscale, and link length. In this paper, utilizing this recently found structure constant and the fourth-order mutual coherence function of atmospheric turbulence, we present the fourth-order mutual coherence function to be used in oceanic turbulence evaluations. Thus, the found fourth-order mutual coherence function of oceanic turbulence is evaluated for the special case of a point source located at the transmitter origin and at a single receiver point. The variations of this special case of the fourth-order mutual coherence function of oceanic turbulence against the changes in the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum, the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of the mean-squared temperature, the wavelength, and the Kolmogorov microscale at various link lengths are presented. PMID:27139862

  1. 12 CFR 163.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... capital requirements under part 167 of this chapter if a Federal savings association or 12 CFR part 390... a Federal savings association or 12 CFR part 390, subpart Z if a state savings association; And... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual capital certificates. 163.74 Section...

  2. Functional analysis of mutual behavior in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lavinia; Hackenberg, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Three pairs of rats were trained to synchronize their lever pressing according to a mutual reinforcement contingency, in which alternating lever presses that fell within a 500-ms window were reinforced with food. In Experiment 1, rats worked in adjacent chambers separated by a transparent barrier, and the effects of the mutual reinforcement contingency were compared to those under yoked-control conditions that provided the same rate of food reinforcement but without the temporal coordination response requirement. In Experiment 2, coordinated behavior was compared with and without a barrier, and across different barrier types: transparent, opaque, wire mesh. In Experiment 3, the effects of social familiarity were assessed by switching partners, enabling a comparison of coordinated behavior with familiar and unfamiliar partners. The overall pattern of results shows that the coordinated behavior of two rats was (a) maintained by mutual reinforcement contingencies, (b) unrelated to the type or presence of a barrier separating the rats, and (c) sufficiently flexible to adjust to the presence and behavior of an unfamiliar partner. Taken as a whole, the study illustrates a promising approach to conceptualizing and analyzing behavioral mechanisms of mutual behavior, an important component of an integrated study of social behavior. PMID:26479279

  3. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  4. Functional analysis of mutual behavior in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Tan, Lavinia; Hackenberg, Timothy D

    2016-02-01

    Three pairs of rats were trained to synchronize their lever pressing according to a mutual reinforcement contingency, in which alternating lever presses that fell within a 500-ms window were reinforced with food. In Experiment 1, rats worked in adjacent chambers separated by a transparent barrier, and the effects of the mutual reinforcement contingency were compared with those under yoked-control conditions that provided the same rate of food reinforcement but without the temporal coordination response requirement. In Experiment 2, coordinated behavior was compared with and without a barrier, and across different barrier types: transparent, opaque, wire mesh. In Experiment 3, the effects of social familiarity were assessed by switching partners, enabling a comparison of coordinated behavior with familiar and unfamiliar partners. The overall pattern of results shows that the coordinated behavior of 2 rats was (a) maintained by mutual reinforcement contingencies, (b) unrelated to the type or presence of a barrier separating the rats, and (c) sufficiently flexible to adjust to the presence and behavior of an unfamiliar partner. Taken as a whole, the study illustrates a promising approach to conceptualizing and analyzing behavioral mechanisms of mutual behavior, an important component of an integrated study of social behavior. PMID:26479279

  5. Quadratic mutual information for dimensionality reduction and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, David M.; Principe, José C.

    2010-04-01

    A research area based on the application of information theory to machine learning has attracted considerable interest in the last few years. This research area has been coined information-theoretic learning within the community. In this paper we apply elements of information-theoretic learning to the problem of automatic target recognition (ATR). A number of researchers have previously shown the benefits of designing classifiers based on maximizing the mutual information between the class data and the class labels. Following prior research in information-theoretic learning, in the current results we show that quadratic mutual information, derived using a special case of the more general Renyi's entropy, can be used for classifier design. In this implementation, a simple subspace projection classifier is formulated to find the optimal projection weights such that the quadratic mutual information between the class data and the class labels is maximized. This subspace projection accomplishes a dimensionality reduction of the raw data set wherein information about the class membership is retained while irrelevant information is discarded. A subspace projection based on this criterion preserves as much class discriminability as possible within the subspace. For this paper, laser radar images are used to demonstrate the results. Classification performance against this data set is compared for a gradient descent MLP classifier and a quadratic mutual information MLP classifier.

  6. Flexible Use of Mutual Exclusivity in Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalashnikova, Marina; Mattock, Karen; Monaghan, Padraic

    2016-01-01

    From an early age, children apply the mutual exclusivity (ME) assumption, demonstrating preference for one-to-one mappings between words and their referents. However, for the acquisition of referentially overlapping terms, ME use must be suspended. We test whether contextual cues to intended meaning, in the form of presence of a speaker, may be…

  7. The blind leading the blind: Mutual refinement of approximate theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Smadar T.; Bresina, John L.; Dent, C. Lisa

    1991-01-01

    The mutual refinement theory, a method for refining world models in a reactive system, is described. The method detects failures, explains their causes, and repairs the approximate models which cause the failures. The approach focuses on using one approximate model to refine another.

  8. Measurement reduction for mutual coupling calibration in DOA estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Taylan; Tuncer, T. Engin

    2012-01-01

    Mutual coupling is an important source of error in antenna arrays that should be compensated for super resolution direction-of-arrival (DOA) algorithms, such as Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. A crucial step in array calibration is the determination of the mutual coupling coefficients for the antenna array. In this paper, a system theoretic approach is presented for the mutual coupling characterization of antenna arrays. The comprehension and implementation of this approach is simple leading to further advantages in calibration measurement reduction. In this context, a measurement reduction method for antenna arrays with omni-directional and identical elements is proposed which is based on the symmetry planes in the array geometry. The proposed method significantly decreases the number of measurements during the calibration process. This method is evaluated using different array types whose responses and the mutual coupling characteristics are obtained through numerical electromagnetic simulations. It is shown that a single calibration measurement is sufficient for uniform circular arrays. Certain important and interesting characteristics observed during the experiments are outlined.

  9. Chinese and American Women: Issues of Mutual Concern. Wingspread Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson Foundation, Inc., Racine, WI.

    This article briefly describes a conference of Chinese and American women held to discuss womens' issues and promote mutual understanding between the two groups. The cultural exchange of information at the conference focused on discussion of the All China Womens' Federation (ACWF); the roles of women in China and the United States in the areas of…

  10. Cooperative Efforts: Voluntary Resettlement Agencies and Mutual Assistance Associations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee on Migration and Refugee Affairs, New York, NY. Refugee Center.

    In 1983, the Refugee Resource Center conducted a survey of Mutual Assistance Associations (MAA's) and local voluntary resettlement agency affiliates to find out how the two types of organizations worked together to carry out refugee resettlement. According to the survey, the relations between agency affiliates and MAA's generally revolved around…

  11. Mutual Information Item Selection in Adaptive Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    A general approach for item selection in adaptive multiple-category classification tests is provided. The approach uses mutual information (MI), a special case of the Kullback-Leibler distance, or relative entropy. MI works efficiently with the sequential probability ratio test and alleviates the difficulties encountered with using other local-…

  12. Mutual Exclusivity in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Testing the Pragmatic Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Marchena, Ashley; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Worek, Amanda; Ono, Kim Emiko; Snedeker, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    While there is ample evidence that children treat words as mutually exclusive, the cognitive basis of this bias is widely debated. We focus on the distinction between pragmatic and lexical constraints accounts. High-functioning children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) offer a unique perspective on this debate, as they acquire substantial…

  13. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the association having met specific financial standards; (viii) Not constitute an obligation of the... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563.74 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAVINGS...

  14. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the association having met specific financial standards; (viii) Not constitute an obligation of the... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563.74 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAVINGS...

  15. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the association having met specific financial standards; (viii) Not constitute an obligation of the... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563.74 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAVINGS...

  16. 12 CFR 563.74 - Mutual capital certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the association having met specific financial standards; (viii) Not constitute an obligation of the... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual capital certificates. 563.74 Section 563.74 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAVINGS...

  17. A Mutual Support Group for Young Problem Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binde, Per

    2012-01-01

    A Swedish mutual support group for young problem gamblers is described and discussed. During the study period, 116 weekly meetings occurred, usually involving six to ten participants; in total, 69 problem gamblers (66 male and three female), aged 17-25, and 23 partners and friends attended the meetings. Half the gamblers had problems with Internet…

  18. Problem decomposition by mutual information and force-based clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Richard Edward

    The scale of engineering problems has sharply increased over the last twenty years. Larger coupled systems, increasing complexity, and limited resources create a need for methods that automatically decompose problems into manageable sub-problems by discovering and leveraging problem structure. The ability to learn the coupling (inter-dependence) structure and reorganize the original problem could lead to large reductions in the time to analyze complex problems. Such decomposition methods could also provide engineering insight on the fundamental physics driving problem solution. This work forwards the current state of the art in engineering decomposition through the application of techniques originally developed within computer science and information theory. The work describes the current state of automatic problem decomposition in engineering and utilizes several promising ideas to advance the state of the practice. Mutual information is a novel metric for data dependence and works on both continuous and discrete data. Mutual information can measure both the linear and non-linear dependence between variables without the limitations of linear dependence measured through covariance. Mutual information is also able to handle data that does not have derivative information, unlike other metrics that require it. The value of mutual information to engineering design work is demonstrated on a planetary entry problem. This study utilizes a novel tool developed in this work for planetary entry system synthesis. A graphical method, force-based clustering, is used to discover related sub-graph structure as a function of problem structure and links ranked by their mutual information. This method does not require the stochastic use of neural networks and could be used with any link ranking method currently utilized in the field. Application of this method is demonstrated on a large, coupled low-thrust trajectory problem. Mutual information also serves as the basis for an

  19. Mutual coupling, channel model, and BER for curvilinear antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiyong

    This dissertation introduces a wireless communications system with an adaptive beam-former and investigates its performance with different antenna arrays. Mutual coupling, real antenna elements and channel models are included to examine the system performance. In a beamforming system, mutual coupling (MC) among the elements can significantly degrade the system performance. However, MC effects can be compensated if an accurate model of mutual coupling is available. A mutual coupling matrix model is utilized to compensate mutual coupling in the beamforming of a uniform circular array (UCA). Its performance is compared with other models in uplink and downlink beamforming scenarios. In addition, the predictions are compared with measurements and verified with results from full-wave simulations. In order to accurately investigate the minimum mean-square-error (MSE) of an adaptive array in MC, two different noise models, the environmental and the receiver noise, are modeled. The minimum MSEs with and without data domain MC compensation are analytically compared. The influence of mutual coupling on the convergence is also examined. In addition, the weight compensation method is proposed to attain the desired array pattern. Adaptive arrays with different geometries are implemented with the minimum MSE algorithm in the wireless communications system to combat interference at the same frequency. The bit-error-rate (BER) of systems with UCA, uniform rectangular array (URA) and UCA with center element are investigated in additive white Gaussian noise plus well-separated signals or random direction signals scenarios. The output SINR of an adaptive array with multiple interferers is analytically examined. The influence of the adaptive algorithm convergence on the BER is investigated. The UCA is then investigated in a narrowband Rician fading channel. The channel model is built and the space correlations are examined. The influence of the number of signal paths, number of the

  20. Evolutionary origin of insect–Wolbachia nutritional mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Nikoh, Naruo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Moriyama, Minoru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Fukatsu, Takema

    2014-01-01

    Obligate insect–bacterium nutritional mutualism is among the most sophisticated forms of symbiosis, wherein the host and the symbiont are integrated into a coherent biological entity and unable to survive without the partnership. Originally, however, such obligate symbiotic bacteria must have been derived from free-living bacteria. How highly specialized obligate mutualisms have arisen from less specialized associations is of interest. Here we address this evolutionary issue by focusing on an exceptional insect–Wolbachia nutritional mutualism. Although Wolbachia endosymbionts are ubiquitously found in diverse insects and generally regarded as facultative/parasitic associates for their insect hosts, a Wolbachia strain associated with the bedbug Cimex lectularius, designated as wCle, was shown to be essential for host’s growth and reproduction via provisioning of B vitamins. We determined the 1,250,060-bp genome of wCle, which was generally similar to the genomes of insect-associated facultative Wolbachia strains, except for the presence of an operon encoding the complete biotin synthetic pathway that was acquired via lateral gene transfer presumably from a coinfecting endosymbiont Cardinium or Rickettsia. Nutritional and physiological experiments, in which wCle-infected and wCle-cured bedbugs of the same genetic background were fed on B-vitamin–manipulated blood meals via an artificial feeding system, demonstrated that wCle certainly synthesizes biotin, and the wCle-provisioned biotin significantly contributes to the host fitness. These findings strongly suggest that acquisition of a single gene cluster consisting of biotin synthesis genes underlies the bedbug–Wolbachia nutritional mutualism, uncovering an evolutionary transition from facultative symbiosis to obligate mutualism facilitated by lateral gene transfer in an endosymbiont lineage. PMID:24982177

  1. 25 CFR 700.53 - Dwelling, replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dwelling, replacement. 700.53 Section 700.53 Indians THE... Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.53 Dwelling, replacement. The term replacement dwelling means a dwelling selected by the head of a household as a replacement dwelling that meets the criteria of...

  2. 25 CFR 700.53 - Dwelling, replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dwelling, replacement. 700.53 Section 700.53 Indians THE... Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.53 Dwelling, replacement. The term replacement dwelling means a dwelling selected by the head of a household as a replacement dwelling that meets the criteria of...

  3. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR. PMID:27295772

  4. Indications for ulnar head replacement.

    PubMed

    Berger, Richard A

    2008-08-01

    Implanting an endoprosthesis is a clinically proven means of reestablishing mechanical contact between the distal radius and ulna, thus providing the foundation for stability of the entire forearm. The indications for, contraindications to, and outcomes of ulnar head replacement are discussed, together with the underlying mechanics, pathomechanics of ulnar head excision, the theoretical basis for implant arthroplasty, and the designs that have been employed. PMID:18836608

  5. Synthetic meniscus replacement: a review.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, Anne Christiane Theodora; Buma, Pieter; van Tienen, Tony George

    2013-02-01

    The number of meniscus-related operations continues to rise due to the ageing and more active population. Irreparable meniscal lesions generally require (partial) meniscectomy. Although a majority of the patients benefit from pain relief and functional improvement post-meniscectomy, some remain symptomatic. As an alternative to a meniscal allograft, which is only indicated for the severely damaged meniscus, most patients can nowadays be treated by implantation of a synthetic meniscal substitute. Currently three of these implants, two partial and one total replacement, are clinically available and several others are in the stage of preclinical testing. Grossly, two types of meniscal substitutes can be distinguished: porous, resorbable implants that stimulate tissue regeneration and solid, non-resorbable implants that permanently replace the whole meniscus. Although the implantation of a porous meniscus replacement generally seems promising and improves clinical outcome measures to some degree, their superiority to partial meniscectomy still needs to be proven. The evaluation of new prostheses being developed requires a wider focus than has been adopted so far. Upon selection of the appropriate materials, preclinical evaluation of such implants should comprise a combination of (in vitro) biomechanical and (in vivo) biological tests, while up to now the focus has mainly been on biological aspects. Obviously, well-defined randomised controlled trials are necessary to support clinical performance of new implants. Since the use of a meniscus replacement requires an additional costly implant and surgery compared to meniscectomy only, the clinical outcome of new products should be proven to surpass the results of the conventional therapies available. PMID:23100123

  6. Mitral valve repair versus replacement

    PubMed Central

    Keshavamurthy, Suresh; Gillinov, A. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative, ischemic, rheumatic and infectious (endocarditis) processes are responsible for mitral valve disease in adults. Mitral valve repair has been widely regarded as the optimal surgical procedure to treat mitral valve dysfunction of all etiologies. The supporting evidence for repair over replacement is strongest in degenerative mitral regurgitation. The aim of the present review is to summarize the data in each category of mitral insufficiency and to provide recommendations based upon this data. PMID:26309824

  7. Nicotine Replacement Therapy: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wadgave, Umesh; Nagesh, L

    2016-01-01

    Today tobacco use is the single greatest preventable cause of death in the world. Tobacco use is often incorrectly perceived to be solely a personal choice. This is contradicted by the fact that when fully aware of the health impact, most tobacco users want to quit but find it difficult to stop due to the addictiveness of nicotine. Henceforth, Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) came into existence which temporarily replaces much of the nicotine from tobacco to reduce motivation to consume tobacco and nicotine withdrawal symptoms, thus easing the transition from cigarette smoking to complete abstinence. Various alternative nicotine sources (gum, transdermal patch, nasal spray, inhaler and sublingual tablets/lozenges) have been incorporated into tobacco cessation programs. Recent research is more focusing on rapid delivery of nicotine (Nicotine preloading, true pulmonary inhaler) and immunological approaches (nicotine vaccine) to tackle nicotine dependence. These NRTs are in general well tolerated and have minimal adverse effects. The review aims to summarize literature on various modes of nicotine replacement therapy methods currently used to treat nicotine dependence, and to give an overview about future possible approaches to treat tobacco use disorder. PMID:27610066

  8. Nicotine Replacement Therapy: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Wadgave, Umesh; Nagesh, L

    2016-07-01

    Today tobacco use is the single greatest preventable cause of death in the world. Tobacco use is often incorrectly perceived to be solely a personal choice. This is contradicted by the fact that when fully aware of the health impact, most tobacco users want to quit but find it difficult to stop due to the addictiveness of nicotine. Henceforth, Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) came into existence which temporarily replaces much of the nicotine from tobacco to reduce motivation to consume tobacco and nicotine withdrawal symptoms, thus easing the transition from cigarette smoking to complete abstinence. Various alternative nicotine sources (gum, transdermal patch, nasal spray, inhaler and sublingual tablets/lozenges) have been incorporated into tobacco cessation programs. Recent research is more focusing on rapid delivery of nicotine (Nicotine preloading, true pulmonary inhaler) and immunological approaches (nicotine vaccine) to tackle nicotine dependence. These NRTs are in general well tolerated and have minimal adverse effects. The review aims to summarize literature on various modes of nicotine replacement therapy methods currently used to treat nicotine dependence, and to give an overview about future possible approaches to treat tobacco use disorder. PMID:27610066

  9. Hydrothermal replacement of calcite by Mg-carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Laura; Mueller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The transport of heat and mass through the Earth's crust is coupled to mineral reactions and the exchange of isotopes and elements between different phases. Carbonate minerals are a major constituent of the Earth's crust and play an important role in different physical, chemical and even biological processes. In this experimental study, the element exchange reaction between calcite (CaCO3) and a Mg-rich fluid phase is investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Single crystals of calcite (2x2x2 mm) react with 1 ml of a 1 M MgCl2 solution at 200° C in a Teflon-lined steel autoclave for different times between one day and four weeks. The reaction leads to the formation of a porous reaction front and the pseudomorphic replacement of calcite by dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] and magnesite (MgCO3). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the reaction rim consists of small Mg-carbonate rhombs closely attached to each other, suggesting that the replacement reaction takes place by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Typically, the observed reaction front can be divided into two different domains. The outer part of the reaction rim, i.e. from the mineral surface in contact to the fluid inwards, consists of magnesite, whereas the inner part of the rim surrounding the unreacted calcite core consists of Ca-rich dolomite. The formation of a porous microstructure that varies in different parts of the reaction rim is a direct result of the large molar volume change induced by the replacement of calcite by magnesite and dolomite. The developing porosity therefore creates fluid pathways that promote the progress of the reaction front towards the unreacted core of the single crystal. Compositional profiles measured perpendicular to the mineral surface across the reactions rims using electron microprobe (EMPA) further revealed a compositional gradient within the reaction rim with regard to the structure-forming elements Mg and Ca. Here, the amount of Mg incorporated in both product

  10. Mutual diffusion coefficients in systems containing the nickel ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Ana C. F.; Veríssimo, Luis V. M. M.; Gomes, Joselaine C. S.; Santos, Cecilia I. A. V.; Barros, Marisa C. F.; Lobo, Victor M. M.; Sobral, Abílio J. F. N.; Esteso, Miguel A.; Leaist, Derek G.

    2013-04-01

    Mutual diffusion coefficients of nickel chloride in water have been measured at 293.15 K and 303.15 K and at concentrations between 0.020 mol dm-3 and 0.100 mol dm-3, using a conductimetric cell. The experimental mutual diffusion coefficients are discussed on the basis of the Onsager-Fuoss model. The equivalent conductances at infinitesimal concentration of the nickel ion in these solutions at those temperatures have been estimated using these results. In addition, from these data, we have estimated some transport and structural parameters, such as limiting diffusion coefficient, ionic conductance at infinitesimal concentration, hydrodynamic radii and activation energy, contributing this way to a better understanding of the structure of these systems and of their thermodynamic behavior in aqueous solution at different concentrations.

  11. Kepler-108: A Mutually Inclined Giant Planet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of well studied giant-planet systems, including the Solar System, are nearly coplanar which implies dissipation within a primordial gas disk. However, intrinsic instability may lead to planet-planet scattering, which often produces non-coplanar, eccentric orbits. Planet scattering theories have been developed to explain observed high eccentricity systems and possibly hot Jupiters; thus far their predictions for mutual inclination (I) have barely been tested. Here we characterize a highly mutually-inclined (I ~ 15-60 degrees), moderately eccentric (e > 0.1) giant planet system: Kepler-108. This system consists of two Saturn mass planets with periods of ~49 and ~190 days around a star with a wide (~300 AU) binary companion in an orbital configuration inconsistent with a purely disk migration origin.

  12. Circumstances for Pluto-Charon mutual events in 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.; Buie, Marc W.; Swift, Catherine E.

    1987-01-01

    Circumstances are tabulated for 88 Pluto-Charon mutual events occurring during the 1987 opposition. Charon is predicted to be completely obscured either by Pluto or Pluto's shadow during each passage behind Pluto during this opposition, providing several opportunities to study Pluto uncontaminated by the light of Charon. The duration of these total events is predicted to be from 32 to 79 min. The mutual-event season is now expected to conclude during the 1990 opposition. Two new stars have been selected as comparison stars for events occurring prior to opposition in 1987. Standardization of the primary comparison stars used in 1985 and 1986 has yielded the following magnitudes: B = 12.6044 + or - 0.0015 and V = 11.7956 + or - 0.0017 (1985 Primary); B = 13.1238 + or 0.0008 and V = 12.3885 + or - 0.0014 (1986 Primary).

  13. Modeling of a bipedal robot using mutually coupled Rayleigh oscillators.

    PubMed

    Filho, Armando C de Pina; Dutra, Max S; Raptopoulos, Luciano S C

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the work presented here was the modeling of a bipedal robot using a central pattern generator (CPG) formed by a set of mutually coupled Rayleigh oscillators. We analyzed a 2D model, with the three most important determinants of gait, that performs only motions parallel to the sagittal plane. Using oscillators with integer relation of frequency, we determined the transient motion and the stable limit cycles of the network formed by the three oscillators, showing the behavior of the knee angles and the hip angle. A comparison of the plotted graphs revealed that the system provided excellent results when compared to experimental analysis. Based on the results of the study, we come to the conclusion that the use of mutually coupled Rayleigh oscillators can represent an excellent method of signal generation, allowing their application for feedback control of a walking machine. PMID:15580522

  14. Role of mutual punishment in the snowdrift game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    The effects of punishment on cooperation have drawn increasing attention. In this paper, we propose a new mechanism of punishment, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. We incorporate the mutual punishment into the snowdrift game. Results for well-mixed and structured populations have shown that, for no punishment or small values of punishment fine, the fraction of cooperators continuously decreases with the temptation to defect. However, for large values of punishment fine, there exists an abrupt transition point, at which the fraction of cooperators suddenly drops from 1 to 0. Compared to no punishment, mutual punishment promotes cooperation when the temptation to defect is small but inhibits cooperation when the temptation to defect is large. For weak (strong) temptation to defect, the cooperation level increases (decreases) with the punishment fine. For moderate temptation to defect, there exists an optimal value of the punishment fine that leads to the highest cooperation level.

  15. Scale-Space Mutual Information for Textural-Patterns Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Seedahmed, Gamal H.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-08-22

    The essence of image texture is typically understood by two aspects. First, within a texture-pattern there is a significant variation in intensity values between nearby pixels. Second, texture is a homogeneous property at some spatial scale larger than the spatial resolution of the image. Motivated by the essential aspects of image texture, this paper proposes a novel methodology that combines the use of scale-space and mutual information to characterize textural-patterns. Scale-space offers the mechanism for a multi-scale representation of the image, which will be used to address the scale aspect of texture. On the other hand, mutual information provides a measure to quantify the dependency relationship across the scale-space. It has been found that the proposed methodology has the potential to capture different properties of texture such as periodicity, scale, fineness, coarseness, and spatial extent or size. Practical examples are provided to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodology.

  16. An efficient algorithm for direction finding against unknown mutual coupling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijiang; Ren, Shiwei; Ding, Yingtao; Wang, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an algorithm of direction finding is proposed in the presence of unknown mutual coupling. The preliminary direction of arrival (DOA) is estimated using the whole array for high resolution. Further refinement can then be conducted by estimating the angularly dependent coefficients (ADCs) with the subspace theory. The mutual coupling coefficients are finally determined by solving the least squares problem with all of the ADCs utilized without discarding any. Simulation results show that the proposed method can achieve better performance at a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with a small-sized array and is more robust, compared with the similar processes employing the initial DOA estimation and further improvement iteratively. PMID:25347587

  17. Entanglement entropy and mutual information in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Wenxin; Yang Kun

    2009-07-15

    In this paper we study the entanglement properties of free nonrelativistic Bose gases. At zero temperature, we calculate the bipartite block entanglement entropy of the system and find that it diverges logarithmically with the particle number in the subsystem. For finite temperatures, we study the mutual information between the two blocks. We first analytically study an infinite-range hopping model, then numerically study a set of long-range hopping models in one dimension that exhibit Bose-Einstein condensation. In both cases we find that a Bose-Einstein condensate, if present, makes a divergent contribution to the mutual information which is proportional to the logarithm of the number of particles in the condensate in the subsystem. The prefactor of the logarithmic divergent term is model dependent.

  18. Mutual information as an order parameter for quantum synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, V.; Eghbali-Arani, M.; Mari, A.; Farace, A.; Kheirandish, F.; Giovannetti, V.; Fazio, R.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous synchronization is a fundamental phenomenon, important in many theoretical studies and applications. Recently, this effect has been analyzed and observed in a number of physical systems close to the quantum-mechanical regime. In this work we propose mutual information as a useful order parameter which can capture the emergence of synchronization in very different contexts, ranging from semiclassical to intrinsically quantum-mechanical systems. Specifically, we first study the synchronization of two coupled Van der Pol oscillators in both classical and quantum regimes and later we consider the synchronization of two qubits inside two coupled optical cavities. In all these contexts, we find that mutual information can be used as an appropriate figure of merit for determining the synchronization phases independently of the specific details of the system.

  19. Networks in financial markets based on the mutual information rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years there have been many efforts in econophysics studying how network theory can facilitate understanding of complex financial markets. These efforts consist mainly of the study of correlation-based hierarchical networks. This is somewhat surprising as the underlying assumptions of research looking at financial markets are that they are complex systems and thus behave in a nonlinear manner, which is confirmed by numerous studies, making the use of correlations which are inherently dealing with linear dependencies only baffling. In this paper we introduce a way to incorporate nonlinear dynamics and dependencies into hierarchical networks to study financial markets using mutual information and its dynamical extension: the mutual information rate. We show that this approach leads to different results than the correlation-based approach used in most studies, on the basis of 91 companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange 100 between 2003 and 2013, using minimal spanning trees and planar maximally filtered graphs.

  20. Integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling-Xiu; Liu, Bo-Wen; Lv, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-05-11

    We experimentally study the characteristics of an integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection through a connected optical waveguide. Based on the lasing spectra, four-wave mixing, injection locking, and period-two oscillation states are observed due to the mutually optical injection by adjusting the injected currents applied to the two microdisks. The enhanced 3 dB bandwidth is realized for the microdisk laser at the injection locking state, and photonic microwave is obtained from the electrode of the microdisk laser under the period-two oscillation state. The plentifully dynamical states similar as semiconductor lasers subject to external optical injection are realized due to strong optical interaction between the two microdisks.

  1. The Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC-MIP) onboard ROSETTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Pierre; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Béghin, Christian; Décréau, Pierrette; Grard, Réjean; Hamelin, Michel; Mazelle, Christian; Randriamboarison, Orélien; Schmidt, Walter; Winterhalter, Daniel; Aouad, Youcef; Lagoutte, Dominique; Vallières, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The ROSETTA mission will reach the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014 and enable, for the first time, the in situ survey of a comet activity during along orbit. On board the ROSETTA orbiter, the Mutual Impedance Probe (MIP) is one of the instruments of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) that aims at monitoring the cometary plasma environment. MIP is a quadrupolar probe that measures the frequency response of the coupling impedance between two emitting and two receiving dipoles. The electron density and temperature are derived from the resonance peak and the interference pattern of the mutual impedance spectrum. We will describe this instrument and discuss the preliminary results obtained during the third ROSETTA Earth flyby to show its expected capabilities. The RPC switch ON for the post-hibernation recommissioning is planned at the end of March. The health status of the instrument will be discussed.

  2. Abiotic mediation of a mutualism drives herbivore abundance.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Emily H; Phillips, Joseph S; Tillberg, Chadwick V; Sandrow, Cheryl; Nelson, Annika S; Mooney, Kailen A

    2016-01-01

    Species abundance is typically determined by the abiotic environment, but the extent to which such effects occur through the mediation of biotic interactions, including mutualisms, is unknown. We explored how light environment (open meadow vs. shaded understory) mediates the abundance and ant tending of the aphid Aphis helianthi feeding on the herb Ligusticum porteri. Yearly surveys consistently found aphids to be more than 17-fold more abundant on open meadow plants than on shaded understory plants. Manipulations demonstrated that this abundance pattern was not due to the direct effects of light environment on aphid performance, or indirectly through host plant quality or the effects of predators. Instead, open meadows had higher ant abundance and per capita rates of aphid tending and, accordingly, ants increased aphid population growth in meadow but not understory environments. The abiotic environment thus drives the abundance of this herbivore exclusively through the mediation of a protection mutualism. PMID:26563752

  3. An Efficient Algorithm for Direction Finding against Unknown Mutual Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijiang; Ren, Shiwei; Ding, Yingtao; Wang, Haoyu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an algorithm of direction finding is proposed in the presence of unknown mutual coupling. The preliminary direction of arrival (DOA) is estimated using the whole array for high resolution. Further refinement can then be conducted by estimating the angularly dependent coefficients (ADCs) with the subspace theory. The mutual coupling coefficients are finally determined by solving the least squares problem with all of the ADCs utilized without discarding any. Simulation results show that the proposed method can achieve better performance at a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with a small-sized array and is more robust, compared with the similar processes employing the initial DOA estimation and further improvement iteratively. PMID:25347587

  4. Pluto-Charon mutual event predictions for 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Circumstances are tabulated for 81-Pluto-Charon mutual events occurring during the 1986 opposition. The deepest and longest events will occur in February and reach a depth of about 0.15 mag. Observations of these events will lead to an accurate determination of the satellite's orbit, the diameters of the two bodies, the mean density of the system, and crude albedo maps of one hemisphere on each object.

  5. Detecting entanglement of continuous variables with three mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, E. C.; Tasca, D. S.; Rudnicki, Łukasz; Walborn, S. P.

    2016-07-01

    An uncertainty relation is introduced for a symmetric arrangement of three mutually unbiased bases in continuous-variable phase space, and then used to derive a bipartite entanglement criterion based on the variance of global operators composed of these three phase-space variables. We test this criterion using spatial variables of photon pairs and show that the entangled photons are correlated in three pairs of bases.

  6. Computer Code For Calculation Of The Mutual Coherence Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugnolo, Dimitri S.

    1986-05-01

    We present a computer code in FORTRAN 77 for the calculation of the mutual coherence function (MCF) of a plane wave normally incident on a stochastic half-space. This is an exact result. The user need only input the path length, the wavelength, the outer scale size, and the structure constant. This program may be used to calculate the MCF of a well-collimated laser beam in the atmosphere.

  7. Resolving Dynamical Properties for Four 2007 Uranus Satellite Mutual Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles; Chanover, N. J.

    2008-09-01

    Uranus reached equinox in December 2007, an event that occurs once every 42 years. The 2007 equinox provided an opportunity to observe a number of mutual satellite encounters - occultations and eclipses - as the equatorial plane of Uranus pointed at Earth. The mean orbital motions of the Uranian satellites, specifically their relative mean anomalies and relative velocities, dictate the precise midpoint timing of an occultation. Likewise, the relative orbital inclinations of the interacting satellites determine the impact parameter of each event, which affects the magnitude drop. Therefore, identifying the precise midpoint timing and magnitude drop of mutual satellite encounters provides a check on the ephemerides used to predict these mutual events, which in turn places constraints on the satellite orbital models used to derive the ephemerides. We observed four Uranus satellite mutual encounters - occultations of Titania and Ariel by Umbriel in August 2007, and eclipses of Ariel by Umbriel and of Umbriel by Ariel in December 2007. We observed all events using the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5 meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in Sunspot, NM with the Agile high-speed time-series photometer and a Johnson I-band filter. We obtained light curves with a time resolution of 0.5 second for both occultations and 1.0 second for both eclipses. We fit data from simulated occultations and eclipses to our light curves to determine values for four free parameters - event midpoint, relative albedo, relative velocity, and impact parameter - and compared them to predicted values. We find that all four midpoints occurred later than predicted, with delays ranging from 21.2 to 37.6 seconds. We present our results and discuss our occultation and eclipse models. This study was funded through the NMSU 21st Space and Aerospace Research Cluster Graduate Fellowship.

  8. Observation and Analysis of Jovian and Saturnian Satellite Mutual Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.

    2001-01-01

    The main goal of this research was to acquire high time resolution photometry of satellite-satellite mutual events during the equatorial plane crossing for Saturn in 1995 and Jupiter in 1997. The data would be used to improve the orbits of the Saturnian satellites to support Cassini mission requirements, and also to monitor the secular acceleration of Io's orbit to compare with heat flow measurements.

  9. Finite difference time domain calculations of antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique was applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic analysis problems, including shielding and scattering. However, the method has not been exclusively applied to antennas. Here, calculations of self and mutual admittances between wire antennas are made using FDTD and compared with results obtained during the method of moments. The agreement is quite good, indicating the possibilities for FDTD application to antenna impedance and coupling.

  10. Finite difference time domain calculations of antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique has been applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic analysis problems, including shielding and scattering. However, the method has not been extensively applied to antennas. In this short paper calculations of self and mutual admittances between wire antennas are made using FDTD and compared with results obtained using the Method of Moments. The agreement is quite good, indicating the possibilities for FDTD application to antenna impedance and coupling.

  11. Extracting an entanglement signature from only classical mutual information

    SciTech Connect

    Starling, David J.; Howell, John C.; Broadbent, Curtis J.

    2011-09-15

    We introduce a quantity which is formed using classical notions of mutual information and which is computed using the results of projective measurements. This quantity constitutes a sufficient condition for entanglement and represents the amount of information that can be extracted from a bipartite system for spacelike separated observers. In addition to discussion, we provide simulations as well as experimental results for the singlet and maximally correlated mixed states.

  12. Exometabolomics Assisted Design and Validation of Synthetic Obligate Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kosina, Suzanne M; Danielewicz, Megan A; Mohammed, Mujahid; Ray, Jayashree; Suh, Yumi; Yilmaz, Suzan; Singh, Anup K; Arkin, Adam P; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Northen, Trent R

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic microbial ecology has the potential to enhance the productivity and resiliency of biotechnology processes compared to approaches using single isolates. Engineering microbial consortia is challenging; however, one approach that has attracted significant attention is the creation of synthetic obligate mutualism using auxotrophic mutants that depend on each other for exchange or cross-feeding of metabolites. Here, we describe the integration of mutant library fitness profiling with mass spectrometry based exometabolomics as a method for constructing synthetic mutualism based on cross-feeding. Two industrially important species lacking known ecological interactions, Zymomonas mobilis and Escherichia coli, were selected as the test species. Amino acid exometabolites identified in the spent medium of Z. mobilis were used to select three corresponding E. coli auxotrophs (proA, pheA and IlvA), as potential E. coli counterparts for the coculture. A pooled mutant fitness assay with a Z. mobilis transposon mutant library was used to identify mutants with improved growth in the presence of E. coli. An auxotroph mutant in a gene (ZMO0748) with sequence similarity to cysteine synthase A (cysK), was selected as the Z. mobilis counterpart for the coculture. Exometabolomic analysis of spent E. coli medium identified glutathione related metabolites as potentially available for rescue of the Z. mobilis cysteine synthase mutant. Three sets of cocultures between the Z. mobilis auxotroph and each of the three E. coli auxotrophs were monitored by optical density for growth and analyzed by flow cytometry to confirm high cell counts for each species. Taken together, our methods provide a technological framework for creating synthetic mutualisms combining existing screening based methods and exometabolomics for both the selection of obligate mutualism partners and elucidation of metabolites involved in auxotroph rescue. PMID:26885935

  13. Quantum algorithm for SAT problem andquantum mutual entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, Masanori

    2005-02-01

    It is von Neumann who opened the window for today's information epoch. He definedquantum entropy including Shannon's information more than 20 years ahead of Shannon, and he explained what computation means mathematically. In this paper I discuss two problems studied recently by me and my coworkers. One of them concerns a quantum algorithm in a generalized sense solving the SAT problem (one of NP complete problems) and another concerns quantum mutual entropy properly describing quantum communication processes.

  14. In Situ Heat-Induced Replacement of GaAs Nanowires by Au.

    PubMed

    Fauske, Vidar T; Huh, Junghwan; Divitini, Giorgio; Dheeraj, Dasa L; Munshi, A Mazid; Ducati, Caterina; Weman, Helge; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; van Helvoort, Antonius T J

    2016-05-11

    Here we report on the heat-induced solid-state replacement of GaAs by Au in nanowires. Such replacement of semiconductor nanowires by metals is envisioned as a method to achieve well-defined junctions within nanowires. To better understand the mechanisms and dynamics that govern the replacement reaction, we performed in situ heating studies using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The dynamic evolution of the phase boundary was investigated, as well as the crystal structure and orientation of the different phases at reaction temperatures. In general, the replacement proceeds one GaAs(111) bilayer at a time, and no fixed epitaxial relation could be found between the two phases. The relative orientation of the phases affects the replacement dynamics and can induce growth twins in the Au nanowire phase. In the case of a limited Au supply, the metal phase can also become liquid. PMID:27104293

  15. Part mutual information for quantifying direct associations in networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Zhou, Yiwei; Zhang, Xiujun; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-01

    Quantitatively identifying direct dependencies between variables is an important task in data analysis, in particular for reconstructing various types of networks and causal relations in science and engineering. One of the most widely used criteria is partial correlation, but it can only measure linearly direct association and miss nonlinear associations. However, based on conditional independence, conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to quantify nonlinearly direct relationships among variables from the observed data, superior to linear measures, but suffers from a serious problem of underestimation, in particular for those variables with tight associations in a network, which severely limits its applications. In this work, we propose a new concept, "partial independence," with a new measure, "part mutual information" (PMI), which not only can overcome the problem of CMI but also retains the quantification properties of both mutual information (MI) and CMI. Specifically, we first defined PMI to measure nonlinearly direct dependencies between variables and then derived its relations with MI and CMI. Finally, we used a number of simulated data as benchmark examples to numerically demonstrate PMI features and further real gene expression data from Escherichia coli and yeast to reconstruct gene regulatory networks, which all validated the advantages of PMI for accurately quantifying nonlinearly direct associations in networks. PMID:27092000

  16. Multiple occurrences of mutualism in the yucca moth lineage.

    PubMed Central

    Pellmyr, O; Thompson, J N

    1992-01-01

    The complex mutualism between yuccas and the moths that pollinate their flowers is regarded as one of the most obvious cases of coevolution. Studies of related genera show that at least two of the critical behavioral and life history traits suggested to have resulted from coevolved mutualism in yucca moths are plesiomorphic to the family. Another trait, oviposition into flowers, has evolved repeatedly within the family. One species with these traits, Greya politella, feeds on and pollinates plants of a different family, but pollination occurs through a different component of the oviposition behavior than in the yucca moths. Major differences compared with yucca moths and their hosts are that G. politella only passively pollinates its host and that copollinators often contribute to pollination. This analysis suggests that evolution of mutualism between yuccas and yucca moths may have required few behavioral and life history changes in the moths. The truly coevolved features of this interaction appear to be the evolution of active pollination by the moths, the associated morphological structures in the moths for carrying pollen, and the exclusion of copollinators by yuccas. Images PMID:11607287

  17. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Parker, V. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  18. Track-to-Track Data Association using Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, I.; Roscoe, C.; Wilkins, M.; Schumacher, P.

    In this paper, we build on recent work to further investigate the use of mutual information to solve various association problems in space situational awareness. Specifically, we solve the track-to-track association (TTTA) problem where we seek to associate a given set of tracks at one point in time with another set of tracks at a different time instance. Both sets of tracks are uncertain and are probabilistically described using multivariate normal distributions. This allows for a closed-form solution, based on the unscented transform and on mutual information. Future work will focus on developing a similar solution when uncertainty is analytic but not Gaussian or when it is completely non-analytic -e.g., when the uncertainty is described using a particle cloud. The proposed solution is inspired by a similar solution based on the unscented transform and mutual information for the observation-to-observation association (OTOA) problem that was developed by the authors in the past. This solution can be adjusted to address the classical observation-to-track association problem (OTTA), which will be the focus of future research. We will demonstrate the main result in simulation for LEO, MEO, GTO, and GEO orbit regimes to show general applicability.

  19. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person’s interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks. PMID:25114228

  20. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Parker, V Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  1. Oscillatory dynamics in a bacterial cross-protection mutualism.

    PubMed

    Yurtsev, Eugene Anatoly; Conwill, Arolyn; Gore, Jeff

    2016-05-31

    Cooperation between microbes can enable microbial communities to survive in harsh environments. Enzymatic deactivation of antibiotics, a common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, is a cooperative behavior that can allow resistant cells to protect sensitive cells from antibiotics. Understanding how bacterial populations survive antibiotic exposure is important both clinically and ecologically, yet the implications of cooperative antibiotic deactivation on the population and evolutionary dynamics remain poorly understood, particularly in the presence of more than one antibiotic. Here, we show that two Escherichia coli strains can form an effective cross-protection mutualism, protecting each other in the presence of two antibiotics (ampicillin and chloramphenicol) so that the coculture can survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either strain alone. Moreover, we find that daily dilutions of the coculture lead to large oscillations in the relative abundance of the two strains, with the ratio of abundances varying by nearly four orders of magnitude over the course of the 3-day period of the oscillation. At modest antibiotic concentrations, the mutualistic behavior enables long-term survival of the oscillating populations; however, at higher antibiotic concentrations, the oscillations destabilize the population, eventually leading to collapse. The two strains form a successful cross-protection mutualism without a period of coevolution, suggesting that similar mutualisms may arise during antibiotic treatment and in natural environments such as the soil. PMID:27194723

  2. Variation between self- and mutual assessment in animal contests.

    PubMed

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Heap, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    Limited resources lead animals into conflicts of interest, which are resolved when an individual withdraws from a direct contest. Current theory suggests that the decision to withdraw can be based on a threshold derived from an individual's own state (self-assessment) or on a comparison between their own state and their opponent's (mutual assessment). The observed variation between these assessment strategies in nature does not conform to theory. Thus, we require theoretical developments that explain the functional significance of different assessment strategies. We consider a hawk-dove game with two discrete classes that differ in fighting ability, in which the players strategically decide on their investment toward mutual assessment. Analysis of the model indicates that there are simultaneous trade-offs relating to assessment strategies. First, weak individuals in a population must decide on whether to acquire information about their opponents at the cost of providing opponents with information about themselves. Secondly, all individuals must decide between investing in mutual assessment and being persistent in contests. Our analysis suggests that the potential for individuals to make errors during contests and differences in the consequences of sharing information within a population may serve as fundamental concepts for explaining variation in assessment strategy. PMID:24464195

  3. Oscillatory dynamics in a bacterial cross-protection mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsev, Eugene Anatoly; Conwill, Arolyn; Gore, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation between microbes can enable microbial communities to survive in harsh environments. Enzymatic deactivation of antibiotics, a common mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, is a cooperative behavior that can allow resistant cells to protect sensitive cells from antibiotics. Understanding how bacterial populations survive antibiotic exposure is important both clinically and ecologically, yet the implications of cooperative antibiotic deactivation on the population and evolutionary dynamics remain poorly understood, particularly in the presence of more than one antibiotic. Here, we show that two Escherichia coli strains can form an effective cross-protection mutualism, protecting each other in the presence of two antibiotics (ampicillin and chloramphenicol) so that the coculture can survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either strain alone. Moreover, we find that daily dilutions of the coculture lead to large oscillations in the relative abundance of the two strains, with the ratio of abundances varying by nearly four orders of magnitude over the course of the 3-day period of the oscillation. At modest antibiotic concentrations, the mutualistic behavior enables long-term survival of the oscillating populations; however, at higher antibiotic concentrations, the oscillations destabilize the population, eventually leading to collapse. The two strains form a successful cross-protection mutualism without a period of coevolution, suggesting that similar mutualisms may arise during antibiotic treatment and in natural environments such as the soil. PMID:27194723

  4. Stability of an intraguild predation system with mutual predation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanshi; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2016-04-01

    We examine intraguild predation (IGP), in which species both compete for resources or space and prey on each other. The IGP system is modeled here by a lattice gas model of the mean-field theory. First, we consider the IGP system of one species in which individuals of the same species cannibalize each other. The dynamical behavior of the model demonstrates a mechanism by which the intraspecific predation promotes persistence of the species. Then we consider the IGP system of two species with mutual predation. Global dynamics of the model exhibit basic properties of IGP: (i) When both species' efficiencies in converting the consumptions into fitness are large, the outcome of their interaction is mutualistic in form and the IGP promotes persistence of both species. (ii) When one species' efficiency is large but the other's is small, the interaction outcomes become parasitic in nature, in which an obligate species can survive through the mutual predation with a facultative one. (iii) When both species' efficiencies are small, the interaction outcomes are competitive in nature and the IGP leads to extinction of one of the species. A novel result of this work is that varying one parameter or population density of the species can lead to transition of interaction outcomes between mutualism, parasitism and competition. On the other hand, dynamics of the models demonstrate that over-predation or under-predation will result in extinction of one/both species, while intermediate predation is favorable under certain parameter ranges.

  5. Mutualism with sea anemones triggered the adaptive radiation of clownfishes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adaptive radiation is the process by which a single ancestral species diversifies into many descendants adapted to exploit a wide range of habitats. The appearance of ecological opportunities, or the colonisation or adaptation to novel ecological resources, has been documented to promote adaptive radiation in many classic examples. Mutualistic interactions allow species to access resources untapped by competitors, but evidence shows that the effect of mutualism on species diversification can greatly vary among mutualistic systems. Here, we test whether the development of obligate mutualism with sea anemones allowed the clownfishes to radiate adaptively across the Indian and western Pacific oceans reef habitats. Results We show that clownfishes morphological characters are linked with ecological niches associated with the sea anemones. This pattern is consistent with the ecological speciation hypothesis. Furthermore, the clownfishes show an increase in the rate of species diversification as well as rate of morphological evolution compared to their closest relatives without anemone mutualistic associations. Conclusions The effect of mutualism on species diversification has only been studied in a limited number of groups. We present a case of adaptive radiation where mutualistic interaction is the likely key innovation, providing new insights into the mechanisms involved in the buildup of biodiversity. Due to a lack of barriers to dispersal, ecological speciation is rare in marine environments. Particular life-history characteristics of clownfishes likely reinforced reproductive isolation between populations, allowing rapid species diversification. PMID:23122007

  6. Closure in Knee Replacement Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Total Knee replacement (TKR) is one of the commonest arthroplasty surgeries performed. Various techniques of closures in TKR are described. This technical note describes an useful technique of achieving water tight closure in TKR. An optimal tension watertight closure also reduces the chances of dead space hematomas and infection. The author has described his technique where the soft tissues are never unduly compromised. In his experience the patient can be mobilized freely in bed and even allowed to sleep prone after first wound check.

  7. Senate committee recommends replacing FEMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-05-01

    Flaws in the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that were exposed after Hurricane Katrina struck the U.S. Gulf Coast in August 2005 are too substantial to be fixed, and the agency should be replaced with a more capable structure, recommends a 27 April report released by the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs. ``FEMA is discredited, demoralized, and dysfunctional. It is beyond repair. Just tweaking the organizational chart will not solve the problem,'' said Committee Chair Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine).

  8. [Hemophilia B replacement therapy drugs].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Zeng, Fanyi

    2016-02-01

    Hemophilia B is an X chromosome linked hereditary hemorrhagic disease, which is caused by the lose function mutation of factor IX (FIX), and significantly affects the patients' lifespan and life quality. The severity of hemophilia B depends on the FIX level in the plasma. By referring to the relevant literatures, we reviewed and summarized hemophilia B replacement therapies. Specifically, we focus on recombinant factor IX products on the market and those in the pipeline, especially on the long-acting factor IX drugs, to provide the basis for researches of new hemophilia B drugs. PMID:27382766

  9. Replacing London's cast iron mains

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the cast iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, cast iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter cast iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, cast iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.

  10. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix C to Part 239 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  11. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix C to Part 239 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  12. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A Appendix A to Part 239 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section 1: Corporate...

  13. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A Appendix A to Part 239 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section 1: Corporate...

  14. 12 CFR >appendix A to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Charter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Charter A >Appendix A to Part 239 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE... Part 239—Mutual Holding Company Model Charter FEDERAL MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY CHARTER Section...

  15. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 239 - Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws C Appendix C to Part 239 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...—Mutual Holding Company Model Bylaws MODEL BYLAWS FOR MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES The term “trustees” may...

  16. 24 CFR 203.420 - Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. 203.420 Section 203.420 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... and Distributive Shares § 203.420 Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. The Mutual...

  17. 12 CFR 239.9 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. 239.9 Section 239.9 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual...

  18. 12 CFR 239.9 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. 239.9 Section 239.9 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual...

  19. 12 CFR 239.9 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. 239.9 Section 239.9 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual...

  20. Parent-Child Mutuality in Early Childhood: Two Behavioral Genetic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; O'Connor, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    Used quantitative genetic design to examine between- and within-family variations and gene-environment processes in parent-child mutuality among 3-year-old identical and same-sex fraternal twins. Found that greater mutuality was associated with higher socioeconomic status. Moderate sibling similarity in parent-child mutuality was accounted for by…

  1. 24 CFR 203.420 - Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. 203.420 Section 203.420 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... and Distributive Shares § 203.420 Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. The Mutual...

  2. 24 CFR 203.420 - Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. 203.420 Section 203.420 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... and Distributive Shares § 203.420 Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. The Mutual...

  3. 24 CFR 203.420 - Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. 203.420 Section 203.420 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... and Distributive Shares § 203.420 Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. The Mutual...

  4. 24 CFR 203.420 - Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. 203.420 Section 203.420 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... and Distributive Shares § 203.420 Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. The Mutual...

  5. Mutuality in Mother-Child Interactions in an Antillean Intervention Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boomstra, Nienke W.; van Dijk, Marijn W. G.; van Geert, Paul L. C.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a study on mutuality in mother-child interaction during reading and playing sessions. Within mother-child interaction, mutuality is seen as important in language acquisition. The study was executed within a group of Netherlands Antillean mother-child dyads who participated in an intervention programme. Mutuality was…

  6. 12 CFR 143.9 - Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application for conversion to Federal mutual... FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION Conversion § 143.9 Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter. (a)(1) Filing. Any depository institution that...

  7. 12 CFR 143.9 - Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application for conversion to Federal mutual... FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION Conversion § 143.9 Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter. (a)(1) Filing. Any depository institution that...

  8. 31 CFR 1024.220 - Customer identification programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information available, and the mutual fund's customer base. At a minimum, these procedures must contain the... mutual fund must retain the information in paragraph (a)(3)(i)(A) of this section for five years after the date the account is closed. The mutual fund must retain the information in paragraphs...

  9. 31 CFR 1024.220 - Customer identification programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... information available, and the mutual fund's customer base. At a minimum, these procedures must contain the... mutual fund must retain the information in paragraph (a)(3)(i)(A) of this section for five years after the date the account is closed. The mutual fund must retain the information in paragraphs...

  10. 31 CFR 1024.220 - Customer identification programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information available, and the mutual fund's customer base. At a minimum, these procedures must contain the... mutual fund must retain the information in paragraph (a)(3)(i)(A) of this section for five years after the date the account is closed. The mutual fund must retain the information in paragraphs...

  11. 12 CFR 143.9 - Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application for conversion to Federal mutual... FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION Conversion § 143.9 Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter. (a)(1) Filing. Any depository institution that...

  12. 31 CFR 1024.220 - Customer identification programs for mutual funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information available, and the mutual fund's customer base. At a minimum, these procedures must contain the... mutual fund must retain the information in paragraph (a)(3)(i)(A) of this section for five years after the date the account is closed. The mutual fund must retain the information in paragraphs...

  13. 12 CFR 12.101 - National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... by § 12.4, for mutual fund transactions by providing this information to the customer in a current... mutual fund transactions. 12.101 Section 12.101 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT... Interpretations § 12.101 National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions. A national...

  14. 12 CFR 543.9 - Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Application for conversion to Federal mutual... FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION Conversion § 543.9 Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter. (a)(1) Filing. Any depository institution that...

  15. 12 CFR 543.9 - Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application for conversion to Federal mutual... FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION Conversion § 543.9 Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter. (a)(1) Filing. Any depository institution that...

  16. 12 CFR 543.9 - Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application for conversion to Federal mutual... FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION Conversion § 543.9 Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter. (a)(1) Filing. Any depository institution that...

  17. 12 CFR 12.101 - National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by § 12.4, for mutual fund transactions by providing this information to the customer in a current... mutual fund transactions. 12.101 Section 12.101 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT... Interpretations § 12.101 National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions. A national...

  18. 12 CFR 12.101 - National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by § 12.4, for mutual fund transactions by providing this information to the customer in a current... mutual fund transactions. 12.101 Section 12.101 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT... Interpretations § 12.101 National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions. A national...

  19. 12 CFR 12.101 - National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by § 12.4, for mutual fund transactions by providing this information to the customer in a current... mutual fund transactions. 12.101 Section 12.101 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT... Interpretations § 12.101 National bank disclosure of remuneration for mutual fund transactions. A national...

  20. 12 CFR 543.9 - Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Application for conversion to Federal mutual... FEDERAL MUTUAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-INCORPORATION, ORGANIZATION, AND CONVERSION Conversion § 543.9 Application for conversion to Federal mutual charter. (a)(1) Filing. Any depository institution that...

  1. 12 CFR 575.12 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. 575.12 Section 575.12 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.12 Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. (a)...

  2. 12 CFR 575.12 - Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. 575.12 Section 575.12 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.12 Conversion or liquidation of mutual holding companies. (a)...

  3. Mutuality as an Aspect of Family Functioning in Predicting Eating Disorder Symptoms in College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanftner, Jennifer L.; Cameron, Rebecca P.; Tantillo, Mary; Heigel, Caron P.; Martin, David Myron; Sippel-Silowash, Julie Ann; Taggart, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    We examined mutuality, an aspect of Relational Cultural Theory, in an ethnically diverse sample of 397 college women from Midwestern and Western universities. We hypothesized that mutuality would predict scores on an eating disorder scale after controlling for traditional family variables, such as expressed emotion. As predicted, mutuality, as…

  4. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(14)-1 - Credit unions and mutual insurance funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Credit unions and mutual insurance funds. 1.501(c... unions and mutual insurance funds. Credit unions (other than Federal credit unions described in section 501(c)(1)) without capital stock, organized and operated for mutual purposes and without profit,...

  5. The future of nicotine replacement.

    PubMed

    Russell, M A

    1991-05-01

    Following in the wake of progress forged by nicotine chewing gum, a new generation of nicotine replacement products will soon be available as aids to giving up smoking. These range from nicotine skin patches, which take 6-8 hrs to give very flat steady-state peak blood levels, to nicotine vapour inhalers which mimic the transient high-nicotine boli that follow within a few seconds of each inhaled puff of cigarette smoke. Other products undergoing clinical trials include a nasal nicotine spray and nicotine lozenges. It is argued here that it is not so much the efficacy of new nicotine delivery systems as temporary aids to cessation, but their potential as long-term alternatives to tobacco that makes the virtual elimination of tobacco a realistic future target. Their relative safety compared with tobacco is discussed. A case is advanced for selected nicotine replacement products to be made as palatable and acceptable as possible and actively promoted on the open market to enable them to compete with tobacco products. They will also need health authority endorsement, tax advantages and support from the anti-smoking movement if tobacco use is to be gradually phased out altogether. PMID:1859935

  6. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations. PMID:23588878

  7. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000368.htm Deciding to have knee or hip replacement To use the sharing features on this page, ... make a decision. Who Benefits From Knee or hip Replacement Surgery? The most common reason to have a ...

  8. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is normal to lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a blood transfusion during ... clot form are higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down for long periods ...

  9. B Plant process piping replacement feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Howden, G.F.

    1996-02-07

    Reports on the feasibility of replacing existing embedded process piping with new more corrosion resistant piping between cells and between cells and a hot pipe trench of a Hanford Site style canyon facility. Provides concepts for replacement piping installation, and use of robotics to replace the use of the canyon crane as the primary means of performing/supporting facility modifications (eg, cell lining, pipe replacement, equipment reinstallation) and operational maintenenace.

  10. Knee Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Knee Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Knee Replacement Potpuna zamjena koljena - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Knee Replacement 全膝关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  11. 48 CFR 8.715 - Replacement commodities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Replacement commodities. 8... Are Blind or Severely Disabled 8.715 Replacement commodities. When a commodity on the Procurement List is replaced by another commodity which has not been previously acquired, and a qualified...

  12. Are adolescents' mutually hostile interactions at home reproduced in other everyday life contexts?

    PubMed

    Trifan, Tatiana Alina; Stattin, Håkan

    2015-03-01

    Children involved in mutually hostile interactions at home are at risk of experiencing adjustment problems in other everyday life contexts. However, little is known about whether the pattern of mutual hostility at home is reproduced by high-conflict youths in other interpersonal contexts. In this study, we examined whether adolescents involved in mutually hostile interactions with their parents encounter similar mutually hostile interactions in other interpersonal contexts. We used a longitudinal design, following mid-adolescents over 1 year (N = 2,009, 51% boys, Mage = 14.06, SD = 0.73). The adolescents were 7th and 8th grade students in a mid-sized town in Sweden. The results showed that the youths involved in mutual hostility at home were more likely to be involved in mutual hostility at school and in their free-time. A longitudinal relationship between mutual hostility at home and mutual hostility in other contexts was confirmed. Being involved in mutually hostile interactions at home at Time 1 increased adolescents' likelihood of getting involved in mutually hostile interactions with peers at school and in free-time at Time 2. Overall, the results point to the important role played by experiencing mutual hostility at home in maladaptive behaviors across everyday settings. PMID:25348950

  13. Mitochondrial Replacement: Ethics and Identity.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, Anthony; Wilkinson, Stephen; Appleby, John B

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) have the potential to allow prospective parents who are at risk of passing on debilitating or even life-threatening mitochondrial disorders to have healthy children to whom they are genetically related. Ethical concerns have however been raised about these techniques. This article focuses on one aspect of the ethical debate, the question of whether there is any moral difference between the two types of MRT proposed: Pronuclear Transfer (PNT) and Maternal Spindle Transfer (MST). It examines how questions of identity impact on the ethical evaluation of each technique and argues that there is an important difference between the two. PNT, it is argued, is a form of therapy based on embryo modification while MST is, instead, an instance of selective reproduction. The article's main ethical conclusion is that, in some circumstances, there is a stronger obligation to use PNT than MST. PMID:26481204

  14. Optimal randomized scheduling by replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Saias, I.

    1996-05-01

    In the replacement scheduling problem, a system is composed of n processors drawn from a pool of p. The processors can become faulty while in operation and faulty processors never recover. A report is issued whenever a fault occurs. This report states only the existence of a fault but does not indicate its location. Based on this report, the scheduler can reconfigure the system and choose another set of n processors. The system operates satisfactorily as long as, upon report of a fault, the scheduler chooses n non-faulty processors. We provide a randomized protocol maximizing the expected number of faults the system can sustain before the occurrence of a crash. The optimality of the protocol is established by considering a closely related dual optimization problem. The game-theoretic technical difficulties that we solve in this paper are very general and encountered whenever proving the optimality of a randomized algorithm in parallel and distributed computation.

  15. Mitochondrial Replacement: Ethics and Identity

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Stephen; Appleby, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) have the potential to allow prospective parents who are at risk of passing on debilitating or even life‐threatening mitochondrial disorders to have healthy children to whom they are genetically related. Ethical concerns have however been raised about these techniques. This article focuses on one aspect of the ethical debate, the question of whether there is any moral difference between the two types of MRT proposed: Pronuclear Transfer (PNT) and Maternal Spindle Transfer (MST). It examines how questions of identity impact on the ethical evaluation of each technique and argues that there is an important difference between the two. PNT, it is argued, is a form of therapy based on embryo modification while MST is, instead, an instance of selective reproduction. The article's main ethical conclusion is that, in some circumstances, there is a stronger obligation to use PNT than MST. PMID:26481204

  16. The Attenborough total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Attenborough, C G

    1978-08-01

    The stabilised gliding knee prosthesis is a compromise between hinged joints and condylar prostheses. It is a two-piece implant designed to allow normal gliding movements of flexion and extension and which, stabilised by a connecting rod between the femoral and tibial components, allows a designed laxity of rotation and lateral movements. A modification of the original femoral component is described. Two hundred and forty-five knee replacement operations have been done between January 1973 and September 1977 and the results are reported. The results using this prosthesis are at least equal to those using hinged or condylar prostheses. So far there has been no case of spontaneous loosening of the components and the implant can be used in patients who, because of severe deformities and instability, are unsuitable for condylar prostheses. PMID:681407

  17. Replacement Sequence of Events Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Daniel Wenkert Roy; Khanampompan, Teerpat

    2008-01-01

    The soeWINDOW program automates the generation of an ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations)-compliant sub-RSOE (Replacement Sequence of Events) by extracting a specified temporal window from an RSOE while maintaining page header information. RSOEs contain a significant amount of information that is not ITAR-compliant, yet that foreign partners need to see for command details to their instrument, as well as the surrounding commands that provide context for validation. soeWINDOW can serve as an example of how command support products can be made ITAR-compliant for future missions. This software is a Perl script intended for use in the mission operations UNIX environment. It is designed for use to support the MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) instrument team. The tool also provides automated DOM (Distributed Object Manager) storage into the special ITAR-okay DOM collection, and can be used for creating focused RSOEs for product review by any of the MRO teams.

  18. Characterization of actinobacteria associated with three ant-plant mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Hanshew, Alissa S; McDonald, Bradon R; Díaz Díaz, Carol; Djiéto-Lordon, Champlain; Blatrix, Rumsaïs; Currie, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Ant-plant mutualisms are conspicuous and ecologically important components of tropical ecosystems that remain largely unexplored in terms of insect-associated microbial communities. Recent work has revealed that ants in some ant-plant systems cultivate fungi (Chaetothyriales) within their domatia, which are fed to larvae. Using Pseudomyrmex penetrator/Tachigali sp. from French Guiana and Petalomyrmex phylax/Leonardoxa africana and Crematogaster margaritae/Keetia hispida, both from Cameroon, as models, we tested the hypothesis that ant-plant-fungus mutualisms co-occur with culturable Actinobacteria. Using selective media, we isolated 861 putative Actinobacteria from the three systems. All C. margaritae/K. hispida samples had culturable Actinobacteria with a mean of 10.0 colony forming units (CFUs) per sample, while 26 % of P. penetrator/Tachigali samples (mean CFUs 1.3) and 67 % of P. phylax/L. africana samples (mean CFUs 3.6) yielded Actinobacteria. The largest number of CFUs was obtained from P. penetrator workers, P. phylax alates, and C. margaritae pupae. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of four main clades of Streptomyces and one clade of Nocardioides within these three ant-plant mutualisms. Streptomyces with antifungal properties were isolated from all three systems, suggesting that they could serve as protective symbionts, as found in other insects. In addition, a number of isolates from a clade of Streptomyces associated with P. phylax/L. africana and C. margaritae/K. hispida were capable of degrading cellulose, suggesting that Streptomyces in these systems may serve a nutritional role. Repeated isolation of particular clades of Actinobacteria from two geographically distant locations supports these isolates as residents in ant-plant-fungi niches. PMID:25096989

  19. Gaining (mutual) information about quark/gluon discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2014-11-01

    Discriminating quark jets from gluon jets is an important but challenging problem in jet substructure. In this paper, we use the concept of mutual information to illuminate the physics of quark/gluon tagging. Ideal quark/gluon separation requires only one bit of truth information, so even if two discriminant variables are largely uncorrelated, they can still share the same "truth overlap". Mutual information can be used to diagnose such situations, and thus determine which discriminant variables are redundant and which can be combined to improve performance. Using both parton showers and analytic resummation, we study a two-parameter family of generalized angularities, which includes familiar infrared and collinear (IRC) safe observables like thrust and broadening, as well as IRC unsafe variants like p {/T D } and hadron multiplicity. At leading-logarithmic (LL) order, the bulk of these variables exhibit Casimir scaling, such that their truth overlap is a universal function of the color factor ratio C A /C F . Only at next-to-leading-logarithmic (NLL) order can one see a difference in quark/gluon performance. For the IRC safe angularities, we show that the quark/gluon performance can be improved by combining angularities with complementary angular exponents. Interestingly, LL order, NLL order, Pythia 8, and Herwig++ all exhibit similar correlations between observables, but there are significant differences in the predicted quark/gluon discrimination power. For the IRC unsafe angularities, we show that the mutual information can be calculated analytically with the help of a nonperturbative "weighted-energy function", providing evidence for the complementarity of safe and unsafe observables for quark/gluon discrimination.

  20. Reconstruction of the mutual coherence function for a moving source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic radiation of a randomly fluctuating source in motion is characterized analytically to determine the mutual coherence function (MCF). A far-field relation is derived via a series of invertible transformations, and a higher-dimension Radon transformation is performed to reconstruct the MCF; explicit formulas for computing the MCF from the transformed radiation data are provided. The technique is applied to the cases of an axisymmetric line source of finite extent moving at constant velocity along a line and a spatially incoherent line source. Applications to X-ray tomography and analysis of the noise emitted by a moving jet aircraft are suggested.

  1. Circumstances for Pluto-Charon mutual events in 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.; Buie, Marc W.; Swift, Catherine E.

    1987-01-01

    Physical parameters are tabulated for 89 Pluto-Charon mutual events occurring during the 1988 opposition. A primary star and a check star have been selected as comparison stars for events occurring prior to the 1988 opposition. Standardization of the comparison star 1987 Primary has provided a B magnitude of 12.3093 + or - 0.0013 and a V magnitude of 11.4215 + or - 0.0013. The designations, positions, and preliminary magnitudes and colors are also given for two transformation stars selected in order to aid in determination of the color terms necessary to convert the instrumental magnitudes of observers to the standard system.

  2. Mutual phenomena involving J5 Amalthea in 2002-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachier, F.; Arlot, J. E.; Thuillot, W.

    2002-10-01

    Every six years mutual eclipses and occultations occur among the Jovian system of satellites. Very accurate astrometric measurements and several physical characteristics of the surfaces can be infered from their observation. This paper is provide predictions of this type of events involving the fifth satellite J5 Amalthea, spanning from November 2002 to June 2003 and to urge astronomers to observe them. Only the predictions of the eclipses of Amalthea by Io are presented, when the distance between Amalthea-Io and Amalthea-Jutpiter is large enough for photometric purposes. A full list of phenomena is available on the server http://www.imcce.fr/Phemu03/phemu03_eng.html

  3. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    PubMed Central

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  4. Asymmetric Mutualism in Two- and Three-Dimensional Range Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-04-01

    Genetic drift at the frontiers of two-dimensional range expansions of microorganisms can frustrate local cooperation between different genetic variants, demixing the population into distinct sectors. In a biological context, mutualistic or antagonistic interactions will typically be asymmetric between variants. By taking into account both the asymmetry and the interaction strength, we show that the much weaker demixing in three dimensions allows for a mutualistic phase over a much wider range of asymmetric cooperative benefits, with mutualism prevailing for any positive, symmetric benefit. We also demonstrate that expansions with undulating fronts roughen dramatically at the boundaries of the mutualistic phase, with severe consequences for the population genetics along the transition lines.

  5. Mutual phenomena of Saturn's satellites in 1979-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksnes, K.; Franklin, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Using two sets of orbital elements and the radii of the Saturnian satellites 1 (Mimas) through 7 (Hyperion), we find that from October 1979 until August 1980 nearly 300 mutual eclipses and occultations involving these bodies will occur. To allow for the expected errors in the satellite ephemerides, we repeat these calculations in order to obtain the additional events that occur when all satellite radii (save Titan's) are increased by 1000 km. A third listing predicts eclipses of satellites by (the shadow of) the ring. Photometric observations of a large number of these events will add much precise information to our knowledge of the Saturnian system at a critical time.

  6. 2007 Mutual events within the binary system of (22) Kalliope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, P.; Marchis, F.; Pollock, J.; Berthier, J.; Birlan, M.; Vachier, F.; Colas, F.

    2008-11-01

    In 2007, the asteroid Kalliope will reach one of its annual equinoxes. As a consequence, its small satellite Linus orbiting in the equatorial plane will undergo a season of mutual eclipses and occultations very similar to the one that the Galilean satellites undergo every 6 years. This paper is aimed at preparing a campaign of observations of these mutual events occurring from February to May 2007. This opportunity occurs only under favorable geometric conditions when the Sun and/or the Earth are close to the orbital plane of the system. This is the first international campaign devoted to the observation of photometric events within an asynchronous asteroidal binary system. We took advantage of a reliable orbit solution of Linus to predict a series of 24 mutual eclipses and 12 mutual occultations observable in the spring of 2007. Thanks to the brightness of Kalliope ( mv≃11), these observations are easy to perform even with a small telescope. Anomalous attenuation events could be observed lasting for about 1-3 h with amplitude up to 0.09 mag. The attenuations are of two distinct types that can clearly be identified as primary and secondary eclipses similar to those that have been previously observed in other minor planet binary systems [Pravec, P., Scheirich, P., Kusnirák, P., Sarounová, L., Mottola, S., Hahn, G., Brown, P., Esquerdo, G., Kaiser, N., Krzeminski, Z., Pray, D.P., Warner, B.D., Harris, A.W., Nolan, M.C., Howell, E.S., Benner, L.A.M., Margot, J.-L., Galád, A., Holliday, W., Hicks, M.D., Krugly, Yu.N., Tholen, D., Whiteley, R., Marchis, F., Degraff, D.R., Grauer, A., Larson, S., Velichko, F.P., Cooney, W.R., Stephens, R., Zhu, J., Kirsch, K., Dyvig, R., Snyder, L., Reddy, V., Moore, S., Gajdos, S., Világi, J., Masi, G., Higgins, D., Funkhouser, G., Knight, B., Slivan, S., Behrend, R., Grenon, M., Burki, G., Roy, R., Demeautis, C., Matter, D., Waelchli, N., Revaz, Y., Klotz, A., Rieugné, M., Thierry, P., Cotrez, V., Brunetto, L., Kober, G., 2006

  7. Link Prediction in Complex Networks: A Mutual Information Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Fei; Xia, Yongxiang; Zhu, Boyao

    2014-01-01

    Topological properties of networks are widely applied to study the link-prediction problem recently. Common Neighbors, for example, is a natural yet efficient framework. Many variants of Common Neighbors have been thus proposed to further boost the discriminative resolution of candidate links. In this paper, we reexamine the role of network topology in predicting missing links from the perspective of information theory, and present a practical approach based on the mutual information of network structures. It not only can improve the prediction accuracy substantially, but also experiences reasonable computing complexity. PMID:25207920

  8. Attraction and social coordination: mutual entrainment of vocal activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    McGarva, Andrew R; Warner, Rebecca M

    2003-05-01

    To investigate factors that affect the mutual entrainment of vocal activity rhythms, female general psychology students paired according to attitude similarity questionnaires engaged in 40-minute introductory conversations. Fourier analyses performed on speakers' on-off vocal activity demonstrated periodic oscillations in talkativeness. Although some dyads coordinated their vocal activity rhythms, speech accommodation was not predicted by attitude similarity or attraction and did not affect ratings of conversation quality. These rhythms of dialogue appear resistant to change, their behavioral momentum rooted perhaps in an underlying chronobiology. PMID:12845943

  9. Estimation and classification by sigmoids based on mutual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1994-01-01

    An estimate of the probability density function of a random vector is obtained by maximizing the mutual information between the input and the output of a feedforward network of sigmoidal units with respect to the input weights. Classification problems can be solved by selecting the class associated with the maximal estimated density. Newton's s method, applied to an estimated density, yields a recursive maximum likelihood estimator, consisting of a single internal layer of sigmoids, for a random variable or a random sequence. Applications to the diamond classification and to the prediction of a sun-spot process are demonstrated.

  10. Inflammation and colorectal cancer, when microbiota-host mutualism breaks

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Carbonero, Franck; Rampelli, Simone; Fiorentini, Carla; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes in the gut microbial community have been shown to accompany the progressive development of colorectal cancer. In this review we discuss recent hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in the bacteria-mediated carcinogenesis, as well as the triggering factors favoring the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. The possible role of inflammation, bacterial toxins and toxic microbiota metabolites in colorectal cancer onset is specifically discussed. On the other hand, the strategic role of inflammation as the keystone factor in driving microbiota to become carcinogenic is suggested. As a common outcome of different environmental and endogenous triggers, such as diet, aging, pathogen infection or genetic predisposition, inflammation can compromise the microbiota-host mutualism, forcing the increase of pathobionts at the expense of health-promoting groups, and allowing the microbiota to acquire an overall pro-inflammatory configuration. Consolidating inflammation in the gut, and favoring the bloom of toxigenic bacterial drivers, these changes in the gut microbial ecosystem have been suggested as pivotal in promoting carcinogenesis. In this context, it will become of primary importance to implement dietary or probiotics-based interventions aimed at preserving the microbiota-host mutualism along aging, counteracting deviations that favor a pro-carcinogenic microbiota asset. PMID:24574765

  11. Water Stress Strengthens Mutualism Among Ants, Trees, and Scale Insects

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Elizabeth G.; Akçay, Erol; Raab, Ted K.; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Gordon, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant–plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant–plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites along a Mesoamerican precipitation gradient. At lower precipitation levels, Cordia alliodora trees invest more carbon in Azteca ants via phloem-feeding scale insects that provide the ants with sugars, and the ants provide better defense of the carbon-producing leaves. Under water stress, the trees have smaller carbon pools. A model of the carbon trade-offs for the mutualistic partners shows that the observed strategies can arise from the carbon costs of rare but extreme events of herbivory in the rainy season. Thus, water limitation, together with the risk of herbivory, increases the strength of a carbon-based mutualism. PMID:24223521

  12. Housekeeping Mutualisms: Do More Symbionts Facilitate Host Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Lemer, Sarah; Leray, Matthieu; Mills, Suzanne C.; Osenberg, Craig W.

    2012-01-01

    Mutualisms often involve one host supporting multiple symbionts, whose identity, density and intraguild interactions can influence the nature of the mutualism and performance of the host. However, the implications of multiple co-occurring symbionts on services to a host have rarely been quantified. In this study, we quantified effects of decapod symbionts on removal of sediment from their coral host. Our field survey showed that all common symbionts typically occur as pairs and never at greater abundances. Two species, the crab Trapezia serenei and the shrimp Alpheus lottini, were most common and co-occurred more often than expected by chance. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to test for effects of decapod identity and density on sediment removal. Alone, corals removed 10% of sediment, but removal increased to 30% and 48% with the presence of two and four symbionts, respectively. Per-capita effects of symbionts were independent of density and identity. Our results suggest that symbiont density is restricted by intraspecific competition. Thus, increased sediment removal from a coral host can only be achieved by increasing the number of species of symbionts on that coral, even though these species are functionally equivalent. Symbiont diversity plays a key role, not through added functionality but by overcoming density limitation likely imposed by intraspecific mating systems. PMID:22523536

  13. Mutual learning and reverse innovation–where next?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a clear and evident need for mutual learning in global health systems. It is increasingly recognized that innovation needs to be sourced globally and that we need to think in terms of co-development as ideas are developed and spread from richer to poorer countries and vice versa. The Globalization and Health journal’s ongoing thematic series, “Reverse innovation in global health systems: learning from low-income countries” illustrates how mutual learning and ideas about so-called "reverse innovation" or "frugal innovation" are being developed and utilized by researchers and practitioners around the world. The knowledge emerging from the series is already catalyzing change and challenging the status quo in global health. The path to truly “global innovation flow”, although not fully established, is now well under way. Mobilization of knowledge and resources through continuous communication and awareness raising can help sustain this movement. Global health learning laboratories, where partners can support each other in generating and sharing lessons, have the potential to construct solutions for the world. At the heart of this dialogue is a focus on creating practical local solutions and, simultaneously, drawing out the lessons for the whole world. PMID:24673828

  14. Mutual antipathies and their significance in middle childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Abecassis, Maurissa; Hartup, Willard W; Haselager, Gerbert J T; Scholte, Ron H J; Van Lieshout, Cornelis F M

    2002-01-01

    Mutual antipathies (when two children or adolescents dislike one another) were studied among 2,348 school-age children and 2,768 adolescents to determine incidence, gender and age differences, and implications for social adjustment. The children were more frequently involved than were the adolescents in same-sex antipathies but not mixed-sex ones. Boys were involved more frequently than were girls in same-sex antipathies, but involvement in mixed-sex antipathies was comparable for the two genders. With peer rejection scores used as a covariate, same-sex antipathies were associated with antisocial behavior and social withdrawal among children and adolescents of both genders and, in addition, to emotionality and lack of friendship support among adolescents. Mixed-sex antipathies were related to social adjustment depending on gender: these antipathies were related to antisocial and bullying behavior in boys but not girls; and to nonaggressiveness, victimization, lesser cooperation, shyness, and depression in girls but not boys. Mutual antipathies thus appear to be concomitants of adaptational risk in both childhood and adolescence. PMID:12361318

  15. Permutation auto-mutual information of electroencephalogram in anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Li, Xiaoli

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The dynamic change of brain activity in anesthesia is an interesting topic for clinical doctors and drug designers. To explore the dynamical features of brain activity in anesthesia, a permutation auto-mutual information (PAMI) method is proposed to measure the information coupling of electroencephalogram (EEG) time series obtained in anesthesia. Approach. The PAMI is developed and applied on EEG data collected from 19 patients under sevoflurane anesthesia. The results are compared with the traditional auto-mutual information (AMI), SynchFastSlow (SFS, derived from the BIS index), permutation entropy (PE), composite PE (CPE), response entropy (RE) and state entropy (SE). Performance of all indices is assessed by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability. Main results. The PK/PD modeling and prediction probability analysis show that the PAMI index correlates closely with the anesthetic effect. The coefficient of determination R2 between PAMI values and the sevoflurane effect site concentrations, and the prediction probability Pk are higher in comparison with other indices. The information coupling in EEG series can be applied to indicate the effect of the anesthetic drug sevoflurane on the brain activity as well as other indices. The PAMI of the EEG signals is suggested as a new index to track drug concentration change. Significance. The PAMI is a useful index for analyzing the EEG dynamics during general anesthesia.

  16. Remaining Flexible in Old Alliances: Functional Plasticity in Constrained Mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Diana E.

    2009-01-01

    Central to any beneficial interaction is the capacity of partners to detect and respond to significant changes in the other. Recent studies of microbial mutualists show their close integration with host development, immune responses, and acclimation to a dynamic external environment. While the significance of microbial players is broadly appreciated, we are just beginning to understand the genetic, ecological, and physiological mechanisms that generate variation in symbiont functions, broadly termed “symbiont plasticity” here. Some possible mechanisms include shifts in symbiont community composition, genetic changes via DNA acquisition, gene expression fluctuations, and variation in symbiont densities. In this review, we examine mechanisms for plasticity in the exceptionally stable mutualisms between insects and bacterial endosymbionts. Despite the severe ecological and genomic constraints imposed by their specialized lifestyle, these bacteria retain the capacity to modulate functions depending on the particular requirements of the host. Focusing on the mutualism between Blochmannia and ants, we discuss the roles of gene expression fluctuations and shifts in bacterial densities in generating symbiont plasticity. This symbiont variation is best understood by considering ant colony as the host superorganism. In this eusocial host, the bacteria meet the needs of the colony and not necessarily the individual ants that house them. PMID:19435425

  17. Aggressive mimicry coexists with mutualism in an aphid.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Adrián; Fürstenau, Benjamin; Quero, Carmen; Pérez-Hidalgo, Nicolás; Carazo, Pau; Font, Enrique; Martínez-Torres, David

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the evolutionary transition from interspecific exploitation to cooperation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Ant-aphid relationships represent an ideal system to this end because they encompass a coevolutionary continuum of interactions ranging from mutualism to antagonism. In this study, we report an unprecedented interaction along this continuum: aggressive mimicry in aphids. We show that two morphs clonally produced by the aphid Paracletus cimiciformis during its root-dwelling phase establish relationships with ants at opposite sides of the mutualism-antagonism continuum. Although one of these morphs exhibits the conventional trophobiotic (mutualistic) relationship with ants of the genus Tetramorium, aphids of the alternative morph are transported by the ants to their brood chamber and cared for as if they were true ant larvae. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses reveal that the innate cuticular hydrocarbon profile of the mimic morph resembles the profile of ant larvae more than that of the alternative, genetically identical nonmimic morph. Furthermore, we show that, once in the brood chamber, mimic aphids suck on ant larva hemolymph. These results not only add aphids to the limited list of arthropods known to biosynthesize the cuticular chemicals of their deceived hosts to exploit their resources but describe a remarkable case of plastic aggressive mimicry. The present work adds a previously unidentified dimension to the classical textbook paradigm of aphid-ant relationships by showcasing a complex system at the evolutionary interface between cooperation and exploitation. PMID:25583474

  18. An invasive slug exploits an ant-seed dispersal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Meadley Dunphy, Shannon A; Prior, Kirsten M; Frederickson, Megan E

    2016-05-01

    Plant-animal mutualisms, such as seed dispersal, are often vulnerable to disruption by invasive species. Here, we show for the first time how a non-ant invasive species negatively affects seed dispersal by ants. We examined the effects of several animal species that co-occur in a temperate deciduous forest-including native and invasive seed-dispersing ants (Aphaenogaster rudis and Myrmica rubra, respectively), an invasive slug (Arion subfuscus), and native rodents-on a native myrmecochorous plant, Asarum canadense. We experimentally manipulated ant, slug, and rodent access to seed depots and measured seed removal. We also video-recorded depots to determine which other taxa interact with seeds. We found that A. rudis was the main disperser of seeds and that A. subfuscus consumed elaiosomes without dispersing seeds. Rodent visitation was rare, and rodent exclusion had no significant effect on seed or elaiosome removal. We then used data obtained from laboratory and field mesocosm experiments to determine how elaiosome robbing by A. subfuscus affects seed dispersal by A. rudis and M. rubra. We found that elaiosome robbing by slugs reduced seed dispersal by ants, especially in mesocosms with A. rudis, which picks up seeds more slowly than M. rubra. Taken together, our results show that elaiosome robbing by an invasive slug reduces seed dispersal by ants, suggesting that invasive slugs can have profound negative effects on seed dispersal mutualisms. PMID:26830293

  19. Mutual positive effects between shrubs in an arid ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Tirado, Reyes; Bråthen, Kari Anne; Pugnaire, Francisco I.

    2015-01-01

    One-way facilitation in plants has been found in many harsh environments and their role as structural forces governing species composition in plant communities is now well established. However, reciprocal positive effects benefiting two interacting species have seldom been reported and, in recent reviews, conceptually considered merely as facilitation when in fact there is room for adaptive strategies and evolutionary responses. We tested the existence of such reciprocal positive effects in an arid environment in SE Spain using spatial pattern analysis, a species removal experiment, and a natural experiment. We found that the spatial association between Maytenus senegalensis and Whitania frutescens, two shrub species of roughly similar size intimately interacting in our community, resulted in mutual benefit for both species. Benefits included improved water relations and nutritional status and protection against browsing, and did occur despite simultaneous competition for resources. Our data suggest two-way facilitation or, rather, a facultative mutualism among higher plant species, a process often overlooked which could be a main driver of plant community dynamics allowing for evolutionary processes. PMID:26419958

  20. Mutual information measures applied to EEG signals for sleepiness characterization.

    PubMed

    Melia, Umberto; Guaita, Marc; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Embid, Cristina; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Santamaria, Joan

    2015-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders with a great impact on the patient lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, the automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on non-linear dynamical analysis of EEG signal was proposed. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five maintenance of wakefulness (MWT) and multiple sleep latency (MSLT) tests alternated throughout the day from patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing. A group of 20 patients with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60-s EEG windows in waking state. Measures obtained from cross-mutual information function (CMIF) and auto-mutual-information function (AMIF) were calculated in the EEG. These functions permitted a quantification of the complexity properties of the EEG signal and the non-linear couplings between different zones of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were found in β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). WDS group presented more complexity than EDS in the occipital zone, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between occipital and frontal zones was detected in EDS patients than in WDS. The AMIF and CMIF measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and AUC of ROC above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients. PMID:25638417

  1. Classical mutual information in mean-field spin glass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, Vincenzo; Inglis, Stephen; Pollet, Lode

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the classical Rényi entropy Sn and the associated mutual information In in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (S-K) model, which is the paradigm model of mean-field spin glasses. Using classical Monte Carlo simulations and analytical tools we investigate the S-K model in the n -sheet booklet. This is achieved by gluing together n independent copies of the model, and it is the main ingredient for constructing the Rényi entanglement-related quantities. We find a glassy phase at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures the model exhibits paramagnetic behavior, consistent with the regular S-K model. The temperature of the paramagnetic-glassy transition depends nontrivially on the geometry of the booklet. At high temperatures we provide the exact solution of the model by exploiting the replica symmetry. This is the permutation symmetry among the fictitious replicas that are used to perform disorder averages (via the replica trick). In the glassy phase the replica symmetry has to be broken. Using a generalization of the Parisi solution, we provide analytical results for Sn and In and for standard thermodynamic quantities. Both Sn and In exhibit a volume law in the whole phase diagram. We characterize the behavior of the corresponding densities, Sn/N and In/N , in the thermodynamic limit. Interestingly, at the critical point the mutual information does not exhibit any crossing for different system sizes, in contrast with local spin models.

  2. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Matthias J.; Gerdes, Antje B. M.; Reicherts, Philipp; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not – or only partly – affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e., facial expressions of pain). Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing. PMID:25352817

  3. Dental ontogeny and replacement in Pliosauridae

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Judyth; Foffa, Davide; Marek, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Dental morphology and patterns of tooth replacement in representatives of the clade Pliosauridae (Reptilia, Sauropterygia) are evaluated in detail. The jaws of one basal (Thalassiodracon hawkinsii) and two derived species (Pliosaurus carpenteri, Pliosaurus kevani) were visualized by μCT scans, and the ontogenetic patterns, or ‘movement paths’, of replacement teeth could be mapped. Other specimens (Peloneustes philarchus and Pliosaurus westbuyensis) with well-preserved jaws containing functional and replacement teeth in situ were also examined directly, and waves of tooth replacement could be inferred from the degree of in situ tooth development and the fusion between functional and replacement alveoli. The analysis revealed symmetrical tooth eruption over the medial axis throughout the length of the jaw in the basal pliosaurid Thalassiodracon. By contrast, symmetrical tooth eruption patterns occur only along the anterior sections of the jaws of derived pliosaurids. In Pliosaurus, replacement schedules differ in the anterior and posterior portions of the jaws and appear to correlate with differences in tooth morphology and symmetrical replacement. The anterior teeth exhibit longer replacement cycle periods and symmetrical replacement, while shorter cycle periods and asymmetry are seen posteriorly. A longer period suggests slower replacement and is characteristic of large, specialized caniniform teeth in the longer snouted Late Jurassic taxa. Smaller posterior teeth have a shorter period and therefore a faster replacement cycle. The transition from long to short replacement period over the length of the jaw is thought to account for the loss of symmetry. This differentiation could relate to differential tooth function and a type of heterodonty. We therefore propose a new model of pliosaurid tooth replacement patterns and present it in a phylogenetic context. PMID:26715998

  4. Dental ontogeny and replacement in Pliosauridae.

    PubMed

    Sassoon, Judyth; Foffa, Davide; Marek, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Dental morphology and patterns of tooth replacement in representatives of the clade Pliosauridae (Reptilia, Sauropterygia) are evaluated in detail. The jaws of one basal (Thalassiodracon hawkinsii) and two derived species (Pliosaurus carpenteri, Pliosaurus kevani) were visualized by μCT scans, and the ontogenetic patterns, or 'movement paths', of replacement teeth could be mapped. Other specimens (Peloneustes philarchus and Pliosaurus westbuyensis) with well-preserved jaws containing functional and replacement teeth in situ were also examined directly, and waves of tooth replacement could be inferred from the degree of in situ tooth development and the fusion between functional and replacement alveoli. The analysis revealed symmetrical tooth eruption over the medial axis throughout the length of the jaw in the basal pliosaurid Thalassiodracon. By contrast, symmetrical tooth eruption patterns occur only along the anterior sections of the jaws of derived pliosaurids. In Pliosaurus, replacement schedules differ in the anterior and posterior portions of the jaws and appear to correlate with differences in tooth morphology and symmetrical replacement. The anterior teeth exhibit longer replacement cycle periods and symmetrical replacement, while shorter cycle periods and asymmetry are seen posteriorly. A longer period suggests slower replacement and is characteristic of large, specialized caniniform teeth in the longer snouted Late Jurassic taxa. Smaller posterior teeth have a shorter period and therefore a faster replacement cycle. The transition from long to short replacement period over the length of the jaw is thought to account for the loss of symmetry. This differentiation could relate to differential tooth function and a type of heterodonty. We therefore propose a new model of pliosaurid tooth replacement patterns and present it in a phylogenetic context. PMID:26715998

  5. Visual Image Sensor Organ Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This innovation is a system that augments human vision through a technique called "Sensing Super-position" using a Visual Instrument Sensory Organ Replacement (VISOR) device. The VISOR device translates visual and other sensors (i.e., thermal) into sounds to enable very difficult sensing tasks. Three-dimensional spatial brightness and multi-spectral maps of a sensed image are processed using real-time image processing techniques (e.g. histogram normalization) and transformed into a two-dimensional map of an audio signal as a function of frequency and time. Because the human hearing system is capable of learning to process and interpret extremely complicated and rapidly changing auditory patterns, the translation of images into sounds reduces the risk of accidentally filtering out important clues. The VISOR device was developed to augment the current state-of-the-art head-mounted (helmet) display systems. It provides the ability to sense beyond the human visible light range, to increase human sensing resolution, to use wider angle visual perception, and to improve the ability to sense distances. It also allows compensation for movement by the human or changes in the scene being viewed.

  6. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  7. 26 CFR 1.592-1 - Repayment of certain loans by mutual savings banks, building and loan associations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is wholly owned by the United States, or by any mutual fund established under the authority of the... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Repayment of certain loans by mutual savings... (CONTINUED) Mutual Savings Banks, Etc. § 1.592-1 Repayment of certain loans by mutual savings banks,...

  8. How to overcome difficulties with reserves replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Brashear, J.P.; Becker, A.B.; Godec, M.L.; Crawford, P.M.

    1997-03-10

    The first part of this article discussed the challenge of replacing reserves while maintaining high levels of profitability. An examination of the 82 largest US-based, publicly traded exploration and production (E and P) companies, grouped by size, suggested a potential conflict between reserves replacement and profitability--a ``devil`s dilemma`` between long term viability and financial performance. The 10 largest companies failed to replace their production in the US or worldwide (although they did in non-US operations). They were, however, the most profitable on a per-barrel-equivalent basis. In general, the smaller the company, the higher its reserves-replacement ratio, reflecting greater relative effort but lower unit profitability. This article examines the difficulties that companies face in reserves replacement planning, the accommodations they make to these difficulties, and the problems caused by these accommodations. It then suggests an analytical structure for reserves replacement planning that contributes to overcoming the difficulties.

  9. Mutual Events in the Uranian satellite system in 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlot, J. E.

    2008-09-01

    The equinox time on the giant planets When the Sun crosses the equatorial plane of a giant planet, it is the equinox time occurring every half orbit of the planet, i.e. every 6 years for Jupiter, 14 years for Saturn, 42 years for Uranus and 82 years for Neptune. Except Neptune, each planet have several major satellites orbiting in the equatorial plane, then, during the equinox time, the satellites will eclipse each other mutually. Since the Earth follows the Sun, during the equinox time, a terrestrial observer will see each satellite occulting each other during the same period. These events may be observed with photometric receivers since the light from the satellites will decrease during the events. The light curve will provide information on the geometric configuration of the the satellites at the time of the event with an accuracy of a few kilometers, not depending on the distance of the satellite system. Then, we are able to get an astrometric observation with an accuracy several times better than using direct imaging for positions. Equinox on Uranus in 2007 In 2007, it was equinox time on Uranus. The Sun crossed the equatorial plane of Uranus on December 6, 2007. Since the opposition Uranus-Sun was at the end of August 2007, observations were performed from May to December 2007. Since the declination of Uranus was between -5 and -6 degrees, observations were better to make in the southern hemisphere. However, some difficulties had to be solved: the faintness of the satellites (magnitude between 14 and 16), the brightness of the planet (magnitude 5) making difficult the photometric observation of the satellites. The used of K' filter associated to a large telescope allows to increase the number of observable events. Dynamics of the Uranian satellites One of the goals of the observations was to evaluate the accuracy of the current dynamical models of the motion of the satellites. This knowledge is important for several reasons: most of time the Uranian system is

  10. Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, John A; Richman, Joy M

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development. PMID:23788284

  11. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  12. Peach bottom recirculation piping replacement ALARA program

    SciTech Connect

    Englesson, G.A.; Hilsmeier, A.E.; Mann, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    In late 1983, Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) began detailed planning to replace the recirculation, residual heat removal, and part of the reactor water cleanup piping of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 reactor. Included in this work was an estimate of the collective exposure expected during piping replacement. That initial estimate, 1945 man-rem, is compared with the actual collective dose incurred during the piping replacement program. Also included are the exposures incurred during two additional tasks (safe end replacement and recirculation pump disassembly and decontamination) not considered in the initial estimate.

  13. Opportunistic replacement of fusion power system parts

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J.A.; George, L.L.

    1981-10-26

    This paper describes a maintenance problem in a fusion power plant. The problem is to specify which life limited parts should be replaced when there is an opportunity. The objective is to minimize the cost rate of replacement parts and of maintenance actions while satisfying a power plant availability constraint. The maintenance policy is to look ahead and replace all parts that will reach their life limits within a time called a screen. Longer screens yield greater system availabilities because more parts are replaced prior to their life limits.

  14. Total quality management approach improves medication replacement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L K

    1994-07-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is based on understanding customer needs, improving key processes that affect customer satisfaction, and creating cross-functional teams to resolve process problems. This article describes application of TQM principles and problem-solving processes to improve one OR's medication exchange system. The problem was excessive monthly pharmacy medication replacement costs. The goal was to reduce the monthly medication replacement costs by 50%. Within four months, monthly medication replacement charges decreased from $656 to $302, and by one year, monthly charges decreased to $160. The new process had fewer steps, fewer staff members involved, and fewer delays in medication replacement. PMID:8085806

  15. Determinants of heterotopic ossification after total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Marlene; Neal, Bruce; Cameron, Ian D; Crawford, Ross; Tregonning, Garnet; Winstanley, Julie; Norton, Robyn

    2009-01-01

    The ability of various pre- or peri-operative variables to determine the risk of developing moderate to severe heterotopic ossification (HO) six to twelve months after surgery was investigated among 407 patients undergoing elective total hip replacement (THR) surgery and allocated to placebo in a randomised controlled trial evaluating NSA IDs-based prophylaxis for HO. Overall, 11 (30%) of the 37 patients undergoing revision surgery developed moderate to severe HO compared with 58 (16%) of the 370 patients undergoing primary THR; odds ratio (OR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 4.9. Among patients undergoing primary THR , mutually adjusted analysis of collected independent risk factors demonstrated that receiving a transfusion of red cells or having general as well as epidural or spinal anaesthesia present as indicators of increased risk for developing moderate to severe HO. Patients who have undergone revision surgery have a significantly increased risk of clinically relevant ectopic bone, while among patients who have undergone primary THR surgery, those with indicators of excessive surgical bleeding are also at increased risk of clinically relevant HO. PMID:19455501

  16. Complex degree of mutual anisotropy in diagnostics of biological tissues physiological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Yu. A.; Dubolazov, O. V.; Karachevtcev, A. O.; Zabolotna, N. I.

    2011-05-01

    To characterize the degree of consistency of parameters of the optically uniaxial birefringent protein nets of blood plasma a new parameter - complex degree of mutual anisotropy is suggested. The technique of polarization measuring the coordinate distributions of the complex degree of mutual anisotropy of blood plasma is developed. It is shown that statistic approach to the analysis of complex degree of mutual anisotropy distributions of blood plasma is effective in the diagnosis and differentiation of acute inflammation - acute and gangrenous appendicitis.

  17. Complex degree of mutual anisotropy in diagnostics of biological tissues physiological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Yu. A.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Karachevtcev, A. O.; Zabolotna, N. I.

    2011-09-01

    To characterize the degree of consistency of parameters of the optically uniaxial birefringent protein nets of blood plasma a new parameter - complex degree of mutual anisotropy is suggested. The technique of polarization measuring the coordinate distributions of the complex degree of mutual anisotropy of blood plasma is developed. It is shown that statistic approach to the analysis of complex degree of mutual anisotropy distributions of blood plasma is effective in the diagnosis and differentiation of acute inflammation - acute and gangrenous appendicitis.

  18. Peer pressure: Enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might intuitively expect the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Also, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  19. Conformal invariance in noncommutative geometry and mutually interacting Snyder particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir; Pal, Probir

    2014-11-01

    A system of relativistic Snyder particles with mutual two-body interaction that lives in a noncommutative Snyder geometry is studied. The underlying novel symplectic structure is a coupled and extended version of (single-particle) Snyder algebra. In a recent work by Casalbuoni and Gomis [Phys. Rev. D 90, 026001 (2014)], a system of interacting conventional particles (in commutative spacetime) was studied with special emphasis on its conformal invariance. Proceeding along the same lines, we have shown that our interacting Snyder particle model is also conformally invariant. Moreover, the conformal Killing vectors have been constructed. Our main emphasis is on the Hamiltonian analysis of the conformal symmetry generators. We demonstrate that the Lorentz algebra remains undeformed, but validity of the full conformal algebra requires further restrictions.

  20. An analytic function approach to weak mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olupitan, T.; Lei, C.; Vourdas, A.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum systems with variables in Z(d) are considered, and three different structures are studied. The first is weak mutually unbiased bases, for which the absolute value of the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases is 1 /√{ k } (where k | d) or 0. The second is maximal lines through the origin in the Z(d) × Z(d) phase space. The third is an analytic representation in the complex plane based on Theta functions, and their zeros. It is shown that there is a correspondence (triality) that links strongly these three apparently different structures. For simplicity, the case where d =p1 ×p2, where p1 ,p2 are odd prime numbers different from each other, is considered.