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Sample records for myc-mediated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

  1. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. PMID:12966640

  2. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Brian A; Stevens, Gerin R

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a global disease with cases reported in all continents, affecting people of both genders and of various racial and ethnic origins. Widely accepted as a monogenic disease caused by a mutation in 1 of 13 or more sarcomeric genes, HCM can present catastrophically with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or ventricular arrhythmias or insidiously with symptoms of heart failure. Given the velocity of progress in both the fields of heart failure and HCM, we present a review of the approach to patients with HCM, with particular attention to those with HCM and the clinical syndrome of heart failure. PMID:25657602

  3. Subaortic membrane mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark Joseph; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide; Gersh, Bernard; Geske, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old man was referred for progressive angina and exertional dyspnoea refractory to medical therapy, with a presumptive diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed asymmetric septal hypertrophy without systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflet and with no dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. However, the LVOT velocity was elevated at rest as well as with provocation, without the characteristic late peaking obstruction seen in HCM. Focused TTE to evaluate for suspected fixed obstruction demonstrated a subaortic membrane 2.2 cm below the aortic valve. Coronary CT angiography confirmed the presence of the subaortic membrane and was negative for concomitant coronary artery disease. Surgical resection of the subaortic membrane and septal myectomy resulted in significant symptomatic relief and lower LVOT velocities on postoperative TTE. This case reminds the clinician to carefully evaluate for alternative causes of LVOT obstruction, especially subaortic membrane, as a cause of symptoms mimicking HCM. PMID:26538250

  4. Experimental Therapies in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Marian, Ali J.

    2010-01-01

    The quintessential clinical diagnostic phenotype of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is primary cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac hypertrophy is also a major determinant of mortality and morbidity including the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with HCM. Reversal and attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy and its accompanying fibrosis is expected to improve morbidity as well as decrease the risk of SCD in patients with HCM. The conventionally used pharmacological agents in treatment of patients with HCM have not been shown to reverse or attenuate established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. An effective treatment of HCM has to target the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the pathogenesis of the phenotype. Mechanistic studies suggest that cardiac hypertrophy in HCM is secondary to activation of various hypertrophic signaling molecules and, hence, is potentially reversible. The hypothesis is supported by the results of genetic and pharmacological interventions in animal models. The results have shown potential beneficial effects of angiotensin II receptor blocker losartan, mineralocorticoid receptor blocker spironolactone, 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors simvastatin and atorvastatin, and most recently, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on reversal or prevention of hypertrophy and fibrosis in HCM. The most promising results have been obtained with NAC, which through multiple thiol-responsive mechanisms completely reversed established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in three independent studies. Pilot studies with losartan and statins in humans have established the feasibility of such studies. The results in animal models have firmly established the reversibility of established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in HCM and have set the stage for advancing the findings in the animal models to human patients with HCM through conducting large-scale efficacy studies. PMID:20560006

  5. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  6. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  7. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  8. Pathological features of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M. J.; Pomerance, Ariela; Teare, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The macroscopic features of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are variable. The most easily recognized picture is of disproportionate and asymmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy with a small ventricular volume. Symmetrical ventricular hypertrophy also occurs and dilatation of the ventricular cavity may lead to a configuration more usually associated with congestive cardiomyopathy. Papillary muscle involvement leads to a bullet shape, often retained even when the ventricle dilates. Eighteen of the hearts showed a distinctive band of fibrous thickening below the aortic valve. This was a mirror image of the free edge of the anterior mitral cusp, had the microscopic features of an endocardial friction lesion, and was clearly the morphological expression of the systolic contact between cusp and septum seen on cineangiography. This band is characteristic of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy; it was more common in older patients and is of particular diagnostic value in cases with symmetrical hypertrophy, including those with dilated ventricular cavities. Sudden death was the commonest presentation in the younger cases but in several cases over 60 years at death hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was an incidental necropsy finding. Images PMID:4472994

  9. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdin, Amr; Eitel, Ingo; de Waha, Suzanne; Thiele, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It is characterized by a local hypertrophy of the apical segments and displays typical electrocardiographic and imaging patterns. The clinical manifestations are variable and range from an asymptomatic course to sudden cardiac death. The most frequent symptom is chest pain and thus apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can mimic the symptoms and repolarization disturbances indicative of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26628684

  10. End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a cat

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew J.M.

    2015-01-01

    A 14-year-old Persian cat was referred for evaluation of the progression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) after an acute episode of congestive heart failure. The diagnosis of HCM had been made almost 13 years ago. Echocardiography and electrocardiography revealed end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and multifocal atrial tachycardia. The patient was discharged on medical management with a grave prognosis. PMID:25969586

  11. End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a cat.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew J M

    2015-05-01

    A 14-year-old Persian cat was referred for evaluation of the progression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) after an acute episode of congestive heart failure. The diagnosis of HCM had been made almost 13 years ago. Echocardiography and electrocardiography revealed end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and multifocal atrial tachycardia. The patient was discharged on medical management with a grave prognosis. PMID:25969586

  12. Atrioventricular Sequential Pacing for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy During Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan; Pai, Sher-Lu; Perry, Dana K; Blackshear, Joseph L; Aniskevich, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disorder that carries an increased risk of morbidity and mortality during liver transplantation. We describe the use of atrioventricular sequential pacing, placed preoperatively, to assist with intraoperative management of a patient with severe refractory hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing orthotopic piggyback liver transplantation. We discuss the pathogenesis and treatment of this infrequent but serious comorbidity. PMID:26466305

  13. Right ventricular obstruction in various types of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Stierle, U; Sheikhzadeh, A; Shakibi, J G; Langbehn, A F; Diederich, K W

    1987-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is most probably a genetically transmitted disease with different clinical and hemodynamic features. In hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) the obstruction is predominantly in the left ventricular outflow tract (IHSS). In a minority of cases the obstruction is strictly located in midventricle (midventricular obstruction, MO). Hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (HNCM) includes asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) and apical hypertrophy (AH). Right ventricular hypertrophic obstruction (RVHO) is an uncommon type of HCM and is almost always combined with other types of left ventricular HCM. We describe in the present report 1 case of RVHO with IHSS, 2 cases with MO and, to our knowledge, the first case with AH. PMID:3599397

  14. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Owl Monkeys (Aotus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly. PMID:23759531

  15. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M; Mohun, Timothy J; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation. PMID:27323879

  16. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C.; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J.; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation. PMID:27323879

  17. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy ...

  18. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MR Imaging in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: From Magnet to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Jan; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2014-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ( HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ), the most common genetically transmitted cardiac disorder, has been the focus of extensive research over the past 50 years. HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a multifaceted disease with highly heterogeneous genetic background, phenotypic expression, clinical presentation, and long-term outcome. Though most patients have an indolent course with a life expectancy comparable to that of the general population, early diagnosis and accurate risk profiling are essential to identify the sizeable subset at increased risk of sudden cardiac death or disease progression and heart failure-related complications, requiring aggressive management options. Imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and prognostic assessment of HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients, as well as screening of potentially affected family members. In this context, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has recently emerged as an ideal complement to transthoracic echocardiography. Its multiparametric approach, fusing spatial, contrast, and temporal resolution, provides the clinician with detailed characterization of the HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotype and assessment of its functional consequences including causes and site of dynamic obstruction, presence and extent of myocardial perfusion abnormalities, and fibrosis. Moreover, MR is key in differentiating HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from "phenocopies"-that is, hearts with similar morphology but profoundly different etiology, such as amyloid or Anderson-Fabry disease. Long term, the incremental information provided by MR is relevant to planning of septal reduction therapies, identification of the early stages of end-stage progression, and stratification of arrhythmic risk. The aim of this review is to depict the increasingly important role of MR imaging in relation to the complexity of HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy , highlighting its role in clinical decision making. PMID:25340269

  20. [Left ventricular hypertrophy in the cat - "when hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not hypertrophic cardiomyopathy"].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Wess, G

    2010-07-01

    According to WHO classification hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary genetic cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographically HCM is characterized by symmetric, asymmetric or focal left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) without recognizable underlying physical cause. However, echocardiographically HCM in cats may not be distinguishable from other causes of a thick appearing left ventricle. Hypovolemia can look like a hypertrophied ventricle but is basically only pseudohypertrophic. Well recognized and logical physical causes of LVH include systemic hypertension and outflow obstruction. LVH similar to HCM may also be found in feline hyperthyroidism. The context of the disease helps to differentiate these physical / physiological causes of LVH. Difficult to distinguish from HCM, particularly when based on a snapshot of a single echocardiographic exam, are myocarditis and . Only the clinical and echocardiographic course allow a reasonably confident etiological diagnosis and the differentiation between HCM and secondary LVH. PMID:20582898

  1. Treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with verapamil.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, M; Hopf, R; Kober, G; Bussmann, W D; Keller, M; Petersen, Y

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy were treated with the calcium inhibitor, verapamil, which was administered in a mean oral dose of 480 mg per day. After an average of 15 months of treatment (4 to 24 months), the QRS amplitude in the electrocardiogram was significantly reduced from 4.2 to 3.8 mV. Heart volume calculated from chest x-ray films in the supine position decreased significantly from 858 to 766 ml per 1.73 m2. In 10 patients, follow-up heart catheterisation showed a decrease in left ventricular muscle mass in 7 patients and a slight increase in 3 patients. Coronary artery diameter decreased in 7 patients, increased in 1, and was unchanged in 2. The reduction in coronary artery diameter is considered to be a consequence of a reduced heart muscle mass. From all available clinical data it is concluded that verapamil treatment is superior to beta-blocker therapy. Images PMID:573129

  2. Familial spontaneous complete heart block in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Louie, E K; Maron, B J

    1986-01-01

    Two siblings with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy developed spontaneous complete heart block requiring permanent pacemaker implantation at similar ages (29 and 33 years). The clinical, morphological, and haemodynamic expressions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy differed considerably in these two patients. The sister had severe functional limitation due to dyspnoea, pronounced and diffuse left ventricular hypertrophy (maximum ventricular septal thickness of 41 mm), and left ventricular outflow obstruction (peak subaortic gradient of 75 mm Hg under basal conditions). In contrast the brother was symptom free, had only modest left ventricular hypertrophy which was confined to the anterior ventricular septum (maximal thickness of 16 mm), and had no echocardiographic evidence of subaortic obstruction. These dissimilar findings in siblings with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy suggest that the predisposition to develop complete heart block was probably genetically transmitted, although it was unrelated to the phenotypic and clinical expression of the disease. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3707787

  3. Phonoechocardiography and intracardiac phonocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, J. A.; Alvares, R. F.; Reddy, P. S.; Salerni, R.

    1986-01-01

    The salient phonoechocardiographic features of patients having hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) with or without left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradients are reviewed. Intracardiac sound and pressure recordings from high fidelity catheter-tipped micromanometers have documented that the precordial murmur is the summation of both the systolic ejection murmur (SEM) arising from the LVOT, as well as the mitral regurgitant murmur recorded from the left atrium. The intensity of the precordial murmur varies directly with the LVOT gradient, which in turn is determined primarily by the contractility and loading conditions of the left ventricle. Reversed splitting of the second heart sound (S2) with paradoxical respiratory movement is a common finding in HCM, and when present, almost always denotes a significant LVOT gradient. It is due to marked lengthening of the left ventricular ejection time secondary to prolongation of the contraction and relaxation phases of left ventricular systole. The presence of a fourth heart sound (S4) is the rule in HCM when normal sinus rhythm is present, and is a reflection of a forceful left atrial contraction into a hypertrophied noncompliant left ventricle. A third heart sound (S3) is also common in HCM, and often the initial vibrations occur before the 0 point of the apexcardiogram (ACG) and continue giving the auscultatory impression of a diastolic rumble. When associated with a loud S1, which is frequently present, the clinical presentation may mimic mitral stenosis. This is particularly true when the patient has chronic atrial fibrillation. Careful attention to evidence of marked left ventricular hypertrophy as well as the typical echocardiographic findings of HCM preclude this diagnosis. In conclusion, phonoechocardiography is a simple non-invasive technique which almost always makes the definitive diagnosis of HCM. PMID:3774689

  4. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome, hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and hypotelorism.

    PubMed

    Kellermair, Joerg; Kammler, Juergen; Laubichler, Peter; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder associated with arterial/venous thrombosis. Cardiac manifestations of APS include valve stenosis/insufficiency, coronary artery disease and myocardial dysfunction presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy. In the following report, we present the case of a man with primary APS, hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and hypotelorism-a combination that has not yet been reported in the literature. PMID:27048398

  5. Red blood cell sodium heteroexchange in familial primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Semplicini, A; Mozzato, M G; Bongiovi, S; Marzola, M; Macor, F; Ceolotto, G; Serena, L; Pessina, A C

    1994-03-01

    The hallmark of primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an inappropriate myocardial hypertrophy, linked to myofibril disarray of the left ventricle. Its variable clinical expression may be due to genetic heterogeneity and variable penetrance. Since we have recently shown that abnormalities of cation transport in the erythrocytes are associated with cardiac hypertrophy in essential hypertensives and insulin-dependent diabetics, we have investigated the relationship between cardiac anatomy and function and red cell Li+/Na+ and Na+/H+ exchange in 33 relatives of a patient who died of cardiac failure and was found to have a primary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at autopsy. According to echocardiographic examination, 11 members of the family also had a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a family distribution compatible with autosomal dominant genetic transmission and variable penetrance. Red cell Li+/Na+ and Na+/H+ exchange were not significantly different in the affected members as compared to the unaffected, but in the former, after correction for potentially confounding variables, interventricular septum thickness was positively correlated to Na+/H+ exchange and diastolic function (Area E/Area A and Vmax E/Vmax A) negatively correlated to Li+/Na+ exchange. Since a generalized overactivity of the cell membrane Na+/H+ exchange, reflected by increased Na+/H+ and Li+/Na+ exchanges in the red cells, could favour cellular growth and diastolic dysfunction, our data suggest that abnormalities of cell membrane cation transport could play a role in the phenotypic expression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:8013504

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure.

  7. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  8. Genetics Home Reference: familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle . Thickening usually occurs ... also lead to symptoms of the condition. Cardiac hypertrophy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although ...

  9. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Registry (HCMR): The rationale and design of an international, observational study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.; Appelbaum, Evan; Desai, Milind Y.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; DiMarco, John P.; Friedrich, Matthias G.; Geller, Nancy; Heckler, Sarahfaye; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ivey, Elizabeth A.; Keleti, Julianna; Kim, Dong-Yun; Kolm, Paul; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Maron, Martin S.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Piechnik, Stefan; Watkins, Hugh; Weintraub, William S.; Wu, Pan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic heart disease with a frequency as high as 1 in 200. In many cases, HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding the different components of the sarcomere apparatus. HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myofibrillar disarray, and myocardial fibrosis. The phenotypic expression is quite variable. While the majority of patients with HCM are asymptomatic, serious consequences are experienced in a subset of affected individuals who present initially with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or progress to refractory heart failure (HF). The HCMR study is a National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 2750 patient, 41 site, international registry and natural history study designed to address limitations in extant evidence to improve prognostication in HCM (NCT01915615). In addition to collection of standard demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic variables, patients will undergo state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for assessment of left ventricular (LV) mass and volumes as well as replacement scarring and interstitial fibrosis. In addition, genetic and biomarker analysis will be performed. HCMR has the potential to change the paradigm of risk stratification in HCM, using novel markers to identify those at higher risk. PMID:26299218

  10. Muscular (hypertrophic) subaortic stenosis (hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy): the evidence for true obstruction to left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, E. D.; Henderson, M.; Rakowski, H.; Wilansky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical and haemodynamic significance of the subaortic pressure gradient in patients with muscular (hypertrophic) subaortic stenosis (hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy) has long been debated. In this report we summarize the evidence which indicates that true obstruction to left ventricular outflow exists in these patients. Rapid left ventricular ejection, through an outflow tract narrowed by ventricular septal hypertrophy, results in Venturi forces causing systolic anterior motion of the anterior (or posterior) mitral leaflets. Mitral leaflet-septal contact results in obstruction to outflow and the accompanying mitral regurgitation. The time of onset of mitral leaflet-septal contact determines the magnitude of the pressure gradient and the severity of the mitral regurgitation, as well as the degree of prolongation of left ventricular ejection time and the percentage of left ventricular stroke volume that is ejected in the presence of an obstructive pressure gradient. Early and prolonged mitral leaflet-septal contact results in a large pressure gradient, significant mitral regurgitation, as well as dramatic prolongation of the ejection time and a large percentage of left ventricular stroke volume being obstructed. Late and short mitral leaflet-septal contact results in little haemodynamic perturbation. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with obstructive pressure gradients are significantly more symptomatic than those without. Thus the obstructive pressure gradients in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are of clinical as well as haemodynamic significance. To deny the existence of obstruction to outflow in patients with muscular subaortic stenosis is to deny these patients appropriate medical and surgical therapy. PMID:3774688

  11. Pregnancy related complications in women with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thaman, R; Varnava, A; Hamid, M S; Firoozi, S; Sachdev, B; Condon, M; Gimeno, J R; Murphy, R; Elliott, P M; McKenna, W J

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether pregnancy is well tolerated in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Setting: Referral clinic. Design: The study cohort comprised 127 consecutively referred women with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Forty (31.5%) underwent clinical evaluation before pregnancy. The remaining 87 (68.5%) were referred after their first pregnancy. All underwent history, examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Pregnancy related symptoms and complications were determined by questionnaire and review of medical and obstetric records where available. Results: There were 271 pregnancies in total. Thirty six (28.3%) women reported cardiac symptoms in pregnancy. Over 90% of these women had been symptomatic before pregnancy. Symptoms deteriorated during pregnancy in fewer than 10%. Of the 36 women with symptoms during pregnancy, 30 had further pregnancies. Symptoms reoccurred in 18 (60%); symptomatic deterioration was not reported. Heart failure occurred postnatally in two women (1.6%). No complications were reported in 19 (15%) women who underwent general anaesthesia and in 22 (17.4%) women who received epidural anaesthesia, three of whom had a significant left ventricular outflow tract gradient at diagnosis after pregnancy. Three unexplained intrauterine deaths occurred in women taking cardiac medication throughout pregnancy. No echocardiographic or clinical feature was a useful indicator of pregnancy related complications. Conclusions: Most women with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy tolerate pregnancy well. However, rare complications can occur and therefore planned delivery and fetal monitoring are still required for some patients. PMID:12807849

  12. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: vectorcardiographic findings in echocardiographically unaffected relative.

    PubMed Central

    Loperfido, F; Fiorilli, R; Digaetano, A; Di Gennaro, M; Santarelli, P; Bellocci, F; Coppola, E; Zecchi, P

    1982-01-01

    The electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic (Frank system) features of the first degree relatives of subjects with documented familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were analysed. A total of nine affected members and 29 relatives were examined in four families. THe subjects were considered to be affected when the septal to free posterior wall thickness ratio exceeded 1.3 at M-mode echocardiography. Four relatives had asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Among 25 relatives without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy, two over 20 years and 10 under 20 years of age showed increased voltage of QRS anterior forces (Qz amplitude greater than 0.80 mV) on the orthogonal electrocardiogram. The vectorcardiographic data of the relatives under 20 years of age without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy (18 subjects) were compared with those of 38 normal control subjects of comparable age range. The young relatives without disproportionate septal hypertrophy had significantly greater Qz amplitude and Q/Rz ratio than the normal control subjects. In contrast, the echocardiographic data were not significantly different. We suggest that the electrocardiographic finding of abnormal anterior forces in one or more first degree relatives of subjects with documented hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may constitute a valuable aid in ascertaining the genetic transmission of the disease and in recognising affected members without echocardiographic evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:7200794

  13. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or surgeries may also be used, including: A defibrillator that sends an electrical pulse to stop life- ... failure - overview Heart transplant Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Peripartum cardiomyopathy Restrictive cardiomyopathy Patient Instructions Heart failure - ...

  14. Restrictive myocardium with an unusual pattern of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takuma; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Seguchi, Osamu; Murata, Yoshihiro; Sunami, Haruki; Yanase, Masanobu; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Loeffler endocarditis is a fibrous restrictive cardiomyopathy thought to be caused by persistent eosinophilia. It is difficult to diagnose, and the prognosis is often poor if the underlying eosinophilia is not promptly recognized and treated. We describe the case of a middle-aged woman treated for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy first detected during a routine check-up at age 35years but whose symptoms gradually progressed over the next 14years. Right ventricular biopsy showed extensive fibrosis of the endocardial tissue, and right heart catheterization revealed right heart failure and a low cardiac output state. Ultimately, she became reliant on inotropic and mechanical cardiovascular support, but we were not able to bridge her to transplant. Autopsy findings were typical of endocardial fibroelastosis, but she had not suffered from any tropical disease or traveled to high-risk areas. The presence of abnormal capillary proliferation suggested a diagnosis of Loeffler endocarditis. Nonetheless, apart from a 6-month period of eosinophilia 7years before her death, a history of well-controlled asthma and several drug sensitivities, we were unable to definitively identify the disease trigger. It is critical to diagnose and treat the underlying eosinophilia of Loeffler endocarditis to avoid a poor prognosis. This case highlights the importance of considering the diagnosis of eosinophilic endomyocarditis in patients with an unusual pattern of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (or myocardial fibrosis of unknown etiology), even when there is no apparent history of eosinophilia. PMID:25804825

  15. Hearing Profile in Patients with Dilated and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Zarea, Gehan Abd El-Rahman; Hassan, Yasser Elsayed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy may cause disruptions in the micro-vascular system of the stria vascularis in the cochlea, and, subsequently, may result in cochlear degeneration. Degeneration in the stria vascularis affects the physical and chemical processes in the organ of Corti, thereby causing a possible hearing impairment. The objective of this study was to assess the hearing profiles of patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies to determine the relationship between the degree of hearing loss and the degree and duration of the disease and to compare the dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies as regards hearing profile. Methods In this case control study, we studied 21 patients (cases/study group/group 1) and 15 healthy individuals (controls/group 2). Six patients (group 1a) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and 15 patients (group 1b) had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The data were analyzed using the t-test, chi-squared test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the Multiple Mann-Whitney test. Results The results of this study showed that 80% of those patients with DCM (group 1b) had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and 100% of the patients with HCM (group 1a) had mild to severe bilateral sloping SNHL. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) were present in 14% of the study group and in 100 % of the control group. The results of the measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed that 50% of the study group had abnormal latencies compared to the control group, and there was no correlation between the duration of the disease and the degree of hearing loss or DPOAE. Fifty percent of the patients with HCM and 35% of the patients with DCM had positive family histories of similar conditions, and 35% of those with HCM had a positive family history of sudden death. Conclusion The results of this study suggested that the link between heart disease and hearing loss and early identification of hearing loss in patients with

  16. Sports and Exercise in Athletes with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Craig; Day, Sharlene M; Saberi, Sara

    2015-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease and one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Current guidelines restrict the participation of patients with HCM in competitive sports, limiting the health benefits of exercise. However, many individuals with HCM have safely participated in sports, with a low incidence of SCD. Improved stratification of patients and desired activity may allow most individuals with HCM to engage in physical activity safely. Therefore, physicians should create an individualized approach in guiding each patient with HCM eager to enjoy the benefits of physical activity in a safe manner. PMID:26100424

  17. Subaortic and midventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with extreme segmental hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Parcharidou, Despina G; Ziakas, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Christodoulos E; Karoulas, Takis; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Parcharidis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    Background Subaortic and midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with extreme segmental hypertrophy exceeding the usual maximum wall thickness reported in the literature is a rare phenomenon. Case Presentation A 19-year-old man with recently diagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for sudden death risk assessment. The patient had mild exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class II), but without syncope or chest pain. There was no family history of HCM or sudden death. A two dimensional echocardiogram revealed an asymmetric type of LV hypertrophy; anterior ventricular septum = 49 mm; posterior ventricular septum = 20 mm; anterolateral free wall = 12 mm; and posterior free wall = 6 mm. The patient had 2 types of obstruction; a LV outflow obstruction due to systolic anterior motion of both mitral leaflets (Doppler-estimated 38 mm Hg gradient at rest); and a midventricular obstruction (Doppler-estimated 43 mm Hg gradient), but without apical aneurysm or dyskinesia. The patient had a normal blood pressure response on exercise test and no episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 24-h ECG recording. Cardiac MRI showed a gross late enhancement at the hypertrophied septum. Based on the extreme degree of LV hypertrophy and the myocardial hyperenhancement, an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator was recommended prophylactically for primary prevention of sudden death. Conclusion Midventricular HCM is an infrequent phenotype, but may be associated with an apical aneurysm and progression to systolic dysfunction (end-stage HCM). PMID:17349063

  18. Family communication in a population at risk for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Batte, Brittany; Sheldon, Jane P; Arscott, Patricia; Huismann, Darcy J; Salberg, Lisa; Day, Sharlene M; Yashar, Beverly M

    2015-04-01

    Encouraging family communication is an integral component of genetic counseling; therefore, we sought to identify factors impacting communication to family members at risk for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Participants (N = 383) completed an online survey assessing: 1) demographics (gender, genetic test results, HCM family history, and disease severity); 2) illness representations; 3) family functioning and cohesiveness; 4) coping styles; 5) comprehension of HCM autosomal dominant inheritance; and 6) communication of HCM risk information to at-risk relatives. Participants were a national sample of individuals with HCM, recruited through the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Data from 183 participants were analyzed using a logistic regression analysis, with family communication as a dichotomous dependent variable. We found that female gender and higher comprehension of autosomal dominant inheritance were significant predictors of participants' communication of HCM risk information to all their siblings and children. Our results suggest that utilizing interventions that promote patient comprehension (e.g., a teaching-focused model of genetic counseling) are important and may positively impact family communication within families with HCM. PMID:25304619

  19. Imaging Phenotype vs. Genotype in Non-Hypertrophic Heritable Cardiomyopathies: Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Subha V.; Basso, Cristina; Tandri, Harikrishna; Taylor, Matthew R. G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular imaging increasingly afford unique insights into heritable myocardial disease. As clinical presentation of genetic cardiomyopathies may range from nonspecific symptoms to sudden cardiac death, accurate diagnosis has implications for individual patients as well as related family members. The initial consideration of genetic cardiomyopathy may occur in the imaging laboratory, where one must recognize the patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) among the many with ventricular arrhythmia referred to define myocardial substrate. Accurate diagnosis of the patient presenting with dyspnea and palpitations whose first-degree relatives have lamin A/C cardiomyopathy may warrant genetic testing1, 2 plus imaging of diastolic function and myocardial fibrosis3. As advances in cardiac imaging afford detection of subclinical structural and functional changes, the imaging specialist must be attuned to signatures of specific genetic disorders. With increased availability of both advanced imaging as well as genotyping techniques, this review seeks to provide cardiovascular imaging specialists and clinicians with the contemporary information needed for more precise diagnosis and treatment of heritable myocardial disease. A companion paper in this series covers imaging phenotype and genotype considerations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This review details clinical features, imaging phenotype and current genetic understanding for two of the most common non-HCM conditions that prompt myocardial imaging - dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). While all modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to CMR with its unique capabilities for myocardial tissue characterization. PMID:21081743

  20. Abnormalities of the Mitral Apparatus in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Echocardiographic, Pathophysiologic, and Surgical Insights.

    PubMed

    Silbiger, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disorder characterized by increased cardiac muscle mass. This disorder has broad phenotypic expression, including, among others, asymmetric septal hypertrophy, midcavity hypertrophy, and apical hypertrophy. In recent years, it has been recognized that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not characterized solely by ventricular hypertrophy but that a number of abnormalities of the mitral apparatus (papillary muscles, leaflets, chords, and annulus) may also occur. These figure prominently in the echocardiographic evaluation and surgical planning of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and serve as the focus of this review. PMID:27146120

  1. Distinguishing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Mutations from Background Genetic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Bos, J. Martijn; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant progress that has been made in identifying disease-associated mutations, the utility of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) genetic test is limited by a lack of understanding of the background genetic variation inherent to these sarcomeric genes in seemingly healthy subjects. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in 427 ostensibly healthy individuals for the HCM genetic test using the “Gold Standard” Sanger sequencing method validating the background rate identified in the publically available exomes. While mutations are clearly over-represented in disease, a background rate as high as ~5% among healthy individuals prevents diagnostic certainty. To this end, we have identified a number of estimated predictive value-based associations including gene-specific, topology, and conservation methods generating an algorithm aiding in the probabilistic interpretation of an HCM genetic test. PMID:24510615

  2. Clinical utility of natriuretic peptides and troponins in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Devin W; Buttan, Anshu; Siegel, Robert J; Rader, Florian

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is based on clinical, echocardiographic and in some cases genetic findings. However, prognostication remains limited except in the subset of patients with high-risk indicators for sudden cardiac death. Additional methods are needed for risk stratification and to guide clinical management in HCM. We reviewed the available data regarding natriuretic peptides and troponins in HCM. Plasma levels of natriuretic peptides, and to a lesser extent serum levels of troponins, correlate with established disease markers, including left ventricular thickness, symptom status, and left ventricular hemodynamics by Doppler measurements. As a reflection of left ventricular filling pressure, natriuretic peptides may provide an objective measure of the efficacy of a specific therapy. Both natriuretic peptides and troponins predict clinical risk in HCM independently of established risk factors, and their prognostic power is additive. Routine measurement of biomarker levels therefore may be useful in the clinical evaluation and management of patients with HCM. PMID:27236124

  3. Recent advances in diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Siswanto, B B; Aryani, R

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterised by a thickened but non-dilated left ventricle in the absence of another cardiac or systemic condition capable of producing the magnitude of hypertrophy evident. It is the most common familial genetic disease of the heart (1/500 to 1/1000), as well as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people and athletes. Survival rates of patients with HCM have improved from the 1960s onwards. Natural history in patients with HCM might vary from developing severe heart failure or atrial fibrillation, some die suddenly, often at a young age and in the absence of previous symptoms. Because of its heterogeneous clinical course and expression, HCM frequently presents uncertainty and represents a management dilemma to cardiovascular specialists and other practitioners.

  4. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; Santos, Adaílton Araújo dos; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis. PMID:26312722

  5. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; dos Santos, Adaílton Araújo; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis. PMID:26312722

  6. DDD pacing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a multicentre clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Slade, A. K.; Sadoul, N.; Shapiro, L.; Chojnowska, L.; Simon, J. P.; Saumarez, R. C.; Dodinot, B.; Camm, A. J.; McKenna, W. J.; Aliot, E.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--DDD pacing has been advocated as an effective treatment for drug refractory obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This study reports the outcome of pacing in 56 patients with refractory symptoms referred to four tertiary centres. METHODS--Core data on symptoms, drug burden, and left ventricular outflow tract gradient were recorded. Patients underwent a temporary pacing study with optimisation of the atrioventricular (AV) delay for greatest gradient reduction without haemodynamic compromise. Patients were assessed after implantation in terms of changes in symptoms, drug load, and outflow tract gradient. RESULTS--56 patients underwent pacing assessment. The mean (SD) left ventricular outflow tract gradient before pacing was 78 (31) mm Hg. At temporary study the mean (SD) left ventricular outflow tract gradient was 38 (24) mm Hg with a median (range) optimised sensed AV delay of 65 (25-125) ms. Fifty three patients were implanted and followed up for a mean (SD) of 11 (11) months. The median (range) programmed sensed AV delay was 60 (31-200) ms. Left ventricular outflow tract gradient at follow up was 36 (25) mm Hg. Forty four patients had improved functional class. Although a correlation (r = 0.69) was shown between acute and chronic left ventricular outflow tract gradient reduction, there was no correlation between magnitude of gradient reduction and functional improvement, and no appreciable change in pharmacological burden. CONCLUSION--This series confirms symptomatic improvement after DDD pacing in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There remains, however, a discrepancy between perceived symptomatic benefit and modest objective improvement. Furthermore, the optimal outcome has been achieved only with continued pharmacological treatment. Current methods of temporary evaluation do not predict functional outcome which seems to be independent of the magnitude of gradient reduction. PMID:8624871

  7. Abnormal skeletal muscle bioenergetics in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C. H.; Kemp, G. J.; Taylor, D. J.; Conway, M.; Rajagopalan, B.; O'Donoghue, A.; Styles, P.; McKenna, W. J.; Radda, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the skeletal muscle metabolic manifestations of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. DESIGN: A case-control study. SETTING: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the calf muscle was performed on volunteers from a centre specialising in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PATIENTS: Five patients with abnormal beta myosin heavy chain protein in cardiac and skeletal muscle and five patients with a troponin T abnormality in cardiac muscle were compared with healthy controls. RESULTS: High energy phosphate metabolism in vivo was examined in a non-invasive manner. In resting muscle, the beta myosin heavy chain group had a higher ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP concentration (4.51 (SD 0.17)) than either the troponin T group (3.88 (0.42)) or controls (n = 16; 4.04 (0.40)). Exercise duration was reduced compared to controls, and during the fourth minute of exercise phosphocreatine depletion and muscle acidification were greater in both patient groups. After exercise, the recovery of phosphocreatine-an index of oxidative metabolic capacity of the muscle-was slower in the beta myosin heavy chain group (mean half time 0.65 (0.08) minutes) than in the troponin T group (0.60 (0.17) minutes) or controls (0.48 (0.14) minutes). CONCLUSIONS: Exercise metabolism was abnormal in both groups of subjects, and the affected contractile protein determined the metabolic changes in muscle at rest and during recovery. In patients with abnormal beta myosin heavy chain protein, there was a decrease in oxidative capacity consistent with the reduction in mitochondria reported in muscle biopsy studies of similar patients. PMID:9326994

  8. Surgical Treatment of a 4-Year-Old Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Wu, Qingyu; Xu, Zhonghua; Kong, Xiangchen

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pediatric hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is low. The lesions usually involve the left ventricle or ventricular septum, leading to either left or right ventricular outflow tract stenosis. However, combined left and right ventricular outflow tract stenosis is rare, and the surgical treatment is limited, especially in children. Surgery to release the obstruction was performed successfully in a 4-year-old child with right and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction together with a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The result was excellent. PMID:26913685

  9. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic disease associated with an improper hypertrophic response. Results The coding regions of KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNE4, and KCNE5 were examined, by direct DNA sequencing, in a cohort of 93 unrelated HCM probands and 188 blood donor controls. Fifteen genetic variants, four previously unknown, were identified in the HCM probands. Eight variants were non-synonymous and one was located in the 3'UTR-region of KCNE4. No disease-causing mutations were found and no significant difference in the frequency of genetic variants was found between HCM probands and controls. Two variants of likely functional significance were found in controls only. Conclusions Mutations in KCNE genes are not a common cause of HCM and polymorphisms in these genes do not seem to be associated with a propensity to develop arrhythmia PMID:21967835

  10. Thallium-201 imaging in a patient with mid-ventricular hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Wakasugi, S.; Shibata, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Fudemoto, Y.; Hasegawa, Y.; Nakano, S.

    1988-10-01

    Findings specific to mid-ventricular hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy were obtained in a patient by means of /sup 201/Tl planar myocardial scintigraphy. Namely, a myocardial band-like image dividing the left ventricle into two chambers was clearly shown. This was identified as hypertrophic muscle with sphincter-like muscular stenosis at the mid portion of the left ventricle.

  11. Obstruction is unimportant in the pathophysiology of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Criley, J. M.; Siegel, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    There has been a longstanding controversy about the significance of intracavitary pressure gradients in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). It has been generally assumed that the gradient is the result of an 'obstruction' that impedes left ventricular outflow and which can be relieved by operative intervention. In the first decade after the discovery of HCM (1957-66), the site of 'obstruction' was thought to be a muscular sphincter or contraction ring in the submitral region of the left ventricle, and operations designed to emulate pyloromyectomy (for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis) were developed. Following a challenge to the existence of the 'contraction ring' and an alternative non-obstructive explanation of the pressure gradient, the site of 'obstruction' was translocated to a point of apposition between the anterior mitral leaflet and the interventricular septum, a result of systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve. Despite the translocation of the site and mechanism of 'obstruction', the operation for 'relief of obstruction' has not changed significantly. The newer site of 'obstruction' has been challenged on the grounds that the ventricle is not demonstrably impeded in its emptying; when a gradient is provoked, the ventricle empties more rapidly and more completely than it does without a gradient. In addition to a non-obstructive explanation of the gradient, other phenomena thought to be indicative of 'obstruction' can be explained by rapid and complete emptying of the ventricle (cavitary obliteration). Since the morbidity and mortality of symptomatic HCM patients without pressure gradients may exceed that of patients with pressure gradients, it is suggested that 'obstruction' may be unimportant in the pathophysiology of HCM and attention should be focused on abnormal diastolic function and life threatening arrhythmias. Images Figure 4 Figure 8b PMID:3534838

  12. Radiofrequency catheter septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in children

    PubMed Central

    Emmel, M.; Sreeram, N.

    2005-01-01

    Background The definitive therapeutic options for symptomatic obstructive cardiomyopathy in childhood are restricted. At present, extensive surgical myectomy is the only procedure that is of proven benefit. Patients and Methods Three patients, aged 5, 11 and 17 years, respectively, with progressive hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and increasing symptoms were considered for radiofrequency catheter septal ablation. The peak Doppler gradient recorded on several occasions ranged between 50 to 90mmHg. Via a femoral arterial approach, the His bundle was initially plotted and marked using the LocaLisa navigation system. Subsequently, using a cooled tip catheter a series of lesions were placed in the hypertrophied septum, taking care to stay away from the His bundle. A total of 17, 50 and 45 lesions were applied in the three patients. In one case, the procedure was complicated by two episodes of ventricular fibrillation requiring DC cardioversion but without any neurological sequelae. Results The preablation peak-to-peak gradient between left ventricle and aorta was 50 mmHg, 60 mmHg and 60 mmHg, respectively, and remained unchanged immediately after the procedure. All patients were discharged from hospital 48 hours later. Serial measurement of serum troponin T and CK-MB isoenzyme confirmed significant myocardial necrosis. Follow-up echocardiography both at seven days and at six weeks postablation confirmed a beneficial haemodynamic result, with reduction of left ventricular outflow obstruction and relief of symptoms. Conclusion In young children, in whom alcohol-induced septal ablation is not an option, radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an alternative to surgery, with the benefits of repeatability and a lower risk of procedure-related permanent AV block. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696442

  13. What Do Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Die from?

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Rowin, Ethan J; Casey, Susan A; Garberich, Ross F; Maron, Martin S

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) has become a contemporary and treatable genetic heart disease, now with disease-related mortality reduced to as low as 0.5% per year, based largely on more effective risk stratification and the use of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator for primary prevention of sudden death. This paradigm change in the natural history of HC has caused us to reconsider the overall mortality risk in this disease. We interrogated the databases of 2 HC referral centers, Minneapolis Heart Institute and Tufts Medical Center. Of 1,902 consecutive patients evaluated between 1992 and 2013, 1,653 patients (87%) have survived to the end of follow-up and 249 patients (13%) have died. Most deaths (178 of 249; 72%) were unrelated to HC, commonly because of cancer and predominantly in older patients. Non-HC mortality was significantly more common in adults presenting ≥ 60 years and least common in the youngest patients aged <30 years (p <0.001). Notably, deaths from non-HC causes substantially exceeded HC-related causes by 2.6-fold (p <0.001). In conclusion, only about 25% of patients with HC ultimately died of their disease, including predominantly those who were <30 years of age. These data allow patients with HC to develop a more realistic and reassured perception of their disease. PMID:26718233

  14. Private Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Danish Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christian M.; Aidt, Frederik H.; Havndrup, Ole; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Pham, Tam T.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446 variants. After elimination of 312 (69.9%) non-coding and synonymous variants, a further 109 (24.4%) with a global prevalence > 0.1%, three (0.7%) haplogroup associated and 19 (2.0%) variants with a low predicted in silico likelihood of pathogenicity, three variants: MT-TC: m.5772G>A, MT-TF: m.644A>G, and MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM. PMID:25923817

  15. Comprehensive Versus Targeted Genetic Testing in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bales, Nathan D; Johnson, Nicole M; Judge, Daniel P; Murphy, Anne M

    2016-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disease of the sarcomere that can be found in both children and adults and is associated with many causative mutations. In children who are not the index case of HCM in their families, current recommendations call only for targeted genetic testing for familial mutations. However, clinical experience suggests that de novo mutations are possible, as are mutations inherited from apparently an unaffected parent. A chart review was conducted of all patients who received HCM genetic testing at Johns Hopkins from 2004 to 2013. In total, 239 patient charts were analyzed for personal and familial genetic findings. Eighty-one patients with sarcomere gene mutations were identified, of which 66 had a clinical diagnosis of HCM. Importantly, eight patients had >1 pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutation, including six patients who were diagnosed with HCM as children (18 or younger). In this analysis, when a sarcomere mutation is identified in a family, the likelihood of a child with HCM having >1 mutation is 25 % (6/24), compared to 4.8 % (2/42) for adults. The large number of children with multiple mutations suggests that broad panel rather than targeted genetic testing should be considered in HCM presenting during childhood even if the child is not the index case. PMID:26936621

  16. Diastolic filling in a physical model of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schovanec, Joseph; Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited heart disease that affects as much as one in 500 individuals, and is the most common cause of sudden death in young athletes. The myocardium becomes abnormally thick in HCM and deforms the internal geometry of the left ventricle (LV). Previous studies have shown that a vortex is formed during diastolic filling, and further that the dilated LV morphology seen in systolic heart failure results in altering the filling vortex from elliptical to spherical shape. We have also previously shown that increasing LV wall stiffness decreases the filling vortex circulation. However, alterations to intraventricular filling fluid dynamics due to an obstructive LV morphology and locally elevated wall stiffness (in the hypertrophied region) have not been previously examined from a mechanistic standpoint. We conducted an experimental study using an idealized HCM physical model and compared the intraventricular flow fields obtained from 2D PIV to a baseline LV physical model with lower wall stiffness and anatomical geometry. The obstruction in the HCM model leads to earlier breakdown of the filling vortex as compared to the anatomical LV. Intraventricular filling in both models under increased heart rates will be discussed.

  17. Distinguishing ventricular septal bulge versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Canepa, Marco; Pozios, Iraklis; Vianello, Pier Filippo; Ameri, Pietro; Brunelli, Claudio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Abraham, Theodore P

    2016-07-15

    The burgeoning evidence of patients diagnosed with sigmoidal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) later in life has revived the quest for distinctive features that may help discriminate it from more benign forms of isolated septal hypertrophy often labelled ventricular septal bulge (VSB). HCM is diagnosed less frequently than VSB at older ages, with a reversed female predominance. Most patients diagnosed with HCM at older ages suffer from hypertension, similar to those with VSB. A positive family history of HCM and/or sudden cardiac death and the presence of exertional symptoms usually support HCM, though they are less likely in older patients with HCM, and poorly investigated in individuals with VSB. A more severe hypertrophy and the presence of left ventricular outflow obstruction are considered diagnostic of HCM, though stress echocardiography has not been consistently used in VSB. Mitral annulus calcification is very prevalent in both conditions, whereas a restrictive filling pattern is found in a minority of older patients with HCM. Genetic testing has low applicability in this differential diagnosis at the current time, given that a causative mutation is found in less than 10% of elderly patients with suspected HCM. Emerging imaging modalities that allow non-invasive detection of myocardial fibrosis and disarray may help, but have not been fully investigated. Nonetheless, there remains a considerable morphological overlap between the two conditions. Comprehensive studies, particularly imaging based, are warranted to offer a more evidence-based approach to elderly patients with focal septal thickening. PMID:27122487

  18. Echocardiographic diagnosis of the different phenotypes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Parato, Vito Maurizio; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Sozzi, Fabiola; Marazia, Stefania; Zito, Annapaola; Maiello, Maria; Palmiero, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited cardiovascular disorder of great genetic heterogeneity and has a prevalence of 0.1 - 0.2 % in the general population. Several hundred mutations in more than 27 genes, most of which encode sarcomeric structures, are associated with the HCM phenotype. Then, HCM is an extremely heterogeneous disease and several phenotypes have been described over the years. Originally only two phenotypes were considered, a more common, obstructive type (HOCM, 70 %) and a less common, non-obstructive type (HNCM, 30 %) (Maron BJ, et al. Am J Cardiol 48:418 -28, 1981). Wigle et al. (Circ 92:1680-92, 1995) considered three types of functional phenotypes: subaortic obstruction, midventricular obstruction and cavity obliteration. A leader american working group suggested that HCM should be defined genetically and not morphologically (Maron BJ, et al. Circ 113:1807-16, 2006). The European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases recommended otherwise a morphological classification (Elliott P, et al. Eur Heart J 29:270-6, 2008). Echocardiography is still the principal tool for the diagnosis, prognosis and clinical management of HCM. It is well known that the echocardiographic picture may have a clinical and prognostic impact. For this reason, in this article, we summarize the state of the art regarding the echocardiographic pattern of the HCM phenotypes and its impact on clinical course and prognosis. PMID:27519172

  19. An Atypical Case of Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Absence of Giant T Waves in spite of Extreme Apical Wall Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sanidas, Elias; Bonou, Maria; Anastasiadis, Georgios; Tzanis, Georgios; Barbetseas, John

    2015-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an uncommon variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with hypertrophy mainly affecting the apex of the left ventricle. We hereby describe a case of an octogenarian female patient who was randomly diagnosed with AHCM due to other comorbidities. PMID:26779351

  20. An Atypical Case of Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Absence of Giant T Waves in spite of Extreme Apical Wall Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sanidas, Elias; Bonou, Maria; Anastasiadis, Georgios; Tzanis, Georgios; Barbetseas, John

    2015-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an uncommon variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with hypertrophy mainly affecting the apex of the left ventricle. We hereby describe a case of an octogenarian female patient who was randomly diagnosed with AHCM due to other comorbidities. PMID:26779351

  1. Sudden death following AV node ablation in a man with Fabry disease mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rodda, Odette A; Lynch, Matthew; Parsons, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of Fabry disease with an uncommon pattern of asymmetrical hypertrophy with septal prominence resulting in an erroneous diagnosis of hypertrophic cardilmyopathy clinically. The deceased presented for a medicolegal autopsy following his sudden death after an AV node ablation. Fabry disease continues to be an important misdiagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a clinical setting. Early diagnosis of Fabry disease is essential so that early treatment can be instituted. PMID:27213840

  2. Malalignment of the sarcomeric filaments in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with cardiac myosin heavy chain gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Muraishi, A; Kai, H; Adachi, K; Nishi, H; Imaizumi, T

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate changes in the alignment of the sarcomeric filaments in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and the effects of cardiac β myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) mutation on the sarcomeric ultrastructure.
DESIGN—A retrospective analysis.
PATIENTS—Endomyocardial biopsy samples were examined by transmission electron microscopy in seven patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and β-MHC mutation, six with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but without the mutation, and five controls (with chest pain syndromes).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE—Alignment of the sarcomeric filaments and the distance between neighbouring thick myosin filaments.
RESULTS—In controls, cross sections of the sarcomere at the A band showed a highly organised orthohexagonal array with 6 thin actin filaments surrounding one thick myosin filament, whereas in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the alignment of the sarcomeric filaments was sparse and disrupted. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with a mutation, the distance between neighbouring thick myosin filaments was greater than in controls (mean (SD) 45.3 (4.7) v 38.5 (3.5) nm, p < 0.05), and the variance of the distance was greater than in controls (8.0 (0.7) v 4.8 (1.0) nm, p < 0.001) or in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy without a mutation (6.7 (0.6) nm, p < 0.05). In the latter, the variance of the distance was also greater than in the controls (p < 0.01). A significant correlation was found between the grade of the myocyte hypertrophy and the variance of the distance (r = 0.654; p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—The alignment of the sarcomeric filaments is disrupted in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, particularly when there is β-MHC mutation.


Keywords: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; β myosin heavy chain; myosin filament; sarcomere PMID:10525522

  3. Abnormal Mitral Valve Dimensions in Pediatric Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Daryl; Benson, Lee; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Dragulescu, Andreea; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark; Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) show structural abnormalities other than isolated wall thickening. Recently, adult HCM patients have been found to have longer mitral valve leaflets than control subjects. The aim of the current study was to assess whether children and adolescents with HCM have similar measureable differences in mitral valve leaflet dimensions when compared to a healthy control group. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 46 children with myocardial hypertrophy and a phenotype and/or genotype consistent with sarcomeric HCM were reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were evaluated. The anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet lengths and myocardial structure were compared to 20 healthy controls. The anterior mitral valve was longer in the HCM group than in the control group (28.4 ± 4.9 vs. 25.2 ± 3.6 mm in control patients, p = 0.013) as was the posterior mitral valve leaflet (16.3 ± 3.0 vs. 13.1 ± 2.3 mm for controls <0.0001). There was no correlation between the resting left ventricular outflow tract gradient and anterior mitral valve leaflet length, nor was the anterior mitral valve leaflet longer in those with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve compared to those without (28.9 ± 6.1 vs. 28.1 ± 4.5 mm, p = 0.61). Children and adolescents with HCM have abnormally long mitral valve leaflets when compared with healthy control subjects. These abnormalities do not appear to result in, or be due to, obstruction to left ventricular outflow. The mechanism of this mitral valve elongation is not clear but appears to be independent of hemodynamic disturbances. PMID:26961572

  4. Occurrence of Clinically Diagnosed Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Maron, Martin S; Hellawell, Jennifer L; Lucove, Jaime C; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2016-05-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is the most common genetic heart disease and an important cause of sudden death and heart failure symptoms. The current prevalence for HC (1:500) is based on echocardiographic population studies in which a substantial proportion of affected subjects have not come to clinical recognition. Therefore, we sought to define the subset of patients with HC who are diagnosed in the US. A proprietary integrated claims database including medical condition International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnostic codes for over 160 million individual patients in the US was interrogated for 2013 to identify the prevalence of clinically recognized HC. Patients with ≥1 claim for any of the HC International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes from January to December 2013 were identified. The combined occurrence rate of HC was stratified by age and gender and multiplied by the 2013 United States population in the same age/gender categories to produce the final projected prevalence. The analysis was performed on 169,089,614 patients, of whom 59,009 unique patients were identified with ≥1 claim for HC. The projected estimated occurrence of diagnosed HC in the US in 2013 was 1:3,195 for a total of 98,958 subjects. Average age at HC diagnosis was in the fifth decade of life, with 43% of the cohort composed of women. In conclusion, leveraging a claims-based data analytic technique, about 100,000 patients are diagnosed clinically with HC in the US, an occurrence which is less than the prevalence reported in systematic population studies based on echocardiographic diagnosis. This observation supports the view that many patients with HC are undiagnosed throughout life and enhances our understanding of the burden of this genetic heart disease on the health care system. PMID:27006153

  5. Clinical significance of giant negative T waves in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, F.; Nihoyannopoulos, P.; Stewart, J.; Dickie, S.; Lemery, R.; McKenna, W.J. )

    1990-04-01

    To assess the clinical significance of giant negative T waves in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from Western nations, clinical, echocardiographic, radionuclide and 48 h electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring findings were compared in 27 patients with and 56 patients without giant negative T waves. Patients with giant negative T waves were older at diagnosis (43 +/- 15 versus 32 +/- 14 years, p less than 0.005), had greater ECG voltage (SV1 + RV5 = 57 +/- 20 versus 37 +/- 18 mm, p less than 0.001) and had a more vertical frontal plane axis (38.4 +/- 34 versus 13.4 +/- 45 degrees, p less than 0.05). Left ventricular wall thickness on two-dimensional echocardiography was similar at the mitral valve level (mean 16.5 +/- 4 versus 16.6 +/- 3 cm), but was greater at the papillary muscle level (mean 20.7 +/- 5 versus 17.6 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.01) and apex (mean 23.3 +/- 5 versus 17.3 +/- 3 mm, p less than 0.001) in patients with giant negative T waves. Fewer patients with giant negative T waves had asymmetric septal hypertrophy (12 (44%) of 27 versus 36 (64%) of 56, p = 0.08) or systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (4 (14%) of 27 versus 25 (45%) of 56, p less than 0.01), whereas left ventricular end-diastolic (44.1 +/- 6 versus 39.6 +/- 5 mm, p = 0.01) and end-systolic dimensions (27.8 +/- 4 versus 24 +/- 6 mm, p less than 0.05) were greater in this group. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was seen on ECG monitoring in 21% of patients in both groups.

  6. [Regional right ventricular hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Seo, T; Yokota, Y; Kumaki, T; Takarada, A; Kubo, M; Kaku, K; Toh, S; Fukuzaki, H

    1985-06-01

    The mode of right ventricular hypertrophy was assessed by two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) for 24 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and the results were compared with those of 51 patients with hypertension (HT). The patients with HT were categorized in four groups depending on the thickness of the interventricular septum (IVST) and left ventricular posterior wall (PWT): HT-ASH with both left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) (IVST greater than or equal to 13 mm) and asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) (IVST/PWT greater than or equal to 1.3), severe HT with LVH and without ASH, and mild HT without LVH and ASH. Anterior wall thickness (AWT), posterior wall thickness (PWT), and diaphragmatic wall thickness (DWT) of the right ventricle were obtained from 2DE in the parasternal long-axis view, the short-axis view and subxiphoid view, respectively. These were recorded on video tape, and the measurements were made on the stop frames. Right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) was estimated by the maximal right ventricular wall thickness (max RVWT), and the ratio of the maximal and minimal thickness (max RVWT/min RVWT) was calculated to evaluate asymmetrical hypertrophy (AH) of the right ventricle (RV). The incidence of RVH (Max RVWT greater than or equal to 5 mm) and asymmetrical hypertrophy (AH) (max RVWT/min RVWT greater than or equal to 1.3) of the RV in HCM, HT-ASH and mild HT were 67% and 41%, 57% and 45%, and 15% and 11%, respectively. The incidence of RVH with AH was more frequent in patients with HCM as well as HT with ASH than in patients with HT without ASH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4093619

  7. Utilizing ECG-Based Heartbeat Classification for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Identification.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Quazi Abidur; Tereshchenko, Larisa G; Kongkatong, Matthew; Abraham, Theodore; Abraham, M Roselle; Shatkay, Hagit

    2015-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease where the heart muscle is partially thickened and blood flow is (potentially fatally) obstructed. A test based on electrocardiograms (ECG) that record the heart electrical activity can help in early detection of HCM patients. This paper presents a cardiovascular-patient classifier we developed to identify HCM patients using standard 10-second, 12-lead ECG signals. Patients are classified as having HCM if the majority of their recorded heartbeats are recognized as characteristic of HCM. Thus, the classifier's underlying task is to recognize individual heartbeats segmented from 12-lead ECG signals as HCM beats, where heartbeats from non-HCM cardiovascular patients are used as controls. We extracted 504 morphological and temporal features—both commonly used and newly-developed ones—from ECG signals for heartbeat classification. To assess classification performance, we trained and tested a random forest classifier and a support vector machine classifier using 5-fold cross validation. We also compared the performance of these two classifiers to that obtained by a logistic regression classifier, and the first two methods performed better than logistic regression. The patient-classification precision of random forests and of support vector machine classifiers is close to 0.85. Recall (sensitivity) and specificity are approximately 0.90. We also conducted feature selection experiments by gradually removing the least informative features; the results show that a relatively small subset of 264 highly informative features can achieve performance measures comparable to those achieved by using the complete set of features. PMID:25915962

  8. Altered patterns of cardiac intercellular junction distribution in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R.; Severs, N. J.; Gourdie, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution pattern of intercellular junctions (the mechanically coupling desmosomes and the electrically coupling gap junctions) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) hearts showing myofibre disarray. DESIGN: Samples from six necropsied hearts were studied, representing the interventricular septum and the free walls of the left and right ventricles. Immunohistochemical labelling of desmoplakin was used as a marker for desmosomes, and of connexin43 as a marker for gap junctions, in single and double stainings. The slides were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Marked disorganisation of intercalated discs was observed in areas featuring myofibre disarray. Besides overall derangement, localised abnormalities in desmosome organisation were evident, which included: (1) the formation of abnormally enlarged megadiscs; (2) the presence of intersecting disc structures; and (3) aberrant side to side desmosomal connections. Gap junctional abnormalities included: (1) random distribution of gap junctions over the surface of myocytes, rather than localisation to intercalated discs; (2) abundant side to side gap junction connections between adjacent myocytes; and (3) formation of abnormally shaped gap junctions. Circles of myocytes continuously interconnected by gap junctions were also observed. Regions of the diseased hearts lacking myofibre disarray, and control hearts of normal patients and patients with other cardiac diseases, did not show these alterations. CONCLUSIONS: The disorganisation of the intercellular junctions associated with myofibre disarray in HCM may play an important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of the disease. The remodelling of gap junction distribution may underlie the formation of an arrhythmogenic substrate, thereby contributing to the generation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias associated with HCM. Images PMID:8944586

  9. Sudden cardiac death associated with occult hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a dog under anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A 6-year-old, 3.0 kg, neutered female, Yorkshire terrier was referred for orthopedic surgery. Cardiac arrest followed unsuccessful treatment of bradycardia and systemic arterial hypotension under general anesthesia. Postmortem examination revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A possible relationship between treatment of bradycardia, systemic arterial hypotension, and sudden cardiac death is described. PMID:16422064

  10. Assessing a murmur, saving a life: current trends in the management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, J R; Krafft, P; Fox, K

    1996-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, formerly called idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS), is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a non-dilated cardiomyopathy primarily affecting the left ventricle, left atria, intraventricular septum, and mitral valve. It is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that impairs diastolic and systolic function. Diagnosis is complex due to the heterogeneity of the disease. Symptoms and morphology are not always related and clinical signs may be absent or limited to a soft systolic murmur. The first symptom of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is frequently sudden cardiac death. Echocardiogram is an accurate diagnostic tool. Asymptomatic patients are generally not treated. Treatment for symptomatic patients begins with beta or calcium channel blockers. Antiarrhythmics may be added to protect against sudden cardiac death. Surgical intervention is done if other treatments fall and involves removal of a portion of the obstructive septum. Operative mortality is 5% with a 60% reduction in symptoms. A promising alternative to surgery is dual-chamber pacemakers. Patient and family teaching is the emphasis of long-term management. PMID:8933537

  11. Videodensitometric time-density curve change after alcohol septal ablation of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nemes, A; Kalapos, A; Sasi, V; Ungi, T; Ungi, I; Forster, T; Sepp, R

    2015-02-01

    A recently developed computerized method for estimation of myocardial perfusion, based on the analysis of the time-density curves, is demonstrated to assess myocardial blush over a selected myocardial region of interest in a patient with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy before and after alcohol septal ablation. PMID:23184598

  12. Dietary copper supplementation reverses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy induced by chronic pressure overload in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustained pressure overload causes cardiac hypertrophy and the transition to heart failure. We show here that dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper (Cu) reverses pre-established hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the presence of pressure overload induced by ascending aor...

  13. Left Atrial Mechanical Function and Global Strain in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Zo, Joo-Hee; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia and is associated with adverse outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Although left atrial (LA) remodeling and dysfunction are known to associate with the development of atrial fibrillation in HCM, the changes of the LA in HCM patients remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the changes in LA size and mechanical function in HCM patients compared to control subjects and to determine the characteristics of HCM associated with LA remodeling and dysfunction. Methods Seventy-nine HCM patients (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) were compared to 79 age- and sex-matched controls (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 76% were men) and 20 young healthy controls (mean age, 33 ± 5 years; 45% were men). The LA diameter, volume, and mechanical function, including global strain (ε), were evaluated by 2D-speckle tracking echocardiography. The phenotype of HCM, maximal left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, LV mass, and presence and extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) were evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results HCM patients showed increased LA volume index, impaired reservoir function, and decreased LA ε compared to the control subjects. When we divided the HCM group according to a maximal LA volume index (LAVImax) of 38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε of 21%, no significant differences in the HCM phenotype and maximal LV wall thickness were observed for patients with LAVImax >38.7 ml/m2 or LA ε ≤21%. Conversely, the LV mass index was significantly higher both in patients with maximal LA volume index >38.7 ml/m2 and with LA ε ≤21% and was independently associated with LAVImax and LA ε. Although the LGE extent was increased in patients with LA ε ≤21%, it was not independently associated with either LAVImax or LA ε. Conclusions HCM patients showed progressed LA remodeling and dysfunction; the determinant of LA remodeling and dysfunction was LV mass index rather than LV myocardial fibrosis

  14. Relationship between Regional Fat Distribution and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmi, Valeria; Maresca, Luciano; Lanzillo, Chiara; Marinoni, Giorgia Michela; D’Adamo, Monica; Di Roma, Mauro; Preziosi, Paolo; Bellia, Alfonso; Calò, Leonardo; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common genetic heart disease, is characterized by heterogeneous phenotypic expression. Body mass index has been associated with LV mass and heart failure symptoms in HCM. The aim of our study was to investigate whether regional (trunk, appendicular, epicardial) fat distribution and extent could be related to hypertrophy severity and pattern in HCM. Methods Cardiovascular magnetic resonance was performed in 32 subjects with echocardiography-based diagnosis of HCM (22M/10F, 57.2±12.6 years) characterized by predominant hypertrophy at the interventricular septum (IVS). Regional fat distribution was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Gender differences were detected in maximum IVS thickness (M: 18.3±3.8 mm vs. F: 14.3±4 mm, p = 0.012), right ventricle (RV) systolic function (M: 61.3±6.7%; F: 67.5±6.3%, p = 0.048), indexed RV end-diastolic (M: 64.8±16.3 ml/m2; F: 50.7±15.5 ml/m2, p = 0.04) and end-systolic volumes (M: 24.3±8.3 ml/m2; F: 16.7±7.4 ml/m2, p = 0.04). After adjusting for age and gender, maximum IVS thickness was associated with truncal fat (Tr-FAT) (β = 0.43, p = 0.02), but not with either appendicular or epicardial fat. Epicardial fat resulted independently associated with NT-proBNP levels (β = 0.63, p = 0.04). Late Gadolinium Enhancement-positive subjects displayed greater maximum IVS thickness (p = 0.02), LV mass index (p = 0.015) and NT-proBNP levels (p = 0.04), but no associations with fat amount or distribution were observed. Conclusion Truncal, but not appendicular or epicardial fat amount, seems to be related with maximum IVS thickness, the hallmark feature in our cohort of HCM patients. Further prospective researches are needed to assess a potential causative effect of central adiposity on HCM phenotype. PMID:27388274

  15. Clinical Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by substantial genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, leading to considerable diversity in clinical course including the most common cause of sudden death in young people and a determinant of heart failure symptoms in patients of any age. Traditionally, two-dimensional echocardiography has been the most reliable method for establishing a clinical diagnosis of HCM. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with its high spatial resolution and tomographic imaging capability, has emerged as a technique particularly well suited to characterize the diverse phenotypic expression of this complex disease. For example, CMR is often superior to echocardiography for HCM diagnosis, by identifying areas of segmental hypertrophy (ie., anterolateral wall or apex) not reliably visualized by echocardiography (or underestimated in terms of extent). High-risk HCM patient subgroups identified with CMR include those with thin-walled scarred LV apical aneurysms (which prior to CMR imaging in HCM remained largely undetected), end-stage systolic dysfunction, and massive LV hypertrophy. CMR observations also suggest that the cardiomyopathic process in HCM is more diffuse than previously regarded, extending beyond the LV myocardium to include thickening of the right ventricular wall as well as substantial morphologic diversity with regard to papillary muscles and mitral valve. These findings have implications for management strategies in patients undergoing invasive septal reduction therapy. Among HCM family members, CMR has identified unique phenotypic markers of affected genetic status in the absence of LV hypertrophy including: myocardial crypts, elongated mitral valve leaflets and late gadolinium enhancement. The unique capability of contrast-enhanced CMR with late gadolinium enhancement to identify myocardial fibrosis has raised the expectation that this may represent a novel marker, which may enhance risk stratification. At

  16. Aortic Stiffness in Youth with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Genotype.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Justin P; Johnson, Philip K; Colan, Steven D

    2016-06-01

    Clinical events in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients are related to the degree of hypertrophy. Aortic stiffness in adult HCM patients has been reported to be higher than control patients. Increased stiffness may cause more LV hypertrophy and thus lead to more clinical events. We sought to (a) noninvasively compare aortic structure and function between youth with sarcomeric HCM genotype versus control youth and (b) explore the relation between aortic function and degree of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. In a prospective study from a single referral center, clinical, anthropometric, and hemodynamic data were acquired on 28 consecutive pathogenic HCM gene mutation carriers and 26 unrelated controls (mean age 16.3, 50 % girls). Hemodynamic data included applanation tonometry measured central pulse pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV), reflected wave augmentation index (AIx). In the HCM gene carriers, LV mass-to-volume ratio was extracted from clinically indicated echocardiograms as an index of hypertrophy. Associations were assessed using multivariable adjusted linear regression. The HCM group was comprised of 14 myosin binding protein C3 carriers, 13 myosin heavy chain 7 carriers, and 1 child with both. HCM and control groups did not differ by age, sex, height, body mass index, heart rate, or blood pressure. HCM carriers had significantly lower CFPWV than controls (4.46 ± 0.88 vs. 4.97 ± 0.44 m/s, p = 0.01) and higher AIx magnitude (27 ± 19 vs. 18 ± 7 %, p = 0.04). These associations persisted after adjustment for age, sex, height, heart rate, mean pressure, and medication use. Within the HCM group, LV hypertrophy was related to AIx but not CFPWV. CFPWV nor AIx differed by genotype. Aortic stiffness appears lower, but wave reflection appears higher in youth carrying HCM gene mutations. The degree of wave reflection appears correlated with LV hypertrophy in this high-risk cohort, suggesting that mitigation of wave

  17. Prediction of Sarcomere Mutations in Subclinical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Captur, Gabriella; Lopes, Luis R.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Patel, Vimal; Li, Chunming; Bassett, Paul; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Esteban, Maite Tome; Muthurangu, Vivek; Sherrid, Mark V.; Day, Sharlene M.; Canter, Charles E.; McKenna, William J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Bluemke, David A.; Elliott, Perry M.; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Moon, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sarcomere protein mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) induce subtle cardiac structural changes prior to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We have proposed that myocardial crypts are part of this phenotype and independently associated with the presence of sarcomere gene mutations. We tested this hypothesis in genetic HCM pre-LVH (G+LVH−). Methods and Results A multi-centre case-control study investigated crypts and 22 other cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) parameters in subclinical HCM to determine their strength of association with sarcomere gene mutation carriage. The G+LVH− sample (n=73) was 29±13 years old and 51% male. Crypts were related to the presence of sarcomere mutations (for ≥1 crypt, β=2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-4.4, p=0.014; for ≥2 crypts, β=3.0, 95%CI 0.8-7.9, p=0.004). In combination with 3 other parameters: anterior mitral valve leaflet (AMVL) elongation (β=2.1, 95%CI 1.7-3.1, p<0.001), abnormal LV apical trabeculae (β=1.6, 95%CI 0.8-2.5, p<0.001), and smaller LV end-systolic volumes (β=1.4, 95%CI 0.5-2.3, p=0.001), multiple crypts indicated the presence of sarcomere gene mutations with 80% accuracy and an area under the curve of 0.85 (95%CI 0.8-0.9). In this G+LVH− population cardiac myosin-binding protein C mutation carriers had twice the prevalence of crypts when compared to the other combined mutations (47 vs. 23%; odds ratio, 2.9; 95%CI 1.1–7.9; p=0.045). Conclusions The subclinical HCM phenotype measured by CMR in a multi-center environment and consisting of crypts (particularly multiple), AMVL elongation, abnormal trabeculae and smaller LV systolic cavity, is indicative of the presence of sarcomere gene mutations and highlights the need for further study. PMID:25228707

  18. A new 4D trajectory-based approach unveils abnormal LV revolution dynamics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories' shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods. Left

  19. A New 4D Trajectory-Based Approach Unveils Abnormal LV Revolution Dynamics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers) explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories’ shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by these methods

  20. Echocardiography Differences Between Athlete’s Heart Hearth and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kreso, Amir; Barakovic, Fahir; Medjedovic, Senad; Halilbasic, Amila; Klepic, Muhamed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Among long term athletes there is always present hypertrophy of the left ventricle walls as well as increased cardiac mass. These changes are the result of the heart muscle adaptation to load during the years of training, which should not be considered as pathology. In people suffering from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), there is also present hypertrophy of the left ventricle walls and increased mass of the heart, but these changes are the result of pathological changes in the heart caused by a genetic predisposition for the development HCM of. Differences between myocardial hypertrophy in athletes and HCM are not clearly differentiated and there are always dilemmas between pathological and physiological hypertrophy. The goal of the study is to determine and compare the echocardiographic cardiac parameters of longtime athletes to patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Material and methods: The study included 60 subjects divided into two groups: active athletes and people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Results: Mean values of IVSd recorded in GB is IVSd=17.5 mm (n=20, 95% CI, 16.00–19.00 mm), while a significantly smaller mean value is recorded in GA, IVSd=10.0 mm (n=40, 95% CI, 9.00-11.00 mm). The mean value of the left ventricle in diastole (LVDd) recorded in the GA is LVDd=51 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 48.00 to 52.00 mm), while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVDd value is 42 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 40.00 to 48.00 mm). The mean value of the rear wall of the left ventricle (LVPWd) recorded in the GA is LVDd=10 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 9.00-10.00 mm) while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVDd is 14 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 12.00 to 16.00 mm). The mean of the left ventricle during systole (LVSD) observed in GA is LVSD=34 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 32.00 to 36.00 mm), while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVSD is 28 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 24.00 to 28.83 mm). The mean ejection fraction (EF%) observed in GA is EF

  1. Myocardial stunning in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: recovery predicted by single photon emission computed tomographic thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, D.G.; Clements, I.P.; Callahan, M.J.

    1989-05-01

    A young woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization presented with chest pain and features of a large left ventricular aneurysm. The initial diagnosis was myocardial ischemia with either an evolving or an ancient myocardial infarction. Subsequently, verapamil therapy was associated with complete resolution of the extensive left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, normalization of left ventricular ejection fraction and a minimal myocardial infarction. Normal thallium uptake on single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy early in the hospital course predicted myocardial viability in the region of the aneurysm. Thus, orally administered verapamil may reverse spontaneous extensive myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and possibly limit the extent of myocardial infarction in such circumstances.

  2. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM): How Flow Analysis May Drive Medical Management and Surgical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Theodore P.

    2011-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease and occurs in 1 in 500 persons worldwide regardless of race, age and gender. It is the most common cause of sudden death in the young and also causes heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias. The primary anatomic abnormality is thickening of certain walls, or sometimes global thickening of the left or right ventricle. The patterns of thickening along with increased ventricular stiffness lead to suboptimal ventricular filling and inefficient ejection of blood from the ventricle. Treatment for HCM can be medical or surgical. The choice of therapy is driven by the presence and severity of outflow obstruction. Flow analysis could provide sophisticated information about outflow and inflow ventricular dynamics. These flow dynamics features may enable better medical choices and provide information that would allow superior surgical planning. Associate Professor of Medicine & Director, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic

  3. Comparison of ventricular emptying with and without a pressure gradient in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, R J; Criley, J M

    1985-01-01

    Thirty three patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were studied to determine whether the presence of an intraventricular pressure gradient impaired left ventricular emptying. Patients with resting gradients had a higher mean left ventricular ejection fraction (92 (6.4)%) than patients without a resting or inducible pressure gradient (75.5 (9)%). The rate and degree of emptying increased when gradients greater than 85 mm Hg were induced in two patients with insignificant mitral regurgitation. If the induced gradients had been the result of obstruction a decrease in the rate or degree of ventricular emptying would be expected. Higher ejection fractions in patients with intracavitary pressure gradients as well as enhanced rate and degree of left ventricular emptying with induced gradients are inconsistent with outflow obstruction. These findings support the concept that cavity obliteration is responsible for the pressure gradient in these patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:4038604

  4. Difficult anesthesia management in a case of living donor liver transplantation with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takashi; Kusunoki, Shinji; Kuroda, Masahiko; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2013-12-01

    Liver transplantation with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is associated with acute hemodynamic changes, which can exacerbate left ventricular outflow tract obstruction during surgery. Therefore, selection of general anesthetic agents is important, as most can result in hemodynamic instability by reducing systemic vascular resistance and blood pressure. We report successful anesthetic management in a case of living donor liver transplantation with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy using ketamine, propofol, and fentanyl to avoid vasodilation by anesthetic agents. In addition, landiolol, phenylephrine, and low-dose dopamine were administered to prevent left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, and were found to be effective for improving acute hemodynamic changes during surgery. In the case of this patient, the combination of transesophageal echocardiography and a pulmonary artery catheter was beneficial for intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring. PMID:24597212

  5. Pregnancy outcome in a case of non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Habib, A; Haque, T

    2013-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively common genetic disorder (1:500) inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is caused by mutations in any one of 10 genes encoding protein components of cardiac sarcomere. Some theoretically calculated risks exist when patients with HCM become pregnant. The physiologic increase of cardiac output and increased stroke volume may be impaired due to the non-compliant ventricular walls. In the first trimester, the physiologic hypervolemia of pregnancy to some extent counteracts the natural decrease in peripheral vascular resistance which would have otherwise provoked an obstruction gradientin systolic flow. As pregnancy advances, the vena caval compression may decrease venous return causing cardiac compromise, whereas the stress of labour may precipitate arrhythmia. We report our experience of a pregnancy with co-existant non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and nodal bradycardia ultimately resulting in pre-term delivery, neonatal death and maternal death in puerperium from overt cardiac failure after a relatively uneventful gestation. PMID:23982559

  6. The Mitral Valve in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Test in Context.

    PubMed

    Sherrid, Mark V; Balaram, Sandhya; Kim, Bette; Axel, Leon; Swistel, Daniel G

    2016-04-19

    Mitral valve abnormalities were not part of modern pathological and clinical descriptions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the 1950s, which focused on left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and myocyte fiber disarray. Although systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve was discovered as the cause of LV outflow tract obstruction in the M-mode echocardiography era, in the 1990s structural abnormalities of the mitral valve became appreciated as contributing to SAM pathophysiology. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mitral malformations have been identified at all levels. They occur in the leaflets, usually elongating them, and also in the submitral apparatus, with a wide array of malformations of the papillary muscles and chordae, that can be detected by transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography and by cardiac magnetic resonance. Because they participate fundamentally in the predisposition to SAM, they have increasingly been repaired surgically. This review critically assesses imaging and measurement of mitral abnormalities and discusses their surgical relief. PMID:27081025

  7. Microvascular Permeability Changes Might Explain Cardiac Tamponade after Alcohol Septal Ablation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Jung-Jung; Chung, Chang-Min; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li

    2014-01-01

    Various sequelae of alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy have been reported. Of note, some cases of cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation cannot be well explained. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in whom cardiac tamponade developed one hour after alcohol septal ablation, probably unrelated to mechanical trauma. At that time, we noted a substantial difference in the red blood cell-to-white blood cell ratio between the pericardial effusion (1,957.4) and the peripheral blood (728.3). In addition to presenting the patient's case, we speculate that a possible mechanism for acute tamponade—alcohol-induced changes in microvascular permeability—is a reasonable explanation for cases of alcohol septal ablation that are complicated by otherwise-unexplainable massive pericardial effusions. PMID:24808788

  8. [Utility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: when is it superior to echocardiography?].

    PubMed

    Kammoun, I; Marrakchi, S; Zidi, A; Ibn ElHaj, Z; Naccache, S; Ben Amara, W; Jebri, F; Bennour, E; Kachboura, S

    2015-02-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is usually established by echocardiography. Recently, there has been greatly increased use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) because of its precise determination of myocardial anatomy and the depiction of myocardial fibrosis. In this review, we describe the role of echocardiography and magnetic resonance in the assessment of this complex disease. In conclusion, there is a complementarity between cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography for the diagnosis and the management of HCM. PMID:24834991

  9. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianyi; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yanyun; Song, Bin; Teng, Xiaodong; Yu, Jiren

    2016-01-01

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation. PMID:27390548

  10. Myocardial fragmentation associated with disruption of the Z-band in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Koichi; Ishijima, Mitsuaki; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Abe, Kuniko; Kawai, Kioko; Maemura, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old female with Noonan syndrome had been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and she died of heart failure at the age of 25 years. Light microscopic and electron microscopic examination of her biopsied myocardium and autopsy heart showed myocardial fragmentation associated with Z-band disruption as well as myocardial hypertrophy and disarray with interstitial fibrosis. Myocardial fragmentation associated with Z-band disruption may be related to the progression of cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27216919

  11. Role of endocardial septal ablation in the treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Tolga; Güler, Tümer Erdem; Yalın, Kıvanç; Gölcük, Şükriye Ebru; Özcan, Kazım Serhan

    2016-09-01

    Septal reduction therapy is accepted as a first therapeutic option for symptomatic drug-resistant hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Although, surgical septal myectomy is the gold standard method, alcohol septal ablation is a well-studied alternative approach in the patients with suitable anatomy. Endocardial septal ablation (ESA) therapy was relatively new defined modality and outcomes of the procedure were not clearly elucidated yet. We aimed to review the clinical aspects of ESA procedure and provide some historical background. PMID:27609434

  12. Fatal infantile mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy associated with a homozygous OPA1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Ronen; Saada, Ann; Flannery, Padraig J; Burté, Florence; Soiferman, Devorah; Khayat, Morad; Eisner, Verónica; Vladovski, Eugene; Taylor, Robert W; Bindoff, Laurence A; Shaag, Avraham; Mandel, Hanna; Schuler-Furman, Ora; Shalev, Stavit A; Elpeleg, Orly; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Infantile-onset encephalopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defects are genetically heterogeneous with defects involving both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Objective To identify the causative genetic defect in two sisters presenting with lethal infantile encephalopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy. Methods We describe a comprehensive clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic investigation of two affected siblings from a consanguineous family. Molecular genetic analysis was done by a combined approach involving genome-wide autozygosity mapping and next-generation exome sequencing. Biochemical analysis was done by enzymatic analysis and Western blot. Evidence for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability was investigated using long-range and real-time PCR assays. Mitochondrial cristae morphology was assessed with transmission electron microscopy. Results Both affected sisters presented with a similar cluster of neurodevelopmental deficits marked by failure to thrive, generalised neuromuscular weakness and optic atrophy. The disease progression was ultimately fatal with severe encephalopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities were globally decreased in skeletal muscle biopsies. They were found to be homozygous for a novel c.1601T>G (p.Leu534Arg) mutation in the OPA1 gene, which resulted in a marked loss of steady-state levels of the native OPA1 protein. We observed severe mtDNA depletion in DNA extracted from the patients’ muscle biopsies. Mitochondrial morphology was consistent with abnormal mitochondrial membrane fusion. Conclusions We have established, for the first time, a causal link between a pathogenic homozygous OPA1 mutation and human disease. The fatal multisystemic manifestations observed further extend the complex phenotype associated with pathogenic OPA1 mutations, in particular the previously unreported association

  13. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianyi; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yanyun; Song, Bin; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation. PMID:27390548

  14. Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy in An Infant With Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Answer to a Riddle.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Fatma; Beshlawi, Ismail; Wali, Yasser; Al-Rawas, Abdulhakim; Al Senaidi, Khalfan

    2015-08-01

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHLH) is a hereditary hyperinflammatory condition with T-cell and macrophage activation. Treatment consists of immunosuppressive therapy plus bone marrow transplantation. Cardiac manifestations of FHLH were scarcely mentioned in the literature with conflicting pathophysiological explanations. We report a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy associated with FHLH. Guided by such a case, a clear vision regarding the real cause is thought to be obtained in the cloudy landscape of pathophysiology. PMID:25222062

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a litter of five mixed-breed cats.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M S; Calvert, C A; Jacobs, G J

    1999-01-01

    A litter of five, 18-month-old, mixed-breed cats were determined to have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Although no overt clinical signs were present in any cat, systolic heart murmurs were present in each. Electrocardiograms were normal, while subjective interpretations of heart enlargement on radiographs were made on four cats. Echocardiographic analyses indicated abnormalities consistent with HCM. Overt clinical signs are absent two years following diagnosis. PMID:10416772

  16. Anesthetic Management Guided by Transthoracic Echocardiography During Cesarean Delivery Complicated by Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    DesRoches, Jaclyn M; McKeen, Dolores Madeline; Warren, Andrew; Allen, Victoria M; George, Ronald B; Kells, Catherine; Shukla, Romesh

    2016-03-15

    We describe the management of a parturient woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed a symptomatic accelerated idioventricular rhythm who required an urgent cesarean delivery at 32 weeks. Transthoracic echocardiography helped guide anesthetic management, including epidural dosing, fluid management, and phenylephrine infusion rates. This case demonstrates the application of transthoracic echocardiography to guide anesthetic management in a parturient woman at risk for cardiovascular compromise. PMID:26720049

  17. Mitochondrial ND5 12338T>C variant is associated with maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong; Song, Yanrui; Gu, Shulian; He, Xiangyu; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yaoyao; Wu, Bifeng; Wang, Wei; Li, Shishi; Jiang, Pingping; Lu, Jianhua; Huang, Wendong; Yan, Qingfeng

    2012-09-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary disorder characterized by asymmetric thickening of the septum and left ventricular wall, which affects 1 in 500 individuals in the general population. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA have been found to be one of the most important causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we report the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of a Han Chinese family with a likely maternally transmitted hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Four (2 men/2 women) of 5 matrilineal relatives in this 3-generation family exhibited the variable severity and age at onset of 44 to 79 years old. Sequence analysis of the entire mitochondrial DNA in this pedigree identified the known homoplasmic ND5 12338T>C variant. This mitochondrial DNA haplogroup belongs to the Eastern Asian F2a. The 12338T>C variant, highly evolutionarily conserved, resulted in the replacement of the translation initiating methionine with a threonine, shortening the ND5 polypeptide by 2 amino acids. The occurrence of ND5 12338T>C variant exclusively in maternal members of this Chinese family suggested that the 12338T>C variant is associated with maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Our findings will provide theoretical basis for genetic counseling of maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:22759514

  18. The Metabolome in Finnish Carriers of the MYBPC3-Q1061X Mutation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Heliö, Tiina; Jääskeläinen, Pertti; Laine, Mika; Hilvo, Mika; Nieminen, Markku S.; Laakso, Markku; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Orešič, Matej; Kuusisto, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Aims Mutations in the cardiac myosin-binding protein C gene (MYBPC3) are the most common genetic cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) worldwide. The molecular mechanisms leading to HCM are poorly understood. We investigated the metabolic profiles of mutation carriers with the HCM-causing MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation with and without left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and non-affected relatives, and the association of the metabolome to the echocardiographic parameters. Methods and Results 34 hypertrophic subjects carrying the MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation, 19 non-hypertrophic mutation carriers and 20 relatives with neither mutation nor hypertrophy were examined using comprehensive echocardiography. Plasma was analyzed for molecular lipids and polar metabolites using two metabolomics platforms. Concentrations of branched chain amino acids, triglycerides and ether phospholipids were increased in mutation carriers with hypertrophy as compared to controls and non-hypertrophic mutation carriers, and correlated with echocardiographic LVH and signs of diastolic and systolic dysfunction in subjects with the MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation. Conclusions Our study implicates the potential role of branched chain amino acids, triglycerides and ether phospholipids in HCM, as well as suggests an association of these metabolites with remodeling and dysfunction of the left ventricle. PMID:26267065

  19. A coordinate axis transformation study of spatial QRS loop in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Takimiya, A; Nakajima, S; Mugikura, M; Mutoh, K; Ibukiyama, C

    1991-01-01

    To obtain an overall view of the QRS loop on vectorcardiograms (VCG) of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the coordinate axis was transformed using the resolver method. The morphological features and planarity of the loop were compared with hypertrophic patterns and hypertensive heart disease (HHD). The subjects in the present study included 30 normal individuals, 40 patients with HCM and 30 with HHD. The HHD group was selected from patients showing left ventricular hypertrophy on VCG similar to that of HCM patients. The HCM group showed significantly greater values than the HHD group in the thickness/length ratio, which represents the planarity of the spatial QRS loop. The above finding suggests that the HCM group had greater deformation in the QRS loop than the HHD group. This may provide a useful indicator for the differential diagnosis of the two diseases. PMID:1920958

  20. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the work of the cardiologist at a diagnostic center].

    PubMed

    Mandrusova, R V

    1991-01-01

    The author demonstrates a possibility of diagnosing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP) at the diagnostic center where the main facilities required for examining cardiological patients are available. Provides the results of examining 23 patients with HCMP (according to sex, age, symptoms, clinical course, localization of myocardial hypertrophy, the presence of obstructive and nonobstructive forms, cases of familial diseases). Describes patients seen for HCMP during 6-10 years, in whom idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) transformed to symmetric HCMP with hypertrophy of the interventricular septum and free walls of the left and right ventricles associated with changes in the clinical picture of the disease. It is assumed that in some cases, IHSS may be a stage in the development of symmetric HCMP. In the course of the disease, the localization of myocardial hypertrophy, the presence of obstruction and the clinical picture are variable rather than permanent characteristics. PMID:1839469

  1. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  2. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric M; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L; Evanchik, Marc J; Gorham, Joshua M; Harrison, Brooke C; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D; Rodriguez, Hector M; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A; Spudich, James A; McDowell, Robert S; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  3. High Sensitivity of Late Gadolinium Enhancement for Predicting Microscopic Myocardial Scarring in Biopsied Specimens in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Kenshi; Fujino, Noboru; Nagata, Yoji; Hodatsu, Akihiko; Masuta, Eiichi; Sakata, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial scarring can be assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and by endomyocardial biopsy. However, accuracy of late gadolinium enhancement for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens remains unknown in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart reflects microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Twenty-one consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who were examined both by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and by endomyocardial biopsy were retrospectively studied. The right interventricular septum was the target site for endomyocardial biopsy in all patients. Late gadolinium enhancement in the ventricular septum had an excellent sensitivity (100%) with a low specificity (40%) for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. The sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart remained 100% with a specificity of 27% for predicting microscopic myocardial scarring in biopsied specimens. Quantitative assessments of fibrosis revealed that the extent of late gadolinium enhancement in the whole heart was the only independent variable related to the microscopic collagen fraction in biopsied specimens (β  =  0.59, 95% confident interval: 0.15 – 1.0, p  =  0.012). Conclusions Although there was a compromise in the specificity, the sensitivity of late gadolinium enhancement was excellent for prediction of microscopic myocardial scarring in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the severity of late gadolinium enhancement was independently associated with the quantitative collagen fraction in biopsied specimens in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These findings indicate that late gadolinium enhancement can reflect both the presence and the extent of microscopic myocardial scarring in the small biopsied specimens in

  4. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  5. The search of 'novel' mtDNA mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: MITOMAPping as a risk factor.

    PubMed

    Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Yao, Yong-Gang; Salas, Antonio

    2008-06-01

    MITOMAP is by far the most frequently cited Web resource that is referred to in substantiating novelty of an mtDNA mutation. This database, as is now known, has quite an incomplete coverage of the mtDNA mutations from the literature. This circumstance has seduced many scholars of medical genetics in the past to claim novelty of rather 'worn-out' mtDNA mutations. What is, however, really novel in the field is that researchers take advantage of this situation and deliberately suppress information from other sources, as it appears to have occurred in two recently published cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:17482693

  6. Trileaflet Mitral Valve with Three Papillary Muscles Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Novel Case.

    PubMed

    Rosanio, Salvatore; Simonsen, Cameron J; Starwalt, John; Keylani, Abdul M; Vitarelli, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mitral valve (MV) malformations are uncommon, except for MV prolapse. Despite their infrequency, most of them are well-known and defined entities, such as congenital MV stenosis with two papillary muscles, parachute MV, supravalvular mitral ring, hypoplastic MV, isolated cleft in the anterior and/or posterior leaflets, and double-orifice MV. A trileaflet MV with three separate papillary muscles with concordant atrioventricular and ventricle-arterial connections is exceptionally rare. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it has been reported only once in association with subaortic valvular stenosis. We hereby describe a novel case associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25809503

  7. [The 2014 ESC guidelines on the diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : what is new?].

    PubMed

    Maisch, B; Mahrholdt, H

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the diagnosis and management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) comprise 133 recommendations with 506 references. In comparison to the last 10-year-old American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF)/ESC guidelines new data have been added, such as recent studies on genetics, updated recommendations for family and genetic screening, a special emphasis on red flags in clinical symptomatology and diagnostic features for the identification of non-obstructive variants of HCM, on multimodality non-invasive imaging by echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a HCM risk formula for the assessment of sudden cardiac death within 5 years. Nevertheless, it should not be forgotten that the majority of patients with HCM lead a normal life. This detailed update and the structured recommendations are an excellent summary of the current knowledge on HCM for the cardiomyopathy specialist and also for internists and general physicians. PMID:25410471

  8. Sex dimorphisms of crossbridge cycling kinetics in transgenic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mice.

    PubMed

    Birch, Camille L; Behunin, Samantha M; Lopez-Pier, Marissa A; Danilo, Christiane; Lipovka, Yulia; Saripalli, Chandra; Granzier, Henk; Konhilas, John P

    2016-07-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the sarcomere and may lead to hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and/or arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, or sudden cardiac death. We hypothesized that hearts from transgenic HCM mice harboring a mutant myosin heavy chain increase the energetic cost of contraction in a sex-specific manner. To do this, we assessed Ca(2+) sensitivity of tension and crossbridge kinetics in demembranated cardiac trabeculas from male and female wild-type (WT) and HCM hearts at an early time point (2 mo of age). We found a significant effect of sex on Ca(2+) sensitivity such that male, but not female, HCM mice displayed a decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity compared with WT counterparts. The HCM transgene and sex significantly impacted the rate of force redevelopment by a rapid release-restretch protocol and tension cost by the ATPase-tension relationship. In each of these measures, HCM male trabeculas displayed a gain-of-function when compared with WT counterparts. In addition, cardiac remodeling measured by echocardiography, histology, morphometry, and posttranslational modifications demonstrated sex- and HCM-specific effects. In conclusion, female and male HCM mice display sex dimorphic crossbridge kinetics accompanied by sex- and HCM-dependent cardiac remodeling at the morphometric, histological, and cellular level. PMID:27199124

  9. [Functional regulation of genome with peptide bioregulators by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (by patients and relatives)].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Buadze, T Zh; Gaĭozishvili, M N; Rogava, M A; Lazhava, T A

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a comparative study of the functional genome indicators using lymphocyte cultures of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and their first relatives. Studies conducted both in intact cultures and cultures exposed to the influence of peptide - bioregulators Epithalon, Vilon and Livagen. Last (Livagen) tested at separate and joint application with cobalt chloride salt. As indicated according to the results of the analysis, the cells of the individuals with HCM and their first relatives were characterized by higher frequency of spontaneous quantitative - structural disorders in comparison with the cells of healthy individuals. The findings suggest a different effect of bioregulators. The most effective protective action in relation normalization of functional parameters of the genome shows Epithalon for lowering the level of chromosomal instability in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and relatives of patients with HCM. On the basis of identified protective action Epithalon concludes prospects of its application in the development of preventive measures for individuals at increased risk of morbidity HCM. PMID:24423684

  10. Effects of verapamil on left ventricular diastolic filling in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, E.M.; Rocchini, A.P.; Spicer, R.L.; Juni, J.; Snider, R.; Crowley, D.C.; Rosenthal, A.

    1988-02-15

    The effects of oral verapamil on resting left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling were examined in 10 children and adolescents with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Measurements of diastolic filling were made from gated technetium-99m radionuclide angiograms with postbeat rejection of data outside a 5% RR-interval window. LV time-activity curves were generated and the rapid-filling phase fit with a 3 degrees polynomial to calculate the peak filling rate and the time from end-systole to the point of peak filling. All patients had a radionuclide angiogram performed before and after 0.25 to 3 years of oral verapamil therapy. Verapamil did not change the LV ejection fraction but increased the peak filling rate (3.24 +/- 0.15 to 4.62 +/- 1.05 end-diastolic volume/s,p less than 0.01) and reduced the time to peak filling (217 +/- 57 to 168 +/- 63 ms, p less than 0.01). An increase in exercise endurance as measured by exercise treadmill test and subjective symptomatic improvement were also seen after verapamil therapy. Thus, in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, symptomatic improvement and LV diastolic filling parameters improved with long-term oral verapamil.

  11. Dilated cardiomyopathy and impaired cardiac hypertrophic response to angiotensin II in mice lacking FGF-2

    PubMed Central

    Pellieux, Corinne; Foletti, Alessandro; Peduto, Giovanni; Aubert, Jean-François; Nussberger, Jürg; Beermann, Friedrich; Brunner, Hans-R.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    FGF-2 has been implicated in the cardiac response to hypertrophic stimuli. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to maintain elevated blood pressure in hypertensive individuals and exerts direct trophic effects on cardiac cells. However, the role of FGF-2 in Ang II–induced cardiac hypertrophy has not been established. Therefore, mice deficient in FGF-2 expression were studied using a model of Ang II–dependent hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic measurements show the presence of dilated cardiomyopathy in normotensive mice lacking FGF-2. Moreover, hypertensive mice without FGF-2 developed no compensatory cardiac hypertrophy. In wild-type mice, hypertrophy was associated with a stimulation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase, the extracellular signal regulated kinase, and the p38 kinase pathways. In contrast, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was markedly attenuated in FGF-2–deficient mice. In vitro, FGF-2 of fibroblast origin was demonstrated to be essential in the paracrine stimulation of MAPK activation in cardiomyocytes. Indeed, fibroblasts lacking FGF-2 expression have a defective capacity for releasing growth factors to induce hypertrophic responses in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, these results identify the cardiac fibroblast population as a primary integrator of hypertrophic stimuli in the heart, and suggest that FGF-2 is a crucial mediator of cardiac hypertrophy via autocrine/paracrine actions on cardiac cells. PMID:11748268

  12. A case of asymmetrical apical hypertrophy which is a form of hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy with giant negative T-waves.

    PubMed

    Sheikhzadeh, A; Ghabussi, P

    1982-09-01

    Clinical, hemodynamic, electrocardiographic (ECG), echocardiographic, left ventricular (LV), and coronary angiographic (CA) findings are reported in a case with apical hypertrophy (AH), a form of hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (HNCM). The most striking symptom was chest pain and the most conspicuous electrocardiographic finding consisted of giant negative T waves, reaching an amplitude of 4.0 mV. Echocardiography revealed an apical thickness of the septum and posterior wall of 40 mm; this was significantly greater than septal and posterior free wall thickening in the LV outflow area. The anterior motion (SAM) of the anterior mitral leaflet, was present, and, in hemodymic investigation, the isoproterenol test was negative. The left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and the EF were elevated. In the LV angiogram from the right anterior oblique position (RAO), the LV free wall thickness at the apex was significantly thicker than at the outflow tract level. The patient had dilated coronary arteries. We conclude that these findings are typical for AH (HNCM) and it seems that hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (IHSS, MO), and hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy (ASH, AH) are different manifestations of a wide spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:6217360

  13. Alcohol septal ablation in obstructive acromegalic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy - a first case report.

    PubMed

    Viveiros Monteiro, André; Fiarresga, António; Cacela, Duarte; de Sousa, Lídia; Ramos, Ruben; Galrinho, Ana; Branco, Luísa; Cruz Ferreira, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease, mostly caused by a growth hormone (GH)-secreting benign pituitary tumor, with an increased production of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Cardiovascular complications are common and are associated with cardiomyocyte apoptosis and concentric cardiac hypertrophy. Suppression of GH and IGF-1 appears to improve cardiac function only in the short term, with little or no decrease in left ventricular mass or improvement in cardiac function after prolonged treatment. Alcohol septal ablation (ASA) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to septal myectomy, with significant improvement in symptoms, gradients and left ventricular remodeling. In this report, we describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with acromegaly due to a pituitary adenoma diagnosed and treated surgically at the age of 38 but with recurrence and reoperation at the age of 50. She was referred to our cardiology department due to a three-month history of progressively worsening exercise-induced dyspnea and orthopnea under optimal medical therapy. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe basal hypertrophy of the interventricular septum (19 mm), dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction with a gradient of 70 mmHg at rest and 120 mmHg with Valsalva maneuver, and systolic anterior movement (SAM). Genetic testing excluded the most frequent forms of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. ASA was performed with injection of 2 cc of alcohol in the first septal branch of the left coronary artery, without complications. At one-year reassessment, significant clinical and echocardiographic improvement was noted, with disappearance of SAM. To our knowledge, there have been no previously reported cases of ASA in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to acromegaly. We report a case of successful ASA in acromegalic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27503591

  14. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the interrelation of disarray, fibrosis, and small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Varnava, A; Elliott, P; Sharma, S; McKenna, W; Davies, M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To make a quantitative assessment of the relation between disarray, fibrosis, and small vessel disease in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
DESIGN—Detailed macroscopic and histological examination at 19 segments of the left and right ventricle and the left atrial free wall.
PATIENTS—72 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who had suffered sudden death or progression to end stage cardiac failure (resulting in death or heart transplantation).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The presence of scarring, atrial dilatation, and a mitral valve impact lesion were noted, and heart weight, wall thickness, per cent disarray, per cent fibrosis, and per cent small vessel disease quantitated for each heart.
RESULTS—Within an individual heart the magnitude of hypertrophy correlated with the severity of fibrosis (p = 0.006) and disarray (p = 0.0002). Overall, however, total heart weight related weakly but significantly to fibrosis (r = 0.4, p = 0.0001) and small vessel disease (r = 0.3, p = 0.03), but not to disarray. Disarray was greater in hearts with mild left ventricular hypertrophy (maximum wall thickness < 20 mm) and preserved systolic function (60.9 (26)% v 43 (20.4)% respectively, p = 0.02) and hearts without a mitral valve impact lesion (26.3% v 18.9%, p = 0.04), but was uninfluenced by sex. Fibrosis was influenced by sex (7% in male patients and 4% in female, p = 0.04), but not by the presence of an impact lesion. No relation was found between disarray, fibrosis, and small vessel disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Myocyte disarray is probably a direct response to functional or structural abnormalities of the mutated sarcomeric protein, while fibrosis and small vessel disease are secondary phenomena unrelated to disarray, but modified by factors such as left ventricular mass, sex, and perhaps local autocrine factors.


Keywords: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; histopathology; small vessel disease PMID:11040002

  15. Mitochondrial Haplogroups Modify the Risk of Developing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in a Danish Population

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christian M.; Aidt, Frederik H.; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Havndrup, Ole; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Moolman-Smook, Johanna C.; Larsen, Severin O.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins involved in sarcomere function. The disease is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Evolutionarily developed variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), defining mtDNA haplogroups and haplogroup clusters, is associated with functional differences in mitochondrial function and susceptibility to various diseases, including ischemic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that mtDNA haplogroups, in particular H, J and K, might modify disease susceptibility to HCM. Mitochondrial DNA, isolated from blood, was sequenced and haplogroups identified in 91 probands with HCM. The association with HCM was ascertained using two Danish control populations. Haplogroup H was more prevalent in HCM patients, 60% versus 46% (p = 0.006) and 41% (p = 0.003), in the two control populations. Haplogroup J was less prevalent, 3% vs. 12.4% (p = 0.017) and 9.1%, (p = 0.06). Likewise, the UK haplogroup cluster was less prevalent in HCM, 11% vs. 22.1% (p = 0.02) and 22.8% (p = 0.04). These results indicate that haplogroup H constitutes a susceptibility factor and that haplogroup J and haplogroup cluster UK are protective factors in the development of HCM. Thus, constitutive differences in mitochondrial function may influence the occurrence and clinical presentation of HCM. This could explain some of the phenotypic variability in HCM. The fact that haplogroup H and J are also modifying factors in ischemic cardiomyopathy suggests that mtDNA haplotypes may be of significance in determining whether a physiological hypertrophy develops into myopathy. mtDNA haplotypes may have the potential of becoming significant biomarkers in cardiomyopathy. PMID:23940792

  16. Contemporary techniques for catheter-based intervention for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cuisset, Thomas; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-05-17

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiovascular affection and is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Invasive treatment of symptomatic patients with HOCM refractory to drug therapy was limited to surgical myomectomy for years. In the mid 1990s, alcohol septal ablation (ASA) emerged as a new and less invasive option for septal ablation (SA) and is now considered a good alternative with excellent short- and long-term outcomes. Besides ASA, other techniques have been promoted to treat HOCM. The present review aims to summarise current practice and evidence of catheter-based techniques from the treatment of HOCM. We also detail technical points to achieve a safe and effective procedure. PMID:27174111

  17. A familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy locus maps to chromosome 15q2.

    PubMed Central

    Thierfelder, L; MacRae, C; Watkins, H; Tomfohrde, J; Williams, M; McKenna, W; Bohm, K; Noeske, G; Schlepper, M; Bowcock, A

    1993-01-01

    We report that a gene responsible for familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) in a kindred with a mild degree of cardiac hypertrophy maps to chromosome 15q2. The gene encoding cardiac actin, located on chromosome 15q, was analyzed and excluded as a candidate for FHC at this locus. Two additional families with typical FHC were studied and the disorder in one also maps to the chromosome 15q2 locus. The maximum combined multipoint logarithm of odds score in the two linked families is 6.02. Although these two kindreds reside in the same country, we believe that their disorder is caused by independent mutations in the 15q2 locus because of the clinical and genotypic differences between affected individuals. Mutations in at least four loci can cause FHC: chromosomes 14q1 (beta cardiac myosin heavy chain gene), 1q3, and 15q2 and another unidentified locus, suggesting substantial genetic heterogeneity. PMID:8327508

  18. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spurkeland, Nancy; Bennett, Gregory; Alexander, Chandran; Chang, Dennis; Ceneviva, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA. PMID:25861505

  19. MicroRNAs Based Therapy of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: The Road Traveled So Far

    PubMed Central

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Raposo, Luís R.; Fernandes, Alexandra R.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by variable expressivity, age penetrance, and a high heterogeneity. The transcriptional profile (miRNAs, mRNAs), epigenetic modifications, and posttranslational modifications seem to be highly relevant for the onset of the disease. miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs with 22 nucleotides, have been implicated in the regulation of cardiomyocyte function, being differentially expressed in several heart diseases, including HCM. Moreover, a different miRNA expression profile in the various stages of HCM development is also observed. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the profile of miRNAs characteristic of asymptomatic to overt HCM patients, discussing alongside their potential use for diagnosis and therapy. Indeed, the stability and specificity of miRNAs make them suitable targets for use as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis and as therapeutical targets. PMID:26504850

  20. [Assessment of risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Philipp; Blaschke, Florian; Pieske, Burkert; Tschöpe, Carsten; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a hereditary disease characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy with or without concomitant outflow tract obstruction. Identification of patients with HCM who are at high risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is crucial as those patients are likely to benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Based on the HCM Risk-SCD study published in 2013, that included 3675 HCM patients with 24 313 years of follow up, a new clinical risk prediction model for sudden cardiac death was developed. This model was included in the recently released 2014 ESC guidelines. This review summarizes the changes in the prediction model and the resulting recommendations and discusses potential risks and limitations of the new score. PMID:27404936

  1. A novel mitochondrial ATP8 gene mutation in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, An I; Hogeveen, Marije; Nijtmans, Leo; van den Brand, Mariel; Janssen, Antoon; Diepstra, Heleen; van den Brandt, Frans; van den Heuvel, Bert; Hol, Frans; Hofste, Tom; Kapusta, Livia; Dillmann, U; Shamdeen, M; Smeitink, J; Smeitink, J; Rodenburg, Richard

    2009-01-01

    To identify the biochemical and molecular genetic defect in a 16-year-old patient presenting with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy suspected for a mitochondrial disorder.Measurement of the mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) capacity in muscle and enzyme analysis in muscle and fibroblasts were performed. Relevant parts of the mitochondrial DNA were analysed by sequencing.A homoplasmic nonsense mutation m.8529G→A (p.Trp55X) was found in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene in the patient's fibroblasts and muscle tissue. Reduced complex V activity was measured in the patient's fibroblasts and muscle tissue, and was confirmed in cybrid clones containing patient-derived mitochondrial DNAWe describe the first pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene, resulting in an improper assembly and reduced activity of the complex V holoenzyme. PMID:21686774

  2. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: The Ace-of-Spades as the Disease Card

    PubMed Central

    Diaconu, Camelia C.; Dumitru, Nicoleta; Fruntelata, Ana G.; Lacau, Smarandita; Bartos, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Apical cardiac hypertrophy (Yamaguchi syndrome) is a relatively rare form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A 67-year-old woman presented with exertional angina and moderate dyspnea. Her electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm, flattened T waves in the limb leads and a strain pattern in the V2-V6 leads. Echocardiographic examination showed that apical wall thickness of the left ventricle (LV) was 19 mm. Coronary angiography was normal, but left ventriculography revealed a spade-like shaped LV cavity, typical for apical cardiac hypertrophy. The diagnostic criteria for apical cardiac hypertrophy are: 1) asymmetric LV hypertrophy - predominantly at the apex of the ventricle; 2) LV wall thickness of 15 mm or more during diastole; and 3) apical to posterior wall thickness ratio of 1.5 or more determined by 2-dimensional echocardiography or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Although relatively rare, Yamaguchi syndrome must enter into the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with exertional angina pectoris. PMID:27122852

  3. [New strategies for assessing the risk of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Możeńska, Olga; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by a primarily increased ventricular wall thickness, usually caused by the mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Thanks to the growing awareness in the medical community as well as advances in diagnostic techniques HCM can be diagnosed at earlier stages than ever before. However, in some cases the first symptom of this disease is a sudden cardiac death (SCD) and diagnosis remains unknown until post-mortem examination. Implantation of a cardioverterdefibrillator (ICD) provides the most effective method of SCD prevention. Nevertheless, due to a number of risks associated with surgery as well as the possession of such devices, predictive factors of serious ventricular arrhythmia in individual patients have been sought for many years. The aim of this review is to present the current strategies of risk assessment and prevention of SCD in patients with HCM. PMID:27590646

  4. [New strategies for assessing the risk of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Możeńska, Olga; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by a primarily increased ventricular wall thickness, usually caused by the mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Thanks to the growing awareness in the medical community as well as advances in diagnostic techniques HCM can be diagnosed at earlier stages than ever before. However, in some cases the first symptom of this disease is a sudden cardiac death (SCD) and diagnosis remains unknown until post-mortem examination. Implantation of a cardioverterdefibrillator (ICD) provides the most effective method of SCD prevention. Nevertheless, due to a number of risks associated with surgery as well as the possession of such devices, predictive factors of serious ventricular arrhythmia in individual patients have been sought for many years. The aim of this review is to present the current strategies of risk assessment and prevention of SCD in patients with HCM. PMID:27591441

  5. [Athlete's heart and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: contribution on clinical and morphologic differentiation].

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, Edda; Kuck, Karl Heinz; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2015-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex genetic disorder usually diagnosed in a young adult population. The diagnosis is based on echocardiographic identification of left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with a non-dilated hyperdynamic chamber in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disorder. The differentiation between HCM and physiological left ventricular hypertrophy (athlete`s heart) is essential: HCM is the main cause of exercise-induced sudden cardiac death in the young and especially in young athletes with overlapping features in Athlete's Heart or HCM. Differentiation between physiological left ventricular hypertrophy and HCM is challenging. Echocardiography allows detailed assessment of left ventricular structure and function which is fundamental. Additional genetic studies for identification of the broad HCM phenotype can be necessary to differentiate between Athlete's Heart and HCM. PMID:26230069

  6. Pregnancy in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy with Severe Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeouk; Kim, Minsu; Lee, Junsoo; Kim, Sihun; Kim, Myeonggun; Hwang, Hyunjung; Moon, Jeonggeun; Shin, Mi-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) patients with severe left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction (those with a gradient of > 100 mm Hg) are at the highest risk of hemodynamic deterioration during pregnancy. Complications of HOCM include sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and arrhythmias. Physiological changes during pregnancy may induce these complications, affecting maternal and fetal health conditions. Therefore, close monitoring with appropriate management is essential for the well-being of both mother and fetus. We report on the case of a 27-year-old female patient with severe LVOT obstruction HOCM, pressure gradient (PG) of 125 mm Hg at resting, and 152 mm Hg induced by the Valsalva maneuver at 34 weeks gestation. This case showed how close monitoring using echocardiography and proper management during the course of pregnancy resulted in successful delivery in the patient with extremely high PG HOCM. PMID:27358709

  7. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... permanent pacemaker to control the heartbeat An implanted defibrillator that recognizes life-threatening heart rhythms and sends an electrical pulse to stop them. Sometimes a defibrillator is placed, even if the patient has not ...

  8. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems with blood flow, or leaky heart valves ( mitral valve regurgitation ) may include: Echocardiography ECG 24-hour Holter ... You may need surgery to repair the heart's mitral valve if it is leaking.

  9. Mutation analysis of the phospholamban gene in 315 South Africans with dilated, hypertrophic, peripartum and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Fish, Maryam; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kraus, Sarah; Sliwa, Karen; Seidman, Christine E; Burke, Michael A; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 30% of adult heart failure hospitalisations. This high prevalence poses a challenge in societies without access to resources and interventions essential for disease management. Over 80 genes have been implicated as a cause of cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the phospholamban (PLN) gene are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and severe heart failure. In Africa, the prevalence of PLN mutations in cardiomyopathy patients is unknown. Our aim was to screen 315 patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 111), DCM (n = 95), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 40) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (n = 69) for disease-causing PLN mutations by high resolution melt analysis and DNA sequencing. We detected the previously reported PLN c.25C > T (p.R9C) mutation in a South African family with severe autosomal dominant DCM. Haplotype analysis revealed that this mutation occurred against a different haplotype background to that of the original North American family and was therefore unlikely to have been inherited from a common ancestor. No other mutations in PLN were detected (mutation prevalence = 0.2%). We conclude that PLN is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy in African patients. The PLN p.R9C mutation is not well-tolerated, emphasising the importance of this gene in cardiac function. PMID:26917049

  10. Mutation analysis of the phospholamban gene in 315 South Africans with dilated, hypertrophic, peripartum and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Maryam; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kraus, Sarah; Sliwa, Karen; Seidman, Christine E.; Burke, Michael A.; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J.; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure in Sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 30% of adult heart failure hospitalisations. This high prevalence poses a challenge in societies without access to resources and interventions essential for disease management. Over 80 genes have been implicated as a cause of cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the phospholamban (PLN) gene are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and severe heart failure. In Africa, the prevalence of PLN mutations in cardiomyopathy patients is unknown. Our aim was to screen 315 patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 111), DCM (n = 95), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 40) and peripartum cardiomyopathy (n = 69) for disease-causing PLN mutations by high resolution melt analysis and DNA sequencing. We detected the previously reported PLN c.25C > T (p.R9C) mutation in a South African family with severe autosomal dominant DCM. Haplotype analysis revealed that this mutation occurred against a different haplotype background to that of the original North American family and was therefore unlikely to have been inherited from a common ancestor. No other mutations in PLN were detected (mutation prevalence = 0.2%). We conclude that PLN is a rare cause of cardiomyopathy in African patients. The PLN p.R9C mutation is not well-tolerated, emphasising the importance of this gene in cardiac function. PMID:26917049

  11. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy from A to Z: Genetics, Pathophysiology, Imaging, and Management.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Ameya Jagdish; Restrepo, Carlos S; Vargas, Daniel; Marmol-Velez, Alejandro; Ocazionez, Daniel; Murillo, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heterogeneous group of diseases related to sarcomere gene mutations exhibiting heterogeneous phenotypes with an autosomal dominant mendelian pattern of inheritance. The disorder is characterized by diverse phenotypic expressions and variable natural progression, which may range from dyspnea and/or syncope to sudden cardiac death. It is found across all racial groups and is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in the absence of another systemic or cardiac disease. The management of HCM is based on a thorough understanding of the underlying morphology, pathophysiology, and clinical course. Imaging findings of HCM mirror the variable expressivity and penetrance heterogeneity, with the added advantage of diagnosis even in cases where a specific mutation may not yet be found. The diagnostic information obtained from imaging varies depending on the specific stage of HCM-phenotype manifestation, including the prehypertrophic, hypertrophic, and later stages of adverse remodeling into the burned-out phase of overt heart failure. However, subtle or obvious, these imaging findings become critical components in diagnosis, management, and follow-up of HCM patients. Although diagnosis of HCM traditionally relies on clinical assessment and transthoracic echocardiography, recent studies have demonstrated increased utility of multidetector computed tomography (CT) and particularly cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in diagnosis, phenotype differentiation, therapeutic planning, and prognostication. In this article, we provide an overview of the genetics, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of HCM, with the spectrum of imaging findings at MR imaging and CT and their contribution in diagnosis, risk stratification, and therapy. PMID:26963450

  12. Virtual Cardiac Surgery Using CFD: Application to Septal Myectomy in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore

    2011-11-01

    Obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is characterized by ventricular wall thickening, diastolic dysfunction, and dynamic outflow tract obstruction, all of which strongly influence the vortex dynamics and pressure distribution in the left ventricle (LV). Severe cases of HCM are usually managed through septal myectomy where the surgeon resects the hypertrophic mass. Surgeons currently try to remove as much tissue as possible in order to optimize the post surgical result. However, excessive debulking increases the chance of ventricular septal defects, bundle branch block or complete heart block, and aneurysmal septal thinning. On the other hand, insufficient tissue removal also leads to unsatisfactory outcomes in terms of reduction of outflow tract pressure gradient. Knowing how much muscle to remove and where to remove it from could reduce the likelihood of complications and suboptimal outcomes. In the present study, we employ an immersed boundary solver to model the effect of septal myectomy for ventricles with HOCM and demonstrate the potential of such an approach for surgical planning. Computational resources were provided by the National Institute of Computational Science under Tergrid grant number TG-CTS100002.

  13. Electric cardioversion of atrial fibrillation resulting in pulmonary oedema in patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nawrocka, Izabela; Kaczyńska, Anna; Abramczyk, Piotr

    2015-05-01

    The direct-current electric shock is considered to be safe treatment of arrhythmias and rarely leads to serious hemodynamic complications. A 62-year-old patient was admitted to the hospital due to a first symptomatic episode of atrial fibrillation. Patient was diagnosed with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 20 years ago. Transoesophageal echocardiography was performed to exclude an atrial thrombus followed by electrical cardioversion with restoration of sinus rhythm. After 6 hours symptoms of pulmonary oedema developed. The patient's condition improved after furosemide administration. As the possible cause of the oedema, inotropic effect of administered propafenone and atrial stunning were considered. The atria seem to be responsible for important part of forward cardiac output even during AF, especially in cardiomyopathies. Contractility deterioration of the left atrium (stunning) along with earlier resumption of the right atrium contractile function could be associated with hemodynamic instability causing pulmonary oedema in subjects with hypertrophied myocardium. It is necessary to take into consideration the atrial function while administrating antiarrhythmic drugs, especially those with negative inotropic effect. PMID:26039023

  14. Myocarditis caused by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Five Cats with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rolim, V Machado; Casagrande, R Assis; Wouters, A Terezinha Barth; Driemeier, D; Pavarini, S Petinatti

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections have been implicated as the cause of cardiomyopathy in several mammalian species. This study describes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and myocarditis associated with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in five cats aged between 1 and 4 years. Clinical manifestations included dyspnoea in four animals, one of which also exhibited restlessness. One animal showed only lethargy, anorexia and vomiting. Necropsy examination revealed marked cardiomegaly, marked left ventricular hypertrophy and pallor of the myocardium and epicardium in all animals. Microscopical and immunohistochemical examination showed multifocal infiltration of the myocardium with T lymphocytes and fewer macrophages, neutrophils and plasma cells. An intense immunoreaction for FIV antigen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of lymphocytes and the cytoplasm of some macrophages was observed via immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC did not reveal the presence of antigen from feline calicivirus, coronavirus, feline leukaemia virus, feline parvovirus, Chlamydia spp. or Toxoplasma gondii. The results demonstrate the occurrence of FIV infection in inflammatory cells in the myocardium of five cats with myocarditis and HCM. PMID:26797583

  15. Conservative approach to mitral valve replacement in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with systolic anterior motion – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Suder, Bogdan; Szymoński, Krzysztof; Wasilewski, Grzegorz; Sadowski, Jerzy; Kapelak, Boguslaw

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 60-year-old patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), systolic anterior motion (SAM), and high gradient in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) who underwent surgical treatment. During the surgery, myomectomy of the septum was performed using the Morrow method: despite the persisting SAM and increased LVOT gradients, the mitral valve was not replaced. The case study presents a conservative approach to mitral valve replacement during HCM surgery. PMID:26855652

  16. Obstetric hemorrhage in a case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator: Anaesthesia and intensive care management

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Bhat, Ravindra R.; Kavitha, Jayaram; Kundra, Pankaj; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    The physiological changes occurring during pregnancy and labor may reveal or exacerbate the symptoms of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The addition of obstetric hemorrhage to this presents a unique challenge to the anesthesiologists and intensivists managing these patients in the operation theatres and the Intensive Care Units. Here we present a case of HOCM with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator in situ and postpartum hemorrhagic shock. PMID:26957702

  17. Proteasome inhibition slightly improves cardiac function in mice with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Singh, Sonia R.; Geertz, Birgit; Schulz, Herbert; Reischmann, Silke; Hübner, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    A growing line of evidence indicates a dysfunctional ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cardiac diseases. Anti-hypertrophic effects and improved cardiac function have been reported after treatment with proteasome inhibitors in experimental models of cardiac hypertrophy. Here we tested whether proteasome inhibition could also reverse the disease phenotype in a genetically-modified mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which carries a mutation in Mybpc3, encoding the myofilament protein cardiac myosin-binding protein C. At 7 weeks of age, homozygous mutant mice (KI) have 39% higher left ventricular mass-to-body-weight ratio and 29% lower fractional area shortening (FAS) than wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups were treated with epoxomicin (0.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 1 week via osmotic minipumps. Epoxomicin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity by ~50% in both groups. All parameters of cardiac hypertrophy (including the fetal gene program) were not affected by epoxomicin treatment in both groups. In contrast, FAS was 12% and 35% higher in epoxomicin-treated than vehicle-treated WT and KI mice, respectively. To identify which genes or pathways could be involved in this positive effect, we performed a transcriptome analysis in KI and WT neonatal cardiac myocytes, treated or not with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (1 μM, 24 h). This revealed 103 genes (four-fold difference; 5% FDR) which are commonly regulated in both KI and WT cardiac myocytes. Thus, even in genetically-modified mice with manifest HCM, proteasome inhibition showed beneficial effects, at least with regard to cardiac function. Targeting the UPS in cardiac diseases remains therefore a therapeutic option. PMID:25566086

  18. Relation of QRS duration to mortality in a community-based cohort with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bongioanni, Sergio; Bianchi, Francesca; Migliardi, Alessandro; Gnavi, Roberto; Pron, Paolo Giay; Casetta, Marzia; Conte, Maria Rosa

    2007-08-01

    A prolonged QRS duration on the standard electrocardiogram is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death in cardiomyopathies of different origin. However, the relation between QRS duration and prognosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) remains undefined. We assessed the relation between QRS duration and cardiovascular death in 241 consecutive patients with HC. The study cohort was divided into 2 groups according to QRS duration: <120 and > or =120 ms. Of the 241 patients, 191 (79%) had a QRS duration <120 ms and 50 (21%) a QRS duration > or =120 ms. During a mean follow-up of 7.9 +/- 5.1 years, 35 patients died of cardiovascular causes related to HC. Of these 35 patients, 13 (6%) had a QRS duration <120 ms and 22 (43%) had a QRS duration > or =120 ms (p <0.01). Risk of cardiovascular death was significantly higher in patients with a QRS duration > or =120 ms than in those with a QRS duration <120 ms (relative risk 5.2, p <0.0001). At 8-year follow-up, cumulative risks of HC-related death were 7.1% in patients with a QRS duration <120 ms and 55% in those with a QRS duration > or =120 ms. Multivariate analysis confirmed that a QRS duration > or =120 ms was independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death (hazard ratio 3.2, p = 0.007). New York Heart Association functional class III/IV was the only other clinical variable significantly and independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death. In conclusion, in patients with HC, QRS duration on standard electrocardiogram is directly related to cardiovascular mortality, and a QRS duration > or =120 ms is a strong and independent predictor of prognosis. PMID:17659936

  19. Decreased contractility due to energy deprivation in a transgenic rat model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Mark; Flögel, Ulrich; Knorr, Maike; Grundt, Christina; Hippe, Hans-Joerg; Brors, Benedikt; Frank, Derk; Haselmann, Uta; Antony, Claude; Voelkers, Mirko; Schrader, Juergen; Most, Patrick; Lemmer, Bjoern; Katus, Hugo A; Frey, Norbert

    2009-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with cardiac hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and sudden death. Recently, it has been suggested that inefficient energy utilization could be a common molecular pathway of HCM-related mutations. We have previously generated transgenic Sprague-Dawley rats overexpressing a truncated cardiac troponin T (DEL-TNT) molecule, displaying typical features of HCM such as diastolic dysfunction and an increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We now studied these rats using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). MRS demonstrated that cardiac energy metabolism was markedly impaired, as indicated by a decreased phosphocreatine to ATP ratio (-31%, p < 0.05). In addition, we assessed contractility of isolated cardiomyocytes. While DEL-TNT and control cardiomyocytes showed no difference under baseline conditions, DEL-TNT cardiomyocytes selectively exhibited a decrease in fractional shortening by 28% after 1 h in glucose-deprived medium (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant decreases in contraction velocity and relaxation velocity were observed. To identify the underlying molecular pathways, we performed transcriptional profiling using real-time PCR. DEL-TNT hearts exhibited induction of several genes critical for cardiac energy supply, including CD36, CPT-1/-2, and PGC-1alpha. Finally, DEL-TNT rats and controls were studied by radiotelemetry after being stressed by isoproterenol, revealing a significantly increased frequency of arrhythmias in transgenic animals. In summary, we demonstrate profound energetic alterations in DEL-TNT hearts, supporting the notion that inefficient cellular ATP utilization contributes to the pathogenesis of HCM. PMID:19189074

  20. Effect of Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction on Left Atrial Mechanics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynne K.; Chan, Raymond H.; Carasso, Shemy; Durand, Miranda; Misurka, Jimmy; Crean, Andrew M.; Ralph-Edwards, Anthony; Gruner, Christiane; Woo, Anna; Lesser, John R.; Maron, Barry J.; Maron, Martin S.; Rakowski, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) volumes are known to be increased in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and are a predictor of adverse outcome. In addition, LA function is impaired and is presumed to be due to left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction as a result of hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. In the current study, we assess the incremental effect of outflow tract obstruction (and concomitant mitral regurgitation) on LA function as assessed by LA strain. Patients with HCM (50 obstructive, 50 nonobstructive) were compared to 50 normal controls. A subset of obstructive patients who had undergone septal myectomy was also studied. Utilising feature-tracking software applied to cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, LA volumes and functional parameters were calculated. LA volumes were significantly elevated and LA ejection fraction and strain were significantly reduced in patients with HCM compared with controls and were significantly more affected in patients with obstruction. LA volumes and function were significantly improved after septal myectomy. LVOT obstruction and mitral regurgitation appear to further impair LA mechanics. Septal myectomy results in a significant reduction in LA volumes, paralleled by an improvement in function. PMID:26788503

  1. Constructing "best interests": genetic testing of children in families with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Geelen, Els; Van Hoyweghen, Ine; Doevendans, Pieter A; Marcelis, Carlo L M; Horstman, Klasien

    2011-08-01

    Professional guidelines on genetic testing of children have recently shifted their focus from protecting the child's autonomous choice to professionals, together with parents, striving to work in the child's "best interest." This notion of "best interest" allows room for therapeutical as well as psychological and social considerations, and gives rise to the question how parents and professionals weigh up the child's best interest in practice. In this qualitative study, we followed six extended families involved in genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Netherlands for 3½ years. In total 57 members of these families were interviewed in depth; many of them more than once. Our empirical analysis shows that the best interest of a child is constructed via long-term processes in the broader context of family and kin. In this context, "best interests" are considered and reconsidered. We conclude that a child's best interest should not be framed as the result of an instantaneous agreement between parents and professionals. In dealing with genetic testing of children, parents as well as professionals reflect on and learn from the processes of generating new meanings of "best interest." To enable professionals to deal with the variety in family life, these learning processes should be documented closely. PMID:21739592

  2. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow and Valve Dynamics in Hearts with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xudong; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Pinheiro, Aurelio

    2010-11-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease manifested by the thickening of the ventricular wall and often leads to a partial obstruction to the blood flow out of the left ventricle. HCM is recognized as one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in athletes. In a heart with HCM, the hypertrophy usually narrows the blood flow pathway to the aorta and produces a low pressure zone between the mitral valve and the hypertrophy during systole. This low pressure can suck the mitral valve leaflet back and completely block the blood flow into the aorta. In the current study, a sharp interface immersed boundary method flow solver is employed to study the hemodynamics and valve dynamics inside a heart with HCM. The three-dimensional motion and configuration of the left ventricle including mitral valve leaflets and aortic valves are reconstructed based on echo-cardio data sets. The mechanisms of aortic obstruction associated with HCM are investigated. The long term objective of this study is to develop a computational tool to aid in the assessment and surgical management of HCM.

  3. Outcomes of an extended Morrow procedure without a concomitant mitral valve procedure for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Song, Yunhu; Gao, Ge; Ran, Jun; Su, Wenjun; Li, Haojie; Tang, Yajie; Duan, Fujian; Sun, Hansong

    2016-01-01

    The indications for a concomitant mitral valve (MV) procedure remain controversial for patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). According to previous studies, a concomitant MV surgery was required in 11-20% of inpatient operations. Thus, we aimed to study the outcomes of an extended Morrow procedure without a concomitant MV procedure for HOCM patients who had no intrinsic abnormalities of the MV apparatus. We retrospectively reviewed 232 consecutive HOCM patients who underwent extended Morrow procedures from January 2010 to October 2014. Only 10 (4.31%) patients with intrinsic MV diseases underwent concomitant MV procedures. Of the 232 patients, 230 had no to mild mitral regurgitation (MR) postoperatively. We separated the 232 patients into two groups according to preoperative MR degree. One group is mild MR, and the other is moderate or severe MR. The three-month, one-year, and three-year composite end-point event-free survival rates had no difference between two groups (p = 0.820). When we separated the patients to postoperative no or trace MR group and mild MR group, there was also no difference on survival rates (p = 0.830). In conclusion, concomitant mitral valve procedures are not necessary for HOCM patients with MR caused by systolic anterior motion, even moderate to severe extent. PMID:27357867

  4. Prognostic implications of novel beta cardiac myosin heavy chain gene mutations that cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Anan, R; Greve, G; Thierfelder, L; Watkins, H; McKenna, W J; Solomon, S; Vecchio, C; Shono, H; Nakao, S; Tanaka, H

    1994-01-01

    Three novel beta cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene missense mutations, Phe513Cys, Gly716Arg, and Arg719Trp, which cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) are described. One mutation in exon 15 (Phe513Cys) does not alter the charge of the encoded amino acid, and affected family members have a near normal life expectancy. The Gly716Arg mutation (exon 19; charge change of +1) causes FHC in three family members, one of whom underwent transplantation for heart failure. The Arg719Trp mutation (exon 19; charge change of -1) was found in four unrelated FHC families with a high incidence of premature death and an average life expectancy in affected individuals of 38 yr. A comparable high frequency of disease-related deaths in four families with the Arg719Trp mutation suggests that this specific gene defect directly accounts for the observed malignant phenotype. Further, the significantly different life expectancies associated with the Arg719Trp vs. Phe513Cys mutation (P < 0.001) support the hypothesis that mutations which alter the charge of the encoded amino acid affect survival more significantly than those that produce a conservative amino acid change. Images PMID:8282798

  5. A Delta-Sarcoglycan Gene Polymorphism as a Risk Factor for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Garduño, Martín H.; Pérez-Martínez, Ramón A.; Ruiz, Victor M.; Herrera-Tepatlán, Esteban; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Jiménez-Vaca, Ana L.; Minauro-Sanmiguel, Fernando; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The C allele of c.−94C>G polymorphism of the delta-sarcoglycan gene was associated as a risk factor for coronary spasm in Japanese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim: We evaluated whether the c.−94C>G polymorphism can be a risk factor for HCM in Mexican patients. Methods: The polymorphism was genotyped and the risk was estimated in 35 HCM patients and 145 healthy unrelated individuals. Data of this polymorphism reported in Mexican Amerindian populations were included. Results: The C allele frequency in HCM patients was higher with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.37, and the risk for the CC genotype increased to 5.0. The analysis with Mexican Amerindian populations showed that the C allele frequency was significantly higher in HCM patients with an OR of 2.96 and for CC genotype the risk increased to 7.60. Conclusions: The C allele of the c.−94C>G polymorphism is a risk factor for HCM, which is increased by the Amerindian component and can play an important role in the etiology and progression of disease in Mexican patients. PMID:22524166

  6. Stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Taugner, F M

    2001-01-01

    Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the ventricular myocardium, which may cause sudden death in cats, but neither the aetiology nor the effect on the circulation are well understood. Fourteen cats of either sex with naturally occurring HCM were studied post mortem. Their ages ranged from 9 months to 10 years with an average age of 4.9 years. Heart weights and heart weight expressed as a percentage of body weight were elevated (27.9 g and 0.65%, respectively) as compared with normal values obtained in previous studies. Myocardial disarray was evident in nine of the 14 cats and moderate to severe fibrosis was present in six animals. To evaluate the renal renin-angiotensin system, semiquantitative morphometric data were obtained by means of renin immunohistochemistry and compared with results from an earlier study of 10 healthy cats by the author. The juxtaglomerular index was 36.8% in the cats with HCM as compared with 30.6% in healthy cats. The renin-positive portion of the afferent arteriole was increased in cats affected by HCM to 86.0 microm as compared with 49.9 microm in normal cats. The increase in kidney renin values in cats with HCM may have been due to decreased blood pressure and reduced renal perfusion resulting from impaired cardiac output. PMID:11578127

  7. Transient hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the newborn following multiple doses of antenatal corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Yunis, K A; Bitar, F F; Hayek, P; Mroueh, S M; Mikati, M

    1999-01-01

    Postnatal exposure to steroids has been associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in the newborn. Such an effect has not been described in infants born to mothers who received antenatal steroids. We report three newborns whose mothers were treated with betamethasone prenatally in different doses, duration of time, and who developed various degrees of HCM diagnosed by echocardiography. There was no maternal evidence of diabetes except for one infant whose mother had a normal fasting and post-prandial blood glucose prior to steroid therapy, but an abnormal one hour postprandial glucose after 8 weeks of betamethasone therapy, with a normal HbA1 C level. There was no family history of HCM, no history of maternal intake of other relevant medications, and no hypertension in all three newborns. Follow-up echocardiography revealed complete resolution of the HCM changes in all infants. We suggest that repeated antenatal maternal steroid intake may cause changes of HCM in the newborn. These changes appear to be dose- and duration-related and are mostly reversible. Further prospective controlled studies to evaluate these observations and to investigate potential mechanisms are warranted. PMID:10362077

  8. Setting up Multiplex Panels for Genetic Testing of Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Based on Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    SAGHAFI, Hoorieh; HAGHJOO, Majid; SABBAGH, Sima; SAMIEE, Niloofar; VAKILIAN, Farve; SALEHI OMRAN, Mohammad Taghi; DADASHI, Masoomeh; AMIN, Ahmad; KERAMATIPOUR, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in genes encoding cardiac sarcomere proteins. Nowadays genetic testing of HCM plays an important role in clinical practice by contributing to the diagnosis, prognosis, and screening of high-risk individuals. The aim of this study was developing a reliable testing strategy for HCM based on linkage analysis and appropriate for Iranian population. Methods: Six panels of four microsatellite markers surrounding MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, TPM1, and MYL2 genes (24 markers in total) were selected for multiplex PCR and fragment length analysis. Characteristics of markers and informativeness of the panels were evaluated in 50 unrelated Iranians. The efficacy of the strategy was verified in a family with HCM. Results: All markers were highly polymorphic. The panels were informative in 96–100% of samples. Multipoint linkage analysis excluded the linkage between the disease and all six genes by obtaining maximum LOD score ≤−2. Conclusion: This study suggests a reliable genetic testing method based on linkage analysis between 6 sarcomere genes and familial HCM. It could be applied for diagnostic, predictive, or screening testing in clinical setting. PMID:27141495

  9. Cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: clinical utility of radionuclide imaging for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Y; Isobe, M; Hayasaka, M; Tanaka, M; Fujii, T; Sekiguchi, M

    1998-06-01

    A 62-year-old woman with skin sarcoidosis was admitted to our hospital to ascertain whether she had cardiac involvement. Although she displayed no cardiac signs or symptoms, the electrocardiogram showed first-degree atrioventricular block, right bundle branch block with left anterior fascicular block, and giant negative T waves in the V3 lead. Echocardiography revealed marked hypertrophy localized in the basal portion of the interventricular septum (IVS) without systolic dysfunction, mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging revealed redistribution in the anteroseptal region. Both gallium-67 (67Ga) and technetium-99m pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP) scintigraphy revealed abnormal uptake in the myocardium. These findings disappeared after 2 months of steroid treatment. Reports of cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking HCM are rare. However, hypertrophy in the basal portion of the IVS is an important sign of early cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis. 67Ga and 99mTc-PYP scintigraphy were useful and necessary to differentiate this type of cardiac sarcoidosis from HCM. PMID:9652326

  10. Dynamics of left ventricular ejection in obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; McGranahan, G M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamics of left ventricular ejection in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease were studied during cardiac catheterization. Using a single multisensor catheter, electromagnetically derived ascending aortic flow velocity and high fidelity left ventricular and aortic pressures were recorded during rest (n = 47) and provocative maneuvers (n = 23). Dynamic ventricular emptying during rest was also analyzed with frame-by-frame angiography (n = 46). Left ventricular outflow was independently derived from both flow velocity and angiographic techniques. The HCM patients were subdivided into three groups: (I) intraventricular gradients at rest (n = 9), (II) intraventricular gradients only with provocation (n = 12), and (III) no intraventricular gradients despite provocation (n = 9). During rest, the percentage of the total systolic ejection period during which forward aortic flow existed was as follows (mean +/- 1 SD): group I, 69 +/- 17% (flow), 64 +/- 6% (angio); group II, 63 +/- 14% (flow), 65 +/- 6% (angio); group III, 61 +/- 16% (flow), 62 +/- 4% (angio); control group, 90 +/- 5% (flow), 86 +/- 9% (angio). No significant difference was observed between any of the HCM subgroups, but compared with the control group, ejection was completed much earlier in systole independent of the presence or absence of intraventricular gradients. These results suggest that "outflow obstruction," as traditionally defined by the presence of an abnormal intraventricular pressure gradient and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, does not impede left ventricular outflow in HCM. PMID:6449522

  11. Dynamics of left ventricular ejection in obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; McGranahan, G M

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamics of left ventricular ejection in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease were studied during cardiac catheterization. Using a single multisensor catheter, electromagnetically derived ascending aortic flow velocity and high fidelity left ventricular and aortic pressures were recorded during rest (n = 47) and provocative maneuvers (n = 23). Dynamic ventricular emptying during rest was also analyzed with frame-by-frame angiography (n = 46). Left ventricular outflow was independently derived from both flow velocity and angiographic techniques. The HCM patients were subdivided into three groups: (I) intraventricular gradients at rest (n = 9), (II) intraventricular gradients only with provocation (n = 12), and (III) no intraventricular gradients despite provocation (n = 9). During rest, the percentage of the total systolic ejection period during which forward aortic flow existed was as follows (mean +/- 1 SD): group I, 69 +/- 17% (flow), 64 +/- 6% (angio); group II, 63 +/- 14% (flow), 65 +/- 6% (angio); group III, 61 +/- 16% (flow), 62 +/- 4% (angio); control group, 90 +/- 5% (flow), 86 +/- 9% (angio). No significant difference was observed between any of the HCM subgroups, but compared with the control group, ejection was completed much earlier in systole independent of the presence or absence of intraventricular gradients. These results suggest that "outflow obstruction," as traditionally defined by the presence of an abnormal intraventricular pressure gradient and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, does not impede left ventricular outflow in HCM. PMID:6449522

  12. Comparison of Modified With Classic Morrow Septal Myectomy in Treating Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bangrong; Dong, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of the classic Morrow septal myectomy with the modified procedure in treating hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). A retrospective study was conducted to compare the outcomes of classic with modified Morrow septal myectomy in 42 patients treated from January 2005 to July 2011. Preoperative and postoperative ventricular septal thickness, left ventricular (LV) outflow tract velocity and gradient were measured echocardiographically. In both groups, the ventricular septal thickness, LV outflow tract velocity, and LV outflow tract gradient were significantly decreased after the operation. The modified Morrow procedure group, however, showed significantly greater reduction in these echocardiographic parameters than the classic procedure group. All patients in the modified procedure group were asymptomatic postoperatively with a postoperative transvalvular pressure gradient <30 mm Hg. In the classic procedure group, only 14 (87.5%) patients, however, were asymptomatic postoperatively with a postoperative transvalvular pressure gradient <30 mm Hg, and 2 patients still had severe LV outflow obstruction postoperatively. The modified Morrow septal myectomy is safe and effective in treating HOCM patients, and is superior to the classic procedure in reducing the LV outflow tract gradient and velocity, restoring normal anatomic atrioventricular size, and alleviating symptoms associated with HOCM. PMID:26765408

  13. Slowed atrial and atrioventricular conduction and depressed HRV in a murine model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei-Wen; Baumert, Mathias; Neo, Melissa; Kuklik, Pawel; Ganesan, Anand N; Lau, Dennis H; Tsoutsman, Tatiana; Semsarian, Christopher; Sanders, Prashanthan; Saint, David A

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common heritable cardiac disorder with diverse clinical outcomes including sudden death, heart failure, and stroke. Depressed heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of cardiac autonomic regulation, has been shown to predict mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. Cardiac autonomic remodelling in animal models of HCM are not well characterised. This study analysed Gly203Ser cardiac troponin-I transgenic (TG) male mice previously demonstrated to develop hallmarks of HCM by age 21 weeks. 33 mice aged 30 and 50 weeks underwent continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) recording for 30 min under anaesthesia. TG mice demonstrated prolonged P-wave duration (P < 0.001) and PR intervals (P < 0.001) compared to controls. Additionally, TG mice demonstrated depressed standard deviation of RR intervals (SDRR; P < 0.01), coefficient of variation of RR intervals (CVRR; P < 0.001) and standard deviation of heart rate (SDHR; P < 0.001) compared to controls. Additionally, total power was significantly reduced in TG mice (P < 0.05). No significant age-related difference in either strain was observed in ECG or HRV parameters. Mice with HCM developed slowed atrial and atrioventricular conduction and depressed HRV. These changes were conserved with increasing age. This finding may be indicative of atrial and ventricular hypertrophy or dysfunction, and perhaps an indication of worse clinical outcome in heart failure progression in HCM patients. PMID:26444142

  14. Outcomes of an extended Morrow procedure without a concomitant mitral valve procedure for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Song, Yunhu; Gao, Ge; Ran, Jun; Su, Wenjun; Li, Haojie; Tang, Yajie; Duan, Fujian; Sun, Hansong

    2016-01-01

    The indications for a concomitant mitral valve (MV) procedure remain controversial for patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). According to previous studies, a concomitant MV surgery was required in 11–20% of inpatient operations. Thus, we aimed to study the outcomes of an extended Morrow procedure without a concomitant MV procedure for HOCM patients who had no intrinsic abnormalities of the MV apparatus. We retrospectively reviewed 232 consecutive HOCM patients who underwent extended Morrow procedures from January 2010 to October 2014. Only 10 (4.31%) patients with intrinsic MV diseases underwent concomitant MV procedures. Of the 232 patients, 230 had no to mild mitral regurgitation (MR) postoperatively. We separated the 232 patients into two groups according to preoperative MR degree. One group is mild MR, and the other is moderate or severe MR. The three-month, one-year, and three-year composite end-point event-free survival rates had no difference between two groups (p = 0.820). When we separated the patients to postoperative no or trace MR group and mild MR group, there was also no difference on survival rates (p = 0.830). In conclusion, concomitant mitral valve procedures are not necessary for HOCM patients with MR caused by systolic anterior motion, even moderate to severe extent. PMID:27357867

  15. In vivo natriuretic peptide reporter assay identifies chemical modifiers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy signalling

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jason R.; Robinson, Tamara Y.; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Kelly, Amy E.; Coy, Shannon; Peterson, Randall T.; MacRae, Calum A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Despite increased understanding of the fundamental biology regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure, it has been challenging to find novel chemical or genetic modifiers of these pathways. Traditional cell-based methods do not model the complexity of an intact cardiovascular system and mammalian models are not readily adaptable to chemical or genetic screens. Our objective was to create an in vivo model suitable for chemical and genetic screens for hypertrophy and heart failure modifiers Methods and results Using the developing zebrafish, we established that the cardiac natriuretic peptide genes (nppa and nppb), known markers of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure, were induced in the embryonic heart by pathological cardiac stimuli. This pathological induction was distinct from the developmental regulation of these genes. We created a luciferase-based transgenic reporter line that accurately modelled the pathological induction patterns of the zebrafish nppb gene. Utilizing this reporter line, we were able to show remarkable conservation of pharmacological responses between the larval zebrafish heart and adult mammalian models. Conclusion By performing a focused screen of chemical agents, we were able to show a distinct response of a genetic model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to the histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor, U0126. We believe this in vivo reporter line will offer a unique approach to the identification of novel chemical or genetic regulators of myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:22198505

  16. High resolution melting: improvements in the genetic diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Portuguese cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a complex myocardial disorder with a recognized genetic heterogeneity. The elevated number of genes and mutations involved in HCM limits a gene-based diagnosis that should be considered of most importance for basic research and clinical medicine. Methodology In this report, we evaluated High Resolution Melting (HRM) robustness, regarding HCM genetic testing, by means of analyzing 28 HCM-associated genes, including the most frequent 4 HCM-associated sarcomere genes, as well as 24 genes with lower reported HCM-phenotype association. We analyzed 80 Portuguese individuals with clinical phenotype of HCM allowing simultaneously a better characterization of this disease in the Portuguese population. Results HRM technology allowed us to identify 60 mutated alleles in 72 HCM patients: 49 missense mutations, 3 nonsense mutations, one 1-bp deletion, one 5-bp deletion, one in frame 3-bp deletion, one insertion/deletion, 3 splice mutations, one 5'UTR mutation in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, CSRP3, MYH6 and MYL2 genes. Significantly 22 are novel gene mutations. Conclusions HRM was proven to be a technique with high sensitivity and a low false positive ratio allowing a rapid, innovative and low cost genotyping of HCM. In a short return, HRM as a gene scanning technique could be a cost-effective gene-based diagnosis for an accurate HCM genetic diagnosis and hopefully providing new insights into genotype/phenotype correlations. PMID:22429680

  17. Investigation of Pathogenic Genes in Chinese sporadic Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients by Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Li, Zhongshan; Ren, Xianguo; Dong, Ming; Li, Jinxin; Shi, Xingjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xie, Wei; Sun, Zhongsheng; Liu, Xiangdong; Dai, Qiming

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiovascular disease with high heterogeneity. Limited knowledge concerning the genetic background of nearly 40% HCM cases indicates there is a clear need for further investigation to explore the genetic pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we undertook a whole exome sequencing (WES) approach to identify novel candidate genes and mutations associated with HCM. The cohort consisted of 74 unrelated patients with sporadic HCM (sHCM) previously determined to be negative for mutations in eight sarcomere genes. The results showed that 7 of 74 patients (9.5%) had damaging mutations in 43 known HCM disease genes. Furthermore, after analysis combining the Transmission and De novo Association (TADA) program and the ToppGene program, 10 putative genes gained priority. A thorough review of public databases and related literature revealed that there is strong supporting evidence for most of the genes playing roles in various aspects of heart development. Findings from recent studies suggest that the putative and known disease genes converge on three functional pathways: sarcomere function, calcium signaling and metabolism pathway. This study illustrates the benefit of WES, in combination with rare variant analysis tools, in providing valuable insight into the genetic etiology of a heterogeneous sporadic disease. PMID:26573135

  18. Clinical meaning of isolated increase of QRS voltages in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy versus athlete's heart.

    PubMed

    Calore, Chiara; Zorzi, Alessandro; Corrado, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Recent consensus documents have provided modern criteria for interpretation of the athlete's ECG, which are based on a better definition of physiological versus abnormal ECG changes. The aim of these modern criteria is to lower the traditionally high number of false positives and to reduce unnecessary and expensive investigations, maintaining the sensitivity for identification of cardiac diseases at risk of sudden cardiac death during sports such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This article reviews the published studies regarding the ECG changes associated with HCM ("pathologic hypertrophy") and athlete's heart ("physiologic hypertrophy"), with particular reference to the prevalence and clinical significance of the ECG pattern of isolated increase of QRS voltages. Taken together the results of the available studies show that ECG provides good accuracy for differentiating HCM from athlete's heart and allows to preserve the ECG power for detection of athletes with HCM. Patients with either completely normal ECGs or showing isolated QRS voltage criteria for LV hypertrophy have a less severe HCM phenotype, which is associated with a lower arrhythmic risk. These scientific data support the current recommendation that further cardiovascular tests including echocardiography are not systematically indicated in trained athletes showing an isolated increase of QRS voltages. PMID:25595718

  19. Potential mechanisms of improvement after various treatments for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Leachman, R D

    1995-01-01

    In sum, systolic dysfunction of the ventricle associated with left ventricular outlet obstruction and often with mitral valve regurgitation may be improved by myotomy, myomectomy, mitral valve replacement, and perhaps by the creation of left bundle branch block via DDD right ventricular pacing. Diastolic dysfunction of the ventricle may be improved by prolonging the diastolic filling period, shortening the isovolumic relaxation period with calcium channel blocking drugs, or perhaps by altering the atrioventricular activation time with a DDD pacemaker. The symptoms and complications of associated arrhythmias may be improved by medication, particularly with beta-blockers, which tend to stabilize the atrial rhythm and perhaps the ventricular rhythms. In treating patients with demonstrated ventricular arrhythmias, other antiarrhythmic agents may be helpful. (Table II summarizes the abnormalities, causes, and treatments of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.) Epicardial coronary atherosclerosis is not rare in these patients, and arteriographic confirmation may lead to improvement by surgical bypass treatment. Since stroke volume is nearly fixed, cardiac output depends very much on heart rate. For this reason, each patient needs to receive the appropriate dosage of medications to achieve the optimal heart rate for his or her own physiologic state. Images PMID:7647595

  20. Importance and feasibility of creating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy centers in developing countries: the experience in India.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J

    2015-07-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is a relatively common genetic heart disease responsible for mortality and morbidity at all ages. Using contemporary treatment advances, such as implantable defibrillators, surgical myectomy, heart transplant, and modern defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, it is now possible to reduce HC-related mortality considerably to 0.5% per year, less than expected in the general US adult population. However, in much of the developing world, HC has not yet become a priority given the many other cardiac conditions, such as coronary artery disease and systemic hypertension, so prevalent in the most populous countries such as China and India. Management of HC is best achieved in dedicated centers within institutions, such as previously demonstrated in the United States, Canada, some European countries, and Australia. This model has recently been introduced for the first time in India at the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research in Kochi, Kerala, in which a robust program focused on HC has emerged. This novel initiative, created despite the many obstacles in the Indian health care system, is an important step forward and is reported here detail. PMID:25983127

  1. Midventricular Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy with Apical Aneurysm: Potential for Underdiagnosis and Value of Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandam, Archana; Ananthasubramaniam, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    We illustrate a case of midventricle obstructive HCM and apical aneurysm diagnosed with appropriate use of multimodality imaging. A 75-year-old African American woman presented with a 3-day history of chest pain and dyspnea with elevated troponins. Her electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm, left atrial enlargement, left ventricular hypertrophy, prolonged QT, and occasional ectopy. After medical therapy optimization, she underwent coronary angiography for an initial diagnosis of non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. Her coronaries were unremarkable for significant disease but her left ventriculogram showed hyperdynamic contractility of the midportion of the ventricle along with a large dyskinetic aneurysmal apical sac. A subsequent transthoracic echocardiogram provided poor visualization of the apical region of the ventricle but contrast enhancement identified an aneurysmal pouch distal to the midventricular obstruction. To further clarify the diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with contrast was performed confirming the diagnosis of midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with apical aneurysm and fibrosis consistent with apical scar on delayed enhancement. The patient was medically treated and subsequently underwent elective implantable defibrillator placement in the ensuing months for recurrent nonsustained ventricular tachycardia and was initiated on prophylactic oral anticoagulation with warfarin for thromboembolic risk reduction. PMID:26904306

  2. What's Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more chambers of the heart. Usually, the enlargement begins in one of the two lower pumping ... idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) and asymmetrical septal hypertrophy (ASH), non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) The second ...

  3. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: New Evidence Since the 2011 American Cardiology of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association Guideline.

    PubMed

    Fraiche, Ariane; Wang, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Since publication of the 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), more recent studies offer greater insights about this condition. With increased recognition of the role of sarcomere protein mutations and myocardial structural abnormalities in the pathophysiology of this disease, new evidence offers potential improvements for the management of patients with HCM. In this review of studies published since 2011, we highlight several studies that may impact diagnostic considerations, risk stratification, and treatment of symptoms in HCM. PMID:27294414

  4. Eccentric apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unmasked by multimodality imaging: an uncommon but missed cause of out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Towe, Eric; Sharma, Saurabh; Geske, Jeffrey; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her late 50s experienced a witnessed, sudden out of hospital cardiac arrest. Initial workup included coronary angiography, transthoracic echocardiogram and a CT scan of the chest to rule out pulmonary embolus. She was subsequently discharged home without an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or a life vest. On follow-up at another facility, an ICD was placed and a Holter monitor showed no ventricular ectopy. Further transthoracic echocardiographic images were obtained, which were suggestive of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A limited transthoracic echocardiogram with contrast was performed, which did not elucidate the hypertrophy. However, eccentric left ventricular apical wall hypertrophy was visualised by a coronary CT scan. PMID:26153133

  5. Orthostatic Blood Pressure Test for Risk Stratification in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Münch, Julia; Aydin, Ali; Suling, Anna; Voigt, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Patten, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young adults, mainly ascribed to ventricular tachycardia (VT). Assuming that VT is the major cause of (pre-) syncope in HCM patients, its occurrence is essential for SCD risk stratification and primarily preventive ICD-implantation. However, evidence of VT during syncope is often missing. As the differentiation of potential lethal causes for syncope such as VT from more harmless reasons is crucial, HCM patients were screened for orthostatic dysregulation by using a simple orthostatic blood pressure test. Methods Over 15 months (IQR [9;20]) 100 HCM patients (55.8±16.2 yrs, 61% male) were evaluated for (pre-)syncope and VT (24h-ECGs, device-memories) within the last five years. Eighty patients underwent an orthostatic blood pressure test. Logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. Results In older patients (>40 yrs) a positive orthostatic test result increased the chance of (pre-) syncope by a factor of 63 (95%-CI [8.8; 447.9], p<0.001; 93% sensitivity, 95%-CI [76; 99]; 74% specificity, 95%-CI [58; 86]). No correlation with VT was shown. A prolonged QTc interval also increased the chance of (pre-) syncope by a factor of 6.6 (95%-CI [2.0; 21.7]; p=0.002). Conclusions The orthostatic blood pressure test is highly valuable for evaluation of syncope and presyncope especially in older HCM patients, suggesting that orthostatic syncope might be more relevant than previously assumed. Considering the high complication rates due to ICD therapies, this test may provide useful information for the evaluation of syncope in individual risk stratification and may help to prevent unnecessary device implantations, especially in older HCM patients. PMID:26107635

  6. Atrial Fibrillation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Is the Extent of Septal Hypertrophy Important?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Sang-chol; Park, Seung-jung; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cardiac disease associated with a high incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF). Recent studies have suggested that interventricular septum thickness may influence the risk stratification of patients with AF. We evaluated the effects of septal hypertrophy on morbidity and mortality in patients with HCM. Patients were followed for a median of 6.1 years and were divided into two groups according to the extent of septal hypertrophy. A total of 1,360 HCM patients were enrolled: 482 (33%) apical or apicoseptal, 415 (28%) asymmetric septal, 388 (27%) basal septal, 38 (2.6%) concentric, and 37 (2.5%) diffuse and mixed type. Ninety-two all-cause deaths and 21 cardiac deaths occurred. The total event rates were significantly higher for patients with HCM with more extensive septal hypertrophy (group A) compared to those with HCM ± focal septal hypertrophy (group B), regardless of type (p<0.001). Arrhythmias occurred in 502 patients, with a significantly higher incidence in group A than in group B (p<0.001). Among patients with arrhythmias, the incidence of AF was significantly higher in group A than group B (p<0.001). In univariate Cox analysis, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy (p<0.001), E/E´ ratio (p = 0.011), and mitral regurgitation grade (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with developing AF. In multivariate Cox analyses, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy [odds ratio (OR) 5.44 (2.29–12.92), p<0.001] in patients with HCM was significantly associated with developing AF. In conclusion, a greater extent of septal hypertrophy is an independent predictor of progression to AF in patients with HCM. PMID:27258035

  7. Reproducibility of Gadolinium Enhancement Patterns and Wall Thickness in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Granillo, Gaston A.; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Capunay, Carlos; Zan, Macarena C. De; Carrascosa, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background Reproducibility data of the extent and patterns of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is limited. Objective To explore the reproducibility of regional wall thickness (WT), LGE extent, and LGE patterns in patients with HCM assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods The extent of LGE was assessed by the number of segments with LGE, and by the total LV mass with LGE (% LGE); and the pattern of LGE-CMR was defined for each segment. Results A total of 42 patients (672 segments) with HCM constituted the study population. The mean WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.62 ± 1.0 mm (6.1%), with limits of agreement of 1.36 mm; -2.60 mm and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93-0.96). Maximum WT measurements showed a mean difference between observers of -0.19 ± 0.8 mm (0.9%), with limits of agreement of 1.32 mm; -1.70 mm, and an ICC of 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.98). The % LGE showed a mean difference between observers of -1.17 ± 1.2 % (21%), with limits of agreement of 1.16%; -3.49%, and an ICC of 0.94 (95% CI 0.88-0.97). The mean difference between observers regarding the number of segments with LGE was -0.40 ± 0.45 segments (11%), with limits of agreement of 0.50 segments; -1.31 segments, and an ICC of 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99). Conclusions The number of segments with LGE might be more reproducible than the percent of the LV mass with LGE. PMID:27305110

  8. Comparison of Clinical Features in Blacks Versus Whites With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Lars L; Pinheiro, Aurelio; Dimaano, Veronica Lea; Pozios, Iraklis; Nowbar, Alexandra; Liu, Hongyun; Luo, Hong-Chang; Lin, Xiaoping; Olsen, Niels T; Hansen, Thomas F; Sogaard, Peter; Abraham, Maria R; Abraham, Theodore P

    2016-06-01

    To date, there has not been a large systematic examination of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) phenotype in blacks versus whites. In this study, we investigate differences in presentation of HC between blacks and whites. We included 441 consecutive patients with HC seen at the Johns Hopkins HC clinic in the period from February 2005 to June 2012. We compared 76 blacks for clinical presentation, electrocardiogram, exercise capacity, left ventricular morphology, and hemodynamics by echocardiography to 365 whites. Black patients with HC more often presented with abnormal electrocardiogram (93% vs 80%, p = 0.009), driven by a significant difference in repolarization abnormalities (79% vs 56%, p <0.001). Apical hypertrophy was more common in blacks (26% vs 9%, p <0.001); however, blacks had less severe systolic anterior movement of the mitral valve and had significantly lower left ventricular outflow tract gradients at rest (9 mm Hg; interquartile range [IQR] 7 to 19 vs 16 mm Hg; IQR 8 to 40, p <0.001) and during provocation (36 mm Hg; IQR 16 to 77 vs 59 mm Hg; IQR 26 to 110, p = 0.002). Despite the nonobstructive pathophysiology, blacks had lower exercise capacity (adjusted difference 1.45 metabolic equivalents [0.45 to 2.45], p = 0.005). In conclusion, blacks have an HC phenotype characterized by lower prevalence of the well-recognized echocardiographic features of HC such as systolic anterior movement of the mitral valve and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and display worse exercise capacity. PMID:27084053

  9. Extended Septal Myectomy for Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haitao; Yan, Jun; Wang, Qiang; Li, Dianyuan; Guo, Hongwei; Li, Shoujun; Wang, Ju; Lou, Song; Zeng, Qingdong

    2016-08-01

    Extended septal myectomy for children and adolescents with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenging procedure, and related data are currently limited. Our study objective was to assess the early outcomes in children and adolescents with HOCM after extended septal myectomy. From October 2007 to August 2015, 40 consecutive patients with HOCM underwent transaortic extended septal myectomy in Fuwai Hospital, Beijing, China. Patients clinical data were analyzed retrospectively. Mean age at the time of operation was 11.3 ± 4.3 (0.7-16.7) years. Mean body weight at the time of surgery was 40.8 ± 19.7 (4.3-92.0) kg. After myectomy, mean left ventricular outflow tract gradient decreased from 80.1 ± 33.8 to 14.7 ± 11.5 mmHg and mean degree of mitral regurgitation decreased from 1.9 ± 0.9 to 0.5 ± 0.5 (p < 0.001 for both). Concomitant surgical procedures were required in 13 patients (32.5 %). There was no early death. Residual systolic anterior motion and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction were reported in two and three patients, respectively. Moderate aortic regurgitation was found in one patient during a follow-up of 26.4 ± 15.1 months. Restrictive symptoms were improved in the patients with New York Heart Association functional class I or II. A 15.8-year-old patient died 16 months after operation. A permanent pacemaker was installed in one patient 3 months after operation. Extended septal myectomy is safe and effective in children and adolescents with HOCM, with excellent clinical and echocardiographic outcome at early follow-up. PMID:27160105

  10. Morphological and Electrical Characteristics in Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Quantitative Analysis of 864 Korean Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Hwan; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, Dae Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan; Kim, You-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although several studies have reported the morphological and electrical characteristics in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), comparison between asymmetric and apical HCM has not been investigated in a reasonably sized cohort. Materials and Methods Echocardiography and electrocardiography were quantitatively analyzed in patients with HCM in a Korean tertiary referral center. Results Of 864 patients (mean age 55.4±14.2 years, 68.9% men), 255 (29.5%) patients had apical HCM, 553 (64.0%) patients asymmetric HCM, and 56 (6.4%) patients mixed type HCM. In echocardiographic evaluations, about three quarters of patients (75.8%) had left atrial enlargement. Left ventricular (LV) dilatations and systolic dysfunction were observed in 6.1% and 2.4%, respectively. QRS widening, PR prolongation, and pathologic Q wave are frequent in patients with asymmetric HCM, while LV strain is frequent in patient with apical HCM. The prevalence of J-point elevations (9.4% in inferior, 2.2% in lateral leads) were substantially higher than that in general population. Giant negative T wave was observed in 15.0% of total patients (32.2% in apical, 6.2% in asymmetric, 25% in mixed type). There was no significant correlation between the thickness of the apical wall and the amplitude of T wave inversion (r=-0.005, p=0.71). Conclusion In a large cohort of HCM including apical type, repolarization abnormalities, including early repolarization and QT prolongation as well as LV strain, were significantly observed. T wave inversion was not appropriate for screening of HCM and not correlated with apical wall thickness. PMID:26446631

  11. An in silico analysis of troponin I mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy of Indian origin.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayatri; Kumar, Manoj; Selvi Rani, Deepa; Annanthapur, Venkateshwari; Calambur, Narasimhan; Nallari, Pratibha; Kaur, Punit

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the myocardium which is hypertrophied resulting in arrhythmias and heart failure leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Several sarcomeric proteins and modifier genes have been implicated in this disease. Troponin I, being a part of the Troponin complex (troponin I, troponin C, troponin T), is an important gene for sarcomeric function. Four mutations (1 novel) were identified in Indian HCM cases, namely, Pro82Ser, Arg98Gln, Arg141Gln and Arg162Gln in Troponin I protein, which are in functionally significant domains. In order to analyse the effect of the mutations on protein stability and protein-protein interactions within the Troponin complex, an in silico study was carried out. The freely available X-ray crystal structure (PDB ID: 1JIE) was used as the template to model the protein followed by loop generation and development of troponin complex for both the troponin I wild type and four mutants (NCBI ID: PRJNA194382). The structural study was carried out to determine the effect of mutation on the structural stability and protein-protein interactions between three subunits in the complex. These mutations, especially the arginine to glutamine substitutions were found to result in local perturbations within the troponin complex by creating/removing inter/intra molecular hydrogen bonds with troponin T and troponin C. This has led to a decrease in the protein stability and loss of important interactions between the three subunits. It could have a significant impact on the disease progression when coupled with allelic heterogeneity which was observed in the cases carrying these mutations. However, this can be further confirmed by functional studies on protein levels in the identified cases. PMID:23967088

  12. Formin Homology 2 Domain Containing 3 (FHOD3) Variants Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Eric C.; Hebl, Virginia Bartleson; Wolf, Matthew J.; Greytak, Sarah R.; Orr, Nicole; Draper, Isabelle; Calvino, Jenna E.; Kapur, Navin K.; Maron, Martin S.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Ommen, Steve R.; Bos, J. Martijn; Ackerman, Michael J.; Huggins, Gordon S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Incomplete penetrance and variable expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is well appreciated. Common genetic polymorphisms variants that may affect HCM penetrance and expression have been predicted but are not well established. Methods and Results We performed a case-control genome wide association (GWA) study to identify common HCM-associated genetic polymorphisms and then asked whether such common variants were more represented in HCM or could explain the heterogeneity of HCM phenotypes. We identified an intronic FHOD3 variant (rs516514) associated with HCM (OR = 2.45 (95% CI 1.76–3.41), p=1.25 × 10−7) and validated this finding in an independent cohort. Next, we tested FHOD3-V1151I (rs2303510), a non-synonymous variant in partial linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs516514, and we detected an even stronger association with HCM (p=1.76 × 10−9). While HCM patients were more likely to carry these FHOD3 alleles subjects homozygous for FHOD3-1151I had similar HCM phenotypes as carriers of the V1151 allele. FHOD3 expression is increased in the setting of HCM and both alleles of FHOD3-V1151I were detected in HCM myectomy tissue. Previously FHOD3 was found to be required for formation of the sarcomere and here we demonstrate that its fly homolog fhos is required for normal adult heart systolic contraction. Conclusions Here we demonstrate the association of a common non-synonymous FHOD3 genetic variant with HCM. This discovery further strengthens the potential role of gene mutations and polymorphisms that alter the amino acid sequence of sarcomere proteins and HCM. PMID:23255317

  13. Development and Validation of a Computational Method for Assessment of Missense Variants in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Daniel M.; Kiezun, Adam; Baxter, Samantha M.; Agarwala, Vineeta; Green, Robert C.; Murray, Michael F.; Pugh, Trevor; Lebo, Matthew S.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Funke, Birgit H.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing the significance of novel genetic variants revealed by DNA sequencing is a major challenge to the integration of genomic techniques with medical practice. Many variants remain difficult to classify by traditional genetic methods. Computational methods have been developed that could contribute to classifying these variants, but they have not been properly validated and are generally not considered mature enough to be used effectively in a clinical setting. We developed a computational method for predicting the effects of missense variants detected in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We used a curated clinical data set of 74 missense variants in six genes associated with HCM to train and validate an automated predictor. The predictor is based on support vector regression and uses phylogenetic and structural features specific to genes involved in HCM. Ten-fold cross validation estimated our predictor's sensitivity at 94% (95% confidence interval: 83%–98%) and specificity at 89% (95% confidence interval: 72%–100%). This corresponds to an odds ratio of 10 for a prediction of pathogenic (95% confidence interval: 4.0–infinity), or an odds ratio of 9.9 for a prediction of benign (95% confidence interval: 4.6–21). Coverage (proportion of variants for which a prediction was made) was 57% (95% confidence interval: 49%–64%). This performance exceeds that of existing methods that are not specifically designed for HCM. The accuracy of this predictor provides support for the clinical use of automated predictions alongside family segregation and population frequency data in the interpretation of new missense variants and suggests future development of similar tools for other diseases. PMID:21310275

  14. The association between brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler parameters in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oner, Taliha; Ozdemir, Rahmi; Hazan, Filiz; Karadeniz, Cem; Doksoz, Onder; Yilmazer, Murat Muhtar; Mese, Timur; Tavli, Vedide

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the association between brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and tissue Doppler imaging measurements and also screening for deadly mutations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We enrolled 20 patients diagnosed with HCM (age:10.7±5 years (1-17), 85% male, weight:42.25±23.10 kg, height:141.80±32.45 cm) and 20 age, gender and body weight-matched control subjects. We performed electrocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, and tissue Doppler echocardiography in each group, as well as genetic tests (for Arg403Gln, Arg453Cys, Arg719Trp and Arg719Gln mutations in MYH7 Exons 13, 14, 19) and BNP in the patients. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (Group 1) or absence (Group 2) of left ventricular (LV) outflow tract obstruction. QTc dispersion and the LV ejection fraction and left atrial (LA) volume index were increased in Group 1. The LA volume index and the mitral and septal E/Ea ratio and septum Z-score were increased while the mitral lateral annulus and septal annulus Ea wave velocities and the mitral and tricuspid E/A ratio were decreased in patients with high levels of BNP compared to those with normal BNP levels. There were no mutations that are associated with increased risk of sudden death found in patients included in this study. In the light of our data, we conclude that such parameters BNP levels above the 98 pg/mL, septal thickness Z-score >6, and higher mitral and septal E/Ea ratios can be used for management of patients with HCM according to life-threatening conditions. PMID:26773184

  15. Clinical significance of late gadolinium enhancement in patients<20 years of age with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brandon M; Dorfman, Adam L; Yu, Sunkyung; Russell, Mark W; Agarwal, Prachi P; Mahani, Maryam Ghadimi; Lu, Jimmy C

    2014-04-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is associated with adverse events in adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). However, limited data exist on the extent and clinical significance of LGE in the pediatric population. In 30 patients (aged 14.1±3.2 years) with clinically diagnosed HC who underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging from 2007 to 2012, segments with hypertrophy and LGE were identified by 2 experienced readers blinded to outcome. Radial, circumferential, and longitudinal strains were evaluated using feature tracking software. The composite outcome was defined as cardiac death, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharge. LGE was present in 17 of 30 patients (57%), all in a midmyocardial pattern, with median 3 segments per patient (interquartile range [IQR] 2 to 5). No LGE was detected in patients without phenotypic hypertrophy. Segments with LGE had decreased radial (basal segments 20.7% vs 70.9%, p=0.01), circumferential (basal segments -23.2% vs -29.3%, p=0.04), and longitudinal strains (basal segments -13.8% vs -20.9%, p=0.04). After median follow-up of 26.9 months (IQR 7.5 to 34.3), 7 patients who had an adverse outcome (5 ventricular tachycardia, 1 appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator discharge, and 1 death) had more segments of LGE (median 4, IQR 2 to 7 vs 0, IQR 0 to 2, p=0.01). One patient without LGE had ventricular tachycardia on exercise test. In conclusion, LGE occurs in a similar pattern in pediatric patients with HC as in adults, associated with hypertrophy, decreased myocardial strain, and adverse clinical outcomes. Further longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the rate of development of LGE and relation to outcomes in a larger cohort. PMID:24513464

  16. Right Ventricular and Right Atrial Involvement Can Predict Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Doesch, Christina; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Rudic, Boris; Tueluemen, Erol; Budjan, Johannes; Haubenreisser, Holger; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Borggrefe, Martin; Papavassiliu, Theano

    2016-01-01

    Objectives and Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with clinical deterioration, stroke and disability in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluated cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived determinants for the occurrence of AF in patients with HCM. Methods: 98 Patients with HCM and 30 healthy controls underwent CMR and were followed-up for 6±3 years. Results: 19 (19.4%) patients presented with AF at initial diagnosis, 19 (19.4%) developed AF during follow-up and 60 (61.2%) remained in sinus rhythm (SR). Compared to healthy controls, patients with HCM who remained in SR presented with significantly increased left ventricular mass, an elevated left ventricular remodeling index, enlarged left atrial volumes and reduced septal mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) compared to healthy controls. Whereas HCM patients who presented with AF at initial diagnosis and those who developed AF during follow-up additionally presented with reduced tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and right atrial (RA) dilatation. Receiver-operator curve analysis indicated good predictive performance of TAPSE, RA diameter and septal MAPSE (AUC 0.73, 0.69 and 0.71, respectively) to detect patients at risk of developing AF. Conclusion: Reduced MAPSE measurements and enlarged LA volumes seems to be a common feature in patients with HCM, whereas reduced TAPSE and RA dilatation only seem to be altered in patients with history of AF and those developing AF. Therefore, they could serve as easy determinable markers of AF in patients with HCM. PMID:26812947

  17. Evaluation of apical subtype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kebed, Kalie Y; Al Adham, Raed I; Bishu, Kalkidan; Askew, J Wells; Klarich, Kyle W; Araoz, Philip A; Foley, Thomas A; Glockner, James F; Nishimura, Rick A; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2014-09-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is an uncommon variant of HC. We sought to characterize cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among apical HC patients. This was a retrospective review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of apical HC who underwent cardiac MRI examinations at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from August 1999 to October 2011. Clinical and demographic data at the time of cardiac MRI study were abstracted. Cardiac MRI study and 2-dimensional echocardiograms performed within 6 months of the cardiac MRI were reviewed; 96 patients with apical HC underwent cardiac MRI examinations. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 130.7 ± 39.1 ml and 44.2 ± 20.9 ml, respectively. Maximum LV thickness was 19 ± 5 mm. Hypertrophy extended beyond the apex into other segments in 57 (59.4%) patients. Obstructive physiology was seen in 12 (12.5%) and was more common in the mixed apical phenotype than the pure apical (19.3 vs 2.6%, p = 0.02). Apical pouches were noted in 39 (40.6%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 70 (74.5%) patients. LGE was associated with severe symptoms and increased maximal LV wall thickness. In conclusion, cardiac MRI is well suited for studying the apical form of HC because of difficulty imaging the cardiac apex with standard echocardiography. Cardiac MRI is uniquely suited to delineate the presence or absence of an apical pouch and abnormal myocardial LGE that may have implications in the natural history of apical HM. In particular, the presence of abnormal LGE is associated with clinical symptoms and increased wall thickness. PMID:25037678

  18. Relation of Doppler Tissue Imaging Parameters With Heart Failure Progression in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Ankur; Harris, Kevin M; Maron, Bradley A; Maron, Martin S; Garberich, Ross F; Haas, Tammy S; Lesser, John R; Maron, Barry J

    2016-06-01

    Refractory progressive heart failure (HF) is becoming the predominant cause of mortality in nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). To anticipate development of this important and often unpredictable clinical course, we investigated whether left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, assessed by echocardiographic Doppler parameters, could identify a subset of patients with HC without obstruction at rest who would experience progression of HF. Diastolic function parameters, assessed by Doppler tissue imaging (DTI), mitral inflow, and pulmonary venous flow were measured in 274 consecutive adult patients with HC evaluated from 2003 to 2007. DTI and other diastolic and clinical/demographic parameters were measured against the composite end point of HF/death, heart transplantation, or progression to advanced New York Heart Association functional class III/IV symptoms and sudden death (SD)/implantable defibrillator (ICD) interventions. HF end points were reached in 19 of 274 patients (7%) over a follow-up period of 4.0 ± 2.3 years. Variables significantly associated with HF outcome by univariate analysis included male gender, initial New York Heart Association class II, lower ejection fraction, and reduced septal and lateral e' mitral annular tissue velocities. Multivariable analysis showed only a reduced lateral e' mitral annular tissue velocity to be independently associated with the composite HF end points (HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.91; p = 0.003). In addition, estimated pulmonary arterial systolic pressure and extensive late gadolinium enhancement by magnetic resonance were also associated with HF outcome (p = 0.04 and p <0.001, respectively). No Doppler (or clinical) variable was associated with SD/appropriate ICD interventions. In conclusion, in HC without outflow obstruction at rest, diastolic dysfunction, evidenced by DTI-reduced lateral e' mitral annular tissue velocity, was associated with adverse long-term HF outcome but was unrelated to SD. This

  19. Changes in left atrial deformation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Evaluation by vector velocity imaging

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Hassan, Hesham; Nazmy, Ahmed; Faheem, Naglaa; Saadan, Haythem; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Objectives: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) represents a generalized myopathic process affecting both ventricular and atrial myocardium. We assessed the global and regional left atrial (LA) function and its relation to left ventricular (LV) mechanics and clinical status in patients with HCM using Vector Velocity Imaging (VVI). Methods: VVI of the LA and LV was acquired from apical four- and two-chamber views of 108 HCM patients (age 40 ± 19years, 56.5% men) and 33 healthy subjects, all had normal LV systolic function. The LA subendocardium was traced to obtain atrial volumes, ejection fraction, velocities, and strain (ϵ)/strain rate (SR) measurements. Results: Left atrial reservoir (ϵsys,SRsys) and conduit (early diastolic SRe) function were significantly reduced in HCM compared to controls (P < .0001). Left atrial deformation directly correlated to LVϵsys, SRsys and negatively correlated to age, NYHA class, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), LA volume index and severity of mitral regurge (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characterist was constructed to explore the cutoff value of LA deformation in differentiation of LA dysfunction; ϵsys < 40% was 75% sensitive, 50% specific, SRsys < 1.7s− 1 was 70% sensitive, 61% specific, SRe> − 1.8s− 1 was 81% sensitive and 30% specific, SRa> − 1.5s− 1 was 73% sensitive and 40% specific. By multivariate analysis global LVϵsys and LV septal thickness are independent predictors for LAϵsys, while end systolic diameter is the only independent predictor for SRsys, P < .001. Conclusion: Left atrial reservoir and conduit function as measured by VVI were significantly impaired while contractile function was preserved among HCM patients. Left atrial deformation was greatly influenced by LV mechanics and correlated to severity of phenotype. PMID:24688992

  20. Differentiating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from athlete's heart: An electrocardiographic and echocardiographic approach.

    PubMed

    Grazioli, Gonzalo; Usín, Domingo; Trucco, Emilce; Sanz, Maria; Montserrat, Silvia; Vidal, Bàrbara; Gutierrez, Josep; Canal, Ramon; Brugada, Josep; Mont, Lluis; Sitges, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) vs athlete's heart is challenging in individuals with mild-moderate left-ventricular hypertrophy. This study aimed to assess ECG and echocardiographic parameters proposed for the differential diagnosis of HCM. The study included 75 men in three groups: control (n=30), "gray zone" athletes with interventricular septum (IVS) measuring 13-15mm (n=25) and HCM patients with IVS of 13-18mm (n=20). The most significant differences were found in relative septal thickness (RST), calculated as the ratio of 2 x IVS to left ventricle end-diastolic diameter (LV-EDD) (0.37, 0.51, 0.71, respectively; p<0.01) and in spatial QRS-T angle as visually estimated (9.8, 33.6, 66.2, respectively; p<0.01). The capacity for differential HCM diagnosis of each of the 5 criteria was assessed using the area under the curve (AUC), as follows: LV-EDD<54 (0.60), family history (0.61), T-wave inversion (TWI) (0.67), spatial QRS-T angle>45 (0.75) and RST>0.54 (0.92). Pearson correlation between spatial QRS-T angle>45 and TWI was 0.76 (p 0.01). The combination of spatial QRS-T angle>45 and RST>0.54 for diagnosis of HCM had an AUC of 0.79. The best diagnostic criteria for HCM was RST>0.54. The spatial QRS-T angle>45 did not add sensitivity if TWI was present. No additional improvement in differential diagnosis was obtained by combining parameters. PMID:27016258

  1. Comparison of Outcomes in Patients With Nonobstructive, Labile-Obstructive, and Chronically Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pozios, Iraklis; Corona-Villalobos, Celia; Sorensen, Lars L; Bravo, Paco E; Canepa, Marco; Pisanello, Chiara; Pinheiro, Aurelio; Dimaano, Veronica L; Luo, Hongchang; Dardari, Zeina; Zhou, Xun; Kamel, Ihab; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Bluemke, David A; Abraham, M Roselle; Abraham, Theodore P

    2015-09-15

    Patients with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) are considered low risk, generally not requiring aggressive intervention. However, nonobstructive and labile-obstructive HC have been traditionally classified together, and it is unknown if these 2 subgroups have distinct risk profiles. We compared cardiovascular outcomes in 293 patients HC (96 nonobstructive, 114 labile-obstructive, and 83 obstructive) referred for exercise echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging and followed for 3.3 ± 3.6 years. A subgroup (34 nonobstructive, 28 labile-obstructive, 21 obstructive) underwent positron emission tomography. The mean number of sudden cardiac death risk factors was similar among groups (nonobstructive: 1.4 vs labile-obstructive: 1.2 vs obstructive: 1.4 risk factors, p = 0.2). Prevalence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was similar across groups but more non-obstructive patients had late gadolinium enhancement ≥20% of myocardial mass (23 [30%] vs 19 [18%] labile-obstructive and 8 [11%] obstructive, p = 0.01]. Fewer labile-obstructive patients had regional positron emission tomography perfusion abnormalities (12 [46%] vs nonobstructive 30 [81%] and obstructive 17 [85%], p = 0.003]. During follow-up, 60 events were recorded (36 ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, including 30 defibrillator discharges, 12 heart failure worsening, and 2 deaths). Nonobstructive patients were at greater risk of VT/VF at follow-up, compared to labile obstructive (hazed ratio 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.84, p = 0.03) and the risk persisted after adjusting for age, gender, syncope, family history of sudden cardiac death, abnormal blood pressure response, and septum ≥3 cm (p = 0.04). Appropriate defibrillator discharges were more frequent in nonobstructive (8 [18%]) compared to labile-obstructive (0 [0%], p = 0.02) patients. In conclusion, nonobstructive hemodynamics is associated with more pronounced fibrosis and ischemia than labile

  2. MYBPH acts as modifier of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients.

    PubMed

    Mouton, J M; van der Merwe, L; Goosen, A; Revera, M; Brink, P A; Moolman-Smook, J C; Kinnear, C

    2016-05-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is considered a model disease to study causal molecular factors underlying isolated cardiac hypertrophy. However, HCM manifests with various clinical symptoms, even in families bearing the same genetic defects, suggesting that additional factors contribute to hypertrophy. The gene encoding the cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMYBPC) is one of the most frequently implicated genes in HCM. Recently another myosin binding protein, myosin binding protein H (MYBPH) was shown to function in concert with cMYBPC in regulating cardiomyocyte contraction. Given the similarity in sequence, structure and the critical role MYBPH plays in sarcomere contraction, we proposed that MYBPH may be involved in HCM pathogenesis. Family-based genetic association analysis was employed to investigate the contribution of MYBPH in modifying hypertrophy. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes in MYBPH were investigated for hypertrophy modifying effects in 388 individuals (27 families), in which three unique South African HCM-causing founder mutations (p.R403W and pA797T in β-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) and p.R92W in the cardiac troponin T gene (TNNT2)) segregate. We observed a significant association between rs2250509 and hypertrophy traits in the p.A797T MYH7 mutation group. Additionally, haplotype GGTACTT significantly affected hypertrophy within the same mutation group. MYBPH was for the first time assessed as a candidate hypertrophy modifying gene. We identified a novel association between MYBPH and hypertrophy traits in HCM patients carrying the p.A797T MYH7 mutation, suggesting that variation in MYBPH can modulate the severity of hypertrophy in HCM. PMID:26969327

  3. Prognostic significance of radionuclide-assessed diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chikamori, T.; Dickie, S.; Poloniecki, J.D.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenna, W.J. )

    1990-02-15

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), technetium-99m gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography, acquired in list mode, was performed in 161 patients. Five diastolic indexes were calculated. During 3.0 +/- 1.9 years, 13 patients had disease-related deaths. With univariate analysis, these patients were younger (29 +/- 20 vs 42 +/- 16 years; p less than 0.05), had a higher incidence of syncope (p less than 0.025), dyspnea (p less than 0.001), reduced peak filling rate (2.9 +/- 0.9 vs 3.4 +/- 1.0 end-diastolic volume/s; p = 0.09) with increased relative filling volume during the rapid filling period (80 +/- 7 vs 75 +/- 12%; p = 0.06) and decreased atrial contribution (17 +/- 7 vs 22 +/- 11%; p = 0.07). Stepwise discriminant analysis revealed that young age at diagnosis, syncope at diagnosis, reduced peak ejection rate, positive family history, reduced peak filling rate, increased relative filling volume by peak filling rate and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy were the most statistically significant (p = 0.0001) predictors of disease-related death (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 77%, positive predictive value 25%). Discriminant analysis excluding the diastolic indexes, however, showed similar predictability (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 78%, positive predictive value 26%). To obtain more homogeneous groups for analysis, patients were classified as survivors or electrically unstable, including sudden death, out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia during 48-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, and heart failure death or cardiac transplant.

  4. Physical activity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: prevalence of inactivity and perceived barriers

    PubMed Central

    Sweeting, Joanna; Ingles, Jodie; Timperio, Anna; Patterson, Jillian; Ball, Kylie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and to determine potential demographic, clinical and health-related factors influencing likelihood of meeting physical activity guidelines. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of consecutive patients (n=198) with HCM attending a specialist HCM centre from July 2014 to November 2015. The primary outcome measure was physical activity (minutes per day), as measured by self-report (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)) and objective means (ActiGraph accelerometer). For both, participants were classified as meeting guidelines if they did at least 150 min per week of physical activity. Quality of life (Short Form-36 V.2, SF-36v2), barriers to exercise and clinical–demographic data were also collected. Results In total, 54.8% of participants did not meet physical activity recommendations based on IPAQ, and 12.7% did not meet guidelines based on accelerometer data. The most commonly identified barriers to exercise were ‘pain interferes with my exercise’ (33%) and ‘I have an injury/disability that stops me’ (29%). Independent factors associated with meeting guidelines included older age (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.85, p=0.002), higher education level (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.08 to 4.93, p=0.03), better physical quality of life (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.09, p=0.05) and more reported barriers (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.91, p=0.01). Conclusions More than half of the patients with HCM did not meet minimum physical activity recommendations. Several barriers to exercise among individuals with HCM exist, and provide the basis for targeted interventions to promote physical activity and improve overall health in patients with HCM. PMID:27547438

  5. Verapamil prevents silent myocardial perfusion abnormalities during exercise in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Udelson, J.E.; Bonow, R.O.; O'Gara, P.T.; Maron, B.J.; Van Lingen, A.; Bacharach, S.L.; Epstein, S.E.

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that reversible 201Tl perfusion defects, compatible with silent myocardial ischemia, commonly develop during exercise in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To determine whether this represents a dynamic process that may be modified favorably by medical therapy, we studied 29 asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with HCM, aged 12-55 years (mean, 28), with exercise 201Tl emission computed tomography under control conditions and again after 1 week of oral verapamil (mean dosage, 453 mg/day). Treadmill time increased slightly during verapamil (21.0 +/- 3.6 to 21.9 +/- 2.7 minutes, p less than 0.005), but peak heart rate-blood pressure product was unchanged (26.3 +/- 6.0 X 10(3)) compared with 25.0 +/- 6.4 X 10(3). Two midventricular short-axis images per study were divided into five regions each, and each of these 10 regions was then analyzed on a 0-2 scale by three observers blinded with regard to the patients' therapy. Average regional scores of 1.5 or less were considered to represent perfusion defects, and a change in regional score of 0.5 or more was considered to constitute a significant change. During control studies, 15 patients (52%) developed perfusion defects with exercise (average, 3.7 regions per patient). In 14 of these patients, all perfusion defects completely reversed after 3 hours of rest; one patient had fixed defects. After administration of verapamil, exercise perfusion scores improved in 10 of the 14 patients (71%) with reversible defects; there was overall improvement in 34 of 50 (68%) regions with initially reversible perfusion defects.

  6. N-acetylcysteine reverses diastolic dysfunction and hypertrophy in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Tanganyika; Ryba, David M; Wieczorek, David F; Wolska, Beata M; Solaro, R John

    2015-11-15

    S-glutathionylation of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) induces Ca(2+) sensitization and a slowing of cross-bridge kinetics as a result of increased oxidative signaling. Although there is evidence for a role of oxidative stress in disorders associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), this mechanism is not well understood. We investigated whether oxidative myofilament modifications may be in part responsible for diastolic dysfunction in HCM. We administered N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for 30 days to 1-mo-old wild-type mice and to transgenic mice expressing a mutant tropomyosin (Tm-E180G) and nontransgenic littermates. Tm-E180G hearts demonstrate a phenotype similar to human HCM. After NAC administration, the morphology and diastolic function of Tm-E180G mice was not significantly different from controls, indicating that NAC had reversed baseline diastolic dysfunction and hypertrophy in our model. NAC administration also increased sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase protein expression, reduced extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, and normalized phosphorylation of phospholamban, as assessed by Western blot. Detergent-extracted fiber bundles from NAC-administered Tm-E180G mice showed nearly nontransgenic (NTG) myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Additionally, we found that NAC increased tension cost and rate of cross-bridge reattachment. Tm-E180G myofilaments were found to have a significant increase in S-glutathionylation of cMyBP-C, which was returned to NTG levels upon NAC administration. Taken together, our results indicate that oxidative myofilament modifications are an important mediator in diastolic function, and by relieving this modification we were able to reverse established diastolic dysfunction and hypertrophy in HCM. PMID:26432840

  7. Long-term benefit of myectomy and anterior mitral leaflet extension in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vriesendorp, Pieter A; Schinkel, Arend F L; Soliman, Osama I I; Kofflard, Marcel J M; de Jong, Peter L; van Herwerden, Lex A; Ten Cate, Folkert J; Michels, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    Severely symptomatic patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) may benefit from surgical myectomy. In patients with enlarged mitral leaflets and mitral regurgitation, myectomy can be combined with anterior mitral leaflet extension (AMLE) to stiffen the midsegment of the leaflet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of myectomy combined with AMLE in patients with obstructive HC. This prospective, observational, single-center cohort study included 98 patients (49 ± 14 years, 37% female) who underwent myectomy combined with AMLE from 1991 to 2012. End points included all-cause mortality and change in clinical and echocardiographic characteristics. Mortality was compared with age- and gender-matched patients with nonobstructive HC and subjects from the general population. Long-term follow-up was 8.3 ± 6.1 years. There was no operative mortality, and New York Heart Association class was reduced from 2.8 ± 0.5 to 1.3 ± 0.5 (p <0.001), left ventricular outflow tract gradient from 93 ± 25 to 9 ± 8 mm Hg (p <0.001), mitral valve regurgitation from grade 2.0 ± 0.9 to 0.5 ± 0.8 (p <0.001), and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve from grade 2.4 ± 0.9 to 0.1 ± 0.3 (p <0.001). The 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year cumulative survival rates were 98%, 92%, 86%, and 83%, respectively, and did not differ from the general population (99%, 97%, 92%, and 85%, respectively, p = 0.3) or patients with nonobstructive HC (98%, 97%, 88%, and 83%, respectively, p = 0.8). In conclusion, in selected patients with obstructive HC, myectomy combined with AMLE is a low-risk surgical procedure. It results in long-term symptom relief and survival similar to the general population. PMID:25591899

  8. Diagnosis of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: T-wave inversion and relative but not absolute apical left ventricular hypertrophy☆

    PubMed Central

    Flett, Andrew S.; Maestrini, Viviana; Milliken, Don; Fontana, Mariana; Treibel, Thomas A.; Harb, Rami; Sado, Daniel M.; Quarta, Giovanni; Herrey, Anna; Sneddon, James; Elliott, Perry; McKenna, William; Moon, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of apical HCM utilizes conventional wall thickness criteria. The normal left ventricular wall thins towards the apex such that normal values are lower in the apical versus the basal segments. The impact of this on the diagnosis of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has not been evaluated. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 2662 consecutive CMR referrals, of which 75 patients were identified in whom there was abnormal T-wave inversion on ECG and a clinical suspicion of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These were retrospectively analyzed for imaging features consistent with cardiomyopathy, specifically: relative apical hypertrophy, left atrial dilatation, scar, apical cavity obliteration or apical aneurysm. For comparison, the same evaluation was performed in 60 healthy volunteers and 50 hypertensive patients. Results Of the 75 patients, 48 met conventional HCM diagnostic criteria and went on to act as another comparator group. Twenty-seven did not meet criteria for HCM and of these 5 had no relative apical hypertrophy and were not analyzed further. The remaining 22 patients had relative apical thickening with an apical:basal wall thickness ratio > 1 and a higher prevalence of features consistent with a cardiomyopathy than in the control groups with 54% having 2 or more of the 4 features. No individual in the healthy volunteer group had more than one feature and no hypertension patient had more than 2. Conclusion A cohort of individuals exist with T wave inversion, relative apical hypertrophy and additional imaging features of HCM suggesting an apical HCM phenotype not captured by existing diagnostic criteria. PMID:25666123

  9. [Radiofrequency catheter ablation of an accessory atrioventricular conduction pathway with persistent left superior vena cava and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Neuser, H; Hofmann, E; Ebeling, F; Remp, T; Steinbeck, G

    1996-08-01

    A 43-year-old man with a 30-year history of WPW-syndrome and a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy developed acute heart failure after onset of atrial fibrillation with fast antegrade conduction, which could be converted to sinus rhythm with antiarrhythmic medication. Catheterization of the coronary sinus during EP testing demonstrated a persistent left superior vena cava. The accessory pathway could be localized at the orifice of an atypical epicardial vein. It was successfully abolished after subvalvular placement of the electrode catheter in the left ventricle. This constellation indicates a combined defect during the regression of the sinus venosus to the sinus coronarius with persistence of conducting muscle fibers. Successful RF ablation procedure provides an obvious risk reduction as a result of a lower frequency of atrial fibrillation and the eliminated risk of ventricular fibrillation due to rapid conduction via an accessory pathway. Beyond that, harmless therapeutic treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with a calcium-channel-blocker (verapamil type) can follow RF ablation. PMID:8975500

  10. Quantification and significance of diffuse myocardial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tarique; Dragulescu, Andreea; Benson, Lee; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Meng, Howard; Windram, Jonathan; Wong, Derek; Greiser, Andreas; Friedberg, Mark; Mertens, Luc; Seed, Michael; Redington, Andrew; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in children and adolescents with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and to assess associations with echocardiographic and clinical parameters of disease. While a common end point in adults with HCM, it is unclear whether diffuse myocardial fibrosis occurs early in the disease. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) estimation of myocardial post-contrast longitudinal relaxation time (T1) is an increasingly used method to estimate diffuse fibrosis. T1 measurements were taken using standard multi-breath-hold spoiled gradient echo phase-sensitive inversion-recovery CMR before and 15 min after the injection of gadolinium. The tissue-blood partition coefficient was calculated as a function of the ratio of T1 change of myocardium compared with blood. An echocardiogram and blood brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels were obtained on the day of the CMR. Twelve controls (mean age 12.8 years; 7 male) and 28 patients with HCM (mean age 12.8 years; 21 male) participated. The partition coefficient for both septal (0.27 ± 0.17 vs. 0.13 ± 0.09; p = 0.03) and lateral walls (0.22 ± 0.09 vs. 0.07 ± 0.10; p < 0.001) was increased in patients compared with controls. Eight patients had overt areas of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). These patients did not show increased partition coefficient compared with those without LGE (0.27 ± 0.15 vs. 0.27 ± 0.19 and 0.22 ± 0.09 vs. 0.22 ± 0.09; p = 0.95 and 0.98, respectively). However, patients who were symptomatic (dyspnea, arrhythmia and/or chest pain) had higher lateral wall partition coefficient than asymptomatic HCM patients (0.27 ± 0.08 vs. 0.17 ± 0.08; p = 0.006). Similarly, patients with raised BNP (>100 pg/ml) had raised lateral wall coefficients (0.27 ± 0.07 vs. 0.20 ± 0.07; p = 0.03), as did those with traditional risk factors for sudden death (0.27 ± 0.06 vs. 0.18 ± 0.08; p = 0.007). Diffuse fibrosis, measured by the partition coefficient

  11. Downregulation of GSTK1 Is a Common Mechanism Underlying Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Shota; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Okamoto, Ryuji; Ito, Masaaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and is associated with a number of potential outcomes, including impaired diastolic function, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Various etiologies have been described for HCM, including pressure overload and mutations in sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric genes. However, the molecular pathogenesis of HCM remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify dysregulated genes common to five mouse HCM models of differing etiology: (i) mutation of myosin heavy chain 6, (ii) mutation of tropomyosin 1, (iii) expressing human phospholamban on a null background, (iv) knockout of frataxin, and (v) transverse aortic constriction. Gene-by-gene comparison identified five genes dysregulated in all five HCM models. Glutathione S-transferase kappa 1 (Gstk1) was significantly downregulated in the five models, whereas myosin heavy chain 7 (Myh7), connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf), periostin (Postn), and reticulon 4 (Rtn4) were significantly upregulated. Gene ontology comparison revealed that 51 cellular processes were significantly enriched in genes dysregulated in each transcriptome dataset. Among them, six processes (oxidative stress, aging, contraction, developmental process, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation) were related to four of the five genes dysregulated in all HCM models. GSTK1 was related to oxidative stress only, whereas the other four genes were related to all six cell processes except MYH7 for oxidative stress. Gene–gene functional interaction network analysis suggested correlative expression of GSTK1, MYH7, and actin alpha 2 (ACTA2). To investigate the implications of Gstk1 downregulation for cardiac function, we knocked out gstk1 in zebrafish using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 system. We found that expression of the zebrafish homologs of MYH7, ACTA2, and actin alpha 1

  12. Cardiac magnetic field map topology quantified by Kullback-Leibler entropy identifies patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirdewan, A.; Gapelyuk, A.; Fischer, R.; Koch, L.; Schütt, H.; Zacharzowsky, U.; Dietz, R.; Thierfelder, L.; Wessel, N.

    2007-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common primary inherited cardiac muscle disorder, defined clinically by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy. The detection of affected patients remains challenging. Genetic testing is limited because only in 50%-60% of all HCM diagnoses an underlying mutation can be found. Furthermore, the disease has a varied clinical course and outcome, with many patients having little or no discernible cardiovascular symptoms, whereas others develop profound exercise limitation and recurrent arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death. Therefore prospective screening of HCM family members is strongly recommended. According to the current guidelines this includes serial echocardiographic and electrocardiographic examinations. In this study we investigated the capability of cardiac magnetic field mapping (CMFM) to detect patients suffering from HCM. We introduce for the first time a combined diagnostic approach based on map topology quantification using Kullback-Leibler (KL) entropy and regional magnetic field strength parameters. The cardiac magnetic field was recorded over the anterior chest wall using a multichannel-LT-SQUID system. CMFM was calculated based on a regular 36 point grid. We analyzed CMFM in patients with confirmed diagnosis of HCM (HCM, n =33, 43.8±13 years, 13 women, 20 men), a control group of healthy subjects (NORMAL, n =57, 39.6±8.9 years; 22 women and 35 men), and patients with confirmed cardiac hypertrophy due to arterial hypertension (HYP, n =42, 49.7±7.9 years, 15 women and 27 men). A subgroup analysis was performed between HCM patients suffering from the obstructive (HOCM, n =19) and nonobstructive (HNCM, n =14) form of the disease. KL entropy based map topology quantification alone identified HCM patients with a sensitivity of 78.8% and specificity of 86.9% (overall classification rate 84.8%). The combination of the KL parameters with a regional field strength parameter improved the overall

  13. Heart rate variability analysis based on time-frequency representation and entropies in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Clariá, F; Vallverdú, M; Baranowski, R; Chojnowska, L; Caminal, P

    2008-03-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients there is an increased risk of premature death, which can occur with little or no warning. Furthermore, classification for sudden cardiac death on patients with HCM is very difficult. The aim of our study was to improve the prognostic value of heart rate variability (HRV) in HCM patients, giving insight into changes of the autonomic nervous system. In this way, the suitability of linear and nonlinear measures was studied to assess the HRV. These measures were based on time-frequency representation (TFR) and on Shannon and Rényi entropies, and compared with traditional HRV measures. Holter recordings of 64 patients with HCM and 55 healthy subjects were analyzed. The HCM patients consisted of two groups: 13 high risk patients, after aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD); 51 low risk patients, without SCD. Five-hour RR signals, corresponding to the sleep period of the subjects, were considered for the analysis as a comparable standard situation. These RR signals were filtered in the three frequency bands: very low frequency band (VLF, 0-0.04 Hz), low frequency band (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency band (HF, 0.15-0.45 Hz). TFR variables based on instantaneous frequency and energy functions were able to classify HCM patients and healthy subjects (control group). Results revealed that measures obtained from TFR analysis of the HRV better classified the groups of subjects than traditional HRV parameters. However, results showed that nonlinear measures improved group classification. It was observed that entropies calculated in the HF band showed the highest statistically significant levels comparing the HCM group and the control group, p-value < 0.0005. The values of entropy measures calculated in the HCM group presented lower values, indicating a decreasing of complexity, than those calculated from the control group. Moreover, similar behavior was observed comparing high and low risk of premature death, the values of the

  14. Strain echocardiography is related to fibrosis and ventricular arrhythmias in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Haland, Trine F.; Almaas, Vibeke M.; Hasselberg, Nina E.; Saberniak, Jørg; Leren, Ida S.; Hopp, Einar; Edvardsen, Thor; Haugaa, Kristina H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias (VAs). We aimed to explore whether systolic function by strain echocardiography is related to VAs and to the extent of fibrosis by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods and results We included 150 HCM patients and 50 healthy individuals. VAs were defined as non-sustained and sustained ventricular tachycardia and aborted cardiac arrest. Left ventricular function was assessed by ejection fraction (EF) and by global longitudinal strain (GLS) assessed by speckle tracking echocardiography. Mechanical dispersion was calculated as standard deviation (SD) of time from Q/R on ECG to peak longitudinal strain in 16 left ventricular segments. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was assessed by CMR. HCM patients had similar EF (61 ± 5% vs. 61 ± 8%, P = 0.77), but worse GLS (−15.7 ± 3.6% vs. −21.1 ± 1.9%, P < 0.001) and more pronounced mechanical dispersion (64 ± 22 vs. 36 ± 13 ms, P < 0.001) compared with healthy individuals. VAs were documented in 37 (25%) HCM patients. Patients with VAs had worse GLS (−14.1 ± 3.6% vs. −16.3 ± 3.4%, P < 0.01), more pronounced mechanical dispersion (79 ± 27 vs. 59 ± 16 ms, P < 0.001), and higher %LGE (6.1 ± 7.8% vs. 0.5 ± 1.4%, P < 0.001) than patients without VAs. Mechanical dispersion correlated with %LGE (R = 0.52, P < 0.001) and was independently associated with VAs (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.3, P = 0.02) and improved risk stratification for VAs. Conclusion GLS, mechanical dispersion, and LGE were markers of VAs in HCM patients. Mechanical dispersion was a strong independent predictor of VAs and related to the extent of fibrosis. Strain echocardiography may improve risk stratification of VAs in HCM. PMID:26873460

  15. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Liang, Jingsheng; Huang, Wenrui; Irving, Thomas C; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M; Hare, Joshua M; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-07-28

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 → Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. We hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In support of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype. PMID:26124132

  16. Relation of coronary microvascular dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to contractile dysfunction independent from myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Stefan A J; Germans, Tjeerd; Götte, Marco J W; Rüssel, Iris K; Lubberink, Mark; Ten Berg, Jurrien M; Ten Cate, Folkert J; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Knaapen, Paul; van Rossum, Albert C

    2011-05-15

    We studied the spatial relations among hyperemic myocardial blood flow (hMBF), contractile function, and morphologic tissue alterations in 19 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). All patients were studied with oxygen-15 water positron emission tomography during rest and adenosine administration to assess myocardial perfusion. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance was performed to derive delayed contrast-enhanced images and to calculate contractile function (E(cc)) with tissue tagging. Eleven healthy subjects underwent similar positron emission tomographic and cardiovascular magnetic resonance scanning protocols and served as a control group. In the HC group, hMBF averaged 2.46 ± 0.91 ml/min/g and mean E(cc) was -14.7 ± 3.4%, which were decreased compared to the control group (3.97 ± 1.48 ml/min/g and -17.7 ± 3.2%, respectively, p <0.001 for the 2 comparisons). Delayed contrast enhancement (DCE) was present only in patients with HC, averaging 6.2 ± 10.3% of left ventricular mass. In the HC group, E(cc) and DCE in the septum (-13.7 ± 3.6% and 10.2 ± 13.6%) significantly differed from the lateral wall (-16.0 ± 2.8% and 2.4 ± 5.9%, p <0.001 for the 2 comparisons). In general, hMBF and E(cc) were decreased in segments displaying DCE compared to nonenhanced segments (p <0.001 for the comparisons). In the HC group, univariate analysis revealed relations of hMBF to E(cc) (r = -0.45, p <0.001) and DCE (r = -0.31, p <0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that E(cc) was independently related to hMBF (beta -0.37, p <0.001) and DCE (beta 0.28, p <0.001). In conclusion, in HC hMBF is impaired and related to contractile function independent from presence of DCE. When present, DCE reflected a progressed disease state as characterized by an increased perfusion deficit and contractile dysfunction. PMID:21377644

  17. Downregulation of GSTK1 Is a Common Mechanism Underlying Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Shota; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Okamoto, Ryuji; Ito, Masaaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and is associated with a number of potential outcomes, including impaired diastolic function, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Various etiologies have been described for HCM, including pressure overload and mutations in sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric genes. However, the molecular pathogenesis of HCM remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify dysregulated genes common to five mouse HCM models of differing etiology: (i) mutation of myosin heavy chain 6, (ii) mutation of tropomyosin 1, (iii) expressing human phospholamban on a null background, (iv) knockout of frataxin, and (v) transverse aortic constriction. Gene-by-gene comparison identified five genes dysregulated in all five HCM models. Glutathione S-transferase kappa 1 (Gstk1) was significantly downregulated in the five models, whereas myosin heavy chain 7 (Myh7), connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf), periostin (Postn), and reticulon 4 (Rtn4) were significantly upregulated. Gene ontology comparison revealed that 51 cellular processes were significantly enriched in genes dysregulated in each transcriptome dataset. Among them, six processes (oxidative stress, aging, contraction, developmental process, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation) were related to four of the five genes dysregulated in all HCM models. GSTK1 was related to oxidative stress only, whereas the other four genes were related to all six cell processes except MYH7 for oxidative stress. Gene-gene functional interaction network analysis suggested correlative expression of GSTK1, MYH7, and actin alpha 2 (ACTA2). To investigate the implications of Gstk1 downregulation for cardiac function, we knocked out gstk1 in zebrafish using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 system. We found that expression of the zebrafish homologs of MYH7, ACTA2, and actin alpha 1 were

  18. How does morphology impact on diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Haddad, Francois; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; Magavern, Emma; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Knowles, Joshua W; Myers, Jonathan; Ashley, Euan A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is unclear if morphology impacts on diastole in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We sought to determine the relationship between various parameters of diastolic function and morphology in a large HCM cohort. Setting Tertiary referral centre from Stanford, California, USA. Partecipants 383 patients with HCM and normal systolic function between 1999 and 2011. A group of 100 prospectively recruited age-matched and sex-matched healthy participants were used as controls. Primary and secondary outcome measures Echocardiograms were assessed by two blinded board-certified cardiologists. HCM morphology was classified as described in the literature (reverse, sigmoid, symmetric, apical and undefined). Results Reverse curvature morphology was most commonly observed (218 (57%). Lateral mitral annular E′<12 cm/s was present in 86% of reverse, 88% of sigmoid, 79% of symmetric, 86% of apical and 81% of undefined morphology, p=0.65. E/E′ was similarly elevated (E/E′: 12.3±7.9 in reverse curvature, 12.1±6.1 in sigmoid, 12.7±9.5 in symmetric, 9.4±4.0 in apical, 12.7±7.9 in undefined morphology, p=0.71) and indexed left atrial volume (LAVi)>40 mL/m2 was present in 47% in reverse curvature, 33% in sigmoid, 32% in symmetric, 37% in apical and 32% in undefined, p=0.09. Each morphology showed altered parameters of diastolic function when compared with the control population. Left ventricular (LV) obstruction was independently associated with all three diastolic parameters considered, in particular with LAVi>40 mL/m2 (OR 2.04 (95% CI 1.23 to 3.39), p=0.005), E/E′>15 (OR 4.66 (95% CI 2.51 to 8.64), p<0.001) and E′<8 (OR 2.55 (95% CI 1.42 to 4.53), p=0.001). Other correlates of diastolic dysfunction were age, LV wall thickness and moderate-to-severe mitral regurgitation. Conclusions In HCM, diastolic dysfunction is present to similar degrees independently from the morphological pattern. The main correlates of diastolic dysfunction are LV obstruction, age

  19. The rare Costello variant HRAS c.173C>T (p.T58I) with severe neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hiippala, Anita; Vasilescu, Catalina; Tallila, Jonna; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Paetau, Anders; Tyni, Tiina; Suomalainen, Anu; Euro, Liliya; Ojala, Tiina

    2016-06-01

    We report a 10-year-old girl presenting with severe neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), feeding difficulties, mildly abnormal facial features, and progressive skeletal muscle symptoms but with normal cognitive development. Targeted oligonucleotide-selective sequencing of 101 cardiomyopathy genes revealed the genetic diagnosis, and the mutation was verified by Sanger sequencing in the patient and her parents. To offer insights into the potential mechanism of patient mutation, protein structural analysis was performed using the resolved structure of human activated HRAS protein with bound GTP analogue (PDB id 5P21) in Discovery Studio 4.5 (Dassault Systèmes Biovia, San Diego, CA). The patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and normal cognitive development was diagnosed with an HRAS mutation c.173C>T (p.T58I), a milder variant of Costello syndrome affecting a highly conserved amino acid, threonine 58. Our analysis suggests that the p.G12 mutations slow GTP hydrolysis rendering HRAS unresponsive to GTPase activating proteins, and resulting in permanently active state. The p.T58I mutation likely affects binding of guanidine-nucleotide-exchange factors, thereby promoting the active state but also allowing for slow inactivation. Patients with the HRAS mutation c.173C>T (p.T58I) might go undiagnosed because of the milder phenotype compared with other mutations causing Costello syndrome. We expand the clinical and molecular picture of the rare HRAS mutation by reporting the first case in Europe and the fourth case in the literature. Our protein structure analysis offers insights into the mechanism of the mildly activating p.T58I mutation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888048

  20. Coronary vasodilation is impaired in both hypertrophied and nonhypertrophied myocardium of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A study with nitrogen-13 ammonia and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Camici, P.; Chiriatti, G.; Lorenzoni, R.; Bellina, R.C.; Gistri, R.; Italiani, G.; Parodi, O.; Salvadori, P.A.; Nista, N.; Papi, L. )

    1991-03-15

    To assess regional coronary reserve in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, regional myocardial blood flow was measured in 23 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 12 control subjects by means of nitrogen-13 ammonia and dynamic positron emission tomography. In patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at baseline study, regional myocardial blood flow was 1.14 +/- 0.43 ml/min per g in the hypertrophied (20 +/- 3 mm) interventricular septum and 0.90 +/- 0.35 ml/min per g (p less than 0.05 versus septal flow) in the nonhypertrophied (10 +/- 2 mm) left ventricular free wall. These were not statistically different from the corresponding values in control subjects (1.04 +/- 0.25 and 0.91 +/- 0.21 ml/min per g, respectively, p = NS). After pharmacologically induced coronary vasodilation (dipyridamole, 0.56 mg/kg intravenously over 4 min), regional myocardial blood flow in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy increased significantly less than in control subjects both in the septum (1.63 +/- 0.58 versus 2.99 +/- 1.06 ml/min per g, p less than 0.001) and in the free wall (1.47 +/- 0.58 versus 2.44 +/- 0.82 ml/min per g, p less than 0.001). In addition, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who had a history of chest pain had more pronounced impairment of coronary vasodilator reserve than did those without a history of chest pain. After dipyridamole, coronary resistance in the septum decreased by 38% in patients without a history of chest pain, but decreased by only 14% in those with such a history (p less than 0.05). Coronary resistance in the free wall decreased by 45% in patients without and by 27% in those with a history of chest pain (p = 0.06).

  1. Familial Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome maps to a locus on chromosome 7q3.

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, C A; Ghaisas, N; Kass, S; Donnelly, S; Basson, C T; Watkins, H C; Anan, R; Thierfelder, L H; McGarry, K; Rowland, E

    1995-01-01

    We have mapped a disease locus for Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) and familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) segregating in a large kindred to chromosome 7 band q3. Although WPW syndrome and FHC have been observed in members of the same family in prior studies, the relationship between these two diseases has remained enigmatic. A large family with 25 surviving individuals who are affected by one or both of these conditions was studied. The disease locus is closely linked to loci D7S688, D7S505, and D7S483 (maximum two point LOD score at D7S505 was 7.80 at theta = 0). While four different FHC loci have been described this is the first locus that can be mutated to cause both WPW and/or FHC. PMID:7657794

  2. Prediction of Fetal Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Diabetic Pregnancies Compared with Postnatal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Elmekkawi, Sherif F.; Mansour, Ghada M.; Elsafty, Mohammed S.E.; Hassanin, Alaa S.; Laban, Mohamed; Elsayed, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to estimate the accuracy of prenatal assessment of interventricular septum (IVS) thickness, right myocardial wall thickness (RMWT), and left myocardial wall thickness (LMWT) by two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound for the prediction of perinatal mortality and postnatal diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) among diabetic pregnant women. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A total of 120 diabetic pregnant women at 35 weeks or more were enrolled in this study from January 1, 2012, to June 30, 2014, at Ain Shams Maternity Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. The 2D ultrasound was done once for all the participants at the time of recruitment; IVS thickness, RMWT, and LMWT were measured. The glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of the participants were recorded. Neonatal assessment including postnatal echocardiography was done after 48 hours. Postnatal results were compared with the prenatal predictive results. RESULTS Higher thickness values for IVS, RMW, and LMW were obtained in the uncontrolled diabetic cases (HbA1c > 6.5%) than in the controlled diabetic cases (HbA1c < 6.5%; P < 0.01). Of the included 120 neonates, 10 (8.3%) were stillborn, 99 (82.5%) had a five-minute Apgar score ≥7, and 4 (3.3%) had a five-minute Apgar score ≤3. The four neonates with severe neonatal distress died after admission to neonatal intensive care unit within one week after delivery. Out of 110 live-born neonates, 4 (3.6%) neonates had a low ejection fraction (EF) (<50%) due to HCM; of them 2 (1.8%) died within one week after delivery, while 2 (1.8%) survived. Another two (1.8%) neonates died from severe respiratory distress syndrome. A cutoff value of ≥4.5 mm for prenatal IVS thickness was predictive of neonatal distress due to HCM with a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 68%, and diagnostic accuracy of 72%. A cutoff value of <1.18 for the ratio of IVS thickness to LMWT had a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 72%, and diagnostic accuracy of 74% for the prediction of

  3. Loss of the AE3 Anion Exchanger in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Model Causes Rapid Decompensation and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Al Moamen, Nabeel J.; Prasad, Vikram; Bodi, Ilona; Miller, Marian L.; Neiman, Michelle L.; Lasko, Valerie M.; Alper, Seth L.; Wieczorek, David F.; Lorenz, John N.; Shull, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    The AE3 Cl−/HCO3− exchanger is abundantly expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes, where it mediates Cl−-uptake and HCO3−-extrusion. Inhibition of AE3-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange has been suggested to protect against cardiac hypertrophy; however, other studies indicate that AE3 might be necessary for optimal cardiac function. To test these hypotheses we crossed AE3-null mice, which appear phenotypically normal, with a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model carrying a Glu180Gly mutation in α–tropomyosin (TM180). Loss of AE3 had no effect on hypertrophy; however, survival of TM180/AE3 double mutants was sharply reduced compared with TM180 single mutants. Analysis of cardiac performance revealed impaired cardiac function in TM180 and TM180/AE3 mutants. TM180/AE3 double mutants were more severely affected and exhibited little response to β-adrenergic stimulation, a likely consequence of their more rapid progression to heart failure. Increased expression of calmodulin-dependent kinase II and protein phosphatase 1 and differences in methylation and localization of protein phosphatase 2A were observed, but were similar in single and double mutants. Phosphorylation of phospholamban on Ser16 was sharply increased in both single and double mutants relative to wild-type hearts under basal conditions, leading to reduced reserve capacity for β-adrenergic stimulation of phospholamban phosphorylation. Imaging analysis of isolated myocytes revealed reductions in amplitude and decay of Ca2+ transients in both mutants, with greater reductions in TM180/AE3 mutants, consistent with the greater severity of their heart failure phenotype. Thus, in the TM180 cardiomyopathy model, loss of AE3 had no apparent anti-hypertrophic effect and led to more rapid decompensation and heart failure. PMID:21056571

  4. Relationship of basal-septal fibrosis with LV outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: insights from cardiac magnetic resonance analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Masakazu; Kawamura, Takayuki; Miyaji, Yuki; Morooka, Hanako; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2016-04-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is frequently observed and may be associated with the prognosis in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); however, the clinical pathophysiological features, particularly in terms of fibrosis, of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) remain unclear. This study aimed to determine a role of local fibrosis in HOCM using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). 108 consecutive HCM patients underwent CMR. HOCM was defined as a left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) pressure gradient ≥30 mmHg at rest. Myocardial mass and fibrosis mass by late gadolinium-enhancement CMR (LGE-CMR) were calculated and the distribution/pattern was analyzed using the AHA 17-segment model. LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly higher in patients with HOCM (n = 19) than in those with nonobstructive HCM (n = 89) (P < 0.05). Both total myocardial and fibrosis masses in LV were similar in the two groups (P = 0.385 and P = 0.859, respectively). However, fibrosis in the basal septum was significantly less frequent in the HOCM group than in the nonobstructive HCM group (P < 0.01). The LVOT pressure gradient was significantly higher in the basal-septal non-fibrosis group than in the fibrosis group (23.6 ± 37.3 vs. 4.8 ± 11.4 mmHg, P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis revealed that basal-septal fibrosis was an independent negative predictor of LVOT obstruction in addition to the local wall thickness and LVEF as positive predictors in HCM patients. In conclusion, a significant association was observed between LVOT obstruction and basal septal fibrosis by LGE-CMR in HCM patients. In addition to negative impact of basal-septal fibrosis, basal-septal hypertrophy and preserved global LV contractility may be associated with the pathophysiological features of LVOT obstruction. PMID:26589516

  5. Non-invasive assessment of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy on and off beta adrenergic blocking drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Alvares, R F; Goodwin, J F

    1982-01-01

    Beta adrenergic blocking drugs in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy provide symptomatic relief but their effect on long-term prognosis is uncertain. Thirty patients were studied non-invasively by simultaneous recordings of echocardiogram, apex-cardiogram, phonocardiogram, and electrocardiogram in order to assess diastolic abnormalities on and off oral beta adrenergic blocking drugs. While on treatment these patients had a mean dose of propranolol 200 mg/day. The treatment was stopped for one week and then non-invasive assessment was repeated. The following diastolic time intervals were studied: isovolumic relaxation period (A2-mitral valve opening); rapid relaxation period (A2-O point of the apexcardiogram), and the period from mitral valve opening to the O point of the apexcardiogram (Mo-O) when most of the filling of the left ventricle occurs. The prolongation of the rapid relaxation period reflects a reduced rate of fall of the left ventricular pressure when the pressure differential does not change between A2 and the O point of the apexcardiogram, and in this study this period was prolonged in 19, shortened in eight, and remained the same in three patients after beta blockade. The Mo-O point was prolonged in 22, shortened in seven, and was unchanged in one patient after beta adrenergic blocking drugs. All these results were independent of heart rate. In conclusion the response of diastolic time intervals to beta blocking drugs in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was variable but there was a significant number of patients in whom the time available for filling of the left ventricle was prolonged, suggesting better filling possibly because of improved distensibility of the left ventricle after beta adrenergic blocking drugs. PMID:6125160

  6. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These ... many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. ...

  7. [Clinical and instrumental characteristics of idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dynamics of echocardiographic indices as affected by beta-adrenergic blockaders].

    PubMed

    Barats, S S; Kheĭnonen, I M; Klets, F Kh; Serebrennikov, V A; Lipchenko, A A

    1983-10-01

    Clinical investigation of 31 patients with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortal stenosis (IHSS) and idiopathic hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (IHNCMP) comprised electro- and phonocardiography, roentgenologic examination and echocardiography. The disease was latent in 3 patients, and ischemic heart disease or rheumatic heart lesion had been diagnosed prior to echocardiography in 26. Asymmetrical hypertrophy and hypokinesia of the upper third of the ventricular septum, narrowed left-ventricular cavity and septum-wise systolic movement of the anterior mitral cusp were findings common to all IHSS patients. The ventricular septum/left-ventricular posterior wall thickness ratio was elevated (1.42 +/- 0.06). In IHNCMP patients, this ratio was within normal range. The results of an acute pharmacologic test with 10 mg intravenous obsidan given to 10 IHSS patients suggested that the obstruction of left-ventricular outflow pathway was somewhat reduced. Prolonged (2 months to 3 years) obsidan treatment was given to 25 patients and was associated with positive effect in terms of improved subjective manifestations of the disease. However, echocardiographic patterns only showed moderate improvement in 9 of the 13 patients who had completed 1-3 years' treatment course. PMID:6139501

  8. Microarray analysis of active cardiac remodeling genes in a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model rescued by a phospholamban knockout

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudarsan; Pena, James R.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wolska, Beata M.

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and aberrant systolic and/or diastolic function. Our laboratories have previously developed two mouse models that affect cardiac performance. One mouse model encodes an FHC-associated mutation in α-tropomyosin: Glu → Gly at amino acid 180, designated as Tm180. These mice display a phenotype that is characteristic of FHC, including severe cardiac hypertrophy with fibrosis and impaired physiological performance. The other model was a gene knockout of phospholamban (PLN KO), a regulator of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes; these hearts exhibit hypercontractility with no pathological abnormalities. Previous work in our laboratories shows that when mice were genetically crossed between the PLN KO and Tm180, the progeny (PLN KO/Tm180) display a rescued hypertrophic phenotype with improved morphology and cardiac function. To understand the changes in gene expression that occur in these models undergoing cardiac remodeling (Tm180, PLN KO, PLN KO/Tm180, and nontransgenic control mice), we conducted microarray analyses of left ventricular tissue at 4 and 12 mo of age. Expression profiling reveals that 1,187 genes changed expression in direct response to the three genetic models. With these 1,187 genes, 11 clusters emerged showing normalization of transcript expression in the PLN KO/Tm180 hearts. In addition, 62 transcripts are highly involved in suppression of the hypertrophic phenotype. Confirmation of the microarray analysis was conducted by quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide insight into genes that alter expression during cardiac remodeling and are active during modulation of the cardiomyopathic phenotype. PMID:23800848

  9. Gene expression patterns in transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenrui; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Narasimhan, Giri; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-07-01

    Using microarray and bioinformatics, we examined the gene expression profiles in transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutations in the myosin regulatory light chain shown to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We focused on two malignant RLC-mutations, Arginine 58→Glutamine (R58Q) and Aspartic Acid 166 → Valine (D166V), and one benign, Lysine 104 → Glutamic Acid (K104E)-mutation. Datasets of differentially expressed genes for each of three mutants were compared to those observed in wild-type (WT) hearts. The changes in the mutant vs. WT samples were shown as fold-change (FC), with stringency FC ≥ 2. Based on the gene profiles, we have identified the major signaling pathways that underlie the R58Q-, D166V- and K104E-HCM phenotypes. The correlations between different genotypes were also studied using network-based algorithms. Genes with strong correlations were clustered into one group and the central gene networks were identified for each HCM mutant. The overall gene expression patterns in all mutants were distinct from the WT profiles. Both malignant mutations shared certain classes of genes that were up or downregulated, but most similarities were noted between D166V and K104E mice, with R58Q hearts showing a distinct gene expression pattern. Our data suggest that all three HCM mice lead to cardiomyopathy in a mutation-specific manner and thus develop HCM through diverse mechanisms. PMID:26906074

  10. Relation between left ventricular gradient and relative stroke volume ejected in early and late systole in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Assessment with radionuclide cineangiography.

    PubMed Central

    Sugrue, D D; McKenna, W J; Dickie, S; Myers, M J; Lavender, J P; Oakley, C M; Goodwin, J F

    1984-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterised by hyperkinetic left ventricular function, but the effect of an outflow tract gradient on the haemodynamics of ejection remains controversial. To determine the functional importance of left ventricular gradients in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy technetium-99m gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography was performed in 18 normal subjects and 57 patients, 26 with and 31 without left ventricular gradients. Time activity curves were generated from list mode data, and the proportion of stroke volume ejected during various phases of systole was computed. The proportion of stroke volume ejected during the initial third, the initial 50%, and the initial 80% of systole was greater in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy than in normal subjects but was identical in patients with and without left ventricular gradients. The duration of systole was similar in the three groups. These findings favour the interpretation that a left ventricular gradient does not represent true obstruction and are consistent with previous observations that clinical features and prognostic indicators do not relate to gradients in this disease. PMID:6542420

  11. Specificity of systolic anterior motion of anterior mitral leaflet for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Prevalence in large population of patients with other cardiac diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Maron, B J; Gottdiener, J S; Perry, L W

    1981-01-01

    The value of systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral leaflet as a diagnostic marker for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been questioned because of its reported occurrence in other heart diseases. To determine the true specificity of systolic anterior motion for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 721 echocardiograms from patients with a wide variety of cardiac diseases were reviewed for its presence or absence under basal conditions. Systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral leaflet was present in only 22 (3.0%) of the 721 patients, giving a specificity of 97 per cent. It was most common in patients with d-transposition of the great vessels (11 of 51, or 21%). With patients having transposition of the great vessels excluded from the analysis, the prevalence of systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral leaflet was only 1.6 per cent (specificity 98%). Of note, eight of the 11 patients with systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral leaflet and diseases other than transposition of the great vessels had disproportionate thickening of the ventricular septum, making it exceedingly rare in a patient population with normal septal-free wall thickness ratios (prevalence 0.4%; specificity 99%). Hence, while systolic anterior motion is not pathognomonic of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, it was an uncommon finding in a large population of patients with a variety of cardiac diseases; when present in such patients systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral leaflet is usually associated with disproportionate septal thickening. Images PMID:7193042

  12. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bryce V.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Costa, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  13. Ablation of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 4 prevents development of hypertrophy in a model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N; Lasko, Valerie M; Nieman, Michelle L; Jiang, Min; Gao, Xu; Rubinstein, Jack; Wieczorek, David F; Shull, Gary E

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms linking the expression of sarcomeric mutant proteins to the development of pathological hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase PMCA4 in the HCM phenotype using a transgenic model that expresses mutant (Glu180Gly) α-tropomyosin (Tm180) in heart. Immunoblot analysis revealed that cardiac PMCA4 expression was upregulated early in Tm180 disease pathogenesis. This was accompanied by an increase in levels of the L-type Ca(2+)-channel, which is implicated in pathological hypertrophy. When Tm180 mice were crossed with a PMCA4-null line, loss of PMCA4 caused the abrogation of hypertrophy in Tm180/PMCA4-null double mutant mice. RT-PCR analysis of Tm180/PMCA4-null hearts revealed blunting of the fetal program and reversion of pro-fibrotic Col1a1 and Col3a1 gene expression to wild-type levels. This was accompanied by evidence of reduced L-type Ca(2+)-channel expression, and diminished calcineurin activity. Expression of the metabolic substrate transporters glucose transporter 4 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b was preserved and Tm180-related changes in mRNA levels of various contractile stress-related proteins including the cardiac ankyrin protein CARP and the N2B isoform of titin were reversed in Tm180/PMCA4-null hearts. cGMP levels were increased and phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein was elevated in Tm180/PMCA4-null hearts. These changes were associated with a sharp reduction in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in Tm180/PMCA4-null hearts, which occurred despite persistence of Tm180-related impairment of relaxation dynamics. These results reveal a novel and specific role for PMCA4 in the Tm180 hypertrophic phenotype, with the "protective" effects of PMCA4 deficiency encompassing multiple determinants of HCM-related hypertrophy. PMID:25280781

  14. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Timothy J; Josowitz, Rebecca; Johnson, Bryce V; Gelb, Bruce D; Costa, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  15. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy is disease in which the heart muscle becomes weakened, stretched, or has another structural problem. It ... cannot pump or function well. Most people with cardiomyopathy have heart failure .

  16. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the most common reason for needing a heart transplant. Cardiomyopathy is so dangerous because it often goes ... damaged by ischemic cardiomyopathy, doctors may recommend a heart transplant. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia ( ...

  17. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or ... tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have ...

  18. The flexibility of two tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G, that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaochuan; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Janco, Miro; Geeves, Michael A.; Marston, Steven B.; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Well-known tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G are linked to cardiomyopathies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural mechanics of D175N and E180G tropomyosins have been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D175N and E180G mutations increase both local and global tropomyosin flexibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In muscle, this increased flexibility will enhance myosin interactions on actin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extra myosin interaction can alter cardiac Ca{sup 2+}-switching, leading to dysfunction. -- Abstract: Point mutations targeting muscle thin filament proteins are the cause of a number of cardiomyopathies. In many cases, biological effects of the mutations are well-documented, whereas their structural and mechanical impact on filament assembly and regulatory function is lacking. In order to elucidate molecular defects leading to cardiac dysfunction, we have examined the structural mechanics of two tropomyosin mutants, E180G and D175N, which are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Tropomyosin is an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil dimer which polymerizes end-to-end to create an elongated superhelix that wraps around F-actin filaments of muscle and non-muscle cells, thus modulating the binding of other actin-binding proteins. Here, we study how flexibility changes in the E180G and D175N mutants might affect tropomyosin binding and regulatory motion on F-actin. Electron microscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations show that E180G and D175N mutations cause an increase in bending flexibility of tropomyosin both locally and globally. This excess flexibility is likely to increase accessibility of the myosin-binding sites on F-actin, thus destabilizing the low-Ca{sup 2+} relaxed-state of cardiac muscle. The resulting imbalance in the on-off switching mechanism of the mutants will shift the regulatory equilibrium towards Ca{sup 2+}-activation of cardiac muscle, as is observed in affected

  19. Assessment of left ventricular longitudinal function in cats with subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; FUJII, Yoko; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; AOKI, Takuma

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in cats is characterized by concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and both diastolic and systolic dysfunction. Although impaired cardiac function detected by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) in cats with HCM was previously reported, reference ranges of TDI in normal cats and cats with HCM have been reported as widely variable. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) was useful for assessment of cardiac function in human patients with HCM, but clinical utility was not known in cats. The aim of this study was to assess global and segmental LV myocardial function using STE in cats with HCM whose TDI variables were within the reference range. A total of 35 cats of different breeds were enrolled in this study. The HCM group (n=22) was cats diagnosed as HCM without left atrial enlargement and with normal TDI measurements. HCM cats were further divided into a segmental hypertrophy (S-HCM) group and a diffuse hypertrophy (D-HCM) group. The control group consisted of 13 clinically healthy cats. No cats in any group showed any clinical symptoms. Conventional echocardiography, TDI, and global and segmental STE indices were evaluated and compared between groups. Only the longitudinal strain rate during early diastole was significantly decreased in both HCM groups, even in all segments including those without hypertrophy in S-HCM group. This study suggests that STE parameters are the more sensitive variables compared with conventional TDI parameters to detect early myocardial diastolic dysfunction in cats with HCM. PMID:25877405

  20. Mutations in GTPBP3 Cause a Mitochondrial Translation Defect Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kopajtich, Robert; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Rorbach, Joanna; Metodiev, Metodi D.; Freisinger, Peter; Mandel, Hanna; Vanlander, Arnaud; Ghezzi, Daniele; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Taylor, Robert W.; Marquard, Klaus; Murayama, Kei; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Mayr, Johannes A.; Pearce, Sarah F.; Powell, Christopher A.; Saada, Ann; Ohtake, Akira; Invernizzi, Federica; Lamantea, Eleonora; Sommerville, Ewen W.; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Crushell, Ellen; Okazaki, Yasushi; Kohda, Masakazu; Kishita, Yoshihito; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Assouline, Zahra; Rio, Marlène; Feillet, François; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédict; Chretien, Dominique; Munnich, Arnold; Menten, Björn; Sante, Tom; Smet, Joél; Régal, Luc; Lorber, Abraham; Khoury, Asaad; Zeviani, Massimo; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Bertini, Enrico S.; Van Coster, Rudy; Klopstock, Thomas; Rötig, Agnès; Haack, Tobias B.; Minczuk, Michal; Prokisch, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory chain deficiencies exhibit a wide variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from defective mitochondrial energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. These defects can be caused by either mutations in the mtDNA or mutations in nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. The underlying pathomechanisms can affect numerous pathways involved in mitochondrial physiology. By whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified 11 individuals from 9 families carrying compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in GTPBP3, encoding the mitochondrial GTP-binding protein 3. Affected individuals from eight out of nine families presented with combined respiratory chain complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle. Mutations in GTPBP3 are associated with a severe mitochondrial translation defect, consistent with the predicted function of the protein in catalyzing the formation of 5-taurinomethyluridine (τm5U) in the anticodon wobble position of five mitochondrial tRNAs. All case subjects presented with lactic acidosis and nine developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In contrast to individuals with mutations in MTO1, the protein product of which is predicted to participate in the generation of the same modification, most individuals with GTPBP3 mutations developed neurological symptoms and MRI involvement of thalamus, putamen, and brainstem resembling Leigh syndrome. Our study of a mitochondrial translation disorder points toward the importance of posttranscriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for proper mitochondrial function. PMID:25434004

  1. Screening Mutations of MYBPC3 in 114 Unrelated Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy by Targeted Capture and Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuxia; Jiang, Tengyong; Piao, Chunmei; Li, Xiaoyan; Guo, Jun; Zheng, Shuai; Zhang, Xiaoping; Cai, Tao; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a major cause of sudden cardiac death. Mutations in the MYBPC3 gene represent the cause of HCM in ~35% of patients with HCM. However, genetic testing in clinic setting has been limited due to the cost and relatively time-consuming by Sanger sequencing. Here, we developed a HCM Molecular Diagnostic Kit enabling ultra-low-cost targeted gene resequencing in a large cohort and investigated the mutation spectrum of MYBPC3. In a cohort of 114 patients with HCM, a total of 20 different mutations (8 novel and 12 known mutations) of MYBPC3 were identified from 25 patients (21.9%). We demonstrated that the power of targeted resequencing in a cohort of HCM patients, and found that MYBPC3 is a common HCM-causing gene in Chinese patients. Phenotype-genotype analyses showed that the patients with double mutations (n = 2) or premature termination codon mutations (n = 12) showed more severe manifestations, compared with patients with missense mutations (n = 11). Particularly, we identified a recurrent truncation mutation (p.Y842X) in four unrelated cases (4/25, 16%), who showed severe phenotypes, and suggest that the p.Y842X is a frequent mutation in Chinese HCM patients with severe phenotypes. PMID:26090888

  2. Evaluation of the Mayo Clinic Phenotype-Based Genotype Predictor Score in Patients with Clinically Diagnosed Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sinead L.; Anderson, Jason H.; Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Kruisselbrink, Teresa M.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Ommen, Steve R.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Bos, J. Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) can provide an important clinical marker for disease outcome and family screening. This study set out to validate our recently developed phenotype-based HCM genotype predictor score. Patients clinically diagnosed with HCM and evaluated by genetic counselors comprised the study cohort. Genotype score was derived based on clinical and echocardio-graphic variables. Total score was correlated with the yield of genetic testing. Of 564 HCM patients, 198 sought genetic testing (35 %; 55 % male; mean age at diagnosis, 50 ±20 years). Of these, 101 patients (51 %) were genotype positive for a HCM-associated genetic mutation (55 % male; mean age at diagnosis, 42 ± 18 years). Cochran-Armitage analysis showed similar, statistically significant trends of increased yields for higher genotype scores for both the original and study cohort. Validated by the current study, this scoring system provides an easy-to-use, clinical tool to aid in determining the likelihood of a positive HCM genetic test. PMID:26914223

  3. Effects of nicotine administration in a mouse model of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, α-tropomyosin D175N

    PubMed Central

    Gaffin, Robert D.; Chowdhury, Shamim A. K.; Alves, Marco S. L.; Dias, Fernando A. L.; Ribeiro, Cibele T. D.; Fogaca, Rosalvo T. H.; Wieczorek, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of nicotine (NIC) on normal hearts are fairly well established, yet its effects on hearts displaying familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have not been tested. We studied both the acute and chronic effects of NIC on a transgenic (TG) mouse model of FHC caused by a mutation in α-tropomyosin (Tm; i.e., α-Tm D175N TG, or Tm175). For acute effects, intravenously injected NIC increased heart rate, left ventricular (LV) pressure, and the maximal rate of LV pressure increase (+dP/dt) in non-TG (NTG) and Tm175 mice; however, Tm175 showed a significantly smaller increase in the maximal rate of LV pressure decrease (−dP/dt) compared with NTGs. Western blots revealed phosphorylation of phospholamban Ser16 and Thr17 residue increased in NTG mice following NIC injection but not in Tm175 mice. In contrast, phosphorylation of troponin I at serine residues 23 and 24 increased equally in both NTG and Tm175. Thus the attenuated increase in relaxation in Tm175 mice following acute NIC appears to result primarily from attenuated phospholamban phosphorylation. Chronic NIC administration (equivalent to smoking 2 packs of cigarettes/day for 4 mo) also increased +dP/dt in NTG and Tm175 mice compared with chronic saline. However, chronic NIC had little effect on heart rate, LV pressure, −dP/dt, LV wall and chamber dimensions, or collagen content for either group of mice. PMID:21743000

  4. Short-limb dwarfism and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with paternal isodisomy 14: 45,XYidic(14)(p11)

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.A.; Moore, C.M.; Kaye, C.I.

    1996-11-11

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) has been shown to result in specific disorders either due to imprinting and/or homozygosity of mutant alleles. Here we present the findings in a child with paternal UPD14. Ultrasound evaluation was performed at 30 weeks of gestation because of abnormally large uterine size. Pertinent ultrasound findings included polyhydramnios, short limbs, abnormal position of hands, small thorax, and nonvisualization of the fetal stomach. Postnatally the infant was found to have a low birth weight, short birth length, contractures, short limbs, and a small thorax with upslanting ribs. Assisted ventilation and gastrostomy were required. At age 6 months, the infant required hospitalization for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy which responded to Atenolol{reg_sign}. Initial cytogenetic studies demonstrated an apparently balanced de novo Robertsonian translocation involving chromosomes 14 and a karyotype designation of 45,XY,t(14q14q). No indication of mosaicism for trisomy 14 was observed in metaphase spreads prepared from peripheral blood lymphocytes or skin-derived fibroblasts. C-band and fluorescence in situ hybridization results demonstrated that the chromosome was dicentric. DNA analyses showed paternal uniparental isodisomy for chromosome 14. Based on the cytogenetic and DNA results a final karyotype designation of 45,XY,idic(14)(p11) was assigned to this infant with paternal isodisomy of chromosome 14. 41 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Rapidly Progressive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in an Infant with Noonan syndrome with multiple Lentigines. Palliative Treatment with a Rapamycin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Lauriol, Jessica; Thul, Josef; Behnke-Hall, Kachina; Logeswaran, Tushiha; Schänzer, Anne; Böğürcü, Nuray; Garvalov, Boyan K.; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D.; von Gerlach, Susanne; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Schranz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) frequently manifests with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recently, it was demonstrated that mTOR inhibition reverses HCM in NSML mice. We report for the first time on the effects of treatment with a rapamycin analog in an infant with LS and a malignant form of HCM. In the boy, progressive HCM was diagnosed during the first week of life and diagnosis of NSML was established at age 20 weeks by showing a heterozygous Q510E mutation in the PTPN11 gene. Immunoblotting with antibodies against pERK, pAkt, and pS6RP in fibroblasts demonstrated reduced RAS/MAPK and enhanced Akt/mTOR pathway activities. Because of the patient’s critical condition, everolimus therapy was started at age 24 weeks and continued until heart transplantation at age 36 weeks. Prior to surgery, heart failure improved from NYHA stage IV to II and brain natriuretic peptide values decreased from 9600 to <1000 pg/ml, but no reversal of cardiac hypertrophy was observed. Examination of the explanted heart revealed severe hypertrophy and myofiber disarray with extensive perivascular fibrosis. These findings provide evidence that Akt/mTOR activity is enhanced in NSML with HCM and suggest that rapamycin treatment could be principally feasible for infantile NSML. But the preliminary experiences made in this single patient indicate that therapy should start early to prevent irreversible cardiac remodelling. PMID:25708222

  6. A mutation in the {beta}-myosin rod associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has an unexpected molecular phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Armel, Thomas Z.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common, autosomal dominant disorder primarily characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in youth. HCM is caused by mutations in several sarcomeric proteins, with mutations in MYH7, encoding {beta}-MyHC, being the most common. While many mutations in the globular head region of the protein have been reported and studied, analysis of HCM-causing mutations in the {beta}-MyHC rod domain has not yet been reported. To address this question, we performed an array of biochemical and biophysical assays to determine how the HCM-causing E1356K mutation affects the structure, stability, and function of the {beta}-MyHC rod. Surprisingly, the E1356K mutation appears to thermodynamically destabilize the protein, rather than alter the charge profile know to be essential for muscle filament assembly. This thermodynamic instability appears to be responsible for the decreased ability of the protein to form filaments and may be responsible for the HCM phenotype seen in patients.

  7. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  8. Decreased coronary vasodilatory capacity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy determined by split-dose thallium-dipyridamole myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, Y.; Yamaguchi, R.; Ogata, M.; Kihara, K.; Toshima, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Split-dose thallium-dipyridamole myocardial scintigraphy was performed in patients with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) who had angiographically normal coronary arteries. The dipyridamole-induced increases in thallium-201 uptake, calculated to evaluate coronary vasodilatory capacity, were significantly lower in 30 patients with HC than in 13 control subjects (177 +/- 58 vs 281 +/- 46%) and the reductions were observed in both the septal and lateral segments. The reductions of the septal segment in HC patients were significantly greater than those in 10 hypertensive patients with comparable degrees of septal hypertrophy. Of patients with HC, 16 had increases in thallium uptake well below the normal range. Compared with those having normal increases, these patients had significantly lower exercise duration (11 vs 15 minutes), with 33% having ST depression develop at a workload less than or equal to 80 watts. These data indicate that approximately one-half of patients with HC have impaired coronary vasodilatory capacity that could be an important pathophysiologic abnormality of HC resulting in the development of myocardial ischemia and the impairment of cardiac performance during exercise.

  9. Facilitated Cross-Bridge Interactions with Thin Filaments by Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutations in α-Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Grubich, Justin R.; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Asbury, Thomas M.; Compton, Lisa A.; Mihajlović, Goran; Miller, Victor F.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease of cardiac sarcomeres. To identify molecular mechanisms underlying FHC pathology, functional and structural differences in three FHC-related mutations in recombinant α-Tm (V95A, D175N, and E180G) were characterized using both conventional and modified in vitro motility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Mutant Tm's exhibited reduced α-helical structure and increased unordered structure. When thin filaments were fully occupied by regulatory proteins, little or no motion was detected at pCa 9, and maximum speed (pCa 5) was similar for all tropomyosins. Ca2+-responsiveness of filament sliding speed was increased either by increased pCa50 (V95A), reduced cooperativity n (D175N), or both (E180G). When temperature was increased, thin filaments with E180G exhibited dysregulation at temperatures ~10°C lower, and much closer to body temperature, than WT. When HMM density was reduced, thin filaments with D175N required fewer motors to initiate sliding or achieve maximum sliding speed. PMID:22187526

  10. Cardiac troponin structure-function and the influence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated mutations on modulation of contractility.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanhua; Regnier, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) acts as a pivotal regulator of muscle contraction and relaxation and is composed of three distinct subunits (cTnC: a highly conserved Ca(2+) binding subunit, cTnI: an actomyosin ATPase inhibitory subunit, and cTnT: a tropomyosin binding subunit). In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the structure-function relationship of cTn and its subunits, its modulation by PKA-mediated phosphorylation of cTnI, and what is known about how these properties are altered by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) associated mutations of cTnI. This includes recent work using computational modeling approaches to understand the atomic-based structural level basis of disease-associated mutations. We propose a viewpoint that it is alteration of cTnC-cTnI interaction (rather than the Ca(2+) binding properties of cTn) per se that disrupt the ability of PKA-mediated phosphorylation at cTnI Ser-23/24 to alter contraction and relaxation in at least some HCM-associated mutations. The combination of state of the art biophysical approaches can provide new insight on the structure-function mechanisms of contractile dysfunction resulting cTnI mutations and exciting new avenues for the diagnosis, prevention, and even treatment of heart diseases. PMID:26851561

  11. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in a Patient With Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Case Report and a Brief Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Shah, Amar B; Gass, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a phenotypic variant of nonobstructive HCM, in which hypertrophy of the myocardium predominantly involves the left ventricular apex. It is common in Japanese and other Asian populations but is rare in the United States. Apical HCM has a relatively benign prognosis in terms of cardiovascular mortality; however, morbid events such as ventricular aneurysms, apical thrombi, diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial infarction are not uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old white man who presented to our hospital after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The patient had a witnessed collapse while playing basketball in the field. He was found to be pulseless and unresponsive by his coach, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately started. Upon arrival of emergency medical services, an automated external defibrillator advised shock and he was defibrillated thrice. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 15 minutes. He was intubated for airway protection and was brought to the hospital. Therapeutic hypothermia was initiated. He demonstrated good neurological status after active rewarming. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of apical HCM with right ventricular involvement. The patient underwent an implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement for secondary prevention and was subsequently discharged. In conclusion, apical HCM can rarely be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. The diagnosis may be missed on transthoracic 2-dimensional cardiac echocardiogram, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging should be considered to exclude apical HCM in young patients who present after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:25923227

  12. Kinetics of a single cross-bridge in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy heart muscle measured by reverse Kretschmann fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettikolla, Prasad; Calander, Nils; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a serious heart disease that often leads to a sudden cardiac death of young athletes. It is believed that the alteration of the kinetics of interaction between actin and myosin causes FHC by making the heart to pump blood inefficiently. We set out to check this hypothesis ex vivo. During contraction of heart muscle, a myosin cross-bridge imparts periodic force impulses to actin. The impulses are analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of fluorescently labeled actin. To minimize observation volume and background fluorescence, we carry out FCS measurements in surface plasmon coupled emission mode in a reverse Kretschmann configuration. Fluorescence is a result of near-field coupling of fluorophores excited in the vicinity of the metal-coated surface of a coverslip with the surface plasmons propagating in the metal. Surface plasmons decouple on opposite sides of the metal film and emit in a directional manner as far-field p-polarized radiation. We show that the rate of changes of orientation is significantly faster in contracting cardiac myofibrils of transgenic mice than wild type. These results are consistent with the fact that mutated heart muscle myosin translates actin faster in in vitro motility assays.

  13. Depression in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: is there any relation with the risk factors for sudden death?

    PubMed Central

    Igoumenou, Artemis; Alevizopoulos, Giorgos; Anastasakis, Aris; Stavrakaki, Errika; Toutouzas, Pavlos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate whether depressive symptoms are related to the risk factors for sudden death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Design 121 patients diagnosed as having HCM were assessed for depressive symptomatology using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and followed up for a period of 2 years. For the interview, the authors used the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III/DSM-III-R. A multidimensional longitudinal study was carried out with both somatic and psychological symptoms and signs taken into consideration. SPSS was used for the statistical analysis. Results (1) Patients with HCM are more depressed than the general population. (2) There is no positive correlation between the occurrence of depressive symptoms and the risk factors for sudden death in patients with HCM. (3) Patients at high risk for sudden death are not more depressed than the others. (4) Time from diagnosis of the cardiac disease is not related to the presence and severity of depressive symptoms. Conclusions Patients with HCM are more depressed than the general population. The authors suggest that depressive symptoms and risk factors for sudden death in these patients are not related. It is important to screen for mood disorders in this patient population in order to provide an early diagnosis and treatment of the psychiatric disease. PMID:27326027

  14. [Incidence of conduction disorders in patients who underwent surgery for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Martini, B; Buja, G F; Bassan, L; Rizzardo, P; Canciani, B; Nava, A

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen non-consecutive patients, aging 7 to 61 (average 27) years, underwent left ventricular myotomy-myectomy for a severely symptomatic idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS). In all patients the resting ECG before surgery showed P-R less than 0.18 sec, QRS duration less than 0.11 sec, QRS axis ranging from +10 to +80 degrees. In the immediate post-surgical period 3 patients has complete heart block and 1 had 2nd degree type 2 atrio ventricular block. Lesion was infra-Hisian in 3 patients and intra-Hisian in 1 patient. In the remaining 9 patients an immediate post-surgical left bundle branch block appeared; in 3 out of these patients ECG and an electrophysiologic study documented severe infra-Hisian conduction impairments after an average period of 4 years from surgery. During follow-up 3 patients died suddenly. PMID:2747944

  15. A rare combination of undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed by intraoperative anaphylaxis resulting in acute left ventricular outflow obstruction and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradford B; Nickels, Andrew S; Sviggum, Hans P

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old female presented for left total hip reimplantation and suffered pulseless electrical activity arrest upon lateral positioning and administering vancomycin. Resuscitation was achieved according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocol. Post-event echocardiography showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with asymmetrical septal thickening, an under-filled left ventricle, dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction, and severe mitral regurgitation related to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. Laboratory analysis showed a tryptase level of 209 ng/mL. After multispecialty evaluation, it was concluded that the patient's arrest was due to vancomycin anaphylaxis in the setting of previously undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leading to acute left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. After medical optimization of the patient's cardiomyopathy and an evaluation of potential intraoperative allergic triggers, the patient underwent a successful hip reimplantation without incident. This case presents a novel combination of events leading to intraoperative cardiac arrest. Rapid identification and an understanding of the cause(s) of cardiac arrest in this setting are critical for effective perioperative care. PMID:27185714

  16. Types of Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventricles, making it harder for the heart to pump blood. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also can cause stiffness of the ... Over time, the heart loses the ability to pump blood effectively. Dilated cardiomyopathy can lead to heart failure , ...

  17. Tyrosinemia type 1: a rare and forgotten cause of reversible hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tyrosinemia type 1 (TT1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). TT1 usually presents in infancy with features suggestive of liver disease or with sepsis-like symptoms. Case presentation We report two Saudi siblings with TT1. Case 1 was a male infant who presented at 2 months old with fever, vomiting and refusal of feeding. Examination revealed a sick-looking infant with signs of severe dehydration and hypovolemic shock. He was jaundiced, and had hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes. Echocardiography was performed in light of a lack of response to inotropes, and revealed biventricular and interventricular septal hypertrophies. The ventricular ejection fraction was 65%. Urine organic acid analysis showed elevated succinylacetone, consistent with a diagnosis of TT1. An FAH gene study identified a c.1 A > G homozygous mutation. This patient responded well to intensive cardiorespiratory therapy, tyrosine-free formula, and oral 2-nitro-4- trifluoromethylbenzyl 1, 3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC). Echocardiographic findings reverted to normal after 4 weeks. Case 2 was the younger brother of Case 1, and was born 6 months after his brother had been confirmed with tyrosinemia. Pregnancy and delivery were uneventful. Serum amino acid and organic acid analyses 4 days after birth confirmed tyrosinemia. DNA analysis identified a c.1 A > G homozygous mutation, as in his brother. Echocardiography was normal. Special formula and NTBC were commenced on day 7 of life. The infant remained asymptomatic after 9 months of follow-up. Conclusions These cases highlight TT1 as a treatable cause of cardiomyopathy in children. It also supports the idea that early diagnosis and treatment may prevent the development of cardiomyopathy associated with tyrosinemia. PMID:24016420

  18. Usefulness of Electrocardiographic Patterns at Presentation to Predict Long-term Risk of Cardiac Death in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Elena; Pazzi, Chiara; Olivotto, Iacopo; Musumeci, Beatrice; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Boriani, Giuseppe; Pacileo, Giuseppe; Mastromarino, Vittoria; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Lai, Francesco; Berardini, Alessandra; Mingardi, Francesca; Rosmini, Stefania; Resciniti, Elvira; Borghi, Claudia; Autore, Camillo; Cecchi, Franco; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns in a large multicenter cohort of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; 1,004 consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a recorded standard ECG (64% men, mean age 50 ± 16 years) were evaluated at 4 Italian centers. The study end points were sudden cardiac death (SCD) or surrogates, including appropriate implanted cardiac defibrillator discharge and resuscitated cardiac arrest and major cardiovascular events (including SCD or surrogates and death due to heart failure, cardioembolic stroke, or heart transplantation). Prevalence of baseline electrocardiographic characteristics was: normal ECG 4%, ST-segment depression 56%, pseudonecrosis waves 33%, "pseudo-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)" pattern 17%, QRS duration ≥120 ms 17%, giant inverted T waves 6%, and low QRS voltages 3%. During a mean follow-up of 7.4 ± 6.8 years, 77 patients experienced SCD or surrogates and 154 patients experienced major cardiovascular events. Independent predictors of SCD or surrogates were unexplained syncope (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4 to 4.5, p = 0.003), left ventricular ejection fraction <50% (HR 3.5, 95% CI 1.9 to 6.7, p = 0.0001), nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.6, p = 0.027), pseudo-STEMI pattern (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.8, p = 0.001), QRS duration ≥120 ms (HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.0, p = 0.033), and low QRS voltages (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.01 to 5.1, p = 0.048). Independent predictors of major cardiovascular events were age (HR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.03, p = 0.0001), LV ejection fraction <50% (HR 3.73, 95% CI 2.39 to 5.83, p = 0.0001), pseudo-STEMI pattern (HR 1.66, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.45, p = 0.010), QRS duration ≥120 ms (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.47, p = 0.007), and prolonged QTc interval (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.21 to 2.34, p = 0.002). In conclusion, a detailed

  19. Echocardiography and cardiac MRI in mutation-negative hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an older patient: a case defining the need for ICD.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Fatima; Degnan, Kathleen O; Seidman, Christine E; Mangion, Judy R

    2014-08-01

    We report the case of a 67-year-old man with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who presented for a second opinion about implantable cardio-defibrillator (ICD) placement after a witnessed syncopal episode. Despite his older age, being mutation-negative, and having a maximal septal thickness of 2.2 cm on echocardiography, he demonstrated rapid progression of myocardial fibrosis on cardiac MRI, correlating to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and syncope. We review the role of echocardiography and cardiac MRI in optimizing medical care for such patients who may not otherwise meet criteria for an ICD placement or further interventions. PMID:24816179

  20. CCN2 plays a key role in extracellular matrix gene expression in severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tsoutsman, Tatiana; Wang, Xiaoyu; Garchow, Kendra; Riser, Bruce; Twigg, Stephen; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited primary myocardial disorder. HCM is characterized by interstitial fibrosis and excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Fibrosis in HCM has been associated with impaired cardiac function and heart failure, and has been considered a key substrate for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. The molecular triggers underpinning ECM production are not well established. We have previously developed a double-mutant mouse model of HCM that recapitulates the phenotype seen in humans with multiple mutations, including earlier onset of the disease, progression to a dilated phenotype, severe heart failure and premature mortality. The present study investigated the expression of ECM-encoding genes in severe HCM and heart failure. Significant upregulation of structural Fn1, regulatory Mmp14, Timp1, Serpin3A, SerpinE1, SerpineE2, Tgfβ1, and Tgfβ2; and matricellular Ccn2, Postn, Spp1, Thbs1, Thbs4, and Tnc was evident from the early, pre-phenotype stage. Non-myocytes expressed ECM genes at higher levels than cardiomyocytes in normal and diseased hearts. Synchronous increase of secreted CCN2 and TIMP1 plasma levels and decrease of MMP3 levels were observed in end-stage disease. CCN2 protein expression was increased from early disease in double-mutant hearts and played an important role in ECM responses. It was a powerful modulator of ECM regulatory (Timp1 and SerpinE1) and matricellular protein-encoding (Spp1, Thbs1, Thbs4 and Tnc) gene expression in cardiomyocytes when added exogenously in vitro. Modulation of CCN2 (CTGF, connective tissue growth factor) and associated early ECM changes may represent a new therapeutic target in the treatment and prevention of heart failure in HCM. PMID:23756156

  1. Contemporary strategies for risk stratification and prevention of sudden death with the implantable defibrillator in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Maron, Martin S

    2016-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is regarded as the most common nontraumatic cause of sudden death (SD) in young people (including trained athletes). Introduction of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) to HCM 15 years ago represented a new paradigm for clinical practice and probably the most significant advance in management of this disease. ICDs offer protection against SD by terminating potentially lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias (11%/year secondary and 4%/year primary prevention), although implant decisions are weighed against the possibility of device-related complications (5%/year). ICDs have altered the natural history of HCM, creating the opportunity for extended or normal longevity for many patients. However, assessing SD risk and targeting appropriate candidates for prophylactic device therapy can be compounded by unpredictability of the underlying arrhythmogenic substrate, evident by delays ≥10 years between implant and first ICD intervention. Multiple or a single strong risk marker within the clinical profile of an individual HCM patient can justify consideration for a primary-prevention ICD when combined with physician judgment and shared decision making. The role of the mathematical SD risk score proposed by the European Society of Cardiology to identify patients who benefit from ICD therapy is incompletely resolved. Contemporary treatment interventions and advanced risk stratification using ≥1 conventional markers have served the HCM patient population well, with reduced disease-related mortality rates across all age groups to <1%/year, due largely to the penetration of ICDs into HCM practice. Prevention of SD has now become an integral, albeit challenging, component of HCM management, contributing importantly to its emergence as a contemporary treatable cardiac disease. PMID:26749314

  2. Significance of Late Gadolinium Enhancement at Right Ventricular Attachment to Ventricular Septum in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond H; Maron, Barry J; Olivotto, Iacopo; Assenza, Gabriele E; Haas, Tammy S; Lesser, John R; Gruner, Christiane; Crean, Andrew M; Rakowski, Harry; Rowin, Ethan; Udelson, James; Lombardi, Massimo; Tomberli, Benedetta; Spirito, Paolo; Formisano, Francesco; Marra, Martina P; Biagini, Elena; Autore, Camillo; Manning, Warren J; Appelbaum, Evan; Roberts, William C; Basso, Cristina; Maron, Martin S

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with extensive late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) is a novel marker for increased risk for sudden death (SD) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Small focal areas of LGE confined to the region of right ventricular (RV) insertion to ventricular septum (VS) have emerged as a frequent and highly visible CMR imaging pattern of uncertain significance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of LGE confined to the RV insertion area in patients with HC. CMR was performed in 1,293 consecutive patients with HC from 7 HC centers, followed for 3.4 ± 1.7 years. Of 1,293 patients (47 ± 14 years), 134 (10%) had LGE present only in the anterior and/or inferior areas of the RV insertion to VS, occupying 3.7 ± 2.9% of left ventricular myocardium. Neither the presence nor extent of LGE in these isolated areas was a predictor of adverse HC-related risk, including SD (adjusted hazard ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 1.50, p = 0.53; adjusted hazard ratio 1.16/10% increase in LGE, 95% confidence interval 0.29 to 4.65, p = 0.83, respectively). Histopathology in 20 HC hearts show the insertion areas of RV attachment to be composed of a greatly expanded extracellular space characterized predominantly by interstitial-type fibrosis and interspersed disorganized myocyte patterns and architecture. In conclusion, LGE confined to the insertion areas of RV to VS was associated with low risk of adverse events (including SD). Gadolinium pooling in this region of the left ventricle does not reflect myocyte death and repair with replacement fibrosis or scarring. PMID:26026863

  3. Novel insights on the relationship between T-tubular defects and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Crocini, C.; Ferrantini, C.; Scardigli, M.; Coppini, R.; Mazzoni, L.; Lazzeri, E.; Pioner, J.M.; Scellini, B.; Guo, A.; Song, L.S.; Yan, P.; Loew, L.M.; Tardiff, J.; Tesi, C.; Vanzi, F.; Cerbai, E.; Pavone, F.S.; Sacconi, L.; Poggesi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of cardiomyocyte Ca2 + homeostasis and excitation–contraction (E–C) coupling are early events in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and concomitant determinants of the diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias typical of the disease. T-tubule remodelling has been reported to occur in HCM but little is known about its role in the E–C coupling alterations of HCM. Here, the role of T-tubule remodelling in the electro-mechanical dysfunction associated to HCM is investigated in the Δ160E cTnT mouse model that expresses a clinically-relevant HCM mutation. Contractile function of intact ventricular trabeculae is assessed in Δ160E mice and wild-type siblings. As compared with wild-type, Δ160E trabeculae show prolonged kinetics of force development and relaxation, blunted force-frequency response with reduced active tension at high stimulation frequency, and increased occurrence of spontaneous contractions. Consistently, prolonged Ca2 + transient in terms of rise and duration are also observed in Δ160E trabeculae and isolated cardiomyocytes. Confocal imaging in cells isolated from Δ160E mice reveals significant, though modest, remodelling of T-tubular architecture. A two-photon random access microscope is employed to dissect the spatio-temporal relationship between T-tubular electrical activity and local Ca2 + release in isolated cardiomyocytes. In Δ160E cardiomyocytes, a significant number of T-tubules (> 20%) fails to propagate action potentials, with consequent delay of local Ca2 + release. At variance with wild-type, we also observe significantly increased variability of local Ca2 + transient rise as well as higher Ca2 +-spark frequency. Although T-tubule structural remodelling in Δ160E myocytes is modest, T-tubule functional defects determine non-homogeneous Ca2 + release and delayed myofilament activation that significantly contribute to mechanical dysfunction. PMID:26714042

  4. Effects of flecainide on left ventricular pressure gradient and symptoms in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a comparison of flecainide and disopyramide.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Shintaro; Minami, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2015-09-01

    It remains unclear whether flecainide, a Class I antiarrhythmic drug, improves left ventricular pressure gradient (LVPG) or symptoms in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Our study evaluated the long-term efficacy of flecainide, compared to disopyramide, when administered orally, on LVPG and symptoms in obstructive HCM patients. Among 164 obstructive HCM patients, 15 were administered oral flecainide therapy and 33 administered oral disopyramide therapy. LVPG declined from 79.8 ± 36.6 to 39.2 ± 36.7 mmHg (p = 0.003) after flecainide therapy and from 74.5 ± 26.4 to 31.4 ± 24.8 mmHg (p < 0.001) after disopyramide therapy. The percent reduction in LVPG was -47.9 ± 43.2 % in patients treated with flecainide, comparable to the results for those treated with disopyramide (-57.1 ± 33.0 %; p = 0.425). We found no significant differences in improvement in NYHA functional class between patients treated with flecainide and those treated with disopyramide (p = 0.331). Patients treated with flecainide exhibited no significant adverse side effects, and there was no need for myectomy or alcohol septal ablation to reduce LVPG and symptoms. Improvements in LVPG and symptoms were similar in patients treated with flecainide and patients treated with disopyramide, suggesting that flecainide is a potentially useful alternative for symptomatic obstructive HCM patients, particularly those with disopyramide-induced vagolytic side effects, narrow angle glaucoma, or prostatic hyperplasia and pre-existing urination difficulties. Our data must be viewed with caution, however, in view of the small number of study patients. Flecainide therapy will require further proof of safety before it can be routinely recommended in patients with symptomatic obstructive HCM. PMID:24917414

  5. Abnormal T2-STIR Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Marker of Advanced Disease and Electrical Myocardial Instability

    PubMed Central

    Pisciella, Lorena; Barison, Andrea; Del Franco, Annamaria; Zachara, Elisabetta; Piaggi, Paolo; Re, Federica; Pingitore, Alessandro; Emdin, Michele; Lombardi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial hyperintensity on T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) (HyT2) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images has been demonstrated in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and is considered a sign of acute damage. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between HyT2 and both a) markers of ventricular electrical instability and b) clinical and CMR parameters. Methods Sixty-five patients underwent a thorough clinical examination, consisting of 24-h ECG recording and CMR examination including functional evaluation, T2-STIR images and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Results HyT2 was detected in 27 patients (42%), and subjects with HyT2 showed a greater left ventricle (LV) mass index (p<0.001), lower LV ejection fraction (p = 0.05) and greater extent of LGE (p<0.001) compared to those without HyT2. Twenty-two subjects (34%) presented non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) on the 24-h ECG recording, 21 (95%) of whom exhibited HyT2. Based on the logistic regression analysis, HyT2 (odds ratio [OR]: 165, 95% CI 11–2455, p<0.001) and LGE extent (1.1, 1.0–1.3, p<0.001) served as independent predictors of NSVT, while the presence of LGE was not associated with NSVT occurrence (p = 0.49). The presence of HyT2 was associated with lower heart rate variability (p = 0.006) and a higher number of arrhythmic risk factors (p<0.001). Conclusions In HCM patients, HyT2 upon CMR examination is associated with more advanced disease and increased arrhythmic burden. PMID:25356653

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated Lys104Glu mutation in the myosin regulatory light chain causes diastolic disturbance in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Muthu, Priya; Duggal, Divya; Farman, Gerrie P; Sorensen, Lars; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P; Moore, Jeffrey R; Borejdo, Julian; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2014-09-01

    We have examined, for the first time, the effects of the familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)-associated Lys104Glu mutation in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). Transgenic mice expressing the Lys104Glu substitution (Tg-MUT) were generated and the results were compared to Tg-WT (wild-type human ventricular RLC) mice. Echocardiography with pulse wave Doppler in 6month-old Tg-MUT showed early signs of diastolic disturbance with significantly reduced E/A transmitral velocities ratio. Invasive hemodynamics in 6month-old Tg-MUT mice also demonstrated a borderline significant prolonged isovolumic relaxation time (Tau) and a tendency for slower rate of pressure decline, suggesting alterations in diastolic function in Tg-MUT. Six month-old mutant animals had no LV hypertrophy; however, at >13months they displayed significant hypertrophy and fibrosis. In skinned papillary muscles from 5 to 6month-old mice a mutation induced reduction in maximal tension and slower muscle relaxation rates were observed. Mutated cross-bridges showed increased rates of binding to the thin filaments and a faster rate of the power stroke. In addition, ~2-fold lower level of RLC phosphorylation was observed in the mutant compared to Tg-WT. In line with the higher mitochondrial content seen in Tg-MUT hearts, the MUT-myosin ATPase activity was significantly higher than WT-myosin, indicating increased energy consumption. In the in vitro motility assay, MUT-myosin produced higher actin sliding velocity under zero load, but the velocity drastically decreased with applied load in the MUT vs. WT myosin. Our results suggest that diastolic disturbance (impaired muscle relaxation, lower E/A) and inefficiency of energy use (reduced contractile force and faster ATP consumption) may underlie the Lys104Glu-mediated HCM phenotype. PMID:24992035

  7. The relationship between electrocardiographic changes and CMR features in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuyu; Zhao, Tao; Lu, Minjie; Yin, Gang; Xiangli, Wei; Jiang, Shiliang; Prasad, Sanjay; Zhao, Shihua

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and left ventricular (LV) segmental hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 118 asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with HCM were examined with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR, 12-lead ECG, and echocardiography. The distribution and magnitude of LV segmental hypertrophy and LGE were assessed and analyzed in relation to ECG abnormalities. Abnormal electrocardiograms were found in 113 of 118 (95%) patients. Negative T waves were associated with greater apical septal thickness (P = 0.009) and an increased ratio of LV septum to free wall thickness (P = 0.01). Giant negative T waves (GNT) were found in 19 patients (16%), and were associated with apical HCM (P < 0.001), greater apical thickness (P = 0.004), and increased ratio of LV apical to basal wall thickness (P < 0.001). However, no significant association was demonstrated between GNT and apical LGE (P = 0.71). Abnormal Q waves were associated with greater basal anteroseptal thickness (P = 0.001), maximal basal thickness (P = 0.004), and more segments with extensive LGE (>75% wall thickness involved) (P = 0.001). LV hypertrophy was related to greater LV mass (P = 0.002) and LV end diastolic volume (P = 0.002). In addition, a modest but significant correlation was observed between maximum LV wall thickness and the Romhilt-Estes score (r = 0.41, P < 0.001). GNT were associated with apical HCM and an increased ratio of LV apical to basal wall thickness. Abnormal Q waves were related to basal anteroseptal hypertrophy and segmental extensive LGE. PMID:24723003

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Signaling in Adult Cardiomyocytes Increases Contractility and Results in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cilvik, Sarah N.; Wang, Joy I.; Lavine, Kory J.; Uchida, Keita; Castro, Angela; Gierasch, Carolyn M.; Weinheimer, Carla J.; House, Stacey L.; Kovacs, Attila; Nichols, Colin G.; Ornitz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors are highly conserved signaling molecules that have been implicated in postnatal cardiac remodeling. However, it is not known whether cardiomyocyte-expressed FGF receptors are necessary or sufficient for ventricular remodeling in the adult heart. To determine whether cardiomyocytes were competent to respond to an activated FGF receptor, and to determine if this signal would result in the development of hypertrophy, we engineered a doxycycline (DOX)-inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific, constitutively active FGF receptor mouse model (αMHC-rtTA, TRE-caFgfr1-myc). Echocardiographic and hemodynamic analysis indicated that acute expression of caFGFR1 rapidly and directly increased cardiac contractility, while chronic expression resulted in significant hypertrophy with preservation of systolic function. Subsequent histologic analysis showed increased cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and regions of myocyte disarray and fibrosis, classic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Analysis of downstream pathways revealed a lack of clear activation of classical FGF-mediated signaling pathways, but did demonstrate a reduction in Serca2 expression and troponin I phosphorylation. Isolated ventricular myocytes showed enhanced contractility and reduced relaxation, an effect that was partially reversed by inhibition of actin-myosin interactions. We conclude that adult cardiomyocytes are competent to transduce FGF signaling and that FGF signaling is sufficient to promote increased cardiomyocyte contractility in vitro and in vivo through enhanced intrinsic actin-myosin interactions. Long-term, FGFR overexpression results in HCM with a dynamic outflow tract obstruction, and may serve as a unique model of HCM. PMID:24349409

  9. Discrete effects of A57G-myosin essential light chain mutation associated with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Paulino, Ellena C.; Huang, Wenrui; Muthu, Priya; Liang, Jingsheng; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Rojas, Ana I.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The functional consequences of the familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy A57G (alanine-to-glycine) mutation in the myosin ventricular essential light chain (ELC) were assessed in vitro and in vivo using previously generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing A57G-ELC mutant vs. wild-type (WT) of human cardiac ELC and in recombinant A57G- or WT-protein-exchanged porcine cardiac muscle strips. Compared with the Tg-WT, there was a significant increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of force (ΔpCa50 ≅ 0.1) and an ∼1.3-fold decrease in maximal force per cross section of muscle observed in the mutant preparations. In addition, a significant increase in passive tension in response to stretch was monitored in Tg-A57G vs. Tg-WT strips indicating a mutation-induced myocardial stiffness. Consistently, the hearts of Tg-A57G mice demonstrated a high level of fibrosis and hypertrophy manifested by increased heart weight-to-body weight ratios and a decreased number of nuclei indicating an increase in the two-dimensional size of Tg-A57G vs. Tg-WT myocytes. Echocardiography examination showed a phenotype of eccentric hypertrophy in Tg-A57G mice, enhanced left ventricular (LV) cavity dimension without changes in LV posterior/anterior wall thickness. Invasive hemodynamics data revealed significantly increased end-systolic elastance, defined by the slope of the pressure-volume relationship, indicating a mutation-induced increase in cardiac contractility. Our results suggest that the A57G allele causes disease by means of a discrete modulation of myofilament function, increased Ca2+ sensitivity, and decreased maximal tension followed by compensatory hypertrophy and enhanced contractility. These and other contributing factors such as increased myocardial stiffness and fibrosis most likely activate cardiomyopathic signaling pathways leading to pathologic cardiac remodeling. PMID:23748425

  10. Novel insights on the relationship between T-tubular defects and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Crocini, C; Ferrantini, C; Scardigli, M; Coppini, R; Mazzoni, L; Lazzeri, E; Pioner, J M; Scellini, B; Guo, A; Song, L S; Yan, P; Loew, L M; Tardiff, J; Tesi, C; Vanzi, F; Cerbai, E; Pavone, F S; Sacconi, L; Poggesi, C

    2016-02-01

    Abnormalities of cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) homeostasis and excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling are early events in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and concomitant determinants of the diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias typical of the disease. T-tubule remodelling has been reported to occur in HCM but little is known about its role in the E-C coupling alterations of HCM. Here, the role of T-tubule remodelling in the electro-mechanical dysfunction associated to HCM is investigated in the Δ160E cTnT mouse model that expresses a clinically-relevant HCM mutation. Contractile function of intact ventricular trabeculae is assessed in Δ160E mice and wild-type siblings. As compared with wild-type, Δ160E trabeculae show prolonged kinetics of force development and relaxation, blunted force-frequency response with reduced active tension at high stimulation frequency, and increased occurrence of spontaneous contractions. Consistently, prolonged Ca(2+) transient in terms of rise and duration are also observed in Δ160E trabeculae and isolated cardiomyocytes. Confocal imaging in cells isolated from Δ160E mice reveals significant, though modest, remodelling of T-tubular architecture. A two-photon random access microscope is employed to dissect the spatio-temporal relationship between T-tubular electrical activity and local Ca(2+) release in isolated cardiomyocytes. In Δ160E cardiomyocytes, a significant number of T-tubules (>20%) fails to propagate action potentials, with consequent delay of local Ca(2+) release. At variance with wild-type, we also observe significantly increased variability of local Ca(2+) transient rise as well as higher Ca(2+)-spark frequency. Although T-tubule structural remodelling in Δ160E myocytes is modest, T-tubule functional defects determine non-homogeneous Ca(2+) release and delayed myofilament activation that significantly contribute to mechanical dysfunction. PMID:26714042

  11. Outcome of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation and septal myectomy surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, J. X.; Shiota, T.; Lever, H. M.; Kapadia, S. R.; Sitges, M.; Rubin, D. N.; Bauer, F.; Greenberg, N. L.; Agler, D. A.; Drinko, J. K.; Martin, M.; Tuzcu, E. M.; Smedira, N. G.; Lytle, B.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to evaluate follow-up results in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) who underwent either percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) or septal myectomy. BACKGROUND: Controversy exists with regard to these two forms of treatment for patients with HOCM. METHODS: Of 51 patients with HOCM treated, 25 were treated by PTSMA and 26 patients via myectomy. Two-dimensional echocardiograms were performed before both procedures, immediately afterwards and at a three-month follow-up. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was obtained before the procedures and at follow-up. RESULTS: Interventricular septal thickness was significantly reduced at follow-up in both groups (2.3 +/- 0.4 cm vs. 1.9 +/- 0.4 cm for septal ablation and 2.4 +/- 0.6 cm vs. 1.7 +/- 0.2 cm for myectomy, both p < 0.001). Estimated by continuous-wave Doppler, the resting pressure gradient (PG) across the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) significantly decreased immediately after the procedures in both groups (64 +/- 39 mm Hg vs. 28 +/- 29 mm Hg for PTSMA, 62 +/- 43 mm Hg vs. 7 +/- 7 mm Hg for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). At three-month follow-up, the resting PG remained lower in the PTSMA and myectomy groups (24 +/- 19 mm Hg and 11 +/- 6 mm Hg, respectively, vs. those before procedures, both p < 0.0001). The NYHA functional class was also significantly improved in both groups (3.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7 for PTSMA, 3.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.7 for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Both myectomy and PTSMA reduce LVOT obstruction and significantly improve NYHA functional class in patients with HOCM. However, there are benefits and drawbacks for each therapeutic method that must be counterbalanced when deciding on treatment for LVOT obstruction.

  12. The structural and functional effects of the familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked cardiac troponin C mutation, L29Q

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ian M.; Sevrieva, Ivanka; Li, Monica X.; Irving, Malcolm; Sun, Yin-Biao; Sykes, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is characterized by severe abnormal cardiac muscle growth. The traditional view of disease progression in FHC is that an increase in the Ca2 +-sensitivity of cardiac muscle contraction ultimately leads to pathogenic myocardial remodeling, though recent studies suggest this may be an oversimplification. For example, FHC may be developed through altered signaling that prevents downstream regulation of contraction. The mutation L29Q, found in the Ca2 +-binding regulatory protein in heart muscle, cardiac troponin C (cTnC), has been linked to cardiac hypertrophy. However, reports on the functional effects of this mutation are conflicting, and our goal was to combine in vitro and in situ structural and functional data to elucidate its mechanism of action. We used nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism to solve the structure and characterize the backbone dynamics and stability of the regulatory domain of cTnC with the L29Q mutation. The overall structure and dynamics of cTnC were unperturbed, although a slight rearrangement of site 1, an increase in backbone flexibility, and a small decrease in protein stability were observed. The structure and function of cTnC was also assessed in demembranated ventricular trabeculae using fluorescence for in situ structure. L29Q reduced the cooperativity of the Ca2 +-dependent structural change in cTnC in trabeculae under basal conditions and abolished the effect of force-generating myosin cross-bridges on this structural change. These effects could contribute to the pathogenesis of this mutation. PMID:26341255

  13. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography: high throughput mutation screening in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and SNP genotyping in motor neurone disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, B; Sawyer, N A; Caramins, M; Yuan, Z G; Saunderson, R B; Pamphlett, R; Richmond, D R; Jeremy, R W; Trent, R J

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the usefulness of denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) as a high throughput tool in: (1) DNA mutation detection in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), and (2) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and validation in sporadic motor neurone disease (MND). Methods: The coding sequence and intron–exon boundaries of the cardiac β myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) were screened by DHPLC for mutation identification in 150 unrelated patients diagnosed with FHC. One hundred and forty patients with sporadic MND were genotyped for the A67T SNP in the poliovirus receptor gene. All DHPLC positive signals were confirmed by conventional methods. Results: Mutation screening of MYH7 covered 10 kb with a total of 5700 amplicons, and more than 6750 DHPLC injections were completed within 35 days. The causative mutation was identified in 14% of FHC cases, including seven novel missense mutations (L227V, E328G, K351E, V411I, M435T, E894G, and E927K). Genotyping of the A67T SNP was performed at two different temperatures both in MND cases and 280 controls. This coding SNP was found more frequently in MND cases (13.6%) than in controls (6.8%). Furthermore, 19 and two SNPs were identified in MYH7 and the poliovirus receptor gene, respectively, during DHPLC screening. Conclusions: DHPLC is a high throughput, sensitive, specific, and robust platform for the detection of DNA variants, such as disease causing mutations or SNPs. It enables rapid and accurate screening of large genomic regions. PMID:15858117

  14. Left ventricular wall thickness in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a comparison between cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Sorensen, Lars L; Pozios, Iraklis; Chu, Linda; Eng, John; Abraham, Maria Roselle; Abraham, Theodore P; Kamel, Ihab R; Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2016-06-01

    We assessed whether cardiac MRI (CMR) and echocardiography (echo) have significant differences measuring left ventricular (LV) wall thickness (WT) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) as performed in the clinical routine. Retrospectively identified, clinically diagnosed HCM patients with interventricular-septal (IVS) pattern hypertrophy who underwent CMR and echo within the same day were included. Left Ventricular WT was measured by CMR in two planes and compared to both echo and contrast echo (cecho). 72 subjects, mean age 50.7 ± 16.2 years, 68 % males. Interventricular septal WT by echo and CMR planes showed good to excellent correlation. However, measurements of the postero-lateral wall showed poor correlation. Bland-Altman plots showed greater maximal IVS WT by echo compared to CMR measurement [SAX = 1.7 mm (-5.8, 9.3); LVOT = 1.1 mm (-5.6, 7.8)]. Differences were smaller between cecho and CMR [SAX = 0.8 mm (-9.2, 10.8); LVOT = -0.2 mm (-10.0, 9.6)]. Severity of WT by quartiles showed greater differences between echo and SAX CMR WT compared to cecho. Echocardiography typically measures greater WT than CMR, with the largest differences in moderate to severe hypertrophy. Contrast echocardiography more closely approximates CMR measurements of WT. These findings have potential clinical implications for risk stratification of subjects with HCM. PMID:26896038

  15. Effects of septal myectomy on left ventricular diastolic function and left atrial volume in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tower-Rader, Albree; Furiasse, Nicholas; Puthumana, Jyothy J; Kruse, Jane; Li, Zhi; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Rigolin, Vera; Bonow, Robert O; McCarthy, Patrick M; Choudhury, Lubna

    2014-11-15

    Ventricular septal myectomy in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) has been shown to reduce left ventricular (LV) outflow tract (LVOT) gradient and improve symptoms, although little data exist regarding changes in left atrial (LA) volume and LV diastolic function after myectomy. We investigated changes in LA size and LV diastolic function in patients with HC after septal myectomy from 2004 to 2011. We studied 25 patients (age 49.2 ± 13.1 years, 48% women) followed for a mean of 527 days after surgery who had serial echocardiography at baseline and at most recent follow-up, at least 6 months after myectomy. In addition to myectomy, 3 patients (12%) underwent Maze surgery and 13 (52%) underwent mitral valve surgery, of whom 5 had a mitral valve replacement or mitral annuloplasty. Patients with mitral valve replacement or mitral annuloplasty were excluded from LV diastolic function analysis. LA volume index decreased (from 47.2 ± 17.6 to 35.9 ± 17.0 ml/m(2), p = 0.001) and LV diastolic function improved with an increase in lateral e' velocity (from 7.3 ± 2.9 to 9.8 ± 3.1 cm/sec, p = 0.01) and a decrease in E/e' (from 14.8 ± 6.3 to 11.7 ± 5.5, p = 0.051). Ventricular septal thickness and LVOT gradient decreased, and symptoms of dyspnea and heart failure improved, with reduction in the New York Heart Association functional class III/IV symptoms from 21 (84%) to 1 (4%). In conclusion, relief of LVOT obstruction in HC by septal myectomy results in improved LV diastolic function and reduction in LA volume with improved symptoms. PMID:25260948

  16. The calcium release-activated calcium channel Orai1 represents a crucial component in hypertrophic compensation and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jaime S; Buckley, Cadie L; Alvarez, Ernest M; Schorlemmer, Anita; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    As exceptionally calcium selective store-operated channels, Orai channels play a prominent role in cellular calcium signaling. While most studied in the immune system, we are beginning to recognize that Orai1 provides unique calcium signaling pathways in numerous tissue contexts. To assess the involvement of Orai1 in cardiac hypertrophy we used transverse aortic constriction to model pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in Orai1 deficient mice. We demonstrate that Orai1 deficient mice have significantly decreased survival in this pressure overload model. Transthoracic echocardiography reveals that Orai1 deficient mice develop rapid dilated cardiomyopathy, with greater loss of function, and histological and molecular data indicate that this pathology is associated with significant apoptosis, but not major differences in cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and some major hypertrophic makers. Orai1 represents a crucial calcium entry mechanism in the compensation of the heart to pressure overload over-load, and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:24135962

  17. The calcium release-activated calcium channel Orai1 represents a crucial component in hypertrophic compensation and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Buckley, Cadie L; Alvarez, Ernest M; Schorlemmer, Anita; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    As exceptionally calcium selective store-operated channels, Orai channels play a prominent role in cellular calcium signaling. While most studied in the immune system, we are beginning to recognize that Orai1 provides unique calcium signaling pathways in numerous tissue contexts. To assess the involvement of Orai1 in cardiac hypertrophy we used transverse aortic constriction to model pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in Orai1 deficient mice. We demonstrate that Orai1 deficient mice have significantly decreased survival in this pressure overload model. Transthoracic echocardiography reveals that Orai1 deficient mice develop rapid dilated cardiomyopathy, with greater loss of function, and histological and molecular data indicate that this pathology is associated with significant apoptosis, but not major differences in cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and some major hypertrophic makers. Orai1 represents a crucial calcium entry mechanism in the compensation of the heart to pressure overload over-load, and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:24135962

  18. Cardiac-Specific Over-Expression of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (ErbB2) Induces Pro-Survival Pathways and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xin; Belmonte, Frances; Kang, Byunghak; Bedja, Djahida; Pin, Scott; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Gabrielson, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence shows that ErbB2 signaling has a critical role in cardiomyocyte physiology, based mainly on findings that blocking ErbB2 for cancer therapy is toxic to cardiac cells. However, consequences of high levels of ErbB2 activity in the heart have not been previously explored. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated consequences of cardiac-restricted over-expression of ErbB2 in two novel lines of transgenic mice. Both lines develop striking concentric cardiac hypertrophy, without heart failure or decreased life span. ErbB2 transgenic mice display electrocardiographic characteristics similar to those found in patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, with susceptibility to adrenergic-induced arrhythmias. The hypertrophic hearts, which are 2–3 times larger than those of control littermates, express increased atrial natriuretic peptide and β-myosin heavy chain mRNA, consistent with a hypertrophic phenotype. Cardiomyocytes in these hearts are significantly larger than wild type cardiomyocytes, with enlarged nuclei and distinctive myocardial disarray. Interestingly, the over-expression of ErbB2 induces a concurrent up-regulation of multiple proteins associated with this signaling pathway, including EGFR, ErbB3, ErbB4, PI3K subunits p110 and p85, bcl-2 and multiple protective heat shock proteins. Additionally, ErbB2 up-regulation leads to an anti-apoptotic shift in the ratio of bcl-xS/xL in the heart. Finally, ErbB2 over-expression results in increased activation of the translation machinery involving S6, 4E-BP1 and eIF4E. The dependence of this hypertrophic phenotype on ErbB family signaling is confirmed by reduction in heart mass and cardiomyocyte size, and inactivation of pro-hypertrophic signaling in transgenic animals treated with the ErbB1/2 inhibitor, lapatinib. Conclusions/Significance These studies are the first to demonstrate that increased ErbB2 over-expression in the heart can activate protective signaling pathways and induce a

  19. A Failure to Communicate: MYOSIN RESIDUES INVOLVED IN HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY AFFECT INTER-DOMAIN INTERACTION.

    PubMed

    Kronert, William A; Melkani, Girish C; Melkani, Anju; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2015-12-01

    Our molecular modeling studies suggest a charge-dependent interaction between residues Glu-497 in the relay domain and Arg-712 in the converter domain of human β-cardiac myosin. To test the significance of this putative interaction, we generated transgenic Drosophila expressing indirect flight muscle myosin with charge reversal mutations in the relay (E496R) or converter (R713E). Each mutation yielded dramatic reductions in myosin Ca-ATPase activity (~80%) as well as in basal (~67%) and actin-activated (~84%) Mg-ATPase activity. E496R myosin-induced in vitro actin-sliding velocity was reduced by 71% and R713E myosin permitted no actin motility. Indirect flight muscles of late pupae from each mutant displayed disrupted myofibril assembly, with adults having severely abnormal myofibrils and no flight ability. To understand the molecular basis of these defects, we constructed a putative compensatory mutant that expresses myosin with both E496R and R713E. Intriguingly, ATPase values were restored to ~73% of wild-type and actin-sliding velocity increased to 40%. The double mutation suppresses myofibril assembly defects in pupal indirect flight muscles and dramatically reduces myofibril disruption in young adults. Although sarcomere organization is not sustained in older flies and flight ability is not restored in homozygotes, young heterozygotes fly well. Our results indicate that this charge-dependent interaction between the myosin relay and converter domains is essential to the mechanochemical cycle and sarcomere assembly. Furthermore, the same inter-domain interaction is disrupted when modeling human β-cardiac myosin heavy chain cardiomyopathy mutations E497D or R712L, implying that abolishing this salt bridge is one cause of the human disease. PMID:26446785

  20. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction complicated by apical aneurysm appearing as delayed contrast hyperenhancement on magnetic resonance imaging: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Kunihiko; Hirano, Masaharu; Ogawa, Takashi; Sasame, Atsuko; Yanagisawa, Hidefumi; Namatame, Yasuhide; Shindo, Naohisa; Takei, Yasuyoshi; Sasaki, Kazuyoshi; Katsuyama, Hiroaki; Abe, Kimihiko; Yamashina, Akira

    2003-08-01

    Case 1: A 52-year-old man presented with a chief complaint of palpitation. Diabetes mellitus was pointed out in 1992. Electrocardiography (ECG) revealed left ventricular hypertrophy in 1997. He visited our department in October 1997. Echocardiography showed increased wall thickness at the interventricular septum. The diagnosis was hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Holter ECG revealed nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in December 1997. After this, he visited our outpatient clinic. Echocardiography indicated ventricular aneurysm in January 2002, so he was hospitalized in March 2002. Case 2: A 64-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital because of chest discomfort and tachycardial attack. She had been treated for hypertension and diabetes mellitus. She was taken to a hospital by ambulance. On admission, ECG showed wide QRS tachycardia. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in both patients disclosed almost complete obstruction of the mid-ventricle in the systolic phase on long- and short-axis cine images, and gadolinium delayed imaging revealed contrast hyperenhancement corresponding to an apical ventricular aneurysm on both long- and short-axis images. The final diagnosis was mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with apical aneurysm characterized by delayed hyperenhancement on magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium. PMID:12964519

  1. Obstructive Form of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Gradient: Novel Methods of Provocation, Monitoring of Biomarkers, and Recent Advances in the Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrow, Pawel Petkow; Rajtar-Salwa, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic (latent or/and labile) obstruction of left ventricular outflow (LVOT) was recognized from the earliest clinical descriptions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and has proved to be a complex phenomenon, as well as arguably the most audible (“visible”) pathophysiological hallmark of this heterogeneous disease. The aim of the current review is focused on two novel issues in a subgroup of obstructive HCM. Firstly, the important methodological problem in HCM is the examination of a subgroup of patients with nonobstructive hypertrophy in resting conditions and hard, but possible provoking obstruction. Recently, investigators have proposed physiological stress test (with double combined stimuli) to disclose such type of patients. The upright exercise is described in the ESC guideline on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from 2014 and may appear as a candidate for gold standard provocation test. The second novel area of interest is associated with elevated level of signaling biomarkers: hypercoagulation, hemolysis, acquired von Willebrand 2A disease, and enhanced oxidative stress. The accelerated and turbulent flow within narrow LVOT may be responsible for these biochemical disturbances. The most recent advances in the treatment of obstructive HCM are related to nonpharmacological methods of LVOT gradient reduction. This report extensively discusses novel methods. PMID:27247935

  2. Tissue Doppler Imaging Combined with Advanced 12-Lead ECG Analysis Might Improve Early Diagnosis of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Childhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Femlund, E.; Schlegel, T.; Liuba, P.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of early diagnosis of childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is essential in lowering the risk of HCM complications. Standard echocardiography (ECHO) has shown to be less sensitive in this regard. In this study, we sought to assess whether spatial QRS-T angle deviation, which has shown to predict HCM in adults with high sensitivity, and myocardial Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) could be additional tools in early diagnosis of HCM in childhood. Methods: Children and adolescents with familial HCM (n=10, median age 16, range 5-27 years), and without obvious hypertrophy but with heredity for HCM (n=12, median age 16, range 4-25 years, HCM or sudden death with autopsy-verified HCM in greater than or equal to 1 first-degree relative, HCM-risk) were additionally investigated with TDI and advanced 12-lead ECG analysis using Cardiax(Registered trademark) (IMED Co Ltd, Budapest, Hungary and Houston). Spatial QRS-T angle (SA) was derived from Kors regression-related transformation. Healthy age-matched controls (n=21) were also studied. All participants underwent thorough clinical examination. Results: Spatial QRS-T angle (Figure/ Panel A) and septal E/Ea ratio (Figure/Panel B) were most increased in HCM group as compared to the HCM-risk and control groups (p less than 0.05). Of note, these 2 variables showed a trend toward higher levels in HCM-risk group than in control group (p=0.05 for E/Ea and 0.06 for QRS/T by ANOVA). In a logistic regression model, increased SA and septal E/Ea ratio appeared to significantly predict both the disease (Chi-square in HCM group: 9 and 5, respectively, p less than 0.05 for both) and the risk for HCM (Chi-square in HCM-risk group: 5 and 4 respectively, p less than 0.05 for both), with further increased predictability level when these 2 variables were combined (Chi-square 10 in HCM group, and 7 in HCM-risk group, p less than 0.01 for both). Conclusions: In this small material, Tissue Doppler Imaging and spatial mean QRS-T angle

  3. Subendocardial motion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: assessment from long- and short-axis views by pulsed tissue Doppler imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, T.; Oki, T.; Yamada, H.; Abe, M.; Onose, Y.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a recently developed technique that allows the instantaneous measurement of intrinsic regional myocardial motion velocity. Pulsed TDI is capable of separately assessing left ventricular (LV) regional motion velocity caused by circumferential and longitudinal fiber contraction. This particular feature of function is still controversial in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). METHODS: To better characterize intrinsic circumferential and longitudinal LV systolic myocardial function in HC, we used pulsed TDI to measure short- and long-axis LV motion velocities, respectively. The subendocardial motion velocity patterns at the middle of the LV posterior wall (PW) and ventricular septum (IVS) in LV parasternal and apical long-axis views were recorded by pulsed TDI in 19 patients with nonobstructive HC and in 21 normal controls (NC). RESULTS: Peak short- and long-axis systolic subendocardial velocities in both the LV PW and IVS were significantly smaller in the HC group than in the NC group, and the time to peak velocity was significantly delayed. Furthermore, peak PW systolic velocity was significantly greater along the long axis than along the short axis in the NC group (8.8 +/- 1.5 cm/s vs 8.2 +/- 1.4 cm/s, P <.05), whereas the opposite was observed in the HC group (6.1 +/- 1.2 cm/s vs 7.5 +/- 1.0 cm/s, P <.0001). No significant differences were found in either group between the long- and short-axis IVS velocities (HC: 5.9 +/- 1.4 cm/s vs 5.5 +/- 1.3 cm/s; NC: 7.8 +/- 1.3 cm/s vs 7.9 +/- 1.6 cm/s). CONCLUSIONS: By using the capability of pulsed TDI for the evaluation of intrinsic myocardial velocity instantaneously in a specific region and direction, we found impairment of LV myocardial systolic function in patients with HC not only in the hypertrophied IVS but also in the nonhypertrophied LV PW. We also found a greater decrease in LV PW velocities along the long axis than the short axis, suggesting greater

  4. High signal intensity on T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates with the ventricular tachyarrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hen, Yasuki; Iguchi, Nobuo; Machida, Haruhiko; Takada, Kaori; Utanohara, Yuko; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya

    2013-11-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) can predict ventricular arrhythmia and poor prognosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. Although myocardial T2-high signal has been reported to appear within LGE in those patients, its clinical significance remains unclear. We investigated the relationship between the T2-high signal and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) in HCM patients. Eighty-one HCM patients who underwent Holter ECG and CMR including T2-weighted and LGE imaging were retrospectively recruited. They were divided into NSVT-positive and NSVT-negative groups. We compared the clinical and CMR characteristics between both of the groups, and assessed predictors of NSVT with multivariate analysis. Myocardial T2-high signal was observed in 15/81 (18.5 %) patients. Each T2-high signal was localized within LGE. Significantly in the NSVT-positive group, the prevalence of atrial fibrillation [5/17 (29.4 %) vs. 2/64 (3.1 %), p = 0.0006] and T2-high signal [9/17 (52.9 %) vs. 6/64 (9.4 %), p < 0.0001] and the left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume index (32.2 ± 15.9 ml/m(2) vs. 23.3 ± 14.9 ml/m(2), p = 0.034) and the number of segments with LGE (5.8 ± 3.3 vs. 2.7 ± 2.7, p < 0.0001) was increased, and the LV ejection fraction (54.8 ± 10.9 % vs. 65.1 ± 10.6 %, p = 0.0007) was decreased, compared to the NSVT-negative group. On multivariate analysis, the presence of atrial fibrillation (OR 29.49, p = 0.0025) and DM (OR 7.36, p = 0.0455) and T2-high signal (OR 14.96, p = 0.0014) and reduced LV ejection fraction (OR 0.93, p = 0.0222) were significantly associated with NSVT. The presence of myocardial T2-high signal is a significant independent predictor of NSVT in HCM patients. PMID:23097076

  5. Usefulness of noninvasive detection of left ventricular diastolic abnormalities during isometric stress in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and in athletes.

    PubMed

    Manolas, J; Kyriakidis, M; Anastasakis, A; Pegas, P; Rigopoulos, A; Theopistou, A; Toutouzas, P

    1998-02-01

    We showed previously that the handgrip apexcardiographic test (HAT) is a useful method for detecting left ventricular (LV) diastolic abnormalities in patients with coronary artery disease and systemic hypertension. This study evaluates the use of HAT for assessing the prevalence and types of exercise-induced diastolic abnormalities in patients with obstructive (n = 31) and nonobstructive (n = 35) hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) as well as its potential value for separating healthy subjects and athletes from patients with HC. We obtained a HAT in 66 consecutive patients with HC and in 72 controls (52 healthy volunteers and 20 athletes). A positive HAT was defined by the presence of one of the following: (1) relative A wave to total height (A/H) during or after handgrip > 21% (compliance type), (2) total apexcardiographic relaxation time (TART) > 143 ms or the heart rate corrected TART (TARTI) during handgrip < 0.14, (relaxation type), (3) both types present (mixed type), and (4) diastolic amplitude time index (DATI = TARTI/[A/D]) during handgrip < 0.27. Of the controls, only 1 of 52 healthy subjects and 1 of 20 athletes showed a positive HAT, whereas of the total HC cohort 63 of 66 patients (95%) had a positive result. There was no significant difference in the distribution of these types between obstructive and nonobstructive HC. Further, no LV diastolic abnormalities were present in 10 of 35 patients (29%) with nonobstructive HC at rest and in 3 of 35 patients (9%) during handgrip, whereas of the patients with obstructive HC only 1 of 31 (3%) had no LV diastolic abnormalities at rest and none during handgrip. Based on HAT data, our study demonstrates that in HC (1) LV diastolic abnormalities are very frequent during handgrip; (2) patients with nonobstructive HC show significantly fewer LV diastolic abnormalities at rest than those with obstructive HC; and (3) no significant difference exists between obstructive and nonobstructive HC in the prevalence of types of

  6. A Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-associated MYBPC3 Mutation Common in Populations of South Asian Descent Causes Contractile Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Kuster, Diederik W. D.; Govindan, Suresh; Springer, Tzvia I.; Martin, Jody L.; Finley, Natosha L.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) results from mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, most often MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). A recently discovered HCM-associated 25-base pair deletion in MYBPC3 is inherited in millions worldwide. Although this mutation causes changes in the C10 domain of cMyBP-C (cMyBP-CC10mut), which binds to the light meromyosin (LMM) region of the myosin heavy chain, the underlying molecular mechanism causing HCM is unknown. In this study, adenoviral expression of cMyBP-CC10mut in cultured adult rat cardiomyocytes was used to investigate protein localization and evaluate contractile function and Ca2+ transients, compared with wild-type cMyBP-C expression (cMyBP-CWT) and controls. Forty-eight hours after infection, 44% of cMyBP-CWT and 36% of cMyBP-CC10mut protein levels were determined in total lysates, confirming equal expression. Immunofluorescence experiments showed little or no localization of cMyBP-CC10mut to the C-zone, whereas cMyBP-CWT mostly showed C-zone staining, suggesting that cMyBP-CC10mut could not properly integrate in the C-zone of the sarcomere. Subcellular fractionation confirmed that most cMyBP-CC10mut resided in the soluble fraction, with reduced presence in the myofilament fraction. Also, cMyBP-CC10mut displayed significantly reduced fractional shortening, sarcomere shortening, and relaxation velocities, apparently caused by defects in sarcomere function, because Ca2+ transients were unaffected. Co-sedimentation and protein cross-linking assays confirmed that C10mut causes the loss of C10 domain interaction with myosin LMM. Protein homology modeling studies showed significant structural perturbation in cMyBP-CC10mut, providing a potential structural basis for the alteration in its mode of interaction with myosin LMM. Therefore, expression of cMyBP-CC10mut protein is sufficient to cause contractile dysfunction in vitro. PMID:25583989

  7. Prediction and visualization data for the interpretation of sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric DNA variants found in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bottillo, Irene; D'Angelantonio, Daniela; Caputo, Viviana; Paiardini, Alessandro; Lipari, Martina; De Bernardo, Carmelilia; Majore, Silvia; Castori, Marco; Zachara, Elisabetta; Re, Federica; Grammatico, Paola

    2016-06-01

    Genomic technologies are redefining the understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships and over the past decade, many bioinformatics algorithms have been developed to predict functional consequences of single nucleotide variants. This article presents the data from a comprehensive computational workflow adopted to assess the biomedical impact of the DNA variants resulting from the experimental study "Molecular analysis of sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric genes in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy" (Bottillo et al., 2016) [1]. Several different independently methods were employed to predict the functional consequences of alleles that result in amino acid substitutions, to study the effect of some DNA variants over the splicing process and to investigate the impact of a sequence variant with respect to the evolutionary conservation. PMID:27054166

  8. [Mitral Valve Replacement with a Low-Profile Bioprosthesis in Combination with Septal Myectomy for Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Koji; Sakaguchi, Shuhei; Nakamura, Eisaku; Yano, Mitsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    An 83-year-old woman diagnosed with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was referred to our hospital. Her echocardiogram revealed diffuse left ventricular hypertrophy, severe mitral valve regurgitation with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, and left ventricular obstruction with a peak outflow gradient of 142 mmHg. Cardiac catheterization revealed a peak pressure gradient of 60 mmHg across the left ventricular outflow tract. Because of the patient's advanced age, as well as uncertainty regarding our ability to resolve her mitral regurgitation, we performed mitral valve replacement with a St. Jude Medical Epic porcine low-profile bioprosthesis in combination with septal myectomy. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. At 1 year after the operation, her functional status was New York Heart Association class I. The echocardiogram showed the peak outflow gradient markedly decreased to 9 mmHg. PMID:26066877

  9. [Usefullness of Beta-blocker for Hemodynamic Changes Induced by Uterotonic Drug in a Patient with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy Undergoing Elective Cesarean Section].

    PubMed

    Tsukano, Yuri; Sugita, Michiko; Ikuta, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-06-01

    Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) was given to a 27-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) for a selective cesarean section. After the injection of uterotonic drug via uterine muscle and a vein after delivery, the patient developed dyspnea, tachycardia, ST-change on elecrocardiogram and hypotension. It is important in HOCM patients to control heart rate and left ventricular contractile force. We started to infuse beta-blocker (landiolol, 10 μg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and improved these symptoms of the patient. This case demonstrates that CSEA is safe for HOCM patients and beta-blocker is effective to improve hemodynamic changes induced by uterotonic drug in these patients. PMID:26437557

  10. [Repeated percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation leads to reduction of left ventricular outflow-tract pressure gradient in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Masafumi; Mori, Takao; Ohashi, Yoshitaka; Ichikawa, Shinobu; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Ejiri, Junya; Awano, Kojiro

    2006-06-01

    A 61-year-old man with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was treated twice with percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA). The first procedure improved the left ventricular outflow tract pressure gradient (LVOTG) from 148 to 48 mmHg and the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class from III to II in a week. However, the LVOTG increased to 197 mmHg and the NYHA class worsened to III within 3 months. In spite of medical treatment with beta-blocker, syncope attack occurred suddenly. Repeated PTSMA was performed. Just after the second procedure, the LVOTG did not decrease. However, the LVOTG decreased to 81 mmHg and the NYHA class improved to II with 3 months. The different response of pressure gradient in the acute and chronic phase with repeated PTSMA was interesting. PMID:16800375

  11. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations in the calponin-homology domain of ACTN2 affect actin binding and cardiomyocyte Z-disc incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Natalie J.; Wolny, Marcin; Rogers, Brendan; Trinh, Chi H.; Shuping, Yu; Edwards, Thomas A.; Peckham, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    α-Actinin-2 (ACTN2) is the only muscle isoform of α-actinin expressed in cardiac muscle. Mutations in this protein have been implicated in mild to moderate forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We have investigated the effects of two mutations identified from HCM patients, A119T and G111V, on the secondary and tertiary structure of a purified actin binding domain (ABD) of ACTN2 by circular dichroism and X-ray crystallography, and show small but distinct changes for both mutations. We also find that both mutants have reduced F-actin binding affinity, although the differences are not significant. The full length mEos2 tagged protein expressed in adult cardiomyocytes shows that both mutations additionally affect Z-disc localization and dynamic behaviour. Overall, these two mutations have small effects on structure, function and behaviour, which may contribute to a mild phenotype for this disease. PMID:27287556

  12. Long-term rescue of a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by a mutation in the thin filament protein, tropomyosin, via modulation of a calcium cycling protein.

    PubMed

    Gaffin, Robert D; Peña, James R; Alves, Marco S L; Dias, Fernando A L; Chowdhury, Shamim A K; Heinrich, Lynley S; Goldspink, Paul H; Kranias, Evangelia G; Wieczorek, David F; Wolska, Beata M

    2011-11-01

    We have recently shown that a temporary increase in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) cycling via adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA2) transiently improves relaxation and delays hypertrophic remodeling in a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) caused by a mutation in the thin filament protein, tropomyosin (i.e., α-TmE180G or Tm180). In this study, we sought to permanently alter calcium fluxes via phospholamban (PLN) gene deletion in Tm180 mice in order to sustain long-term improvements in cardiac function and adverse cardiac remodeling/hypertrophy. While similar work has been done in FHCs resulting from mutations in thick myofilament proteins, no one has studied these effects in an FHC resulting from a thin filament protein mutation. Tm180 transgenic (TG) mice were crossbred with PLN knockout (KO) mice and four groups were studied in parallel: 1) non-TG (NTG), 2) Tm180, 3) PLNKO/NTG and 4) PLNKO/Tm180. Tm180 mice exhibit increased heart weight/body weight and hypertrophic gene markers compared to NTG mice, but levels in PLNKO/Tm180 mice were similar to NTG. Tm180 mice also displayed altered function as assessed via in situ pressure-volume analysis and echocardiography at 3-6 months and one year; however, altered function in Tm180 mice was rescued back to NTG levels in PLNKO/Tm180 mice. Collagen deposition, as assessed by Picrosirius Red staining, was increased in Tm180 mice but was similar in NTG and in PLNKO/Tm180 mice. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation increased in Tm180 mice while levels in PLNKO/Tm180 mice were similar to NTGs. The present study shows that by modulating SR calcium cycling, we were able to rescue many of the deleterious aspects of FHC caused by a mutation in the thin filament protein, Tm. PMID:21840315

  13. Maternally inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to a novel T-to-C transition at nucleotide 9997 in the mitochondrial tRNA{sup glycine} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Merante, F.; Tein, I.; Benson, L.; Robinson, B.H.

    1994-09-01

    The authors report a unique heteroplasmic T-to-C transition at nucleotide 9997 in the mitochondrial tRNA{sup glycine} gene in a multiplex family who manifested nonobstructive cardiomyopathy. The degree of mtDNA heteroplasmy generally correlated with the severity of the symptoms. This T-to-C transition disrupts hydrogen bonding in the region adjacent to the acceptor stem of the tRNA molecule. The thymine residue at position 9997 is highly conserved in mammals, as well as in various vertebrates and invertebrates. A PCR diagnostic test for the presence of the 9997 T-to-C transition revealed that the base change was always present in high proportion in affected family members, not present in unaffected family members, and never present in control subjects from various ethnic groups (25 groups sampled, 42 individuals), thus ruling out the possibility that this change represents a polymorphic variant in the general population. The degree of heteroplasmy in lymphoblast cultures also correlated with the level of enzyme activity present for cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and succinate cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complexes II and III). The absence of previously reported mtDNA mutations associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was verified by both PCR diagnostic procedures and sequence analysis. All mitochondrial tRNA genes, as well as genes encoding ATPase subunits 6 and 8, were sequenced and found not to possess base changes consistent with the clinical profile. More detailed biochemical and molecular biological investigations are discussed. 51 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Predictive Values of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Cardiac Troponin I for Myocardial Fibrosis in Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changlin; Liu, Rong; Yuan, Jiansong; Cui, Jingang; Hu, Fenghuan; Yang, Weixian; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Youzhou; Qiao, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    Background Both high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T and B-type natriuretic peptide are useful in detecting myocardial fibrosis, as determined by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), in patients with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, their values to predict myocardial fibrosis in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) remain unclear. We investigated the role of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) to identify LGE-CMR in patients with HOCM. Methods Peripheral concentrations of NT-proBNP and cTnI were determined in patients with HOCM (n = 163; age = 47.2 ± 10.8 years; 38.7% females). Contrast-enhanced CMR was performed to identify and quantify myocardial fibrosis. Results LGE was detected in 120 of 163 patients (73.6%). Patients with LGE had significantly higher levels of NT-proBNP and cTnI than those without LGE (1386.2 [904.6–2340.8] vs. 866.6 [707.2–1875.2] pmol/L, P = 0.003; 0.024 [0.010–0.049] vs. 0.010 [0.005–0.021] ng/ml, P <0.001, respectively). The extent of LGE was positively correlated with log cTnI (r = 0.371, P <0.001) and log NT-proBNP (r = 0.211, P = 0.007). On multivariable analysis, both log cTnI and maximum wall thickness (MWT) were independent predictors of the presence of LGE (OR = 3.193, P = 0.033; OR = 1.410, P < 0.001, respectively), whereas log NT-proBNP was not. According to the ROC curve analysis, combined measurements of MWT ≥21 mm and/or cTnI ≥0.025ng/ml indicated good diagnostic performance for the presence of LGE, with specificity of 95% or sensitivity of 88%. Conclusions Serum cTnI is an independent predictor useful for identifying myocardial fibrosis, while plasma NT-proBNP is only associated with myocardial fibrosis on univariate analysis. Combined measurements of serum cTnI with MWT further improve its value in detecting myocardial fibrosis in patients with HOCM. PMID:26765106

  15. Simvastatin Induces Regression of Cardiac Hypertrophy and Fibrosis and Improves Cardiac Function in a Transgenic Rabbit Model of Human Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajnikant; Nagueh, Sherif F.; Tsybouleva, Natalie; Abdellatif, Maha; Lutucuta, Silvia; Kopelen, Helen A.; Quinones, Miguel A.; Zoghbi, William A.; Entman, Mark L.; Roberts, Robert; Marian, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disease characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, myocyte disarray, interstitial fibrosis, and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We have proposed that hypertrophy and fibrosis, the major determinants of mortality and morbidity, are potentially reversible. We tested this hypothesis in β-myosin heavy chain–Q403 transgenic rabbits. Methods and Results We randomized 24 β-myosin heavy chain–Q403 rabbits to treatment with either a placebo or simvastatin (5 mg · kg−1 · d−1) for 12 weeks and included 12 nontransgenic controls. We performed 2D and Doppler echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging before and after treatment. Demographic data were similar among the groups. Baseline mean LV mass and interventricular septal thickness in nontransgenic, placebo, and simvastatin groups were 3.9±0.7, 6.2±2.0, and 7.5±2.1 g (P<0.001) and 2.2±0.2, 3.1±0.5, and 3.3±0.5 mm (P=0.002), respectively. Simvastatin reduced LV mass by 37%, interventricular septal thickness by 21%, and posterior wall thickness by 13%. Doppler indices of LV filling pressure were improved. Collagen volume fraction was reduced by 44% (P<0.001). Disarray was unchanged. Levels of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 were increased in the placebo group and were less than normal in the simvastatin group. Levels of activated and total p38, Jun N-terminal kinase, p70S6 kinase, Ras, Rac, and RhoA and the membrane association of Ras, RhoA, and Rac1 were unchanged. Conclusions Simvastatin induced the regression of hypertrophy and fibrosis, improved cardiac function, and reduced ERK1/2 activity in the β-myosin heavy chain–Q403 rabbits. These findings highlight the need for clinical trials to determine the effects of simvastatin on cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction in humans with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:11457751

  16. Prognostic value of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia and the potential role of amiodarone treatment in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: assessment in an unselected non-referral based patient population

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, F; Olivotto, I; Montereggi, A; Squillatini, G; Dolara, A; Maron, B

    1998-01-01

    Background—Amiodarone has been reported to reduce the likelihood of sudden death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). However, data regarding the clinical course in HCM have traditionally come from selected referral populations biased toward assessment of high risk patients.
Aims—To evaluate antiarrhythmic treatment for sudden death in an HCM population not subject to tertiary referral bias, closely resembling the true disease state present in the community.
Methods—Cardiovascular mortality was assessed in relation to the occurrence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) on 24 or 48 hour ambulatory Holter recording, a finding previously regarded as a marker for sudden death, particularly when the arrhythmia was frequent, repetitive or prolonged. 167 consecutive patients were analysed by multiple Holter ECG recordings (mean (SD) 157 (129) hours) and followed for a mean of 10 (5) years. Only patients with multiple repetitive NSVT were treated with amiodarone, and in relatively low doses (220 (44) mg/day).
Results—Nine HCM related deaths occurred: 8 were the consequence of congestive heart failure, but only 1 was sudden and unexpected. Three groups of patients were segregated based on their NSVT profile: group 1 (n = 39), multiple (⩾ 2 runs) and repetitive bursts (on ⩾ 2 Holters) of NSVT, or prolonged runs of ventricular tachycardia, included 4 deaths due to heart failure; group 2 (n = 38), isolated infrequent bursts of NSVT, included 1 sudden death; group 3 (n = 90), without NSVT, included 4 heart failure deaths. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed no significant differences in survival between the three groups throughout follow up.
Conclusions—In an unselected patient population with HCM, isolated, non-repetitive bursts of NSVT were not associated with adverse prognosis and so this arrhythmia does not appear to justify chronic antiarrhythmic treatment. Amiodarone, administered in relatively low

  17. Comparison of left ventricular diastolic function in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in patients undergoing percutaneous septal alcohol ablation versus surgical myotomy/myectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitges, Marta; Shiota, Takahiro; Lever, Harry M.; Qin, Jian Xin; Bauer, Fabrice; Drinko, Jeannie K.; Agler, Deborah A.; Martin, Maureen G.; Greenberg, Neil L.; Smedira, Nicholas G.; Lytle, Bruce W.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Garcia, Mario J.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    Both percutaneous transcoronary alcohol septal reduction (ASR) and surgical myectomy are effective treatments to relieve left ventricular (LV) outflow tract obstruction in obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). LV diastolic function was assessed by echocardiography in 57 patients with obstructive HC at baseline and 5 +/- 4 months after ASR (n = 37) or surgical myectomy (n = 20). LV outflow tract pressure gradient decreased from 65 +/- 40 to 23 +/- 21 mm Hg (p <0.01) after treatment. The ratio of the early-to-late peak diastolic LV inflow velocities, and the ratio of the early peak diastolic LV inflow velocity to the lateral mitral annulus early diastolic velocity determined by tissue Doppler imaging significantly decreased after the procedures (1.6 +/- 1.7 vs 1.0 +/- 0.7 and 15 +/- 8 vs 11 +/- 5, respectively), whereas LV inflow propagation velocity significantly increased (60 +/- 24 vs 71 +/- 36 cm/s). Left atrial size decreased from 29 +/- 7 to 25 +/- 6 cm(2) (p <0.05). Patients had a significant improvement in New York Heart Association functional class and in exercise performance. When comparing ASR with myectomy, no difference was found in the degree of change in any parameter of diastolic function. Thus, diastolic function indexes obtained by echocardiography changed after septal reduction interventions in patients with obstructive HC; this change was similar to that after surgical myectomy and ASR.

  18. Structural and Kinetic Effects of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Related Mutations R146G/Q and R163W on the Regulatory Switching Activity of Rat Cardiac Troponin I

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiqun; Rieck, Daniel; Li, King-Lun; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) have been reported to change the contractility of cardiac myofilaments, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to investigate the specific structural and kinetic effects that HCM related rat cTnI mutations R146G/Q and R163W exert on Ca2+ and myosin S1 dependent conformational transitions in rat cTn structure. Ca2+-induced changes in interactions between cTnC and cTnI were individually monitored in reconstituted thin filaments using steady state and time resolved FRET, and kinetics were determined using stopped flow. R146G/Q and R163W all changed the FRET distances between cTnC and cTnI in unique and various ways. However, kinetic rates of conformational transitions induced by Ca2+-dissociation were universally slowed when R146G/Q and R163W were present. Interestingly, the kinetic rates of changes in the inhibitory region of cTnI were always slower than that of the regulatory region, suggesting that the fly casting mechanism that normally underlies deactivation is preserved in spite of mutation. In situ rat myocardial fiber studies also revealed that FRET distance changes indicating mutation specific disruption of the cTnIIR–actin interaction were consistent with increased passive tension. PMID:23246786

  19. Unexpectedly Low Mutation Rates in Beta-Myosin Heavy Chain and Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein Genes in Italian Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Roberta; Latronico, Michael VG; Musumeci, Beatrice; Aurino, Stefania; Torella, Annalaura; Bang, Marie-Louise; Jotti, Gloria Saccani; Puca, Annibale A; Volpe, Massimo; Nigro, Vincenzo; Autore, Camillo; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiac disease. Fourteen sarcomeric and sarcomere-related genes have been implicated in HCM etiology, those encoding β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) reported as the most frequently mutated: in fact, these account for around 50% of all cases related to sarcomeric gene mutations, which are collectively responsible for approximately 70% of all HCM cases. Here, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography followed by bidirectional sequencing to screen the coding regions of MYH7 and MYBPC3 in a cohort (n = 125) of Italian patients presenting with HCM. We found 6 MHY7 mutations in 9/125 patients and 18 MYBPC3 mutations in 19/125 patients. Of the three novel MYH7 mutations found, two were missense, and one was a silent mutation; of the eight novel MYBPC3 mutations, one was a substitution, three were stop codons, and four were missense mutations. Thus, our cohort of Italian HCM patients did not harbor the high frequency of mutations usually found in MYH7 and MYBPC3. This finding, coupled to the clinical diversity of our cohort, emphasizes the complexity of HCM and the need for more inclusive investigative approaches in order to fully understand the pathogenesis of this disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 2894–2900, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21302287

  20. Micromechanical thermal assays of Ca2+-regulated thin-filament function and modulation by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutants of human cardiac troponin.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Nicolas M; Mihajlović, Goran; Aledealat, Khaled; Wang, Fang; Xiong, Peng; von Molnár, Stephan; Chase, P Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Microfabricated thermoelectric controllers can be employed to investigate mechanisms underlying myosin-driven sliding of Ca(2+)-regulated actin and disease-associated mutations in myofilament proteins. Specifically, we examined actin filament sliding-with or without human cardiac troponin (Tn) and α-tropomyosin (Tm)-propelled by rabbit skeletal heavy meromyosin, when temperature was varied continuously over a wide range (~20-63°C). At the upper end of this temperature range, reversible dysregulation of thin filaments occurred at pCa 9 and 5; actomyosin function was unaffected. Tn-Tm enhanced sliding speed at pCa 5 and increased a transition temperature (T(t)) between a high activation energy (E(a)) but low temperature regime and a low E(a) but high temperature regime. This was modulated by factors that alter cross-bridge number and kinetics. Three familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) mutations, cTnI R145G, cTnI K206Q, and cTnT R278C, cause dysregulation at temperatures ~5-8°C lower; the latter two increased speed at pCa 5 at all temperatures. PMID:22500102

  1. Impact of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked mutations in the NH2 terminus of the RLC on β-myosin cross-bridge mechanics.

    PubMed

    Farman, Gerrie P; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-15

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is associated with mutations in sarcomeric proteins, including the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). Here we studied the impact of three HCM mutations located in the NH2 terminus of the RLC on the molecular mechanism of β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) cross-bridge mechanics using the in vitro motility assay. To generate mutant β-myosin, native RLC was depleted from porcine cardiac MHC and reconstituted with mutant (A13T, F18L, and E22K) or wild-type (WT) human cardiac RLC. We characterized the mutant myosin force and motion generation capability in the presence of a frictional load. Compared with WT, all three mutants exhibited reductions in maximal actin filament velocity when tested under low or no frictional load. The actin-activated ATPase showed no significant difference between WT and HCM-mutant-reconstituted myosins. The decrease in velocity has been attributed to a significantly increased duty cycle, as was measured by the dependence of actin sliding velocity on myosin surface density, for all three mutant myosins. These results demonstrate a mutation-induced alteration in acto-myosin interactions that may contribute to the pathogenesis of HCM. PMID:25324513

  2. Mutation-Specific Phenotypes in hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes Carrying Either Myosin-Binding Protein C Or α-Tropomyosin Mutation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Chandra; Pölönen, Risto-Pekka; Rajala, Kristiina; Pekkanen-Mattila, Mari; Rasku, Jyrki; Larsson, Kim; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease, which affects the structure of heart muscle tissue. The clinical symptoms include arrhythmias, progressive heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death but the mutation carrier can also be totally asymptomatic. To date, over 1400 mutations have been linked to HCM, mostly in genes encoding for sarcomeric proteins. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease are still largely unknown. Two founder mutations for HCM in Finland are located in myosin-binding protein C (MYBPC3-Gln1061X) and α-tropomyosin (TPM1-Asp175Asn) genes. We studied the properties of HCM cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) carrying either MYBPC3-Gln1061X or TPM1-Asp175Asn mutation. Both types of HCM-CMs displayed pathological phenotype of HCM but, more importantly, we found differences between CMs carrying either MYBPC3-Gln1061X or TPM1-Asp175Asn gene mutation in their cellular size, Ca2+ handling, and electrophysiological properties, as well as their gene expression profiles. These findings suggest that even though the clinical phenotypes of the patients carrying either MYBPC3-Gln1061X or TPM1-Asp175Asn gene mutation are similar, the genetic background as well as the functional properties on the cellular level might be different, indicating that the pathophysiological mechanisms behind the two mutations would be divergent as well. PMID:27057166

  3. How Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Became a Contemporary Treatable Genetic Disease With Low Mortality: Shaped by 50 Years of Clinical Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Rowin, Ethan J; Casey, Susan A; Maron, Martin S

    2016-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively common genetic heart disease encumbered throughout much of its almost 60-year history by a large measure of misunderstanding and the perception of a grim outcome without effective treatment options. However, it is now apparent that the majority of patients affected with HCM can achieve normal or near-normal life expectancy without disability, and usually do not require major treatment interventions. Nevertheless, for those patients with HCM who are at risk for (or experience) disease-related complications, a constellation of comprehensive nonpharmacologic management strategies have evolved over the last 15 years, altering the natural history and disease course for many, including implantable defibrillators, heart transplant, external defibrillation/therapeutic hypothermia, advances in surgical myectomy, and alcohol ablation. In particular, expanded contemporary risk stratification strategies have led to a more reliable selection of patients likely to achieve primary prevention of sudden death with implantable defibrillators. Most recently, large cohort studies using current management strategies and therapeutic measures have shown that it is now possible to achieve significantly improved survival with a low HCM-related mortality of 0.5% per year across all ages, and including children and young adults characteristically with the most aggressive disease course. These clinical management initiatives, instituted by the practicing cardiology community, have succeeded in preserving life and restoring an active lifestyle for thousands of patients with HCM, while providing many with a measure of reassurance and a reasonable expectation for an extended (if not normal) life span. PMID:27437663

  4. An explicitly solvated full atomistic model of the cardiac thin filament and application on the calcium binding affinity effects from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy linked mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The previous version of our cardiac thin filament (CTF) model consisted of the troponin complex (cTn), two coiled-coil dimers of tropomyosin (Tm), and 29 actin units. We now present the newest revision of the model to include explicit solvation. The model was developed to continue our study of genetic mutations in the CTF proteins which are linked to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Binding of calcium to the cTnC subunit causes subtle conformational changes to propagate through the cTnC to the cTnI subunit which then detaches from actin. Conformational changes propagate through to the cTnT subunit, which allows Tm to move into the open position along actin, leading to muscle contraction. Calcium disassociation allows for the reverse to occur, which results in muscle relaxation. The inclusion of explicit TIP3 water solvation allows for the model to get better individual local solvent to protein interactions; which are important when observing the N-lobe calcium binding pocket of the cTnC. We are able to compare in silica and in vitro experimental results to better understand the physiological effects from mutants, such as the R92L/W and F110V/I of the cTnT, on the calcium binding affinity compared to the wild type.

  5. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  6. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  7. Enhanced troponin I binding explains the functional changes produced by the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation A8V of cardiac troponin C.

    PubMed

    Zot, Henry G; Hasbun, Javier E; Michell, Clara A; Landim-Vieira, Maicon; Pinto, Jose R

    2016-07-01

    Higher affinity for TnI explains how troponin C (TnC) carrying a causative hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation, TnC(A8V), sensitizes muscle cells to Ca(2+). Muscle fibers reconstituted with TnC(A8V) require ∼2.3-fold less [Ca(2+)] to achieve 50% maximum-tension compared to fibers reconstituted with wild-type TnC (TnC(WT)). Binding measurements rule out a significant change in N-terminus Ca(2+)-affinity of isolated TnC(A8V), and TnC(A8V) binds the switch-peptide of troponin-I (TnI(sp)) ∼1.6-fold more strongly than TnC(WT); thus we model the TnC-TnI(sp) interaction as competing with the TnI-actin interaction. Tension data are well-fit by a model constrained to conditions in which the affinity of TnC(A8V) for TnI(sp) is 1.5-1.7-fold higher than that of TnC(WT) at all [Ca(2+)]. Mean ATPase rates of reconstituted cardiac myofibrils is greater for TnC(A8V) than TnC(WT) at all [Ca(2+)], with statistically significant differences in the means at higher [Ca(2+)]. To probe TnC-TnI interaction in low Ca(2+), displacement of bis-ANS from TnI was monitored as a function of TnC. Whereas Ca(2+)-TnC(WT) displaces significantly more bis-ANS than Mg(2+)-TnC(WT), Ca(2+)-TnC(A8V) displaces probe equivalently to Mg(2+)-TnC(A8V) and Ca(2+)-TnC(WT), consistent with stronger Ca(2+)-independent TnC(A8V)-TnI(sp). A Matlab program for computing theoretical activation is reported. Our work suggests that contractility is constantly above normal in hearts made hypertrophic by TnC(A8V). PMID:26976709

  8. A human MYBPC3 mutation appearing about 10 centuries ago results in a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with delayed onset, moderate evolution but with a risk of sudden death

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. One specific mutation in the MYBPC3 gene is highly prevalent in center east of France giving an opportunity to define the clinical profile of this specific mutation. Methods HCM probands were screened for mutation in the MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3 genes. Carriers of the MYBPC3 IVS20-2A>G mutation were genotyped with 8 microsatellites flanking this gene. The age of this MYBPC3 mutation was inferred with the software ESTIAGE. The age at first symptom, diagnosis, first complication, first severe complication and the rate of sudden death were compared between carriers of the IVS20-2 mutation (group A) and carriers of all other mutations (group B) using time to event curves and log rank test. Results Out of 107 HCM probands, 45 had a single heterozygous mutation in one of the 4 tested sarcomeric genes including 9 patients with the MYBPC3 IVS20-2A>G mutation. The IVS20-2 mutation in these 9 patients and their 25 mutation carrier relatives was embedded in a common haplotype defined after genotyping 4 polymorphic markers on each side of the MYBPC3 gene. This result supports the hypothesis of a common ancestor. Furthermore, we evaluated that the mutation occurred about 47 generations ago, approximately at the 10th century. We then compared the clinical profile of the IVS20-2 mutation carriers (group A) and the carriers of all other mutations (group B). Age at onset of symptoms was similar in the 34 group A cases and the 73 group B cases but group A cases were diagnosed on average 15 years later (log rank test p = 0.022). Age of first complication and first severe complication was delayed in group A vs group B cases but the prevalence of sudden death and age at death was similar in both groups. Conclusion A founder mutation arising at about the 10th century in the MYBPC3 gene accounts for 8.4% of all HCM in center east France and results in a cardiomyopathy starting late and

  9. Validation of the 2014 European Society of Cardiology Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Prediction Model in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in a Reference Center in South America.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Adrián; Quiroga, Alejandro; Ochoa, Juan Pablo; Mysuta, Mauricio; Casabé, José Horacio; Biagetti, Marcelo; Guevara, Eduardo; Favaloro, Liliana E; Fava, Agostina M; Galizio, Néstor

    2016-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a common cause of death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Our aim was to conduct an external and independent validation in South America of the 2014 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) SCD risk prediction model to identify patients requiring an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. This study included 502 consecutive patients with HC followed from March, 1993 to December, 2014. A combined end point of SCD or appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy was assessed. For the quantitative estimation of individual 5-year SCD risk, we used the formula: 1 - 0.998(exp(Prognostic index)). Our database also included the abnormal blood pressure response to exercise as a risk marker. We analyzed the 3 categories of 5-year risk proposed by the ESC: low risk (LR) <4%; intermediate risk (IR) ≥4% to <6%, and high risk (HR) ≥6%. The LR group included 387 patients (77%); the IR group 39 (8%); and the HR group 76 (15%). Fourteen patients (3%) had SCD/appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy (LR: 0%; IR: 2 of 39 [5%]; and HR: 12 of 76 [16%]). In a receiver-operating characteristic curve, the new model proved to be an excellent predictor because the area under the curve for the estimated risk is 0.925 (statistical C: 0.925; 95% CI 0.8884 to 0.9539, p <0.0001). In conclusion, the SCD risk prediction model in HC proposed by the 2014 ESC guidelines was validated in our population and represents an improvement compared with previous approaches. A larger multicenter, independent and external validation of the model with long-term follow-up would be advisable. PMID:27189816

  10. Comparison of Clinical Presentation, Left Ventricular Morphology and Hemodynamics, and Exercise Tolerance in Obese versus Non-Obese Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Canepa, Marco; Sorensen, Lars L.; Pozios, Iraklis; Dimaano, Veronica L.; Hong-Chang, Luo; Pinheiro, Aurelio C.; Strait, James B.; Brunelli, Claudio; Abraham, M. Roselle; Ferrucci, Luigi; Abraham, Theodore P.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is independently associated with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and thus may be an important modifier of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) phenotype. We examined if obesity modifies the clinical presentation, LV morphology, outflow hemodynamics and exercise tolerance in HC. In this cross-sectional study, 88 obese (body mass index, BMI≥30 kg/m2) and 154 non-obese (BMI<30 kg/m2) patients from the Johns Hopkins HC clinic were compared with respect to a variety of clinical and LV echocardiographic measurements. Obese patients (36.4%) were more likely to report exertional dyspnea (p=0.04) and chest pain (p=0.002), and had higher prevalence of hypertension (p=0.008). LV posterior wall thickness (p=0.01) but not the septal wall (p≥0.21) was significantly higher in obese patients, resulting in an increased LV mass index (p=0.003). No significant differences in LV systolic and diastolic function were observed, but obesity was associated with higher LV stroke volume (p=0.03), inducible LV outflow tract gradients (p=0.045) and chance of developing LV outflow tract obstruction during stress (p=0.035). In multivariate analysis, BMI was associated with increased posterior (but not septal) wall thickness (β=0.15, p=0.02) and LV mass index (β=0.18, p=0.005), particularly in those with hypertension. Obesity was also associated with reduced exercise time and functional capacity, and BMI independently correlated with reduced exercise tolerance. In conclusion, obesity is associated with larger LV mass, worse symptoms, lower exercise tolerance and labile obstructive hemodynamics in HC. The association with increased outflow tract gradients has particular importance as contribution of obesity to the pressure gradients may influence clinical decisions in labile obstructive HC. PMID:24079444

  11. Electrocardiographic screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and long QT syndrome: the drivers of cost-effectiveness for the prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brett R; McElligott, Sean; Polsky, Daniel; Vetter, Victoria L

    2014-02-01

    It is universally recognized that the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in youth is an important public health initiative. The best approach remains uncertain. Many European and Asian countries support the use of electrocardiograms (ECGs). In the United States, this is highly controversial. Many debate its cost-effectiveness. We designed a comprehensive economic model of two of the most prevalent causes of SCD identifiable by ECG, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and long QT syndrome (LQTS), to determine the drivers of uncertainty in the estimate of cost-effectiveness. We compared the cost-effectiveness of screening with history and physical examination (H&P) plus ECG to the current United States standard, H&P alone, for the detection and treatment of HCM and LQTS. We used a Markov model on a theoretical cohort of healthy 12-year-olds over a 70-year time horizon from a societal perspective, employing extensive univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses, to determine drivers of costs and effectiveness. The incremental cost-effectiveness of adding ECGs to H&Ps was $41,400/life-year saved. The model was highly sensitive to the effect of identification and treatment of previously undiagnosed individuals with HCM; however, it was insensitive to many variables commonly assumed to be significant, including the costs of ECGs, echocardiograms, and genetic testing, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of ECGs. No LQTS-related parameters were significant. This study suggests that the key to determining the cost-effectiveness of ECG screening in the United States lies in developing a better understanding of disease progression in the previously undiagnosed HCM population. PMID:24005901

  12. Risk factors, clinical signs, and survival in cats with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: 74 cases (1985-1989).

    PubMed

    Atkins, C E; Gallo, A M; Kurzman, I D; Cowen, P

    1992-08-15

    Population characteristics, risk factors, and survival characteristics were evaluated in 74 cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) seen at North Carolina State University veterinary teaching hospital from 1985 to 1989, and compared with 82 clinically normal cats. The mean (+/- SD) age of cats with HC was 6.5 (4.0) years. Neutered males were at significantly greater risk (odds ratio 3.1) than neutered females. Breed, body weight, or coat color were not determined to be risk factors for HC. Tricolor cats were significantly underrepresented, probably reflecting the male predisposition for HC and not a true risk reduction associated with coat color. Forty-one cats were without clinical signs of heart disease (murmur and/or gallop sound only), 24 were in congestive heart failure, and 9 had systemic arterial embolism, 3 of which had concomitant congestive heart failure. The median survival time for 61 cats with HC, for which survival information could be obtained and that were not euthanatized on day 1, was 732 days. Survival was not affected by age at diagnosis, breed, body weight, or sex. However, clinical signs were important in determining prognosis; cats with heart rates greater than 200 beats/min survived significantly longer (median survival greater than 1,830 days) than those with heart rates greater than or equal to 200 beats/min (median survival = 152 days). Cats without clinical signs (median survival greater than 1,830 days) survived longer than those with clinical signs, and cats in heart failure survived a median of 92 days, compared with 61 days for those with systemic arterial embolism. Analysis of survival revealed no significant difference between the 2 groups of cats with clinical signs; however, all cats with embolism and only 60% of cats with heart failure were dead 6 months after diagnosis. PMID:1517140

  13. Impact of incidental amyloidosis on the prognosis of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing septal myectomy for left ventricular outflow tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Helder, Meghana R K; Schaff, Hartzell V; Nishimura, Rick A; Gersh, Bernard J; Dearani, Joseph A; Ommen, Steve R; Mereuta, Oana M; Theis, Jason D; Dogan, Ahmet; Edwards, William D

    2014-11-01

    To determine the impact of amyloid on the prognosis of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), we reviewed outcomes of patients who underwent septal myectomy for HC from March 7, 1996, to October 9, 2012, with amyloid deposits identified in operative specimens. Amyloid subtypes were differentiated by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The survival rate was compared with that of an age-matched population (2:1) without amyloid who underwent septal myectomy for HC. Sixteen patients (mean age ± SD 71 ± 8 years; 12 men) met study criteria. All 16 had intraventricular peak systolic gradients reduced intraoperatively from 105 ± 53 mm Hg to 3 ± 7 mm Hg (p <0.001). Amyloid deposits in specimens ranged from minimal to mild. Nine patients had senile (transthyretin-type) amyloidosis, 4 had immunoglobulin-associated amyloidosis, 2 had apolipoprotein A4 amyloidosis type, and 1 had serum amyloid A type. There were no deaths before 30 days. Twelve patients had New York Heart Association class III or IV function preoperatively, and at last follow-up (median 3 years), class I or II. Only 1 patient received postoperative amyloidosis treatment. The postoperative survival rate at 2 and 4 years was 100% (n = 11 at risk) and 91% (n = 6 at risk), respectively, similar to that of the age-matched population with HC without amyloid who underwent myectomy (p = 0.13). Patients undergoing septal myectomy for HC who have histologic evidence of mild amyloidosis have early outcomes and midterm survival similar to those of patients with HC without amyloidosis who undergo myectomy. In conclusion, although longer follow-up is necessary, small amounts of amyloid, regardless of subtype, do not confer a poor prognosis on patients with HC who undergo septal myectomy. PMID:25217455

  14. Short-term beat-to-beat variability of the QT interval is increased and correlates with parameters of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Andrea; Baczkó, István; Nagy, Viktória; Gavallér, Henriette; Csanády, Miklós; Forster, Tamás; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Lengyel, Csaba; Sepp, Róbert

    2015-09-01

    Stratification models for the prediction of sudden cardiac death (SCD) are inappropriate in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We investigated conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) repolarization parameters and the beat-to-beat short-term QT interval variability (QT-STV), a new parameter of proarrhythmic risk, in 37 patients with HCM (21 males, average age 48 ± 15 years). Resting ECGs were recorded for 5 min and the frequency corrected QT interval (QTc), QT dispersion (QTd), beat-to-beat short-term variability of QT interval (QT-STV), and the duration of terminal part of T waves (Tpeak-Tend) were calculated. While all repolarization parameters were significantly increased in patients with HCM compared with the controls (QTc, 488 ± 61 vs. 434 ± 23 ms, p < 0.0001; QT-STV, 4.5 ± 2 vs. 3.2 ± 1 ms, p = 0.0002; Tpeak-Tend duration, 107 ± 27 vs. 91 ± 10 ms, p = 0.0015; QTd, 47 ± 17 vs. 34 ± 9 ms, p = 0.0002), QT-STV had the highest relative increase (+41%). QT-STV also showed the best correlation with indices of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, i.e., maximal LV wall thickness normalized for body surface area (BSA; r = 0.461, p = 0.004) or LV mass (determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging) normalized for BSA (r = 0.455, p = 0.015). In summary, beat-to-beat QT-STV showed the most marked increase in patients with HCM and may represent a novel marker that merits further testing for increased SCD risk in HCM. PMID:26313025

  15. Faster cross-bridge detachment and increased tension cost in human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with the R403Q MYH7 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Witjas-Paalberends, E Rosalie; Ferrara, Claudia; Scellini, Beatrice; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Montag, Judith; Tesi, Chiara; Stienen, Ger J M; Michels, Michelle; Ho, Carolyn Y; Kraft, Theresia; Poggesi, Corrado; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2014-01-01

    The first mutation associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the R403Q mutation in the gene encoding β-myosin heavy chain (β-MyHC). R403Q locates in the globular head of myosin (S1), responsible for interaction with actin, and thus motor function of myosin. Increased cross-bridge relaxation kinetics caused by the R403Q mutation might underlie increased energetic cost of tension generation; however, direct evidence is absent. Here we studied to what extent cross-bridge kinetics and energetics are related in single cardiac myofibrils and multicellular cardiac muscle strips of three HCM patients with the R403Q mutation and nine sarcomere mutation-negative HCM patients (HCMsmn). Expression of R403Q was on average 41 ± 4% of total MYH7 mRNA. Cross-bridge slow relaxation kinetics in single R403Q myofibrils was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than in HCMsmn myofibrils (0.47 ± 0.02 and 0.30 ± 0.02 s−1, respectively). Moreover, compared to HCMsmn, tension cost was significantly higher in the muscle strips of the three R403Q patients (2.93 ± 0.25 and 1.78 ± 0.10 μmol l–1 s−1 kN−1 m−2, respectively) which showed a positive linear correlation with relaxation kinetics in the corresponding myofibril preparations. This correlation suggests that faster cross-bridge relaxation kinetics results in an increase in energetic cost of tension generation in human HCM with the R403Q mutation compared to HCMsmn. Therefore, increased tension cost might contribute to HCM disease in patients carrying the R403Q mutation. PMID:24928957

  16. Contractility parameters of human β-cardiac myosin with the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R403Q show loss of motor function

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Suman; Sommese, Ruth F.; Ujfalusi, Zoltan; Combs, Ariana; Langer, Stephen; Sutton, Shirley; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Geeves, Michael A.; Ruppel, Kathleen M.; Spudich, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding the force-generating machinery of the cardiac sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin. We present a detailed characterization of the most debated HCM-causing mutation in human β-cardiac myosin, R403Q. Despite numerous studies, most performed with nonhuman or noncardiac myosin, there is no consensus about the mechanism of action of this mutation on the function of the enzyme. We use recombinant human β-cardiac myosin and new methodologies to characterize in vitro contractility parameters of the R403Q myosin compared to wild type. We extend our studies beyond pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin. We find that, with pure actin, the intrinsic force generated by R403Q is ~15% lower than that generated by wild type. The unloaded velocity is, however, ~10% higher for R403Q myosin, resulting in a load-dependent velocity curve that has the characteristics of lower contractility at higher external loads compared to wild type. With regulated actin filaments, there is no increase in the unloaded velocity and the contractility of the R403Q myosin is lower than that of wild type at all loads. Unlike that with pure actin, the actin-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity for R403Q myosin with Ca2+-regulated actin filaments is ~30% lower than that for wild type, predicting a lower unloaded duty ratio of the motor. Overall, the contractility parameters studied fit with a loss of human β-cardiac myosin contractility as a result of the R403Q mutation. PMID:26601291

  17. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort.

    PubMed

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). The overall detection rate for patients with positive family history was 84%, and 90.5% in patients with early disease onset. In our study NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective. PMID:27483260

  18. Mutations in troponin T associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy increase Ca(2+)-sensitivity and suppress the modulation of Ca(2+)-sensitivity by troponin I phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Messer, Andrew E; Bayliss, Christopher R; El-Mezgueldi, Mohammed; Redwood, Charles S; Ward, Douglas G; Leung, Man-Ching; Papadaki, Maria; Dos Remedios, Cristobal; Marston, Steven B

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effect of 7 Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)-causing mutations in troponin T (TnT) on troponin function in thin filaments reconstituted with actin and human cardiac tropomyosin. We used the quantitative in vitro motility assay to study Ca(2+)-regulation of unloaded movement and its modulation by troponin I phosphorylation. Troponin from a patient with the K280N TnT mutation showed no difference in Ca(2+)-sensitivity when compared with donor heart troponin and the Ca(2+)-sensitivity was also independent of the troponin I phosphorylation level (uncoupled). The recombinant K280N TnT mutation increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity 1.7-fold and was also uncoupled. The R92Q TnT mutation in troponin from transgenic mouse increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity and was also completely uncoupled. Five TnT mutations (Δ14, Δ28 + 7, ΔE160, S179F and K273E) studied in recombinant troponin increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity and were all fully uncoupled. Thus, for HCM-causing mutations in TnT, Ca(2+)-sensitisation together with uncoupling in vitro is the usual response and both factors may contribute to the HCM phenotype. We also found that Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can restore coupling to all uncoupled HCM-causing TnT mutations. In fact the combination of Ca(2+)-desensitisation and re-coupling due to EGCG completely reverses both the abnormalities found in troponin with a TnT HCM mutation suggesting it may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27036851

  19. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). The overall detection rate for patients with positive family history was 84%, and 90.5% in patients with early disease onset. In our study NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective. PMID:27483260

  20. Impact of left ventricular outflow tract area on systolic outflow velocity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a real-time three-dimensional echocardiographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Jian Xin; Shiota, Takahiro; Lever, Harry M.; Rubin, David N.; Bauer, Fabrice; Kim, Yong Jin; Sitges, Marta; Greenberg, Neil L.; Drinko, Jeanne K.; Martin, Maureen; Agler, Deborah A.; Thomas, James D.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to use real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) to investigate the quantitative relation between minimal left ventricular (LV) outflow tract area (A(LVOT)) and maximal LV outflow tract (LVOT) velocity in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HCM). BACKGROUND: In patients with HCM, LVOT velocity should change inversely with minimal A(LVOT) unless LVOT obstruction reduces the pumping capacity of the ventricle. METHODS: A total of 25 patients with HCM with systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve leaflets underwent real-time 3DE. The smallest A(LVOT) during systole was measured using anatomically oriented two-dimensional "C-planes" within the pyramidal 3DE volume. Maximal velocity across LVOT was evaluated by two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography (2DE). For comparison with 3DE A(LVOT), the SAM-septal distance was determined by 2DE. RESULTS: Real-time 3DE provided unique information about the dynamic SAM-septal relation during systole, with A(LVOT) ranging from 0.6 to 5.2 cm(2) (mean: 2.2 +/- 1.4 cm(2)). Maximal velocity (v) correlated inversely with A(LVOT) (v = 496 A(LVOT)(-0.80), r = -0.95, p < 0.001), but the exponent (-0.80) was significantly different from -1.0 (95% confidence interval: -0.67 to -0.92), indicating a significant impact of small A(LVOT) on the peak LVOT flow rate. By comparison, the best correlation between velocity and 2DE SAM-septal distance was significantly (p < 0.01) poorer at -0.83, indicating the superiority of 3DE for assessing A(LVOT). CONCLUSIONS: Three-dimensional echocardiography-measured A(LVOT) provides an assessment of HCM geometry that is superior to 2DE methods. These data indicate that the peak LVOT flow rate appears to be significantly decreased by reduced A(LVOT). Real-time 3DE is a potentially valuable clinical tool for assessing patients with HCM.

  1. High Spatial Resolution Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance at 7.0 Tesla in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy – First Experiences: Lesson Learned from 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Prothmann, Marcel; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Töpper, Agnieszka; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Shahid, Etham; Graessl, Andreas; Rieger, Jan; Lysiak, Darius; Thalhammer, C.; Huelnhagen, Till; Kellman, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) provides valuable information in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) based on myocardial tissue differentiation and the detection of small morphological details. CMR at 7.0T improves spatial resolution versus today’s clinical protocols. This capability is as yet untapped in HCM patients. We aimed to examine the feasibility of CMR at 7.0T in HCM patients and to demonstrate its capability for the visualization of subtle morphological details. Methods We screened 131 patients with HCM. 13 patients (9 males, 56 ±31 years) and 13 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects (9 males, 55 ±31years) underwent CMR at 7.0T and 3.0T (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). For the assessment of cardiac function and morphology, 2D CINE imaging was performed (voxel size at 7.0T: (1.4x1.4x2.5) mm3 and (1.4x1.4x4.0) mm3; at 3.0T: (1.8x1.8x6.0) mm3). Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was performed at 3.0T for detection of fibrosis. Results All scans were successful and evaluable. At 3.0T, quantification of the left ventricle (LV) showed similar results in short axis view vs. the biplane approach (LVEDV, LVESV, LVMASS, LVEF) (p = 0.286; p = 0.534; p = 0.155; p = 0.131). The LV-parameters obtained at 7.0T where in accordance with the 3.0T data (pLVEDV = 0.110; pLVESV = 0.091; pLVMASS = 0.131; pLVEF = 0.182). LGE was detectable in 12/13 (92%) of the HCM patients. High spatial resolution CINE imaging at 7.0T revealed hyperintense regions, identifying myocardial crypts in 7/13 (54%) of the HCM patients. All crypts were located in the LGE-positive regions. The crypts were not detectable at 3.0T using a clinical protocol. Conclusions CMR at 7.0T is feasible in patients with HCM. High spatial resolution gradient echo 2D CINE imaging at 7.0T allowed the detection of subtle morphological details in regions of extended hypertrophy and LGE. PMID:26863618

  2. Quantitative diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of myocardial fibrosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy compared with T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian-Ming; Chen, Bing-Hua; Yao, Qiu-Ying; Ou, Yang-Rongzheng; Wu, Rui; Jiang, Meng; Hu, Jiani; An, Dong-Aolei; Xu, Jian-Rong

    2016-08-01

    To identify myocardial fibrosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) subjects using quantitative cardiac diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and to compare its performance with native T1 mapping and extracellular volume (ECV). Thirty-eight HCM subjects (mean age, 53 ± 9 years) and 14 normal controls (mean age, 51 ± 8 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) on a 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) machine with DWI, T1 mapping and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging as the reference standard. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), native T1 value and ECV were determined for each subject. Overall, the HCM subjects exhibited an increased native T1 value (1241.04 ± 78.50 ms), ECV (0.31 ± 0.03) and ADC (2.36 ± 0.34 s/mm(2)) compared with the normal controls (1114.60 ± 37.99 ms, 0.24 ± 0.04, and 1.62 ± 0.38 s/mm(2), respectively) (p < 0.05). DWI differentiated healthy and fibrotic myocardia with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.93, while the AUCs of the native T1 values (0.93), (p > 0.05) and ECV (0.94), (p > 0.05) exhibited an equal differentiation ability. Both HCM LGE+ and HCM LGE- subjects had an increased native T1 value, ECV and ADC compared to the normal controls (p < 0.05). HCM LGE+ subjects exhibited an increased ECV (0.31 ± 0.04) and ADC (2.43 ± 0.36 s/mm(2)) compared to HCM LGE- subjects (p < 0.05). HCM LGE+ and HCM LGE- subjects had similar native T1 values (1250 ± 76.36 ms vs. 1213.98 ± 92.30 ms, respectively) (p > 0.05). ADC values were linearly associated with increased ECV (R(2) = 0.36) and native T1 values (R(2) = 0.40) among all subjects. DWI is a feasible alternative to native T1 mapping and ECV for the identification of myocardial fibrosis in patients with HCM. DWI and ECV can quantitatively characterize the extent of fibrosis in HCM LGE+ and HCM LGE- patients. PMID:27198892

  3. Association of Late Gadolinium Enhancement and Degree of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Assessed on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Ventricular Tachycardia in Children With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Joseph A; Noel, Cory V; Denfield, Susan W; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Jeewa, Aamir; Dreyer, William J; Maskatia, Shiraz A

    2016-04-15

    There are limited data on the clinical significance of left ventricular (LV) mass and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in pediatric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). We reviewed cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) studies of children with HC to investigate the associations between the extent and distribution of LGE and LV mass with ventricular tachycardia (VT) in children with HC. A blinded observer reviewed CMR studies for the presence and distribution of LV hypertrophy and LGE using a 17-segment model. The primary outcome was VT. LGE was present 17 of 33 subjects (52%). VT was present on outpatient Holter monitor or exercise stress test in 7 patients, of which 5 patients (71%) had LGE. Each additional segment of LGE was associated with an increase in the odds of VT (odds ratio [OR] 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.9) and fewer than 5 segments with LGE had 93% specificity for the presence or absence of VT (OR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.5). VT was more common in patients with LGE in the apical septal (p = 0.03), basal inferoseptal (p <0.01), and basal inferior (p = 0.04) segments, whereas LGE in more commonly involved segments (midanteroseptal and midinferoseptal) was not associated with VT (p = 0.13, 0.26). Patients with VT had greater LV mass index (76.4 ± 40.4 g/m(2.7) vs 50.9 ± 24.3 g/m(2.7); p = 0.03). Each centimeter of increased maximum LV thickness was associated with increased likelihood of VT (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 6.8). In conclusion, in pediatric HC, CMR to evaluate the extent and pattern of LGE, LV mass index, and maximum LV thickness may help to identify children with HC at risk of VT. PMID:26892450

  4. [Gallopamil and chlorthalidone versus atenolol and chlorthalidone in the treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in patients with arterial hypertension: polycardiographic evaluation of the systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle].

    PubMed

    Chieppa, S; Lobascio, C; Brandini, V; Iarussi, D; Giuliani, F; Langella, S; De Simone, R

    1989-08-01

    In 13 patients, affected by hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) and essential hypertension, antihypertensive-efficacy and effects of a new calcium-channel blocker (gallopamil) associated with a diuretic agent (chlorthalidone) on left ventricular systolic and diastolic performance assessed by phonocardiographic methods. The results were compared to those obtained, in the same group of patients, with a selective beta-blocker (atenolol) associated with the same diuretic agent (chlorthalidone). With both therapeutic regimens a statistically significant reduction of systolic and diastolic arterial pressure was observed; both agents were able to reduce hemodynamic gradient in systole which characterize HOCM; however, the treatment with gallopamil plus chlorthalidone determined greater effects on left ventricular diastolic function as compared to the treatment with atenolol plus chlorthalidone; both treatments determined bradycardia. PMID:2605580

  5. Delayed hyperenhancement in magnetic resonance imaging of left ventricular hypertrophy caused by aortic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: visualisation of focal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Debl, K; Djavidani, B; Buchner, S; Lipke, C; Nitz, W; Feuerbach, S; Riegger, G; Luchner, A

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare the extent and distribution of focal fibrosis by gadolinium contrast‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; delayed hyperenhancement) in severe left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in patients with pressure overload caused by aortic stenosis (AS) and with genetically determined hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods 44 patients with symptomatic valvular AS (n  =  22) and HCM (n  =  22) were studied. Cine images were acquired with fast imaging with steady‐state precession (trueFISP) on a 1.5 T scanner (Sonata, Siemens Medical Solutions). Gadolinium contrast‐enhanced MRI was performed with a segmented inversion–recovery sequence. The location, extent and enhancement pattern of hyperenhanced myocardium was analysed in a 12‐segment model. Results Mean LV mass was 238.6 (SD 75.3) g in AS and 205.4 (SD 80.5) g in HCM (p  =  0.17). Hyperenhancement was observed in 27% of patients with AS and in 73% of patients with HCM (p < 0.01). In AS, hyperenhancement was observed in 60% of patients with a maximum diastolic wall thickness ⩾ 18 mm, whereas no patient with a maximum diastolic wall thickness < 18 mm had hyperenhancement (p < 0.05). Patients with hyperenhancement had more severe AS than patients without hyperenhancement (aortic valve area 0.80 (0.09) cm2v 0.99 (0.3) cm2, p < 0.05; maximum gradient 98 (22) mm Hg v 74 (24) mm Hg, p < 0.05). In HCM, hyperenhancement was predominant in the anteroseptal regions and patients with hyperenhancement had higher end diastolic (125.4 (36.9) ml v 98.8 (16.9) ml, p < 0.05) and end systolic volumes (38.9 (18.2) ml v 25.2 (1.7) ml, p < 0.05). The volume of hyperenhancement (percentage of total LV myocardium), where present, was lower in AS than in HCM (4.3 (1.9)% v 8.6 (7.4)%, p< 0.05). Hyperenhancement was observed in 4.5 (3.1) and 4.6 (2.7) segments in AS and HCM, respectively (p  =  0.93), and the enhancement

  6. Mechanical aberrations in hypetrophic cardiomyopathy: emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Tzimagiorgis, Georgios; Efthimiadis, Georgios K.; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common monogenic disorder in cardiology. Despite important advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, it is not clear how flaws in individual sarcomere components are responsible for the observed phenotype. The aim of this article is to provide a brief interpretative analysis of some currently proposed pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a special emphasis on alterations in the cardiac mechanical properties. PMID:26347658

  7. Point Mutations in Human β Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Have Differential Effects on Sarcomeric Structure and Assembly: An ATP Binding Site Change Disrupts Both Thick and Thin Filaments, Whereas Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutations Display Normal Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Becker, K. David; Gottshall, Kim R.; Hickey, Reed; Perriard, Jean-Claude; Chien, Kenneth R.

    1997-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a human heart disease characterized by increased ventricular mass, focal areas of fibrosis, myocyte, and myofibrillar disorganization. This genetically dominant disease can be caused by mutations in any one of several contractile proteins, including β cardiac myosin heavy chain (βMHC). To determine whether point mutations in human βMHC have direct effects on interfering with filament assembly and sarcomeric structure, full-length wild-type and mutant human βMHC cDNAs were cloned and expressed in primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRC) under conditions that promote myofibrillogenesis. A lysine to arginine change at amino acid 184 in the consensus ATP binding sequence of human βMHC resulted in abnormal subcellular localization and disrupted both thick and thin filament structure in transfected NRC. Diffuse βMHC K184R protein appeared to colocalize with actin throughout the myocyte, suggesting a tight interaction of these two proteins. Human βMHC with S472V mutation assembled normally into thick filaments and did not affect sarcomeric structure. Two mutant myosins previously described as causing human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, R249Q and R403Q, were competent to assemble into thick filaments producing myofibrils with well defined I bands, A bands, and H zones. Coexpression and detection of wild-type βMHC and either R249Q or R403Q proteins in the same myocyte showed these proteins are equally able to assemble into the sarcomere and provided no discernible differences in subcellular localization. Thus, human βMHC R249Q and R403Q mutant proteins were readily incorporated into NRC sarcomeres and did not disrupt myofilament formation. This study indicates that the phenotype of myofibrillar disarray seen in HCM patients which harbor either of these two mutations may not be directly due to the failure of the mutant myosin heavy chain protein to assemble and form normal sarcomeres, but may rather be a

  8. Sex differences in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sven; van der Meer, Peter; van Tintelen, J Peter; van den Berg, Maarten P

    2014-03-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle diseases with a variety of specific phenotypes. According to the contemporary European Society of Cardiology classification, they are classified into hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular (ARVC), restrictive (RCM), and unclassified cardiomyopathies. Each class is aetiologically further categorized into inherited (familial) and non-inherited (non-familial) forms. There is substantial evidence that biological sex is a strong modulator of the clinical manifestation of these cardiomyopathies, and sex-specific characteristics are detectable in all classes. For the clinician, it is important to know the sex-specific aspects of clinical disease expression and the potential modes of inheritance or the hereditary influences underlying the development of cardiomyopathies, since these may aid in diagnosing such diseases in both sexes. PMID:24464619

  9. Heart antibodies in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, T; Thompson, R A; Cummins, P; Littler, W A

    1981-01-01

    The reported frequency of circulating heart reactive antibodies in cardiomyopathies has varied and their significance is unknown. In this study such antibodies were sought in patients with primary congestive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and other heart diseases. Standard "single sandwich" and the more sensitive "double sandwich" indirect immunofluorescence techniques failed to disclose a significant difference between any cardiomyopathic group and controls in repeated experiments. With both techniques results were subject to considerable method-specific artefacts and observer variation. No published work associating heart antibodies detected by immunofluorescence methods with cariomyopathies adequately takes these into account. PMID:7028058

  10. Prediction and visualization data for the interpretation of sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric DNA variants found in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bottillo, Irene; D’Angelantonio, Daniela; Caputo, Viviana; Paiardini, Alessandro; Lipari, Martina; De Bernardo, Carmelilia; Majore, Silvia; Castori, Marco; Zachara, Elisabetta; Re, Federica; Grammatico, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Genomic technologies are redefining the understanding of genotype–phenotype relationships and over the past decade, many bioinformatics algorithms have been developed to predict functional consequences of single nucleotide variants. This article presents the data from a comprehensive computational workflow adopted to assess the biomedical impact of the DNA variants resulting from the experimental study “Molecular analysis of sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric genes in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy” (Bottillo et al., 2016) [1]. Several different independently methods were employed to predict the functional consequences of alleles that result in amino acid substitutions, to study the effect of some DNA variants over the splicing process and to investigate the impact of a sequence variant with respect to the evolutionary conservation. PMID:27054166

  11. Incidence of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1 and without anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin-Jian; Yuan, Jin-Qing; Fan, Chao-Mei; Pu, Jie-Lin; Fang, Pi-Hua; Ma, Jian; Guo, Xi-Ying; Li, Yi-Shi

    2016-07-01

    Data on the risk of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism (iSSE) events in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and without anticoagulant therapy are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of iSSE events in these patients. We consecutively screened medical records of patients with HCM and NVAF referred to Fuwai Hospital between January 1994 and March 2014. The primary end point was iSSE events, defined as a composite of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism. Follow-up was carried out to ascertain end point status. Medical records of 522 patients with NVAF and HCM were screened. A total of 108 patients (20.7 %) with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1 and without anticoagulant therapy were enrolled and constituted our study population. After a median follow-up of 2.4 years (range 0.6-14.1 years; 376.2 patient-years), ischemic stroke occurred in 2 patients, resulting in death of 1 patient in the first year and paralysis of the other patient in the fourth year. No other iSSE events occurred. The incidence of iSSE was 0.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.0-5.0 %] in the first year, and 0.5 % per 100 patient-years (95 % CI 0.1-1.9 %). The risk of iSSE events seems low in patients with NVAF, a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1, HCM, and without anticoagulant therapy. Multicenter studies with sizeable study populations are needed to validate the risk of iSSE events in these patients. PMID:26231425

  12. Significant reduction of left atrial volume concomitant with clinical improvement after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation for drug-refractory hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, and its precise detection with multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Yuichiro; Akita, Keitaro; Tsuruta, Hikaru; Yamada, Yoshitake; Hayashida, Kentaro; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Murata, Mitsushige; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective In patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM), left atrial (LA) volume measurement is very important to provide prognostic information. Recent studies demonstrated that multidetector CT (MDCT) is useful to assess the changes in LA volume. Our aim was to examine the utility of a follow-up cardiac MDCT for long-term evaluation of the effect of percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) on LA volume. Methods We studied a consecutive cohort of 20 patients with drug-refractory symptomatic HOCM after PTSMA. We evaluated LA volume analyses with cardiac MDCT on patients who underwent PTSMA as compared to echocardiography. Results Before PTSMA, 75% of all patients had heart failure-associated symptoms in the New York Heart Association functional class III/IV. All patients experienced relief from heart failure-associated symptoms after PTSMA. Cardiac MDCT showed significant reduction in the index of maximum LA volume during follow-up compared to before PTSMA in the same way as in echocardiography (93.6±34.1 mL/m2 vs 82.6±35.3 mL/m2, p=0.035). A Bland-Altman plot showed small mean differences and limits of agreement in the measurements of the index of maximum LA volume before and after PTSMA between echocardiography and MDCT. Conclusions The follow-up cardiac MDCT was a useful tool to evaluate the effectiveness of PTSMA on reduction of LA volume. Cardiac MDCT might provide comparable measurements of the LA volume in patients with drug-refractory symptomatic HOCM before and after PTSMA compared to echocardiography. PMID:27307994

  13. Evolving Approaches to Genetic Evaluation of Specific Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Teo, Loon Yee Louis; Moran, Rocio T; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy has expanded significantly over the past 2 decades. The increasing availability, shortening diagnostic time, and lowering costs of genetic testing have provided researchers and physicians with the opportunity to identify the underlying genetic determinants for thousands of genetic disorders, including inherited cardiomyopathies, in effort to improve patient morbidities and mortality. As such, genetic testing has advanced from basic scientific research to clinical application and has been incorporated as part of patient evaluations for suspected inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic evaluation framework of inherited cardiomyopathies typically encompasses careful evaluation of family history, genetic counseling, clinical screening of family members, and if appropriate, molecular genetic testing. This review summarizes the genetics, current guideline recommendations, and evidence supporting the genetic evaluation framework of five hereditary forms of cardiomyopathy: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). PMID:26472190

  14. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2014-11-26

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotype-phenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children. PMID:25429328

  15. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26411603

  16. Molecular etiology of idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, T; Hayashi, T; Kimura, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is a primary cardiac disorder associated with abnormalities of ventricular wall thickness, size of ventricular cavity, contraction, relaxation, conduction and rhythm. Over the past two decades, molecular genetic analyses have revealed that mutations in the various genes cause ICM and such information concerning the genetic basis of ICM enables us to speculate the pathogenesis of this heterogeous cardiac disease. This review focuses on the molecular pathogenesis, i.e., genetic abnormalities and functional alterations due to the mutations especially in sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in three characteristic features of ICM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Understanding the functional abnormalities of the sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in ICM, has unraveled the function of these components not only as a contractile unit but also as a pivot for transduction of biochemical signals. PMID:18646564

  17. Evolving molecular diagnostics for familial cardiomyopathies: at the heart of it all

    PubMed Central

    Callis, Thomas E; Jensen, Brian C; Weck, Karen E; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are an important and heterogeneous group of common cardiac diseases. An increasing number of cardiomyopathies are now recognized to have familial forms, which result from single-gene mutations that render a Mendelian inheritance pattern, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. Recently, clinical genetic tests for familial cardiomyopathies have become available for clinicians evaluating and treating patients with these diseases, making it necessary to understand the current progress and challenges in cardiomyopathy genetics and diagnostics. In this review, we summarize the genetic basis of selected cardiomyopathies, describe the clinical utility of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies and outline the current challenges and emerging developments. PMID:20370590

  18. Ca2+-regulatory function of the inhibitory peptide region of cardiac troponin I is aided by the C-terminus of cardiac troponin T: Effects of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations cTnI R145G and cTnT R278C, alone and in combination, on filament sliding

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Nicolas M.; Chase, P. Bryant; Mihajlović, Goran; Schoffstall, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of cardiomyopathy mutations in Ca2+ regulatory proteins troponin and tropomyosin provide crucial information about cardiac disease mechanisms, and also provide insights into functional domains in the affected polypeptides. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated mutations TnI R145G, located within the inhibitory peptide (Ip) of human cardiac troponin I (hcTnI), and TnT R278C, located immediately C-terminal to the IT arm in human cardiac troponin T (hcTnT), share some remarkable features: structurally, biochemically, and pathologically. Using bioinformatics, we find compelling evidence that TnI and TnT, and more specifically the affected regions of hcTnI and hcTnT, may be related not just structurally but also evolutionarily. To test for functional interactions of these mutations on Ca2+-regulation, we generated and characterized Tn complexes containing either mutation alone, or both mutations simultaneously. The most important results from in vitro motility assays (varying [Ca2+], temperature or HMM density) show that the TnT mutant “rescued” some deleterious effects of the TnI mutant at high Ca2+, but exacerbated the loss of function, i.e., switching off the actomyosin interaction, at low Ca2+. Taken together, our experimental results suggest that the C-terminus of cTnT aids Ca2+-regulatory function of cTnI Ip within the troponin complex. PMID:24418317

  19. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pediatric Cardiomyopathies Updated:Oct 22,2015 Patient education material ... oxygen or high blood pressure. According to the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, one in every 100,000 children ...

  20. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Lewis D; Fulbright, Robert; Baehring, Joachim M

    2016-08-15

    Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis (HP) denotes inflammation and thickening of the dura mater that can be idiopathic or secondary to a wide variety of conditions. Clinically, HP can present as debilitating headaches and cranial nerve defects but in other cases may be completely asymptomatic. We aimed to determine the relative incidence of different etiologies of HP and compare their associated imaging findings. Additionally, we sought to compare the clinical features of the underlying syndromes. We retrospectively examined twenty-two consecutive cases of HP seen in a single practitioner neurology practice over a ten-year time period. The most common etiologies were idiopathic HP and neurosarcoidosis. No imaging features were completely specific to any etiology. Nonetheless, idiopathic HP typically demonstrated diffuse regular enhancement whereas neurosarcoidosis was more likely to display a nodular enhancement pattern. Headache and cranial neuropathies were the most common clinical presentation. HP symptoms were often responsive to steroids but complete responses were rare. HP is a diagnostic challenge without specific findings on minimally or non-invasive diagnostic studies. Biopsy is often required and serves as the basis for effective therapy. PMID:27423604

  1. Cross-talk between ER and HER2 regulates c-MYC-mediated glutamine metabolism in aromatase inhibitor resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhike; Wang, Yuanzhong; Warden, Charles; Chen, Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapies in hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer is a significant clinical problem for a considerable number of patients. The oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC (hereafter referred to as MYC), which regulates glutamine metabolism in cancer cells, has been linked to endocrine resistance. We were interested in whether MYC-mediated glutamine metabolism is also associated with aromatase inhibitor (AI) resistant breast cancer. We studied the expression and regulation of MYC and the fects of inhibition of MYC expression in both AI sensitive and resistant breast cancer cells. Considering the role of MYC in glutamine metabolism, we evaluated the contribution of glutamine to the proliferation of AI sensitive and resistant cells, and performed RNA-sequencing to investigate mechanisms of MYC-mediated glutamine utilization in AI resistance. We found that glutamine metabolism was independent of estrogen but still required ER in AI resistant breast cancer cells. The expression of MYC oncogene was up-regulated through the cross-talk between estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in AI resistant breast cancer cells. Moreover, the glutamine transporter solute carrier family (SLC)1A5 was significantly up-regulated in AI resistant breast cancer cells. ER down-regulator fulvestrant inhibited MYC, SLC1A5, glutaminase (GLS) and glutamine consumption in AI resistant breast cancer cells. Inhibition of MYC, SLC1A5 and GLS decreased AI resistant breast cancer cell proliferation. Our study has uncovered that MYC expression is up-regulated by the cross-talk between ER and HER2 in AI resistant breast cancer cells. MYC-mediated glutamine metabolism is associated with AI resistance of breast cancer. PMID:25683269

  2. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a disease of functional impairment in the cardiac muscle and its etiology includes both extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Cardiomyopathy caused by the intrinsic factors is called as primary cardiomyopathy of which two major clinical phenotypes are hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Genetic approaches have revealed the disease genes for hereditary primary cardiomyopathy and functional studies have demonstrated that characteristic functional alterations induced by the disease-associated mutations are closely related to the clinical types, such that increased and decreased Ca(2+) sensitivities of muscle contraction are associated with HCM and DCM, respectively. In addition, recent studies have suggested that mutations in the Z-disc components found in HCM and DCM may result in increased and decreased stiffness of sarcomere, respectively. Moreover, functional analysis of mutations in the other components of cardiac muscle have suggested that the altered response to metabolic stresses is associated with cardiomyopathy, further indicating the heterogeneity in the etiology and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26178429

  3. Treatment of depression in an adolescent with cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Tanidir, Canan; Tanidir, Ibrahim C; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2015-10-01

    Patients with cardiomyopathy have a higher incidence of mood and anxiety disorders, resulting in greater probability for hospitalisation and increased risk for arrhythmia and death. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy with Danon disease, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, who later developed depression and significant weight loss. The patient was successfully treated for his anxiety and depression with mirtazapine without any adverse cardiac effects. PMID:25400066

  4. The genetic landscape of cardiomyopathy and its role in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Barefield, David Y; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is highly influenced by heritability, and nearly 100 genes link to familial cardiomyopathy. Despite the marked genetic diversity that underlies these complex cardiovascular phenotypes, several key genes and pathways have emerged. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterized by increased contractility and a greater energetic cost of cardiac output. Dilated cardiomyopathy is often triggered by mutations that disrupt the giant protein titin. The energetic consequences of these mutations offer molecular targets and opportunities for new drug development and gene correction therapies. PMID:25651172

  5. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry: 1995–2007

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, James D.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Alvarez, Jorge A.; Bublik, Natalya; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a serious disorder of the heart muscle and, although rare, it is potentially devastating in children. Funded by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute since 1994, the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry (PCMR) was designed to describe the epidemiology and clinical course of selected CMs in patients 18 years old or younger and to promote the development of etiology-specific prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, data from more than 3,000 children with cardiomyopathy have been entered in the PCMR database with annual follow-up continuing until death, heart transplant, or loss-to-follow up. Using PCMR data, the incidence of cardiomyopathy in two large regions of the United States is estimated to be 1.13 cases per 100,000 children. Only 1/3 of children had a known etiology at the time of cardiomyopathy diagnosis. Diagnosis was associated with certain patient characteristics, family history, echocardiographic findings, laboratory testing, and biopsy. Greater incidence was found in boys and infants (<1 yr) for both dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (DCM, HCM) and black race for only DCM. In DCM, prognosis is worse in older children (>1yr), heart failure (HF) at diagnosis or idiopathic etiology. For HCM, worse prognosis is associated with inborn errors of metabolism or combination of HCM and another cardiomyopathy functional type. The best outcomes were observed in children presenting at age >1 yr with idiopathic HCM. PCMR data have enabled analysis of patients with cardiomyopathy and muscular dystrophy, as well as Noonan Syndrome. Currently, collaborations with the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study group and a newly established Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Biologic Specimen Repository at Texas Children’s Hospital will continue to yield important results. The PCMR is the largest and most complete multi-center prospective data resource regarding the etiology, clinical course and outcomes for children with cardiomyopathy. PMID:19343086

  6. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Fennira, S; Demiraj, A; Khouaja, A; Boujnah, M R

    2006-10-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and under recognized form of dilated cardiomyopathy, defined as a heart failure in the last month of pregnancy or in the first five months post-partum with absence of determinable cause for cardiac failure and absence of demonstrable heart disease. The incidence of peripartum cardiomyopathy ranges from 1 in 1300 to 1 in 15,000 pregnancy. Advanced maternal age, multiparity, twin births, preeclampsia and black race are known risk factors. The etiology of peripartum cardiomyopathy remains unknown but viral, autoimmune or idiopathic myocarditis are highly suggested. The clinical presentation on patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy is similar to that of patients with systolic heart failure. The treatment is based on drugs for sympyomatic control. Studies in graeter populations are need to determine the role of immunosupressive treatment. About half patients of peripartum cardiomyopathy recover. The left ventricular ejection fraction and the left ventricular end-diastolic diameter are statistically significant prognostic factors. The risk of developing peripartum cardiomyopathy in subsequent pregnancies remains high. The place of dobutamine stress test in counseling the patients who desire pregnancy must be more studied. PMID:17078264

  7. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood returns from the body (diastole). When the disease progresses, the heart may not pump blood strongly. The abnormal heart function can affect the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Restrictive cardiomyopathy may affect either or both of the ...

  8. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Hare JM. The dilated, restrictive, and infiltrative cardiomyopathies. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 68.

  9. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood returns from the body (diastole). When the disease progresses, the heart may not pump blood strongly. The abnormal heart function can affect the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Restrictive cardiomyopathy may affect ...

  10. Diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Omar; Al-Sunni, Ahmed; Khavandi, Kaivan; Khavandi, Ali; Withers, Sarah; Greenstein, Adam; Heagerty, Anthony M.; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a distinct primary disease process, independent of coronary artery disease, which leads to heart failure in diabetic patients. Epidemiological and clinical trial data have confirmed the greater incidence and prevalence of heart failure in diabetes. Novel echocardiographic and MR (magnetic resonance) techniques have enabled a more accurate means of phenotyping diabetic cardiomyopathy. Experimental models of diabetes have provided a range of novel molecular targets for this condition, but none have been substantiated in humans. Similarly, although ultrastructural pathology of the microvessels and cardiomyocytes is well described in animal models, studies in humans are small and limited to light microscopy. With regard to treatment, recent data with thiazoledinediones has generated much controversy in terms of the cardiac safety of both these and other drugs currently in use and under development. Clinical trials are urgently required to establish the efficacy of currently available agents for heart failure, as well as novel therapies in patients specifically with diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:19364331

  11. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Frédéric; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from alteration of angiogenesis toward the end of pregnancy. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnoses to rule out are myocardial infarction, amniotic liquid embolism, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, and history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (>30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, African origin, obesity, preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function <25% because of higher risk of thrombus. A specific treatment by bromocriptine can be initiated on a case-by-case basis. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50% of cases. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover. PMID:26160284

  12. Troponins, intrinsic disorder, and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Kong, Min J; Straight, Shelby; Pinto, Jose R; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac troponin is a dynamic complex of troponin C, troponin I, and troponin T (TnC, TnI, and TnT, respectively) found in the myocyte thin filament where it plays an essential role in cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in troponin subunits are found in inherited cardiomyopathies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The highly dynamic nature of human cardiac troponin and presence of numerous flexible linkers in its subunits suggest that understanding of structural and functional properties of this important complex can benefit from the consideration of the protein intrinsic disorder phenomenon. We show here that mutations causing decrease in the disorder score in TnI and TnT are significantly more abundant in HCM and DCM than mutations leading to the increase in the disorder score. Identification and annotation of intrinsically disordered regions in each of the troponin subunits conducted in this study can help in better understanding of the roles of intrinsic disorder in regulation of interactomes and posttranslational modifications of these proteins. These observations suggest that disease-causing mutations leading to a decrease in the local flexibility of troponins can trigger a whole plethora of functional changes in the heart. PMID:27074551

  13. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Milani, A; Zaccaria, R; Bombardieri, G; Gasbarrini, A; Pola, P

    2007-06-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis is characterized by a peripheral vasodilation with a low-resistance hyperdynamic circulation. The sustained increase of cardiac work load associated with such a condition may result in an inconstant and often subclinical series of heart abnormalities, constituting a new clinical entity known as "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy". Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is variably associated with baseline increase in cardiac output, defective myocardial contractility and lowered systo-diastolic response to inotropic and chronotropic stimuli, down-regulated beta-adrenergic function, slight histo-morphological changes, and impaired electric "recovery" ability of ventricular myocardium. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is usually clinically latent or mild, likely because the peripheral vasodilation significantly reduces the left ventricle after-load, thus actually "auto-treating" the patient and masking any severe manifestation of heart failure. In cirrhotic patients, the presence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may become unmasked and clinically evident by certain treatment interventions that increase the effective blood volume and cardiac pre-load, including surgical or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts, peritoneo-venous shunts (LeVeen) and orthotopic liver transplantation. Under these circumstances, an often transient overt congestive heart failure may develop, with increased cardiac output as well as right atrial, pulmonary artery and capillary wedge pressures. PMID:17383244

  14. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-del-Árbol, Luis; Serradilla, Regina

    2015-01-01

    During the course of cirrhosis, there is a progressive deterioration of cardiac function manifested by the disappearance of the hyperdynamic circulation due to a failure in heart function with decreased cardiac output. This is due to a deterioration in inotropic and chronotropic function which takes place in parallel with a diastolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the absence of other known cardiac disease. Other findings of this specific cardiomyopathy include impaired contractile responsiveness to stress stimuli and electrophysiological abnormalities with prolonged QT interval. The pathogenic mechanisms of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy include impairment of the b-adrenergic receptor signalling, abnormal cardiomyocyte membrane lipid composition and biophysical properties, ion channel defects and overactivity of humoral cardiodepressant factors. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be difficult to determine due to the lack of a specific diagnosis test. However, an echocardiogram allows the detection of the diastolic dysfunction and the E/e′ ratio may be used in the follow-up progression of the illness. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the impairment of effective arterial blood volume and correlates with the degree of liver failure. A clinical consequence of cardiac dysfunction is an inadequate cardiac response in the setting of vascular stress that may result in renal hypoperfusion leading to renal failure. The prognosis is difficult to establish but the severity of diastolic dysfunction may be a marker of mortality risk. Treatment is non-specific and liver transplantation may normalize the cardiac function. PMID:26556983

  15. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies.

  16. Inherited cardiomyopathies caused by troponin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qun-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Morimoto, Sachio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic investigations of cardiomyopathy in the recent two decades have revealed a large number of mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins as a cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Most functional analyses of the effects of mutations on cardiac muscle contraction have revealed significant changes in the Ca2+-regulatory mechanism, in which cardiac troponin (cTn) plays important structural and functional roles as a key regulatory protein. Over a hundred mutations have been identified in all three subunits of cTn, i.e., cardiac troponins T, I, and C. Recent studies on cTn mutations have provided plenty of evidence that HCM- and RCM-linked mutations increase cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, while DCM-linked mutations decrease it. This review focuses on the functional consequences of mutations found in cTn in terms of cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, ATPase activity, force generation, and cardiac troponin I phosphorylation, to understand potential molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms of the three types of inherited cardiomyopathy. PMID:23610579

  17. Cardiomyopathies in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy (CMP) is a heterogeneous disease caused by a functional abnormality of the cardiac muscle. CMP is of 2 major types, dilated and hypertrophic, and is further classified as either primary or secondary. Secondary CMP is caused by extrinsic factors, including infection, ischemia, hypertension, and metabolic disorders. Primary CMP is diagnosed when the extrinsic factors of secondary CMP are absent. Furthermore, the World Health Organization, American Heart Association, and European Cardiology Association have different systems for clinically classifying primary CMP. Primary CMP is rare and associated with a family history of the disease, implying that genetic factors might affect its incidence. In addition, the incidence of CMP varies widely according to patient ethnicity. Genetic testing plays an important role in the care of patients with CMP and their families because it confirms diagnosis, determines the appropriate care for the patient, and possibly affects patient prognosis. The diagnosis and genetic identification of CMP in patients' families allow the possibility to identify novel genes that may lead to new treatments. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CMP, with the aim of providing pediatricians with insights that may be helpful in the early identification and management of idiopathic CMP in children. PMID:23482511

  18. PIWIL2 induces c-Myc expression by interacting with NME2 and regulates c-Myc-mediated tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Lu, Yilu; Chen, Jianhui; Zheng, Xulei; Tao, Dachang; Liu, Yunqiang; Ma, Yongxin

    2014-01-01

    c-Myc serves as a crucial regulator in multiple cellular events. Cumulative evidences demonstrate that anomalous c-Myc overexpression correlates with proliferation, invasion and metastasis in various human tumors. However, the transcriptionally activating mechanisms responsible for c-Myc overexpression are complex and continue to be intangible. Here we showed that Piwi-Like RNA-Mediated Gene Silencing 2 (PIWIL2) can upregulate c-Myc via binding with NME/NM23 nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 (NME2). PIWIL2 promotes c-Myc transcription by interacting with and facilitating NME2 to bind to G4-motif region within c-Myc promoter. Interestingly, in a c-Myc-mediated manner, PIWIL2 upregulates RhoA, which in turn induces filamentary F-actin. Deficiency of PIWIL2 results in obstacle for c-Myc expression, cell cycle progress and cell proliferation. Taken together, our present work demonstrates that PIWIL2 modulates tumor cell proliferation and F-actin filaments via promoting c-Myc expression. PMID:25193865

  19. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo-Merello, Gonzalo; Cobo-Marcos, Marta; Gallego-Delgado, Maria; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently consumed toxic substance in the world. Low to moderate daily intake of alcohol has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In contrast, exposure to high levels of alcohol for a long period could lead to progressive cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction associated with chronic and excessive alcohol intake is a specific cardiac disease known as alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM). In spite of its clinical importance, data on ACM and how alcohol damages the heart are limited. In this review, we evaluate available evidence linking excessive alcohol consumption with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment of ACM. PMID:25228956

  20. Infiltrative Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Bejar, David; Colombo, Paolo C; Latif, Farhana; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrative cardiomyopathies can result from a wide spectrum of both inherited and acquired conditions with varying systemic manifestations. They portend an adverse prognosis, with only a few exceptions (ie, glycogen storage disease), where early diagnosis can result in potentially curative treatment. The extent of cardiac abnormalities varies based on the degree of infiltration and results in increased ventricular wall thickness, chamber dilatation, and disruption of the conduction system. These changes often lead to the development of heart failure, atrioventricular (AV) block, and ventricular arrhythmia. Because these diseases are relatively rare, a high degree of clinical suspicion is important for diagnosis. Electrocardiography and echocardiography are helpful, but advanced techniques including cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear imaging are increasingly preferred. Treatment is dependent on the etiology and extent of the disease and involves medications, device therapy, and, in some cases, organ transplantation. Cardiac amyloid is the archetype of the infiltrative cardiomyopathies and is discussed in great detail in this review. PMID:26244036

  1. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Non-ischemic Cardiomyopathies: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Olivas-Chacon, Cristina I; Mullins, Carola; Stewart, Kevan; Akle, Nassim; Calleros, Jesus E; Ramos-Duran, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are defined as either primary or secondary diseases of the myocardium resulting in cardiac dysfunction. While primary cardiomyopathies are confined to the heart and can be genetic or acquired, secondary cardiomyopathies show involvement of the heart as a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease including metabolic, inflammatory, granulomatous, infectious, or autoimmune entities. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies are currently classified as hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, or unclassifiable, including left ventricular non-compaction. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) not only has the capability to assess cardiac morphology and function, but also the ability to detect edema, hemorrhage, fibrosis, and intramyocardial deposits, providing a valuable imaging tool in the characterization of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This pictorial essay shows some of the most important non-ischemic cardiomyopathies with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features. PMID:26199786

  3. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic abnormalities, and non-compaction. Identification of the genetic cause of these important conditions provides unique opportunities to interrogate and characterize disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology, starting from the molecular level and expanding from there. With such insights, there is potential for clinical translation that may transform management of patients and families with inherited cardiomyopathies. If key pathways for disease development can be identified, they could potentially serve as targets for novel disease-modifying or disease-preventing therapies. By utilizing gene-based diagnostic testing, we can identify at-risk individuals prior to the onset of clinical disease, allowing for disease-modifying therapy to be initiated early in life, at a time that such treatment may be most successful. In this section, we review the current application of genetics in clinical management, focusing on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a paradigm; discuss state-of-the-art genetic testing technology; review emerging knowledge of gene expression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies; and discuss both the prospects, as well as the challenges, of bringing genetics to medicine. PMID:25634555

  4. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tardiff, Jil C.; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M.; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S.; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. PMID:25634554

  5. Pseudoidiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis in a patient with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Pandi, A S; Kronik, G

    1987-04-01

    A 53-year-old woman with a large pericardial effusion and tamponade presented with signs of IHSS including a grade 4/6 apical systolic murmur, severe SAM, early systolic aortic valve closure and a small hypercontractile left ventricle but at most borderline left ventricular hypertrophy. Following pericardiocentesis, the clinical and echocardiographic signs of subvalvular obstruction resolved completely. One year later the patient died of bronchial carcinoma and no evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was found at autopsy. Pericardial tamponade should be added to the list of possible causes of dynamic subvalvular obstruction in a structurally normal heart. PMID:3829760

  6. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Tc; Ezenyeaku, Cct; Ikeako, Lc

    2013-07-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare form of unexplained cardiac failure of unknown origin, unique to the pregnant woman with highly variable outcome associated with high morbidity and mortality. PPCM is fraught with controversies in its definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. PPCM is frequently under diagnosed, inadequately treated and without a laid down follow-up regimen, thus, the aim of this review. Publications on PPCM were accessed using Medline, Google scholar and Pubmed databases. Relevant materials on PPCM, selected references from internet services, journals, textbooks, and lecture notes on PPCM were also accessed and critically reviewed. PPCM is multifactorial in origin. It is a diagnosis of exclusion and should be based on classic echocardiographic criteria. The outcome of PPCM is also highly variable with high morbidity and mortality rates. Future pregnancies are not recommended in women with persistent ventricular dysfunction because the heart cannot tolerate increased cardiovascular workload associated with the pregnancy. Although, multiparity is associated with PPCM, there is an increased risk of fetal prematurity and fetal loss. PPCM is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown origin, unique to pregnant women. The pathophysiology is poorly understood. Echocardiography is central to diagnosis of PPCM and effective treatment monitoring in patients of PPCM. The outcome is highly variable and related to reversal of ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24116305

  7. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Thiene, Gaetano; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Migliore, Federico; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Zorzi, Alessandro; Daliento, Luciano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and pathologically by an acquired and progressive dystrophy of the ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement. Due to an estimated prevalence of 1:2000-1:5000, AC is listed among rare diseases. A familial background consistent with an autosomal-dominant trait of inheritance is present in most of AC patients; recessive variants have also been reported, either or not associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair. AC-causing genes mostly encode major components of the cardiac desmosome and up to 50% of AC probands harbor mutations in one of them. Mutations in non-desmosomal genes have been also described in a minority of AC patients, predisposing to the same or an overlapping disease phenotype. Compound/digenic heterozygosity was identified in up to 25% of AC-causing desmosomal gene mutation carriers, in part explaining the phenotypic variability. Abnormal trafficking of intercellular proteins to the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes and Wnt/beta catenin and Hippo signaling pathways have been implicated in disease pathogenesis.AC is a major cause of sudden death in the young and in athletes. The clinical picture may include a sub-clinical phase; an overt electrical disorder; and right ventricular or biventricular pump failure. Ventricular fibrillation can occur at any stage. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies led to identify biventricular and dominant left ventricular variants, thus supporting the use of the broader term AC.Since there is no "gold standard" to reach the diagnosis of AC, multiple categories of diagnostic information have been combined and the criteria recently updated, to improve diagnostic sensitivity while maintaining specificity. Among diagnostic tools, contrast enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance is playing a major role in detecting left dominant forms of AC, even preceding morpho

  8. Peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Blauwet, Lori A; Sliwa, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a potentially devastating disease that affects women during the last months of pregnancy or the first months after delivery. The aetiology and pathogenesis of this disease remain unclear, but oxidative stress and the generation of a cardiotoxic fragment of prolactin may play key roles. Diagnosing PPCM remains a challenge, as symptoms may mimic those women experience during normal pregnancy and the peripartum period. A high index of suspicion is thus necessary to make the diagnosis. Patients with PPCM have a varied clinical course, as some patients achieve full recovery while others progress to end-stage heart failure and even death. Standard heart failure treatment is indicated, although special provisions are necessary in pregnant and lactating women. Additional research into the pathophysiology of this disease, including possible genetic contributions, may lead to novel treatment strategies that can improve outcomes.

  9. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Search The Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation (CCF) is a national, non-profit organization focused on pediatric cardiomyopathy, a chronic disease of the heart muscle. CCF is dedicated to accelerating the search for ...

  10. [Ventricular arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. When and how to treat].

    PubMed

    Tullio, D; Valerio, A; Tucci, C

    1997-10-01

    Patients with apical hypertrophy have a natural favourable history. Non Specific Ventricular Tachycardia (NSVT) at ambulatory monitoring is more favourable if it is not associated with consciousness disorders. A high rate of NSVT episodes at Holter or the association with syncope can lead to a less favourable prognosis and therefore require pharmacological or electric treatment. The role of ET (electrophysiological test) has not yet been clearly described and is in progress. Recent studies of molecular genetics help to identify high-risk patients. Sustained monomorphic VT is not frequent but when it occurs it should be treated with BT. Patients with a light risk of VT should be treated with pharmacological therapy (white amiodarone and/or sotalol) and preferably with implantable defibrillator (ID) if VT cannot be eliminated. ID should be implanted also in the few patients surviving heart attack to avoid the risk of relapses. PMID:9489319

  11. Analysis of shape and motion of the mitral annulus in subjects with and without cardiomyopathy by echocardiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachskampf, F. A.; Chandra, S.; Gaddipatti, A.; Levine, R. A.; Weyman, A. E.; Ameling, W.; Hanrath, P.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The shape and dynamics of the mitral annulus of 10 patients without heart disease (controls), 3 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 5 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and normal systolic function were analyzed by transesophageal echocardiography and 3-dimensional reconstruction. Mitral annular orifice area, apico-basal motion of the annulus, and nonplanarity were calculated over time. Annular area was largest in end diastole and smallest in end systole. Mean areas were 11.8 +/- 2.5 cm(2) (controls), 15.2 +/- 4.2 cm(2) (dilated cardiomyopathy), and 10.2 +/- 2.4 cm(2) (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) (P = not significant). After correction for body surface, annuli from patients with normal left ventricular function were smaller than annuli from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (5.9 +/- 1.2 cm(2)/m(2) vs 7.7 +/- 1.0 cm(2)/m(2); P <.02). The change in area during the cardiac cycle showed significant differences: 23.8% +/- 5.1% (controls), 13.2% +/- 2.3% (dilated cardiomyopathy), and 32.4% +/- 7.6% (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) (P <.001). Apico-basal motion was highest in controls, followed by those with hypertrophic obstructive and dilated cardiomyopathy (1.0 +/- 0.3 cm, 0.8 +/- 0.2 cm, 0.3 +/- 0.2 cm, respectively; P <.01). Visual inspection and Fourier analysis showed a consistent pattern of anteroseptal and posterolateral elevations of the annulus toward the left atrium. In conclusion, although area changes and apico-basal motion of the mitral annulus strongly depend on left ventricular systolic function, nonplanarity is a structural feature preserved throughout the cardiac cycle in all three groups.

  12. Absence of viral nucleic acids in early and late dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, N; Zal, B; Arno, G; Risley, P; Pinto-Basto, J; McKenna, W; Davies, M; Baboonian, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether viral infection acts as a trigger factor for the development of dilated cardiomyopathy in genetically predisposed individuals with a family history of disease.
SETTING—Patients attending the cardiomyopathy unit in a cardiac tertiary referral centre.
DESIGN—Nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) was used to determine whether enteroviral, adenoviral, or cytomegaloviral nucleic acids were detectable in the myocardium of 19 asymptomatic relatives of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy; all these relatives had echocardiographic abnormalities thought to represent early disease. Explanted hearts from patients with end stage dilated cardiomyopathy were also studied and were compared with 25 controls (ischaemic heart disease (21), valvar heart disease (2), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (1), restrictive cardiomyopathy (1)). Myocardial tissue from two fatal cases of culture positive coxsackie myocarditis was used as a positive control.
RESULTS—No viral nucleic acid was detected in any group other than in those with myocarditis. Spiking of random wells with purified recombinant viral nucleic acids confirmed the sensitivity and reproducibility of the assays.
CONCLUSIONS—Myocardial viral infection is not detectable in relatives of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy who are suspected of having early disease. There is no evidence that viruses act as a trigger factor for initiating the dilated cardiomyopathy in these patients.


Keywords: viral infection; dilated cardiomyopathy PMID:11711469

  13. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Farina Júnior, Jayme Adriano

    2014-08-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  14. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  15. Mechanistic Heterogeneity in Contractile Properties of α-Tropomyosin (TPM1) Mutants Associated with Inherited Cardiomyopathies*

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Tejas M.; Haque, Farah; Gangadharan, Binnu; Sunitha, Margaret S.; Mukherjee, Souhrid; Anandhan, Swetha; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Mukundan, Namita; Jambekar, Amruta; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Sommese, Ruth F.; Nag, Suman; Spudich, James A.; Mercer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The most frequent known causes of primary cardiomyopathies are mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. Among those are 30 single-residue mutations in TPM1, the gene encoding α-tropomyosin. We examined seven mutant tropomyosins, E62Q, D84N, I172T, L185R, S215L, D230N, and M281T, that were chosen based on their clinical severity and locations along the molecule. The goal of our study was to determine how the biochemical characteristics of each of these mutant proteins are altered, which in turn could provide a structural rationale for treatment of the cardiomyopathies they produce. Measurements of Ca2+ sensitivity of human β-cardiac myosin ATPase activity are consistent with the hypothesis that hypertrophic cardiomyopathies are hypersensitive to Ca2+ activation, and dilated cardiomyopathies are hyposensitive. We also report correlations between ATPase activity at maximum Ca2+ concentrations and conformational changes in TnC measured using a fluorescent probe, which provide evidence that different substitutions perturb the structure of the regulatory complex in different ways. Moreover, we observed changes in protein stability and protein-protein interactions in these mutants. Our results suggest multiple mechanistic pathways to hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Finally, we examined a computationally designed mutant, E181K, that is hypersensitive, confirming predictions derived from in silico structural analysis. PMID:25548289

  16. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients. PMID:23456048

  17. An 'Omics' Perspective on Cardiomyopathies and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Raghow, Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    Pathological enlargement of the heart, represented by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), occurs in response to many genetic and non-genetic factors. The clinical course of cardiac hypertrophy is remarkably variable, ranging from lifelong absence of symptoms to rapidly declining heart function and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Unbiased omics studies have begun to provide a glimpse into the molecular framework underpinning altered mechanotransduction, mitochondrial energetics, oxidative stress, and extracellular matrix in the heart undergoing physiological and pathological hypertrophy. Omics analyses indicate that post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays an overriding role in the normal and diseased heart. Studies to date highlight a need for more effective bioinformatics to better integrate patient omics data with their comprehensive clinical histories. PMID:27499035

  18. Topical treatments for hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zurada, Joanna M; Kriegel, David; Davis, Ira C

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic scars represent an abnormal, exaggerated healing response after skin injury. In addition to cosmetic concern, scars may cause pain, pruritus, contractures, and other functional impairments. Therapeutic modalities include topical medications, intralesional corticosteroids, laser therapy, and cryosurgery. Topical therapies, in particular, have become increasingly popular because of their ease of use, comfort, noninvasiveness, and relatively low cost. This review will discuss the properties and effectiveness of these agents, including pressure therapy, silicone gel sheeting and ointment, polyurethane dressing, onion extract, imiquimod 5% cream, and vitamins A and E in the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scars. PMID:17097399

  19. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  20. Experimental models of inherited cardiomyopathy and its therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Miki; Morimoto, Sachio

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a disease of myocardium categorized into three major forms, hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), which has recently been demonstrated to be a monogenic disease due to mutations in various proteins expressed in cardiomyocytes. Mutations in HCM and RCM typically increase the myofilament sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca2+, leading to systolic hyperfunction and diastolic dysfunction. In contrast, mutations in DCM typically decrease the myofilament sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca2+ and/or force generation/transmission, leading to systolic dysfunction. Creation of genetically-manipulated transgenic and knock-in animals expressing mutant proteins exogenously and endogenously, respectively, in their hearts provides valuable animal models to discover the molecular and cellular mechanisms for pathogenesis and promising therapeutic strategy in vivo. Recently, cardiomyocytes have been differentiated from patient’s induced pluripotent stem cells as a model of inherited cardiomyopathies in vitro. In this review, we provide overview of experimental models of cardiomyopathies with a focus on revealed molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutics. PMID:25548614

  1. Rapidly Progressing Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hollowed, John; McCullough, Matthew; Sanchez, Daniel; Traina, Mahmoud; Hernandez, Salvador; Murillo, Efrain

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasiteTrypanosoma cruzi, can cause a potentially life-threatening cardiomyopathy in approximately 10-40% of afflicted individuals. The decline in cardiac function characteristically progresses over the course of many years. We report a case of Chagas disease in which the patient experienced an atypical rapid deterioration to severe cardiomyopathy over the course of 16 months. This case argues the need for increased routine surveillance for patients with confirmedT. cruziinfection, who are determined to be at high-risk for worsening cardiomyopathy. PMID:26856912

  2. [Molecular targets and novel pharmacological options to prevent myocardial hypertrophic remodeling].

    PubMed

    Coppini, Raffaele; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Poggesi, Corrado; Mugelli, Alessandro; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial hypertrophic remodeling is a pathophysiological feature of several cardiac conditions and is the hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common monogenic inherited disease of the heart. In recent years, preclinical and clinical studies investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms and intracellular signaling pathways involved in pathologic cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and highlighted a number of possible molecular targets of therapy aimed at preventing its development. Early prevention of myocardial hypertrophic remodeling is particularly sought after in HCM, as current therapeutic strategies are unable to remove the primary cause of disease, i.e. the disease-causing gene mutation. Studies on transgenic animal models or human myocardial samples from patients with HCM identified intracellular calcium overload as a central mechanism driving pathological hypertrophy. In this review, we analyze recent preclinical and clinical studies on animal models and patients with HCM aimed at preventing or modifying hypertrophic myocardial remodeling. Mounting evidence shows that prevention of pathological hypertrophy is a feasible strategy in HCM and will enter the clinical practice in the near future. Considering the close mechanistic similarities between HCM and secondary hypertrophy, these studies are also relevant for the common forms of cardiac hypertrophy, such as hypertensive or valvular heart disease. PMID:27029877

  3. How Is Cardiomyopathy Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... arrest Stopping the disease from getting worse Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Your doctor may suggest lifestyle changes to manage a condition that’s causing your cardiomyopathy including: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for a healthy weight Managing stress ...

  4. Mutations in NEBL encoding the cardiac Z-disk protein nebulette are associated with various cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tomasov, Pavol; Villard, Eric; Faludi, Reka; Melacini, Paola; Lossie, Janine; Lohmann, Nadine; Richard, Pascale; De Bortoli, Marzia; Angelini, Annalisa; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Sperling, Silke R.; Simor, Tamás; Veselka, Josef; Özcelik, Cemil; Charron, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transgenic mice overexpressing mutated NEBL, encoding the cardiac-specific Z-disk protein nebulette, develop severe cardiac phenotypes. Since cardiomyopathies are commonly familial and because mutations in a single gene may result in variable phenotypes, we tested the hypothesis that NEBL mutations are associated with cardiomyopathy. Material and methods We analyzed 389 patients, including cohorts of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC). The 28 coding exons of the NEBL gene were sequenced. Further bioinformatic analysis was used to distinguish variants. Results In total, we identified six very rare heterozygous missense mutations in NEBL in 7 different patients (frequency 1.8%) in highly conserved codons. The mutations were not detectable in 320 Caucasian sex-matched unrelated individuals without cardiomyopathy and 192 Caucasian sex-matched blood donors without heart disease. Known cardiomyopathy genes were excluded in these patients. The mutations p.H171R and p.I652L were found in 2 HCM patients. Further, p.Q581R and p.S747L were detected in 2 DCM patients, while the mutation p.A175T was identified independently in two unrelated patients with DCM. One LVNC patient carried the mutation p.P916L. All HCM and DCM related mutations were located in the nebulin-like repeats, domains responsible for actin binding. Interestingly, the mutation associated with LVNC was located in the C-terminal serine-rich linker region. Conclusions Our data suggest that NEBL mutations may cause various cardiomyopathies. We herein describe the first NEBL mutations in HCM and LVNC. Our findings underline the notion that the cardiomyopathies are true allelic diseases. PMID:27186169

  5. The Emerging Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Evaluation of Metabolic Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Mavrogeni, S; Markousis-Mavrogenis, G; Markussis, V; Kolovou, G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in the diagnosis, risk stratification, and follow-up of metabolic cardiomyopathies. The classification of myocardial diseases, proposed by WHO/ISFC task force, distinguished specific cardiomyopathies, caused by metabolic disorders, into 4 types: 1) endocrine disorders, 2) storage or infiltration disorders (amyloidosis, hemochromatosis and familial storage disorders), 3) nutritional disorders (Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, and alcohol), and 4) diabetic heart. Thyroid disease, pheochromocytoma, and growth hormone excess or deficiency may contribute to usually reversible dilated cardiomyopathy. Glucogen storage diseases can be presented with myopathy, liver, and heart failure. Lysosomal storage diseases can provoke cardiac hypertrophy, mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias. Hereditary hemochromatosis, an inherited disorder of iron metabolism, leads to tissue iron overload in different organs, including the heart. Cardiac amyloidosis is the result of amyloid deposition in the heart, formed from breakdown of normal or abnormal proteins that leads to increased heart stiffness, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Finally, nutritional disturbances and metabolic diseases, such as Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, alcohol consumption, and diabetes mellitus may also lead to severe cardiac dysfunction. CMR, through its capability to reliably assess anatomy, function, inflammation, rest-stress myocardial perfusion, myocardial fibrosis, aortic distensibility, iron and/or fat deposition can serve as an excellent tool for early diagnosis of heart involvement, risk stratification, treatment evaluation, and long term follow-up of patients with metabolic cardiomyopathies. PMID:26197853

  6. Role of left ventricular twist mechanics in cardiomyopathies, dance of the helices

    PubMed Central

    Kauer, Floris; Geleijnse, Marcel Leonard; van Dalen, Bastiaan Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular twist is an essential part of left ventricular function. Nevertheless, knowledge is limited in “the cardiology community” as it comes to twist mechanics. Fortunately the development of speckle tracking echocardiography, allowing accurate, reproducible and rapid bedside assessment of left ventricular twist, has boosted the interest in this important mechanical aspect of left ventricular deformation. Although the fundamental physiological role of left ventricular twist is undisputable, the clinical relevance of assessment of left ventricular twist in cardiomyopathies still needs to be established. The fact remains; analysis of left ventricular twist mechanics has already provided substantial pathophysiological understanding on a comprehensive variety of cardiomyopathies. It has become clear that increased left ventricular twist in for example hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be an early sign of subendocardial (microvascular) dysfunction. Furthermore, decreased left ventricular twist may be caused by left ventricular dilatation or an extensive myocardial scar. Finally, the detection of left ventricular rigid body rotation in noncompaction cardiomyopathy may provide an indispensible method to objectively confirm this difficult diagnosis. All this endorses the value of left ventricular twist in the field of cardiomyopathies and may further encourage the implementation of left ventricular twist parameters in the “diagnostic toolbox” for cardiomyopathies. PMID:26322187

  7. Dystrophin-Deficient Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Garry, Daniel J

    2016-05-31

    Dystrophinopathies are a group of distinct neuromuscular diseases that result from mutations in the structural cytoskeletal Dystrophin gene. Dystrophinopathies include Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as DMD and BMD female carriers. The primary presenting symptom in most dystrophinopathies is skeletal muscle weakness. However, cardiac muscle is also a subtype of striated muscle and is similarly affected in many of the muscular dystrophies. Cardiomyopathies associated with dystrophinopathies are an increasingly recognized manifestation of these neuromuscular disorders and contribute significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Recent studies suggest that these patient populations would benefit from cardiovascular therapies, annual cardiovascular imaging studies, and close follow-up with cardiovascular specialists. Moreover, patients with DMD and BMD who develop end-stage heart failure may benefit from the use of advanced therapies. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, cardiac involvement, and treatment of cardiomyopathy in the dystrophic patient. PMID:27230049

  8. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Mariann R.; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a specific heart muscle disease found in individuals with a history of long-term heavy alcohol consumption. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is associated with a number of adverse histological, cellular, and structural changes within the myocardium. Several mechanisms are implicated in mediating the adverse effects of ethanol, including the generation of oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics/stress, derangements in fatty acid metabolism and transport, and accelerated protein catabolism. In this review, we discuss the evidence for such mechanisms and present the potential importance of drinking patterns, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, race, and sex. The purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic paradigm for future research in the area of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24671642

  9. Limited Distribution of a Cardiomyopathy-Associated Variant in India

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Tatum S.; Zhang, Yuhua; Huff, Chad D.; Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W. Scott; Witherspoon, David J.; Woodward, Scott R.; Jorde, Lynn B.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death of people in South Asia, and cardiomyopathy is a major cause of heart failure. Myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) is expressed in the heart muscle, where it regulates the cardiac response to adrenergic stimulation and is important for the structural integrity of the sarcomere. Mutations in the MYBPC3 gene are associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathies. A 25-base-pair deletion in intron 32 causes skipping of the downstream exon and is associated with familial cardiomyopathy. To date, this deletion is found primarily in India and South Asia, although it is also found at low frequency in Southeast Asia. In order to better characterize the distribution of this variant, we determined its frequency in 447 individuals from 19 populations, including 10 populations from India and neighboring populations from Pakistan and Nepal. The deletion frequency is over 8% in some of our Indian samples, and it is not present in any of the populations we sampled outside of India. The differences in the deletion frequencies among populations in India are consistent with patterns of variation previously reported and with patterns we observed among Indian populations based on high-density SNP chip data. Our results indicate the MYBPC3 deletion is primarily found among Indian populations, and that its distribution is consistent with genome-wide patterns of variation in India. PMID:20201939

  10. Molecular profiling of dilated cardiomyopathy that progresses to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Joshua M.; Conner, David A.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; DePalma, Steve R.; Eminaga, Seda; Konno, Tetsuo; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by progressive functional and structural changes. We performed RNA-seq at different stages of disease to define molecular signaling in the progression from pre-DCM hearts to DCM and overt heart failure (HF) using a genetic model of DCM (phospholamban missense mutation, PLNR9C/+). Pre-DCM hearts were phenotypically normal yet displayed proliferation of nonmyocytes (59% relative increase vs. WT, P = 8 × 10−4) and activation of proinflammatory signaling with notable cardiomyocyte-specific induction of a subset of profibrotic cytokines including TGFβ2 and TGFβ3. These changes progressed through DCM and HF, resulting in substantial fibrosis (17.6% of left ventricle [LV] vs. WT, P = 6 × 10−33). Cardiomyocytes displayed a marked shift in metabolic gene transcription: downregulation of aerobic respiration and subsequent upregulation of glucose utilization, changes coincident with attenuated expression of PPARα and PPARγ coactivators -1α (PGC1α) and -1β, and increased expression of the metabolic regulator T-box transcription factor 15 (Tbx15). Comparing DCM transcriptional profiles with those in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) revealed similar and distinct molecular mechanisms. Our data suggest that cardiomyocyte-specific cytokine expression, early fibroblast activation, and the shift in metabolic gene expression are hallmarks of cardiomyopathy progression. Notably, key components of these profibrotic and metabolic networks were disease specific and distinguish DCM from HCM. PMID:27239561

  11. Cardiomyopathy Following Latrodectus Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Michael; Canning, Josh; Chase, Robyn; Ruha, Anne-Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Latrodectus envenomations are common throughout the United States and the world. While many envenomations can result in catecholamine release with resultant hypertension and tachycardia, myocarditis is very rare. We describe a case of a 22-year-old male who sustained a Latrodectus envenomation complicated by cardiomyopathy. PMID:21293781

  12. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26712328

  13. Molecular screening by polymerase chain reaction detects panleukopenia virus DNA in formalin-fixed hearts from cats with idiopathic cardiomyopathy and myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Meurs, K M; Fox, P R; Magnon, A L; Liu, S; Towbin, J A

    2000-01-01

    Viral myocarditis has been suggested as an etiology for cardiomyopathy in several mammalian species. Myocarditis and idiopathic cardiomyopathy have been reported in the domestic cat, although a viral etiology has not been demonstrated. Because of the continuing interest in the potential relationship between viral myocarditis and cardiomyopathy, we evaluated hearts from cats with spontaneous, idiopathic cardiomyopathy for viral genomic material within myocytes by polymerase chain reaction, and for the presence of myocarditis by light microscopy. Thirty-one (31) formalin-fixed hearts from domestic cats who died of idiopathic cardiomyopathy were randomly selected from pathology archives. Seventeen (17) formalin-fixed hearts from healthy cats were similarly selected as normal controls. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to evaluate myocardial tissue for the presence of viral genome from feline panleukopenia virus, herpes virus, calici virus, and corona virus. Hearts were examined using light microscopy for histologic evidence of myocarditis according to the Dallas criteria. Panleukopenia virus was identified by PCR in 10 of 31 cats with cardiomyopathy but in none of the controls. Neither cardiomyopathic or control cats tested positive by PCR for herpes virus, calici virus, and corona virus. Myocarditis was detected by histologic examination in 18 of 31 cardiomyopathic cats and in none of 17 control cats. Myocarditis and or feline panleukopenia virus genome was detected in felines with idiopathic hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive cardiomyopathy, suggesting a possible role of viral infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in this species. PMID:10867362

  14. Laser application for hypertrophic rhinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, Tetsuzo; Tanabe, Tetsuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Ogura, Masami

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 and KTP/532 lasers have been used in the treatment of an allergic and hypertrophic rhinitis for the past several years. As we know, the laser enables a surgeon to perform the operation with minimum hemorrhage and minimized pain, during and after the procedure. Additionally many of these operations can be performed under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia, on an outpatient basis. The laser is used to irradiate the mucous membranes of the inferior turbinates. Vaporization and cutting is easily done. Post operative management of the local operated area is easy. The advantages of laser surgery over regular surgical techniques are supreme for intranasal operations when performed under local anesthesia.

  15. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Hot Spots and Doubly Heterozygous Mutations in Chinese Patients with Familial Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Feng, Yue; Zhang, Yun-Mei; Ding, Xiao-Xue; Song, Yu-Zhu; Zhang, A-Mei; Liu, Li; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Jia-Huan; Xia, Xue-Shan

    2015-01-01

    As a common cardiac disease mainly caused by gene mutations in sarcomeric cytoskeletal, calcium-handling, nuclear envelope, desmosomal, and transcription factor genes, inherited cardiomyopathy is becoming one of the major etiological factors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). This disease is characterized by remarkable genetic heterogeneity, which makes it difficult to screen for pathogenic mutations using Sanger sequencing. In the present study, three probands, one with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHCM) and two with familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDCM), were recruited together with their respective family members. Using next-generation sequencing technology (NGS), 24 genes frequently known to be related to inherited cardiomyopathy were screened. Two hot spots (TNNI3-p.Arg145Gly, and LMNA-p.Arg190Trp) and double (LMNA-p.Arg190Trp plus MYH7-p.Arg1045His) heterozygous mutations were found to be highly correlated with familial cardiomyopathy. FDCM patients with doubly heterozygous mutations show a notably severe phenotype as we could confirm in our study; this indicates that the double mutations had a dose effect. In addition, it is proposed that genetic testing using NGS technology can be used as a cost-effective screening tool and help guide the treatment of patients with familial cardiomyopathy particularly regarding the risk of family members who are clinically asymptomatic. PMID:26199943

  16. [Hypothyroid cardiomyopathy--an underdiagnosed cause of heart failure].

    PubMed

    Gundersen, T; Paulsen, A Q; Gallefoss, F; Aslaksen, B B

    1990-06-10

    20 patients with hypothyroid cardiomyopathy were evaluated by M-mode echocardiography. The mean interventricular septum (IVSd) thickness was 1.94 cm before treatment and was reduced to 1.21 cm after 4-6 months of thyroxin therapy. The mean left ventricular posterior wall (LVPWd) thickness was 1.14 cm before and 1.05 cm after treatment. The IVS/LVPW ratio decreased from 1.7 to 1.15 within 4-6 months. Pericardial effusion was demonstrated in 15 of the patients, but disappeared during thyroxin therapy. The study confirms the importance of examining for hypothyreoidism in the case of patients with symptoms of heart failure of unknown cause, and of patients with echocardiographic evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) and idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS). PMID:2141958

  17. Cardiac involvement of primary hyperoxaluria accompanied by non-compaction cardiomyopathy and patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Arat, Nurcan; Akyıldız, Murat; Tellioğlu, Gürkan; Tokat, Yaman

    2015-04-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder resulting in accumulation of calcium oxalate in visceral organs, including the heart. We report a 19-year-old male with non- compaction cardiomyopathy combined with patent ductus arteriosus awaiting combined liver-kidney transplantation for primary hyperoxaluria. After surgical closure of the patent ductus arteriosus, the patient underwent a successful renal and subsequent liver transplantation. The presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in hyperoxaluria patients has been reported before, but this is the first report of non-compaction myocardium with patent ductus arteriosus in a patient with primary hyperoxaluria. At the third month after combined liver and renal transplantation, improvement in cardiac functions were observed. Primary hyperoxaluria is a clinical entity to be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis of hypertrophied myocardium with high myocardial echocardiographic intensity. In cases of hyperoxaluria, additional congenital abnormalities may complicate the clinical picture. PMID:25906003

  18. Exome Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutations in Infantile Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Alexandra; Tyynismaa, Henna; Euro, Liliya; Ellonen, Pekka; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Ojala, Tiina; Hämäläinen, Riikka H.; Tommiska, Johanna; Raivio, Taneli; Oresic, Matej; Karikoski, Riitta; Tammela, Outi; Simola, Kalle O.J.; Paetau, Anders; Tyni, Tiina; Suomalainen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Infantile cardiomyopathies are devastating fatal disorders of the neonatal period or the first year of life. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of this group of diseases, but the underlying gene defects have been characterized in only a minority of cases, because tissue specificity of the manifestation hampers functional cloning and the heterogeneity of causative factors hinders collection of informative family materials. We sequenced the exome of a patient who died at the age of 10 months of hypertrophic mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with combined cardiac respiratory chain complex I and IV deficiency. Rigorous data analysis allowed us to identify a homozygous missense mutation in AARS2, which we showed to encode the mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS). Two siblings from another family, both of whom died perinatally of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, had the same mutation, compound heterozygous with another missense mutation. Protein structure modeling of mtAlaRS suggested that one of the mutations affected a unique tRNA recognition site in the editing domain, leading to incorrect tRNA aminoacylation, whereas the second mutation severely disturbed the catalytic function, preventing tRNA aminoacylation. We show here that mutations in AARS2 cause perinatal or infantile cardiomyopathy with near-total combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in the heart. Our results indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful tool for identifying mutations in single patients and allows recognition of the genetic background in single-gene disorders of variable clinical manifestation and tissue-specific disease. Furthermore, we show that mitochondrial disorders extend to prenatal life and are an important cause of early infantile cardiac failure. PMID:21549344

  19. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J.

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype–phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young. PMID:21810862

  20. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tomoya; Nishijima, Haruo; Haga, Rie; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Ueno, Tatsuya; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2015-10-15

    We report a case of idiopathic cerebral hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. No other identifiable cause of pachymeningitis was detected. Corticosteroid therapy was effective for both diseases. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is closely related to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. This case supports the hypothesis that hypertrophic pachymeningitis can be a rare comorbidity of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. PMID:26439957

  1. A Review of the Giant Protein Titin in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics of Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Gigli, Marta; Begay, Rene L.; Morea, Gaetano; Graw, Sharon L.; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Taylor, Matthew R. G.; Granzier, Henk; Mestroni, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Titin (TTN) is known as the largest sarcomeric protein that resides within the heart muscle. Due to alternative splicing of TTN, the heart expresses two major isoforms (N2B and N2BA) that incorporate four distinct regions termed the Z-line, I-band, A-band, and M-line. Next-generation sequencing allows a large number of genes to be sequenced simultaneously and provides the opportunity to easily analyze giant genes such as TTN. Mutations in the TTN gene can cause cardiomyopathies, in particular dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). DCM is the most common form of cardiomyopathy, and it is characterized by systolic dysfunction and dilation of the left ventricle. TTN truncating variants have been described as the most common cause of DCM, while the real impact of TTN missense variants in the pathogenesis of DCM is still unclear. In a recent population screening study, rare missense variants potentially pathogenic based on bioinformatic filtering represented only 12.6% of the several hundred rare TTN missense variants found, suggesting that missense variants are very common in TTN and are frequently benign. The aim of this review is to understand the clinical role of TTN mutations in DCM and in other cardiomyopathies. Whereas TTN truncations are common in DCM, there is evidence that TTN truncations are rare in the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype. Furthermore, TTN mutations can also cause arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) with distinct clinical features and outcomes. Finally, the identification of a rare TTN missense variant cosegregating with the restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) phenotype suggests that TTN is a novel disease-causing gene in this disease. Clinical diagnostic testing is currently able to analyze over 100 cardiomyopathy genes, including TTN; however, the size and presence of extensive genetic variation in TTN presents clinical challenges in determining significant disease-causing mutations. This review discusses the current

  2. Cardiac deficiency of single cytochrome oxidase assembly factor scox induces p53-dependent apoptosis in a Drosophila cardiomyopathy model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Morentin, Leticia; Martínez, Lidia; Piloto, Sarah; Yang, Hua; Schon, Eric A.; Garesse, Rafael; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen; Cervera, Margarita; Arredondo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The heart is a muscle with high energy demands. Hence, most patients with mitochondrial disease produced by defects in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system are susceptible to cardiac involvement. The presentation of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy includes hypertrophic, dilated and left ventricular noncompaction, but the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac impairment are unknown. One of the most frequent OXPHOS defects in humans frequently associated with cardiomyopathy is cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency caused by mutations in COX assembly factors such as Sco1 and Sco2. To investigate the molecular mechanisms that underlie the cardiomyopathy associated with Sco deficiency, we have heart specifically interfered scox expression, the single Drosophila Sco orthologue. Cardiac-specific knockdown of scox reduces fly lifespan, and it severely compromises heart function and structure, producing dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyocytes with low levels of scox have a significant reduction in COX activity and they undergo a metabolic switch from OXPHOS to glycolysis, mimicking the clinical features found in patients harbouring Sco mutations. The major cardiac defects observed are produced by a significant increase in apoptosis, which is dp53-dependent. Genetic and molecular evidence strongly suggest that dp53 is directly involved in the development of the cardiomyopathy induced by scox deficiency. Remarkably, apoptosis is enhanced in the muscle and liver of Sco2 knock-out mice, clearly suggesting that cell death is a key feature of the COX deficiencies produced by mutations in Sco genes in humans. PMID:25792727

  3. Compound heterozygous or homozygous truncating MYBPC3 mutations cause lethal cardiomyopathy with features of noncompaction and septal defects

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Marja W; Herkert, Johanna C; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M; Dalinghaus, Michiel; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; de Krijger, Ronald R; Michels, Michelle; de Coo, Irenaeus FM; Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M; Dooijes, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is usually caused by autosomal dominant pathogenic mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric or sarcomere-associated cardiac muscle proteins. The disease mainly affects adults, although young children with severe HCM have also been reported. We describe four unrelated neonates with lethal cardiomyopathy, and performed molecular studies to identify the genetic defect. We also present a literature overview of reported patients with compound heterozygous or homozygous pathogenic MYBPC3 mutations and describe their clinical characteristics. All four children presented with feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, and dyspnea. They died from cardiac failure before age 13 weeks. Features of left ventricular noncompaction were diagnosed in three patients. In the fourth, hypertrabeculation was not a clear feature, but could not be excluded. All of them had septal defects. Two patients were compound heterozygotes for the pathogenic c.2373dup p.(Trp792fs) and c.2827C>T p.(Arg943*) mutations, and two were homozygous for the c.2373dup and c.2827C>T mutations. All patients with biallelic truncating pathogenic mutations in MYBPC3 reported so far (n=21) were diagnosed with severe cardiomyopathy and/or died within the first few months of life. In 62% (13/21), septal defects or a patent ductus arteriosus accompanied cardiomyopathy. In contrast to heterozygous pathogenic mutations, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating pathogenic MYBPC3 mutations cause severe neonatal cardiomyopathy with features of left ventricular noncompaction and septal defects in approximately 60% of patients. PMID:25335496

  4. Hypoxia-driven glycolytic and fructolytic metabolic programs: Pivotal to hypertrophic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mirtschink, Peter; Krek, Wilhelm

    2016-07-01

    Pathologic cardiac growth is an adaptive response of the myocardium to various forms of systemic (e.g. pressure overload) or genetically-based (e. g. mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins) stress. It represents a key aspect of different types of heart disease including aortic stenosis (AS) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). While many of the pathophysiological and hemodynamical aspects of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy have been uncovered during the last decades, its underlying metabolic determinants are only beginning to come into focus. Here, we review the epidemiological evidence and pathological features of hypertrophic heart disease in AS and HCM and consider in this context the development of microenvironmental tissue hypoxia as a key component of the heart's growth response to pathologic stress. We particularly reflect on recent evidence illustrating how activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) drives glycolytic and fructolytic metabolic programs to maintain ATP generation and support anabolic growth of the pathologically-stressed heart. Finally we discuss how this metabolic programs, when protracted, deprive the heart of energy leading ultimately to heart failure. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26896647

  5. Structural and protein interaction effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathic mutations in alpha-tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Audrey N.; Greenfield, Norma J.; Singh, Abhishek; Potter, James D.; Pinto, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    The potential alterations to structure and associations with thin filament proteins caused by the dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) associated tropomyosin (Tm) mutants E40K and E54K, and the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) associated Tm mutants E62Q and L185R, were investigated. In order to ascertain what the cause of the known functional effects may be, structural and protein-protein interaction studies were conducted utilizing actomyosin ATPase activity measurements and spectroscopy. In actomyosin ATPase measurements, both HCM mutants and the DCM mutant E54K caused increases in Ca2+-induced maximal ATPase activities, while E40K caused a decrease. Investigation of Tm's ability to inhibit actomyosin ATPase in the absence of troponin showed that HCM-associated mutant Tms did not inhibit as well as wildtype, whereas the DCM associated mutant E40K inhibited better. E54K did not inhibit the actomyosin ATPase activity at any concentration of Tm tested. Thermal denaturation studies by circular dichroism and molecular modeling of the mutations in Tm showed that in general, the DCM mutants caused localized destabilization of the Tm dimers, while the HCM mutants resulted in increased stability. These findings demonstrate that the structural alterations in Tm observed here may affect the regulatory function of Tm on actin, thereby directly altering the ATPase rates of myosin. PMID:25520664

  6. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Dilated Cardiomyopathy Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Primary dilated cardiomyopathy ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (36 links) ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... CARDIOMYOPATHY, FAMILIAL RESTRICTIVE, 3 Sources for This Page Elliott P, Andersson B, Arbustini E, Bilinska Z, Cecchi ... Sebire N, Ashworth M, Deanfield JE, McKenna WJ, Elliott PM. Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy in children is caused ...

  8. Peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy: different at heart

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Ilse A. E.; Van Deel, Elza D.; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; Van Der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a severe cardiac disease occurring in the last month of pregnancy or in the first 5 months after delivery and shows many similar clinical characteristics as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) such as ventricle dilation and systolic dysfunction. While PPCM was believed to be DCM triggered by pregnancy, more and more studies show important differences between these diseases. While it is likely they share part of their pathogenesis such as increased oxidative stress and an impaired microvasculature, discrepancies seen in disease progression and outcome indicate there must be differences in pathogenesis as well. In this review, we compared studies in DCM and PPCM to search for overlapping and deviating disease etiology, pathogenesis and outcome in order to understand why these cardiomyopathies share similar clinical features but have different underlying pathologies. PMID:25642195

  9. Apoptosis in Anthracycline Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianjian; Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Wei, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated physiologic process of programmed cell death that occurs in both normal and pathologic tissues. Numerous in vitro or in vivo studies have indicated that cardiomyocyte death through apoptosis and necrosis is a primary contributor to the progression of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy. There are now several pieces of evidence to suggest that activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways contribute to anthracycline-induced apoptosis in the heart. Novel strategies were developed to address a wide variety of cardiotoxic mechanisms and apoptotic pathways by which anthracycline influences cardiac structure and function. Anthracycline-induced apoptosis provides a very valid representation of cardiotoxicity in the heart, an argument which has implications for the most appropriate animal models of damaged heart plus diverse pharmacological effects. In this review we describe various aspects of the current understanding of apoptotic cell death triggered by anthracycline. Differences in the sensitivity to anthracycline-induced apoptosis between young and adult hearts are also discussed. PMID:22212952

  10. Pathogenesis of Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Kleber, Andre G; Saffitz, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a primary myocardial disease. It is characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and increased risk of sudden cardiac death typically arising as an early manifestation before the onset of significant myocardial remodelling. Myocardial degeneration, often confined to the right ventricular free wall, with replacement by fibrofatty scar tissue, develops in many patients. ACM is a familial disease but genetic penetrance can be low and disease expression is highly variable. Inflammation might promote disease progression. It also appears that exercise increases disease penetrance and accelerates its development. More than 60% of probands harbour mutations in genes that encode desmosomal proteins, which has raised the possibility that defective cell-cell adhesion might play a role in disease pathogenesis. Recent advances have implicated changes in the canonical wingless-type mouse mammary tumour virus integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin and Hippo signalling pathways and defects in forwarding trafficking of ion channels and other proteins to the intercalated disk in cardiac myocytes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ACM and highlight future research directions. PMID:26199027

  11. [Initial and final changes in the signal-averaged QRS in the time and frequency domain in a case of hypertrophic myocardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Canciani, B; Mormino, P; Scanavacca, G; Della Rocca, F

    1994-02-01

    We report on a patient suffering from asymmetrical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with alterations occurring in the signal-averaged electrocardiogram (SAQRS). Recordings of 3-lead orthogonal ECG were obtained and analyzed by a Del Mar Avionics 750A Innovator device. The time domain analysis showed late potentials and a slow inscription of the initial portion of the SAQRS, that we called "early potentials". On the frequency domain there was a high degree of spectral turbulence at the beginning and at the end of the SAQRS. We discuss the possibility that the slow and fragmented conduction of the initial portion of the SAQRS could be related to the electrical instability of the disease. PMID:8013767

  12. Laparoscopic management of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Gogolja, D; Visnjić, S; Maldini, B; Radesić, L; Roić, G; Zganjer, M; Fattorini, I

    2001-01-01

    Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a common problem in pediatric surgery. Conventional management by the upper laparotomy was the method of choice over the last few decades. Advanced minimally invasive surgery allows successful endoscopic management of this entity too. We report on our initial experience with endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis with respect to some technical details. The operative procedure was well tolerated by the infant. After a short and uneventful postoperative course, the infant regained eating habits and was discharged from the hospital on the fifth postoperative day. Our favourable initial experience suggests that laparoscopic pyloromyotomy could be a safe and efficient alternative to the open surgery. PMID:11428282

  13. PRAS40 prevents development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and improves hepatic insulin sensitivity in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Völkers, Mirko; Doroudgar, Shirin; Nguyen, Nathalie; Konstandin, Mathias H; Quijada, Pearl; Din, Shabana; Ornelas, Luis; Thuerauf, Donna J; Gude, Natalie; Friedrich, Kilian; Herzig, Stephan; Glembotski, Christopher C; Sussman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a multi-organ disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy can result in heart failure, which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. In the liver, insulin resistance contributes to hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia, which further worsens the metabolic profile. Defects in mTOR signalling are believed to contribute to metabolic dysfunctions in diabetic liver and hearts, but evidence is missing that mTOR activation is causal to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study shows that specific mTORC1 inhibition by PRAS40 prevents the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This phenotype was associated with improved metabolic function, blunted hypertrophic growth and preserved cardiac function. In addition PRAS40 treatment improves hepatic insulin sensitivity and reduces systemic hyperglycaemia in obese mice. Thus, unlike rapamycin, mTORC1 inhibition with PRAS40 improves metabolic profile in diabetic mice. These findings may open novel avenues for therapeutic strategies using PRAS40 directed against diabetic-related diseases. PMID:24408966

  14. Complete excision of large invasive retroperitoneal paraganglioma mislabelled as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Tasnim; Latif, Amir; Sohail, Sara; Jabeen, Rukshanda; Rehman, Urooj Lal

    2016-01-01

    Paraganglioma originates from chromaffin cells of adrenal medulla and autonomic paraganglia, which are derived from the neural crest cells. Paragangliomas are half as common as pheochromocytomas with 69% occurring in head and neck, 22% in abdomen and pelvis and 10% in the thorax. About 70% paragangliomas are sporadic, 30% are hereditary, having identifiable germline mutations of Succinate Dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). PMID:26712193

  15. Computational Characterization of Mutations in Cardiac Troponin T Known to Cause Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Guinto, Pia J.; Manning, Edward P.; Schwartz, Steven D.; Tardiff, Jil C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) is a central modulator of thin filament regulation of myofilament activation. The lack of structural data for the TNT1 tail domain, a proposed α-helical region, makes the functional implications of the FHC mutations difficult to determine. Studies have suggested that flexibility of TNT1 is important in normal protein-protein interactions within the thin filament. Our groups have previously shown through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations that some FHC mutations, Arg92Leu(R92L) and Arg92Trp(R92W), result in increased flexibility at a critical hinge region 12 residues distant from the mutation. To explain this distant effect and its implications for FHC mutations, we characterized the dynamics of wild type and mutational segments of cTnT using MD. Our data shows an opening of the helix between residues 105–110 in mutants. Consequently, the dihedral angles of these residues correspond to non-α-helical regions on Ramachandran plots. We hypothesize the removal of a charged residue decreases electrostatic repulsion between the point mutation and surrounding residues resulting in local helical compaction. Constrained ends of the helix and localized compaction results in expansion within the nearest non-polar helical turn from the mutation site, residues 105–109. PMID:26500385

  16. Percutaneous cardioscopy of the cardiac chambers in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Uchida, Yasumi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tomaru, Takanobu; Miwa, Atsuko; Hirose, Junichi; Sasaki, Michihiko; Oshima, Tomomitsu; Tsubouchi, Hiroyuki

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in fiberoptic technology enables us to observe the cardiac chambers percutaneously in various categories of heart disease. We applied cardioscopy in 4 patients with HCM. Two of them presented excessive or good left ventricular function and no history of congestive heart failure (CHF). The other two patients showed reduced left ventricular function with a history of CHF. Cardioscopy was successfully performed in all patients. In patients with excessive or good left ventricular function, the color of the endocardial surface was light brown mixed with white. The trabeculae were significantly thick and contracted vigorously. In patients with reduced left ventricular function, the color was whiter, and the thickness and contraction of the trabeculae were reduced obviously. Myocardial biopsy revealed that interstitial fibrosis was prominent in the latters. These results indicate that (1) cardioscopy is safe and useful for evaluation of the internal surface of the ventricle in patients with HCM, and (2) cardioscopic characteristics of the ventricle are closely related to histopathological features.

  17. Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew RG; Carniel, Elisa; Mestroni, Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a heart muscle disease characterized by ventricular dilatation and impaired systolic function. Patients with DCM suffer from heart failure, arrhythmia, and are at risk of premature death. DCM has a prevalence of one case out of 2500 individuals with an incidence of 7/100,000/year (but may be under diagnosed). In many cases the disease is inherited and is termed familial DCM (FDC). FDC may account for 20–48% of DCM. FDC is principally caused by genetic mutations in FDC genes that encode for cytoskeletal and sarcomeric proteins in the cardiac myocyte. Family history analysis is an important tool for identifying families affected by FDC. Standard criteria for evaluating FDC families have been published and the use of such criteria is increasing. Clinical genetic testing has been developed for some FDC genes and will be increasingly utilized for evaluating FDC families. Through the use of family screening by pedigree analysis and/or genetic testing, it is possible to identify patients at earlier, or even presymptomatic stages of their disease. This presents an opportunity to invoke lifestyle changes and to provide pharmacological therapy earlier in the course of disease. Genetic counseling is used to identify additional asymptomatic family members who are at risk of developing symptoms, allowing for regular screening of these individuals. The management of FDC focuses on limiting the progression of heart failure and controlling arrhythmia, and is based on currently accepted treatment guidelines for DCM. It includes general measures (salt and fluid restriction, treatment of hypertension, limitation of alcohol intake, control of body weight, moderate exercise) and pharmacotherapy. Cardiac resynchronization, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left ventricular assist devices have progressively expanding usage. Patients with severe heart failure, severe reduction of the functional capacity and depressed left ventricular ejection

  18. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: ultrasound and MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brook; Amin, Tania; Leone, Valentina; Wood, Mark; Kraft, Jeannette K

    2016-05-01

    Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is a rare genetic disorder related to failures in prostaglandin metabolism. Patients present with joint pain, limb enlargement, skin thickening and finger clubbing. Radiographs show characteristic periosteal reaction and thickening along the long bones. We present MRI and US findings in a child with the condition. Ultrasound showed echogenic tissue surrounding the long bones, presumably reflecting oedema and inflammatory tissue. Doppler sonograms demonstrated increased vascularity on the surface of some superficial bony structures. PMID:26939972

  19. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  20. Usefulness of an Implantable Loop Recorder to Detect Clinically Relevant Arrhythmias in Patients With Advanced Fabry Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Maier, Sebastian K G; Störk, Stefan; Brunner, Thomas; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Seydelmann, Nora; Schneider, Andreas; Becher, Jan; Canan-Kühl, Sima; Blaschke, Daniela; Bijnens, Bart; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Nordbeck, Peter

    2016-07-15

    Patients with genetic cardiomyopathy that involves myocardial hypertrophy often develop clinically relevant arrhythmias that increase the risk of sudden death. Consequently, guidelines for medical device therapy were established for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but not for conditions with only anecdotal evidence of arrhythmias, like Fabry cardiomyopathy. Patients with Fabry cardiomyopathy progressively develop myocardial fibrosis, and sudden cardiac death occurs regularly. Because 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms (ECGs) might not detect clinically important arrhythmias, we tested an implanted loop recorder for continuous heart rhythm surveillance and determined its impact on therapy. This prospective study included 16 patients (12 men) with advanced Fabry cardiomyopathy, relevant hypertrophy, and replacement fibrosis in "loco typico." No patients previously exhibited clinically relevant arrhythmias on Holter ECGs. Patients received an implantable loop recorder and were prospectively followed with telemedicine for a median of 1.2 years (range 0.3 to 2.0 years). The primary end point was a clinically meaningful event, which required a therapy change, captured with the loop recorder. Patients submitted data regularly (14 ± 11 times per month). During follow-up, 21 events were detected (including 4 asystole, i.e., ECG pauses ≥3 seconds) and 7 bradycardia events; 5 episodes of intermittent atrial fibrillation (>3 minutes) and 5 episodes of ventricular tachycardia (3 sustained and 2 nonsustained). Subsequently, as defined in the primary end point, 15 events leaded to a change of therapy. These patients required therapy with a pacemaker or cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and/or anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation. In conclusion, clinically relevant arrhythmias that require further device and/or medical therapy are often missed with Holter ECGs in patients with advanced stage Fabry cardiomyopathy, but they can be detected by telemonitoring with

  1. Current Treatment of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Massin, Edward K.

    1991-01-01

    Within the last decade, the treatment for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy has changed. Clinical management of these patients is aimed at controlling congestive heart failure, treating arrhythmias, preventing pulmonary and systemic emboli, and managing chest pain. The goals of treatment for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy are to make the patient feel better and live longer. To achieve this, we direct treatment to improving left ventricular function and cardiac output and controlling arrhythmias and thromboemboli. Basic treatment begins with inotropic therapy, preload reduction, and afterload reduction. For patients with symptomatic disease, we recommend diuretics, digoxin, and converting enzyme inhibitors for first-line therapy. Patients with arrhythmias may be treated by the addition of amiodarone, a pacemaker, or an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; and most such patients need to be anticoagulated. All patients need close follow-up for possible drug toxicity associated with their regimens. Heart transplantation can be considered for patients refractory to medical treatment. Although the incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy continues to increase, we are learning better ways to treat it. In the future, new drugs with fewer side effects should be available to treat, and perhaps impede, the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:41-9) PMID:15227507

  2. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  3. Hypertrophic osteopathy associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Victoria D.; Souza, Carlos; Vanderhart, Daniel; Boston, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female dog diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma and hypertrophic osteopathy was negative for additional lesions on computed tomography of the thorax and abdomen. Resection of the affected liver lobe resulted in resolution of clinical signs. This is the first case of hypertrophic osteopathy secondary to hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26130837

  4. Topical modalities for treatment and prevention of postsurgical hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chong Wee; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam

    2011-08-01

    There is no universally accepted treatment regimen and no evidence-based literature to guide management of hypertrophic scars. This article summarizes the existing literature regarding topical treatments such as silicone gel sheeting and ointment, onion extract, vitamin E, pressure garment therapy, massage therapy, and topical imiquimod 5% cream in the management of hypertrophic scars. PMID:21856542

  5. Familial aggregation of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: clinical features and pedigree analysis in 14 families.

    PubMed Central

    Zachara, E; Caforio, A L; Carboni, G P; Pellegrini, A; Pompili, A; Del Porto, G; Sciarra, A; Bosman, C; Boldrini, R; Prati, P L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--A recent prospective study in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy has reported that the disease is familial in at least 20% of cases, but the pattern of inheritance could not be ascertained. The presence of an autosomal dominant pattern, such as seen in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, could make it possible to search for single gene defects with linkage analysis, whereas polygenic inheritance would be consistent with the autoimmune hypothesis. To assess the pattern of inheritance, we retrospectively identified patients with familial disease and assessed their first degree relatives (parents, siblings and children) for dilated cardiomyopathy. DESIGN AND PATIENTS--The family history of 105 consecutive patients with dilated cardiomyopathy was reviewed and 14 who had at least one first degree relative with documented disease were identified as probands. Their healthy relatives (109) were studied by physical examination, electrocardiography, M mode and cross sectional echocardiography, and were classified as unequivocally normal or as potential carriers. The potential carriers had abnormal electrocardiography with either at least one echocardiographic measurement of left ventricular cavity dimension or percentage fractional shortening outside 2 SDs of normal values (based on age and body surface area). The potential carriers underwent 24 hour Holter monitoring and maximal treadmill exercise. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--Twenty three relatives (21%) were classified as potential carriers: 12 had an increased left ventricular end diastolic dimension, with reduced percentage fractional shortening in three; 11 had an abnormal electrocardiogram and increased end diastolic dimension, with reduced percentage fractional shortening in five. Such abnormalities were very mild and follow up is necessary to find whether such changes represent early disease. Pedigree analysis was most consistent with polygenic inheritance. PMID:8435238

  6. Stress cardiomyopathy: yet another type of neurocardiogenic injury: 'stress cardiomyopathy'.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Maciej; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Krzych, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Tako-tsubo syndrome pertains to rare acquired cardiomyopathies, characterized by left ventricular dyskinesia and symptomatology typical for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Despite its low incidence and relatively benign course, stress cardiomyopathy should be thoroughly differentiated from AMI. The importance of tako-tsubo consists of the fact that its manifestation initially resembles AMI. Despite seemingly low incidence of tako-tsubo, acute coronary syndromes globally constitute a major epidemiological issue and both clinical entities should be accurately differentiated. Many patients present with only mild troponin release, certain extent of regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) and absence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis. In such instances, a careful interview aimed at preceding emotional or physical traumatic event should be undertaken. The subsequent verification of the diagnosis is based upon prompt recovery of contractile function. Although precise diagnostic criteria were formulated, symptomatology of tako-tsubo might be clinically misleading due to the possibility of concomitant coronary vasospasm, atypical pattern of RWMA and presence of non-significant coronary disease. For this reason, its exact rate might be underestimated. Stress cardiomyopathy reflects merely a single aspect of a much wider range of neurocardiogenic injury, which encompasses cardiac dysfunction associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracranial hypertension and cerebral ischemia. Both psychological and physical insult to central nervous system may trigger a disastrous response of sympathetic nervous system, eventually leading to end-organ catecholamine-mediated damage. This review sought to delineate the phenomenon of tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and deliver evidence for common pathophysiology of the broad spectrum of neurocardiogenic injury. PMID:24462197

  7. Blepharoptosis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Aysun Şanal; Acaroğlu, Gölge; Dikmetas, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old male patient presented to our hospital with a history of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) associated with an abdominal neoplasia and blepharoptosis. He had finger clubbing, hyperhidrosis, and hypertrichosis. He also had a recent history of extensive abdominal surgery with a pathology report of myelolipoma. Routine blood work was unremarkable. Upper eyelid reconstruction with blepharoplasty, upper eyelid wedge resection, and brow suspension was performed to address his eyelid concerns. By this case report, we would like to attract notice that the eyelid involvement may be a part of HOA and to emphasize the importance of systemic and pathologic evaluation in failed blepharoptosis surgery. PMID:27221686

  8. Identification of the Syrian hamster cardiomyopathy gene.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V; Okazaki, Y; Belsito, A; Piluso, G; Matsuda, Y; Politano, L; Nigro, G; Ventura, C; Abbondanza, C; Molinari, A M; Acampora, D; Nishimura, M; Hayashizaki, Y; Puca, G A

    1997-04-01

    The BIO14.6 hamster is a widely used model for autosomal recessive cardiomyopathy. These animals die prematurely from progressive myocardial necrosis and heart failure. The primary genetic defect leading to the cardiomyopathy is still unknown. Recently, a genetic linkage map localized the cardiomyopathy locus on hamster chromosome 9qa2.1-b1, excluding several candidate genes. We now demonstrate that the cardiomyopathy results from a mutation in the delta-sarcoglycan gene that maps to the disease locus. This mutation was completely coincident with the disease in backcross and F2 pedigrees. This constitutes the first animal model identified for human sarcoglycan disorders. PMID:9097966

  9. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  10. Atomoxetine-related Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Naguy, Ahmed; Al-Mutairi, Haya; Al-Tajali, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Many psychotropic medications target norepinephrine receptors, which can have serious cardiovascular implications, especially in the context of overdoses, polypharmacy, and high-risk populations. This article presents the case of a patient with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder who developed takotsubo cardiomyopathy subsequent to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between atomoxetine, a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, and fluoxetine. Clinicians should be mindful of the potential for cardiovascular adverse effects when prescribing agents that target noradrenergic receptors. PMID:27123802

  11. Skeletal muscle involvement in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Raffaella; Maddaloni, Valeria; Rea, Alessandra; Sarkozy, Anna; McKenna, William J

    2013-12-01

    The link between heart and skeletal muscle disorders is based on similar molecular, anatomical and clinical features, which are shared by the 'primary' cardiomyopathies and 'primary' neuromuscular disorders. There are, however, some peculiarities that are typical of cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders. Skeletal muscle weakness presenting at any age may indicate a primary neuromuscular disorder (associated with creatine kinase elevation as in dystrophinopathies), a mitochondrial disease (particularly if encephalopathy, ocular myopathy, retinitis, neurosensorineural deafness, lactic acidosis are present), a storage disorder (progressive exercise intolerance, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa, as in Danon disease), or metabolic disorders (hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia or other specific biochemical abnormalities). In such patients, skeletal muscle weakness usually precedes the cardiomyopathy and dominates the clinical picture. Nevertheless, skeletal involvement may be subtle, and the first clinical manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder may be the occurrence of heart failure, conduction disorders or ventricular arrhythmias due to cardiomyopathy. ECG and echocardiogram, and eventually, a more detailed cardiovascular evaluation may be required to identify early cardiac involvement. Paediatric and adult cardiologists should be proactive in screening for neuromuscular and related disorders to enable diagnosis in probands and evaluation of families with a focus on the identification of those at risk of cardiac arrhythmia and emboli who may require specific prophylactic treatments, for example, pacemaker, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and anticoagulation. PMID:24149064

  12. [Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: a specific entity].

    PubMed

    Brondex, A; Arlès, F; Lipovac, A-S; Richecoeur, M; Bronstein, J-A

    2012-04-01

    Cirrhosis is a frequent and severe condition, which is the late stage of numerous chronic liver diseases. It is associated with major hemodynamic alterations characteristic of hyperdynamic circulation and with a series of structural, functional, electrophysiological and biological heart abnormalities termed cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. The pathogenesis of this syndrome is multifactorial. It is usually clinically latent or mild, likely because the peripheral vasodilatation significantly reduces the left ventricle afterload. However, sudden changes of hemodynamic state (vascular filling, surgical or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts, peritoneo-venous shunts and orthotopic liver transplantation) or myocardial contractility (introduction of beta-blocker therapy) can unmask its presence, and sometimes convert latent to overt heart failure. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may also contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatorenal syndrome. This entity has been described recently, and its diagnostic criteria are still under debate. To date, current management recommendations are empirical, nonspecific measures. Recognition of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy depends on a high level of awareness for the presence of this syndrome, particularly in patients with advanced cirrhosis who undergo significant surgical, pharmacological or physiological stresses. PMID:22115174

  13. Cardiomyopathies and the Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, D A; Cox, A T; Boos, C; Hardman, R; Sharma, S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a group of heterogeneous myocardial diseases that are frequently inherited and are a recognised cause of premature sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Incomplete expressions of disease and the overlap with the physiological cardiac manifestations of regular intensive exercise create diagnostic challenges in young athletes and military recruits. Early identification is important because sudden death in the absence of prodromal symptoms is a common presentation, and there are several therapeutic strategies to minimise this risk. This paper examines the classification and clinical features of cardiomyopathies with specific reference to a military population and provides a detailed account of the optimum strategy for diagnosis, indications for specialist referral and specific guidance on the occupational significance of cardiomyopathy. A 27-year-old Lance Corporal Signaller presents to his Regimental medical officer (RMO) after feeling 'light-headed' following an 8 mile unloaded run. While waiting to see the RMO, the medical sergeant records a 12-lead ECG. The ECG is reviewed by the RMO immediately prior to the consultation and shows voltage criteria for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and inverted T-waves in II, III, aVF and V1-V3 (Figure 1). This Lance Corporal is a unit physical training instructor and engages in >10 h of aerobic exercise per week. He is a non-smoker and does not have any significant medical history. PMID:26246349

  14. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  15. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in a weimaraner

    PubMed Central

    Eason, Bryan D.; Leach, Stacey B.; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) was diagnosed postmortem in a weimaraner dog. Syncope, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death in this patient combined with the histopathological fatty tissue infiltration affecting the right ventricular myocardium are consistent with previous reports of ARVC in non-boxer dogs. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy has not been previously reported in weimaraners. PMID:26483577

  16. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  17. Stem Cell Therapy for Pediatric Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Selem, Sarah M.; Kaushal, Sunjay; Hare, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a serious and life-threatening disorder in children. It is the most common form of pediatric cardiomyopathy. Therapy for this condition has varied little over the last several decades and mortality continues to be high. Currently, children with dilated cardiomyopathy are treated with pharmacological agents and mechanical support, but most require heart transplantation and survival rates are not optimal. The lack of common treatment guidelines and inadequate survival rates after transplantation necessitates more therapeutic clinical trials. Stem cell and cell-based therapies offer an innovative approach to restore cardiac structure and function towards normal, possibly reducing the need for aggressive therapies and cardiac transplantation. Mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac stem cells may be the most promising cell types for treating children with dilated cardiomyopathy. The medical community must begin a systematic investigation of the benefits of current and novel treatments such as stem cell therapies for treating pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:23666883

  18. Cushing's Disease Presented by Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Aydoğan, Berna İmge; Gerede, Demet Menekşe; Canpolat, Asena Gökçay; Erdoğan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is rarely reported among CS patients especially without hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Materials and Methods. We hereby report a Cushing's syndrome case presenting with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results. A 48-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with severe proximal myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy without ventricular hypertrophy. Cushing's disease was diagnosed and magnetic-resonance imaging of the pituitary gland revealed a microadenoma. Under diuretic and ketoconazole treatments, she underwent a successful transnasal/transsphenoidal adenomectomy procedure. Full recovery of symptoms and echocardiographic features was achieved after six months of surgery. Conclusion. Cushing's syndrome must be kept in mind as a reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recovery of cardiomyopathy is achieved with successful surgery. PMID:26649206

  19. Cushing's Disease Presented by Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğan, Berna İmge; Gerede, Demet Menekşe; Canpolat, Asena Gökçay; Erdoğan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is rarely reported among CS patients especially without hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Materials and Methods. We hereby report a Cushing's syndrome case presenting with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results. A 48-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with severe proximal myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy without ventricular hypertrophy. Cushing's disease was diagnosed and magnetic-resonance imaging of the pituitary gland revealed a microadenoma. Under diuretic and ketoconazole treatments, she underwent a successful transnasal/transsphenoidal adenomectomy procedure. Full recovery of symptoms and echocardiographic features was achieved after six months of surgery. Conclusion. Cushing's syndrome must be kept in mind as a reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recovery of cardiomyopathy is achieved with successful surgery. PMID:26649206

  20. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Severe Hypothyroidism in an Elderly Female.

    PubMed

    Brenes-Salazar, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress cardiomyopathy, is a syndrome that affects predominantly postmenopausal women. Despite multiple described mechanisms, intense, neuroadrenergic myocardial stimulation appears to be the main trigger. Hyperthyroidism, but rarely hypothyroidism, has been described in association with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Herein, we present a case of stress cardiomyopathy in the setting of symptomatic hypothyroidism. PMID:27512537

  1. The molecular basis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are caused by dermal injuries such as trauma and burns to the deep dermis, which are red, raised, itchy and painful. They can cause cosmetic disfigurement or contractures if craniofacial areas or mobile region of the skin are affected. Abnormal wound healing with more extracellular matrix deposition than degradation will result in HTS formation. This review will introduce the physiology of wound healing, dermal HTS formation, treatment and difference with keloids in the skin, and it also review the current advance of molecular basis of HTS including the involvement of cytokines, growth factors, and macrophages via chemokine pathway, to bring insights for future prevention and treatment of HTS. PMID:27574672

  2. Ergotamine-Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozpelit, Mehmet E; Akdeniz, Bahri; Göldeli, Özhan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a recently increasing diagnosed disease showed by transient apical or mid-apical left ventricular dysfunction. It is known as a disease of postmenopausal women, which is usually triggered by emotional or physical stress. Although the trigger is mostly endogenous, some drugs have also been reported as the cause. Published case reports of TC associated with drug usage consist of sympathomimetic drugs, inotropic agents, thyroid hormone, cocaine, and 5-fluorouracil. We present an unusual case of TC in which the possible trigger is ergotamine toxicity. PMID:25099482

  3. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn. PMID:26500857

  4. MRI and MR tractography in bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Debraj; Gulati, Yoginder S.; Malik, Virender; Mohimen, Aneesh; Sibi, Eranki; Reddy, Deepak Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration is a trans-synaptic neuronal degeneration associated with hypertrophy of the inferior olivary nucleus due to a lesion in the triangle of Guillain-Mollaret. Familiarity with this entity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential to avoid other erroneous ominous diagnoses. We present a case of bilateral hypertrophic olivary degeneration and discuss the etiopathogenesis and MRI findings in this entity. The contributory role of MR tractography in the diagnosis is also highlighted. PMID:25489133

  5. Activated keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed Central

    Machesney, M.; Tidman, N.; Waseem, A.; Kirby, L.; Leigh, I.

    1998-01-01

    The etiology of hypertrophic scarring, a pathological end point of wound healing, is unknown. The scars most commonly occur when epithelialization has been delayed during, for example, the healing of deep dermal burn wounds. Hypertrophic scars are conventionally described as a dermal pathology in which the epidermis has only a passive role. In this study, the expression of keratin intermediate filament proteins and filaggrin has been investigated in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars and site-matched controls from the same patients. Hypertrophic scar epidermis was found to express the hyperproliferative keratins K6 and K16 in interfollicular epidermis in association with K17 and precocious expression of filaggrin. K16 mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization using a highly specific cRNA probe. In contrast to the immunohistochemical location of K16 protein, the K16 mRNA was found to be expressed in the basal cell layer of normal skin. In hypertrophic scars the mRNA distribution corroborated the abnormal K16 protein distribution. These results suggest the keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar epidermis have entered an alternative differentiation pathway and are expressing an activated phenotype. Activated keratinocytes are a feature of the early stages of wound healing producing growth factors that influence fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and the inflammatory response. We propose that cellular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scarring are more complex than isolated dermal phenomena. The persistence of activated keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar epidermis implicates abnormal epidermal-mesenchymal interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9588880

  6. Morphological and immunochemical differences between keloid and hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, H. P.; Desmoulière, A.; Diegelmann, R. F.; Cohen, I. K.; Compton, C. C.; Garner, W. L.; Kapanci, Y.; Gabbiani, G.

    1994-01-01

    There are two types of excessive scarring, keloid and hypertrophic scar. Contrary to hypertrophic scars, keloids do not regress with time, are difficult to revise surgically, and do not provoke scar contractures. These two lesions require different therapeutic approaches but are often confused because of an apparent lack of morphological differences. We have investigated the collagen organization and the possible presence of alpha-smooth muscle (SM) actin-expressing myofibroblasts in these conditions. Keloids contain large, thick collagen fibers composed of numerous fibrils closely packed together. In contrast hypertrophic scars exhibit modular structures in which fibroblastic cells, small vessels, and fine, randomly organized collagen fibers are present. We confirm that such nodular structures are always present in hypertrophic scar and rarely in keloid. Furthermore, only nodules of hypertrophic scars contain alpha-SM actin-expressing myofibroblasts. Electron microscopic examination supports the above-mentioned differences in collagen organization and in fibroblastic features and shows the presence of an amorphous extracellular material surrounding fibroblastic cells in keloid. The presence in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts of alpha-SM actin, the actin isoform typical of vascular SM cells, may represent an important element in the pathogenesis of contraction. Interestingly, when placed in culture fibroblasts from hypertrophic scars and keloid express similar amounts of alpha-SM actin, suggesting that local microenvironmental factors influence in vivo the expression of this protein. Thus several morphological and immunohistochemical differences exist between hypertrophic scar and keloid that are useful for the biological and pathological characterization of the two lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8030742

  7. The Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing Protein 10 (LRRC10) in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Matthew J.; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiomyocyte-specific member of the Leucine-rich repeat containing (LRRC) protein superfamily with critical roles in cardiac function and disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have identified LRRC10 mutations in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Lrrc10 homozygous knockout mice develop DCM, strongly linking LRRC10 to the molecular etiology of DCM. LRRC10 localizes to the dyad region in cardiomyocytes where it can interact with actin and α-actinin at the Z-disc and associate with T-tubule components. Indeed, this region is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling center in cardiomyocytes, not only for calcium cycling, excitation-contraction coupling, and calcium-sensitive hypertrophic signaling, but also as a nodal signaling hub where the myocyte can sense and respond to mechanical stress. Disruption of a wide range of critical structural and signaling molecules in cardiomyocytes confers susceptibility to cardiomyopathies in addition to the more classically studied mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM remain unclear. Here, we review what is known about the cardiomyocyte functions of LRRC10, lessons learned about LRRC10 and DCM from the Lrrc10 knockout mouse model, and discuss ongoing efforts to elucidate molecular mechanisms whereby mutation or absence of LRRC10 mediates cardiac disease. PMID:27536250

  8. Molecular mechanisms of cardiomyopathy phenotypes associated with myosin light chain mutations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenrui; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-12-01

    We discuss here the potential mechanisms of action associated with hypertrophic (HCM) or dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathy causing mutations in the myosin regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC) light chains. Specifically, we focus on four HCM mutations: RLC-A13T, RLC-K104E, ELC-A57G and ELC-M173V, and one DCM RLC-D94A mutation shown by population studies to cause different cardiomyopathy phenotypes in humans. Our studies indicate that RLC and ELC mutations lead to heart disease through different mechanisms with RLC mutations triggering alterations of the secondary structure of the RLC which further affect the structure and function of the lever arm domain and impose changes in the cross bridge cycling rates and myosin force generation ability. The ELC mutations exert their detrimental effects through changes in the interaction of the N-terminus of ELC with actin altering the cross talk between the thick and thin filaments and ultimately resulting in an altered force-pCa relationship. We also discuss the effect of mutations on myosin light chain phosphorylation. Exogenous myosin light chain phosphorylation and/or pseudo-phosphorylation were explored as potential rescue tools to treat hypertrophy-related cardiac phenotypes. PMID:26385864

  9. The Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing Protein 10 (LRRC10) in Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Brody, Matthew J; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiomyocyte-specific member of the Leucine-rich repeat containing (LRRC) protein superfamily with critical roles in cardiac function and disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have identified LRRC10 mutations in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Lrrc10 homozygous knockout mice develop DCM, strongly linking LRRC10 to the molecular etiology of DCM. LRRC10 localizes to the dyad region in cardiomyocytes where it can interact with actin and α-actinin at the Z-disc and associate with T-tubule components. Indeed, this region is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling center in cardiomyocytes, not only for calcium cycling, excitation-contraction coupling, and calcium-sensitive hypertrophic signaling, but also as a nodal signaling hub where the myocyte can sense and respond to mechanical stress. Disruption of a wide range of critical structural and signaling molecules in cardiomyocytes confers susceptibility to cardiomyopathies in addition to the more classically studied mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM remain unclear. Here, we review what is known about the cardiomyocyte functions of LRRC10, lessons learned about LRRC10 and DCM from the Lrrc10 knockout mouse model, and discuss ongoing efforts to elucidate molecular mechanisms whereby mutation or absence of LRRC10 mediates cardiac disease. PMID:27536250

  10. Inherited cardiomyopathies--Novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Leviner, Dror B; Hochhauser, Edith; Arad, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies arising due to a single gene defect represent various pathways that evoke adverse remodeling and cardiac dysfunction. While the gene therapy approach is slowly evolving and has not yet reached clinical "prime time" and gene correction approaches are applicable at the bench but not at the bedside, major advances are being made with molecular and drug therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary drugs introduced or being tested to help manage these unique disorders bearing a major impact on the quality of life and survival of the affected individuals. The restoration of the RNA reading frame facilitates the expression of partly functional protein to salvage or alleviate the disease phenotype. Chaperones are used to prevent the degradation of abnormal but still functional proteins, while other molecules are given for pathogen silencing, to prevent aggregation or to enhance clearance of protein deposits. The absence of protein may be managed by viral gene delivery or protein therapy. Enzyme replacement therapy is already a clinical reality for a series of metabolic diseases. The progress in molecular biology, based on the knowledge of the gene defect, helps generate small molecules and pharmaceuticals targeting the key events occurring in the malfunctioning element of the sick organ. Cumulatively, these tools augment the existing armamentarium of phenotype oriented symptomatic and evidence-based therapies for patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. PMID:26297672

  11. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: origin and variants].

    PubMed

    Aronov, D M

    2008-01-01

    This literature review is devoted to the " tako-tsubo " cardiomyopathy - rare type of cardiomyopathy characterized by transient myocardial stunning. In acute phase the disease resembles myocardial infarction. However no involvement of coronary arteries is found at angiography. Echocardiography and ventriculography reveal a- or - hypokinesia of various parts of the left ventricle. Classic (initial) variant of the disease is associated with concomitant apical akinesia and hyperkinesis of basal segments. The heart acquires a distinctive configuration with ballooning apex which resembles device used to trap octopus. The author refers to described by him 11 cases of myocardial damage with infarct-like clinic without changes of coronary arteries in healthy men younger than 35 years (D.M.Aronow, 1968, 1974). These cases occurred during severe physical stress and had in their basis hypercatecholaminemia which led to reversible myocardial damage of the myocardium which corresponded to modern concept of myocardial stunning. During exercise tests these patients had 3 times greater increase of urinal epinephrine excretion compared with 61 patients of the same age with atherosclerotic heart disease. PMID:18991836

  12. Early Administration of Carvedilol Protected against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Chai, Han-Tan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Liu, Chu-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tien-Hung; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chua, Sarah; Lu, Hung-I; Lee, Fan-Yen; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-12-01

    This study tested for the benefits of early administration of carvedilol as protection against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiomyopathy. Thirty male, adult B6 mice were categorized into group 1 (untreated control), group 2 [DOX treatment (15 mg/every other day for 2 weeks, i.p.], and group 3 [carvedilol (15 mg/kg/d, from day 7 after DOX treatment for 28 days)], and euthanized by day 35 after DOX treatment. By day 35, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly lower in group 2 than in groups 1 and 3, and significantly lower in group 3 than in group 1, whereas the left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and LV end-systolic dimensions showed an opposite pattern to the LVEF among the three groups. The protein expressions of fibrotic (Smad3, TGF-β), apoptotic (BAX, cleaved caspase 3, PARP), DNA damage (γ-H2AX), oxidative stress (oxidized protein), mitochondrial damage (cytosolic cytochrome-C), heart failure (brain natriuretic peptide), and hypertrophic (β-MHC) biomarkers of the LV myocardium showed an opposite pattern to the LVEF among the three groups. The protein expressions of antifibrotic (BMP-2, Smad1/5), α-MHC, and phosphorylated-Akt showed an identical pattern to the LVEF among the three groups. The microscopic findings of fibrotic and collagen-deposition areas and the numbers of γ-H2AX(+) and 53BP1(+) cells in the LV myocardium exhibited an opposite pattern, whereas the numbers of endothelial cell (CD31(+), vWF(+)) markers showed an identical pattern to the LVEF among the three groups. Cardiac stem cell markers (C-kit(+) and Sca-1(+) cells) were significantly and progressively increased from group 1 to group 3. Additionally, the in vitro study showed carvedilol treatment significantly inhibited DOX-induced cardiomyoblast DNA (CD90/XRCC1(+), CD90/53BP1(+), and r-H2AX(+) cells) damage. Early carvedilol therapy protected against DOX-induced DNA damage and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26511374

  13. Knock-out of nexilin in mice leads to dilated cardiomyopathy and endomyocardial fibroelastosis.

    PubMed

    Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Schlossarek, Saskia; Stoelting, Stephanie; Klinger, Matthias; Geertz, Birgit; Weinberger, Florian; Kessler, Thorsten; Aherrahrou, Redouane; Moreth, Kristin; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Just, Steffen; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schunkert, Heribert; Carrier, Lucie; Erdmann, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is one of the most common causes of chronic heart failure worldwide. Mutations in the gene encoding nexilin (NEXN) occur in patients with both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM); however, little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms and relevance of NEXN to these disorders. Here, we evaluated the functional role of NEXN using a constitutive Nexn knock-out (KO) mouse model. Heterozygous (Het) mice were inter-crossed to produce wild-type (WT), Het, and homozygous KO mice. At birth, 32, 46, and 22 % of the mice were WT, Het, and KO, respectively, which is close to the expected Mendelian ratio. After postnatal day 6, the survival of the Nexn KO mice decreased dramatically and all of the animals died by day 8. Phenotypic characterizations of the WT and KO mice were performed at postnatal days 1, 2, 4, and 6. At birth, the relative heart weights of the WT and KO mice were similar; however, at day 4, the relative heart weight of the KO group was 2.3-fold higher than of the WT group. In addition, the KO mice developed rapidly progressive cardiomyopathy with left ventricular dilation and wall thinning and decreased cardiac function. At day 6, the KO mice developed a fulminant DCM phenotype characterized by dilated ventricular chambers and systolic dysfunction. At this stage, collagen deposits and some elastin deposits were observed within the left ventricle cavity, which resembles the features of endomyocardial fibroelastosis (EFE). Overall, these results further emphasize the role of NEXN in DCM and suggest a novel role in EFE. PMID:26659360

  14. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  15. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  16. Left Ventricular Noncompaction: A Distinct Genetic Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Favalli, Valentina; Narula, Nupoor; Serio, Alessandra; Grasso, Maurizia

    2016-08-30

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) describes a ventricular wall anatomy characterized by prominent left ventricular (LV) trabeculae, a thin compacted layer, and deep intertrabecular recesses. Individual variability is extreme, and trabeculae represent a sort of individual "cardioprinting." By itself, the diagnosis of LVNC does not coincide with that of a "cardiomyopathy" because it can be observed in healthy subjects with normal LV size and function, and it can be acquired and is reversible. Rarely, LVNC is intrinsically part of a cardiomyopathy; the paradigmatic examples are infantile tafazzinopathies. When associated with LV dilation and dysfunction, hypertrophy, or congenital heart disease, the genetic cause may overlap. The prevalence of LVNC in healthy athletes, its possible reversibility, and increasing diagnosis in healthy subjects suggests cautious use of the term LVNC cardiomyopathy, which describes the morphology but not the functional profile of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:27561770

  17. Unveiling nonischemic cardiomyopathies with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Peterson, Tyler J; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Glockner, James; Mankad, Sunil V; Williamson, Eric E

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a heterogeneous group of myocardial disorders with mechanical or electrical dysfunction. Identification of the etiology is important for accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, but continues to be challenging. The ability of cardiac MRI to non-invasively obtain 3D-images of unparalleled resolution without radiation exposure and to provide tissue characterization gives it a distinct advantage over any other diagnostic tool used for evaluation of cardiomyopathies. Cardiac MRI can accurately visualize cardiac morphology and function and also help identify myocardial edema, infiltration and fibrosis. It has emerged as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in tertiary care centers for work up of patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This review covers the role of cardiac MRI in evaluation of nonischemic cardiomyopathies, particularly in the context of other diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities. PMID:24417294

  18. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A New Perspective in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady Y.; Barbour, Mohamad F.; Noonan, Thomas E.; Al-Qadi, Mazen O.

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is an entity of reversible cardiomyopathy known for its association with physical or emotional stress and may mimic myocardial infarction. We report an exceedingly rare case of albuterol-induced TCM with moderate asthma exacerbation. An interesting association that may help in understanding the etiology of TCM in the asthmatic population. Although the prognosis of TCM is excellent, it is crucial to recognize beta agonists as a potential stressor. PMID:26246918

  19. [Lipoprotein lipase and diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into free fatty acids (FFA) to provide energy for cardiac tissue. During diabetes, cardiac energy supply is insufficient due to defected utilization of glucose. As a compensation of cardiac energy supply, FFAs are released through the hydrolysis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicrons (CM) due to activation of LPL activity. In diabetic patients, activated LPL activity and elevated FFAs result in the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and lipids in myocardium and potentially induce the diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms of myocardial LPL and the pathogenesis of DCM induced by LPL and provides novel therapeutic targets and pathways for DCM. PMID:24873138

  20. Stimulant-related Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Mike; Riguzzi, Christine; Frenkel, Oron; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a rare but increasingly recognized mimic of acute coronary syndrome. Patients present with angina,ST-segment changes on electrocardiogram (both elevations and depressions),and rapid rises in cardiac biomarkers. Many kinds of stressful events have been associated with TC, but only a handful of drug-related cases have previously been reported. We describe the case of a 58-year-old woman who developed TC 2 days after crack cocaine use, a diagnosis first suggested as bedside echocardiography in the emergency department.Recognition of the classic echocardiographic appearance of TC—apical hypokinesis causing “ballooning” of the left ventricle during systole—may greatly assist providers in the early identification of this condition. PMID:25308824

  1. GENETIC CAUSES OF DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Mestroni, Luisa; Brun, Francesca; Spezzacatene, Anita; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Taylor, Matthew RG

    2014-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of the myocardium characterized by left ventricular dilatation and/or dysfunction, affecting both adult and pediatric populations. Almost half of cases are genetically determined with an autosomal pattern of inheritance. Up to 40 genes have been identified affecting proteins of a wide variety of cellular structures such as the sarcomere, the nuclear envelope, the cytoskeleton, the sarcolemma and the intercellular junction. Novel gene mutations have been recently identified thanks to advances in next-generation sequencing technologies. Genetic screening is an essential tool for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prognostic stratification and, possibly, adoption of primary preventive measures in affected patients and their asymptomatic relatives. The purpose of this article is to review the genetic basis of DCM, the known genotype-phenotype correlations, the role of current genetic sequencing techniques in the discovery of novel pathogenic gene mutations and new therapeutic perspectives. PMID:25584016

  2. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Occurring in the Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Süleyman; Bakal, Ömer; İnangil, Gökhan; Şen, Hüseyin; Özkan, Sezai

    2015-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy simulates acute myocardial infarction, and it is characterised by reversible left ventricular failure. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnosed after emergency angiography performed in a patient with evidence of acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period will be described in this report. Transurethral resection of a bladder tumour (TUR-BT) was performed in a 92-year-old male patient by the urology clinic. The patient was transferred to the post-anaesthesia care unit after the operation. An echocardiography was performed because of the sudden onset of dyspnoea, tachycardia (140-150 beats per minute, rhythm-atrial fibrillation) and ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography (ECG) at the first postoperative hour, and midapical dyskinesia was detected at the patient. An immediate angiography was performed due to suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. Patent coronary arteries and temporary aneurysmatic dilatation of the apex of the heart were revealed by angiography. As a result of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by the cardiology service. The patient was discharged uneventfully following 10 days in the intensive care unit. Aneurysm of the apex of the left ventricle and normal anatomy of the coronary arteries in the angiography have diagnostic value for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Diuretics (furosemide) and beta-blockers (metoprolol) are commonly used for the treatment of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Even though Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare and benign disease, it should be kept in mind in patients suspected for acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period. PMID:27366464

  3. Development and pathomechanisms of cardiomyopathy in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (VLCAD(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Flögel, Ulrich; Hermann, Sven; Sturm, Marga; Schäfers, Michael; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a typical manifestation of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD), the most common long-chain β-oxidation defects in humans; however in some patients cardiac function is fully compensated. Cardiomyopathy may also be reversed by supplementation of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). We here characterize cardiac function of VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-)) mice over one year. Furthermore, we investigate the long-term effect of a continuous MCT diet on the cardiac phenotype. We assessed cardiac morphology and function in VLCAD(-/-) mice by in vivo MRI. Cardiac energetics were measured by (31)P-MRS and myocardial glucose uptake was quantified by positron-emission-tomography (PET). Metabolic adaptations were identified by the expression of genes regulating glucose and lipid metabolism using real-time-PCR. VLCAD(-/-) mice showed a progressive decrease in heart function over 12 months accompanied by a reduced phosphocreatine-to-ATP-ratio indicative of chronic energy deficiency. Long-term MCT supplementation aggravated the cardiac phenotype into dilated cardiomyopathy with features similar to diabetic heart disease. Cardiac energy production and function in mice with a β-oxidation defect cannot be maintained with age. Compensatory mechanisms are insufficient to preserve the cardiac energy state over time. However, energy deficiency by impaired β-oxidation and long-term MCT induce cardiomyopathy by different mechanisms. Cardiac MRI and MRS may be excellent tools to assess minor changes in cardiac function and energetics in patients with β-oxidation defects for preventive therapy. PMID:24530811

  4. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Dundon, B K; Puri, R; Leong, D P; Worthley, M I

    2008-07-01

    Lightning strike is the most common environmental cause of sudden cardiac death, but may also be associated with a myriad of injuries to various organ systems. Direct myocardial injury may be manifest as electrocardiographic alterations or elevation in cardiac-specific isoenzymes; however, significant electrical cardiac trauma appears uncommon. A case is presented of severe acute cardiomyopathy in a "Takotsubo" distribution causing cardiogenic shock following lightning strike in a previously healthy 37-year-old woman. Although rarely identified in this context, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (also known as "transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome") is characterised by transient cardiac dysfunction, electrocardiographic changes that may mimic acute myocardial infarction and minimal release of cardiac-specific enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. The condition is associated with a substantial female bias (up to 90% of cases) in reported series, and despite occasionally dramatic presentations recovery of left ventricular function is almost universal over days to weeks. In rare instances, however, the syndrome has been associated with more catastrophic complications such as papillary muscle or cardiac free wall rupture, necessitating emergency surgical intervention to preserve life. In clinical practice, non-lethal lightning strike-induced cardiac injury is frequently associated with small elevations of cardiac isoenzymes without overt clinical sequelae; however, the incidence of silent myocardial mechanical dysfunction remains unknown. Cases such as the one presented highlight the potential for serious, albeit usually transient, cardiac sequelae from lightning strike injury and remind us that our mothers' advice to remain indoors during thunderstorms is probably worth heeding. PMID:18573973

  5. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Dundon, Benjamin K; Puri, Rishi; Leong, Darryl P; Worthley, Matthew Ian

    2009-01-01

    Lightning strike is the most common environmental cause of sudden cardiac death, but it may also be associated with a myriad of injuries to various organ systems. Direct myocardial injury may be manifest as electrocardiographic alterations or elevation in cardiac-specific isoenzymes; however, significant electrical cardiac trauma appears uncommon. A case is presented of severe acute cardiomyopathy in a "Takotsubo" distribution causing cardiogenic shock following lightning strike in a previously healthy 37-year-old woman. Although rarely identified in this context, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (also known as "transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome") is characterised by transient cardiac dysfunction, electrocardiographic changes that may mimic acute myocardial infarction and minimal release of cardiac-specific enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. The condition is associated with a substantial female bias (up to 90% of cases) in reported series, and despite occasionally dramatic presentations recovery of left ventricular function is almost universal over days to weeks. In rare instances, however, the syndrome has been associated with more catastrophic complications such as papillary muscle or cardiac free wall rupture, necessitating emergency surgical intervention to preserve life. In clinical practice, non-lethal lightning strike-induced cardiac injury is frequently associated with small elevations of cardiac isoenzymes without overt clinical sequelae; however, the incidence of silent myocardial mechanical dysfunction remains unknown. Cases such as the one presented highlight the potential for serious, albeit usually transient, cardiac sequelae from lightning strike injury and remind us that our mothers' advice to remain indoors during thunderstorms is probably worth heeding. PMID:21686980

  6. Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy in 30 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Withers, S. S.; Johnson, E. G.; Culp, W. T. N.; Rodriguez, C. O.; Skorupski, K. A.; Rebhun, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic hypertrophic osteopathy (pHO) is known to occur in both canine and human cancer patients. While the pathology of pHO is well-described in the dog, very little information exists regarding the true clinical presentation of dogs affected with pHO. The primary objective of this study was to provide a more comprehensive clinical picture of pHO. To this end, we retrospectively identified 30 dogs and recorded data regarding presenting complaints and physical examination (PE) findings on the date of pHO diagnosis. As a secondary objective, any blood test results were also collected from the computerized records. The most common clinical signs included leg swelling, ocular discharge and/or episcleral injection, lameness, and lethargy. The most common haematological and serum biochemical abnormalities included anaemia, neutrophilia and elevated alkaline phosphatase. In addition to presenting a more detailed clinical description of pHO in the dog, these data support the previously described haematological, serum biochemical and PE abnormalities published in individual case reports. PMID:23489591

  7. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis: significance of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    PubMed

    Yokoseki, Akiko; Saji, Etsuji; Arakawa, Musashi; Kosaka, Takayuki; Hokari, Mariko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Takeda, Shigeki; Sanpei, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Akazawa, Kouhei; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kawachi, Izumi

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics, pathogenesis and treatment strategy of hypertrophic pachymeningitis that is associated with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). We retrospectively investigated clinical, radiological, immunological and pathological profiles of 36 patients with immune-mediated or idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis, including 17 patients with myeloperoxidase-ANCA, four patients with proteinase 3-ANCA, six patients with other immune-mediated disorders, and nine patients with 'idiopathic' variety. Myeloperoxidase-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis was characterized by: (i) an elderly female predominance; (ii) 82% of patients diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (previously known as Wegener's granulomatosis) according to Watts' algorithm; (iii) a high frequency of patients with lesions limited to the dura mater and upper airways, developing headaches, chronic sinusitis, otitis media or mastoiditis; (iv) a low frequency of patients with the 'classical or generalized form' of granulomatosis with polyangiitis involving the entire upper and lower airways and kidney, or progressing to generalized disease, in contrast to proteinase 3-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis; (v) less severe neurological damage according to the modified Rankin Scale and low disease activity according to the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score compared with proteinase 3-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis; (vi) increased levels of CXCL10, CXCL8 and interleukin 6 in cerebrospinal fluids, and increased numbers of T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, plasma cells and monocytes/macrophages in autopsied or biopsied dura mater with pachymeningitis, suggesting TH1-predominant granulomatous lesions in hypertrophic pachymeningitis, as previously reported in pulmonary or renal lesions of granulomatosis with polyangiitis; and (vii) greater efficacy of combination therapy with prednisolone and

  8. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  9. The use of radiofrequency catheter ablation to cure dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Lobban, J H; Reddy, S; Hoelper, M; Palmer, D L

    1997-01-01

    Incessant supraventricular tachycardia can cause a dilated cardiomyopathy. This article discusses the case of a 55-year-old woman whose cardiomyopathy was reversed when she underwent successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a unifocal atrial tachycardia. PMID:9197188

  10. Identification of novel mutations including a double mutation in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy by a targeted sequencing approach using the Ion Torrent PGM system

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUE; CAO, HONG; SONG, YINDI; FENG, YUE; DING, XIAOXUE; PANG, MINGJIE; ZHANG, YUNMEI; ZHANG, HONG; DING, JIAHUAN; XIA, XUESHAN

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the major cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). The disease is associated with extensive genetic heterogeneity; pathogenic mutations in cardiac sarcomere protein genes, cytoskeletal protein genes and nuclear envelope protein genes have been linked to its etiology. Early diagnosis is conducive to clinical monitoring and allows for presymptomatic interventions as needed. In the present study, the entire coding sequences and flanking regions of 12 major disease (cardiomyopathy)-related genes [namely myosin, heavy chain 7, cardiac muscle, β (MYH7); myosin binding protein C, cardiac (MYBPC3); lamin A/C (LMNA); troponin I type 3 (cardiac) (TNNI3); troponin T type 2 (cardiac) (TNNT2); actin, α, cardiac muscle 1 (ACTC1); tropomyosin 1 (α) (TPM1); sodium channel, voltage gated, type V alpha subunit (SCN5A); myosin, light chain 2, regulatory, cardiac, slow (MYL2); myosin, heavy chain 6, cardiac muscle, α (MYH6); myosin, light chain 3, alkali, ventricular, skeletal, slow (MYL3); and protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 2 non-catalytic subunit (PRKAG2)] in 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and in 8 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were amplified and then sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) system. As a result, a novel heterozygous mutation (MYH7, p.Asn885Thr) and a variant of uncertain significance (TNNT2, p.Arg296His) were identified in 2 patients with HCM. These 2 missense mutations, which were absent in the samples obtained from the 200 healthy control subjects, altered the amino acid that was evolutionarily conserved among a number of vertebrate species; this illustrates that these 2 non-synonymous mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of HCM. Moreover, a double heterozygous mutation (PRKAG2, p.Gly100Ser plus MYH7, p.Arg719Trp) was identified in a patient with severe familial HCM, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. This patient provided us with more

  11. Intractable chest pain in cardiomyopathy: treatment by a novel technique of cardiac cryodenervation with quantitative immunohistochemical assessment of success.

    PubMed Central

    Gaer, J A; Gordon, L; Wharton, J; Polak, J M; Taylor, K M; McKenna, W; Parker, D J

    1993-01-01

    A novel method of cardiac denervation by cryoablation has been developed experimentally. The technique uses liquid nitrogen delivered under pressure to ablate the principal sources of cardiac innervation--namely, the adventitia surrounding the aorta, pulmonary arteries, and veins. The technique has been verified experimentally both in vivo by physiological means and in vitro by quantitative immunohistochemistry and the measurement of myocardial noradrenaline concentrations. A 35 year old woman presented with intractable precordial pain, normal epicardial coronary arteries, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Her symptoms were refractory to maximal medical treatment and she was thought to be unsuitable for either conventional myocardial revascularisation, autotransplantation, or allografting with the concomitant risk of transplant coronary artery disease. She therefore underwent cardiac denervation by the method developed in the laboratory. There was quantitative immunohistochemical evidence of extrinsic cardiac denervation associated with a considerable improvement in her symptoms. This improvement persisted during a follow up period of over 16 months. Images PMID:8280529

  12. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  13. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with chronic overuse of an adrenaline inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M J; Fraser, D M; Boon, N

    1992-01-01

    Endogenous catecholamines in excess are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. A patient presented with dilated cardiomyopathy after many years of overusing an adrenaline inhaler. Pathological features and a considerable improvement in myocardial function after withdrawal implicated the exogenous catecholamine excess in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:1389744

  14. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  15. Cardiomyopathy in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2000-09-01

    From 1994 to 1999, 16 captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), from among 42 necropsy cases, were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy in this study population was 38%. Fourteen of 16 hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy were males and all hedgehogs were adult (>1 year old). Nine hedgehogs exhibited 1 or more of the following clinical signs before death: heart murmur, lethargy, icterus, moist rales, anorexia, dyspnea, dehydration, and weight loss. The remaining 7 hedgehogs died without premonitory clinical signs. Gross findings were cardiomegaly (6 cases), hepatomegaly (5 cases), pulmonary edema (5 cases), pulmonary congestion (4 cases), hydrothorax (3 cases), pulmonary infarct (1 case), renal infarcts (1 case), ascites (1 case), and 5 cases showed no changes. Histologic lesions were found mainly within the left ventricular myocardium and consisted primarily of myodegeneration, myonecrosis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and disarray of myofibers. All hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy had myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema, or both. Other common histopathologic findings were acute and chronic passive congestion of the lungs, acute passive congestion of the liver, renal tubular necrosis, vascular thrombosis, splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic lipidosis. This is the first report of cardiomyopathy in African hedgehogs. PMID:11021439

  16. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy; Summary of 41 Years

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Ugur; Aydogdu, Sinan; Abboud, Hanna Emily

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have an increased risk for development of cardiomyopathy, even in the absence of well known risk factors like coronary artery disease and hypertension. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was first recognized approximately four decades ago. To date, several pathophysiological mechanisms thought to be responsible for this new entity have also been recognized. In the presence of hyperglycemia, non-enzymatic glycosylation of several proteins, reactive oxygen species formation, and fibrosis lead to impairment of cardiac contractile functions. Impaired calcium handling, increased fatty acid oxidation, and increased neurohormonal activation also contribute to this process. Demonstration of left ventricular hypertrophy, early diastolic and late systolic dysfunction by sensitive techniques, help us to diagnose diabetic cardiomyopathy. Traditional treatment of heart failure is beneficial in diabetic cardiomyopathy, but specific strategies for prevention or treatment of cardiac dysfunction in diabetic patients has not been clarified yet. In this review we will discuss clinical and experimental studies focused on pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy, and summarize diagnostic and therapeutic approaches developed towards this entity. PMID:26240579

  17. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated hyperinsulinaemia can promote the development of a specific form of cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, this form of cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and the prevalence of this condition is rising in parallel with increases in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of note, female patients seem to be particularly susceptible to the development of this complication of metabolic disease. The diabetic cardiomyopathy observed in insulin-resistant or hyperinsulinaemic states is characterized by impaired myocardial insulin signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, abnormal coronary microcirculation, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and maladaptive immune responses. These pathophysiological changes result in oxidative stress, fibrosis, hypertrophy, cardiac diastolic dysfunction and eventually systolic heart failure. This Review highlights a surge in diabetic cardiomyopathy research, summarizes current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition and explores potential preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26678809

  18. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; DeMarco, Vincent G; Sowers, James R

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated hyperinsulinaemia can promote the development of a specific form of cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, this form of cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and the prevalence of this condition is rising in parallel with increases in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of note, female patients seem to be particularly susceptible to the development of this complication of metabolic disease. The diabetic cardiomyopathy observed in insulin- resistant or hyperinsulinaemic states is characterized by impaired myocardial insulin signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, abnormal coronary microcirculation, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and maladaptive immune responses. These pathophysiological changes result in oxidative stress, fibrosis, hypertrophy, cardiac diastolic dysfunction and eventually systolic heart failure. This Review highlights a surge in diabetic cardiomyopathy research, summarizes current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition and explores potential preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26678809

  19. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  20. Autonomic Findings in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Martinez, Jose; Katz, Stuart D; Tully, Lisa; Reynolds, Harmony R

    2016-01-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often occurs after emotional or physical stress. Norepinephrine levels are unusually high in the acute phase, suggesting a hyperadrenergic mechanism. Comparatively little is known about parasympathetic function in patients with TC. We sought to characterize autonomic function at rest and in response to physical and emotional stimuli in 10 women with a confirmed history of TC and 10 age-matched healthy women. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity was assessed at rest and during baroreflex stimulation (Valsalva maneuver and tilt testing), cognitive stimulation (Stroop test), and emotional stimulation (event recall, patients). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation were also performed. TC women (tested an average of 37 months after the event) had excessive pressor responses to cognitive stress (Stroop test: p <0.001 vs baseline and p = 0.03 vs controls) and emotional arousal (recall of TC event: p = 0.03 vs baseline). Pressor responses to hemodynamic stimuli were also amplified (Valsalva overshoot: p <0.05) and prolonged (duration: p <0.01) in the TC women compared with controls. Plasma catecholamine levels did not differ between TC women and controls. Indexes of parasympathetic (vagal) modulation of heart rate induced by respiration and cardiovagal baroreflex gain were significantly decreased in the TC women versus controls. In conclusion, even long after the initial episode, women with previous episode of TC have excessive sympathetic responsiveness and reduced parasympathetic modulation of heart rate. Impaired baroreflex control may therefore play a role in TC. PMID:26743349

  1. Metabolic Dysfunction in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Isfort, Michael; Stevens, Sarah C.W.; Schaffer, Stephen; Jong, Chian Ju; Wold, Loren E.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined as cardiac disease independent of vascular complications during diabetes. The number of new cases of DCM is rising at epidemic rates in proportion to newly diagnosed cases of diabetes mellitus (DM) throughout the world. DCM is a heart failure syndrome found in diabetic patients that is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced diastolic function, with or without concurrent systolic dysfunction, occurring in the absence of hypertension and coronary artery disease. DCM and other diabetic complications are caused in part by elevations in blood glucose and lipids, characteristic of DM. Although there are pathological consequences to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, the combination of the two metabolic abnormalities potentiates the severity of diabetic complications. A natural competition exists between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the heart that is regulated by allosteric and feedback control and transcriptional modulation of key limiting enzymes. Inhibition of these glycolytic enzymes not only controls flux of substrate through the glycolytic pathway, but also leads to the diversion of glycolytic intermediate substrate through pathological pathways, which mediate the onset of diabetic complications. The present review describes the limiting steps involved in the development of these pathological pathways and the factors involved in the regulation of these limiting steps. Additionally, therapeutic options with demonstrated or postulated effects on DCM are described. PMID:23443849

  2. Electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karaye, Kamilu M; Karaye, Kamilu M; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To identify potential electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Methods: This was a case–control study carried out in three hospitals in Kano, Nigeria. Logistic regression models and a risk score were developed to determine electrocardiographic predictors of PPCM. Results: A total of 54 PPCM and 77 controls were consecutively recruited after satisfying the inclusion criteria. After controlling for confounding variables, a rise in heart rate of one beat/minute increased the risk of PPCM by 6.4% (p = 0.001), while the presence of ST–T-wave changes increased the odds of PPCM 12.06-fold (p < 0.001). In the patients, QRS duration modestly correlated (r = 0.4; p < 0.003) with left ventricular dimensions and end-systolic volume index, and was responsible for 19.9% of the variability of the latter (R2 = 0.199; p = 0.003). A risk score of ≥ 2, developed by scoring 1 for each of the three ECG disturbances (tachycardia, ST–T-wave abnormalities and QRS duration), had a sensitivity of 85.2%, specificity of 64.9%, negative predictive value of 86.2% and area under the curve of 83.8% (p < 0.0001) for potentially predicting PPCM. Conclusion In postpartum women, using the risk score could help to streamline the diagnosis of PPCM with significant accuracy, prior to confirmatory investigations PMID:27213852

  3. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy presenting as unilateral cellulitis with successful treatment using pamidronate disodium.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Sebastian G; Emer, Jason J; Burnett, Mark E; Gordon, Marsha

    2012-09-01

    Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy is a paraneoplastic syndrome seen in patients with lung cancer. This condition is characterized by the presence of digital clubbing, periosteal thickening, synovial thickening, and severe pain of the affected joints. Other syndromes exhibiting clubbing may or may not have underlying diseases causing their manifestation. An example is primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, or pachydermoperiostosis. While clubbing makes up part of the clinical picture in both hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, the latter has no underlying disease associations. Rather, primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is familial, idiopathic, and has a chronic course often beginning during puberty in males. Secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is an acquired form of clubbing that is classically associated with lung disease. However, it has also been associated with diseases of the heart, liver, and intestines. In the setting of pulmonary malignancy, secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is known as hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy. Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy has a distinct constellation of clinical findings that includes intractable pain often refractory to treatments other than resolution of the underlying disease process. The authors herein report a case of hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy masquerading as recurrent lower extremity cellulitis with chronic hand and foot pain in the setting of pulmonary malignancy that responded dramatically to intravenous pamidronate disodium (a bisphosphonate). Given the rarity of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with lung cancer and the difficulty with pain management in such circumstances, the authors present the following case in which pain was mitigated by treatment with bisphosphonate therapy. PMID:23050033

  4. A surprising cause of reversible dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vlot, Mariska; de Jong, Margriet; de Ronde, Pim; Tukkie, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes two cases of dilated cardiomyopathy due to hypocalcaemia as a result of hypoparathyroidism. Patient A suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy due to secondary hypoparathyroidism as a result of previous neck surgery. Patient B suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy with congestive heart failure due to primary hypoparathyroidism. Hypoparathyroidism can exist for years before being recognised, especially after neck surgery. Besides standard treatment of heart failure, restoration of serum calcium levels with calcium and vitamin D supplementation can lead to rapid improvement of cardiac function and should be continued lifelong. Both patients were responding very well to heart failure therapy and calcium supplementation as ejection fraction improved after restoration of plasma calcium levels. This case report emphasises that hypocalcaemia should be in the differential diagnosis of heart failure. PMID:24879729

  5. The Role of CMR in Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has made major inroads in the new millenium in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis for patients with cardiomyopathies. Imaging of left and right ventricular structure and function and tissue characterization with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as well as T1 and T2 mapping enable accurate diagnosis of the underlying etiology. In the setting of coronary artery disease, either transmurality of LGE or contractile reserve in response to dobutamine can assess the likelihood of recovery of function after revascularization. The presence of scar reduces the likelihood of response to medical therapy and to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure. The presence and extent of LGE relate to overall cardiovascular outcome in cardiomyopathies. An emerging major role for CMR in cardiomyopathies is to identify myocardial scar for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. PMID:26033902

  6. Myocardial gallium-67 imaging in dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, John B.; Henkin, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of gallium-67, an isotope that is avid for areas of inflammation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, is described and compared with endomyocardial biopsy in 68 consecutive patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Myocarditis was diagnosed in 8% on biopsy and the likelihood of a positive biopsy when the gallium scan was positive for inflammation, rose to 36%. It is concluded that gallium scanning is a useful adjunct to biopsy in detecting myocarditis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and in following patients with evidence of myocarditis on biopsy. Disadvantages of gallium-67 imaging include the radiation dose accumulated with multiple scans and 72h delay from initial injection of the isotope to imaging. It is suggested that definitive conclusions regarding the technique should await the results of a large multicentre trial evaluating gallium in comparison with endomyocardial biopsy in the diagnosis of myocarditis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  7. Difficulty of diagnosing infected hypertrophic pseudarthrosis by radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjipavlou, A.; Lisbona, R.; Rosenthall, L.

    1983-02-01

    Hypertrophic pseudarthrosis was studied with /sup 99m/Tc MDP and /sup 67/Ga citrate in 11 patients. Two of the 11 pseudarthroses were complicated by infection. A high concentration of both radiopharmaceuticals was obtained at all 11 sites and their distribution patterns were identical. It was therefore impossible to distinguish the infected from the noninfected pseudarthroses by using /sup 67/Ga.

  8. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: can hearts really break?

    PubMed

    Farris, Cindy; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise; Kanayama, Tiffanie

    2014-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM), or broken-heart syndrome, is a form of cardiomyopathy (CM) that is significantly different from other common types. This form of CM occurs spontaneously and can be easily reversed. TCM is seen primarily in postmenopausal women with a recent stressful event. Patients with TCM often present with symptoms suggestive of a myocardial infarction. Home health-care and hospice clinicians interact frequently with caregivers and other family members who are living under stressful circumstances. It is important that home care clinicians be familiar with TCM and understand the relationship that may exist between stress, stressful events, triggers, and TCM. PMID:24978575

  9. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  10. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vitamin A deficiency was detected. This case suggests that celiac disease should be considered in patients with cardiomyopathy and/or pulmonary haemosiderosis regardless of the intestinal symptoms of celiac disease. PMID:23169927

  11. Modeling human protein aggregation cardiomyopathy using murine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Limphong, Pattraranee; Zhang, Huali; Christians, Elisabeth; Liu, Qiang; Riedel, Michael; Ivey, Kathryn; Cheng, Paul; Mitzelfelt, Katie; Taylor, Graydon; Winge, Dennis; Srivastava, Deepak; Benjamin, Ivor

    2013-03-01

    Several mutations in αB-crystallin (CryAB), a heat shock protein with chaperone-like activities, are causally linked to skeletal and cardiac myopathies in humans. To better understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms, we had previously generated transgenic (TG) mice expressing R120GCryAB, which recapitulated distinguishing features of the myopathic disorder (e.g., protein aggregates, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). To determine whether induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes, a new experimental approach for human disease modeling, would be relevant to aggregation-prone disorders, we decided to exploit the existing transgenic mouse model to derive iPSCs from tail tip fibroblasts. Several iPSC lines were generated from TG and non-TG mice and validated for pluripotency. TG iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes contained perinuclear aggregates positive for CryAB staining, whereas CryAB protein accumulated in both detergent-soluble and insoluble fractions. iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes identified by cardiac troponin T staining were significantly larger when expressing R120GCryAB at a high level in comparison with TG low expressor or non-TG cells. Expression of fetal genes such as atrial natriuretic factor, B-type natriuretic peptide, and α-skeletal α-actin, assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, were increased in TG cardiomyocytes compared with non-TG, indicating the activation of the hypertrophic genetic program in vitro. Our study demonstrates for the first time that differentiation of R120G iPSCs into cardiomyocytes causes protein aggregation and cellular hypertrophy, recapitulating in vitro key pathognomonic hallmarks found in both animal models and patients. Our findings pave the way for further studies exploiting this cell model system for mechanistic and therapeutic investigations. PMID:23430692

  12. Arrhythmogenic Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy: Is There an Echocardiographic Phenotypic Overlap of Two Distinct Cardiomyopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Dursun; Cay, Serkan; Ozcan, Firat; Baser, Kazım; Dogan, Umuttan; Unlu, Murat; Demirkan, Burcu; Tufekcioglu, Omac; Topaloglu, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathies is often challenging. It is difficult to differentiate the isolated left ventricular (LV) noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NC) from biventricular NC or from coexisting arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AC). There are currently few established morphologic criteria for the diagnosis other than RV dilation and presence of excessive regional trabeculation. The gross and microscopic changes suggest pathological similarities between, or coexistence of, RV-NC and AC. Therefore, the term arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is somewhat misleading as isolated LV or biventricular involvement may be present and thus a broader term such as AC should be preferred. We describe an unusual case of AC associated with a NC in a 27-year-old man who had a history of permanent pacemaker 7 years ago due to second-degree atrioventricular block. PMID:26448828

  13. Mutation of mitochondrial DNA G13513A presenting with Leigh syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Bing; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Ni-Chung; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Fan, Pi-Chuan; Lee, Wang-Tso

    2008-08-01

    Mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) G13513A, encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I, can cause mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) and Leigh syndrome. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and optic atrophy were reported in a high proportion of patients with this mutation. We report an 18-month-old girl, with an 11-month history of psychomotor regression who was diagnosed with WPW syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, in association with Leigh syndrome. Supplementation with coenzyme Q10, thiamine and carnitine prevented further regression in gross motor function but the patient's heart function deteriorated and dilated cardiomyopathy developed 11 months later. She was found to have a mutation of mtDNA G13513A. We suggest that mtDNA G13513A mutation is an important factor in patients with Leigh syndrome associated with WPW syndrome and/or optic atrophy, and serial heart function monitoring by echocardiography is recommended in this group of patients. PMID:19054921

  14. Hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy in Holstein-Friesian cattle in Japan: association with hereditary myopathy of the diaphragmatic muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuoka, H; Yagi, S; Murakami, A; Honma, A; Kobayashi, Y; Matsui, T; Miyahara, K; Taniyama, H

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the pathology and genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy in 10 Holstein-Friesian cows aged 3-6 years, a disease similar to that reported in Simmental-Red Holstein and Holstein-Friesian cattle in several other countries. The main clinical signs were associated with systemic circulatory failure, and at necropsy the animals showed cardiomegaly, severe congestion and fibrosis of the liver, and systemic cardiac oedema. Histologically, hypertrophy and vacuolation of the cardiac muscle fibres and severe fibrosis were noted. Electron microscopically, the sarcoplasm of the hypertrophic fibres was seen to be filled with fine structures of low electron-density, together with thin filamentous material, suggesting myofibrillar lysis. The mitochondria showed increased size, an abnormal cristae pattern and vacuolation due to partial loss of cristae. Pedigree analysis of the affected cattle indicated an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The family line of this cardiomyopathy overlapped with that of hereditary myopathy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Holstein-Friesian cattle, the pathological aspects and inheritance mode of which were reported previously. The available evidence suggested a genetic association between these two pathologically distinct diseases. PMID:11578132

  15. A Mutation in C2orf64 Causes Impaired Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly and Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Huigsloot, Merei; Nijtmans, Leo G.; Szklarczyk, Radek; Baars, Marieke J.H.; van den Brand, Mariël A.M.; HendriksFranssen, Marthe G.M.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Smeitink, Jan A.M.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Rodenburg, Richard J.T.

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) involves the coordinated action of several assembly chaperones. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at least 30 different assembly chaperones have been identified. To date, pathogenic mutations leading to a mitochondrial disorder have been identified in only seven of the corresponding human genes. One of the genes for which the relevance to human pathology is unknown is C2orf64, an ortholog of the S. cerevisiae gene PET191. This gene has previously been shown to be a complex IV assembly factor in yeast, although its exact role is still unknown. Previous research in a large cohort of complex IV deficient patients did not support an etiological role of C2orf64 in complex IV deficiency. In this report, a homozygous mutation in C2orf64 is described in two siblings affected by fatal neonatal cardiomyopathy. Pathogenicity of the mutation is supported by the results of a complementation experiment, showing that complex IV activity can be fully restored by retroviral transduction of wild-type C2orf64 in patient-derived fibroblasts. Detailed analysis of complex IV assembly intermediates in patient fibroblasts by 2D-BN PAGE revealed the accumulation of a small assembly intermediate containing subunit COX1 but not the COX2, COX4, or COX5b subunits, indicating that C2orf64 is involved in an early step of the complex IV assembly process. The results of this study demonstrate that C2orf64 is essential for human complex IV assembly and that C2orf64 mutational analysis should be considered for complex IV deficient patients, in particular those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21457908

  16. Analysis of hypertrophic and normal scar gene expression with cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tsou, R; Cole, J K; Nathens, A B; Isik, F F; Heimbach, D M; Engrav, L H; Gibran, N S

    2000-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one form of abnormal wound healing. Previous studies have suggested that hypertrophic scar formation results from altered gene expression of extracellular matrix molecules. A broadscale evaluation of gene expression in hypertrophic scars has not been reported. To better understand abnormalities in hypertrophic scar gene expression, we compared messenger RNA expression in hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin with the use of complementary (c)DNA microarrays. Total RNA was extracted from freshly excised human hypertrophic scars, normal scars, or uninjured skin and reverse transcribed into cDNA with the incorporation of [33P] deoxycytidine triphosphate. The resulting radioactive cDNA probes were hybridized onto cDNA microarrays of 4000 genes. Hybridization signals were normalized and analyzed. In the comparison of tissue samples, mean intensities were calculated for each gene within each group (hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin). Ratios of the mean intensities of hypertrophic scars to normal scars, hypertrophic scars to uninjured skin, and normal scars to uninjured skin were generated. A ratio that was greater than 1 indicated upregulation of any particular gene and a ratio that was less than 1 indicated downregulation of any particular gene. Our data indicated that 142 genes were overexpressed and 50 genes were underexpressed in normal scars compared with uninjured skin, 107 genes were overexpressed and 71 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with uninjured skin, and 44 genes were overexpressed and 124 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with normal scars. Our analysis of collagen, growth factor, and metalloproteinase gene expression confirmed that our molecular data were consistent with published biochemical and clinical observations of normal scars and hypertrophic scars. cDNA microarray analysis provides a powerful tool for the investigation of differential gene expression in

  17. Insights into the hereditability of canine cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Meurs, K M

    1998-11-01

    There is evidence for a genetic etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy in at least two breeds, the Doberman pinscher and the Boxer dog. Significant effort toward determining a genetic etiology in these breeds will depend on careful characterization of the disease, determination of criteria for diagnosing asymptomatic affected individuals, determination of a pattern of inheritance, and, eventually, molecular evaluation of the specific gene. PMID:10098247

  18. Biventricular Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Namho; Yoon, Byung Woo; Song, Yonggeon; Lee, Chang Kyun; Lee, Tae Yeon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in an elderly woman after status epilepticus. In an emergency echocardiography, not only left ventricular apical ballooning but also right ventricular apical hypokinesia was observed. After a medical management, the patient's condition was improved and a follow-up echocardiography showed substantial recovery of left and right ventricular apical ballooning. PMID:26755936

  19. Shape analysis of hypertrophic and hypertensive heart disease using MRI-based 3D surface models of left ventricular geometry.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Siamak; Jain, Saurabh; Sanzi, Alianna; Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Abraham, Theodore P; Abraham, M Roselle; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Wu, Katherine C; Winslow, Raimond L; Miller, Michael I; Younes, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this study was to develop advanced mathematical tools to construct high-resolution 3D models of left-ventricular (LV) geometry to evaluate focal geometric differences between patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and hypertensive heart disease (HHD) using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) cross-sectional images. A limiting factor in 3D analysis of cardiac MR cross-sections is the low out-of-plane resolution of the acquired images. To overcome this problem, we have developed a mathematical framework to construct a population-based high-resolution 3D LV triangulated surface (template) in which an iterative matching algorithm maps a surface mesh of a normal heart to a set of cross-sectional contours that were extracted from short-axis cine cardiac MR images of patients who were diagnosed with either HCM or HHD. A statistical analysis was conducted on deformations that were estimated at each surface node to identify shape differences at end-diastole (ED), end-systole (ES), and motion-related shape variation from ED to ES. Some significant shape difference in radial thickness was detected at ES. Differences of LV 3D surface geometry were identified focally on the basal anterior septum wall. Further research is needed to relate these findings to the HCM morphological substrate and to design a classifier to discriminate among different etiologies of LV hypertrophy. PMID:26766206

  20. Silencing of miR-34a Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction in a Setting of Moderate, but Not Severe, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Bianca C.; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Tham, Yow Keat; Kiriazis, Helen; Winbanks, Catherine E.; Ooi, Jenny Y. Y.; Boey, Esther J. H.; Obad, Susanna; Kauppinen, Sakari; Gregorevic, Paul; Du, Xiao-Jun; Lin, Ruby C. Y.; McMullen, Julie R.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic inhibition of the miR-34 family (miR-34a,-b,-c), or miR-34a alone, have emerged as promising strategies for the treatment of cardiac pathology. However, before advancing these approaches further for potential entry into the clinic, a more comprehensive assessment of the therapeutic potential of inhibiting miR-34a is required for two key reasons. First, miR-34a has ∼40% fewer predicted targets than the miR-34 family. Hence, in cardiac stress settings in which inhibition of miR-34a provides adequate protection, this approach is likely to result in less potential off-target effects. Secondly, silencing of miR-34a alone may be insufficient in settings of established cardiac pathology. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of the miR-34 family, but not miR-34a alone, provided benefit in a chronic model of myocardial infarction. Inhibition of miR-34 also attenuated cardiac remodeling and improved heart function following pressure overload, however, silencing of miR-34a alone was not examined. The aim of this study was to assess whether inhibition of miR-34a could attenuate cardiac remodeling in a mouse model with pre-existing pathological hypertrophy. Mice were subjected to pressure overload via constriction of the transverse aorta for four weeks and echocardiography was performed to confirm left ventricular hypertrophy and systolic dysfunction. After four weeks of pressure overload (before treatment), two distinct groups of animals became apparent: (1) mice with moderate pathology (fractional shortening decreased ∼20%) and (2) mice with severe pathology (fractional shortening decreased ∼37%). Mice were administered locked nucleic acid (LNA)-antimiR-34a or LNA-control with an eight week follow-up. Inhibition of miR-34a in mice with moderate cardiac pathology attenuated atrial enlargement and maintained cardiac function, but had no significant effect on fetal gene expression or cardiac fibrosis. Inhibition of miR-34a in mice with severe pathology provided no therapeutic benefit. Thus, therapies that inhibit miR-34a alone may have limited potential in settings of established cardiac pathology. PMID:24587330

  1. Prevalence of Non-Left Anterior Descending Septal Perforator Culprit in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Undergoing Alcohol Septal Ablation.

    PubMed

    Alkhouli, Mohamad; Sajjad, Waseem; Lee, Junsoo; Fernandez, Genaro; Waits, Bryan; Schwarz, Karl Q; Cove, Christopher J

    2016-05-15

    Identifying the coronary branch that supplies the basal septum is the cornerstone for successful alcohol septal ablation (ASA). The basal septum is often supplied by septal perforator artery/arteries (SPA/SPAs) not originating from the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. We aim to investigate the prevalence and significance of non-LAD septal "culprit" in patients undergoing ASA. A retrospective review of patients who underwent ASA from 2006 to 2014 was conducted. Procedural and midterm outcomes of patients who had ASA of LAD and non-LAD culprit SPA were reported. A total 89 patients were included in the analysis; 13 patients (15%) had ASA of non-LAD SPA. These patients were more likely to have a history of failed ASA, more than one SPA treated, more ethanol dose injected, longer procedures, and higher contrast use compared with those who had ASA of LAD-SPA. In-hospital outcomes, residual gradient, symptom improvement, and midterm mortality were similar in the 2 groups. In conclusion, in a cohort of patients undergoing ASA, 15% had ablation of SPA culprit that did not originate from the LAD. Half of these patients had previous unsuccessful ASA. Systematic screening for the ideal culprit SPA with nonselective coronary injection of echo contrast should be used to avoid incomplete or failed ASA. PMID:27006152

  2. Autoimmune Myocarditis, Valvulitis, and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer M.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Fairweather, DeLisa; Huber, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-induced autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a model of inflammatory heart disease initiated by CD4+ T cells (Smith and Allen 1991; Li, Heuser et al. 2004). It is a paradigm of the immune-mediated cardiac damage believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of postinfectious human cardiomyopathies (Rose, Herskowitz et al. 1993). Myocarditis is induced in susceptible mice by immunization with purified cardiac myosin (Neu, Rose et al. 1987) or specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Donermeyer, Beisel et al. 1995; Pummerer, Luze et al. 1996) (see Basic Protocol 1), or by adoptive transfer of myosin-reactive T cells (Smith and Allen 1991) (see Alternate Protocol). Myocarditis has been induced in Lewis rats by immunization with purified rat or porcine cardiac myosin (Kodama, Matsumoto et al. 1990; Li, Heuser et al. 2004) (see Basic Protocol 2) or S2-16 peptide (Li, Heuser et al. 2004), or by adoptive transfer of T cells stimulated by specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Wegmann, Zhao et al. 1994). Myocarditis begins 12 to 14 days after the first immunization, and is maximal after 21 days. Other animal models commonly used to study myocarditis development include the pathogen-induced models in which disease is initiated by viral infection. The first murine model of acute viral myocarditis causes sudden death via viral damage to cardiomyocytes (Huber, Gauntt et al. 1998; Horwitz, La Cava et al. 2000; Fong 2003; Fuse, Chan et al. 2005; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) whereas the second model is based on inoculation with heart-passaged coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) that includes damaged heart proteins (Fairweather, Frisancho-Kiss et al. 2004; Fairweather D 2004; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) In addition to the protocols used to induce EAM in mice and rats, support protocols are included for preparing purified cardiac myosin using mouse or rat heart tissue (see Support Protocol 1), preparing purified

  3. Effects of Noscarna™ on hypertrophic scarring in the rabbit ear model: histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Won; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Hiep, Tran Tuan; Han, Sang Duk; Kim, Bo Gyun; Kang, Min Kyung; Do, Eui Seon; Jun, Joon Ho; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Sohn, Young Taek; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of silicone-based gel on the healing of hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model. After 4-week application of silicone-based gel containing allantoin, dexpanthenol and heparin (Noscarna™) to scars in a rabbit ear model of hypertrophic scarring, significant improvements in hypertrophic scar healing and a great loss of skin pigment were observed compared to the non-treated control, base or silicone control-treated scars. Furthermore, histological analysis of Noscarna™-treated scars revealed a significant reduction in scar elevation index (SEI), anterior skin and epithelial thicknesses, inflammatory cells, vessels, collagen disorganization and fibroblasts compared to all control hypertrophic scars. Furthermore, Noscarna™ showed more favorable effects on hypertrophic scars than a commercial product, Contractubex®. Therefore, these results clearly demonstrated that the newly developed silicone-based gel, Noscarna™, could be a promising formulation as an effective therapeutic agent for hypertrophic scars. PMID:23212642

  4. Hypertrophic osteopathy associated with a renal adenoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Lenz, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic osteopathy is a hyperostotic syndrome of the appendicular skeleton that is most commonly associated with intrathoracic neoplasia or inflammation. The condition is rarely associated with intra-abdominal lesions. The majority of cases have occurred in dogs and human beings, with fewer cases reported in cats, horses, and other species. A 15-year-old male neutered Domestic Shorthair cat presented for swollen limbs and difficulty in ambulation. Radiographs and gross postmortem revealed severe periosteal hyperostosis of the diaphysis and metaphysis of all 4 limbs, including the humerus, radius, ulna, carpi, metacarpi, femur, tibia, tarsi, metatarsi, and phalanges. The axial skeleton was spared. Hyperostotic lesions were characterized microscopically by lamellar bony trabeculae separated by adipocytes and scant hematopoietic tissue. In several areas, fibrovascular connective tissue, woven bone, and islands of cartilage were also present. A 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm perirenal neoplasm compressed the left kidney and adrenal gland. This mass consisted of well-differentiated tubules of cuboidal epithelial cells and was most consistent with a renal tubular adenoma, because mitotic figures were rare, and no distant metastases were found. Thoracic pathology was absent. Hyperostosis was consistent with hypertrophic osteopathy secondary to the renal adenoma. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic osteopathy is uncertain, but predominant theories point to increased peripheral circulation and angiogenesis as a key initiating event. Recent literature highlights the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor in the human condition. The mechanism by which this renal adenoma caused hypertrophic osteopathy is unknown. PMID:21217054

  5. Hypertrophic neuropathy in Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Sole, Guilhem; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Taieb, Alain

    2016-06-01

    RASopathies comprise several genetic syndromes with mainly cardio-facial-cutaneous manifestations. We report a patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) due to a PTPN11 (p.Thr468Met) mutation associated with hypertrophic neuropathy of lumbar plexus in an adult woman, initially referred for neuropathic pain. Differential diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and other RASopathies is difficult without molecular testing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26952712

  6. Monomelic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy secondary to aortic prosthesis infection.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M V; Antonio del Olmo, J; Orellana, C; Mestres, C A; Mũnoz-Gómez, J

    1995-01-01

    We describe a case of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA), exclusively located in the left lower leg and secondary to vascular prosthesis infection. Four years before, the patient underwent aortofemoral bifurcation grafting because of a ruptured aortic aneurysm. The investigations revealed prosthesis infection by Pseudomona aeruginosa and Bacteroides thetaiotamicron. The onset of HOA in a patient with a vascular prosthesis can help to achieve an early diagnosis of graft infection. The literature on this uncommon association is reviewed. PMID:7699670

  7. Nd:YAG Laser Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Akaishi, Satoshi; Koike, Sachiko; Dohi, Teruyuki; Kobe, Kyoko; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cutaneous scars such as keloids and hypertrophic scars (HSs) are characterized by a diffuse redness that is caused by the overgrowth of capillary vessels due to chronic inflammation. Our group has been using long-pulsed, 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser in noncontact mode with low fluence and a submillisecond pulse duration to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars since 2006 with satisfactory results. The present study examined the efficacy of this approach in 22 Japanese patients with keloids (n = 16) or hypertrophic scars (n = 6) who were treated every 3 to 4 weeks. Treatment settings were as follows: 5 mm spot size diameter; 14 J/cm2 energy density; 300 μs exposure time per pulse; and 10 Hz repetition rate. The responses of the pathological scars to the treatment were assessed by measuring their erythema, hypertrophy, hardness, itching, and pain or tenderness. Moreover, skin samples from 3 volunteer patients were subjected to histological evaluation and 5 patients underwent thermography during therapy. The average total scar assessment score dropped from 9.86 to 6.34. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Elastica Masson-Goldner staining showed that laser treatment structurally changed the tissue collagen. This influence reached a depth of 0.5 to 1 mm. Electron microscopy revealed plasma protein leakage, proteoglycan particles, and a change in the collagen fiber fascicles. Further analyses revealed that noncontact mode Nd:YAG laser treatment is highly effective for keloids and hypertrophic scars regardless of patient age, the origin and multiplicity of scarring, the location of the scar(s), or the tension on the scar. PMID:22259645

  8. [The sonographic diagnosis of hypertrophic stenosis of the pylorus].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R I; Briceño de Rodríguez, J A; Urrutia, M

    1993-09-01

    The clinical records of 18 children were studied, between 15 and 60 days old. They were hospitalized due to vomiting and diagnosis of suspected pyloric hypertrophic stenosis (PHS). The sonography confirmed the diagnosis in 8 children, by the thickening of the muscular layer and enlargement of the pyloric canal. The surgery (pyloromyotomy) ratified the diagnosis in all 8 children. They all were in good health after being operated. PMID:8146343

  9. [The sonographic diagnosis of hypertrophic stenosis of the pylorus].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, R I; Briceño de Rodríguez, J A; Urrutia, M

    1993-05-01

    The clinical records of 18 children were studied, between 15 and 60 days old. They were hospitalized due to vomiting and diagnosis of suspected pyloric hypertrophic stenosis (PHS). The sonography confirmed the diagnosis in 8 children, by the thickening of the muscular layer and enlargement of the pyloric canal. The surgery (pyloromyotomy) ratified the diagnosis in all 8 children. They all were in good health after being operated. PMID:8327749

  10. Clinical Genetic Testing for the Cardiomyopathies and Arrhythmias: A Systematic Framework for Establishing Clinical Validity and Addressing Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John; Tahiliani, Jackie; Johnson, Nicole Marie; Aguilar, Sienna; Beltran, Daniel; Daly, Amy; Decker, Emily; Haverfield, Eden; Herrera, Blanca; Murillo, Laura; Nykamp, Keith; Topper, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made large, diagnostic gene panels affordable and efficient. Broad adoption of such panels has begun to deliver on the promises of personalized medicine, but has also brought new challenges such as the presence of unexpected results, or results of uncertain clinical significance. Genetic analysis of inherited cardiac conditions is particularly challenging due to the extensive genetic heterogeneity underlying cardiac phenotypes, and the overlapping, variable, and incompletely penetrant nature of their clinical presentations. The design of effective diagnostic tests and the effective use of the results depend on a clear understanding of the relationship between each gene and each considered condition. To address these issues, we developed simple, systematic approaches to three fundamental challenges: (1) evaluating the strength of the evidence suggesting that a particular condition is caused by pathogenic variants in a particular gene, (2) evaluating whether unusual genotype/phenotype observations represent a plausible expansion of clinical phenotype associated with a gene, and (3) establishing a molecular diagnostic strategy to capture overlapping clinical presentations. These approaches focus on the systematic evaluation of the pathogenicity of variants identified in clinically affected individuals, and the natural history of disease in those individuals. Here, we applied these approaches to the evaluation of more than 100 genes reported to be associated with inherited cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and to a set of related syndromes such as Noonan Syndrome and Fabry disease. These approaches provide a framework for delivering meaningful and accurate genetic test results to individuals with hereditary