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Sample records for mycoplasma hominis strains

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma hominis Strain Sprott (ATCC 33131), Isolated from a Patient with Nongonococcal Urethritis.

    PubMed

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Presented here is the complete and annotated genome sequence of Mycoplasma hominis Sprott (ATCC 33131). The chromosome comprises 695,214 bp, which is approximately 30 kb larger than the syntenic genome of M. hominis PG21(T). Tetracycline resistance of strain Sprott is most probably conferred by the tetM determinant, harbored on a mosaic transposon-like structure. PMID:26159538

  2. Detection and prevention of mycoplasma hominis infection

    DOEpatents

    DelVecchio, Vito G. (Scranton, PA); Gallia, Gary L. (Philadelphia, PA); McCleskey, Ferne K. (San Antonio, TX)

    1997-01-21

    The present invention is directed to a rapid and sensitive method for detecting Mycoplasma hominis using M. hominis-specific probes, oligonucleotides or antibodies. In particular a target sequence can be amplified by in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, detected by nucleic acid hybridization using the subject probes and oligonucleotides or detected by immunoassay using M. hominis-specific antibodies. M. hominis-specific nucleic acids which do not recognize or hybridize to genomic nucleic acid of other Mycoplasma species are also provided.

  3. [Localization of the division protein FtsZ in mycoplasma cells Mycoplasma hominis].

    PubMed

    Vishniakov, I E; Borkhsenius, S N; Basovski?, Iu I; Levitski?, S A; Lazarev, V N; Snigirevskaia, E S; Komissarchik, Ia Iu

    2009-01-01

    Localization of the protein FtsZ in Mycoplasma hominis cells was determined. Ultra thin sections were treated by rabbit polyclonal antibodies against FtsZ M. hominis: a conjugate of protein A with colloidal gold particles was used instead of secondary antibodies. Considerable polymorphism of cells was seen on electron microscopy pictures of M. hominis cells, which is typical for mycoplasmas. Among a wide variety of cell shapes we distinguished dumbbell-shaped dividing cells, and the cells connected with each other with the aid of thin membrane tubules (former constrictions). Dominants distribution of the label in the constriction area of dividing M. hominis cells and in the area of the thin membrane tubules was observed. We revealed the cross septum in the mycoplasma cells for the first time, as well as the gold labeling of this structure. Furthermore, in some rounded and oval cells colloidal gold particles labeled the whole plasma membrane in ring-shaped manner. Probably, the label in these cases marks a submembrane contractile ring (Z-ring). The facts mentioned above confirm that FtsZ of M. hominis plays an active role in the mycoplasma cytokinesis. In a series of cases spiral-like distribution of gold particles was observed. Probably, FtsZ protofilaments in M. hominis cells can form spiral structures similar to Z-spirals of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. Its presence in mycoplasma cells may be considered as an important argument in favour of model of Z-ring assembling through reorganization of Z-spirals. FtsZ also may participate in maintenance of mycoplasma cell shape (membrane localization). PMID:19435279

  4. Host Cell Responses to Persistent Mycoplasmas - Different Stages in Infection of HeLa Cells with Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Hopfe, Miriam; Deenen, René; Degrandi, Daniel; Köhrer, Karl; Henrich, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a facultative human pathogen primarily associated with bacterial vaginosis and pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is also able to spread to other sites, leading to arthritis or, in neonates, meningitis. With a minimal set of 537 annotated genes, M. hominis is the second smallest self-replicating mycoplasma and thus an ideal model organism for studying the effects of an infectious agent on its host more closely. M. hominis adherence, colonisation and invasion of HeLa cells were characterised in a time-course study using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and microarray-based analysis of the HeLa cell transcriptome. At 4 h post infection, cytoadherence of M. hominis to the HeLa cell surface was accompanied by differential regulation of 723 host genes (>2 fold change in expression). Genes associated with immune responses and signal transduction pathways were mainly affected and components involved in cell-cycle regulation, growth and death were highly upregulated. At 48 h post infection, when mycoplasma invasion started, 1588 host genes were differentially expressed and expression of genes for lysosome-specific proteins associated with bacterial lysis was detected. In a chronically infected HeLa cell line (2 weeks), the proportion of intracellular mycoplasmas reached a maximum of 10% and M. hominis-filled protrusions of the host cell membrane were seen by confocal microscopy, suggesting exocytotic dissemination. Of the 1972 regulated host genes, components of the ECM-receptor interaction pathway and phagosome-related integrins were markedly increased. The immune response was quite different to that at the beginning of infection, with a prominent induction of IL1B gene expression, affecting pathways of MAPK signalling, and genes connected with cytokine-cytokine interactions and apoptosis. These data show for the first time the complex, time-dependent reaction of the host directed at mycoplasmal clearance and the counter measures of this pestering pathogen. PMID:23326599

  5. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC)-Instill(®) with continuous irrigation for the treatment of Mycoplasma hominis mediastinitis.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Saziye; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2015-10-01

    A 56-year-old patient who underwent ascending aorta replacement postoperatively developed mediastinitis with atypical Mycoplasma hominis. We present the first successful treatment of M. hominis mediastinitis after cardiac surgery with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC)-Instill(®) therapy combined with dilute antiseptic irrigation for bacterial eradication. PMID:24684727

  6. Host and pathogen interaction during vaginal infection by Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma hominis or Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, C; Sluiters, H J; van der Meijden, W I; van Beek, P; Peerbooms, P; Verbrugh, H; van Belkum, A

    2001-05-01

    Vaginal infections by Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma hominis have been shown to be associated. Since M. hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are similar pathogens, both belonging to the class of the mycoplasmata, we describe here a molecular study into the interdependence of U. urealyticum and T. vaginalis during infection. Susceptibility towards infection by U. urealyticum depends on genetic polymorphism in the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) gene. Now, we defined the relation between IL-1RA genotypes and infection by M. hominis and T. vaginalis. Finally, we also developed a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) tool for mapping variation in the T. vaginalis AP33 adhesin in order to define putative associations between parasite subtype and mycoplasmata or host. Studies using crudepellets from T. vaginalis culture broth clearly confirm the association between T. vaginalis and M. hominis infection. The association between IL-1RA genotype 2,2 and lack of U. urealyticum infection is corroborated as well. U. urealyticum infection and infection by T. vaginalis are independent. Furthermore, T. vaginalis and M. hominis infection are not depending on IL-1RA genotypes. Interestingly, one of the three AP33 RFLP types identified appeared to be associated with the absence of U. urealyticum infection. In conclusion, the complex interaction between bacterial and parasitic pathogens and the infected host is determined by genetic characteristics of host and microorganisms involved. PMID:11295198

  7. Frequency and antimicrobial sensitivity of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in patients with vaginal discharge.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Leonor; Cabrera, Luis E; Fernández, Tania; Ibáñez, Inailay; Torres, Yulian; Obregón, Yakelí; Rivero, Yanelys

    2013-10-01

    Determination of antimicrobial sensitivity helps establish adequate treatment and avoids future genital tract diseases in women of fertile age. In Cuba, prevalence of mycoplasma in patients with vaginal discharge is unknown. The objective of this research was to determine frequency and antimicrobial sensitivity of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in women with vaginal discharge through analysis of laboratory data from vaginal smears from 255 patients referred to the Municipal Hygiene and Epidemiology Center in Güines, Mayabeque Province, Cuba. Mycoplasma System Plus (Italy) was used for detection, identification, count and sensitivity testing. The finding of mycoplasmas in almost two thirds of specimens examined suggests that the sexually active female population should be screened for these bacteria and that barrier contraception methods should be promoted to decrease their spread and prevent longterm sequelae. Such updating of local patterns of antimicrobial resistance supports decision making for best treatment options in patients with these infections. Our results should help clinicians in our area choose an antibiotic, and also confirm the utility of Mycoplasma System Plus for mycoplasma research in resource-scarce settings, to benefit individual and population health. PMID:24253351

  8. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, S A; Christiansen, G

    1994-01-01

    The homolog of the gyrB gene, which has been reported to be present in the vicinity of the initiation site of replication in bacteria, was mapped on the Mycoplasma hominis genome, and the region was subsequently sequenced. Five open reading frames were identified flanking the gyrB gene, one of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene. PMID:7521872

  9. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. associated endocarditis with myocardial necrosis in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) in Manitoba in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Krzysztof M.; Copeland, Shelagh; Postey, Rosemary; Ngeleka, Musangu

    2015-01-01

    Severe endocarditis with myonecrosis, moderate to severe pleural and pericardial effusions, and mild ascites were found on necropsy in 3 alpacas. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. was detected on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fresh affected endocardial tissue in 1 alpaca. PMID:25694661

  10. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. associated endocarditis with myocardial necrosis in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) in Manitoba in 2011.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Krzysztof M; Copeland, Shelagh; Postey, Rosemary; Ngeleka, Musangu

    2015-02-01

    Severe endocarditis with myonecrosis, moderate to severe pleural and pericardial effusions, and mild ascites were found on necropsy in 3 alpacas. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. was detected on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fresh affected endocardial tissue in 1 alpaca. PMID:25694661

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Hemotropic Mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis Strain Ohio2 and Mycoplasma suis Strain Illinois ?

    PubMed Central

    Messick, Joanne B.; Santos, Andrea P.; Guimaraes, Ana Marcia S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the complete and fully assembled genomes of Mycoplasma haemofelis strain Ohio2 and Mycoplasma suis strain Illinois, which are the first available genomes of these uncultivatable hemoplasma species. The single circular chromosomes of 1,152,484 bp and 742,431 bp for M. haemofelis and M. suis, respectively, are typical of mycoplasma species, having reduced size and low G+C content (38.8% for M. haemofelis and 31.1% for M. suis). Their metabolic pathways are reduced, with evidence of adaption to the blood environment. PMID:21317328

  12. Complete genome sequences of two hemotropic mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis strain Ohio2 and Mycoplasma suis Strain Illinois.

    PubMed

    Messick, Joanne B; Santos, Andrea P; Guimaraes, Ana Marcia S

    2011-04-01

    We report the complete and fully assembled genomes of Mycoplasma haemofelis strain Ohio2 and Mycoplasma suis strain Illinois, which are the first available genomes of these uncultivatable hemoplasma species. The single circular chromosomes of 1,152,484 bp and 742,431 bp for M. haemofelis and M. suis, respectively, are typical of mycoplasma species, having reduced size and low G+C content (38.8% for M. haemofelis and 31.1% for M. suis). Their metabolic pathways are reduced, with evidence of adaption to the blood environment. PMID:21317328

  13. Biochemical diversity of Mycoplasma fermentans strains.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, S A; Miles, R

    1999-07-01

    In this study, the metabolism of a diverse range of Mycoplasma fermentans strains was investigated. It was shown that the ability to utilise glucose, fructose and N-acetylglucosamine differentiated strains, and that the patterns and kinetics of substrate utilisation were correlated with the site of isolation, i.e. joint fluid, respiratory tract, urinary tract or cell culture. Interestingly, isolates from the urogenital tract of AIDS patients used fructose in preference to glucose. There was also some correlation of fructose and N-acetylglucosamine utilisation of isolates with M. fermentans sub-groups, identified in an independent study, and based on the distribution of insertion sequence-like elements in the M. fermentans genome. PMID:10418144

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma synoviae Strain WVU 1853T

    PubMed Central

    Kutish, Gerald F.; Barbet, Anthony F.; Michaels, Dina L.

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid sequence assembly of the complete Mycoplasma synoviae type strain WVU 1853T genome was compared to that of strain MS53. The findings support prior conclusions about M. synoviae, based on the genome of that otherwise uncharacterized field strain, and provide the first evidence of epigenetic modifications in M. synoviae. PMID:26021934

  15. Proteomic analysis of Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The persistence and displacement abilities of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F (F-strain) are well documented. Understanding the mechanism(s) of colonization and persistence of F-strain will aid in the current intervention strategies to diagnose and control MG infections in poultry. In ...

  16. Swine and Poultry Pathogens: the Complete Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a Strain of Mycoplasma synoviae†

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R.; Ferreira, Henrique B.; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Carvalho, Marcos O.; Pinto, Paulo M.; Almeida, Darcy F.; Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Almeida, Rosana; Alves-Filho, Leonardo; Assunção, Enedina N.; Azevedo, Vasco A. C.; Bogo, Maurício R.; Brigido, Marcelo M.; Brocchi, Marcelo; Burity, Helio A.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Camargo, Sandro S.; Carepo, Marta S.; Carraro, Dirce M.; de Mattos Cascardo, Júlio C.; Castro, Luiza A.; Cavalcanti, Gisele; Chemale, Gustavo; Collevatti, Rosane G.; Cunha, Cristina W.; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; Dambrós, Bibiana P.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Falcão, Clarissa; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Felipe, Maria S. S.; Fiorentin, Laurimar; Franco, Gloria R.; Freitas, Nara S. A.; Frías, Diego; Grangeiro, Thalles B.; Grisard, Edmundo C.; Guimarães, Claudia T.; Hungria, Mariangela; Jardim, Sílvia N.; Krieger, Marco A.; Laurino, Jomar P.; Lima, Lucymara F. A.; Lopes, Maryellen I.; Loreto, Élgion L. S.; Madeira, Humberto M. F.; Manfio, Gilson P.; Maranhão, Andrea Q.; Martinkovics, Christyanne T.; Medeiros, Sílvia R. B.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Neiva, Márcia; Ramalho-Neto, Cicero E.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Paixão, Roger F. C.; Pedrosa, Fábio O.; Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Pereira, Maristela; Pereira-Ferrari, Lilian; Piffer, Itamar; Pinto, Luciano S.; Potrich, Deise P.; Salim, Anna C. M.; Santos, Fabrício R.; Schmitt, Renata; Schneider, Maria P. C.; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene S.; Schuck, Adriana F.; Seuanez, Hector N.; Silva, Denise W.; Silva, Rosane; Silva, Sérgio C.; Soares, Célia M. A.; Souza, Kelly R. L.; Souza, Rangel C.; Staats, Charley C.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.; Urmenyi, Turan P.; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Zuccherato, Luciana W.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2005-01-01

    This work reports the results of analyses of three complete mycoplasma genomes, a pathogenic (7448) and a nonpathogenic (J) strain of the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a strain of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae; the genome sizes of the three strains were 920,079 bp, 897,405 bp, and 799,476 bp, respectively. These genomes were compared with other sequenced mycoplasma genomes reported in the literature to examine several aspects of mycoplasma evolution. Strain-specific regions, including integrative and conjugal elements, and genome rearrangements and alterations in adhesin sequences were observed in the M. hyopneumoniae strains, and all of these were potentially related to pathogenicity. Genomic comparisons revealed that reduction in genome size implied loss of redundant metabolic pathways, with maintenance of alternative routes in different species. Horizontal gene transfer was consistently observed between M. synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Our analyses indicated a likely transfer event of hemagglutinin-coding DNA sequences from M. gallisepticum to M. synoviae. PMID:16077101

  17. Swine and poultry pathogens: the complete genome sequences of two strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a strain of Mycoplasma synoviae.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Ferreira, Henrique B; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Bonatto, Sandro L; Carvalho, Marcos O; Pinto, Paulo M; Almeida, Darcy F; Almeida, Luiz G P; Almeida, Rosana; Alves-Filho, Leonardo; Assunção, Enedina N; Azevedo, Vasco A C; Bogo, Maurício R; Brigido, Marcelo M; Brocchi, Marcelo; Burity, Helio A; Camargo, Anamaria A; Camargo, Sandro S; Carepo, Marta S; Carraro, Dirce M; de Mattos Cascardo, Júlio C; Castro, Luiza A; Cavalcanti, Gisele; Chemale, Gustavo; Collevatti, Rosane G; Cunha, Cristina W; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; Dambrós, Bibiana P; Dellagostin, Odir A; Falcão, Clarissa; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Felipe, Maria S S; Fiorentin, Laurimar; Franco, Gloria R; Freitas, Nara S A; Frías, Diego; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Grisard, Edmundo C; Guimarães, Claudia T; Hungria, Mariangela; Jardim, Sílvia N; Krieger, Marco A; Laurino, Jomar P; Lima, Lucymara F A; Lopes, Maryellen I; Loreto, Elgion L S; Madeira, Humberto M F; Manfio, Gilson P; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Martinkovics, Christyanne T; Medeiros, Sílvia R B; Moreira, Miguel A M; Neiva, Márcia; Ramalho-Neto, Cicero E; Nicolás, Marisa F; Oliveira, Sergio C; Paixão, Roger F C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Pena, Sérgio D J; Pereira, Maristela; Pereira-Ferrari, Lilian; Piffer, Itamar; Pinto, Luciano S; Potrich, Deise P; Salim, Anna C M; Santos, Fabrício R; Schmitt, Renata; Schneider, Maria P C; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene S; Schuck, Adriana F; Seuanez, Hector N; Silva, Denise W; Silva, Rosane; Silva, Sérgio C; Soares, Célia M A; Souza, Kelly R L; Souza, Rangel C; Staats, Charley C; Steffens, Maria B R; Teixeira, Santuza M R; Urmenyi, Turan P; Vainstein, Marilene H; Zuccherato, Luciana W; Simpson, Andrew J G; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2005-08-01

    This work reports the results of analyses of three complete mycoplasma genomes, a pathogenic (7448) and a nonpathogenic (J) strain of the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a strain of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae; the genome sizes of the three strains were 920,079 bp, 897,405 bp, and 799,476 bp, respectively. These genomes were compared with other sequenced mycoplasma genomes reported in the literature to examine several aspects of mycoplasma evolution. Strain-specific regions, including integrative and conjugal elements, and genome rearrangements and alterations in adhesin sequences were observed in the M. hyopneumoniae strains, and all of these were potentially related to pathogenicity. Genomic comparisons revealed that reduction in genome size implied loss of redundant metabolic pathways, with maintenance of alternative routes in different species. Horizontal gene transfer was consistently observed between M. synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Our analyses indicated a likely transfer event of hemagglutinin-coding DNA sequences from M. gallisepticum to M. synoviae. PMID:16077101

  18. SDS-PAGE and immunological analysis of different axenic Blastocystis hominis strains.

    PubMed

    Kukoschke, K G; Müller, H E

    1991-07-01

    Consistent major differences were detected by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and Ouchterlony immunodiffusion in four axenic and microscopically indistinguishable strains of the anaerobic human parasite Blastocystis hominis from different sources. It is concluded that at least two variants with different polypeptide patterns and antigens exist and the biological significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:1906543

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus hominis Strain CRBIP 24.179T, Isolated from Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Sylvie; Creno, Sophie; Ma, Laurence; Clermont, Dominique; Loux, Valentin; Bizet, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the strain Lactobacillus hominis CRBIP 24.179T, isolated from a human clinical sample. The total length of the 28 contigs is about 1.9 Mb, with a G+C content of 37% and 1,983 coding sequences. PMID:23969062

  20. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline. PMID:8452363

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma haemocanis Strain Illinois

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Ana M. S.; Santos, Andrea P.; SanMiguel, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemocanis is a blood pathogen that may cause acute disease in immunosuppressed or splenectomized dogs. The genome of the strain Illinois is a single circular chromosome with 919,992 bp and a GC content of 35%. Analyses of the M. haemocanis genome will provide insights into its biology and in vitro cultivation requirements. PMID:22374945

  2. Highly specific and efficient primers for in-house multiplex PCR detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although sophisticated methodologies are available, the use of endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect 16S rDNA genes remains a good approach for estimating the incidence and prevalence of specific infections and for monitoring infections. Considering the importance of the early diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), the development of a sensitive and affordable method for identifying pathogens in clinical samples is needed. Highly specific and efficient primers for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) system were designed in silico to detect the 16S rDNA genes of four bacteria that cause genital infections, and the PCR method was developed. Methods The Genosensor Probe Designer (GPD) (version 1.0a) software was initially used to design highly specific and efficient primers for in-house m-PCR. Single-locus PCR reactions were performed and standardised, and then primers for each locus in turn were added individually in subsequent amplifications until m-PCR was achieved. Amplicons of the expected size were obtained from each of the four bacterial gene fragments. Finally, the analytical specificity and limits of detection were tested. Results Because they did not amplify any product from non-STI tested species, the primers were specific. The detection limits for the Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum primer sets were 5.12?×?105, 3.9?×?103, 61.19?×?106 and 6.37?×?105 copies of a DNA template, respectively. Conclusions The methodology designed and standardised here could be applied satisfactorily for the simultaneous or individual detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. This method is at least as efficient as other previously described methods; however, this method is more affordable for low-income countries. PMID:24997675

  3. MLVA typing of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and field strains

    PubMed Central

    Tamiozzo, P.; Zamora, R.; Lucchesi, P. M. A.; Estanguet, A.; Parada, J.; Carranza, A.; Camacho, P.; Ambrogi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the lack of information about both the genetic characteristics of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae commercial vaccines and their relationship with field strains, the authors attempted to identify genetic subtypes of some M hyopneumoniae bacterins, and to compare them with M. hyopneumoniae field strains. Six commercial M hyopneumoniae bacterins and 28 bronchoalveolar lavages from pigs at slaughter from three herds were analysed by Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) on p146R1, p146R3, H4, H5 and p95 loci. The results obtained showed the presence of more than one M hyopneumoniae genotype in some pigs and also in one of the bacterins analysed. It is also worth noting that MLVA typing allowed the distinction among circulating field strains and also when comparing them with vaccine strains, which, knowing the relatedness among them, could be useful in the research of the efficacy of the vaccines. PMID:26495127

  4. Electrophoretic Analysis of Cell Proteins of T-Strain Mycoplasmas Isolated from Man

    PubMed Central

    Razin, S.; Valdesuso, J.; Purcell, R. H.; Chanock, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Electrophoretic patterns of the cell proteins of 12 T-strain mycoplasmas isolated from man showed a remarkable similarity. This finding suggests that these strains are genetically closely related and supports their classification in a single species. PMID:5482398

  5. Electrophoretic analysis of cell proteins of T-strain mycoplasmas isolated from man.

    PubMed

    Razin, S; Valdesuso, J; Purcell, R H; Chanock, R M

    1970-09-01

    Electrophoretic patterns of the cell proteins of 12 T-strain mycoplasmas isolated from man showed a remarkable similarity. This finding suggests that these strains are genetically closely related and supports their classification in a single species. PMID:5482398

  6. Comparative genomic analysis of seven Mycoplasma hyosynoviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Bumgardner, Eric A; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Bumgarner, Roger E; Lawrence, Paulraj K

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Mycoplasma hyosynoviae can result in debilitating arthritis in pigs, particularly those aged 10 weeks or older. Strategies for controlling this pathogen are becoming increasingly important due to the rise in the number of cases of arthritis that have been attributed to infection in recent years. In order to begin to develop interventions to prevent arthritis caused by M. hyosynoviae, more information regarding the specific proteins and potential virulence factors that its genome encodes was needed. However, the genome of this emerging swine pathogen had not been sequenced previously. In this report, we present a comparative analysis of the genomes of seven strains of M. hyosynoviae isolated from different locations in North America during the years 2010 to 2013. We identified several putative virulence factors that may contribute to the ability of this pathogen to adhere to host cells. Additionally, we discovered several prophage genes present within the genomes of three strains that show significant similarity to MAV1, a phage isolated from the related species, M. arthritidis. We also identified CRISPR-Cas and type III restriction and modification systems present in two strains that may contribute to their ability to defend against phage infection. PMID:25693846

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma wenyonii Strain Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Ana M. S.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; SanMiguel, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma wenyonii is a hemotrophic mycoplasma that causes acute and chronic infections in cattle. Here, we announce the first complete genome sequence of this organism. The genome is a single circular chromosome with 650,228 bp and G+C% of 33.9. Analyses of M. wenyonii genome will provide insights into its biology. PMID:22965086

  8. Experimental infection of chickens with an atypical Mycoplasma gallisepticum strain: comparison of diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Kempf, I; Gesbert, F; Guittet, M

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen chickens were inoculated with the atypical Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) K703 strain. On different dates post inoculation, tracheal swab samples were collected for mycoplasma culture and blood samples were analysed by slide agglutination test (SA) with commercial or homologous antigen and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with three different kits. Results showed that MG isolation rate was low on several sampling dates. The SA with commercial antigen did not yield positive results, although birds were positive when tested with homologous antigen. With commercial ELISA kits, the numbers of positive samples remained low. These results illustrate the difficulty of diagnosis of infections with such MG variant strains. PMID:9491445

  9. Differential and strain-specific triggering of bovine alveolar macrophage effector functions by mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Jungi, T W; Krampe, M; Sileghem, M; Griot, C; Nicolet, J

    1996-12-01

    Mycoplasma strains being considered as pathogenic or non-pathogenic for cattle were tested on their capacity to activate bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro. Of particular interest was the behaviour of Mycoplasma mycoides ssp. mycoides small colony type (M.m.m. SC), the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). Increases in procoagulant activity (PCA), tumor necrosis factor-alpha- (TNF-alpha) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) generation were tested. To minimize an influence of macrophage activation by mycoplasma growth media, mycoplasmas were cultured on embryonic calf nose epithelial cells. The three macrophage functions tested were not correlated, but were differentially induced in strain-specific manner. Four out of seven strains induced PCA, regardless of pathogenicity, and all strains promoted moderate NO generation at high concentrations. All tested M.m.m. SC strains (Afadé, L2 and PG1), and the pathogenic M. bovis, induced TNF-alpha production at low concentrations (10(6) colony forming units per ml). M.sp. serogroup 7 and the non-pathogenic M. bovirhinis and Acholeplasma laidlawii did not induce TNF-alpha up to 10(8) cfu/ml. Thus, strain-specific differences are reflected in differential macrophage activation patterns. The findings are consistent with an important role for TNF-alpha in pathogenesis of CBPP. PMID:8971688

  10. A family of strain-variant surface lipoproteins of Mycoplasma fermentans.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, K S; Kim, M F; Theiss, P M; Lo, S C

    1993-01-01

    The wall-less procaryote Mycoplasma fermentans is currently being examined as an agent potentially associated with human disease, including infectious processes affecting immunocompromised individuals. To delineate and understand the interactions of M. fermentans with its host, specific membrane surface components were characterized as markers for detecting the organism and for assessing heterogeneity in antigenic surface architecture within this mycoplasma species. Detergent phase fractionation of metabolically labeled organisms of type strain PG18 identified a family of prominent integral membrane proteins; several of these labeled with 35S-cysteine and 3H-palmitate, which are characteristics of procaryotic lipoproteins. Specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies raised to strain PG18 components further distinguished seven of these membrane proteins, which were localized on the organism's surface by monitoring their selective susceptibility during trypsin treatment of intact cells. With these antibodies, Western immunoblot profiles of surface membrane antigens expressed on strain PG18 were compared with those expressed on the recently identified Incognitus strain of M. fermentans, as well as with several other human and animal mycoplasma species. While the antibodies were specific for M. fermentans, marked differences were observed between the strains in the size of one surface lipoprotein and in the apparent levels of several antigens expressed in the cultured populations analyzed. Some monoclonal antibodies to strain PG18 and a previously described monoclonal antibody to strain Incognitus showed apparent selectivity for the strain used for immunization. Monoclonal antibodies developed here recognize stable epitopes defining a family of surface lipoproteins and provide critical tools to determine the basis of surface variation in this mycoplasma species and to assess the location and antigenic phenotypes of organisms in the human host. Images PMID:8335364

  11. Comparative genomic analyses of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae pathogenic 168 strain and its high-passaged attenuated strain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a mild, chronic pneumonia of swine. Despite presenting with low direct mortality, EP is responsible for major economic losses in the pig industry. To identify the virulence-associated determinants of M. hyopneumoniae, we determined the whole genome sequence of M. hyopneumoniae strain 168 and its attenuated high-passage strain 168-L and carried out comparative genomic analyses. Results We performed the first comprehensive analysis of M. hyopneumoniae strain 168 and its attenuated strain and made a preliminary survey of coding sequences (CDSs) that may be related to virulence. The 168-L genome has a highly similar gene content and order to that of 168, but is 4,483 bp smaller because there are 60 insertions and 43 deletions in 168-L. Besides these indels, 227 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were identified. We further investigated the variants that affected CDSs, and compared them to reported virulence determinants. Notably, almost all of the reported virulence determinants are included in these variants affected CDSs. In addition to variations previously described in mycoplasma adhesins (P97, P102, P146, P159, P216, and LppT), cell envelope proteins (P95), cell surface antigens (P36), secreted proteins and chaperone protein (DnaK), mutations in genes related to metabolism and growth may also contribute to the attenuated virulence in 168-L. Furthermore, many mutations were located in the previously described repeat motif, which may be of primary importance for virulence. Conclusions We studied the virulence attenuation mechanism of M. hyopneumoniae by comparative genomic analysis of virulent strain 168 and its attenuated high-passage strain 168-L. Our findings provide a preliminary survey of CDSs that may be related to virulence. While these include reported virulence-related genes, other novel virulence determinants were also detected. This new information will form the foundation of future investigations into the pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and facilitate the design of new vaccines. PMID:23384176

  12. Analysis of membrane proteins of Mycoplasma capricolum strains by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Benkirane, A; Amghar, S; Kirchhoff, H

    1993-03-01

    Sixteen moroccan and five other Mycoplasma (M.) capricolum strains were characterized by SDS-PAGE as well as by the immunobinding assay and immunoblotting, using antisera against M. capricolum California Kid (CK) and M. mycoides YG. There was a strong reaction of all 21 strains with antiserum against M. capricolum CK and of 18 strains with antiserum against M. mycoides YG in the immunobinding assay, confirming the cross-reactivity between these two species observed earlier. A marked heterogeneity among the M. capricolum strains appeared in SDS-PAGE and in immunoblotting, characterized by different protein patterns and different strengths of identical protein bands. All M. capricolum strains investigated revealed, however, at least three strong protein bands with mol. weights of about 30, 42 and 52 KD reacting in immunoblotting with antiserum against M. capricolum CK but not with antiserum against M. mycoides YG. These proteins may represent antigens suitable for the identification and differentiation of M. capricolum strains. PMID:8322544

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hemotrophic Mycoplasma suis Strain KI3806?

    PubMed Central

    Oehlerking, Joern; Kube, Michael; Felder, Kathrin M.; Matter, Denise; Wittenbrink, Max M.; Schwarzenbach, Sarah; Kramer, Manuela M.; Hoelzle, Katharina; Hoelzle, Ludwig E.

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma suis, a member of the hemotrophic mycoplasma (HM) group, parasitize erythrocytes of pigs. Increasing evidence suggests that M. suis is also a zoonotic agent. Highly pathogenic strains of M. suis (e.g., M. suis KI3806) have been demonstrated to invade erythrocytes. This complete sequenced and manually annotated genome of M. suis KI3806 is the first available from this species and from the HM group. The DNA was isolated from blood samples of experimentally infected pigs due to the lack of an in vitro cultivation system. The small circular chromosome of 709,270 bp, encoding an unexpectedly high number of hypothetical proteins and limited transport and metabolic capacities, could reflect the unique lifestyle of HM on the surface of erythrocytes. PMID:21398558

  14. [In vitro antibiosensitivity of different strains of Mycoplasma capricolum].

    PubMed

    Benkirane, A; Amghar, S

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro sensitivity of 20 wild strains of M. capricolum and that of the reference strain (California kid) against 14 antibiotics was investigated by means of a micromethod. The technique is based on the determination of the inhibitory minimum concentration (IMC) in a liquid medium as revealed by the inhibition of glucose metabolism. The following results were obtained: all strains were sensitive to five antibiotics (tylosin, oxytetracyclin, gentamycin, neomycin, nalidixic acid) with an IMC varying from 0.06 to 8 meq/ml. The variation in the IMC values from 8 to 32 meq/ml for spiramycin and erythromycin indicated that some of these strains were sensitive and other resistant to these two drugs. All strains were resistant to seven antibiotics (streptomycin, bacitracin, polymyxin, chloramphenicol, lincomycine, rifampicine and novobiocine), sometimes at a concentration exceeding 128 meg/ml. PMID:2132784

  15. INITIAL PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED PROTEINS FROM MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM VACCINE STRAINS TS-11 AND F DETECTED BY WESTERN BLOTTING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) reduces the number of eggs produced by layer chickens. Three live MG vaccine strains are available for use in layer chickens and include F, ts-11 and 6/85. The MG vaccine strains ts-11 and 6/85 are safer than F and they have little or no potential of spreading from bi...

  16. Integrative conjugative elements are widespread in field isolates of Mycoplasma species pathogenic for ruminants.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Florence; Mick, Virginie; Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Marenda, Marc Serge; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Blanchard, Alain; Citti, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Comparative genomics have revealed massive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between Mycoplasma species sharing common ruminant hosts. Further results pointed toward an integrative conjugative element (ICE) as an important contributor of HGT in the small-ruminant-pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae. To estimate the prevalence of ICEs in ruminant mycoplasmas, we surveyed their occurrence in a collection of 166 field strains representing 4 (sub)species that are recognized as major pathogens. Based on available sequenced genomes, we first defined the conserved, minimal ICE backbone as composed of 4 coding sequences (CDSs) that are evenly distributed and predicted to be essential for ICE chromosomal integration-excision and horizontal transfer. Screening of the strain collection revealed that these 4 CDSs are well represented in ruminant Mycoplasma species, suggesting widespread occurrence of ICEs. Yet their prevalence varies within and among species, with no correlation found with the individual strain history. Extrachromosomal ICE forms were also often detected, suggesting that ICEs are able to circularize in all species, a first and essential step in ICE horizontal transfer. Examination of the junction of the circular forms and comparative sequence analysis of conserved CDSs clearly pointed toward two types of ICE, the hominis and spiroplasma types, most likely differing in their mechanism of excision-integration. Overall, our data indicate the occurrence and maintenance of functional ICEs in a large number of field isolates of ruminant mycoplasmas. These may contribute to genome plasticity and gene exchanges and, presumably, to the emergence of diverse genotypes within pathogenic mycoplasmas of veterinary importance. PMID:25527550

  17. Mycoplasma gallisepticum transmission: Comparison of commercial F-strain vaccine versus layer complex-derived field strains in a tunnel ventilated house

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two simultaneous trials were conducted using a commercially available, live, F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccine [Trial 1] or two inocula of layer complex-derived MG strains (LCD-MG) [Trial 2]. In each of the two trials, four commercial turkeys were housed in each of two adjoining pens ...

  18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Large DNA Repetitive Elements RepMP1 Show Type Specific Organization among Strains

    PubMed Central

    Musatovova, Oxana; Kannan, T. R.; Baseman, Joel B.

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the smallest self-replicating bacterium with a streamlined genome of 0.81 Mb. Complete genome analysis revealed the presence of multiple copies of four large repetitive elements (designated RepMP1, RepMP2/3, RepMP4 and RepMP5) that are implicated in creating sequence variations among individual strains. Recently, we described RepMP1-associated sequence variations between reference strain M129 and clinical isolate S1 that involved three RepMP1-genes (i.e. mpn130, mpn137 and mpn138). Using PCR and sequencing we analyze 28 additional M. pneumoniae strains and demonstrate the existence of S1-like sequence variants in nine strains and M129-like variants in the remaining nineteen strains. We propose a series of recombination steps that facilitates transition from M129- to S1-like sequence variants. Next we examined the remaining RepMP1-genes and observed no other rearrangements related to the repeat element. The only other detected difference was varying numbers of the 21-nucleotide tandem repeats within mpn127, mpn137, mpn501 and mpn524. Furthermore, typing of strains through analysis of large RepMPs localized within the adhesin P1 operon revealed that sequence divergence involving RepMP1-genes mpn130, mpn137 and mpn138 is strictly type-specific. Once more our analysis confirmed existence of two highly conserved groups of M. pneumoniae strains. PMID:23091634

  19. EFFECTS OF BROILER REARING ENVIRONMENT ON TRANSMISSION OF F-STRAIN MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM FROM COMMERCIAL LAYER HENS TO BROILER CHICKENS: ROLE OF ACID-BASE BALANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted concurrently to determine and compare, blood pH, blood gases, hematocrit, and hemoglobin in mycoplasma-free, F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation layers, and FMG contact-infected broilers. FMG-inoculated layers had the highest partial pressure of O2 and the l...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bovine Mastitis Pathogen Mycoplasma californicum Strain ST-6T (ATCC 33461T)

    PubMed Central

    Foecking, Mark F.; Fox, Lawrence K.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma californicum is one of several mycoplasmal species associated with bovine mastitis. The complete genome sequence of 793,841 bp has been determined and annotated for the M. californicum ST-6 type strain, providing a resource for the identification of surface antigens and putative pathoadaptive features. PMID:24994797

  1. Emergence of Atypical Mycoplasma agalactiae Strains Harboring a New Prophage and Associated with an Alpine Wild Ungulate Mortality Episode

    PubMed Central

    Tardy, Florence; Baranowski, Eric; Nouvel, Laurent-Xavier; Mick, Virginie; Manso-Silvàn, Lucía; Thiaucourt, François; Thébault, Patricia; Breton, Marc; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Blanchard, Alain; Garnier, Alexandre; Gibert, Philippe; Game, Yvette; Poumarat, François

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Mycoplasma agalactiae is responsible for contagious agalactia (CA) in small domestic ruminants, a syndrome listed by the World Organization for Animal Health and responsible for severe damage to the dairy industry. Recently, we frequently isolated this pathogen from lung lesions of ibexes during a mortality episode in the French Alps. This situation was unusual in terms of host specificity and tissue tropism, raising the question of M. agalactiae emergence in wildlife. To address this issue, the ibex isolates were characterized using a combination of approaches that included antigenic profiles, molecular typing, optical mapping, and whole-genome sequencing. Genome analyses showed the presence of a new, large prophage containing 35 coding sequences (CDS) that was detected in most but not all ibex strains and has a homolog in Mycoplasma conjunctivae, a species causing keratoconjunctivitis in wild ungulates. This and the presence in all strains of large integrated conjugative elements suggested highly dynamic genomes. Nevertheless, M. agalactiae strains circulating in the ibex population were shown to be highly related, most likely originating from a single parental clone that has also spread to another wild ungulate species of the same geographical area, the chamois. These strains clearly differ from strains described in Europe so far, including those found nearby, before CA eradication a few years ago. While M. agalactiae pathogenicity in ibexes remains unclear, our data showed the emergence of atypical strains in Alpine wild ungulates, raising the question of a role for the wild fauna as a potential reservoir of pathogenic mycoplasmas. PMID:22522685

  2. Characterisation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains involved in respiratory disease in pheasants and peafowl.

    PubMed

    Bencina, D; Mrzel, I; RoJs, O Zorman; Bidovec, A; Dovc, A

    2003-02-22

    Two cases of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in different avian species in backyard gamebird operations in Slovenia were investigated. In the first case, M gallisepticum was associated with severe respiratory disease with almost 20 per cent mortality in pheasants, whereas the infection was less pathogenic for chickens and turkeys reared at the same site. The M gallisepticum isolates from pheasants had a unique pMGA gene sequence containing a repeat of 12 nucleotides, and they contained only small amounts of the cytadhesins MGC1 and MGC3 and no PvpA protein. However, they expressed some typical M gallisepticum proteins and several proteins which were immunogenic for pheasants, chickens and turkeys. A strain of M gallisepticum isolated from the sinus of a pheasant was highly pathogenic for chicken embryos. In the second case, the M gallisepticum strain that was associated with respiratory disease and mortality in peafowl also affected chickens. M gallisepticum strain ULB 992 was isolated from the infraorbital sinus of a dead peafowl. The ULB 992 strain synthesised a small amount of MGC3, a truncated form of MGC1 and lacked PvpA. However, it expressed several proteins which were immunogenic for the birds infected with M gallisepticum at both gamebird operations. PMID:12625537

  3. Search for the presence of six Mycoplasma species in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of subjects seropositive and seronegative for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, R; Launay, V; Tuppin, P; Lafeuillade, A; Feuillie, V; Montagnier, L; Grau, O

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of Mycoplasma fermentans, Mycoplasma pirum, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Mycoplasma penetrans was investigated by using specific PCR assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects infected or not infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Only M. fermentans was detected in 5.8% of 154 HIV-seropositive and 11.1% of 90 HIV-seronegative subjects. PMID:8784596

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma ovis Strain Michigan, a Hemoplasma of Sheep with Two Distinct 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Andrea P.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; Hampel, Joseph A.; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Dyson, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma ovis strain Michigan. Its single circular chromosome has 702,511 bp and contains 2 copies of the 16S rRNA gene, one corresponding to M. ovis and the other to “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemovis.” All housekeeping genes and the 5S-23S rRNA genes are present in single copies. PMID:24482515

  5. Cultivation of Mycoplasmas on glass.

    PubMed

    Purcell, R H; Valdesuso, J R; Cline, W L; James, W D; Chanock, R M

    1971-02-01

    Eight Mycoplasma species of human origin were successfully cultivated on glass. Complement-fixing (CF) antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas were potent, specific, and free from anticomplementary activity. PPLO broth medium supplemented with 1 to 5% PPLO serum fraction (bovine), 2.5% fresh yeast extract, and 1% glucose (glycolytic species) or 1% arginine (arginine-utilizing species) supported moderate to luxuriant growth of mycoplasmas on glass. The potency of CF antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas varied with the species of Mycoplasma tested and the duration of incubation. When the potency of CF antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas was compared with that material sedimented from the broth phase of the same culture, three patterns of growth were observed: M. hominis and M. orale type 2 grew preferentially in the broth phase; M. salivarium, M. orale types 1 and 3, M. pneumoniae, and M. lipophilum preferentially adhered to the glass; and M. fermentans was biphasic. The growth of mycoplasmas on glass provides a simple means of concentrating and purifying such organisms for immunological and biochemical studies. PMID:5547544

  6. Cultivation of Mycoplasmas on Glass

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, R. H.; Valdesuso, J. R.; Cline, W. L.; James, W. D.; Chanock, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    Eight Mycoplasma species of human origin were successfully cultivated on glass. Complement-fixing (CF) antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas were potent, specific, and free from anticomplementary activity. PPLO broth medium supplemented with 1 to 5% PPLO serum fraction (bovine), 2.5% fresh yeast extract, and 1% glucose (glycolytic species) or 1% arginine (arginine-utilizing species) supported moderate to luxuriant growth of mycoplasmas on glass. The potency of CF antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas varied with the species of Mycoplasma tested and the duration of incubation. When the potency of CF antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas was compared with that material sedimented from the broth phase of the same culture, three patterns of growth were observed: M. hominis and M. orale type 2 grew preferentially in the broth phase; M. salivarium, M. orale types 1 and 3, M. pneumoniae, and M. lipophilum preferentially adhered to the glass; and M. fermentans was biphasic. The growth of mycoplasmas on glass provides a simple means of concentrating and purifying such organisms for immunological and biochemical studies. PMID:5547544

  7. Genome Sequences of Seven Mycoplasma hyosynoviae Strains Isolated from the Joint Tissue of Infected Swine (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Bumgardner, Eric; Bey, Russell F.; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Bumgarner, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyosynoviae is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause debilitating arthritis in swine. Currently, there are no M. hyosynoviae genome sequences in the GenBank database, which makes it impossible to understand its pathogenesis, nutrition, or colonization characteristics, or to devise an effective strategy for its control. Here, we report the genome sequences of seven strains of M. hyosynoviae. Within each genome, several virulence factors were identified that may prove important in the pathogenesis of M. hyosynoviae-mediated arthritis and serve as potential virulence markers that may be critical in vaccine development. PMID:24903877

  8. Characterization of the 16S rRNA genes from Mycoplasma sp. strain F38 and development of an identification system based on PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñana, C R; Mattsson, J G; Bölske, G; Johansson, K E

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma sp. (strain F38) is the causative agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia, which is a goat disease of great global concern. Strain F38 belongs to the so-called "Mycoplasma mycoides cluster," and the members of this cluster have many biochemical and serological properties in common, which makes it difficult to differentiate between them by conventional methods. Their phylogenetic interrelationship are thus uncertain. The 16S rRNA gene of the rrnB operon from strain F38 was cloned and sequenced. The sequence was compared with the 16S rRNA sequences of related mycoplasmas, and phylogenetic trees were constructed by parsimony analysis. A three-way ambiguity among strain F38, Mycoplasma capricolum, and Mycoplasma sp. strain PG50 was observed in the trees. This observation is in agreement with a recent proposal to reclassify strain F38 and M. capricolum. A primer set was designed for in vitro amplification by PCR of a fragment of the 16S rRNA genes from the M. mycoides cluster. The amplimers of strain F38 could be distinguished easily from the corresponding amplimers from other members of the M. mycoides cluster by restriction enzyme analysis with PstI. This observation was utilized to design an identification system for strain F38. Part of the 16S rRNA gene of the rrnA operon from strain F38 was also cloned, and several sequence differences between the two rRNA operons were discovered, revealing microheterogeneity between the two 16S rRNA genes of this organism. Images PMID:8169205

  9. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kelley C.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Ratliff, Amy E.; Crabb, Donna M.; Sheppard, Edward S.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Dluhy, Richard A.; Waites, Ken B.; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Krause, Duncan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/?l) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/?l. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains. PMID:26121242

  10. EFFECTS OF F-STRAIN MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM INOCULATION AT TWELVE WEEKS OF AGE ON EGG YOLK COMPOSITION IN COMMERCIAL EGG LAYING HENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In two trials, the effects of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) on the content of egg yolks from commercial Single Combed White Leghorn laying hens were investigated over a production cycle. Ten hens were assigned to each of eight (Trial 1) or sixteen (Trial 2) negative pressure fiberglass bi...

  11. Genome Sequence Analysis of Mycoplasma sp. HU2014, Isolated from Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Szikriszt, Bernadett; Póti, Ádám; Molnár, János; Gervai, Judit Z.; Tusnády, Gábor E.; Foecking, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a novel Mycoplasma strain, designated Mycoplasma sp. HU2014, has been determined. The genome comprises 1,084,927 nucleotides and was obtained from a mycoplasma-infected culture of chicken DT40 cells. Phylogenetic analysis places this taxon in a group comprising the closely related species Mycoplasma yeatsii and Mycoplasma cottewii. PMID:26383655

  12. Complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma haemofelis, a hemotropic mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Barker, Emily N; Helps, Chris R; Peters, Iain R; Darby, Alistair C; Radford, Alan D; Tasker, Séverine

    2011-04-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence of Mycoplasma haemofelis strain Langford 1, representing the first hemotropic mycoplasma (hemoplasma) species to be completely sequenced and annotated. Originally isolated from a cat with hemolytic anemia, this strain induces severe hemolytic anemia when inoculated into specific-pathogen-free-derived cats. The genome sequence has provided insights into the biology of this uncultivatable hemoplasma and has identified potential molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenicity. PMID:21317334

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma haemofelis, a Hemotropic Mycoplasma?

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Emily N.; Helps, Chris R.; Peters, Iain R.; Darby, Alistair C.; Radford, Alan D.; Tasker, Séverine

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence of Mycoplasma haemofelis strain Langford 1, representing the first hemotropic mycoplasma (hemoplasma) species to be completely sequenced and annotated. Originally isolated from a cat with hemolytic anemia, this strain induces severe hemolytic anemia when inoculated into specific-pathogen-free-derived cats. The genome sequence has provided insights into the biology of this uncultivatable hemoplasma and has identified potential molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenicity. PMID:21317334

  14. Blastocystis hominis revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Stenzel, D J; Boreham, P F

    1996-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis is a unicellular organism found commonly in the intestinal tract of humans and many other animals. Very little is known of the basic biology of the organism, and controversy surrounds its taxonomy and pathogenicity. There morphological forms (vacuolar, granular, and ameboid) have been recognized, but recent studies have revealed several additional forms (cyst, avacuolar, and multivacuolar). The biochemistry of the organism has not been studied to any extent, and organelles and structures of unknown function and composition are present in the cells. Several life cycles have been proposed but not experimentally validated. The form used for transmission has not been defined. Infections with the organism are worldwide and appear in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient individuals. Symptoms generally attributed to B. hominis infection are nonspecific, and the need for treatment is debated. If treatment appears warranted, metronidazole is suggested as the drug of choice, although failures of this drug in eradicating the organism have been reported. Infection is diagnosed by light microscopic examination of stained smears or wet mounts of fecal material. Most laboratories identify B. hominis by observing the vacuolar form, although morphological studies indicate that other forms, such as the cyst form and multivacuolar form, also should be sought for diagnosis. PMID:8894352

  15. Strain differences in sensitivity of rats to Mycoplasma arthritidis ISR 1 infection are under multiple gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, A; Gärtner, K; Hedrich, H J; Hermanns, W; Kirchhoff, H; Wonigeit, K

    1990-01-01

    At least 5 female rats from each of 24 inbred (ACI, AS, BDIX, BH, BN, BS, BUF, DA, LE, LEW, MWF, OM, SPRD-Cu3, W-Krypt, and WKY), RT1 congenic [BH.1L(LEW), LEW.1A(AVN), LEW.1C(WIST), LEW.1LV3(BH), LEW.1K(SHR), and LEW.1N(BN)], and F1 hybrid [(LEW x BN)F1, (LEW.1W x LEW.1A)F1, and (LEW x LEW.1W)F1] strains, representing eight independent major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes (a, b, c, dv1, k, l, n, and u) and five related RT1 haplotypes (av1, lv1, lv3, uv2, and uv3), were inoculated intravenously with Mycoplasma arthritidis, and the severity of the polyarthritis that developed was determined by estimating arthritis scores and weight reductions. The 24 inbred, congenic, and F1 hybrid rat strains differed considerably in their sensitivity to infection with M. arthritidis and in the severity of the polyarthritis that they developed. Statistical evaluation showed that in the acute phase (days 1 to 42 after infection) as well as in the chronic phase (days 39 to 121 after infection) of the disease, the means of the arthritis scores for the strains form a continuous variation without significant interruptions, with the very sensitive LEW rats, the RT1 congenic rats on LEW background, the F1 hybrids with LEW, and the MWF, BS, BH, and DA rats on one end and the resistant WKY, BUF, W-Krypt, LE, and OM rats on the other end. A continuous variation was also observed for the means of the growth rates. There were, however, no significant differences between the sensitive and the resistant rat strains in the antibody titers determined by complement fixation test and enzyme immunoassay. Heritabilities of arthritis scores were calculated for all strains (h2 = 0.39 to 0.62), for the RT1 congenic strains (h2 = 0.04 to 0.14), and for several strains with identical MHC genes (h2 = 0.61 to 0.93). The results show that non-MHC genes are probably responsible for the sensitivity of rats to infection with M. arthritidis. PMID:2111282

  16. Analysis of immune responses to recombinant proteins from strains of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Perez-Casal, Jose; Prysliak, Tracy; Maina, Teresa; Wang, Yejun; Townsend, Hugh; Berverov, Emil; Nkando, Isabel; Wesonga, Hezron; Liljander, Anne; Jores, Joerg; Naessens, Jan; Gerdts, Volker; Potter, Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Current contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) vaccines are based on live-attenuated strains of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). These vaccines have shortcomings in terms of efficacy, duration of immunity and in some cases show severe side effects at the inoculation site; hence the need to develop new vaccines to combat the disease. Reverse vaccinology approaches were used and identified 66 candidate Mycoplasma proteins using available Mmm genome data. These proteins were ranked by their ability to be recognized by serum from CBPP-positive cattle and thereafter used to inoculate naïve cattle. We report here the inoculation of cattle with recombinant proteins and the subsequent humoral and T-cell-mediated immune responses to these proteins and conclude that a subset of these proteins are candidate molecules for recombinant protein-based subunit vaccines for CBPP control. PMID:26384697

  17. A chronicle of serologic response in commercial layer chickens to vaccination with commercial F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initial efforts by the poultry industry at controlling and containing Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) included testing and slaughter of reactor flocks. Ultimately, using the aforementioned measures coupled with heat treatment of hatching eggs together with biosecurity and biosurveillance procedures, ...

  18. Comparison of immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 168 strain in pigs

    PubMed Central

    LI, Pengcheng; LI, Yunfeng; SHAO, Guoqing; YU, Qinghua; YANG, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) 168 strain in the local respiratory tract in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: an intranasal immunization group, an intrapulmonary immunization group, an intramuscular immunization group and a control group. The levels of local respiratory tract cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6 in the early stage of immunization (P<0.01), local specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in nasal swab samples (P<0.01); and IgA- and IgG-secreting cells in the nasal mucosa and trachea were higher after intranasal vaccination (P<0.01) than in the control group. Interestingly, intrapulmonary immunization induced much stronger immune responses than intranasal immunization. Intrapulmonary immunization also significantly increased the secretion of IL-6 and local specific sIgA and the numbers of IgA- and IgG-secreting cells. The levels of IL-10 and interferon-? in the nasal swab samples and the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the lung and hilar lymph nodes were significantly increased by intrapulmonary immunization compared with those in the control group (P<0.01). These data suggest that intrapulmonary immunization with attenuated Mhp is effective in evoking local cellular and humoral immune responses in the respiratory tract. Intrapulmonary immunization with Mhp may be a promising route for defense against Mhp in pigs. PMID:25649413

  19. Rapid, Simple and Cost-Effective Molecular Method to Differentiate the Temperature Sensitive (ts+) MS-H Vaccine Strain and Wild-Type Mycoplasma synoviae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Sulyok, Kinga Mária; Pásztor, Alexandra; Erdélyi, Károly; Felde, Orsolya; Povazsán, János; K?rösi, László; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae infection in chickens and turkeys can cause respiratory disease, infectious synovitis and eggshell apex abnormality; thus it is an economically important pathogen. Control of M. synoviae infection comprises eradication, medication or vaccination. The differentiation of the temperature sensitive (ts+) MS-H vaccine strain from field isolates is crucial during vaccination programs. Melt-curve and agarose gel based mismatch amplification mutation assays (MAMA) are provided in the present study to distinguish between the ts+ MS-H vaccine strain, its non-temperature sensitive re-isolates and wild-type M. synoviae isolates based on the single nucleotide polymorphisms at nt367 and nt629 of the obg gene. The two melt-MAMAs and the two agarose-MAMAs clearly distinguish the ts+ MS-H vaccine strain genotype from its non-temperature sensitive re-isolate genotype and wild-type M. synoviae isolate genotype, and no cross-reactions with other Mycoplasma species infecting birds occur. The sensitivity of the melt-MAMAs and agarose-MAMAs was 103 and 104 copy numbers, respectively. The assays can be performed directly on clinical samples and they can be run simultaneously at the same annealing temperature. The assays can be performed in laboratories with limited facilities, using basic real-time PCR machine or conventional thermocycler coupled with agarose gel electrophoresis. The advantages of the described assays compared with previously used methods are simplicity, sufficient sensitivity, time and cost effectiveness and specificity. PMID:26207635

  20. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Phytase and 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol on the Digestive and Reproductive Organ Characteristics of Commercial Layers Inoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with the F-Strain of Mycoplasma galli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 3 trials, the effects of dietary supple mentation with phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-D3) on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial layers that were inoculated pre-lay (12 wk of age) or at the onset of lay (22 wk of age) with F-strain Mycoplasma gallis...

  1. EFFECTS OF S6-STRAIN MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM INOCULATION AT TEN, TWENTY-TWO, OR FORTY-FIVE WEEKS OF AGE ON THE BLOOD CHARACTERISTICS OF COMMERCIAL EGG LAYING HENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In two consecutive trials of the current study, the effect of the age of application of S6-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (S6MG) inoculation on the blood characteristics of commercial layers housed and maintained under controlled conditions was determined. The ages of inoculation compared were tho...

  2. High rates of genital mycoplasma infection in the highlands of Papua New Guinea determined both by culture and by a commercial detection kit.

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, A; Passey, M; Yoannes, M; Michael, A

    1997-01-01

    Duplicate vaginal swabs were collected from 100 women, and comparisons were made between an in-house broth-agar culture system and a commercially available kit, the Mycoplasma IST kit (bioMérieux), for the detection of Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. There was good agreement between the two systems for detection of the genital mycoplasmas in terms of sensitivity, with values of > 92% being obtained. In terms of specificity, the mutual comparisons were less favorable, though specificity values of > 72% were obtained. Statistically there was no significant difference in the performance of the two tests (P < 0.1 for both M. hominis and U. urealyticum). While the broth-agar culture system was considerably less expensive than the kit, the Mycoplasma IST kit provided additional information on antibiotic susceptibilities and had the advantages of a shelf life of up to 12 months and not requiring the preparation of culture media. The prevalences of colonization obtained for M. hominis and U. urealyticum were extremely high in this randomly selected group of women from periurban and rural settlements in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, being > or = 70% for M. hominis and > or = 78% for U. urealyticum. colonization with both genital mycoplasmas simultaneously was also very common, with > or = 60% of women being colonized by both M. hominis and U. urealyticum. PMID:8968907

  3. Haemotropic mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Séverine

    2010-01-01

    Practical relevance The feline haemotropic mycoplasmas (‘haemoplasmas') are a group of bacteria that can induce haemolytic anaemia in cats. Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic of the species; ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis’ are less pathogenic. The natural route of transmission of feline haemoplasma infection has not been confirmed, but fleas are implicated. When disease results, common clinical signs are pallor, lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, depression, dehydration and pyrexia. Treatment with tetracyclines or fluoroquinolones is usually effective at resolving clinical disease, but clearance of infection may not result. Global importance The feline haemoplasmas are found worldwide, although prevalence varies geographically. Patient group Older male non-pedigree cats are believed to be at increased risk of haemoplasma infection, although younger cats are possibly more likely to show clinical disease associated with M haemofelis. Clinical challenges The significance of feline haemoplasma infection is difficult to determine due to the existence of asymptomatic carrier cats and the variable pathogenicity of the haemoplasma species. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results should be interpreted in the light of the patient's clinical signs and haematological findings, infecting haemoplasma species and level of haemoplasma DNA present in the blood. Trial antibiotic treatment for haemoplasmosis may be warranted in suspected cases while awaiting PCR results. Evidence base Aspects of feline haemoplasmosis, particularly risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnostic methods and treatment, have been the focus of much recent research. This article draws on the current evidence base with a view to helping clinicians diagnose and manage cases more effectively. PMID:20417898

  4. gga-miR-101-3p Plays a Key Role in Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HS Strain) Infection of Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zaiwei; Bi, Dingren; Hou, Yue; Zhao, Yabo; Sun, Jianjun; Peng, Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), one of the most pathogenic Mycoplasma, has caused tremendous economic loss in the poultry industry. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are involved in microbial pathogenesis. However, little is known about potential roles of miRNAs in MG infection of chicken. In the present study, using miRNA Solexa sequencing we have found that gga-miR-101-3p was up-regulated in the lungs of MG-infected chicken embryos. Moreover, gga-miR-101-3p regulated expression of the host enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) through binding to the 3’ un-translated region (3’-UTR) of EZH2 gene. Over-expression of gga-miR-101-3p significantly inhibited EZH2 expression and hence inhibited proliferation of chicken embryonic fibroblast (DF-1 cells) by blocking the G1-to-S phase transition. Similar results were obtained in MG-infected chicken embryos and DF-1 cells, where gga-miR-101-3p was significantly up-regulated, while EZH2 was significantly down-regulated. This study reveals that gga-miR-101-3p plays an important role in MG infection through regulation of EZH2 expression and provides a new insight into the mechanisms of MG pathogenesis. PMID:26633386

  5. gga-miR-101-3p Plays a Key Role in Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HS Strain) Infection of Chicken.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zaiwei; Bi, Dingren; Hou, Yue; Zhao, Yabo; Sun, Jianjun; Peng, Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), one of the most pathogenic Mycoplasma, has caused tremendous economic loss in the poultry industry. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are involved in microbial pathogenesis. However, little is known about potential roles of miRNAs in MG infection of chicken. In the present study, using miRNA Solexa sequencing we have found that gga-miR-101-3p was up-regulated in the lungs of MG-infected chicken embryos. Moreover, gga-miR-101-3p regulated expression of the host enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) through binding to the 3' un-translated region (3'-UTR) of EZH2 gene. Over-expression of gga-miR-101-3p significantly inhibited EZH2 expression and hence inhibited proliferation of chicken embryonic fibroblast (DF-1 cells) by blocking the G1-to-S phase transition. Similar results were obtained in MG-infected chicken embryos and DF-1 cells, where gga-miR-101-3p was significantly up-regulated, while EZH2 was significantly down-regulated. This study reveals that gga-miR-101-3p plays an important role in MG infection through regulation of EZH2 expression and provides a new insight into the mechanisms of MG pathogenesis. PMID:26633386

  6. Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov., a fast growing Mycoplasma species isolated from wild Caprinae.

    PubMed

    Jores, Joerg; Fischer, Anne; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Thomann, Andreas; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth M; Schnee, Christiane; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Heller, Martin; Frey, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    Five Mycoplasma strains from wild Caprinae were analyzed: four from Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) which died at the Berlin Zoo between 1993 and 1994, one from a Rocky Mountain goat collected in the USA prior to 1987. These five strains represented a population different from the populations belonging to the 'Mycoplasma mycoides cluster' as tested using multi locus sequence typing, Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene (rrs), genomic sequence based in silico as well as laboratory DNA-DNA hybridization, and the analysis of phenotypic traits in particular their exceptionally rapid growth all confirmed that they do not belong to any Mycoplasma species described to date. We therefore suggest these strains represent a novel species, for which we propose the name Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov. The type strain is G5847(T) (=DSM 26019(T)=NCTC 13622(T)) [corrected]. PMID:24016869

  7. Blastocystis hominis--a potential intestinal pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Babb, R R; Wagener, S

    1989-01-01

    The parasite Blastocystis hominis has been found in 10% to 18% of stool specimens submitted to microbiology laboratories. Controversy exists as to whether this organism can cause illness in humans. We have reviewed the records of 65 symptomatic patients with B hominis in their stool. We conclude that B hominis is a potential pathogen that may or may not require drug therapy depending on the overall clinical circumstances, the severity of symptoms, and the presence of other pathogenic organisms. Images PMID:2603418

  8. Survey of Surface Proteins from the Pathogenic Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Strain 7448 Using a Biotin Cell Surface Labeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reolon, Luciano Antonio; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Schrank, Irene Silveira; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of the repertoire of proteins exposed on the cell surface by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae), the etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, is critical to understand physiological processes associated with bacterial infection capacity, survival and pathogenesis. Previous in silico studies predicted that about a third of the genes in the M. hyopneumoniae genome code for surface proteins, but so far, just a few of them have experimental confirmation of their expression and surface localization. In this work, M. hyopneumoniae surface proteins were labeled in intact cells with biotin, and affinity-captured biotin-labeled proteins were identified by a gel-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach. A total of 20 gel slices were separately analyzed by mass spectrometry, resulting in 165 protein identifications corresponding to 59 different protein species. The identified surface exposed proteins better defined the set of M. hyopneumoniae proteins exposed to the host and added confidence to in silico predictions. Several proteins potentially related to pathogenesis, were identified, including known adhesins and also hypothetical proteins with adhesin-like topologies, consisting of a transmembrane helix and a large tail exposed at the cell surface. The results provided a better picture of the M. hyopneumoniae cell surface that will help in the understanding of processes important for bacterial pathogenesis. Considering the experimental demonstration of surface exposure, adhesion-like topology predictions and absence of orthologs in the closely related, non-pathogenic species Mycoplasma flocculare, several proteins could be proposed as potential targets for the development of drugs, vaccines and/or immunodiagnostic tests for enzootic pneumonia. PMID:25386928

  9. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma parvum (Formerly Eperythrozoon parvum), a Diminutive Hemoplasma of the Pig

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Andrea P.; Chu, Yuefeng; Guimaraes, Ana M. S.; Pagliaro, Apryl

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma parvum strain Indiana. Its circular chromosome is 564,395 bp, which is smaller than that of Mycoplasma genitalium, which was previously considered the smallest member of the Mollicutes. Comparative analyses of the genomes of M. parvum and Mycoplasma suis will provide novel insights into the molecular basis of their virulence. PMID:24285648

  10. Mycoplasma gallisepticum: Control by live attenuated vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  11. Evaluation of Mycoplasma inactivation during production of biologics: egg-based viral vaccines as a model.

    PubMed

    David, Selwyn A Wilson; Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Ye, Zhiping; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Although mycoplasmas are generally considered to be harmless commensals, some mycoplasma species are able to cause infections in pediatric, geriatric, or immunocompromised patients. Thus, accidental contamination of biologics with mycoplasmas represents a potential risk for the health of individuals who receive cell-derived biological and pharmaceutical products. To assess the efficiency of inactivation of mycoplasmas by the agents used in the manufacture of egg-derived influenza vaccines, we carried out a series of experiments aimed at monitoring the viability of mycoplasmas spiked into both chicken allantoic fluid and protein-rich microbiological media and then treated with beta-propiolactone, formalin, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, Triton X-100, and sodium deoxycholate, which are agents that are commonly used for virus inactivation and disruption of viral particles during influenza vaccine production. Twenty-two mycoplasma species (with one to four strains of each species) were exposed to these inactivating agents at different concentrations. The most efficient inactivation of the mycoplasmas evaluated was observed with either 0.5% Triton X-100 or 0.5% sodium deoxycholate. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide at concentrations of >or=0.08% was also able to rapidly inactivate (in less than 30 min) all mycoplasmas tested. In contrast, negligible reductions in mycoplasma titers were observed with 0.0125 to 0.025% formaldehyde. However, increasing the concentration of formaldehyde to 0.1 to 0.2% improved the mycoplasmacidal effect. Incubation of mycoplasmas with 0.1% beta-propiolactone for 1 to 24 h had a marked mycoplasmacidal effect. A comparison of the mycoplasma inactivation profiles showed that strains of selected species (Mycoplasma synoviae, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma orale, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Acholeplasma laidlawii) represent a set of strains that can be utilized to validate the effectiveness of mycoplasma clearance obtained by inactivation and viral purification processes used for the manufacture of an inactivated egg-based vaccine. PMID:20228111

  12. Extensive Variation and Rapid Shift of the MG192 Sequence in Mycoplasma genitalium Strains from Patients with Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Miriam; Williams, James A.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Jia, Qiuyao; Myers, Leann; Martin, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium causes persistent urogenital tract infection in humans. Antigenic variation of the protein encoded by the MG192 gene has been proposed as one of the mechanisms for persistence. The aims of this study were to determine MG192 sequence variation in patients with chronic M. genitalium infection and to analyze the sequence structural features of the MG192 gene and its encoded protein. Urogenital specimens were obtained from 13 patients who were followed for 10 days to 14 months. The variable region of the MG192 gene was PCR amplified, subcloned into plasmids, and sequenced. Sequence analysis of 220 plasmid clones yielded 97 unique MG192 variant sequences. MG192 sequence shift was identified between sequential specimens from all but one patient. Despite great variation of the MG192 gene among and within clinical specimens from different patients, MG192 sequences were more related within M. genitalium specimens from an individual patient than between patients. The MG192 variable region consisted of 11 discrete subvariable regions with different degrees of variability. Analysis of the two most variable regions (V4 and V6) in five sequential specimens from one patient showed that sequence changes increased over time and that most sequences were present at only one time point, suggesting immune selection. Topology analysis of the deduced MG192 protein predicted a surface-exposed membrane protein. Extensive variation of the MG192 sequence may not only change the antigenicity of the protein to allow immune evasion but also alter the mobility and adhesion ability of the organism to adapt to diverse host microenvironments, thus facilitating persistent infection. PMID:24396043

  13. Bacterial Decolorization of Textile Azo Dye Acid Orange by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajat Pratap; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Lakhan

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain RMLRT03 with ability to decolorize textile dye Acid Orange dye was isolated from textile effluent contaminated soil of Tanda, Ambedkar Nagar, Uttar Pradesh (India). The decolorization studies were performed in Bushnell and Haas medium (BHM) amended with Acid Orange dye. The bacterial strain was identified as Staphylococcus hominis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence. The bacterial strain exhibited good decolorization ability with glucose and yeast extract supplementation as cosubstrate in static conditions. The optimal condition for the decolorization of Acid Orange dye by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03 strain were at pH 7.0 and 35°C in 60 h of incubation. The bacterial strain could tolerate high concentrations of Acid Orange dye up to 600 mg l-1. The high decolorizing activity under natural environmental conditions indicates that the bacterial strain has practical application in the treatment of dye containing wastewaters. PMID:25253925

  14. Feline hemotropic mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jane E

    2010-11-01

    Three species of hemotropic mycoplasmas are known to infect cats worldwide, Mycoplasma haemofelis, "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum." These organisms were previously known as Haemobartonella felis, but are now known to be mycoplasmas. Assays based on polymerase chain reaction technology are the most sensitive and specific diagnostic tests available for these organisms. M haemofelis is the most pathogenic species, and causes hemolytic anemia in immunocompetent cats. Other differential diagnoses for hemolytic anemia should be considered in cats testing positive for "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum," because the presence of these organisms is not always associated with anemia. Blood from infected cats should be handled with care because of the potential zoonotic nature of hemoplasma infections. The treatment of choice for cats with clinical disease is doxycycline. PMID:20933142

  15. Mycoplasma-dependent activation of normal lymphocytes: mitogenic potential of mycoplasmas for mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Aldridge, K E; Ward, J R

    1977-01-01

    Nonviable preparations of a wide variety of glucose-utilizing mycoplasma species, including Acholeplasma laidlawii and Spiroplasma citri, were found to be mitogenic for mouse lymphocytes. Particularly strong reactions were obtained with Mycoplasma synoviae, M. gallisepticum, M. pneumoniae, S. citri, and a strain of M. fermentans that was previously isolated from a leukemic patient. Nonviable preparations of arginine-utilizing mycoplasmas inhibited the uptake of [3H]thymidine by lymphocytes, but this effect could be reversed by heat treatment or arginine supplementation, and a stimulatory effect was then observed. Viable M. arthritidis was also found to have a mitogenic effect, as detected by an increased uptake of [3H]thymidine by normal lymphocytes and by autoradiographic techniques in which an increase in the numbers of transformed cells was seen. These observations provide the potential for enhanced immunological responsiveness or lymphokine-mediated inflammation in mycoplasma-infected hosts. PMID:924676

  16. Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemolamae” Strain Purdue, a Red Blood Cell Pathogen of Alpacas (Vicugna pacos) and Llamas (Lama glama)

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Balazs; Santos, Andrea P.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; Kritchevsky, Janice E.

    2012-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemolamae,” an endemic red-cell pathogen of camelids. The single, circular chromosome has 756,845 bp, a 39.3% G+C content, and 925 coding sequences (CDSs). A great proportion (49.1%) of these CDSs are organized into paralogous gene families, which can now be further explored with regard to antigenic variation. PMID:23105057

  17. Pentatrichomonas hominis: first isolation from the feces of a dog with diarrhea in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Chao; Gong, Peng-Tao; Ying, Meng; Li, Jian-Hua; Yang, Ju; Li, He; Yang, Zheng-Tao; Zhang, Guo-Cai; Zhang, Xi-Chen

    2014-05-01

    A trichomonad-like parasite isolated from canine fecal samples in Changchun, China was successfully cultivated in vitro using RPMI1640 medium supplemented with 10% heat-inactivated calf serum and antibiotics. These were then subjected to scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ultrastructural study. This parasite has four anterior flagella of unequal length, one independent flagellum, and one recurrent flagellum. It exhibits an anterior nucleus, a Golgi complex, an axostyle, food vacuoles, and hydrogenosomes. These features are consistent with the ultrastructural characteristics of previously described Pentatrichomonas hominis. Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of three genetic loci, including ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2, 18S rRNA, and EF-1?, were also used to compare these samples with other trichomonad species. Molecular identification was also consistent with P. hominis. This is the first time that isolation of P. hominis has been isolated from dog in China, although several other strains of P. hominis have been isolated from human samples. PMID:24623347

  18. Revisiting the reference genomes of human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species: reannotation of C. parvum Iowa and a new C. hominis reference.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Juan P; Galván, Ana Luz; Polanco, Victor; Huang, Bernice; Matveyev, Andrey V; Serrano, Myrna G; Manque, Patricio; Buck, Gregory A; Alzate, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis are the most relevant species of this genus for human health. Both cause a self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent individuals, but cause potentially life-threatening disease in the immunocompromised. Despite the importance of these pathogens, only one reference genome of each has been analyzed and published. These two reference genomes were sequenced using automated capillary sequencing; as of yet, no next generation sequencing technology has been applied to improve their assemblies and annotations. For C. hominis, the main challenge that prevents a larger number of genomes to be sequenced is its resistance to axenic culture. In the present study, we employed next generation technology to analyse the genomic DNA and RNA to generate a new reference genome sequence of a C. hominis strain isolated directly from human stool and a new genome annotation of the C. parvum Iowa reference genome. PMID:26549794

  19. Revisiting the reference genomes of human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species: reannotation of C. parvum Iowa and a new C. hominis reference

    PubMed Central

    Isaza, Juan P.; Galván, Ana Luz; Polanco, Victor; Huang, Bernice; Matveyev, Andrey V.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Manque, Patricio; Buck, Gregory A.; Alzate, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis are the most relevant species of this genus for human health. Both cause a self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent individuals, but cause potentially life-threatening disease in the immunocompromised. Despite the importance of these pathogens, only one reference genome of each has been analyzed and published. These two reference genomes were sequenced using automated capillary sequencing; as of yet, no next generation sequencing technology has been applied to improve their assemblies and annotations. For C. hominis, the main challenge that prevents a larger number of genomes to be sequenced is its resistance to axenic culture. In the present study, we employed next generation technology to analyse the genomic DNA and RNA to generate a new reference genome sequence of a C. hominis strain isolated directly from human stool and a new genome annotation of the C. parvum Iowa reference genome. PMID:26549794

  20. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma acquisition in male HIV-1 infected patients: a multistage cross-sectional survey in Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, L-S; Wu, J-R; Wang, B; Yang, T; Yuan, R; Zhao, Y-Y; Xu, J-S; Guo, H-X; Huan, X-P

    2015-11-01

    Mycoplasma infections are most frequently associated with disease in the urogenital or respiratory tracts and, in most cases, mycoplasmas infect the host persistently. In HIV-infected individuals the prevalence and role of genital mycoplasmas has not been well studied. To investigate the six species of Mycoplasma and the risk factors for infection in Jiangsu province, first-void urine and venous blood samples were collected and epidemiological questionnaires were administered after informed consent. A total of 1541 HIV/AIDS patients were recruited in this study. The overall infection rates of six Mycoplasma species were: Ureaplasma urealyticum (26·7%), Mycoplasma hominis (25·3%), M. fermentans (5·1%), M. genitalium (20·1%), M. penetrans (1·6%) and M. pirum (15·4%). The Mycoplasma infection rate in the unmarried group was lower than that of the married, divorced and widowed groups [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·432, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·077-1·904, P < 0·05]. The patients who refused highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) had a much higher risk of Mucoplasma infection (aOR 1·357, 95% CI 1·097-1·679, P < 0·05). Otherwise, a high CD4+ T cell count was a protective factor against Mycoplasma infection (aOR 0·576, 95% CI 0·460-0·719, P < 0·05). Further research will be required to confirm a causal relationship and to identify risk factors for Mycoplasma infection in HIV/AIDS populations. PMID:25792346

  1. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma species isolated from the genital tract of Dorper sheep in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kalshingi, Habu A; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Gouws, Johan; van Vuuren, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular analysis were conducted on 34 strains of Mycoplasma species isolated between 2003 and 2009 from the genital tract of clinically healthy Dorper sheep and sheep with ulcerative vulvitis and balanitis. Earlier publications identified the causative agent as Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides large colony (MmmLC) and Arcanobacterium pyogenes. The aims of the study were to characterise Mycoplasma species isolated from the genital tract of Dorper sheep with polymerase chain reaction assay, cloning and gene sequencing. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) results revealed six predominant Mycoplasma species: Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, Arcanobacterium laidlawii, MmmLC, Mycoplasma sp. ovine/caprine serogroup II and M. canadense. Sequencing of the 34 isolates were analysed using phylogenetic methods, and 18 (50%) were identified as M. arginini with 99% - 100% similarity to M. arginini from England and Sweden. Six isolates showed 99% similarity to M. bovigenitalium strains from Turkey and Germany. Two isolates had 99% similarity to an M. sp. ovine/caprine sero group II from the United Kingdom. BLAST for two isolates revealed 99% similarity to Acholeplasma laidlawii from India, another two were 99% similar to MmmLC strain from Sweden, two showed 98% similarity to Mycoplasma sp. Usp 120 from Brazil, and two isolates have a 97% - 99% similarity to M. mm. Jcv1 strain from the United States of America. Finally, one isolate showed similarity of 99% to Mycoplasma canadense strain from Italy. The findings support the hypothesis that ulcerative vulvitis and balanitis of Dorper sheep in South Africa (SA) is a multifactorial disease with involvement of different Mycoplasma species. PMID:26244581

  2. Genomic repeats, genome plasticity and the dynamics of Mycoplasma evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Blanchard, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Mycoplasmas evolved by a drastic reduction in genome size, but their genomes contain numerous repeated sequences with important roles in their evolution. We have established a bioinformatic strategy to detect the major recombination hot-spots in the genomes of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma pulmonis. This allowed the identification of large numbers of potentially variable regions, as well as a comparison of the relative recombination potentials of different genomic regions. Different trends are perceptible among mycoplasmas, probably due to different functional and structural constraints. The largest potential for illegitimate recombination in M.pulmonis is found at the vsa locus and its comparison in two different strains reveals numerous changes since divergence. On the other hand, the main M.pneumoniae and M.genitalium adhesins rely on large distant repeats and, hence, homologous recombination for variation. However, the relation between the existence of repeats and antigenic variation is not necessarily straightforward, since repeats of P1 adhesin were found to be anti-correlated with epitopes recognized by patient antibodies. These different strategies have important consequences for the structures of genomes, since large distant repeats correlate well with the major chromosomal rearrangements. Probably to avoid such events, mycoplasmas strongly avoid inverse repeats, in comparison to co-oriented repeats. PMID:11972343

  3. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM HOMINIS N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE) FROM HUMANS, HOMO SAPIENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on biological and molecular data, the species of Cryptosporidium infecting the intestine of humans is considered a new species for which the name Cryptosporidium hominis is proposed. The structure and infectivity of the oocysts of C. hominis from the feces of humans are described. Oocysts are ...

  4. The polymerase chain reaction for Mycoplasma gallisepticum detection.

    PubMed

    Kempf, I; Blanchard, A; Gesbert, F; Guittet, M; Bennejean, G

    1993-12-01

    On the basis of the aligned 16S rRNA sequences of Mollicutes, a pair of primers was chosen for the detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum. When used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the primers detected a specific amplification of all Mg strains tested, yielding an expected 330 bp product. Amplification was not detected when other Mollicutes or E. coli were used as PCR templates. SPF chickens were experimentally inoculated with two strains of M. gallisepticum or Mycoplasma iowae. Tracheal swabs were collected 8, 15, 20 and 28 days after inoculation, and cultured for mycoplasma or tested by PCR. PCR products were detected by hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled probe and by chemiluminescence. The results showed that culture was positive for 49/73 swabs while PCR detected 70/72 positive samples. Thus, PCR can provide the basis of a sensitive, specific, rapid and non-radio-active method for detecting M. gallisepticum. PMID:18671058

  5. Mycoplasma bovis research update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis in bison is a newly emerging and potentially devastating threat to the bison industry. This bacterium is increasingly being identified, both in the United States and Canada, as the cause of severe respiratory disease outbreaks with devastating consequences for the health of the ani...

  6. Studies with Lectins on the Surface Carbohydrate Structures of Mycoplasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Hans-Gerd; Gerhardt, Ursula; Brunner, Helmut; Krüpe, Martin

    1974-01-01

    The surface carbohydrate structures on the cell membranes of various mycoplasma species have been investigated by using lectins, which are sugar-specific proteins. Carbohydrate structures presumably bound to glycolipids, with both galactose and glucose units, were found to be exposed on the surface of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and its temperature-sensitive mutants, M. mycoides var. mycoides and capri, M. pulmonis, M. gallinarum, and M. gallisepticum. Lipid-bound glucose was found on M. neurolyticum. The possible relationship of the lipid-bound surface carbohydrate groups to the known serological cross-reactions and lipid compositions of the various mycoplasma species is discussed. Intact Acholeplasma laidlawii and M. fermentans have no lectin-binding sites exposed on their surfaces; galactose groups were discovered only after Pronase digestion of the organisms, suggesting that their glycolipids are hidden under a protein layer. Neither intact nor Pronase-digested M. hominis reacted with the lectins; this is fully consistent with the lipid composition of this organism, which contains glycolipids. The lectins from Vicia cracca and Phaseolus vulgaris, which react with N-acetyl-galactosamine groups, agglutinated M. gallinarum, M. gallisepticum, M. mycoides var. capri, and M. pulmonis. The agglutinability was lost after Pronase treatment, indicating that the corresponding carbohydrates are presumably protein bound. They may be correlated with the extracellular structures observed by electron microscopy of both sectioned and negatively stained mycoplasma species. PMID:4138526

  7. Mycoplasma infections of plants.

    PubMed

    Bove, J M

    1981-07-01

    Plants can be infected by two types of wall-less procaryotes, spiroplasmas and mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO), both located intracellularly in the phloem tissues of affected plants. Spiroplasmas have been cultured, characterized and shown to be true members of the class Mollicutes. MLO have not yet been cultured or characterized; they are thought to be mycoplasma-like on the basis of their ultrastructure as seen in situ, their sensitivity to tetracycline and resistance to penicillin. Mycoplasmas can also be found on the surface of plants. These extracellularly located organisms are members of the following genera: Spiroplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. The presence of such surface mycoplasmas must not be overlooked when attempts to culture MLO from affected plants are undertaken. Sensitive serological techniques such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can successfully be used to compare the MLO located in the phloem of affected plants with those eventually cultured from the same plants. In California and Morocco periwinkles naturally infected with both Spiroplasma citri and MLO have been reported. With such doubly infected plants, the symptom expression has been that characteristic of the MLO disease (phyllody or stolbur), not that given by S. citri. Only S. citri can be cultured from such plants, but this does not indicate that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease expressed by the plant. In California many nonrutaceous plants have been found to be infected with S. citri. Stubborn affected citrus trees represent an important reservoir of S. citri, and Circulifer tenellus is an active leafhopper vector of S. citri. Hence, it is not surprising that in California MLO-infected fruit trees could also become infected with S. citri but it would not mean that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease. Criteria are discussed that are helpful in distinguishing between MLO infections and S. citri infections. PMID:7287398

  8. Comparative Genomics and Phylogenomics of Hemotrophic Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Ana M. S.; Santos, Andrea P.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; Timenetsky, Jorge; Messick, Joanne B.

    2014-01-01

    Hemotrophic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas) are a group of animal pathogens of the Mollicutes class. Recently, the genomes of 8 hemoplasmas have been completely sequenced. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of their genomic features and relationship to other Mycoplasma species. The genome structure and dynamics of hemoplasmas were analyzed by evaluating gene synteny, adaptive evolution of paralogous gene families (PGF) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The Mollicutes class was then phylogenetically analyzed by constructing a distance matrix of the 16S rRNA genes and a phylogenetic tree with 32 conserved, concatenated proteins. Our results suggest that the hemoplasmas have dynamic genomes. The genome size variation (from 547 to 1,545 genes) indicates substantial gene gain/loss throughout evolution. Poorly conserved gene syntenies among hemoplasmas, positional shuffling of paralogous genes between strains, HGT, and codons under positive selection in PGFs were also observed. When compared to other Mollicutes species, the hemoplasmas experienced further metabolic reduction, and the 16S rRNA gene distance matrix of the available mollicutes suggests that these organisms presently constitute the most divergent clade within its class. Our phylogenetic tree of concatenated proteins showed some differences when compared to the 16S rRNA gene tree, but non-mycoplasma organisms, such as Ureaplasma spp. and Mesoplasma spp., continue to branch within Mycoplasma clades. In conclusion, while the hemoplasmas experienced further metabolic shrinkage through gene loss, PGFs with positively selected codons are likely beneficial to these species. Phylogeny of the mollicutes based on 16S rRNA genes or concatenated proteins do not obey the current taxonomy. The metabolism and genetic diversity of the mollicutes, the presence of HGT, and lack of standard for genus circumscription are likely to hinder attempts to classify these organisms based on phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24642917

  9. Programmed cell death in a human intestinal parasite, Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed

    Nasirudeen, A M; Tan, K S; Singh, M; Yap, E H

    2001-09-01

    Although programmed cell death (PCD) has been associated with multicellular organisms, there have been more reports of its presence in some protozoans. Our study shows the existence of PCD in an intestinal protozoan, Blastocystis hominis. Light and electron microscopy, biochemical and flow cytometry studies showed apoptosis-like death in B. hominis cells exposed to a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody (MAb 1D5). B. hominis cells displayed key morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis, namely, nuclear condensation and in situ fragmentation, reduced cytoplasmic volume, some externalization of phosphatidylserine and maintenance of plasma membrane integrity. No oligonucleosomal DNA laddering was observed in gel electrophoresis. This study supports earlier observations that the cellular machinery that is required to carry out PCD may have existed before the advent of multicellularity. Our study also ascribes a novel function for the B. hominis central vacuole in apoptosis; it acts as a repository where apoptotic bodies are stored before being released into the extracellular space. PMID:11578087

  10. Complexity of the Mycoplasma fermentans M64 Genome and Metabolic Essentiality and Diversity among Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Huang-I; Liu, Yen-Ming; Wu, Keh-Ming; Shu, Hung-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Hsiao, Kwang-Jen; Hu, Wensi S.; Ng, Wailap Victor

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the genomes of two Mycoplasma fermentans strains, namely M64 and JER, have been completely sequenced. Gross comparison indicated that the genome of M64 is significantly bigger than the other strain and the difference is mainly contributed by the repetitive sequences including seven families of simple and complex transposable elements ranging from 973 to 23,778 bps. Analysis of these repeats resulted in the identification of a new distinct family of Integrative Conjugal Elements of M. fermentans, designated as ICEF-III. Using the concept of “reaction connectivity”, the metabolic capabilities in M. fermentans manifested by the complete and partial connected biomodules were revealed. A comparison of the reported M. pulmonis, M. arthritidis, M. genitalium, B. subtilis, and E. coli essential genes and the genes predicted from the M64 genome indicated that more than 73% of the Mycoplasmas essential genes are preserved in M. fermentans. Further examination of the highly and partly connected reactions by a novel combinatorial phylogenetic tree, metabolic network, and essential gene analysis indicated that some of the pathways (e.g. purine and pyrimidine metabolisms) with partial connected reactions may be important for the conversions of intermediate metabolites. Taken together, in light of systems and network analyses, the diversity among the Mycoplasma species was manifested on the variations of their limited metabolic abilities during evolution. PMID:22509252

  11. Is Mycoplasma synoviae outrunning Mycoplasma gallisepticum? A viewpoint from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Landman, Wil J M

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae are the most relevant mycoplasma species for commercial poultry from the clinical and economic point of view. Although the importance of M. gallisepticum was recognized many decades ago, the relevance of M. synoviae has been a matter of debate. Until the turn of the century, only the respiratory and synovitis forms of the disease were reported, while the majority of infections were subclinical. Since the year 2000 M. synoviae strains with oviduct tropism, able to induce eggshell apex abnormalities and egg drops, have been encountered worldwide. A decreasing incidence of M. gallisepticum has been observed, at least in breeding stock, in countries with control and eradication programmes for this Mycoplasma species. In contrast, the sero-prevalence of M. synoviae is much higher, especially in layer flocks, and in most continents exceeds 70%. Given the emergence of virulent M. synoviae strains with oviduct tropism, its ability to also induce joint and respiratory disease, to act synergistically with other pathogens as well as its much higher sero-prevalence, it seems that M. synoviae is outrunning M. gallisepticum, at least in countries with control and eradication programmes for the latter. This stresses the need to update M. synoviae prevention and control strategies. Thus, in January 2013, the Dutch poultry industry implemented a mandatory control and eradication programme for M. synoviae at all levels of poultry farming with the exception of broilers. PMID:24397240

  12. Cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis acquired in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, S; Francia, C; Persico, M C; La Vela, V

    2009-12-01

    The authors describe a case of cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis in a 23-year-old Italian woman who contracted the infestation during a tour in Jamaica. The infestation was located on the back and was characterized clinically by a single inflammatory nodule. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cutaneous myiasis due to Dermatobia hominis acquired in Jamaica. PMID:20583696

  13. Mycoplasma pneumoniae in hamster tracheal organ culture studied by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Muse, K E; Powell, D A; Collier, A M

    1976-01-01

    Hamster tracheal rings in organ culture were inoculated with a virulent strain of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and examined by scanning electron microscopy. A progressive increase in epithelial cell injury was detected from 48 to 96 h post-inoculation and was characterized by apparent loss of the apical portion of ciliated cells. M. pneumoniae attaching to the epithelial cell surfaces could be identified by comparison with the surface morphology of mycoplasmas grown on glass cover slips. Images PMID:1248872

  14. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of horses.

    PubMed Central

    Allam, N. M.; Lemcke, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Ten mycoplasmas were isolated from 130 nasopharyngeal swabs from thoroughbred horses with acute respiratory disease and three from 198 apparently normal horses. Two mycoplasmas were isolated from 21 tracheal swabs taken at necropsy. These mycoplasmas, together with six isolated from the equine respiratory tract by other workers, were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Other properties examined in certain representative strains were appearance under the electron microscope, ability to adsorb or agglutinate the erythrocytes of various animal species and the electrophoretic pattern of the cell proteins. On the basis of these test, mycoplasmas from the equine respiratory tract were divided into seven species. Three species belonged to the genus Acholeplasma, members of which do not require sterol for growth, and were identified as A. laidlawii, A. oculi (formerly A. oculusi) originally isolated from the eyes of goats, and a recently named species A. equifoetale, previously isolated from aborted equine fetuses. Of the four sterol-dependent Mycoplasma species, one was indentified as M. pulmonis, a common rodent pathogen. Another cross-reacted serologically with M. felis and should probably be classified as that species. The other two species probably represent new species peculiar to the horse. One of these, represented by the strains N3 and N11, ferments glucose and is serologically distinct from 19 recognized species of glucose-utilizing mycoplasmas and from two species which do not metabolize either glucose or arginine. The other species, represented by four strains, hydrolyses arginine and, because it is serologically distinct from all the named arginine-hydrolysing Mycoplasma species, the name M. equirhinis sp.nov. is proposed for it. Of the seven species, only M. pulmonis and the glucose-utilizing species represented by N3 and N11 were found exclusively in horses with acute respiratory disease. A. oculi was isolated from an apparently normal horse. The other four species were found in normal horses as well as those with respiratory disease, although three out of the four strains of M. equirhinis were from sick horses. Images Plate 2 Plate 5 Plate 3 Plate 1 Plate 4 PMID:807616

  15. The Recognition of a vlhA Protein from the F-Strain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum with Monoclonal Antibody 6F10

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this project is to identify the genes encoding M. gallisepticum F-strain surface proteins recognized by specific antibody reagents to characterize the individual role of each gene product in host colonization. Here we report the characterization of a 70-kDa surface protein recognized by ...

  16. Haemotrophic Mycoplasma infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, Sarah M; Winkler, Margit; Groebel, Katrin; Dieckmann, Michael P; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Hoelzle, Katharina; Wittenbrink, Max M; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2010-10-26

    Haemotrophic mycoplasmas (HM) are parasites on the surface of red blood cells and known to infect a wide range of animals. However, there are no previous evidences of HM infections in horses. In this study HM were detected for the first time in the blood of two horses suffering from poor performance, apathy, weight loss, and anaemia. Using a HM specific PCR assay and subsequent sequencing the infective agents isolated from the blood of said horses were confirmed as closely related to the HM species Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos'. PMID:20452151

  17. Effects of mycoplasma contamination on phenotypic expression of mitochondrial mutants in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doersen, C.J.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1981-04-01

    HeLa cells sensitive to the mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibitors erythromycin (ERY) and chloramphenicol (CAP) and HeLa variants resistant to the effects of these drugs were purposefully infected with drug-sensitive and -resistnat mycoplasma strains. Mycoplasma hyorhinis and the ERY-resistant strain of Mycoplasma orale, MO-ERY/sup r/, did not influence the growth of HeLa and ERY-resistant ERY2301 cells in the presence or absence of ERY. M. hyorhinis also did not affect the growth of HeLa and CAP-resistant Cap-2 cells in the presence or absence of CAP. However, both HeLa and Cap-2 cells infected with the CAP-resistant strain of M. hyorhinis, MH-CAP/sup r/, were more sensitive to the cytotoxix effect of CAP. This maybe due to the glucose dependence of the cells, which was compromised by the increased utilization of glucose by MH-CAP/sup r/ in these infected cell cultures. In vitro protein synthesis by isolated mitochondria was significantly altered by mycoplasma infection of the various cell lines. A substantial number of mycoplasmas copurified with the mitochondria, resulting in up to a sevenfold increase in the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. More importantly, the apparent drug sensitivity or resistance of mitchondrial preparations from mycoplasma-infected cells reflected the drug sensitivity or resistance of the contaminating mycoplasmas. These results illustrate the hazards in interpreting mitochondrial protein synthesis data derived from mycoplasma-infected cell lines, particularly putative mitochondrially encoded mutants resistant to inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  18. Pentatrichomonas hominis in laboratory-bred common marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takashi; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Yasuda, Masahiko; Sasaki, Erika; Itoh, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonadid protozoa have been found in the intestinal tracts of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). However, there is little information available on species identification and the pathogenicity of these trichomonads. In this study, we conducted a fecal survey of a common marmoset colony maintained as laboratory animals in Japan and identified the trichomonad species. Screening using a fecal smear examination revealed that 66% (58/88) of the marmosets had trichomonadid trophozoites in their feces. The trichomonads were found in both normal feces (31/49, 63%) and diarrhea (27/39, 69%), with no significant difference in frequency. The protozoa were identified as Pentatrichomonas hominis using morphological characters and the 100% identity of the nucleotide sequence of the partial 18S rRNA gene (297 bp). The intraspecific genetic variability between P. hominis from the marmosets in this study and P. hominis from other reported mammal hosts was ?1% in the nucleotide sequence, including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS-2 (293 bp). P. hominis inhabits the large intestine of various mammalian hosts, including primates, and is considered nonpathogenic. These results suggest that P. hominis is transmitted among marmosets and other mammals but is not a primary cause of bowel disease in marmosets. PMID:26156572

  19. Clinical significance and prevalence of Blastocystis hominis in Van, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Beyhan, Yunus E.; Yilmaz, Hasan; Cengiz, Zeynep T.; Ekici, Abdurrahman

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the associated clinical symptoms and prevalence of Blastocystis hominis (B. hominis). Methods: Stool samples of 50,185 patients (26,784 males and 23,401 females) who were received at the Parasitology Laboratory of Yuzuncu Yil University Faculty of Medicine, Van, Turkey in the last 5 years were inspected microscopically using saline and iodine-stained wet-mount preparations. Age, gender, and symptoms of patients were recorded and their significance was evaluated. Results: The prevalence of B. hominis in the total sample was 0.54% (275/50185). Out of 275 infected patients, 143 (52%) were males, and 132 (48%) were female (?2=0.884; p=0.348). The distribution of B. hominis infection was high in 7-13 aged children (34.9%) (?2=306.8; p=0.001). Blastocystis was higher among symptomatic patients (70.2%) compared with asymptomatic patients (29.8%) (?2=107.13; p=0.001). The most frequent clinical symptoms associated with the disease were abdominal pain (27.3%) and diarrhea (19.6%) followed by anorexia, fever, saliva, anal itching, and nausea. Conclusion: Blastocystis hominis is considered a causative agent of human disease in patients with recurrent symptoms. Due to the significant risk for zoonotic transmission, molecular techniques must be used to determine the route and source of infection. PMID:26318472

  20. Increasing the value of hominy feed as a coproduct by fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hominy feed is a low value ($83.7/metric ton) coproduct of the corn dry milling process that accounts for nearly 35% of the starting corn quantity. The average composition of hominy feed on a dry basis is 56.9% starch, 25.2% neutral detergent fiber, 11.1% protein, and 5.3% fat. Starch in hominy fe...

  1. Subacute bacterial endocarditis caused by Cardiobacterium hominis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Davie; Carson, Julie; Johnson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cardiobacterium hominis, a member of the HACEK group of organisms, is an uncommon but important cause of subacute bacterial endocarditis. First-line therapy is a third-generation cephalosporin due to rare beta-lactamase production. The authors report a case involving endovascular infection due to C hominis that initially tested resistant to third-generation cephalosporins using an antibiotic gradient strip susceptibility method (nitrocephin negative), but later proved to be susceptible using broth microdilution reference methods (a ‘major’ error). There are limited studies to guide susceptibility testing and interpretive breakpoints for C hominis in the medical literature, and the present case illustrates some of the issues that may arise when performing susceptibility testing for fastidious organisms in the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:25798154

  2. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Further Genetic Characterization of the Enigmatic Pathogen, Staphylococcus hominis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangfen; Thomas, Jonathan C.; Miragaia, Maria; Bouchami, Ons; Chaves, Fernando; d’Azevedo, Pedro A.; Aanensen, David M.; de Lencastre, Herminia; Gray, Barry M.; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus hominis is a commensal resident of human skin and an opportunistic pathogen. The species is subdivided into two subspecies, S. hominis subsp. hominis and S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus, which are difficult to distinguish. To investigate the evolution and epidemiology of S. hominis, a total of 108 isolates collected from 10 countries over 40 years were characterized by classical phenotypic methods and genetic methods. One nonsynonymous mutation in gyrB, scored with a novel SNP typing assay, had a perfect association with the novobiocin-resistant phenotype. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed from six housekeeping gene fragments, and revealed relatively high levels of genetic diversity and a significant impact of recombination on S. hominis population structure. Among the 40 sequence types (STs) identified by MLST, three STs (ST2, ST16 and ST23) were S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus, and they distinguished between isolates from different outbreaks, whereas 37 other STs were S. hominis subsp. hominis, one of which was widely disseminated (ST1). A modified PCR assay was developed to detect the presence of ccrAB4 from the SCCmec genetic element. S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus isolates were oxacillin-resistant and carriers of specific components of SCCmec (mecA class A, ccrAB3, ccrAB4, ccrC), whereas S. hominis subsp. hominis included both oxacillin-sensitive and -resistant isolates and a more diverse array of SCCmec components. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus may be a polyphyletic and, hence, artificial taxon. In summary, these results revealed the genetic diversity of S. hominis, the identities of outbreak-causing clones, and the evolutionary relationships between subspecies and clones. The pathogenic lifestyle attributed to S. hominis subsp. novobiosepticus may have originated on more than one occasion. PMID:23776678

  3. Effects of 6/85-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccination Alone at Ten Weeks of Age or in Conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays at 22 or 45 Weeks of Age on the Reproductive and Digestive....Hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay 6/85-strain M. gallisepticum (6/85MG) vaccination alone or in conjunction with time specific F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays on the gross reproductive and digestive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens...

  4. Mycoplasma synoviae infection on Newcastle disease vaccination of chickens

    PubMed Central

    de Cássia Figueira Silva, Rita; do Nascimento, Elmiro Rosendo; de Almeida Pereira, Virgínia Léo; Barreto, Maria Lúcia; do Nascimento, Maria da Graça Fichel

    2008-01-01

    Newcastle disease is characterized by respiratory manifestations in association with nervous and/or digestive symptoms. Its prevention is done by vaccination with live attenuated (lentogenic strains) and/or killed vaccines. The lentogenic strains can lead to strong post-vaccination reaction, principally due to the presence of other pathogenic agents. Among them, Mycoplasma synoviae is worldwide important, mainly in Brazil. The dissemination of this agent in poultry flocks has been achieved due to difficulties in diagnosis and disease reproduction, virulence variations among different M.synoviae strains, and attribution of typical M.synoviae disease manifestation to other disease agents. This experimental study in SPF chicks (Gallus gallus), previously infected by M.synoviae and thereafter vaccinated against Newcastle disease, was done with the objective of evaluating M.synoviae pathogenicity through assessment of post-vaccinal respiratory reactions and serologic responses to Newcastle disease virus vaccine in the absence of environmental factors. A total of 86 three days old chicks were used, being 57 infected by eye and nostril drop, with chicken activated M. synoviae strain WVU 1853. Seven days later, 21 mycoplasma infected birds plus 29 not mycoplasma infected ones were vaccinated against Newcastle disease. As results, the not infected and vaccinated birds yielded, significantly, higher and longer lasting serologic responses to Newcastle disease vaccine virus than those infected and vaccinated. Similarly, the infected and vaccinated birds yielded lower serologic reactions to M.synoviae than those only mycoplasma infected. No post-vaccinal respiratory reaction was observed in the vaccinated birds. PMID:24031234

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Human Gut Symbiont Roseburia hominis

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Anthony J.; Kelly, Denise; Flint, Harry J.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the human gut symbiont Roseburia hominis A2-183T (= DSM 16839T = NCIMB 14029T), isolated from human feces. The genome is represented by a 3,592,125-bp chromosome with 3,405 coding sequences. A number of potential functions contributing to host-microbe interaction are identified. PMID:26543119

  6. Reduction of Hydrogen Peroxide Accumulation and Toxicity by a Catalase from Mycoplasma iowae

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Rachel E.; Prassinos, Alexandre J.; Osborne, John D.; Raviv, Ziv; Balish, Mitchell F.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which degrades H2O2. To test the activity of M. iowae catalase in degrading H2O2, we studied catalase activity and H2O2 accumulation by both M. iowae serovar K strain DK-CPA, whose genome we sequenced, and strains of the H2O2-producing species Mycoplasma gallisepticum engineered to produce M. iowae catalase by transformation with the M. iowae putative catalase gene, katE. H2O2-mediated virulence by M. iowae serovar K and catalase-producing M. gallisepticum transformants were also analyzed using a Caenorhabditis elegans toxicity assay, which has never previously been used in conjunction with mycoplasmas. We found that M. iowae katE encodes an active catalase that, when expressed in M. gallisepticum, reduces both the amount of H2O2 produced and the amount of damage to C. elegans in the presence of glycerol. Therefore, the correlation between the presence of glycerol catabolism genes and the use of H2O2 as a virulence factor by mycoplasmas might not be absolute. PMID:25127127

  7. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the internal egg and eggshell characteristics of commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Live F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccines are presently being used to help control field strain MG outbreaks. However, they may exert some adverse effects on egg production. Live strains of MG of lesser virulence as well as killed vaccines have little or no effect on egg production, bu...

  8. Cloning, expression, and antigenic characterization of recombinant protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rocha, T S; Tramuta, C; Catania, S; Matucci, A; Giuffrida, M G; Baro, C; Profiti, M; Bertolotti, L; Rosati, S

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a member of the most important avian mycoplasmas, causing chronic respiratory disease in chickens and leading to important economic losses in the poultry industry. Recombinant technology represents a strategic approach used to achieve highly reliable and specific diagnostic tests in veterinary diseases control: in particular this aspect is crucial for confirming mycoplasma infection and for maintaining mycoplasma-free breeder flocks. In this study, we identified a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (i.e., E2) protein by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), characterized it in immunoblotting assays, and analyzed its recombinant (r-E2) in a rec-ELISA test. For full-length protein expression in Escherichia coli (EC) a point mutation was introduced. A rabbit antiserum produced against r-E2 was tested in a Western Blot using different samples of Mycoplasma species. The results showed the applicability of site-directed mutagenesis, with a good yield of the r-E2 after purification. Also, anti-E2 serum reacted with all the tested MG strains showing no cross reaction with other mycoplasmas. The developed E2 ELISA test was capable of detecting MG antibodies in the sera examined. Those results demonstrate the antigenic stability of the E2 protein which could represent a recombinant antigen with potential diagnostic applications. PMID:25667423

  9. 21 CFR 864.2360 - Mycoplasma detection media and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Mycoplasma detection media and components. 864.2360 Section...Products § 864.2360 Mycoplasma detection media and components. (a) Identification. Mycoplasma detection media and components are used to detect...

  10. 21 CFR 864.2360 - Mycoplasma detection media and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Mycoplasma detection media and components. 864.2360 Section...Products § 864.2360 Mycoplasma detection media and components. (a) Identification. Mycoplasma detection media and components are used to detect...

  11. Applying network theory epidemics: Control measures for outbreaks Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    E-print Network

    Newman, Mark

    Applying network theory epidemics: Control measures for outbreaks Mycoplasma pneumoniae Lauren W, Atlanta, Georgia #12; Abstract Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major cause bacterial pneumonia the United wards. Analysis this contact network predicts that despite relatively prevalence of mycoplasma pneumonia

  12. Identification in Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus hominis of an Active Primordial Mobile Genetic Element for the Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Yuki; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ito, Teruyo; Ma, Xiao Xue; Ui-Mizutani, Yoko; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported that the methicillin resistance gene mecA is carried by a novel type of mobile genetic element, SCCmec (staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec), in the chromosome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These elements are precisely excised from the chromosome and integrated into a specific site on the recipient chromosome by a pair of recombinase proteins encoded by the cassette chromosome recombinase genes ccrA and ccrB. In the present work, we detected homologues of the ccr genes in Staphylococcus hominis type strain GIFU12263 (equivalent to ATCC 27844), which is susceptible to methicillin. Sequence determination revealed that the ccr homologues in S. hominis were type 1 ccr genes (ccrA1 and ccrB1) that were localized on a genetic element structurally very similar to SCCmec except for the absence of the methicillin-resistance gene, mecA. This genetic element had mosaic-like patterns of homology with extant SCCmec elements, and we designated it SCC12263 and considered it a type I staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC). The ccrB1 gene identified in the S. hominis strain is the first type 1 ccrB gene discovered to retain its function through the excision process as judged by two criteria: (i) SCC12263 was spontaneously excised during cultivation of the strain and (ii) introduction of the S. hominis ccrB1 into an MRSA strain carrying a type I SCCmec whose ccrB1 gene is inactive generated SCCmec excisants at a high frequency. The existence of an SCC without a mec determinant is indicative of a staphylococcal site-specific mobile genetic element that serves as a vehicle of transfer for various genetic markers between staphylococcal species. PMID:12700250

  13. Mycoplasma agassizii sp., nov., isolated from the upper respiratory tract of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Mary E.; Brown, D.R.; Kelin, P.A.; McLaughlin, G.S.; Schumacher, I.M.; Jacobson, E.R.; Adams, H.P.; Tully, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Biochemical, serological and molecular genetic studies were performed on seven mycoplasma isolates that were recovered from the upper respiratory tract of clinically ill desert tortoises. The isolates were serologically related to each other but serologically distinct from previously described species. Unique mycoplasma species-specific 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences were found in the proposed type strain. The name Mycoplasma agassizii is proposed for these isolates. The type strain is PS6T (=ATCC 700616T) which caused upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in experimentally infected tortoises.

  14. Dermatobia hominis: Small Migrants Hidden in Your Skin

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Viligiardi, Riccardo; Strohmeyer, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Myiasis is a parasitic infestation of vertebrate animal tissues due to maggots of two-winged flies (Diptera) that feed on living or necrotic tissue. Dermatobia hominis occurs widely in tropical parts of Latin America; it is the most common cause of furuncular myiasis in this region. The continuous increase in international travel has increased the possibility of observing this pathology outside endemic countries, especially in travelers returning from the tropics. If clinicians are aware of the possibility of the disease and its treatment options, this dermatosis can be easily managed. However, diagnostic delay is very common because the disease is often misdiagnosed as a bacterial skin infection. Here, we report 2 cases of furuncular myiasis caused by D. hominis in travelers returning to Italy from Latin America. Surgical and noninvasive treatment approaches are also described. PMID:25324659

  15. Do Blastocystis hominis colony forms undergo programmed cell death?

    PubMed

    Tan, K S; Howe, J; Yap, E H; Singh, M

    2001-05-01

    Ultrastructural observations were made on colony forms of the protozoan parasite, Blastocystis hominis. Cross-sections of entire colonies were observed by TEM. Cells within a colony were heterogeneous in morphology, consisting of vacuolar, amoeboid, multivacuolar and unusual forms. Dying cells appeared to be in the process of fragmenting into numerous membranebound vesicles, giving rise to empty spaces within the colony. Interestingly, older colonies appeared to show cell fragmentation which resulted in larger, membranebound structures. Numerous cytoplasmic inclusions were present in the central vacuole of some cells, with many containing mitochondria. Amoeboid forms were observed to harbour small membrane-bound vesicles in endosome-like compartments. Other unusual features included margination of chromatin material and distinct blebbing of nuclei. These ultrastructural features suggest that B. hominis colony forms perhaps undergo a form of programmed cell death. PMID:11403377

  16. Genus- and species-specific identification of mycoplasmas by 16S rRNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    van Kuppeveld, F J; van der Logt, J T; Angulo, A F; van Zoest, M J; Quint, W G; Niesters, H G; Galama, J M; Melchers, W J

    1992-01-01

    Systematic computer alignment of mycoplasmal 16S rRNA sequences allowed the identification of variable regions with both genus- and species-specific sequences. Species-specific sequences of Mycoplasma collis were elucidated by asymmetric amplification and dideoxynucleotide sequencing of variable regions, using primers complementary to conserved regions of 16S rRNA. Primers selected for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, M. hominis, M. fermentans, Ureaplasma urealyticum, M. pulmonis, M. arthritidis, M. neurolyticum, M. muris, and M. collis proved to be species specific in the polymerase chain reaction. The genus-specific primers reacted with all mycoplasmal species investigated as well as with members of the genera Ureaplasma, Spiroplasma, and Acholeplasma. No cross-reaction was observed with members of the closely related genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Bacillus, and Clostridium or with any other microorganism tested. On the basis of the high copy number of rRNA, a highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction assay was developed in which the nucleic acid content equivalent to a single organism could be detected. Images PMID:1381174

  17. INDUCTION OF A MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM PMGA GENE IN THE CHICKEN TRACHEAL RING ORGAN CULTURE MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To search for Mycoplasma gallisepticum genes involved in colonization of the poultry respiratory tract, a transposon containing a promoterless lacZ gene was employed as a transcriptional reporter. The transposon was used to randomly mutagenize the chromosome of the M. gallisepticum S6 strain and a ...

  18. An Emerging Mycoplasma Associated with Trichomoniasis, Vaginal Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J. Paul; Glascock, Abigail L.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as “Mnola.” In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name “Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii” for this potential new pathogen. PMID:25337710

  19. Comparative Analysis of Gene Content Evolution in Phytoplasmas and Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chan-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas are two groups of important pathogens in the bacterial class Mollicutes. Because of their economical and clinical importance, these obligate pathogens have attracted much research attention. However, difficulties involved in the empirical study of these bacteria, particularly the fact that phytoplasmas have not yet been successfully cultivated outside of their hosts despite decades of attempts, have greatly hampered research progress. With the rapid advancements in genome sequencing, comparative genome analysis provides a new approach to facilitate our understanding of these bacteria. In this study, our main focus is to investigate the evolution of gene content in phytoplasmas, mycoplasmas, and their common ancestor. By using a phylogenetic framework for comparative analysis of 12 complete genome sequences, we characterized the putative gains and losses of genes in these obligate parasites. Our results demonstrated that the degradation of metabolic capacities in these bacteria has occurred predominantly in the common ancestor of Mollicutes, prior to the evolutionary split of phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas. Furthermore, we identified a list of genes that are acquired by the common ancestor of phytoplasmas and are conserved across all strains with complete genome sequences available. These genes include several putative effectors for the interactions with hosts and may be good candidates for future functional characterization. PMID:22479625

  20. Effects of live and killed vaccines against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the performance characteristics of commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. Different strains of MG have been used as vaccines in multiple-age commercial layer farms in an effort to protect the birds against more virulent field strains. The lower level of protection afforded b...

  1. Molecular Biology and Pathogenicity of Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Razin, Shmuel; Yogev, David; Naot, Yehudith

    1998-01-01

    The recent sequencing of the entire genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae has attracted considerable attention to the molecular biology of mycoplasmas, the smallest self-replicating organisms. It appears that we are now much closer to the goal of defining, in molecular terms, the entire machinery of a self-replicating cell. Comparative genomics based on comparison of the genomic makeup of mycoplasmal genomes with those of other bacteria, has opened new ways of looking at the evolutionary history of the mycoplasmas. There is now solid genetic support for the hypothesis that mycoplasmas have evolved as a branch of gram-positive bacteria by a process of reductive evolution. During this process, the mycoplasmas lost considerable portions of their ancestors’ chromosomes but retained the genes essential for life. Thus, the mycoplasmal genomes carry a high percentage of conserved genes, greatly facilitating gene annotation. The significant genome compaction that occurred in mycoplasmas was made possible by adopting a parasitic mode of life. The supply of nutrients from their hosts apparently enabled mycoplasmas to lose, during evolution, the genes for many assimilative processes. During their evolution and adaptation to a parasitic mode of life, the mycoplasmas have developed various genetic systems providing a highly plastic set of variable surface proteins to evade the host immune system. The uniqueness of the mycoplasmal systems is manifested by the presence of highly mutable modules combined with an ability to expand the antigenic repertoire by generating structural alternatives, all compressed into limited genomic sequences. In the absence of a cell wall and a periplasmic space, the majority of surface variable antigens in mycoplasmas are lipoproteins. Apart from providing specific antimycoplasmal defense, the host immune system is also involved in the development of pathogenic lesions and exacerbation of mycoplasma induced diseases. Mycoplasmas are able to stimulate as well as suppress lymphocytes in a nonspecific, polyclonal manner, both in vitro and in vivo. As well as to affecting various subsets of lymphocytes, mycoplasmas and mycoplasma-derived cell components modulate the activities of monocytes/macrophages and NK cells and trigger the production of a wide variety of up-regulating and down-regulating cytokines and chemokines. Mycoplasma-mediated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6, by macrophages and of up-regulating cytokines by mitogenically stimulated lymphocytes plays a major role in mycoplasma-induced immune system modulation and inflammatory responses. PMID:9841667

  2. Highly Dynamic Genomic Loci Drive the Synthesis of Two Types of Capsular or Secreted Polysaccharides within the Mycoplasma mycoides Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Tardy, Florence; Poumarat, François; Citti, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster are all ruminant pathogens. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is responsible for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and is known to produce capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS). Previous studies have strongly suggested a role for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides polysaccharides in pathogenicity. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted EPS was recently characterized as a ?(1?6)-galactofuranose homopolymer (galactan) identical to the capsular product. Here, we extended the characterization of secreted polysaccharides to all other members of the M. mycoides cluster: M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum, M. leachii, and M. mycoides subsp. capri (including the LC and Capri serovars). Extracted EPS was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, resulting in the identification of a homopolymer of ?(1?2)-glucopyranose (glucan) in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii. Monoclonal antibodies specific for this glucan and for the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted galactan were used to detect the two polysaccharides. While M. mycoides subsp. capri strains of serovar LC produced only capsular galactan, no polysaccharide could be detected in strains of serovar Capri. All strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii produced glucan CPS and EPS, whereas glucan production and localization varied among M. capricolum subsp. capricolum strains. Genes associated with polysaccharide synthesis and forming a biosynthetic pathway were predicted in all cluster members. These genes were organized in clusters within two loci representing genetic variability hot spots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that some of these genes, notably galE and glf, were acquired via horizontal gene transfer. These findings call for a reassessment of the specificity of the serological tests based on mycoplasma polysaccharides. PMID:25398856

  3. Mycoplasma neophronis sp. nov., isolated from the upper respiratory tract of Canarian Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus majorensis).

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pérez, A; Ramírez, A S; Rosales, R S; Calabuig, P; Poveda, C; Rosselló-Móra, R; Nicholas, R A J; Poveda, J B

    2012-06-01

    Six strains with the typical characteristics of mycoplasmas were isolated from the tracheae of six Canarian Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus majorensis). The results of biochemical, serological and molecular genetic studies showed that the isolates were nearly identical and that they could be considered as representing a novel species of the genus Mycoplasma. Colonies possessed the typical fried-egg appearance and electron micrographs revealed a pleomorphic cellular morphology with the lack of a cell wall. The isolates hydrolysed arginine and required sterol for growth but did not ferment glucose or hydrolyse urea. We propose that the isolates be assigned to a novel species,Mycoplasma neophronis sp. nov. The type strain is G.A.(T) ( = DSM 24097(T) = ATCC BAA-2157(T)). The antiserum of strain G.A.(T) has been deposited in the Mollicutes collection at Purdue University (Indiana, USA). PMID:21828019

  4. Recent Advances in Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccine Administration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines to layer chickens generally occurs at 9 to 10 weeks of age. Mycoplasma organisms are extremely fastidious in the laboratory and difficult to grow. Very little attention has been accorded to optimizing parameters for vaccine administration in th...

  5. Isolation of Mycoplasma meleagridis from chickens.

    PubMed

    Béjaoui Khiari, A; Landoulsi, A; Aissa, H; Mlik, B; Amouna, F; Ejlassi, A; Ben Abdelmoumen Mardassi, B

    2011-03-01

    Mycoplasma meleagridis (MM) is a major cause of disease and economic loss in turkeys. Formerly it was thought that this species was very host specific and only restricted to turkey. In this study, we report on the recovery of MM from breeding flocks of chickens located near a turkey breeding unit. Ten MM field strains were isolated (by culture on Frey broth medium) from tracheal swabs of chickens displaying clinical signs of mycoplasmosis-essentially respiratory symptoms and poor performance. Assignment of the isolated field strains to MM was confirmed by a growth inhibition assay using MM-specific polyclonal antiserum and by PCR amplification targeting the 16S rRNA sequence as well as the Mm14 sequence, a MM-species-specific DNA fragment previously identified and characterized in our laboratory. The nucleotide sequence of Mm14 proved to be highly conserved among the 10 MM field strains, indicating a common source of infection. However, on the basis of slight differences in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis whole-cell proteins and western blot profiles, two groups of the isolated MM field strains could be distinguished. Evidence of MM infection of chickens was further provided by serology, since 13.77% (35/254) of sera proved positive to MM by either rapid serum agglutination or recombinant antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, sera of all chickens from which MM was isolated were positive for antibodies to MM. Collectively, the data unambiguously show that MM could infect chickens; thus, MM warrants further exploration to determine its pathogenicity in this unusual host. PMID:21500629

  6. Metronidazole induces programmed cell death in the protozoan parasite Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed

    Nasirudeen, A M A; Hian, Yap Eu; Singh, Mulkit; Tan, Kevin S W

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies by the authors have shown that the protozoan parasite Blastocystis hominis succumbed to a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody with a number of cellular and biochemical features characteristic of apoptosis in higher eukaryotes. The present study reports that apoptosis-like features are also observed in growing cultures of axenic B. hominis upon exposure to metronidazole, a drug commonly used for the treatment of blastocystosis. Upon treatment with the drug, B. hominis cells displayed key morphological and biochemical features of programmed cell death (PCD), viz. nuclear condensation and nicked DNA in nucleus, reduced cytoplasmic volume, externalization of phosphatidylserine and maintenance of plasma membrane integrity with increasing permeability. This present study also supports the authors' previously postulated novel function for the B. hominis central vacuole in PCD; it acts as a repository where apoptotic bodies are stored before being released into the extracellular space. The implications and possible roles of PCD in B. hominis are discussed. PMID:14702395

  7. Co-infection with Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' in three cats from Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Helio A; Guimarães, Ana Marcia S; Vidotto, Odilon; Baumann, Aline; Biondo, Alexander W; Messick, Joanne B

    2007-12-01

    The two most common haemotropic Mycoplasma of cats, Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' have been identified using molecular techniques in all continents, except Antarctica. We report the first molecular characterization in South America of a dual infection with M haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' in three domestic cats. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified in three anaemic cats in which haemoplasma organisms were seen attached to the erythrocytes in the peripheral blood smear. Bands of the expected size for M haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' were observed in all three cats. The 393 bp segment of one of the amplicons had a similarity value of 100% to M haemofelis, whereas the other amplicon, a 192 bp segment, was 100% similar to 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum'. After diagnosis, two cats received blood transfusion and they were all treated with doxycycline. All three cats recovered uneventfully. PMID:17693111

  8. Population identification of Sarcoptes hominis and Sarcoptes canis in China using DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, YaE; Cao, ZhiGuo; Cheng, Juan; Hu, Li; Ma, JunXian; Yang, YuanJun; Wang, XiaoPeng; Zeng, JiHui; Wang, TianPing

    2015-03-01

    There has been no consistent conclusion on whether Sarcoptes mites parasitizing in humans and animals are the same species. To identify Sarcoptes (S.) hominis and S. canis in China, gDNA was extracted from individual mites (five from patients with scabies and five from dogs with mange) for amplification of rDNA ITS2, mtDNA 16S, and cox1 fragment sequences. Then, the sequences obtained were aligned with those from different hosts and geographical locations retrieved from GenBank and sequence analyses were conducted. Phylogenetic trees based on 317-bp mtDNA cox1 showed five distinctive branches (species) of Sarcoptes mites, four for S. hominis (S. hominis Chinese, S. nr. hominis Chinese, S. hominis Australian, and S. hominis Panamanian) and one for S. animal (S. animal). S. animal included mites from nine animal species, with S. canis China, S. canis Australia, and S. canis USA clustering as a subbranch. Further sequence divergence analysis revealed no overlap between intraspecific (? 2.6 %) and interspecific (2.6-10.5 %) divergences in 317-bp mtDNA cox1. However, overlap was detected between intra- and interspecific divergences in 311-bp rDNA ITS2 or 275-bp mtDNA 16S when the divergences exceeded 1.0 %, which resulted in failure in identification of Sarcoptes. The results showed that the 317-bp mtDNA cox1 could be used as a DNA barcode for molecular identification of Sarcoptes mites. In addition, geographical isolation was observed between S. hominis Chinese, S. hominis Australian, and S. hominis Panamanian, but not between all S. canis. S. canis and the other S. animal belonged to the same species. PMID:25547078

  9. Severe Mycoplasma bovis outbreak in an Austrian dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Pothmann, Harald; Spergser, Joachim; Elmer, Josef; Prunner, Isabella; Iwersen, Michael; Klein-Jöbstl, Daniela; Drillich, Marc

    2015-11-01

    A conventional dairy farm, housing 19 Austrian Simmental cows, experienced a spontaneous outbreak of a Mycoplasma bovis infection, showing severe clinical signs of respiratory tract disease, clinical mastitis, and tremendous drop in milk production. Despite intensive therapy, 5 cows died within 2 weeks or were euthanized. From the remaining cows, bacteriological culture and polymerase chain reaction revealed M. bovis in 10 of 14 milk samples. Mycoplasma bovis was found in 1 of 5 randomly collected nasal swabs. Autopsy of 1 cow revealed infection of the lungs and the udder with M. bovis. The 13 M. bovis isolates from milk samples, nasal swabs, lungs, and udder were genotyped by multilocus variable number of tandem-repeat analysis, and indicated that described infections were caused by a single M. bovis strain. The virulent M. bovis strain resulted in dramatic economic loss to the farmer. To control the disease, culling of all animals, including heifers and calves, was recommended, and strict hygienic measures were implemented before introducing new animals to the farm. PMID:26450838

  10. Diagnosis of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by detection and identification of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae by PCR and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bölske, G; Mattsson, J G; Bascuñana, C R; Bergström, K; Wesonga, H; Johansson, K E

    1996-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), one of the most serious and dramatic diseases of goats, is caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (M. capripneumoniae). This organism is very difficult to isolate and to correctly identify. In a previous report we described a method for the rapid detection and identification of M. capripneumoniae. This method is based on a PCR system by which a segment of the 16S rRNA gene from all mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster can be amplified. The PCR product is then analyzed by restriction enzyme cleavage for the identification of M. capripneumoniae DNA. This system has now been further evaluated with respect to specificity and diagnostic efficacy for the identification and direct detection of the organism in clinical material. Identification by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified DNA from mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster was verified for 55 strains, among which were 15 strains of M. capripneumoniae. The PCR was applied to clinical samples from the nose, ear, pharynx, pleural fluid, and lung tissue containing M. capripneumoniae or other mycoplasmas. As expected, mycoplasmas belonging to the M. mycoides cluster could be detected by the PCR. Restriction enzyme analysis of the PCR products could then be applied for the identification of M. capripneumoniae. Clinical samples and cultures containing M. capripneumoniae were dried on filter paper, to try an easier sample transport method, and were tested by PCR. M. capripneumoniae DNA could be detected in the dried specimens, but the sensitivity of the PCR test was reduced. PMID:8815084

  11. Association of Blastocystis hominis with signs and symptoms of human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, D J; Raucher, B G; McKitrick, J C

    1986-01-01

    Purged stools from 389 patients were evaluated microscopically for the presence of Blastocystis hominis. A total of five or more B. hominis cells per 40X field were observed in 43 patients (11%), and B. hominis was the only intestinal parasite present in 23 (6%) of these patients. Of the 23 patients, 19 had symptoms which included abdominal discomfort (15 patients), anorexia (10 patients), diarrhea (9 patients), and flatus (9 patients). The remaining four patients were asymptomatic. The proportion of eosinophils in the peripheral blood ranged from 4 to 12% in 11 (58%) of the symptomatic patients. Absolute eosinophil counts were greater than 250/microliter in 8 patients and greater than 400/microliter in 5 patients. Eosinophilia was not observed in the remaining symptomatic or asymptomatic patients. This study supports the emerging concept of the role of B. hominis as an intestinal parasite causative of human disease. PMID:3771743

  12. Associations among Haemophilus parasuis, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infections in pigs with polyserositis

    PubMed Central

    Palzer, Andreas; Haedke, Kristina; Heinritzi, Karl; Zoels, Susanne; Ladinig, Andrea; Ritzmann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the associations among Haemophilus parasuis, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (EU-field strain) infections in 95 pigs with polyserositis. A significant association between H. parasuis and M. hyorhinis was identified. H. parasuis and M. hyorhinis were significantly more often detected in PRRS virus positive pigs. PMID:25750450

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT WITH MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a common human respiratory pathogen, has been studied experimentally for years using intranasal inoculation of the golden Sytrian hamster. Because of recent evidence outlining the role in pulmonary immune development of particle size and depth of mycoplasma...

  14. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...tested using a set of chicken and a set of turkey serums (the positive serums shall have...Meleagridis Antigen shall be tested using turkey serums. (g) Specificity requirements...Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and five Mycoplasma...

  15. Stress Exacerbates Infectivity and Pathogenicity of Blastocystis hominis: In Vitro and In Vivo Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Chandramathi, Samudi; Suresh, Kumar; Sivanandam, Sinnadurai; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress alters the oxidant-antioxidant state and immune cell responses which disrupts its function to combat infection. Blastocystis hominis, a common intestinal protozoan has been reported to be opportunistic in immunocompromised patients namely cancer. B. hominis infectivity in other altered immune system conditions especially stress is unknown. We aimed to demonstrate the stress effects towards the susceptibility and pathogenicity of B. hominis infection. Methods/Findings Three-week-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (a)control; (b)stress-induced; (c)B. hominis infected; (d)stress-induced with B. hominis infection; (n?=?20 respectively). Stress was induced for an hour daily (30 days) using a Belly Dancer Shaker. Weight gain was monitored, stool samples were collected for B. hominis screening and blood for the determination of differential count, levels of immunoglobulin, oxidative damage, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation upon induction with solubilized antigen of B. hominis (Blasto-Ag). Group (b) exhibited the highest level of weight gain. Group (d) had higher levels of parasite cyst count in stools, serum IgE, oxidized protein and lipid compared to the group (c). Levels of monocyte and antioxidant in group (d) were decreased and their PBMCs showed highest inhibition of proliferation level when exposed to Blasto-Ag. Monocyte level in Group (b) showed insignificant difference compared to group (a) but was significantly lower compared to group (c). Antioxidant levels in group (c) were generally lower compared to group (a) and (b). Inhibition level exhibited by Blasto-Ag treated PBMCs of group (c) was higher compared to group (a) and (b). Conclusion The pathogenicity and augmentation of B. hominis infection is enhanced when stress is present. Lifestyles today are becoming increasingly stressed and the present findings suggest that the parasite which has been reported to be one of the most common organisms seen in stool surveys, namely in developing countries, may tend to be more pathogenic in stressful situations. PMID:24788756

  16. Molecular Demonstration of Hemotropic Mycoplasmas in Wild Japanese Monkeys (Macaca fuscata)

    PubMed Central

    SASHIDA, Hinako; SUZUKI, Yoshihisa; ROKUHARA, Sou; NAGAI, Kazuya; HARASAWA, Ryô

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The prevalence of hemotropic mycoplasmas in wild monkeys is largely unknown. Here, we report the presence of hemoplasmas in blood specimens collected from wild Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) tentatively captured for ecological survey in Mie prefecture, Japan. We examined 9 monkeys using hemoplasma-specific real-time PCR and found all of them positive for a hemoplasma infection. The 16S rRNA gene and 16S to 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region of the hemoplasma detected in wild monkeys were amplified using end-point PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the PCR products were further determined and compared to those of other hemoplasmas. Our examinations revealed a wide prevalence of a hemoplasma strain in Japanese monkeys, which was similar to ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomacaque’ reported in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Pathogenic traits of this hemoplasma strain remain unexplored. PMID:23978941

  17. Experimental Infections with Mycoplasma agalactiae Identify Key Factors Involved in Host-Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Eric; Bergonier, Dominique; Sagné, Eveline; Hygonenq, Marie-Claude; Ronsin, Patricia; Berthelot, Xavier; Citti, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying pathogenic processes in mycoplasma infections are poorly understood, mainly because of limited sequence similarities with classical, bacterial virulence factors. Recently, large-scale transposon mutagenesis in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae identified the NIF locus, including nifS and nifU, as essential for mycoplasma growth in cell culture, while dispensable in axenic media. To evaluate the importance of this locus in vivo, the infectivity of two knock-out mutants was tested upon experimental infection in the natural host. In this model, the parental PG2 strain was able to establish a systemic infection in lactating ewes, colonizing various body sites such as lymph nodes and the mammary gland, even when inoculated at low doses. In these PG2-infected ewes, we observed over the course of infection (i) the development of a specific antibody response and (ii) dynamic changes in expression of M. agalactiae surface variable proteins (Vpma), with multiple Vpma profiles co-existing in the same animal. In contrast and despite a sensitive model, none of the knock-out mutants were able to survive and colonize the host. The extreme avirulent phenotype of the two mutants was further supported by the absence of an IgG response in inoculated animals. The exact role of the NIF locus remains to be elucidated but these data demonstrate that it plays a key role in the infectious process of M. agalactiae and most likely of other pathogenic mycoplasma species as many carry closely related homologs. PMID:24699671

  18. Experimental infections with Mycoplasma agalactiae identify key factors involved in host-colonization.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Eric; Bergonier, Dominique; Sagné, Eveline; Hygonenq, Marie-Claude; Ronsin, Patricia; Berthelot, Xavier; Citti, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying pathogenic processes in mycoplasma infections are poorly understood, mainly because of limited sequence similarities with classical, bacterial virulence factors. Recently, large-scale transposon mutagenesis in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae identified the NIF locus, including nifS and nifU, as essential for mycoplasma growth in cell culture, while dispensable in axenic media. To evaluate the importance of this locus in vivo, the infectivity of two knock-out mutants was tested upon experimental infection in the natural host. In this model, the parental PG2 strain was able to establish a systemic infection in lactating ewes, colonizing various body sites such as lymph nodes and the mammary gland, even when inoculated at low doses. In these PG2-infected ewes, we observed over the course of infection (i) the development of a specific antibody response and (ii) dynamic changes in expression of M. agalactiae surface variable proteins (Vpma), with multiple Vpma profiles co-existing in the same animal. In contrast and despite a sensitive model, none of the knock-out mutants were able to survive and colonize the host. The extreme avirulent phenotype of the two mutants was further supported by the absence of an IgG response in inoculated animals. The exact role of the NIF locus remains to be elucidated but these data demonstrate that it plays a key role in the infectious process of M. agalactiae and most likely of other pathogenic mycoplasma species as many carry closely related homologs. PMID:24699671

  19. A study on Blastocystis hominis in food-handlers: diagnosis and potential pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Fathy, Fouad M

    2011-08-01

    Proper diagnosis of Blastocystis hominis in not performed routinely in medical laboratories of developing countries; consequently clinical significance of this common intestinal protozoon is liable to remain unsettled. Food-handlers are more prone to get and transmit this feco-oral infection. This work compared the sensitivity of direct diagnostic methods to detect B. hominis in stool, estimate the true prevalence among food-handlers in Sirte-Libya, to clarify the association between the parasite and gastrointestinal symptoms and the response to specific treatment. A total of 400 male food-handlers aged 18-50 year were included. Each was subjected to clinical questionnaire and 3 stool examinations by different methods. The results showed high prevalence of B. hominis in food-handlers (35.5%). Short- term in vitro culture (on Boeck and Derbholav's medium) was the most sensitive method for detection of B. hominis (35.5%), followed by permanent Trichrome-stained smear (27.5%); saline-sedimentation concentrated smear (21%) and direct iodine smear (14%). Of 108 cases having B. hominis alone, 68.5% were symptomatic. Diarrhea was the most frequent symptom (75.6%), followed by abdominal pain (66.2%) and flatulence (43.2%). Fecal parasite-load was significantly higher in symptomatic cases than asymptomatic; parasite and symptoms disappeared after metronidazole treatment. So, culture should be used on routine basis to detect B. hominis which should be considered pathogenic particularly when present alone in large numbers in symptomatic patients. PMID:21980782

  20. Distribution and composition of lipopolysaccharides from mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P F; Langworthy, T A; Mayberry, W R

    1976-01-01

    Polymeric carbohydrates containing glycerol and fatty acids were isolated from whole cells and membranes of mycoplasmas by hot aqueous phenol extraction and gel filtration. Lipopolysaccharides were found to occur in four species of Acholeplasma, two of Anaeroplasma, and in Mycoplasma neurolyticum. None were detected in Spiroplasma citri or in five species of Mycoplasma. All lipopolysaccharides contained both neutral and N-acylated amino sugars in ratios varying from 1:1 to 3:1. The neutral sugars found in varying distribution were glucose, galactose, and mannose. The amino sugars included fucosamine, an unidentified deoxyhexosamine, galactosamine, and glucosamine. Fucosamine and glucose were the only sugars common to all lipopolysaccharides. The fatty acids were similar to those found in the lipids of each organism. PMID:1254559

  1. Synergism between upregulation of Rab7 and inhibition of autophagic degradation caused by mycoplasma facilitates intracellular mycoplasma infection

    PubMed Central

    HU, XIAOPENG; YU, JIE; ZHOU, XIANG; LI, ZHAOMING; XIA, YUN; LUO, ZHIYONG; WU, YAQUN

    2014-01-01

    Following fusion of a mycoplasma with a host cell membrane, the inserted components of mycoplasma may then be transported through the endocytic pathway. However, the effects of mycoplasmas on the host cell endomembrane system are largely unknown. In this study, mycoplasma-induced changes in the dynamics of endocytic and autophagic systems were investigated. Endocytosis and autophagy are two major processes involved in the survival of intracellular prokaryotic pathogens. It was found that, immediately following infection, mycoplasmas induce endocytosis in the host cell; however, in the long term the mycoplasmas suppress turnover of the components of the endocytic pathway. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that Rab7 and LC3-II are recruited to the intracellular mycoplasma-containing compartments. Western blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that mycoplasmas increase expression of Rab7 by upregulating transcription, but increase levels of LC3-II and p62 by post-translational regulation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that mycoplasma infection causes inhibition of autophagic degradation of LC3-II and p62. In addition, it was found that upregulation of Rab7 and inhibition of autophagic degradation synergistically contributes to intracellular mycoplasma accumulation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that mycoplasmas may manipulate host cell endosomal and autophagic systems in order to facilitate intracellular infection. PMID:24452847

  2. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  3. In vitro sensitivity of Blastocystis hominis to garlic, ginger, white cumin, and black pepper used in diet.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Beg, Muhammad Asim; Naz, Shagufta; Awan, Safia; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2011-08-01

    To determine the growth pattern and in vitro susceptibility of Blastocystis hominis to metronidazole (MTZ), garlic, ginger, white cumin, and black pepper. Stool specimens were collected from 16 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 10 controls between July-November 2010. Stool microscopy and culture for B. hominis was performed. Drug susceptibility assays was done using 0.01 and 0.1 mg/ml of MTZ, garlic, ginger, white cumin, and black pepper. Effect was assessed on B. hominis culture after 48 h. Stool DNA was extracted using stool DNA extraction kit (Qiagen) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) done using subtype-specific sequence-tagged-site primers. B. hominis genotype 3 and coinfection of 1 and 3 tended to grow well in culture compared to isolated type 1 infection. Exposed to MTZ at a concentration of 0.01 mg/ml, 38% (6/16) B. hominis from IBS did not grow in culture compared to 100% (10/10) of B. hominis from control (p = 0.001). When they were exposed to MTZ at 0.1 mg/ml, 56% (9/16) B. hominis from IBS did not grow in cultures compared to 100% (10/10) from control (p = 0.01). Forty-four percent (7/16) B. hominis from IBS did not grow in culture compared to 100% (10/10) B. hominis from control when exposed to garlic at a concentration of 0.01 mg/ml (p = 0.003) and following exposure to garlic at 0.1 mg/ml, 38% (6/16) B. hominis from IBS did not grow in cultures compared to 100% (10/10) from control (p = 0.001). B. hominis isolates from IBS had a cell count of 6,625 at a MTZ concentration of 0.01 mg/ml that reduced to 1,250 as MTZ concentration was increased to 0.1 mg/ml (p = 0.08). B. hominis from IBS with a mean cell count of 3 × 10(5) at baseline decreased to 1 × 10(4) when exposed to garlic at 0.01 mg/ml (p < 0.001) and to 1 × 10(3) (p < 0.001) when garlic was 0.1 mg/ml. B. hominis from IBS cell count decreased to 1 × 10(5) when exposed to white cumin at 0.01 mg/ml (p = 0.01) and to 1 × 10(5) (p < 0.001) when white cumin was 0.1 mg/ml. Exposed to black pepper at 0.1 mg/ml, cell count of B. hominis from IBS decreased to 1 × 10(5) (p = 0.01). B. hominis from IBS decreased to 1.3 × 10(5) exposed to ginger at 0.01 mg/ml (p = 0.001). B. hominis isolates were mostly genotypes 3, type 1 and 3 coinfection, and non-typeable B. hominis isolates. B. hominis isolates from IBS mostly genotype 1 demonstrated an increased sensitivity to garlic at 0.01 mg/ml with a B. hominis cell count of 3,714 compared to 6,142 when exposed to 0.01 mg/ml of MTZ. However, this sensitivity did not increase as garlic concentration was increased to 0.1 mg/ml, for B. hominis cell count was 6,000 compared to 1,428 as MTZ was increased to 0.1 mg/ml. PMID:21431384

  4. Identification, characterization, and application of a recombinant antigen for the serological investigation of feline hemotropic Mycoplasma infections.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A; Jäckel, Christian; Museux, Kristina; Hoelzle, Katharina; Tasker, Séverine; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2010-12-01

    In felids, three hemotropic mycoplasma species (hemoplasmas) have been described: Mycoplasma haemofelis, "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum," and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis." In particular, M. haemofelis may cause severe, potentially life-threatening hemolytic anemia. No routine serological assays for feline hemoplasma infections are available. Thus, the goal of our project was to identify and characterize an M. haemofelis antigen (DnaK) that subsequently could be applied as a recombinant antigen in a serological assay. The gene sequence of this protein was determined using consensus primers and blood samples from two naturally M. haemofelis-infected Swiss pet cats, an experimentally M. haemofelis-infected specific-pathogen-free cat, and a naturally M. haemofelis-infected Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). The M. haemofelis DnaK gene sequence showed the highest identity to an analogous protein of a porcine hemoplasma (72%). M. haemofelis DnaK was expressed recombinantly in an Escherichia coli DnaK knockout strain and purified using Ni affinity, size-exclusion, and anion-exchange chromatography. It then was biochemically and functionally characterized and showed characteristics typical for DnaKs (secondary structure profile, thermal denaturation, ATPase activity, and DnaK complementation). Moreover, its immunogenicity was assessed using serum samples from experimentally hemoplasma-infected cats. In Western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, it was recognized by sera from cats infected with M. haemofelis, "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum," and "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis," respectively, but not from uninfected cats. This is the first description of a full-length purified recombinant feline hemoplasma antigen that can readily be applied in future pathogenesis studies and may have potential for application in a diagnostic serological test. PMID:20876820

  5. Identification, Characterization, and Application of a Recombinant Antigen for the Serological Investigation of Feline Hemotropic Mycoplasma Infections ? ‡

    PubMed Central

    Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A.; Jäckel, Christian; Museux, Kristina; Hoelzle, Katharina; Tasker, Séverine; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2010-01-01

    In felids, three hemotropic mycoplasma species (hemoplasmas) have been described: Mycoplasma haemofelis, “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum,” and “Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis.” In particular, M. haemofelis may cause severe, potentially life-threatening hemolytic anemia. No routine serological assays for feline hemoplasma infections are available. Thus, the goal of our project was to identify and characterize an M. haemofelis antigen (DnaK) that subsequently could be applied as a recombinant antigen in a serological assay. The gene sequence of this protein was determined using consensus primers and blood samples from two naturally M. haemofelis-infected Swiss pet cats, an experimentally M. haemofelis-infected specific-pathogen-free cat, and a naturally M. haemofelis-infected Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). The M. haemofelis DnaK gene sequence showed the highest identity to an analogous protein of a porcine hemoplasma (72%). M. haemofelis DnaK was expressed recombinantly in an Escherichia coli DnaK knockout strain and purified using Ni affinity, size-exclusion, and anion-exchange chromatography. It then was biochemically and functionally characterized and showed characteristics typical for DnaKs (secondary structure profile, thermal denaturation, ATPase activity, and DnaK complementation). Moreover, its immunogenicity was assessed using serum samples from experimentally hemoplasma-infected cats. In Western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, it was recognized by sera from cats infected with M. haemofelis, “Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum,” and “Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis,” respectively, but not from uninfected cats. This is the first description of a full-length purified recombinant feline hemoplasma antigen that can readily be applied in future pathogenesis studies and may have potential for application in a diagnostic serological test. PMID:20876820

  6. Diagnosis of genital Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma infections.

    PubMed

    Friberg, J

    1985-03-01

    Genital Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma have been implicated in pelvic inflammatory disease, puerperal infections, septic abortions, low birth weight, nongonococcal urethritis and prostatitis as well as spontaneous abortion and infertility. An unequivocal diagnosis of infection with these organisms can be made only after properly obtained specimens have been evaluated with the use of selective cultures. PMID:4020782

  7. Chronic "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" infects felids. The pathogenesis of "Candidatus M. turicensis" chronic infection is poorly understood. The goals of the present study were to (1) induce reactivation of the infection in chronic carrier cats by attempted immunosuppression, (2) identify potential tissue sequestration using real-time TaqMan® PCR and (3) monitor the humoral immune response by DnaK enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ten specified pathogen-free cats that had ostensibly recovered from experimental "Candidatus M. turicensis" infection were used: five cats (group 1) received high dose methylprednisolone (attempted immunosuppression), while five cats served as untreated controls (group 2). Besides weekly blood samples, tissue samples were collected from bone marrow, kidney, liver and salivary glands at selected time points. The cats in group 1 had significantly lower lymphocyte counts and higher blood glucose levels after methylprednisolone administration than the controls. After methylprednisolone administration one blood and three tissue samples from cats in group 1 tested PCR-positive; before the administration, only one sample was positive. All other samples tested PCR-negative. All cats stayed seropositive; the antibody levels of the cats in group 1 showed a significant transient decrease after methylprednisolone administration. This is the first study to report the presence of "Candidatus M. turicensis" in tissues of chronically infected cats and the persistence of anti-feline hemoplasma antibodies in the absence of detectable bacteremia. Methylprednisolone administration did not lead to a significant reactivation of the infection. Our results enhance the knowledge of "Candidatus M. turicensis" infection pathogenesis and are clinically relevant to the prognosis of hemoplasma-infected cats. PMID:21507220

  8. Effects of single and combined Mycoplasma gallisepticums vaccinations on blood electrolytes and acid-base balance in commercial egg-laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study, it was shown to occur in response to an F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation layers from our laboratory a significant increase in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), which is generally associated with an oxygen-dependent improvement in tissue oxygenation to...

  9. Field-Applicable Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingyan; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Heller, Martin; Nepper, Julia F.; Weibel, Douglas B.; Gluecks, Ilona; Younan, Mario; Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent; Jores, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a highly contagious disease caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae that affects goats in Africa and Asia. Current available methods for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma infection, including cultivation, serological assays, and PCR, are time-consuming and require fully equipped stationary laboratories, which make them incompatible with testing in the resource-poor settings that are most relevant to this disease. We report a rapid, specific, and sensitive assay employing isothermal DNA amplification using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) for the detection of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. We developed the assay using a specific target sequence in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, as found in the genome sequence of the field strain ILRI181 and the type strain F38 and that was further evidenced in 10 field strains from different geographical regions. Detection limits corresponding to 5 × 103 and 5 × 104 cells/ml were obtained using genomic DNA and bacterial culture from M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain ILRI181, while no amplification was obtained from 71 related Mycoplasma isolates or from the Acholeplasma or the Pasteurella isolates, demonstrating a high degree of specificity. The assay produces a fluorescent signal within 15 to 20 min and worked well using pleural fluid obtained directly from CCPP-positive animals without prior DNA extraction. We demonstrate that the diagnosis of CCPP can be achieved, with a short sample preparation time and a simple read-out device that can be powered by a car battery, in <45 min in a simulated field setting. PMID:26085615

  10. Field-Applicable Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Liljander, Anne; Yu, Mingyan; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Heller, Martin; Nepper, Julia F; Weibel, Douglas B; Gluecks, Ilona; Younan, Mario; Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent; Jores, Joerg

    2015-09-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a highly contagious disease caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae that affects goats in Africa and Asia. Current available methods for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma infection, including cultivation, serological assays, and PCR, are time-consuming and require fully equipped stationary laboratories, which make them incompatible with testing in the resource-poor settings that are most relevant to this disease. We report a rapid, specific, and sensitive assay employing isothermal DNA amplification using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) for the detection of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. We developed the assay using a specific target sequence in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, as found in the genome sequence of the field strain ILRI181 and the type strain F38 and that was further evidenced in 10 field strains from different geographical regions. Detection limits corresponding to 5 × 10(3) and 5 × 10(4) cells/ml were obtained using genomic DNA and bacterial culture from M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain ILRI181, while no amplification was obtained from 71 related Mycoplasma isolates or from the Acholeplasma or the Pasteurella isolates, demonstrating a high degree of specificity. The assay produces a fluorescent signal within 15 to 20 min and worked well using pleural fluid obtained directly from CCPP-positive animals without prior DNA extraction. We demonstrate that the diagnosis of CCPP can be achieved, with a short sample preparation time and a simple read-out device that can be powered by a car battery, in <45 min in a simulated field setting. PMID:26085615

  11. Mycoplasma haemocanis – the canine hemoplasma and its feline counterpart in the genomic era

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemocanis is a hemotrophic mycoplasma (hemoplasma), blood pathogen that may cause acute disease in immunosuppressed or splenectomized dogs. The genome of the strain Illinois, isolated from blood of a naturally infected dog, has been entirely sequenced and annotated to gain a better understanding of the biology of M. haemocanis. Its single circular chromosome has 919 992 bp and a low G?+?C content (35%), representing a typical mycoplasmal genome. A gene-by-gene comparison against its feline counterpart, M. haemofelis, reveals a very similar composition and architecture with most of the genes having conserved synteny extending over their entire chromosomes and differing only by a small set of unique protein coding sequences. As in M. haemofelis, M. haemocanis metabolic pathways are reduced and apparently rely heavily on the nutrients afforded by its host environment. The presence of a major percentage of its genome dedicated to paralogous genes (63.7%) suggests that this bacterium might use antigenic variation as a mechanism to evade the host’s immune system as also observed in M. haemofelis genome. Phylogenomic comparisons based on average nucleotide identity (ANI) and tetranucleotide signature suggest that these two pathogens are different species of mycoplasmas, with M. haemocanis infecting dogs and M. haemofelis infecting cats. PMID:23020168

  12. Mycoplasma haemocanis--the canine hemoplasma and its feline counterpart in the genomic era.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Naíla C; Santos, Andrea P; Guimaraes, Ana Ms; Sanmiguel, Phillip J; Messick, Joanne B

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemocanis is a hemotrophic mycoplasma (hemoplasma), blood pathogen that may cause acute disease in immunosuppressed or splenectomized dogs. The genome of the strain Illinois, isolated from blood of a naturally infected dog, has been entirely sequenced and annotated to gain a better understanding of the biology of M. haemocanis. Its single circular chromosome has 919 992 bp and a low G?+?C content (35%), representing a typical mycoplasmal genome. A gene-by-gene comparison against its feline counterpart, M. haemofelis, reveals a very similar composition and architecture with most of the genes having conserved synteny extending over their entire chromosomes and differing only by a small set of unique protein coding sequences. As in M. haemofelis, M. haemocanis metabolic pathways are reduced and apparently rely heavily on the nutrients afforded by its host environment. The presence of a major percentage of its genome dedicated to paralogous genes (63.7%) suggests that this bacterium might use antigenic variation as a mechanism to evade the host's immune system as also observed in M. haemofelis genome. Phylogenomic comparisons based on average nucleotide identity (ANI) and tetranucleotide signature suggest that these two pathogens are different species of mycoplasmas, with M. haemocanis infecting dogs and M. haemofelis infecting cats. PMID:23020168

  13. Infection of the finger-nail by Pyrenochaeta unguis-hominis.

    PubMed

    English, M P

    1980-07-01

    Infection of the finger-nail of an elderly woman by Pyrenochaeta unguis-hominis is reported. The small lesion was extending slowly into the healthy nail plate. The fungus has been isolated from diseased toe-nails on two previous occasions but its extra-human habitat is unknown. PMID:7426409

  14. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya’an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis. PMID:26509708

  15. Varying incidence of Blastocystis hominis in cultures from faeces of patients with diarrhoea and from healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Kukoschke, K G; Müller, H E

    1992-06-01

    A study was performed on the frequency of Blastocystis hominis in the faeces from 100 patients suffering from diarrhoea and from 100 healthy persons. Surprisingly, an increased detection rate was observed in samples from healthy persons after anaerobic cultivation. This increased frequency is obviously not dependent on the kind of serum used as a culture supplement and raises the question whether the protozoa morphologically described as B. hominis represent a homogenous species. When rabbit and horse sera were used instead of human serum for cultivation, in both groups the share of positive cultures increased and more large forms of B. hominis cells were observed. Biological implications are being discussed. PMID:1520961

  16. Characterization of the gene for an immunodominant 72 kDa lipoprotein of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Nicolet, J; Miserez, R; Kuhnert, P; Krampe, M; Pilloud, T; Abdo, E M; Griot, C; Frey, J

    1996-12-01

    With the aim of characterizing specific immunogenic proteins of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony (SC) type, the aetiological agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, a gene encoding a major immunogenic protein of 72 kDa named P72 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was of the same apparent molecular mass as that produced by the parent strain. The predicted molecular mass of P72, based on the DNA-deduced amino acid sequence, was 61.118 kDa, significantly lower than the apparent molecular mass of endogenous or recombinant P72 on SDS-PAGE. Analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed a typical prokaryotic signal peptidase II-membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site and a transmembrane structure domain in the leader sequence at the amino-terminal end of the protein. P72 was shown to be a lipoprotein and its surface location was confirmed by trypsin treatment of whole cells. An unassigned gene encoding a peptide with some similarity to P72 was found on the genome sequence of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum but not on that of Mycoplasma genitalium. The P72 gene was detected in 11/11 M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC strains. Antiserum against recombinant P72 reacted strongly with 12/12 strains of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, weakly with Mycoplasma bovine group 7 strain PG50, but not with other members of the 'mycoides cluster' or closely related mycoplasmas. Cows experimentally contact-infected with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC developed a humoral response against P72 within 35 d. P72 is a specific antigenic membrane lipoprotein of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC with potential for use in development of diagnostic reagents. It seems to belong to a family of lipoproteins of the "mycoides cluster'. PMID:9004514

  17. An epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Mason, S J; Maiers, J D

    1984-01-01

    A major epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum occurred in the Monroe, North Carolina, area between January and June of 1983. The outbreak involved 304,000 turkeys of various ages, which were slaughtered in the eradication program at a cost of more than $550,000 to growers and poultry companies. An infected peafowl was the likely source of infection on the first farm. Traffic between farms by growers and company personnel was theorized to be the means of further spread. PMID:6487195

  18. Characterization of western X-disease mycoplasma-like organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    The causal agent of western X-disease, an important disease of cherry (Prunus avium) and peach (Prunus persica) in the western United States, was shown to be a non-culturable, mycoplasma-like organism (WX-MLO). Procedures were developed to purify WX-MLOs from celery and leafhoppers infected with a greenhouse-maintained isolate of the peach yellow leaf roll (ghPYLR) strain of western X-disease. WX-MLOs, purified from ghPYLR-infected leafhoppers, elicited the production of specific antisera (WX antisera) when injected into rabbits. When used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), WX antisera quantitatively detected WX-MLOs in celery, periwinkle, and leafhoppers experimentally infected with either ghPYLR or the Green Valley (GVX) strain of western X-disease. Recombinant clones were screened by colony, dot and southern hybridizations using /sup 32/P-nick translated DNA extracted from healthy and ghPYLR-infected celery and leafhoppers. Twenty-four clones were identified which hybridized with DNA from diseased but not healthy hosts. DNA hybridization assays, using radiolabeled, cloned WX-MLO DNA, readily detected WX-MLOs in celery, periwinkle, and leafhoppers infected with either GVX or ghPYLR and in cherry and peach with symptoms of GVX.

  19. Mycoplasmas and cancer: focus on nucleoside metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Balzarini, Jan; Liekens, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for patients suffering cancer often includes treatment with nucleoside analogues (NAs). NAs are internalized by cell-specific nucleobase/nucleoside transporters and, after enzymatic activation (often one or more phosphorylation steps), interfere with cellular nucleo(s)(t)ide metabolism and DNA/RNA synthesis. Therefore, their efficacy is highly dependent on the expression and activity of nucleo(s)(t)ide-metabolizing enzymes, and alterations thereof (e.g. by down/upregulated expression or mutations) may change the susceptibility to NA-based therapy and/or confer drug resistance. Apart from host cell factors, several other variables including microbial presence may determine the metabolome (i.e. metabolite concentrations) of human tissues. Studying the diversity of microorganisms that are associated with the human body has already provided new insights in several diseases (e.g. diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease) and the metabolic exchange between tissues and their specific microbiota was found to affect the bioavailability and toxicity of certain anticancer drugs, including NAs. Several studies report a preferential colonization of tumor tissues with some mycoplasma species (mostly Mycoplasma hyorhinis). These prokaryotes are also a common source of cell culture contamination and alter the cytostatic activity of some NAs in vitro due to the expression of nucleoside-catabolizing enzymes. Mycoplasma infection may therefore bias experimental work with NAs, and their presence in the tumor microenvironment could be of significance when optimizing nucleoside-based cancer treatment. PMID:26417262

  20. “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomacaque” and Bartonella quintana Bacteremia in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mascarelli, Patricia E.; Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Rohde, Cynthia M.; Kelly, Catherine M.; Ramaiah, Lila; Leach, Michael W.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report latent infections with Bartonella quintana and a hemotropic Mycoplasma sp. in a research colony of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Sequence alignments, evolutionary analysis, and signature nucleotide sequence motifs of the hemotropic Mycoplasma 16S rRNA and RNase P genes indicate the presence of a novel organism. PMID:23408694

  1. "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomacaque" and Bartonella quintana bacteremia in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Ricardo G; Mascarelli, Patricia E; Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Rohde, Cynthia M; Kelly, Catherine M; Ramaiah, Lila; Leach, Michael W; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2013-05-01

    Here, we report latent infections with Bartonella quintana and a hemotropic Mycoplasma sp. in a research colony of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Sequence alignments, evolutionary analysis, and signature nucleotide sequence motifs of the hemotropic Mycoplasma 16S rRNA and RNase P genes indicate the presence of a novel organism. PMID:23408694

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Cases of Mycoplasma californicum Infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kan-ichiro; Hanyu, Hideki; Itoh, Megumi; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kobayashi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Bovine mastitis due to Mycoplasma californicum is often accompanied by huge economic losses, and the disease spreads very quickly. An appropriate molecular epidemiological analysis is needed to prevent and control infectious disease, but molecular epidemiological analysis methods for M. californicum have not yet been reported. Here we developed a combination of multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) methods, which are common genotyping methods for various bacteria, for M. californicum. The MLVA is based on four interspersed repeat units that were found in the M. californicum genome data. The MLVA using these repeat units showed sufficient discriminatory power for a molecular epidemiological analysis; i.e., a Hunter-Gaston diversity index (HGDI) of 0.949, against M. californicum strains in Japan and M. californicum strain ATCC 33461. The PFGE for M. californicum also showed sufficient discriminatory power, with an HGDI of 0.985. Strain ATCC 33461 showed MLVA profiles and pulsotypes that differed greatly from those of strains from Japan. These results indicate that MLVA and PFGE are good tools for identifying M. californicum transmission events more accurately. Our combined MLVA and PFGE analysis suggests the persistence of M. californicum infection among herds in a specific area for a long period of time, as well as the movement of cows and heifers accompanying the expansion of M. californicum infection. Failure to identify asymptomatic infected cows is suspected as one of the central causes of the present M. californicum infection scenario in Japan. PMID:25281385

  3. Molecular epidemiology of cases of Mycoplasma californicum infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hata, Eiji; Suzuki, Kan-Ichiro; Hanyu, Hideki; Itoh, Megumi; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kobayashi, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    Bovine mastitis due to Mycoplasma californicum is often accompanied by huge economic losses, and the disease spreads very quickly. An appropriate molecular epidemiological analysis is needed to prevent and control infectious disease, but molecular epidemiological analysis methods for M. californicum have not yet been reported. Here we developed a combination of multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) methods, which are common genotyping methods for various bacteria, for M. californicum. The MLVA is based on four interspersed repeat units that were found in the M. californicum genome data. The MLVA using these repeat units showed sufficient discriminatory power for a molecular epidemiological analysis; i.e., a Hunter-Gaston diversity index (HGDI) of 0.949, against M. californicum strains in Japan and M. californicum strain ATCC 33461. The PFGE for M. californicum also showed sufficient discriminatory power, with an HGDI of 0.985. Strain ATCC 33461 showed MLVA profiles and pulsotypes that differed greatly from those of strains from Japan. These results indicate that MLVA and PFGE are good tools for identifying M. californicum transmission events more accurately. Our combined MLVA and PFGE analysis suggests the persistence of M. californicum infection among herds in a specific area for a long period of time, as well as the movement of cows and heifers accompanying the expansion of M. californicum infection. Failure to identify asymptomatic infected cows is suspected as one of the central causes of the present M. californicum infection scenario in Japan. PMID:25281385

  4. Hemotropic mycoplasmas in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemotropic mycoplasmas are epicellular erythrocytic bacteria that can cause infectious anemia in some mammalian species. Worldwide, hemotropic mycoplasmas are emerging or re-emerging zoonotic pathogens potentially causing serious and significant health problems in wildlife. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasma species in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with and without Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destrucans, the causative agent of white nose syndrome (WNS) that causes significant mortality events in bats. Methods In order to establish the prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasma species in a population of 68 little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with (n?=?53) and without (n?=?15) white-nose syndrome (WNS), PCR was performed targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Results The overall prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasmas in bats was 47%, with similar (p?=?0.5725) prevalence between bats with WNS (49%) and without WNS (40%). 16S rDNA sequence analysis (~1,200 bp) supports the presence of a novel hemotropic Mycoplasma species with 91.75% sequence homology with Mycoplasma haemomuris. No differences were found in gene sequences generated from WNS and non-WNS animals. Conclusions Gene sequences generated from WNS and non-WNS animals suggest that little brown bats could serve as a natural reservoir for this potentially novel Mycoplasma species. Currently, there is minimal information about the prevalence, host-specificity, or the route of transmission of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. among bats. Finally, the potential role of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. as co-factors in the development of disease manifestations in bats, including WNS in Myotis lucifugus, remains to be elucidated. PMID:24655520

  5. Comparative antibiotic eradication of mycoplasma infections from continuous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2002-02-01

    Accumulating data implicate mycoplasma contamination as the single biggest problem in the culture of continuous cell lines. Mycoplasma infection can affect virtually every parameter and functional activity of the eukaryotic cells. A successful alternative to discarding infected cultures is to attempt to eliminate the contaminants by treatment with specific and efficient antimycoplasma antibiotics. The addition of antibiotics to the culture medium during a limited period of time (1-3 wk) is a simple, inexpensive, and very practical approach for decontaminating continuous cell lines. Here, we examined the effectiveness of several antibiotic treatment protocols that we have employed routinely in our cell lines bank. On an aggregate, 673 cultures from 236 chronically mycoplasma-positive cell lines were exposed to one of the following five antibiotic regimens: mycoplasma removal agent (quinolone; a 1-wk treatment), enrofloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), sparfloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), ciprofloxacin (quinolone; 2 wk), and BM-Cyclin (alternating tiamulin and minocycline; 3 wk). The mycoplasma infection was permanently (as determined by three solid mycoplasma detection assays) eliminated by the various antibiotics in 66-85% of the cultures treated. Mycoplasma resistance was seen in 7-21%, and loss of the culture as a result of cytotoxically caused cell death occurred in 3-11% of the cultures treated. Overall, 223 of the 236 mycoplasma-positive cell lines could be cured in a first round of antibiotic treatment with at least one regimen. Taken together, 95% of the mycoplasma-infected cell lines were permanently cleansed of the contaminants by antibiotic treatment, which validates this approach as an efficient and technically simple mycoplasma eradication method. PMID:11929000

  6. Antigenic and Genetic Characterization of Lipoprotein LppQ from Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, El-Mostafa; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    Lipoprotein LppQ, a predominant 48-kDa antigen, and its corresponding gene, lppQ, were characterized in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, the etiological agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. The lppQ gene is specific to M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC and was found in the type strain and in field strains isolated in Europe, Africa, and Australia, as well as in vaccinal strains. LppQ is encoded as a precursor with a consensus sequence for prokaryotic signal peptidase II and a lipid attachment site. The leader sequence shows significant prominent transmembrane helix structure with a predicted outside-to-inside helix formation capacity. The N-terminal domain of the mature LppQ was shown to be surface exposed. It induced a strong, specific, early, and persistent immune response in naturally and experimentally infected animals. The C-terminal domain of LppQ possesses an integral membrane structure built up of repeated units, rich in hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids, which have a pore formation potential. A recombinant peptide representing the N-terminal domain of LppQ was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of nine Mycoplasma-specific TGA (Trp) codons into universal TGG (Trp) codons and expression in Escherichia coli hosts. It was used for serodetection of cattle infected with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, in which it was detected postinfection for significantly longer than conventional serological test reactions. PMID:10882657

  7. Examination of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos' and Mycoplasma haemofelis.

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, Fumina; Suzuki, Jin; Fujihara, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Yusaku; Nagai, Kazuya; Harasawa, Ryô

    2012-01-01

    The intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes of mycoplasmas has been used for a genetic marker for identification of the species. Here we show the intergenic spacer regions of two hemotropic mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos (synonym: 'C. M. haemobovis')' are also useful for classification of this particular group of mycoplasms. The spacer region of M. haemofelis and `C. M. haemobos' consisted of 209 and 210 base pairs, respectively, and both lacked the spacer tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis suggested a monophyletic relationship among hemoplasmas and M. fastidiosum. A hypothetical secondary structure predicted in the spacer regions tentatively assigned the boxA and boxB motifs peculiar to the members of the genus Mycoplasma. M. haemofelis and 'C. M. haemobos' possessed a stem-loop structure in common, despite the presence of a palindromic nucleotide substitution in the stem region. PMID:21836377

  8. Human Coinfection with Bartonella henselae and Two Hemotropic Mycoplasma Variants Resembling Mycoplasma ovis?

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Jane E.; Lindsay, LeAnn L.; Maggi, Ricardo G.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

    2010-01-01

    Two variants of an organism resembling the ovine hemoplasma, Mycoplasma ovis, were detected by PCR in blood samples from a veterinarian in Texas. Coinfection with similar variants has been described in sheep. This represents the first report of human infection with this organism. The veterinarian was coinfected with Bartonella henselae. PMID:20702675

  9. Development of a sensitive nested PCR method for the specific detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC.

    PubMed

    Miserez, R; Pilloud, T; Cheng, X; Nicolet, J; Griot, C; Frey, J

    1997-04-01

    A specific and sensitive test for the detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (SC), the aetiological agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) was developed using two nested PCR reactions. The PCR reactions are based on the nucleotide sequence of lipoprotein P72 of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. The two specific oligonucleotide primer pairs were chosen to match those sequence segments of the P72 gene which differ most from the gene of the closely related lipoprotein P67 of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 (strain PG50). The nested PCR reacted with all of the 34 different strains of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC analysed, and gave no amplification product with any of the closely related mycoplasmas tested, showing its high specificity. In bronchial lavage fluid experimentally contaminated with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, the assay was able to detect as few as two viable cells per ml using a simple lysis procedure prior to the amplification step. With clinical samples, the sensitivity of the nested PCR was about 10(4)-10(5) higher than that of single PCR amplifications performed under the same conditions. The assay was also successfully used to detect M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in bronchial lavage fluid of experimentally infected cattle and proved to be more sensitive than classical culture methods. PMID:9160324

  10. Chromosomal Transfers in Mycoplasmas: When Minimal Genomes Go Mobile

    PubMed Central

    Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Sagné, Eveline; Baranowski, Eric; Breton, Marc; Nouvel, Laurent Xavier; Blanchard, Alain; Marenda, Marc Serge; Tardy, Florence; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a main driving force of bacterial evolution and innovation. This phenomenon was long thought to be marginal in mycoplasmas, a large group of self-replicating bacteria characterized by minute genomes as a result of successive gene losses during evolution. Recent comparative genomic analyses challenged this paradigm, but the occurrence of chromosomal exchanges had never been formally addressed in mycoplasmas. Here, we demonstrated the conjugal transfer of large chromosomal regions within and among ruminant mycoplasma species, with the incorporation of the incoming DNA occurring by homologous recombination into the recipient chromosome. By combining classical mating experiments with high-throughput next-generation sequencing, we documented the transfer of almost every position of the mycoplasma chromosome. Mycoplasma conjugation relies on the occurrence of an integrative conjugative element (ICE) in at least one parent cell. While ICE propagates horizontally from ICE-positive to ICE-negative cells, chromosomal transfers (CTs) occurred in the opposite direction, from ICE-negative to ICE-positive cells, independently of ICE movement. These findings challenged the classical mechanisms proposed for other bacteria in which conjugative CTs are driven by conjugative elements, bringing into the spotlight a new means for rapid mycoplasma innovation. Overall, they radically change our current views concerning the evolution of mycoplasmas, with particularly far-reaching implications given that over 50 species are human or animal pathogens. PMID:25425234

  11. Duplex PCR to differentiate between Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the basis of conserved species-specific sequences of their hemagglutinin genes.

    PubMed

    Mardassi, B Ben Abdelmoumen; Mohamed, R Ben; Gueriri, I; Boughattas, S; Mlik, B

    2005-02-01

    We developed a duplex PCR assay targeting the hemagglutinin multigene families, vlhA and pMGA, of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum, respectively. The assay proved to be specific and sensitive enough to justify its use for the simultaneous detection of the two major avian mycoplasma species from field isolates. PMID:15695715

  12. Morphology of Ureaplasma urealyticum (T-mycoplasma) organisms and colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Razin, S; Masover, G K; Palant, M; Hayflick, L

    1977-01-01

    The morphology of Ureaplasm urealyticum in broth cultures was studied by phase-contrast microscopy. Most organisms appeared singly or in pairs. Long filaments and long chains of cocci, common in classical mycoplasma cultures, were not observed. On solid medium, U. urealyticum produced "fried-egg" colonies which developed according to the scheme suggested by Razin and Oliver (J. Gen. Microbiol., 1961) for the morphogenesis of the classical mycoplasma colonies. The formation of the peripheral zone of the colonies followed that of the central zone only when growth conditions were adequate, Hence, the appearance of peripheral zones, and consequently the larger colony size, can be taken as an indicator of improved growth conditions. Incubation in an atmosphere of 100% CO2 resulted in significantly larger colonies than in an atmosphere of N2, O2, or air. CO2 acts as a buffer, keeping the pH at the optimal range for Ureaplasma growth (pH 6.0 to 6.5) in the presence of the ammonia produced from the urea hydrolyzed by the organisms. The addition to the medium of 0.01 M urea together with 0.01 M putrescine enabled better growth than with urea alone. Small amounts of phosphate improved growth in an atmosphere of CO2, apparently fulfilling a nutritional role. Under nitrogen, higher phosphate concentrations were required for good growth, apparently serving as a buffer as well as a nutrient. Sodium chloride and sucrose which had been added to increase the tonicity of the medium inhibited growth above 0.1 M. An increase in the agar concentration above 2% resulted in decreased colony size. Likewise, prolonged drying of the agar plates caused a marked decrease in colony size, mostly affecting the peripheral zone. The addition of both urea and putrescine to the growth medium and incubation in a humidified CO2 atmosphere are recommended for improved growth and formation of fried-egg colonies of U. ureaplyticum on agar. It must be emphasized that these experiments were carried out with a laboratory-adapted strain. Images PMID:15986

  13. Rapid detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Kursa, Olimpia; Wo?niakowski, Grzegorz; Tomczyk, Grzegorz; Sawicka, Anna; Minta, Zenon

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) remains a serious concern in production of poultry and affects world production of chickens and turkeys. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA has been recently used for the identification of different economically important avian pathogens. The aim of this study was to develop LAMP for simple and inexpensive detection of MS strains in poultry using specifically designed primers targeting hemagglutin A (vlh) gene. The assay was conducted in a water bath for 1 h at 63 °C. The results were visualized after addition of SYBR Green(®) fluorescent dye. LAMP was specific exclusively for MS without cross-reactivity with other Mycoplasma species. The sensitivity of LAMP was determined as 10(-1) CFU/ml and was 1,000 times higher than MS-specific polymerase chain reaction. LAMP assay was conducted on 18 MS field strains to ensure its reliability and usefulness. This is the first report on LAMP development and application for the rapid detection of MS isolated from chickens. This simple method may be applied by diagnostic laboratories without access to expensive equipment. PMID:25413672

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus hominis (MRSHo): Low Clonality and Reservoirs of SCCmec Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Bouchami, Ons; Ben Hassen, Assia; de Lencastre, Herminia; Miragaia, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus hominis (MRSHo) are important human pathogens in immunocompromised patients. However, little is known regarding its population structure and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) content. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the population structure and the SCCmec content of S. hominis, 34 MRSHo and 11 methicillin-susceptible S. hominis (MSSHo) from neutropenic patients collected over a 3-year period were studied. The genetic backgrounds of S. hominis isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and SCCmec types were determined by PCR. Cassette chromosome recombinases (ccr) were characterized by PCR and ccrB sequencing. The 34 S. hominis isolates were classified into as many as 28 types and 32 subtypes (SID?=?99.82%); clonal dissemination was occasionally observed. The main SCCmec structures identified were SCCmec type VI (4B) (20%), SCCmec VIII (4A) (15%), and a new SCCmec composed of mec complex A in association with ccrAB1 (38%); 27% of the isolates harbored non-typeable SCCmec. Overall, a high prevalence of mec complex A (73.5%), ccrAB1 (50%) and ccrAB4 (44%) were found. Importantly, ccrB1 and ccrB4 from both MRSHo and MSSHo showed a high nucleotide sequence homology with those found in S. aureus SCCmec I, VI and VIII respectively (>95%). Conclusions/Significance The S. hominis population showed a limited clonality and a low genetic diversity in the allotypes of ccr and classes of mec complex. Moreover, our data suggest that S. hominis might have been a privileged source of mec complex A, ccrB1 and ccrB4, for the assembly of primordial SCCmec types. PMID:21760926

  15. New insights on the biology of swine respiratory tract mycoplasmas from a comparative genome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis live in swine respiratory tracts. M. flocculare, a commensal bacterium, is genetically closely related to M. hyopneumoniae, the causative agent of enzootic porcine pneumonia. M. hyorhinis is also pathogenic, causing polyserositis and arthritis. In this work, we present the genome sequences of M. flocculare and M. hyopneumoniae strain 7422, and we compare these genomes with the genomes of other M. hyoponeumoniae strain and to the a M. hyorhinis genome. These analyses were performed to identify possible characteristics that may help to explain the different behaviors of these species in swine respiratory tracts. Results The overall genome organization of three species was analyzed, revealing that the ORF clusters (OCs) differ considerably and that inversions and rearrangements are common. Although M. flocculare and M. hyopneumoniae display a high degree of similarity with respect to the gene content, only some genomic regions display considerable synteny. Genes encoding proteins that may be involved in host-cell adhesion in M. hyopneumoniae and M. flocculare display differences in genomic structure and organization. Some genes encoding adhesins of the P97 family are absent in M. flocculare and some contain sequence differences or lack of domains that are considered to be important for adhesion to host cells. The phylogenetic relationship of the three species was confirmed by a phylogenomic approach. The set of genes involved in metabolism, especially in the uptake of precursors for nucleic acids synthesis and nucleotide metabolism, display some differences in copy number and the presence/absence in the three species. Conclusions The comparative analyses of three mycoplasma species that inhabit the swine respiratory tract facilitated the identification of some characteristics that may be related to their different behaviors. M. hyopneumoniae and M. flocculare display many differences that may help to explain why one species is pathogenic and the other is considered to be commensal. However, it was not possible to identify specific virulence determinant factors that could explain the differences in the pathogenicity of the analyzed species. The M. hyorhinis genome contains differences in some components involved in metabolism and evasion of the host’s immune system that may contribute to its growth aggressiveness. Several horizontal gene transfer events were identified. The phylogenomic analysis places M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis in the hyopneumoniae clade. PMID:23497205

  16. Molecular characterization of Mycoplasma arthritidis variable surface protein MAA2.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, K E; Weaver, E J; Donelan, W; Al-Sheboul, S

    1998-06-01

    Earlier studies implied a role for Mycoplasma arthritidis surface protein MAA2 in cytadherence and virulence and showed that it exhibited both size and phase variability. Here we report the further analysis of MAA2 and the cloning and sequencing of the maa2 gene from two M. arthritidis strains, 158p10p9 and H606, expressing two size variants of MAA2. Triton X-114 partitioning and metabolic labeling with [3H]palmitic acid suggested lipid modification of MAA2. Surface exposure of the C terminus was indicated by cleavage of monoclonal antibody-specific epitopes from intact cells by carboxypeptidase Y. The maa2 genes from both strains were highly conserved, consisting largely of six (for 158p10p9) or five (for H606) nearly identical, 264-bp tandem direct repeats. The deduced amino acid sequence predicted a largely hydrophilic, highly basic protein with a 29-amino-acid lipoprotein signal peptide. The maa2 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli from the lacZ promoter of vector pGEM-T. The recombinant product was approximately 3 kDa larger than the native protein, suggesting that the signal peptide was not processed in E. coli. The maa2 gene and upstream DNA sequences were cloned from M. arthritidis clonal variants differing in MAA2 expression state. Expression state correlated with the length of a poly(T) tract just upstream of a putative -10 box. Full-sized recombinant MAA2 was expressed in E. coli from genes derived from both ON and OFF expression variants, indicating that control of expression did not include alterations within the coding region. PMID:9596719

  17. Survival of Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' in blood of cats used for transfusions.

    PubMed

    Gary, Anthony T; Richmond, Holly L; Tasker, Séverine; Hackett, Timothy B; Lappin, Michael R

    2006-10-01

    Blood transfusions are commonly administered to cats; associated risks include the transmission of various infectious diseases including Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (Mhm). Blood transfusions in citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA-1) solution are commonly administered immediately or stored for up to 1 month prior to administration. It is unknown whether Mhf or Mhm survive in this solution or temperature. The purpose of this study was to determine if Mhf or Mhm remain viable after storage in CPDA-1 for varying periods of time. The results provide evidence that transmission of hemoplasmas to naïve cats occurs after administration of infected feline blood that has been stored in CPDA-1 solution for 1h (Mhf) and 1 week (Mhm). These findings support the recommendation that cats used as blood donors be screened for Mhf and Mhm infections by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay prior to use. PMID:16777455

  18. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Mycoplasma pneumoniae range from inapparent infection to mild or severe upper respiratory disease, ear infection, and bronchial pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Mycoplasma pneumoniae range from inapparent infection to mild or severe upper respiratory disease, ear infection, and bronchial pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Mycoplasma pneumoniae range from inapparent infection to mild or severe upper respiratory disease, ear infection, and bronchial pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Mycoplasma pneumoniae range from inapparent infection to mild or severe upper respiratory disease, ear infection, and bronchial pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Mycoplasma pneumoniae range from inapparent infection to mild or severe upper respiratory disease, ear infection, and bronchial pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification...

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF IMMUNOGENS OF 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' BY PROTEIN BLOTTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to a nitrocellulose sheet by blotting. Sera obtained from infected hamsters and immunized rabbits were then incubated with the nitrocellulose strips. Proteins which are capa...

  4. 21 CFR 864.2360 - Mycoplasma detection media and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2360 Mycoplasma detection...pleuropneumonia-like organisms (PPLO), a common microbial contaminant in cell cultures. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  5. Pharmacodynamics of Antimicrobials against Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides Small Colony, the Causative Agent of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John D.; McKellar, Quintin A.; McKeever, Declan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC) is the causative agent of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a disease of substantial economic importance in sub-Saharan Africa. Failure of vaccination to curtail spread of this disease has led to calls for evaluation of the role of antimicrobials in CBPP control. Three major classes of antimicrobial are effective against mycoplasmas, namely tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones and macrolides. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effector kinetics of oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin against two MmmSC field strains in artificial medium and adult bovine serum. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined for oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin against MmmSC strains B237 and Tan8 using a macrodilution technique, and time-kill curves were constructed for various multiples of the MIC over a 24 hour period in artificial medium and serum. Data were fitted to sigmoid Emax models to obtain 24 hour-area under curve/MIC ratios for mycoplasmastasis and, where appropriate, for mycoplasmacidal activity and virtual mycoplasmal elimination. Results Minimum inhibitory concentrations against B237 were 20-fold higher, 2-fold higher and approximately 330-fold lower in serum than in artificial medium for oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin, respectively. Such differences were mirrored in experiments using Tan8. Oxytetracycline was mycoplasmastatic against both strains in both matrices. Danofloxacin elicited mycoplasmacidal activity against B237 and virtual elimination of Tan8; similar maximum antimycoplasmal effects were observed in artificial medium and serum. Tulathromycin effected virtual elimination of B237 but was mycoplasmastatic against Tan8 in artificial medium. However, this drug was mycoplasmastatic against both strains in the more physiologically relevant matrix of serum. Conclusions Oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin are all suitable candidates for further investigation as potential treatments for CBPP. This study also highlights the importance of testing drug activity in biological matrices as well as artificial media. PMID:22952911

  6. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Phytase and 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol on the Blood Characteristics of Commercial Layers Innoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with the F-Stain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 3 trials, the effects of dietary supplementation with phytase and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on BW and the blood characteristics of commercial layers that were inoculated pre-lay (12 wk of age) or at the onset of lay (22 wk of age) with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were assessed at 34, ...

  7. Insights into the Gene Expression Profile of Uncultivable Hemotrophic Mycoplasma suis during Acute Infection, Obtained Using Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Kathrin M.; Carranza, Paula M.; Gehrig, Peter M.; Roschitzki, Bernd; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Hoelzle, Katharina; Riedel, Katharina; Kube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hemotrophic mycoplasmas, bacteria without cell walls whose niche is the erythrocytes of their hosts, have never been cultivated in vitro. Therefore, knowledge of their pathogenesis is fundamental. Mycoplasma suis infects pigs, causing either acute fatal hemolytic anemia or chronic low-grade anemia, growth retardation, and immune suppression. Recently, the complete genomes of two hemotrophic mycoplasma species, M. suis and M. haemofelis, were sequenced, offering new strategies for the analysis of their pathogenesis. In this study we implemented a proteomic approach to identify M. suis proteins during acute infection by using tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-two percent of the predicted proteins encoded in M. suis strain KI_3806 were identified. These included nearly all encoded proteins of glycolysis and nucleotide metabolism. The proteins for lipid metabolism, however, were underrepresented. A high proportion of the detected proteins are involved in information storage and processing (72.6%). In addition, several proteins of different functionalities, i.e., posttranslational modification, membrane genesis, signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, inorganic ion transport, and defense mechanisms, were identified. In its reduced genome, M. suis harbors 65.3% (strain Illinois) and 65.9% (strain KI_3806) of the genes encode hypothetical proteins. Of these, only 6.3% were identified at the proteome level. All proteins identified in this study are present in both M. suis strains and are encoded in more highly conserved regions of the genome sequence. In conclusion, our proteome approach is a further step toward the elucidation of the pathogenesis and life cycle of M. suis as well as the establishment of an in vitro cultivation system. PMID:22267506

  8. Insights into the gene expression profile of uncultivable hemotrophic Mycoplasma suis during acute infection, obtained using proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Felder, Kathrin M; Carranza, Paula M; Gehrig, Peter M; Roschitzki, Bernd; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Hoelzle, Katharina; Riedel, Katharina; Kube, Michael; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2012-03-01

    Hemotrophic mycoplasmas, bacteria without cell walls whose niche is the erythrocytes of their hosts, have never been cultivated in vitro. Therefore, knowledge of their pathogenesis is fundamental. Mycoplasma suis infects pigs, causing either acute fatal hemolytic anemia or chronic low-grade anemia, growth retardation, and immune suppression. Recently, the complete genomes of two hemotrophic mycoplasma species, M. suis and M. haemofelis, were sequenced, offering new strategies for the analysis of their pathogenesis. In this study we implemented a proteomic approach to identify M. suis proteins during acute infection by using tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-two percent of the predicted proteins encoded in M. suis strain KI_3806 were identified. These included nearly all encoded proteins of glycolysis and nucleotide metabolism. The proteins for lipid metabolism, however, were underrepresented. A high proportion of the detected proteins are involved in information storage and processing (72.6%). In addition, several proteins of different functionalities, i.e., posttranslational modification, membrane genesis, signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, inorganic ion transport, and defense mechanisms, were identified. In its reduced genome, M. suis harbors 65.3% (strain Illinois) and 65.9% (strain KI_3806) of the genes encode hypothetical proteins. Of these, only 6.3% were identified at the proteome level. All proteins identified in this study are present in both M. suis strains and are encoded in more highly conserved regions of the genome sequence. In conclusion, our proteome approach is a further step toward the elucidation of the pathogenesis and life cycle of M. suis as well as the establishment of an in vitro cultivation system. PMID:22267506

  9. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from pigs using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguti, Maurício; Oliveira, Rosângela C; Marques, Lucas M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Buim, Marcos R; Neto, Renata L; Guimarães, Ana Márcia S; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Economic loss in pig breeding is common due to respiratory disorders, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, namely, are the most common infectious agents. The aim of this study is to recover these mollicutes and detect their genotypic variations by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing the 16?s rRNA gene. One hundred and twenty-six swabs from tonsil and nasal mucus of pigs with respiratory disorders were analysed. A total of 78 lungs were sampled, as well as two trachea and two tonsils obtained from animals with respiratory disorder. A total of 59 isolates were obtained: 1 (1.70 per cent) of M hyopneumoniae, 2 (3.40 per cent) of Mycoplasma flocculare and 56 (94.90 per cent) of M hyorhinis. The PFGE for M hyorhinis showed 10 profiles with enzyme AvaI and 9 profiles with XhoI. A low polymorphism of the 16sRNS gene was detected in M hyorhinis isolates compared with the type strain in the GenBank. M hyorhinis isolates of different herds showed a large heterogenicity with enzymes AvaI and XhoI. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed for analysing the interspecific and intraspecific variations of isolated mycoplasmas. PMID:26688737

  10. Characterization of triosephosphate isomerase from Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shijun; Chen, Danqing; Yu, Shengqing; Chen, Hongjun; Tan, Lei; Hu, Meirong; Qiu, Xusheng; Song, Cuiping; Ding, Chan

    2015-09-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (Tpi) is a glycolytic enzyme that is essential for efficient energy production in many pathogens. However, its function in Mycoplasma gallisepticum has not been fully elucidated. In this study, the mga0357 gene of M. gallisepticum, which encodes TpiA (MGTpiA), was amplified and expressed in Escherichia coli by IPTG induction. The purified recombinant MGTpiA protein exhibited catalytic activity that was similar to TPI from rabbit muscle, reducing NAD(+) to NADH. The MGTpiA was also found to be a surface-exposed protein by western blotting and immunofluorescence assays. In addition, cytadherence inhibition assays confirmed that the cytadherence of M. gallisepticum to the DF-1 cells was significantly inhibited by the anti-MGTpiA serum. The results of the study suggested that MGTpiA plays an important role in the metabolism and closely related to the M. gallisepticum pathogenicity. PMID:26319024

  11. Proteome of the bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Demina, I A; Serebryakova, M V; Ladygina, V G; Rogova, M A; Zgoda, V G; Korzhenevskyi, D A; Govorun, V M

    2009-02-01

    Using modern proteomic assays, we have identified the products of gene expression and posttranslational modifications of proteins of the bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum S6. Combinations of different technologies of protein separation by electrophoresis and mass-spectrometric analysis gave us a total of 446 proteins, i.e. 61% of the annotated proteins of this microorganism. The Pro-Q Diamond and Pro-Q Emerald dye technology was used for fluorescent detection of ten phosphoproteins and two glycoproteins. The acylation of proteins was studied by electrophoresis after in vivo labeling with different 14C-labeled fatty acids, followed by autoradiography. Sixteen acylated proteins were identified, with a quarter of them involved in plasma membrane construction and another quarter involved in cell energy metabolism. PMID:19267672

  12. Lung abscess caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Omae, Takashi; Matsubayashi, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy with West syndrome was referred to hospital because of high fever and cough. Chest X-ray and computed tomography showed consolidation with an abscess in the right upper lobe. Laboratory data indicated cytokine storm. Various antibacterial agents and additional corticosteroid were unable to control the hypercytokinemia, which was suppressed after cyclosporine A was started. The lung abscess remained, however, and right upper lobectomy was performed. Culture from the abscess showed no growth, while polymerase chain reaction assay indicated Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA. Serum passive agglutinin titer for M. pneumoniae was significantly elevated in the convalescent phase. These findings are strong evidence that the lung abscess was caused by M. pneumoniae infection. PMID:26177124

  13. Role of the GapA and CrmA Cytadhesins of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in Promoting Virulence and Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Indiková, Ivana; Much, Peter; Stipkovits, László; Siebert-Gulle, Karin; Citti, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is an important avian pathogen that commonly induces chronic respiratory disease in chicken. To better understand the mycoplasma factors involved in host colonization, chickens were infected via aerosol with two hemadsorption-negative (HA?) mutants, mHAD3 and RCL2, that were derived from a low passage of the pathogenic strain R (Rlow) and are both deficient in the two major cytadhesins GapA and CrmA. After 9 days of infection, chickens were monitored for air sac lesions and for the presence of mycoplasmas in various organs. The data showed that mHAD3, in which the crmA gene has been disrupted, did not promote efficient colonization or significant air sac lesions. In contrast, the spontaneous HA? RCL2 mutant, which contains a point mutation in the gapA structural gene, successfully colonized the respiratory tract and displayed an attenuated virulence compared to that of Rlow. It has previously been shown in vitro that the point mutation of RCL2 spontaneously reverts with a high frequency, resulting in on-and-off switching of the HA phenotype. Detailed analyses further revealed that such an event is not responsible for the observed in vivo outcome, since 98.4% of the mycoplasma populations recovered from RCL2-infected chickens still display the mutation and the associated phenotype. Unlike Rlow, however, RCL2 was unable to colonize inner organs. These findings demonstrate the major role played by the GapA and CrmA proteins in M. gallisepticum host colonization and virulence. PMID:23460514

  14. In vitro effect of some Egyptian herbal extracts against Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Ahmad, Azza K; Andelgelil, Noha H; Abdellatif, Manal Z M; Kamal, Amany M; Mohamed, Rabie M

    2015-04-01

    Blastocystis hominis is an enteric parasite that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of humans and many animals. This emerging parasite has a worldwide distribution. It is often identified as the most common eukaryotic organism reported in human fecal samples that showed a dramatic increase in recent years. Metronidazole is the main therapy for blastocystosis. However, frequent reports of treatment failure suggesting isolates resistance to metronidazole. This study determined the growth pattern and in vitro susceptibility of B. hominis to nitazoxanide (NTZ), garlic, ginger, onion and turmeric. Fecal samples positive for Blastocystis were collected from patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and processed for culture. Cultured samples were subjected to examination by light microscopy. Herbs' extracts was freshly prepared. Drug susceptibility assays was done using 0.1 mg/ml of NTZ, garlic, ginger, onion and turmeric. Effects assessed on parasite culture after 24 hr. and 48 hr. Cultured fecal samples of B. hominis have identified several forms of the organism; vacuolar, granular, amoeboid and cyst forms within 24 hr. Nitazoxanide treatment significantly (P < 0.001) lowered the parasite number after 48 hr. (mean, 337.5 ± 17.67) /ml. The reduction rate after 48 hr. compared to PBS was 93.33%. Ginger treatment significantly (P < 0.002) lowered the number of the parasite after 48 hr. (mean, 335 ± 7.07)/ml. Moreover, garlic treatment also significantly (P < 0.002) lowered the number of the parasite after 48 hr. (mean, 382.5 ± 10.60)/ml. The reduction rates after 48 hr. in these treated samples compared to PBS were 92.98% and 92.44% respectively. However, onion, and turmeric treatments insignificantly lowered the number of the parasite after 48 hr. (P < 0.15 & < 0.22 respectively). PMID:26012223

  15. Proteomics inference of genes involved in host adaptation of Mycoplasma gallinarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different from most other host-specific mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma gallinarum has been isolated from various hosts, such as poultry, pig, cattle, and sheep. The wide distribution among different hosts, the low pathogenesis, and the weak host immunological responses suggest this mycoplasma has a unique ...

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Biofilm Cells and Molecular Characterisation of Staphylococcus hominis Isolates from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Olazarán, Soraya; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; González, Gloria M.; Casillas-Vega, Néstor; Garza-González, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to characterise the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, genetic relatedness, biofilm formation and composition, icaADBC genes detection, icaD expression, and antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus hominis isolates from blood. Methods The study included 67 S. hominis blood isolates. Methicillin resistance was evaluated with the cefoxitin disk test. mecA gene and SCCmec were detected by multiplex PCR. Genetic relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Biofilm formation and composition were evaluated by staining with crystal violet and by detachment assay, respectively; and the biofilm index (BI) was determined. Detection and expression of icaADBC genes were performed by multiplex PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibilities of planktonic cells (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC) and biofilm cells (minimum biofilm eradication concentration, MBEC) were determined by the broth dilution method. Results Eighty-five percent (57/67) of isolates were methicillin resistant and mecA positive. Of the mecA-positive isolates, 66.7% (38/57) carried a new putative SCCmec type. Four clones were detected, with two to five isolates each. Among all isolates, 91% (61/67) were categorised as strong biofilm producers. Biofilm biomass composition was heterogeneous (polysaccharides, proteins and DNA). All isolates presented the icaD gene, and 6.66% (1/15) isolates expressed icaD. This isolate presented the five genes of ica operon. Higher BI and MBEC values than the MIC values were observed for amikacin, vancomycin, linezolid, oxacillin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions S. hominis isolates were highly resistant to methicillin and other antimicrobials. Most of the detected SCCmec types were different than those described for S. aureus. Isolates indicated low clonality. The results indicate that S. hominis is a strong biofilm producer with an extracellular matrix with similar composition of proteins, DNA and N-acetylglucosamine; and presents high frequency and low expression of icaD gene. Biofilm production is associated with increased antibiotic resistance. PMID:26659110

  17. Serological and molecular survey of sheep infected with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen; Jun, Qiao; Qingling, Meng; Zhengxiang, Hu; Yu, Ma; Xuepeng, Cai; Zibing, Cheng; Jinsheng, Zhang; Zaichao, Zhang; Kuojun, Cai; Chuangfu, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumonia is one of the most important infectious diseases that threaten sheep production. In order to investigate the epidemic status of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae infection in sheep, indirect hemagglutination assay was used to analyze 1679 serum samples collected from four different breeds of sheep (Kazak sheep, Hu sheep, Merino sheep, and Duolang sheep) in six regions in Xinjiang between 2012 and 2014. One thousand one hundred sixty-nine sheep nasal swabs and 180 lungs were PCR analyzed. The results showed that the average positive rates of the serum samples were 17.75 %. The positive rates were between 9.76 and 30.61 % in the four breeds. Among them, the Hu sheep had a significantly higher rate than other breeds (P?strains isolated from inland areas of China, indicating that these epidemic isolates came from the trans-province introductions. Our survey suggests that quarantine is necessary for sheep imported from inland, and effective immunization should be implemented in sheep susceptible to M. ovipneumoniae in Xinjiang, China. PMID:26315151

  18. Determination of sensitivity of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae to tylosin and selected antibacterial drugs by a microtiter technique.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, B J; Ross, R F

    1975-01-01

    A microtiter technique was used for determination of the sensitivity of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae to antibiotics and other drugs. Use of a biphasic agar-broth medium in microtiter plates allowed direct visualization of growth. Results were more reproducible with this system than when broth alone was used and evaluation based on color change was required. Attempts to adapt the test for use with Mycoplasma hyorhinis were not successful. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 12 drugs and drug combinations for 12 strains of M. hyosynoviae are presented. Drugs with the lowest minimal inhibitory concentrations were tylosin (0.37 mcg/ml)and lincomycin (0.88 mcg/ml), both of which have been used for treatment and control of M. hyosynoviae arthritis. Comparison of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of tylosin for 43 isolates of M. hyosynoviae obtained in 1959 and 1960 and from 1966 through 1971 indicated the possibilty of decreasing sensitivity to the drug although differences between recent isolates and earlier ones were not statistically significant. PMID:122911

  19. Proteomic analysis of tylosin-resistant Mycoplasma gallisepticum reveals enzymatic activities associated with resistance.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Cui, Yaowen; Kang, Mengjiao; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a significant pathogenic bacterium that infects poultry, causing chronic respiratory disease and sinusitis in chickens and turkeys, respectively. M. gallisepticum infection poses a substantial economic threat to the poultry industry, and this threat is made worse by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. The mechanisms of resistance are often difficult to determine; for example, little is known about antibiotic resistance of M. gallisepticum at the proteome level. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analyses of an antibiotic (tylosin)-resistant M. gallisepticum mutant and a susceptible parent strain using a combination of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were identified as differentially expressed in the resistant strain compared to the susceptible strain. Most of these proteins were related to catalytic activity, including catalysis that promotes the formylation of initiator tRNA and energy production. Elongation factors Tu and G were over-expressed in the resistant strains, and this could promote the binding of tRNA to ribosomes and catalyze ribosomal translocation, the coordinated movement of tRNA, and conformational changes in the ribosome. Taken together, our results indicate that M. gallisepticum develops resistance to tylosin by regulating associated enzymatic activities. PMID:26584633

  20. Proteomic analysis of tylosin-resistant Mycoplasma gallisepticum reveals enzymatic activities associated with resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Cui, Yaowen; Kang, Mengjiao; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a significant pathogenic bacterium that infects poultry, causing chronic respiratory disease and sinusitis in chickens and turkeys, respectively. M. gallisepticum infection poses a substantial economic threat to the poultry industry, and this threat is made worse by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. The mechanisms of resistance are often difficult to determine; for example, little is known about antibiotic resistance of M. gallisepticum at the proteome level. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analyses of an antibiotic (tylosin)-resistant M. gallisepticum mutant and a susceptible parent strain using a combination of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were identified as differentially expressed in the resistant strain compared to the susceptible strain. Most of these proteins were related to catalytic activity, including catalysis that promotes the formylation of initiator tRNA and energy production. Elongation factors Tu and G were over-expressed in the resistant strains, and this could promote the binding of tRNA to ribosomes and catalyze ribosomal translocation, the coordinated movement of tRNA, and conformational changes in the ribosome. Taken together, our results indicate that M. gallisepticum develops resistance to tylosin by regulating associated enzymatic activities. PMID:26584633

  1. Interaction of virulent Mycoplasma pneumoniae with hamster tracheal organ cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, P C; Collier, A M; Baseman, J B

    1976-01-01

    Exposure of hamster tracheal organ cultures to virulent Mycoplasma pneumoniae leads to alterations in ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein biosynthesis and metabolism of the respiratory epithelium. An examination of the turnover rates of RNA and protein in infected tracheal organ cultures indicates that the rates of degradation of both prelabeled host cell RNA and protein are similar to those of uninfected controls. Infected tracheal organ cultures shifted to a nonpermissive medium within 24 h after infection and further incubated in the nonpermissive medium for 72 or 96 h behaved as normal uninfected cultures in terms of metabolic precursor uptake. Under these conditions, mycoplasmas remained attached to the respiratory epithelium. Cell membranes prepared from virulent mycoplasmas by several procedures neither attached to nor altered the metabolic activity of tracheal cultures. These data indicate that the intimate contact between virulent mycoplasmas and the respiratory epithelium does not alone account for the subsequent interruption of host cell metabolism but must be accompanied by continued multiplication and biochemical function of attached mycoplasmas. Images PMID:985803

  2. Inorganic pyrophosphatase in uncultivable hemotrophic mycoplasmas: identification and properties of the enzyme from Mycoplasma suis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma suis belongs to a group of highly specialized hemotrophic bacteria that attach to the surface of host erythrocytes. Hemotrophic mycoplasmas are uncultivable and the genomes are not sequenced so far. Therefore, there is a need for the clarification of essential metabolic pathways which could be crucial barriers for the establishment of an in vitro cultivation system for these veterinary significant bacteria. Inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPase) are important enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate PPi to inorganic phosphate Pi. PPases are essential and ubiquitous metal-dependent enzymes providing a thermodynamic pull for many biosynthetic reactions. Here, we describe the identification, recombinant production and characterization of the soluble (s)PPase of Mycoplasma suis. Results Screening of genomic M. suis libraries was used to identify a gene encoding the M. suis inorganic pyrophosphatase (sPPase). The M. suis sPPase consists of 164 amino acids with a molecular mass of 20 kDa. The highest identity of 63.7% was found to the M. penetrans sPPase. The typical 13 active site residues as well as the cation binding signature could be also identified in the M. suis sPPase. The activity of the M. suis enzyme was strongly dependent on Mg2+ and significantly lower in the presence of Mn2+ and Zn2+. Addition of Ca2+ and EDTA inhibited the M. suis sPPase activity. These characteristics confirmed the affiliation of the M. suis PPase to family I soluble PPases. The highest activity was determined at pH 9.0. In M. suis the sPPase builds tetramers of 80 kDa which were detected by convalescent sera from experimentally M. suis infected pigs. Conclusion The identification and characterization of the sPPase of M. suis is an additional step towards the clarification of the metabolism of hemotrophic mycoplasmas and, thus, important for the establishment of an in vitro cultivation system. As an antigenic and conserved protein the M. suis sPPase could in future be further analyzed as a diagnostic antigen. PMID:20646294

  3. Occurrence of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' infection in domestic cats in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Masashi; Yamada, Takatsugu; Harasawa, Ryô

    2007-10-01

    We have examined the presence of hemoplasmas, hemotropic mycoplasmas, among domestic cats (Felis catus) in Japan by using a species specific PCR, and found 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis', a recently recognized hemoplasma species. A total of 60 feline blood samples collected in 2004 and 2005 were subjected to PCR amplification for the detection of Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis'. Six blood samples collected from domestic cats were found infected with the 'Candidatus M. turicensis'. All of them are also infected with other species of hemoplasmas, M. haemofelis and/or 'Candidatus M. haemominutum'. This is the first to demonstrate 'Candidatus M. turicensis' infections among cat population in Japan. PMID:17984594

  4. Substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines as Cryptosporidium hominis thymidylate synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vidya P; Frey, Kathleen M; Wang, Yiqiang; Jain, Hitesh K; Gangjee, Aleem; Anderson, Karen S

    2013-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a gastrointestinal disease caused by a protozoan Cryptosporidium hominis is often fatal in immunocompromised individuals. There is little clinical data to show that the existing treatment by nitazoxanide and paromomycin is effective in immunocompromised individuals. Thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) are essential enzymes in the folate biosynthesis pathway and are well established as drug targets in cancer and malaria. A novel series of classical antifolates, 2-amino-4-oxo-5-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines have been evaluated as Cryptosporidium hominis thymidylate synthase (ChTS) inhibitors. Crystal structure in complex with the most potent compound, a 2'-chlorophenyl with a sulfur bridge with a Ki of 8.83±0.67 nM is discussed in terms of several Van der Waals, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions with the protein residues and the substrate analog 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate. Of these interactions, two interactions with the non-conserved residues (A287 and S290) offer an opportunity to develop ChTS specific inhibitors. Compound 6 serves as a lead compound for analog design and its crystal structure provides clues for the design of ChTS specific inhibitors. PMID:23927969

  5. Genotypic Characterization of Cryptosporidium hominis from Water Samples in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Ronalda S.; Dropa, Milena; Fernandes, Licia N.; Carvalho, Terezinha T.; Sato, Maria Inês Z.; Soares, Rodrigo M.; Matté, Glavur R.; Matté, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium has emerged as one of the most important water contaminants, causing waterborne outbreaks of diarrheal diseases worldwide. The small size of oocysts under the microscope and the possibility of changes in characteristics of oocysts, mainly in environmental samples, make the taxonomy of the genus difficult if morphologic characteristics are considered. This limitation encouraged the application of molecular methods to identify this microorganism. The aim of this study was to detect and identify by nested-polymerase chain reaction oocysts of Cryptosporidium present in water samples in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Water samples were concentrated through a membrane filter, DNA was extracted by using a standard technique, and both amplification reactions used forward and reverse oligonucleotides that were complementary to Cryptosporidium 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Thirty water samples from different sites of collection in the state of São Paulo were evaluated. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 30% of the samples. By genoptyping, C. hominis and Cryptosporidium sp. were identified in recreational water and C. meleagridis was identified in surface water samples. This is the first report of C. hominis in environmental samples in Brazil. Although identification of Cryptosporidium is still a difficult task, molecular methods are essential for specific identification and are a helpful tool to aid to understand the epidemiology of this parasite in Brazil. PMID:22049036

  6. Warble? What’s a Warble? A recap of the human bot fly, Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr. 1781)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human bot fly, Dermatobia hominis (Linnaeus Jr., 1781) is a major pest of livestock in Mexico, Central and South America. Myiasis caused by the larvae result in economic losses due to hide damage and reductions in weight gain and milk production. They have a broad host range which includes wildl...

  7. Prevalence and Genotype Characterization of Blastocystis hominis Among the Baghmalek People in Southwestern Iran in 2013 - 2014

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnood, Saleh; Rafiei, Abdollah; Saki, Jasem; Alizadeh, Kobra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blastocystis hominis is a common globally distributed parasite. The prevalence of this parasite has been shown to vary among different countries. Molecular studies have also shown that there is a high level of genetic diversity among Blastocystis spp. isolated from humans and animals. Extensive information on parasitic genotypes will aid in devising more effective strategies for the identification and potential control of these pathogenic parasites. Objectives: This study aimed to gain information on the prevalence and abundance of Blastocystis subtypes in Iran. Materials and Methods: Over a period of 3 months, 1,410 stool samples were collected and examined by microscopy. Samples found to be positive for B. hominis were concentrated and phylogenetic analysis was subsequently performed. A questionnaire was completed by all study participants. Results: Blastocystis hominis was found to have a prevalence of 3.33% in the study population. There was no significant association of Blastocystis infection with age (P = 0.3) or gender (P = 0.57). The Blastocystis subtypes (ST) identified in this study were ST3, ST4, ST5, and ST7 with the most prevalent being ST4 (40.9%). Conclusions: The prevalence of B. hominis in the study area was lower than that reported for most developed countries, and unlike in other countries in the Middle East, ST4 was the most prevalent subtype. PMID:26587213

  8. Cloning, Expression, Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Mycoplasma Genitalium Protein MG289

    SciTech Connect

    Sippel, K.; Boehlein, S; Sakai, Y; Quirit, J; Agbandje-McKenna, M; Rosser, C; McKenna, R

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a human pathogen that is associated with nongonococcal urethritis in men and cervicitis in women. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the protein MG289 from M. genitalium strain G37 are reported here. Crystals of MG289 diffracted X-rays to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.7, b = 90.9, c = 176.1 {angstrom}. The diffraction data after processing had an overall R{sub merge} of 8.7%. The crystal structure of Cypl, the ortholog of MG289 from M. hyorhinis, has recently been determined, providing a reasonable phasing model; molecular replacement is currently under way.

  9. Detection of Tritrichomonas foetus and Pentatrichomonas hominis in intestinal tissue specimens of cats by chromogenic in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Mostegl, Meike M.; Wetscher, Andreas; Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Dinhopl, Nora; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    In this retrospective study 102 cats were analyzed for the presence of trichomonads in intestinal tissue sections using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). Two intestinal trichomonad species are described in cats: Pentatrichomonas hominis and Tritrichomonas foetus. While P. hominis is considered a mere commensal, T. foetus has been found to be the causative agent of feline large-bowel diarrhea. For the detection of both agents within intestinal tissue CISH assays using three different probes were performed. In the first CISH run a probe specific for all relevant members of the order Trichomonadida (OT probe) was used. In a second CISH run all positive samples were further examined on three consecutive tissue sections using the OT probe, a probe specific for the family of Tritrichomonadidae (Tritri probe) and a newly designed probe specifically detecting P. hominis (Penta hom probe). In total, four of the 102 cats were found to be positive with the OT probe. Thereof, one cat gave a positive reaction with the P. hominis probe and three cats were positive with the T. foetus probe. All Trichomonas-positive cats were pure-bred and between 8 and 32 weeks of age. In one cat positive for T. foetus large amounts of parasites were found in the gut lumen and invading the intestinal mucosa. The species of the detected trichomonads were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing of a part of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. In this study, the usefulness of CISH to detect intestinal trichomonads within feline tissue samples was shown. Additionally, the specific detection of P. hominis using CISH was established. Generally, it was shown that CISH is well suited for detection and differentiation of trichomonosis in retrospective studies using tissue samples. PMID:21856079

  10. Mycoplasma pneumonia combined with pulmonary infarction in a child

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Zhihong; Li, Fengyan; Chen, Xiaoxin; Jin, Peina; Guo, Qingmin; Wang, Huaili

    2015-01-01

    We reported a 9-year-old boy with mycoplasma pneumonia who developed pulmonary infarction. The child first had fever and cough, and then had difficult breathing. But, the signs of his lung were not obvious. Mycoplasma antibody IgM was positive. The child was given intravenous azithromycin for anti-infection, and intravenous low molecular weight heparin and oral warfarin for anti-coagulation. Although difficult breathing was relieved, sudden cardiac arrest occurred. His parents requested to give up treatment. PMID:25785159

  11. The immunosuppressive effect of Mycoplasma meleagridis on nonreplicating antigens.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A M; Yamamoto, R; Benedict, A A; Mateos, A P

    1981-01-01

    The humoral responses of Mycoplasma meleagridis-free and -infected turkeys were compared following primary and secondary antigenic stimulation with inactivated Salmonella pullorum or dinitrophenyl-bovine gamma globulin. The mycoplasma-infected groups had significantly lower antibody responses to both antigens. The suppression was more evident in the secondary response. The results suggest that the immune response in turkeys infected with M. meleagridis is similar to that of bursectomized chickens: the ability of chickens to synthesize immunoglobulin G is affected more readily than the ability to synthesize IgM. PMID:6175300

  12. Mechanisms of volume regulation in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, a cell wall-less bacterium, must confront the problem of colloid osmotic swelling. Cell volume was determined by optical density and intracellular water measurements. Transmembrane pH and electrical gradients were determined by the distribution of the weak acid benzoate and lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium respectively. Cells incubated in sodium chloride without glucose exhibited a progressive fall in ATP over several hours. When ATP fell below 40 uM the cells swelled, leaked protein and became permeable to inulin. Subsequent addition of glucose induced shrinkage and restored the original permeability properties. Energized cells exhibited an electrochemical gradient of protons of up to 130 mV, inside negative and alkaline. The proton-ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), which collapsed the chemical and electrical components of the proton gradient, induced rapid swelling despite high ATP levels thus implicating the proton gradient in volume regulation. Either the pH gradient or the membrane potential could maintain volume. Energy-dependent sodium efflux in exchange for protons was demonstrated in sodium-loaded cells using radioactive sodium and 9-aminoacridine fluorescence to follow sodium and proton translocation respectively.

  13. The immune response of bovine mammary epithelial cells to live or heat-inactivated Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Christina; Pilo, Paola; Frey, Joachim; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Wellnitz, Olga

    2015-09-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is an emerging bacterial agent causing bovine mastitis. Although these cell wall-free bacteria lack classical virulence factors, they are able to activate the immune system of the host. However, effects on the bovine mammary immune system are not yet well characterized and detailed knowledge would improve the prevention and therapy of mycoplasmal mastitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunogenic effects of M. bovis on the mammary gland in an established primary bovine mammary epithelial cell (bMEC) culture system. Primary bMEC of four different cows were challenged with live and heat-inactivated M. bovis strain JF4278 isolated from acute bovine mastitis, as well as with the type strain PG45. The immune response was evaluated 6 and 24h after mycoplasmal challenge by measuring the relative mRNA expression of selected immune factors by quantitative PCR. M. bovis triggered an immune response in bMEC, reflected by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin(IL)-1?, IL-6, IL-8, lactoferrin, Toll-like receptor-2, RANTES, and serum amyloid A mRNA. Interestingly, this cellular reaction was only observed in response to live, but not to heat-inactivated M. bovis, in contrast to other bacterial pathogens of mastitis such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study provides evidence that bMEC exhibit a strong inflammatory reaction in response to live M. bovis. The lack of a cellular response to heat-inactivated M. bovis supports the current hypothesis that mycoplasmas activate the immune system through secreted secondary metabolites. PMID:26211967

  14. The immunodominant 90-kilodalton protein is localized on the terminal tip structure of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Franzoso, G; Hu, P C; Meloni, G A; Barile, M F

    1993-01-01

    Immunoblot analysis of convalescent-phase sera of experimentally infected chimpanzees or monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the 90- and 40-kDa proteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae indicated that both proteins were present in cytadsorbing, pathogenic strains PI-1428, M129, and FH but absent in noncytadsorbing, nonpathogenic strain M129-B176. Adsorption of convalescent-phase chimpanzee sera with virulent strain PI-1428 removed reactivity, whereas adsorption with avirulent strain M129-B176 did not remove reactivity to these two proteins. By using proteolysis and specific MAbs, we demonstrated that the 90- and 40-kDa proteins were surface exposed. Immunoelectron microscopy employing specific MAbs showed that the 90-kDa protein is localized on the terminal tip attachment apparatus. However, the MAb specific for the 40-kDa protein failed to indicate a similar localization. Nevertheless, these data, taken together, indicate that the immunodominant 90- and 40-kDa proteins are surface exposed, are localized on the terminal tip apparatus, and might be involved in the attachment mechanism. Images PMID:8454358

  15. Epidemiological survey of Blastocystis hominis in Huainan City, Anhui Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Xia; Li, Chao-Pin; Wang, Jian; Cui, Yu-Bao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To provide scientific evidence for prevention and controlling of blastocystosis, the infection of Blastocystis homonis and to study its clinical significance in Huainan City, Anhui Province, China. METHODS: Blastocystis homonis in fresh stools taken from 100 infants, 100 pupils, 100 middle school students and 403 patients with diarrhea was smeared and detected with method of iodine staining and hematoxylin staining. After preliminary direct microscopy, the shape and size of Blastocystis homonis were observed with high power lens. The cellular immune function of the patients with blastocystosis was detected with biotin-streptavidin (BSA). RESULTS: The positive rates of Blastocystis homonis in fresh stools taken from the infants, pupils, middle school students and the patients with diarrhea, were 1.0% (1/100), 1.0% (1/100), 0% (0/100) and 5.96% (24/403) respectively. Furthermore, the positive rates of Blastocystis homonis in the stool samples taken from the patients with mild diarrhea, intermediate diarrhea, severe diarrhea and obstinate diarrhea were 6.03% (14/232), 2.25% (2/89), 0% (0/17) and 12.31% (8/65) respectively. The positive rates of Blastocystis homonis in fresh stools of male and female patients with diarrhea were 7.52% (17/226) and 3.95% (7/177) respectively, and those of patients in urban and rural areas were 4.56% (11/241) and 8.02% (13/162) respectively. There was no significant difference between them (P > 0.05). The positive rates of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ in serum of Blastocystis homonis-positive and-negative individuals were 0.64 ± 0.06, 0.44 ± 0.06, 0.28 ± 0.04 and 0.60 ± 0.05, 0.40 ± 0.05 and 0.30 ± 0.05 respectively, and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ of the two groups were 1.53 ± 0.34 and 1.27 ± 0.22. There was significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of Blastocystis hominis as an enteric pathogen in human seems not to be associated with gender and living environment, and that Blastocystis hominis is more common in stool samples of the patients with diarrhea, especially with chronic diarrhea or obstinate diarrhea. When patients with diarrhea infected by Blastocystis hominis, their cellular immune function decreases, which make it more difficult to be cured. PMID:12378644

  16. Comparative analysis of the Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum GM508D genome reveals subrogation of phase-variable contingency genes and a novel integrated genetic element.

    PubMed

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F

    2015-08-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capricolum is both a pathogen of small ruminants and a model recipient organism for gene transplantation and synthetic biology. With the availability of the complete genome of the type strain California kid (released in 2005), a draft genome of strain GM508D was determined to investigate genomic variation in this subspecies. Differences in mobile genetic element location and complement, catabolic pathway genes, contingency loci, surface antigen genes and type II restriction-modification systems highlight the plasticity and diversity within this taxon. PMID:26040761

  17. Real-time PCR investigation of potential vectors, reservoirs, and shedding patterns of feline hemotropic mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Willi, Barbara; Boretti, Felicitas S; Meli, Marina L; Bernasconi, Marco V; Casati, Simona; Hegglin, Daniel; Puorger, Maria; Neimark, Harold; Cattori, Valentino; Wengi, Nicole; Reusch, Claudia E; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2007-06-01

    Three hemotropic mycoplasmas have been identified in pet cats: Mycoplasma haemofelis, "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum," and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis." The way in which these agents are transmitted is largely unknown. Thus, this study aimed to investigate fleas, ticks, and rodents as well as saliva and feces from infected cats for the presence of hemotropic mycoplasmas, to gain insight into potential transmission routes for these agents. DNA was extracted from arthropods and from rodent blood or tissue samples from Switzerland and from salivary and fecal swabs from two experimentally infected and six naturally infected cats. All samples were analyzed with real-time PCR, and some positive samples were confirmed by sequencing. Feline hemotropic mycoplasmas were detected in cat fleas and in a few Ixodes sp. and Rhipicephalus sp. ticks collected from animals but not in ticks collected from vegetation or from rodent samples, although the latter were frequently Mycoplasma coccoides PCR positive. When shedding patterns of feline hemotropic mycoplasmas were investigated, "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis" DNA was detected in saliva and feces at the early but not at the late phase of infection. M. haemofelis and "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum" DNA was not amplified from saliva and feces of naturally infected cats, despite high hemotropic mycoplasma blood loads. Our results suggest that besides an ostensibly indirect transmission by fleas, direct transmission through saliva and feces at the early phase of infection could play a role in the epizootiology of feline hemotropic mycoplasmas. Neither the investigated tick nor the rodent population seems to represent a major reservoir for feline hemotropic mycoplasmas in Switzerland. PMID:17468284

  18. Blastocystis Isolates from a Pig and a Horse Are Closely Related to Blastocystis hominis

    PubMed Central

    Thathaisong, Umaporn; Worapong, Jeerapun; Mungthin, Mathirut; Tan-Ariya, Peerapan; Viputtigul, Kwanjai; Sudatis, Apichart; Noonai, Adisak; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2003-01-01

    Blastocystis has a widespread distribution in a variety of animals, which is a potential source of infection for humans. However, the contribution of zoonotic transmission remains unclear due to the absence of molecular proof of these organisms being identical to those found in humans. We report herein the similar subgroup of Blastocystis isolates from humans, pigs, and a horse using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of partial small-subunit ribosomal DNA (ssu rDNA). Additionally, sequence and phylogenic analysis of partial ssu rDNA of Blastocystis from a human, a pig, and a horse sharing a common subgroup shows that Blastocystis isolates from a pig and a horse were monophyletic and closely related to B. hominis, with 92 to 94% identity. These results suggest the possibility of zoonotic potential of Blastocystis. PMID:12624017

  19. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  4. Stability of rehydrated Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine homogeneity over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper vaccine application is required to maximize the results of the vaccination, with maintenance of a homogenous solution is critical to obtain uniform results. This study was designed to analyze the need for continued mixing of a Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine solution in order to maintain a ...

  5. 21 CFR 864.2360 - Mycoplasma detection media and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycoplasma detection media and components. 864.2360 Section 864.2360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture...

  6. 21 CFR 864.2360 - Mycoplasma detection media and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycoplasma detection media and components. 864.2360 Section 864.2360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture...

  7. Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae, United States1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stella; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yi-Wei; Stiles, Jeffrey; Hong, Tao; Todd, Kathleen; Ratliff, Amy E.; Crabb, Donna M.; Xiao, Li; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Waites, Ken B.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is highly prevalent in Asia and is now being reported from Europe. Few data on MRMP are available in the United States. Using genotypic and phenotypic methods, we detected high-level MRMP in 13.2% of 91 M. pneumoniae­–positive specimens from 6 US locations. PMID:26196107

  8. The Attempted Immunization of Turkey Hens with Viable Mycoplasma meleagridis

    PubMed Central

    Bigland, C. H.; Vlaovic, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    The attempted immunization of 53 female Broad Breasted White turkeys with five weekly 1.0 ml injections of viable Mycoplasma meleagridis, when combined with insemination with M. meleagridis infected semen, did not produce immunity but only imposed additional infection. This was detrimental to the offspring by increasing the incidence and severity of air sac lesions. PMID:4260949

  9. Detection of Mycoplasma gallinarum by real-time PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallinarum colonizes poultry as well as mammals, but is considered to have a commensal relationship with its hosts. Though unable to cause poultry disease by itself, reports have been published suggesting a synergism during mixed infections between M. gallinarum and respiratory viruses or...

  10. Innate Immune Response to Intramammary Mycoplasma bovis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mastitis caused by Mycoplasma bovis is a growing concern for the dairy industry. M. bovis intramammary infection commonly results in an untreatable case of chronic mastitis. The innate immune system is responsible for initial recognition of, and immediate host responses to, infectious pathogens. ...

  11. Mycoplasma bovis: An emerging pathogen of ranched bison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) is an emerging, primary pathogen of ranched bison (Bison bison) in North America. It causes severe disease among animals in feedlots as well as breeding-age cows and bulls on pasture. Mortality in adult bison is as high as 25 percent, resulting in significant economic l...

  12. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...time observation for growth of Mycoplasma shall be made at a magnification of no less than 300×. If the Dienes Methylene Blue-Azure dye or an equivalent staining procedure is used, no less than a one square cm. plug of the agar shall...

  13. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...time observation for growth of Mycoplasma shall be made at a magnification of no less than 300×. If the Dienes Methylene Blue-Azure dye or an equivalent staining procedure is used, no less than a one square cm. plug of the agar shall...

  14. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...time observation for growth of Mycoplasma shall be made at a magnification of no less than 300×. If the Dienes Methylene Blue-Azure dye or an equivalent staining procedure is used, no less than a one square cm. plug of the agar shall...

  15. Protective Immunity against Infection with Mycoplasma haemofelis

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chelsea A. E.; Willi, Barbara; Riond, Barbara; Novacco, Marilisa; Meli, Marina L.; Stokes, Christopher R.; Helps, Christopher R.; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Hemoplasmas are potentially zoonotic mycoplasmal pathogens, which are not consistently cleared by antibiotic therapy. Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic feline hemoplasma species. The aim of this study was to determine how cats previously infected with M. haemofelis that had recovered reacted when rechallenged with M. haemofelis and to characterize the immune response following de novo M. haemofelis infection and rechallenge. Five specific-pathogen-free (SPF)-derived naive cats (group A) and five cats that had recovered from M. haemofelis infection (group B) were inoculated subcutaneously with M. haemofelis. Blood M. haemofelis loads were measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR), antibody response to heat shock protein 70 (DnaK) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), blood lymphocyte cell subtypes by flow cytometry, and cytokine mRNA levels by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Group A cats all became infected with high bacterial loads and seroconverted, while group B cats were protected from reinfection, thus providing the unique opportunity to study the immunological parameters associated with this protective immune response against M. haemofelis. First, a strong humoral response to DnaK was only observed in group A, demonstrating that an antibody response to DnaK is not important for protective immunity. Second, proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels appeared to increase rapidly postinoculation in group B, indicating a possible role in protective immunity. Third, an increase in IL-12p35 and -p40 mRNA and decrease in the Th2/Th1 ratio observed in group A suggest that a Th1-type response is important in primary infection. This is the first study to demonstrate protective immunity against M. haemofelis reinfection, and it provides important information for potential future hemoplasma vaccine design. PMID:25410206

  16. Protective immunity against infection with Mycoplasma haemofelis.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Chelsea A E; Willi, Barbara; Riond, Barbara; Novacco, Marilisa; Meli, Marina L; Stokes, Christopher R; Helps, Christopher R; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Tasker, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Hemoplasmas are potentially zoonotic mycoplasmal pathogens, which are not consistently cleared by antibiotic therapy. Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic feline hemoplasma species. The aim of this study was to determine how cats previously infected with M. haemofelis that had recovered reacted when rechallenged with M. haemofelis and to characterize the immune response following de novo M. haemofelis infection and rechallenge. Five specific-pathogen-free (SPF)-derived naive cats (group A) and five cats that had recovered from M. haemofelis infection (group B) were inoculated subcutaneously with M. haemofelis. Blood M. haemofelis loads were measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR), antibody response to heat shock protein 70 (DnaK) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), blood lymphocyte cell subtypes by flow cytometry, and cytokine mRNA levels by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Group A cats all became infected with high bacterial loads and seroconverted, while group B cats were protected from reinfection, thus providing the unique opportunity to study the immunological parameters associated with this protective immune response against M. haemofelis. First, a strong humoral response to DnaK was only observed in group A, demonstrating that an antibody response to DnaK is not important for protective immunity. Second, proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels appeared to increase rapidly postinoculation in group B, indicating a possible role in protective immunity. Third, an increase in IL-12p35 and -p40 mRNA and decrease in the Th2/Th1 ratio observed in group A suggest that a Th1-type response is important in primary infection. This is the first study to demonstrate protective immunity against M. haemofelis reinfection, and it provides important information for potential future hemoplasma vaccine design. PMID:25410206

  17. Infection with Hemotropic Mycoplasma Species in Patients with or without Extensive Arthropod or Animal Contact

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Sarah M.; Trull, Chelsea L.; Mascarelli, Patricia E.; Mozayeni, B. Robert; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    PCR amplification targeting the 16S rRNA gene was used to test individuals with and without extensive arthropod and animal contact for the possibility of hemotropic mycoplasma infection. The prevalence of hemotropic mycoplasma infection (4.7%) was significantly greater in previously reported cohorts of veterinarians, veterinary technicians, spouses of veterinary professionals, and others with extensive arthropod exposure and/or frequent animal contact than in a previously reported cohort of patients examined by a rheumatologist because of chronic joint pain or evidence of small-vessel disease (0.7%). Based upon DNA sequence analysis, a Mycoplasma ovis-like species was the most prevalent organism detected; however, infection with “Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum” and a potentially novel, but incompletely characterized, hemotropic Mycoplasma species was also documented. Historical exposure to animals and arthropod vectors that can harbor hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. should be considered during epidemiological investigations and in the evaluation of individual patients. PMID:23863574

  18. A review of the occurrence of hemoplasmas (hemotrophic mycoplasmas) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Alexander Welker; Dos Santos, Andrea Pires; Guimarães, Ana Marcia Sá; Vieira, Rafael Felipe da Costa; Vidotto, Odilon; Macieira, Daniel de Barros; Almosny, Nádia Regina Pereira; Molento, Marcelo Beltrão; Timenetsky, Jorge; de Morais, Helio Autran; González, Félix Hilário Diáz; Messick, Joanne Belle

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have been conducted in Brazil using molecular techniques for the detection of hemotrophic mycoplasmas in several mammals. In domestic cats, Mycoplasma haemofelis, "Candidatus M. haemominutum", and "Candidatus M. turicensis" infections have been identified. These species have also been found in free-ranging and captive neotropical felid species. Two canine hemoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemocanis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum", have been identified in dogs. In commercial swine populations, Mycoplasma suis was found to be highly prevalent, especially in sows. Moreover, novel mycoplasma species have been identified in Brazilian commercial pigs and domestic dogs. A hemoplasma infection in a human patient infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was also recently documented. In conclusion, hemoplasma species are common and important infectious agents in Brazil. Further studies should be conducted to better understand their impact on pets, production animals, and wildlife fauna, as well as their role as zoonotic agents, particularly in immunocompromised patients. PMID:19772768

  19. What are mycoplasmas - The relationship of tempo and mode in bacterial evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Stackebrand, E.; Ludwig, W.

    1985-01-01

    In phenotype the mycoplasmas are very different from ordinary bacteria. However, genotypically (i.e., phylogenetically) they are not. On the basis of ribosomal RNA homologies the mycoplasmas belong with the clostridia, and indeed have specific clostridial relatives. Mycoplasmas are, however, unlike almost all other bacteria in the evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs. These RNAs contain relatively few of the highly conserved oligonucleotide sequences characteristic of normal eubacterial ribosomal RNAs. This is interpreted to be a reflection of an elevated mutation rate in mycoplasma lines of descent. A general consequence of this would be that the variation associated with a mycoplasma population is augmented both in number and kind, which in turn would lead to an unusual evolutionary course, one unique in all respects. Mycoplasmas, then, are actually tachytelic bacteria. The unusual evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs are the imprints of their rapid evolution.

  20. What are mycoplasmas: the relationship of tempo and mode in bacterial evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Ludwig, W.

    1984-01-01

    In phenotype the mycoplasmas are very different from ordinary bacteria. However, genotypically (i.e., phylogenetically) they are not. On the basis of ribosomal RNA homologies the mycoplasmas belong with the clostridia, and indeed have specific clostridial relatives. Mycoplasmas are, however, unlike almost all other bacteria in the evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs. These RNAs contain relatively few of the highly conserved oligonucleotide sequences characteristic of normal eubacterial ribosomal RNAs. This is interpreted to be a reflection of an elevated mutation rate in mycoplasma lines of descent. A general consequence of this would be that the variation associated with a mycoplasma population is augmented both in number and kind, which in turn would lead to an unusual evolutionary course, one unique in all respects. Mycoplasmas, then, are actually tachytelic bacteria. The unusual evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs are the imprints of their rapid evolution.

  1. Distribution and diversity of mycoplasma plasmids: lessons from cryptic genetic elements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolution of mycoplasmas from a common ancestor with Firmicutes has been characterized not only by genome down-sizing but also by horizontal gene transfer between mycoplasma species sharing a common host. The mechanisms of these gene transfers remain unclear because our knowledge of the mycoplasma mobile genetic elements is limited. In particular, only a few plasmids have been described within the Mycoplasma genus. Results We have shown that several species of ruminant mycoplasmas carry plasmids that are members of a large family of elements and replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism. All plasmids were isolated from species that either belonged or were closely related to the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster; none was from the Mycoplasma bovis-Mycoplasma agalactiae group. Twenty one plasmids were completely sequenced, named and compared with each other and with the five mycoplasma plasmids previously reported. All plasmids share similar size and genetic organization, and present a mosaic structure. A peculiar case is that of the plasmid pMyBK1 from M. yeatsii; it is larger in size and is predicted to be mobilizable. Its origin of replication and replication protein were identified. In addition, pMyBK1 derivatives were shown to replicate in various species of the M. mycoides cluster, and therefore hold considerable promise for developing gene vectors. The phylogenetic analysis of these plasmids confirms the uniqueness of pMyBK1 and indicates that the other mycoplasma plasmids cluster together, apart from the related replicons found in phytoplasmas and in species of the clade Firmicutes. Conclusions Our results unraveled a totally new picture of mycoplasma plasmids. Although they probably play a limited role in the gene exchanges that participate in mycoplasma evolution, they are abundant in some species. Evidence for the occurrence of frequent genetic recombination strongly suggests they are transmitted between species sharing a common host or niche. PMID:23145790

  2. Comparison of the prevalence of Mycoplasma species in dogs with and without respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Bianka S; Raufeisen, Katharina; Weber, Karin; Laberke, Siija; Hartmann, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of Mycoplasma species in dogs with and without signs of respiratory disease. Bronchoalveolarlavage fluid (BALF) and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 29 dogs with respiratory diseases (RD) and 16 dogs without signs of RD that were euthanised because of other diseases. Samples were tested for Mycoplasma species by PCR and culture, and sequencing was performed in Mycoplasma species-positive BALF samples. Pharyngeal swabs were positive for Mycoplasma species by PCR in 91.7% of dogs with RD and 86.7% of dogs without signs of RD (p = 1.000); BALF samples were PCR-positive in 37.9% of dogs with RD and 18.8% of dogs without signs of RD (p = 0.194) Mycoplasmo culture of BALF was positive in 28.6% of dogs with RD and in 18.8% without signs of RD (p = 0.730). When culture and PCR were compared, there was no significant difference in the detection rate of Mycoplasma species (p = 0.658) Sequencing detected different Mycoplasma species. Out of these, however, Mycoplasma cynos was isolated from four dogs with RD. There is no significant difference in the prevalence of Mycoplasma species between dogs with RD and dogs without evidence of RD; however, Mycoplasma cynos seems to be associated with respiratory disease. PMID:26281443

  3. Mycoplasma detection and isolation from one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Mederos-Iriarte, Lidia E; Poveda, José B; Poveda, Carlos G; Vega-Orellana, Orestes M; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Corbera, Juan A; Ramírez, Ana S

    2014-10-01

    In scientific literature, a small amount of information is found concerning mycoplasmosis in camel species. Mycoplasma (M.) arginini, Acholeplasma (A.) laidlawii, and Acholeplasma oculi have been reported to be isolated from these host species. Serologically positive results have been reported for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC type, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, and M. mycoides subsp. capri. The aims of this study were to detect, isolate, and identify mycoplasmas from camels (Camelus dromedarius). Initially, saliva and ear smears plus conjunctival and vaginal secretions were taken from five female animals, but only conjunctival secretions in three male animals, all belonging to the same farm. An unknown mycoplasma was isolated from one of the vagina samples. Additionally, another unknown and uncultured mycoplasma was detected with molecular biology in the same sample. In the second stage, 23 vaginal secretions were taken from the same farm plus another secretion from a different one. Ten isolates of the same unknown and previously isolated mycoplasma were detected, nine of them recovered from the vagina of female camels. Some mycoplasmas have been related to reproductive disorders; however, there is no evidence that the isolated mycoplasmas are related to such disorders. PMID:25059705

  4. A unique case of facial burn superinfected with Dermatobia Hominis larvae resulting in a bilateral enucleation of the eyes.

    PubMed

    Pinos, Victor Hugo; Ortiz-Prado, Esteban; Bermeo, Carlos; León, Juan; Armijos, Luciana; Almeida, Estibaliz

    2014-10-01

    We present a case of a female Ecuadorian patient who presented a deep facial burn injury complicated with a severe infestation of Dermatobia Hominis larvae. The burn injury was complicated by severe myiasis attributable to the poor management of the wound received at home, using tropical plants, which caused a secondary infection and severe necrosis of the tissue involving the forehead, cheeks, chin, scalp, nose, mouth and the eyes resulting in a bilateral enucleation and long inpatient hospital care. PMID:24728977

  5. Detection of UV-Induced Thymine Dimers in Individual Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis Oocysts by Immunofluorescence Microscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adhami, B. H.; Nichols, R. A. B.; Kusel, J. R.; O'Grady, J.; Smith, H. V.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of UV light on Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis oocysts in vitro, we exposed intact oocysts to 4-, 10-, 20-, and 40-mJ·cm?2 doses of UV irradiation. Thymine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody against cyclobutyl thymine dimers (anti-TDmAb). Dimer-specific fluorescence within sporozoite nuclei was confirmed by colocalization with the nuclear fluorogen 4?,6?-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Oocyst walls were visualized using either commercial fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled anti-Cryptosporidium oocyst antibodies (FITC-CmAb) or Texas Red-labeled anti-Cryptosporidium oocyst antibodies (TR-CmAb). The use of FITC-CmAb interfered with TD detection at doses below 40 mJ·cm?2. With the combination of anti-TDmAb, TR-CmAb, and DAPI, dimer-specific fluorescence was detected in sporozoite nuclei within oocysts exposed to 10 to 40 mJ·cm?2 of UV light. Similar results were obtained with C. hominis. C. parvum oocysts exposed to 10 to 40 mJ·cm?2 of UV light failed to infect neonatal mice, confirming that results of our anti-TD immunofluorescence assay paralleled the outcomes of our neonatal mouse infectivity assay. These results suggest that our immunofluorescence assay is suitable for detecting DNA damage in C. parvum and C. hominis oocysts induced following exposure to UV light. PMID:17012589

  6. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147...of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has...H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.”...

  7. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section...evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure...Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma...

  8. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section...evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure...Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma...

  9. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section...evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure...Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma...

  10. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section...evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure...Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma...

  11. Studies into the prevalence of Mycoplasma species in small ruminants in Benue State, North-central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akwuobu, Chinedu A; Ayling, Roger D; Chah, Kennedy Foinkfu; Oboegbulem, Stephen I

    2014-08-01

    The indicative prevalence of respiratory Mycoplasma species in small ruminants (SR) was determined in North-central Nigeria. Nasal swabs from 172 sheep and 336 goats from the Northeast, Northwest and South Senatorial Districts of Benue State were examined. Initial Mycoplasma isolation used Mycoplasma culture techniques followed by digitonin sensitivity testing. Species identification was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Overall, Mycoplasma organisms were isolated from 131 (25.8 %) of the 508 SR examined. Prevalence rates of 18.1 and 29.8 % were recorded for sheep and goats, respectively. A total of 135 isolates of Mycoplasma belonging to three different species were identified: Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (127), Mycoplasma arginini (7) and Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies capri (1). More than one Mycoplasma species were detected in four (3.1 %) of the 131 confirmed Mycoplasma positive cultures. Mycoplasma was isolated from 16.2 and 29.1 % of animals with and without respiratory signs, respectively. The high isolation rate of mycoplasmas in apparently healthy and clinically sick sheep and goats in this study indicates a carrier status in these SR which may constitute a serious problem in disease control. PMID:24828562

  12. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  13. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  14. A change in the genetic code in Mycoplasma capricolum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum was previously found to use UGA instead of UGG as its codon for tryptophan and to contain 75 percent A + T in its DNA. The codon change could have been due to mutational pressure to replace C + G by A + T, resulting in the replacement of UGA stop codons by UAA, change of the anticodon in tryptophan tRNA from CCA to UCA, and replacement of UGG tryptophan codons by UGA. None of these changes should have been deleterious.

  15. Mycoplasma bovis mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer.

    PubMed

    2015-12-19

    Mycoplasma bovis causing mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heiferNutritional myopathy in a three-month-old suckler calfAcute fasciolosis in ewes in AyrshireCardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology causing death of a three-year-old Suffolk ramSpinal aspergillosis in a seven-week-old pheasant poult These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for August from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26679914

  16. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma bovis reveals host-specific genotypes in cattle versus bison.

    PubMed

    Register, Karen B; Thole, Luke; Rosenbush, Ricardo F; Minion, F Chris

    2015-01-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and the bacterium most frequently isolated from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex. Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant health problem in bison, causing necrotic pharyngitis, pneumonia, dystocia and abortion. Whether isolates from cattle and bison comprise genetically distinct populations is unknown. This study describes the development of a highly discriminatory multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) method for M. bovis and its use to investigate the population structure of the bacterium. Genome sequences from six M. bovis isolates were used for selection of gene targets. Seven of 44 housekeeping genes initially evaluated were selected as targets on the basis of sequence variability and distribution within the genome. For each gene target sequence, four to seven alleles could be distinguished that collectively define 32 sequence types (STs) from a collection of 94 cattle isolates and 42 bison isolates. A phylogeny based on concatenated target gene sequences of each isolate revealed that bison isolates are genetically distinct from strains that infect cattle, suggesting recent disease outbreaks in bison may be due to the emergence of unique genetic variants. No correlation was found between ST and disease presentation or geographic origin. MLST data reported here were used to populate a newly created and publicly available, curated database to which researchers can contribute. The MLST scheme and database provide novel tools for exploring the population structure of M. bovis and tracking the evolution and spread of strains. PMID:25433454

  17. First morphological characterization of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' using electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Willi, Barbara; Museux, Kristina; Novacco, Marilisa; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Wild, Peter; Groebel, Katrin; Ziegler, Urs; Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A; Kessler, Yvonne; Geret, Catrina; Tasker, Séverine; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2011-05-01

    At least three haemotropic mycoplasmas have been recognized in cats: Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf), 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) and 'Candidatus M. turicensis' (CMt). The latter was originally identified in a Swiss pet cat with haemolytic anaemia and shown to be prevalent in domestic cats and wild felids worldwide using molecular methods. So far, there has been no confirmatory morphological evidence of the existence of CMt presumably due to low blood loads during infection while CMhm has only been characterized by light microscopy with discrepant results. This study aimed to provide for the first time electron microscopic characteristics of CMt and CMhm and to compare them to Mhf. Blood samples from cats experimentally infected with CMt, CMhm and Mhf were used to determine copy numbers in blood by real-time PCR and for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. High resolution scanning electron microscopy revealed CMt and CMhm to be discoid-shaped organisms of 0.3 ?m in diameter attached to red blood cells (RBCs). In transmission electron microscopy of CMt, an oval organism of about 0.25 ?m with several intracellular electron dense structures was identified close to the surface of a RBC. CMhm and CMt exhibited similar morphology to Mhf but had a smaller diameter. This is the first study to provide morphological evidence of CMt thereby confirming its status as a distinct haemoplasma species, and to present electron microscopic features of CMhm. PMID:21183295

  18. First morphological characterization of ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis’ using electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Willi, Barbara; Museux, Kristina; Novacco, Marilisa; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Wild, Peter; Groebel, Katrin; Ziegler, Urs; Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A.; Kessler, Yvonne; Geret, Catrina; Tasker, Séverine; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2011-01-01

    At least three haemotropic mycoplasmas have been recognized in cats: Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf), ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ (CMhm) and ‘Candidatus M. turicensis’ (CMt). The latter was originally identified in a Swiss pet cat with haemolytic anaemia and shown to be prevalent in domestic cats and wild felids worldwide using molecular methods. So far, there has been no confirmatory morphological evidence of the existence of CMt presumably due to low blood loads during infection while CMhm has only been characterized by light microscopy with discrepant results. This study aimed to provide for the first time electron microscopic characteristics of CMt and CMhm and to compare them to Mhf. Blood samples from cats experimentally infected with CMt, CMhm and Mhf were used to determine copy numbers in blood by real-time PCR and for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. High resolution scanning electron microscopy revealed CMt and CMhm to be discoid-shaped organisms of 0.3 ?m in diameter attached to red blood cells (RBCs). In transmission electron microscopy of CMt, an oval organism of about 0.25 ?m with several intracellular electron dense structures was identified close to the surface of a RBC. CMhm and CMt exhibited similar morphology to Mhf but had a smaller diameter. This is the first study to provide morphological evidence of CMt thereby confirming its status as a distinct haemoplasma species, and to present electron microscopic features of CMhm. PMID:21183295

  19. Validation of PCR Assay for Identification of Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis

    PubMed Central

    NAZ, Shumaila; RIZVI, Dilwar ABBAS; JAVAID, Amara; ISMAIL, Muhammad; CHAUDHRY, Farhana RIAZ

    2013-01-01

    Background Infestation of the skin by the “itch mite” Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis results in a contagious skin infection in humans called “scabies”. By resolving morphology issues, the present study was designed to be acquainted with itch mite by molecular markers. Methods The mite samples were collected from scabies patients by visiting government hospitals of twin City, Pakistan. For successful molecular detection approach, preparation of Sarcoptes mite DNA by commercial DNA extraction kit method. Furthermore, two primers i.e. Sarms 15 F/R and 16S D1/D2 were used to amplify target sequence by using PCR. The amplified products were then separated by agarose gel, electrophoresis and analyzed after staining and visualizing in UV transilluminator. Results Analysis of PCR product showed one specific band of 178 bp with primer Sarms 15 F/R, while, with primer 16S D1/D2 bands of 460 bp and 600 bp were observed on 2% agarose gel. The appearance of different band of 600 bp revealed that it might be due to heteroplasmy state present in the Pakistani Sarcoptes mites population. Conclusion Current study adds validity to the claim that PCR is more accurate, specific and sensitive in the detection of the ectoparasites even in smallest amount. PMID:24454438

  20. Severe anemia associated with Mycoplasma wenyonii infection in a mature cow

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Suzanne G.; Streeter, Robert N.; Velguth, Karen E.; Snider, Timothy A.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Simpson, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical findings, diagnostic tests, and treatment of clinical anemia in a mature Angus cow infected with the hemoplasma Mycoplasma wenyonii are described. Mycoplasma wenyonii has been previously reported to cause clinical anemia in young or splenectomized cattle; however, infection has not been associated with severe anemia in mature animals. PMID:22379205

  1. Detection, Characterization, and Molecular Typing of Human Mycoplasma spp. from Major Hospitals in Cairo, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Metwally, Mirihan A.; Yassin, Aymen S.; Essam, Tamer M.; Hamouda, Hayam M.; Amin, Magdy A.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are fastidious slow growing organisms lacking a cell wall and mostly isolated from the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts. There is a dearth of information regarding clinical Mycoplasma spp. isolates among Egyptian patients. A total of 170 samples were collected from patients and apparently healthy personnel in local public hospitals in Cairo, Egypt. Isolation of Mycoplasma spp. was carried out using appropriate culture media and further identification was carried out by biochemical tests followed by serotyping using specific antisera. Confirmation was done by PCR for detection of different Mycoplasma spp. using genus-specific primers targeting 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Characterization of the antibiotic resistance and sensitivity pattern against different antimicrobials was carried out using disc diffusion test. The results indicated the presence of six Mycoplasma spp. in 22.94% of the samples. Mycoplasmas were detected more frequently in throat swabs than sputum. Mycoplasma pneumoniae was highly sensitive to macrolides and quinolones but less sensitive to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines. Molecular techniques were found to be of more rapid, highly sensitive, able to detect nonviable organisms, and cost effective. These results shed light on difficulties of Mycoplasma detection and the superiority of molecular techniques over culture. PMID:25506614

  2. The effects of increasing sodium chloride concentration on Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine survival in solution.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lyophilized Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccines are generally rehydrated and diluted with distilled or chlorine-free water as per manufacturer recommendations. However, as mycoplasma species lack a cell wall, this can lead to decreased viability of live vaccine during administration. The abilit...

  3. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia Associated With Methemoglobinemia and Anemia: An Overlooked Association?

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Abu Rmeileh, Ayman; Kornspan, Jonathan David; Abel, Roy; Mizrahi, Meir; Nir-Paz, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute methemoglobinemia and anemia in a patient with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We suggest that M. pneumoniae secretes a putative protein that can induce methemoglobin in red blood cells. Thus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae may induce methemoglobinemia in patients who have low oxygen saturation and anemia. PMID:26034771

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the First Human Isolate of the Ruminant Pathogen Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Anne; Heller, Martin; Jores, Joerg; Sachse, Konrad; Mourier, Tobias; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is a well-known pathogen of small ruminants. A recent human case of septicemia involving this agent raised the question of its potential pathogenicity to humans. We present the first draft genome sequence of a human Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum isolate. PMID:26089408

  5. Two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Cryptosporidium hominis reveal protein–ligand interactions including a structural basis for observed antifolate resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Amy C.

    2005-03-01

    An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of DHFR-TS from C. hominis reveals a possible structural basis for observed antifolate resistance in C. hominis DHFR. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals residue substitutions that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors. Cryptosporidium hominis is a protozoan parasite that causes acute gastrointestinal illness. There are no effective therapies for cryptosporidiosis, highlighting the need for new drug-lead discovery. An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) from C. hominis, determined at 2.8 and 2.87 Å resolution, reveals that the interactions of residues Ile29, Thr58 and Cys113 in the active site of C. hominis DHFR provide a possible structural basis for the observed antifolate resistance. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals active-site differences that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors.

  6. Occurrence of mycoplasmas in free-ranging birds of prey in Germany.

    PubMed

    Lierz, M; Hagen, N; Hernadez-Divers, S J; Hafez, H M

    2008-10-01

    Mycoplasmas are well-known avian pathogens of poultry and some passerines. Although reported in birds of prey, their role as pathogens is still unclear. Healthy, free-ranging raptor nestlings sampled during a routine ringing (banding) program, and birds of prey from rehabilitation centers, tested positive for Mycoplasma spp. by culture and a genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Given the lack of clinical signs and disease, we suggest that mycoplasmas in raptors may be commensal rather than pathogenic. Using immunobinding assay and species-specific PCR tests, Mycoplasma buteonis, M. falconis, and M. gypis were identified; M. falconis was only detected in falcons. Additionally, some isolates could not be identified. This is the first report of Mycoplasma spp. isolations from Western Marsh Harriers (Circus aeroginosus), a Eurasian Hobby (Falco subbuteo), and a Barn Owl (Tyto alba). PMID:18957640

  7. Humoral and bronchial immune responses in cattle experimentally infected with Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type.

    PubMed

    Abdo el-M; Nicolet, J; Miserez, R; Gonçalves, R; Regalla, J; Griot, C; Bensaide, A; Krampe, M; Frey, J

    1998-01-16

    The course of immune reactions of the manifold antigens of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (SC) was analysed in serum and bronchial lavage of cattle experimentally infected with the African strain Afadé and the European strain L2 using Western-blots and complement fixation. Western-blot analysis of total antigens of both strains with sera from animals infected with the homologous and heterologous strain revealed the common dominant immunogenic antigens with the molecular masses of 110, 95, 85, 80, 72, 62, 48 and 39 kDa. The sequential sampling of the blood and bronchial lavages before and after contact infections allowed us to identify the antigens of 85, 80, 72, 48 and 39 kDa as particularly early immunogens. The IgA Western blots of the bronchial lavages showed distinct, early and persistent reactions to the 110, 85, 80, 72, 48 and 45 kDa proteins. These proteins were the predominant lipoproteins as determined by [14C]palmitic acid labelling. Only relatively weak reactions of the bronchial lavages were detected with IgG. In general immune responses were significantly stronger in the animals infected with the African strain Afadé, which gave positive results two weeks after contact infection. In contrast, the animals infected with the European strain L2 induced much lower reactions with a delay of three months after contact infection. In one animal strain L2 caused no sero-conversion and no infection. The results indicate a difference in virulence between the African strain Afadé and the European strain L2. PMID:9549852

  8. Antibody responses of swine following infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare.

    PubMed

    Gomes Neto, João Carlos; Strait, Erin L; Raymond, Matthew; Ramirez, Alejandro; Minion, F Chris

    2014-11-01

    Several mycoplasma species possessing a range of virulence have been described in swine. The most commonly described are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma flocculare. They are ubiquitious in many pig producing areas of the world, and except for M. hyopneumoniae, commercial antibody-based assays are lacking for most of these. Antibody cross-reactivity among these four mycoplasma species is not well characterized. Recently, the use of pen-based oral fluids for herd surveillance is of increasing interest. Thus, this study sought to measure pig antibody responses and the level of cross-reactivity in serum and pen-based oral fluids after challenge with four species of swine mycoplasmas. Four groups of four mycoplasma-free growing pigs were separately inoculated with the different mycoplasma species. Pen-based oral fluids and serum samples were collected weekly until necropsy. Species-specific Tween 20 ELISAs were used to measure antibody responses along with four other commercial M. hyopneumoniae ELISAs. Animals from all groups seroconverted to the challenge species of mycoplasma and no evidence of cross-contamination was observed. A delayed antibody response was seen with all but M. hyorhinis-infected pigs. Cross-reactive IgG responses were detected in M. hyopneumoniae- and M. flocculare-infected animals by the M. hyorhinis Tween 20 ELISA, while sera from M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare-infected pigs were positive in one commercial assay. In pen-based oral fluids, specific anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgA responses were detected earlier after infection than serum IgG responses. In summary, while some antibody-based assays may have the potential for false positives, evidence of this was observed in the current study. PMID:25240775

  9. Use of real-time PCR to detect Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' in the saliva and salivary glands of haemoplasma-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rachel S; Helps, Chris R; Gruffydd Jones, Timothy J; Tasker, Séverine

    2008-08-01

    Feline haemoplasma infection can cause haemolytic anaemia. The natural method of transmission of haemoplasmas between cats is currently unknown but the nature of some of the risk factors for infection suggests that saliva may act as a mode of transmission. The aim of this study was to determine if Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) DNAs could be amplified from saliva and salivary gland samples collected from haemoplasma-infected cats. PMID:18313962

  10. First report of furuncular myiasis caused by the larva of botfly, Dermatobia hominis, in a Taiwanese traveler.

    PubMed

    Hu, Je-Ming; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chao, Li-Lian; Lee, Chung-Shinn; Shih, Chien-Ming

    2013-03-01

    A case of furuncular myiasis was reported for the first time in a 29-year-old young Taiwanese traveler returning from an ecotourism in Peru. Furuncle-like lesions were observed on the top of his head and he complained of crawling sensations within his scalp. The invasive larva of botfly, Dermatobia hominis, was extruded from the furuncular lesion of the patient. Awareness of cutaneous myiasis for clinicians should be considered for a patient who has a furuncular lesion and has recently returned from a botfly-endemic area. PMID:23620844

  11. Molecular detection of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" in a lion (Panthera leo) from a Brazilian zoological garden.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Ana M S; Javorouski, Manoel L; Bonat, Marcelo; Lacerda, Oneida; Balbinotti, Bruna; Queiroz, Lucyenne G P B; Timenetsky, Jorge; Biondo, Alexander W; Messick, Joanne B

    2007-01-01

    Although Mycoplasma haemofelis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" infections have been reported in wild cats from United States, their presence among native and captive wild cats in Brazil is still unknown. A 12 year old healthy male lion (Panthera leo) from the Zoological Garden of Curitiba, Brazil was anesthetized for transportation and dental evaluation. A blood sample was obtained for a complete blood cell count (CBC) and PCR analysis. DNA was extracted and fragments of Mycoplasma haemofelis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" 16S ribosomal RNA gene were amplified in PCR assays. CBC results were within reference intervals. A weak band of 192 pb for "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" was observed, and no band was amplified from Mycoplasma haemofelis reaction. A weak PCR band associated with normal CBC results and without visible parasitemia or clinical signs may suggest a chronic subclinical infection with "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum". The lack of clinical signs may also represent the low pathogenicity of this organism; however, it is noteworthy that immune suppression caused by management and/or corticoids treatment may induce parasitemia and anemia in this animal. This detection suggests further studies in captive wild cats in Brazilian Zoological Gardens. PMID:17625699

  12. Mycoplasmas isolated from stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus) used in falconry in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Volker; Spergser, Joachim; Cramer, Kerstin; Di Somma, Antonio; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Bailey, Tom

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of transmission of Mycoplasma spp. from quarry to hunting falcons in the Middle East. Groups of 17 houbara bustards (Chlamydotis undulata) and 29 stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus) kept at three different private collections in Dubai were evaluated for the presence of Mycoplasma. Additionally, 10 falcons used for hunting were investigated for comparison. The falcons showed no clinical signs and were examined within the scope of a routine health check. From all birds, conjunctival and choanal swabs were taken and analyzed via polymerase chain reaction and culture. Although mycoplasmas were not recovered from choanal and conjunctival swabs taken from the houbara bustards, Mycoplasma gypis and M. falconis were isolated from the majority (28/29; 97%) of the stone curlews from choanal and conjunctival swabs. Most of the birds had no associated pathologic findings. Mycoplasma falconis was also detected in samples collected from 2 of the 10 falcons, and M. buteonis was isolated from the majority of falcons (6/10 falcons) from choanal (n = 5) and conjunctival (n = 1) swabs. Mycoplasma gypis could also be isolated from tissue samples (liver, oviduct, syrinx) of one dead stone curlew. This study presents the first isolation of mycoplasmas from stone curlews. PMID:19569479

  13. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chikara; Manaka, Sachie; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Miyata, Makoto; Maruyama, Yuusuke

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  14. Performance of PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays for mycoplasma detection.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Lopes, Talíria Silva; Ferreira, Nívea; Balthazar, Nathália; Monteiro, Antônio M; Borojevic, Radovan; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Contaminated eukaryotic cell cultures are frequently responsible for unreliable results. Regulatory entities request that cell cultures must be mycoplasma-free. Mycoplasma contamination remains a significant problem for cell cultures and may have an impact on biological analysis since they affect many cell parameters. The gold standard microbiological assay for mycoplasma detection involves laborious and time-consuming protocols. PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays have been considered for routine cell culture screening in research laboratories since they are fast, easy and sensitive. Thus, the aim of this work is to compare the performance of two popular commercial assays, PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays, by assessing the level of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures from Rio de Janeiro Cell Bank (RJCB) and also from customers' laboratories. The results obtained by both performed assays were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we evaluated the limit of detection of the PCR kit under our laboratory conditions and the storage effects on mycoplasma detection in frozen cell culture supernatants. The performance of both assays for mycoplasma detection was not significantly different and they showed very good agreement. The Bioluminescent assay for mycoplasma detection was slightly more dependable than PCR-based due to the lack of inconclusive results produced by the first technique, especially considering the ability to detect mycoplasma contamination in frozen cell culture supernatants. However, cell lines should be precultured for four days or more without antibiotics to obtain safe results. On the other hand, a false negative result was obtained by using this biochemical approach. The implementation of fast and reliable mycoplasma testing methods is an important technical and regulatory issue and PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays may be good candidates. However, validation studies are needed. PMID:26296900

  15. In vitro studies of mycoplasma-like organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, M.; Shiomi, T.; Nasu, S.

    1983-01-01

    We determined whether the western X mycoplasma (WXM) isolated from Colladonus montanus could be maintained in vitro by ultrathin sections or by assay of infectivity. Large spherical or small electron-dense bodies like those found in intact infected cells were observed in some media. Infectivity of WXM can be maintained for 28 days in cultured salivary glands in a newly developed medium, and for 281 days (seven passages) in modified AcTc, for 231 days (eight passages) in modified PC, 107 days (one passage) in spiroplasma medium, and 52 days (one passage) in modified GITC medium extracts. However, there is no evidence that WXM multiplied in any medium. PMID:6382828

  16. Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in chukar partridges, pheasants, and peafowl.

    PubMed

    Cookson, K C; Shivaprasad, H L

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection was diagnosed in a group of chukar partridges, pheasants, and peafowl based on serology and isolation techniques. The farm also had quail, chickens, and ducks. Clinical signs in growing birds consisted of foamy eyes, swollen infraorbital sinuses, respiratory distress, and death. Breeding birds experienced a severe drop in egg production. Histologically, the growing birds exhibited lymphoplasmacytic inflammation of the conjunctiva, sinus, and trachea. The most likely source of infection was either chickens, which had been introduced before the onset of clinical signs, or the chukar partridge breeders, which had been obtained at various hunting field trials. PMID:7702531

  17. Eggshell apex abnormalities associated with Mycoplasma synoviae infection in layers

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Eun-Ok; Kim, Jong-Nyeo; Lee, Hae-Rim; Koo, Bon-Sang; Min, Kyeong-Cheol; Han, Moo-Sung; Lee, Seung-Baek; Bae, Yeon-Ji; Mo, Jong-Suk; Cho, Sun-Hyung; Lee, Chang-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Eggs exhibiting eggshell apex abnormalities (EAA) were evaluated for changes in shell characteristics such as strength, thickness, and ultrastructure. Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) infection was confirmed by serological assay along with isolation of MS from the trachea and oviduct. Changes in eggshell quality were shown to be statistically significant (p < 0.01). We also identified ultrastructural changes in the mammillary knob layer by Scanning Electron Microscopy. While eggs may seem to be structurally sound, ultrastructural evaluation showed that affected eggs do not regain their former quality. In our knowledge, this is the first report describing the occurrence of EAA in Korea. PMID:24962418

  18. Biological evaluation of Mycoplasma pulmonis temperature-sensitive mutants for use as possible rodent vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, W C; Bennett, M; Lu, Y S; Pakes, S P

    1990-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants (TSMs) of Mycoplasma pulmonis were produced by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Three TSMs were selected at 38 degrees C, as a restrictive temperature, and at 34 degrees C, as a permissive temperature. Two TSMs, UTCMI and UTCMII, were proven to be nonpathogenic but immunogenic. In addition, they did not induce pneumonia, tracheitis, or tympanitis but did induce mild rhinitis. They were stable after 10 passages in vitro and in vivo. They elicited excellent antibody production and cell-mediated immunity in vaccinated rats. They also were not mitogenic to rat lymphocytes. Rats immunized intranasally with these TSMs were significantly protected against challenge with wild-type organisms. These mutants were morphologically and serologically indistinguishable from the wild-type organisms. The growth characteristics and antibiotic sensitivities were similar to those of wild-type organisms, except that they grew only at 34 degrees C. In contrast to wild-type organisms, they did not bind to or lyse sheep erythrocytes. Thus, these TSMs may qualify as a vaccine to prevent M. pulmonis infection in rats. PMID:2365461

  19. Genome of Mycoplasma haemofelis, unraveling its strategies for survival and persistence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemofelis is a mycoplasmal pathogen (hemoplasma) that attaches to the host's erythrocytes. Distributed worldwide, it has a significant impact on the health of cats causing acute disease and, despite treatment, establishing chronic infection. It might also have a role as a zoonotic agent, especially in immunocompromised patients. Whole genome sequencing and analyses of M. haemofelis strain Ohio2 was undertaken as a step toward understanding its survival and persistence. Metabolic pathways are reduced, relying on the host to supply many of the nutrients and metabolites needed for survival. M. haemofelis must import glucose for ATP generation and ribose derivates for RNA/DNA synthesis. Hypoxanthine, adenine, guanine, uracil and CMP are scavenged from the environment to support purine and pyrimidine synthesis. In addition, nicotinamide, amino acids and any vitamins needed for growth, must be acquired from its environment. The core proteome of M. haemofelis contains an abundance of paralogous gene families, corresponding to 70.6% of all the CDSs. This "paralog pool" is a rich source of different antigenic epitopes that can be varied to elude the host's immune system and establish chronic infection. M. haemofelis also appears to be capable of phase variation, which is particularly relevant to the cyclic bacteremia and persistence, characteristics of the infection in the cat. The data generated herein should be of great use for understanding the mechanisms of M. haemofelis infection. Further, it will provide new insights into its pathogenicity and clues needed to formulate media to support the in vitro cultivation of M. haemofelis. PMID:21936946

  20. Genome of Mycoplasma haemofelis, unraveling its strategies for survival and persistence.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrea P; Guimaraes, Ana M S; do Nascimento, Naíla C; Sanmiguel, Phillip J; Martin, Samuel W; Messick, Joanne B

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemofelis is a mycoplasmal pathogen (hemoplasma) that attaches to the host's erythrocytes. Distributed worldwide, it has a significant impact on the health of cats causing acute disease and, despite treatment, establishing chronic infection. It might also have a role as a zoonotic agent, especially in immunocompromised patients. Whole genome sequencing and analyses of M. haemofelis strain Ohio2 was undertaken as a step toward understanding its survival and persistence. Metabolic pathways are reduced, relying on the host to supply many of the nutrients and metabolites needed for survival. M. haemofelis must import glucose for ATP generation and ribose derivates for RNA/DNA synthesis. Hypoxanthine, adenine, guanine, uracil and CMP are scavenged from the environment to support purine and pyrimidine synthesis. In addition, nicotinamide, amino acids and any vitamins needed for growth, must be acquired from its environment. The core proteome of M. haemofelis contains an abundance of paralogous gene families, corresponding to 70.6% of all the CDSs. This "paralog pool" is a rich source of different antigenic epitopes that can be varied to elude the host's immune system and establish chronic infection. M. haemofelis also appears to be capable of phase variation, which is particularly relevant to the cyclic bacteremia and persistence, characteristics of the infection in the cat. The data generated herein should be of great use for understanding the mechanisms of M. haemofelis infection. Further, it will provide new insights into its pathogenicity and clues needed to formulate media to support the in vitro cultivation of M. haemofelis. PMID:21936946

  1. Mycoplasma agalactiae, an Etiological Agent of Contagious Agalactia in Small Ruminants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Rahal, Anu; Verma, Amit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is one of the causal agents of classical contagious agalactia (CA), a serious, economically important but neglected enzootic disease of small ruminants. It occurs in many parts of the world and most notably in the Mediterranean Basin. Following the infection common complications are septicaemia, mastitis, arthritis, pleurisy, pneumonia, and keratoconjunctivitis. Primary or tentative diagnosis of the organism is based upon clinical signs. Various serological tests, namely, growth precipitation, immunofluorescence, complement fixation test, haemagglutination inhibition, agglutination, immunodiffusion, enzyme immunoassays, immunoelectrophoresis, blotting techniques, and others, are available. Molecular tools seem to be much more sensitive, specific, and faster and help to differentiate various strains. The real-time PCR, multiplex PCR, quantitative PCR, PCR-RFLP, MLST, and gene probes, complementary to segments of chromosomal DNA or 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), have strengthened the diagnosis of M. agalactiae. Both live attenuated and adjuvant (alum precipitated or saponified) inactivated vaccines are available with greater use of inactivated ones due to lack of side effects. The present review discusses the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical signs of contagious agalactia in small ruminants along with trends and advances in its diagnosis, treatment, vaccination, prevention, and control strategies that will help in countering this disease. PMID:25097796

  2. High Frequency of Latent Conjunctival C. trachomatis, M. hominis, and U. urealyticum Infections in Young Adults with Dry Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boiko, Ernest V.; Pozniak, Alexei L.; Maltsev, Dmitrii S.; Suetov, Alexei A.; Nuralova, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine the frequency of detection of conjunctival C. trachomatis (CT), M. hominis (MH), and U. urealyticum (UU) infections in young adults with dry eye disease (DED), since these infections may potentially produce the chronic subclinical inflammation characteristic of DED. Materials and Methods. The study included subjects of 25–45 years of age, divided into the DED (n = 114) and nondry eye control (n = 98) groups, with the diagnosis based on self-reported complaints, biomicroscopy, the Schirmer I test, and break-up time. All patients had conjunctival scrapings taken to detect CT, MH, and UU with direct fluorescent-antibody assay kits. Results. At least one of the three microorganisms was found in 87.7% of the DED patients versus 8.2% of the controls. Of all the DED patients, 63.2%, 50.8%, and 42.1% were found to be infected with CT, MH, and UU, respectively. Multiple pathogens were identified in 65% of the DED patients found to be infected. CT infection was detected in 6.1% of the controls. Conclusion. C. trachomatis, M. hominis, and U. urealyticum were detected with high frequency in the conjunctiva of young adults with DED and may be an important risk factor for DED in them. PMID:24967096

  3. Scanning electron microscopy studies of sensilla and other structures of adult Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr., 1781) (Diptera: Cuterebridae).

    PubMed

    de Fernandes, Fernando Freitas; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Linardi, Pedro Marcos

    2004-07-01

    The surfaces of the body segments and appendages of male and female Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr., 1781) were studied by scanning electron microscopy with the objective of contributing to the current knowledge of the morphology of this insect. The image analyses were done with consideration of the scientific literature on morphology, ultrastructure, and insect sensory structures. A new criterion for distinguishing the sexes of this fly was observed as well as a new setiform empodium type associated with other smaller setae. Different types of trichoid sensilla were observed, as well as spinules, a type of cuticular setiform projection and a scale-like structure. The possible function of the sensilla was discussed, and sensilla with mechanosensory and chemosensory functions were found. Pilose regions that could be involved in the production and/or liberation of pheromones were encountered in the intersegmental spaces of the female abdomen. The current study of the ultrastructure of the body surface of D. hominis contributes to current knowledge of morphology, taxonomy, and sensory structures of this species. PMID:15318390

  4. Nonconserved Residues Ala287 and Ser290 of the Cryptosporidium hominis Thymidylate Synthase Domain Facilitate Its Rapid Rate of Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doan,L.; Martucci, W.; Vargo, M.; Atreya, C.; Anderson, K.

    2007-01-01

    Cryptosporidium hominis TS-DHFR exhibits an unusually high rate of catalysis at the TS domain, at least 10-fold greater than those of other TS enzymes. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have mutated residues Ala287 and Ser290 in the folate-binding helix to phenylalanine and glycine, respectively, the corresponding residues in human and most other TS enzymes. Our results show that the mutant A287F, the mutant S290G, and the double mutant all have reduced affinities for methylene tetrahydrofolate and reduced rates of reaction at the TS domain. Interestingly, the S290G mutant enzyme had the lowest TS activity, with a catalytic efficiency {approx}200-fold lower than that of the wild type (WT). The rate of conformational change of the S290G mutant is {approx}80 times slower than that of WT, resulting in a change in the rate-limiting step from hydride transfer to covalent ternary complex formation. We have determined the crystal structure of ligand-bound S290G mutant enzyme, which shows that the primary effect of the mutation is an increase in the distance between the TS ligands. The kinetic and crystal structure data presented here provide the first evidence explaining the unusually fast TS rate in C. hominis.

  5. Mycoplasma agassizii in Morafka's desert tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Berry, Kristin H; Brown, Mary B; Vaughn, Mercy; Gowan, Timothy A; Hasskamp, Mary Ann; Torres, Ma Cristina Meléndez

    2015-01-01

    We conducted health evaluations of 69 wild and 22 captive Morafka's desert tortoises (Gopherus morafkai) in Mexico between 2005 and 2008. The wild tortoises were from 11 sites in the states of Sonora and Sinaloa, and the captive tortoises were from the state-managed Centro Ecológico de Sonora Zoo in Hermosillo and a private residence in the town of Alamos. We tested 88 tortoises for mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for specific antibody and by culture and PCR for detection of Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudineum. Fifteen of 22 captive tortoises had one or more positive diagnostic test results for M. agassizii whereas no wild tortoises had positive tests. Tortoises with positive tests also had significantly more moderate and severe clinical signs of mycoplasmosis on beaks and nares compared to tortoises with negative tests. Captive tortoises also exhibited significantly more clinical signs of illness than did wild tortoises, including lethargy and moderate to severe ocular signs. The severity of trauma and diseases of the shell and integument did not differ significantly among tortoises by site; however, clinical signs of moderate to severe trauma and disease were more prevalent in older tortoises. Similar to research findings for other species in the genus Gopherus in the US, we found that URTD is an important disease in captive tortoises. If they escape or are released by intention or accident to the wild, captive tortoises are likely to pose risks to healthy, naïve wild populations. PMID:25375948

  6. Molecular characterization of the uncultivatable hemotropic bacterium Mycoplasma haemofelis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemofelis is a pathogenic feline hemoplasma. Despite its importance, little is known about its metabolic pathways or mechanism of pathogenicity due to it being uncultivatable. The recently sequenced M. haemofelis str. Langford 1 genome was analysed and compared to those of other available hemoplasma genomes. Analysis showed that in hemoplasmas genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism are limited to enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, with glucose appearing to be the sole energy source. The majority of the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes that catalyze the de novo synthesis of ribonucleotides were absent, as were cell division protein FtsZ and chaperonins GroEL/ES. Uncharacterized protein paralogs containing putative surface expression motifs, comprised 62% of M. haemofelis and 19% of Mycoplasma suis genome coverage respectively, the majority of which were present in a small number of unstructured islands. Limited mass spectrometry and immunoblot data matched a number of characterized proteins and uncharacterized paralogs, confirming their expression and immunogenicity in vivo. These data have allowed further characterization of these important pathogens, including their limited metabolic capabilities, which may contribute to their uncultivatable status. A number of immunogenic proteins, and a potential mechanism for host immune system evasion, have been identified. PMID:21749699

  7. Molecular characterization of the uncultivatable hemotropic bacterium Mycoplasma haemofelis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Emily N; Darby, Alistair C; Helps, Chris R; Peters, Iain R; Heesom, Kate J; Arthur, Christopher J; Crossett, Ben; Hughes, Margaret A; Radford, Alan D; Tasker, Séverine

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemofelis is a pathogenic feline hemoplasma. Despite its importance, little is known about its metabolic pathways or mechanism of pathogenicity due to it being uncultivatable. The recently sequenced M. haemofelis str. Langford 1 genome was analysed and compared to those of other available hemoplasma genomes.Analysis showed that in hemoplasmas genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism are limited to enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, with glucose appearing to be the sole energy source. The majority of the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes that catalyze the de novo synthesis of ribonucleotides were absent, as were cell division protein FtsZ and chaperonins GroEL/ES. Uncharacterized protein paralogs containing putative surface expression motifs, comprised 62% of M. haemofelis and 19% of Mycoplasma suis genome coverage respectively, the majority of which were present in a small number of unstructured islands. Limited mass spectrometry and immunoblot data matched a number of characterized proteins and uncharacterized paralogs, confirming their expression and immunogenicity in vivo.These data have allowed further characterization of these important pathogens, including their limited metabolic capabilities, which may contribute to their uncultivatable status. A number of immunogenic proteins, and a potential mechanism for host immune system evasion, have been identified. PMID:21749699

  8. Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides and Stress Response in Mycoplasma pulmonis

    PubMed Central

    Fehri, Lina Fassi; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Gourgues, Géraldine; Jan, Gwenaël; Wróblewski, Henri; Blanchard, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely distributed in nature, and in vertebrates, they play a key function in the innate immune defense system. It is generally agreed that these molecules may provide new antibiotics with therapeutic value. However, there are still many unsolved questions regarding the mechanisms underlying their antimicrobial activity as well as the mechanisms of resistance evolved by microorganisms against these molecules. The second point was addressed in this study. After determining the activity of 10 antimicrobial peptides against Mycoplasma pulmonis, a murine respiratory pathogen, the development of resistance was investigated. Following in vitro selection using subinhibitory concentrations of peptides, clones of this bacterium showing increased resistance to melittin or gramicidin D were obtained. For some of the clones, a cross-resistance was observed between these two peptides, in spite of their deep structural differences, and also with tetracycline. A proteomic analysis suggested that the stress response in these clones was constitutively activated, and this was confirmed by finding mutations in the hrcA gene; in mycoplasmas, bacteria which lack alternative sigma factors, the HrcA protein is supposed to play a key role as a negative regulator of heat shock proteins. By complementation of the hrcA mutants with the wild-type gene, the initial MICs of melittin and gramicidin D decreased to values close to the initial ones. This indicates that the resistance of M. pulmonis to these two antimicrobial peptides could result from a stress response involving HrcA-regulated genes. PMID:16189093

  9. Incorporation and modification of exogenous phosphatidylcholines by mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Rottem, S; Adar, L; Gross, Z; Ne'eman, Z; Davis, P J

    1986-01-01

    The uptake and modification of exogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) by several Mycoplasma and Spiroplasma species was investigated. While in most Mycoplasma species and in all Spiroplasma species tested the PC appears to be incorporated unchanged from the growth medium, the PC of M. gallisepticum, M. pulmonis, and M. pneumoniae was disaturated PC, apparently formed by modification of 1-saturated-2-unsaturated PC from the growth medium. The modification of the exogenous PC by M. gallisepticum was inhibited by chloramphenicol under conditions that did not affect de novo synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol. A low activity of an endogenous phospholipase A was detected in native M. gallisepticum membranes. The activity was markedly stimulated by treating the membranes with low concentrations of the nonionic detergents. The PC modification was affected by the fatty acid composition of the exogenous PC species. Diunsaturated, 1-saturated-2-unsaturated, and 1-unsaturated-2-saturated PCs were modified to various extents, whereas the disaturated dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) was not. Both modified and unmodified PCs were incorporated by the cells, but the unmodified DPPC was incorporated at a lower rate and to a lesser extent. The possibility that the incorporation of DPPC into M. gallisepticum cells is associated with the formation of intracytoplasmic membranes is discussed. Images PMID:3087959

  10. Prevalence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in desert bighorn sheep in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justice-Allen, Anne E.; Luedtke, Clint J.; Overstreet, Matthew; Cain, James W.; Stephenson, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the potential for an epizootic of pneumonia to result from either natural immigration or translocation, we compared the seroprevalence to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in several populations of desert bighorn sheep in Arizona. We collected blood samples and nasal or oropharyngeal swabs from 124 desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) from 6 populations in Arizona in 2009 and 2010. M. ovipneumoniae organisms were detected by PCR in 22%, whereas antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae were detected in 47% of tested bighorn sheep. Mycoplasma antibodies were not found in 2 of 6 populations, indicating some bighorn sheep populations in Arizona are naïve to this bacterium. In contrast, others had seroprevalence rates up to 80%. We were able to compare seroprevalence rates and titers over time in 9 individuals (7 individuals included in the 124 bighorn sheep sampled in 2009 and 2010, and 2 individuals originally captured in 2006). Antibody titers persisted for 12 months in individuals from the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge (n = 7) while antibody titers appeared to decline in the Kanab Creek population (n = 2). M. ovipneumoniae is present or has been present in several, but not all, populations of bighorn sheep in Arizona. The results demonstrate the importance of routine health testing for future translocation efforts to reduce disease risk for naive populations.

  11. Mycoplasma pneumoniae, an underutilized model for bacterial cell biology.

    PubMed

    Balish, Mitchell F

    2014-11-01

    In recent decades, bacterial cell biology has seen great advances, and numerous model systems have been developed to study a wide variety of cellular processes, including cell division, motility, assembly of macromolecular structures, and biogenesis of cell polarity. Considerable attention has been given to these model organisms, which include Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus, and Myxococcus xanthus. Studies of these processes in the pathogenic bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae and its close relatives have also been carried out on a smaller scale, but this work is often overlooked, in part due to this organism's reputation as minimalistic and simple. In this minireview, I discuss recent work on the role of the M. pneumoniae attachment organelle (AO), a structure required for adherence to host cells, in these processes. The AO is constructed from proteins that generally lack homology to those found in other organisms, and this construction occurs in coordination with cell cycle events. The proteins of the M. pneumoniae AO share compositional features with proteins with related roles in model organisms. Once constructed, the AO becomes activated for its role in a form of gliding motility whose underlying mechanism appears to be distinct from that of other gliding bacteria, including Mycoplasma mobile. Together with the FtsZ cytoskeletal protein, motility participates in the cell division process. My intention is to bring this deceptively complex organism into alignment with the better-known model systems. PMID:25157081

  12. Mycoplasma agassizii in Morafka's desert tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) in Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Kristin H.; Brown, Mary B.; Vaughn, Mercy; Gowan, Timothy A.; Hasskamp, Mary Ann; Torres, Ma. Cristina Melendez

    2015-01-01

    We conducted health evaluations of 69 wild and 22 captive Morafka's desert tortoises (Gopherus morafkai) in Mexico between 2005 and 2008. The wild tortoises were from 11 sites in the states of Sonora and Sinaloa, and the captive tortoises were from the state-managed Centro Ecológico de Sonora Zoo in Hermosillo and a private residence in the town of Alamos. We tested 88 tortoises for mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for specific antibody and by culture and PCR for detection of Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudineum. Fifteen of 22 captive tortoises had one or more positive diagnostic test results for M. agassizii whereas no wild tortoises had positive tests. Tortoises with positive tests also had significantly more moderate and severe clinical signs of mycoplasmosis on beaks and nares compared to tortoises with negative tests. Captive tortoises also exhibited significantly more clinical signs of illness than did wild tortoises, including lethargy and moderate to severe ocular signs. The severity of trauma and diseases of the shell and integument did not differ significantly among tortoises by site; however, clinical signs of moderate to severe trauma and disease were more prevalent in older tortoises. Similar to research findings for other species in the genus Gopherusin the US, we found that URTD is an important disease in captive tortoises. If they escape or are released by intention or accident to the wild, captive tortoises are likely to pose risks to healthy, naïve wild populations.

  13. The effects of extracts from anti-diarrheic Thai medicinal plants on the in vitro growth of the intestinal protozoa parasite: Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed

    Sawangjaroen, Nongyao; Sawangjaroen, Kitja

    2005-04-01

    The activities of n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol extracts from five anti-diarrheic Thai medicinal plants, Acacia catechu (Fabaceae) resin, Amaranthus spinosus (Amaranthaceae) whole plant, Brucea javanica (Simaroubaceae) seed, Piper longum (Piperaceae) fruit and Quercus infectoria (Fagaceae) nut gall were tested against the in vitro growth of fresh isolates of the intestinal protozoan parasite, Blastocystis hominis. The extracts at concentrations that ranged from 62.5 to 2000 microg/mL, were incubated with several isolates of Blastocystis hominis for 48 h. The activities were classified as killed, inhibited, moderately inhibited and not-inhibited. Dichloromethane and methanol extracts from the Brucea javanica seed and a methanol extract from Quercus infectoria nut gall showed the highest activity. At a concentration of 2000 microg/mL, the three extracts killed 82, 75 and 67% of the Blastocystis hominis samples tested and inhibited 94, 100 and 76% of them, respectively. Metronidazole, used as a reference antiprotozoan drug, at a concentration of 40 microg/mL, killed 97% of the Blastocystis hominis isolates and inhibited all samples tested at concentrations that ranged from 1.25 to 20 microg/mL. PMID:15763365

  14. Effect of Mycoplasma bovis and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium in semen on fertilization and association with in vitro produced morula and blastocyst stage embryos.

    PubMed

    Bielanski, A; Devenish, J; Phipps-Todd, B

    2000-04-01

    Frozen-thawed bovine semen contaminated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) or Mycoplasma bovigenitalium (M. bovigenitalium) at either a high (10(6) CFU/mL) or low (10(4) CFU/mL) concentration was used for bovine oocyte insemination. The resulting embryos were washed 10 times as recommended by the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) prior to isolation of agent. A total of 1494 oocytes was inseminated with contaminated sperm cells and 855 oocytes with uninfected control semen. There was a significantly higher proportion of embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage in control than in the mycoplasma exposed groups (P<0.05). Isolation of motile spermatozoa by swim-up procedure prior to insemination did not render sperm cells free of Mycoplasma spp. Although M. bovis was isolated from all washed embryos after the high exposure level, it was found in only 60% of the samples after the low exposure level. In contrast, M. bovigenitalium was isolated from 70 and 12% of washed embryos exposed to the high and low levels of microorganism, respectively. Using scanning electron microscopy, both microorganisms were detected in association with the surface of zona pellucida-intact embryos and with sperm cells. These results indicate that mycoplasmas present in semen can be transmitted through the IVF system and infect embryos. Furthermore, the experiments showed that supplementation of culture media with standard antibiotics and washing embryos as recommended by IETS were not effective in rendering IVF embryos free from M. bovis and M. bovigenitalium. PMID:10832747

  15. 9 CFR 147.15 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...deionized distilled water first, except as noted in paragraph (e)(4) of this section, to prevent the precipitation of proteins. 14 Thallium acetate may be obtained from Fischer Scientific Company. (4) Mycoplasma Broth Base, dextrose,...

  16. 9 CFR 147.15 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...deionized distilled water first, except as noted in paragraph (e)(4) of this section, to prevent the precipitation of proteins. 14 Thallium acetate may be obtained from Fischer Scientific Company. (4) Mycoplasma Broth Base, dextrose,...

  17. Mycoplasma Contamination of Cell Cultures: Vesicular Traffic in Bacteria and Control over Infectious Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, V. M.; Chernova, O. A.; Sanchez-Vega, J. T.; Kolpakov, A. I.; Ilinskaya, O. N.

    2014-01-01

    Cell cultures are subject to contamination either with cells of other cultures or with microorganisms, including fungi, viruses, and bacteria. Mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures is of particular importance. Since cell cultures are used for the production of vaccines and physiologically active compounds, designing a system for controlling contaminants becomes topical for fundamental science and biotechnological production. The discovery of extracellular membrane vesicles in mycoplasmas makes it necessary to take into consideration the bacterial vesicular traffic in systems designed for controlling infectious agents. The extracellular vesicles of bacteria mediate the traffic of proteins and genes, participate in cell-to-cell interactions, as well as in the pathogenesis and development of resistance to antibiotics. The present review discusses the features of mycoplasmas, their extracellular vesicles, and the interaction between contaminants and eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, it provides an analysis of the problems associated with modern methods of diagnosis and eradication of mycoplasma contamination from cell cultures and prospects for their solution. PMID:25349713

  18. Evolutionary History of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia Using Next Generation Sequencing of Mycoplasma mycoides Subsp. mycoides “Small Colony”

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Virginie; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Barbe, Valérie; Thebault, Patricia; Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Citti, Christine; Poumarat, François; Blanchard, Alain; Breton, Marc; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Thiaucourt, François

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides “Small Colony” (MmmSC) is responsible for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in bovidae, a notifiable disease to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Although its origin is not documented, the disease was known in Europe in 1773. It reached nearly world-wide distribution in the 19th century through the cattle trade and was eradicated from most continents by stamping-out policies. During the 20th century it persisted in Africa, and it reappeared sporadically in Southern Europe. Yet, classical epidemiology studies failed to explain the re-occurrence of the disease in Europe in the 1990s. The objectives of this study were to obtain a precise phylogeny of this pathogen, reconstruct its evolutionary history, estimate the date of its emergence, and determine the origin of the most recent European outbreaks. A large-scale genomic approach based on next-generation sequencing technologies was applied to construct a robust phylogeny of this extremely monomorphic pathogen by using 20 representative strains of various geographical origins. Sixty two polymorphic genes of the MmmSC core genome were selected, representing 83601 bp in total and resulting in 139 SNPs within the 20 strains. A robust phylogeny was obtained that identified a lineage specific to European strains; African strains were scattered in various branches. Bayesian analysis allowed dating the most recent common ancestor for MmmSC around 1700. The strains circulating in Sub-Saharan Africa today, however, were shown to descend from a strain that existed around 1810. MmmSC emerged recently, about 300 years ago, and was most probably exported from Europe to other continents, including Africa, during the 19th century. Its diversity is now greater in Africa, where CBPP is enzootic, than in Europe, where outbreaks occurred sporadically until 1999 and where CBPP may now be considered eradicated unless MmmSC remains undetected. PMID:23071648

  19. Mycoplasmas (Mollicutes) have a low number of rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Amikam, D; Glaser, G; Razin, S

    1984-01-01

    DNA from Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, Acholeplasma, and Spiroplasma species digested by restriction endonucleases was hybridized with probes consisting of portions of the rrnB rRNA operon of Escherichia coli and the rRNA operon of Mycoplasma capricolum. The results indicate the presence of only one or two sets of rRNA genes in the genome of Mollicutes linked in the procaryotic fashion, 16S-23S-5S. PMID:6201476

  20. Suitability of peracetic acid for sterilization of media for mycoplasma cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Wutzler, P; Sprössig, M; Peterseim, H

    1975-01-01

    The utility of peracetic acid for sterilization of serum and yeast extract additions to mycoplasma medium was studied by culturing six Mycoplasma species. Culture media containing additions that had been sterilized with peracetic acid proved to be as good as filtered components. The use of 0.05 to 0.1% peracetic acid is recommended to sterilize the serum and yeast extract additions since savings in time and equipment can be accomplished. PMID:1100656

  1. Haemotropic mycoplasmas of cats and dogs: transmission, diagnosis, prevalence and importance in Europe.

    PubMed

    Willi, B; Novacco, M; Meli, M; Wolf-Jäckel, G; Boretti, F; Wengi, N; Lutz, H; Hofmann-Lehmann, R

    2010-05-01

    Haemotropic mycoplasmas (or haemoplasmas) are the causative agents of infectious anaemia in many mammalian species. They were previously known as Haemobartonella and Eperythrozoon species. The development of sensitive, specific PCR assays has expanded our knowledge of these agents and PCR is the method of choice to diagnose and differentiate haemoplasma infections. In felids, Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' have been described. They vary strongly in their pathogenic potential and co-factors may influence the disease severity. In dogs, Mycoplasma haemocanis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum' are known; clinical signs are mainly found in immunocompromised dogs. Transmission of haemoplasmas may occur via infected blood (aggressive interaction, transfusion) or blood-sucking arthropods. Infections can be treated with Doxycycline, although it is disputable whether the infection is completely eliminated. Feline haemoplasmas must be expected in cats all over Europe, while canine haemoplasmas are mainly encountered in dogs in Mediterranean countries but should also be considered in Swiss dogs with a travel history. PMID:20464683

  2. Identification of Chlamydiae and Mycoplasma species in ruminants with ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Chahota, R; Bhardwaj, B; Malik, P; Verma, S; Sharma, M

    2015-02-01

    Infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC) is a highly contagious ocular inflammatory condition, which is often reported in domestic small and large ruminants. Multiple infectious aetiologies are reported to be involved, but information about the role of certain fastidious bacterial pathogens such as chlamydiae and mycoplasmas is limited in India. Hence, this study was performed to determine the role of these pathogens and their identification by molecular approach. A total of 53 samples from 31 ovine, 14 caprine and eight bovine having clinical symptoms were collected and tested using species-specific PCR tests for chlamydiae and mycoplasmas followed by nucleotide sequence analysis. The results showed 77.41, 14.29 and 25% samples were chlamydiae positive in ovine, caprine and bovine, respectively, whereas 41.93, 14.29 and 37.5% prevalence of mycoplasma infection was detected in ovine, caprine and bovines, respectively. Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila psittaci, Mycoplasma arginini and Mycoplasma hyorhinis were detected from tested samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these species are identified in IKC cases from India. Coinfection of both chlamydial and mycoplasmal species was detected in eight IKC cases of ovine which suggest synergistic roles played by both chlamydiae and mycoplasma in IKC samples. PMID:25421836

  3. Detection of mycoplasma infection in circulating tumor cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hong Seo; Lee, Hyun Min; Kim, Won-Tae; Kim, Min Kyu; Chang, Hee Jin; Lee, Hye Ran; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Dae Shick; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • This study generates a monoclonal antibody CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein. • CA27 isolates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of liver cancer patients. • Results show the first evidence for mycoplasma infected-CTCs in cancer patients. - Abstract: Many studies have shown that persistent infections of bacteria promote carcinogenesis and metastasis. Infectious agents and their products can modulate cancer progression through the induction of host inflammatory and immune responses. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is considered as an important indicator in the metastatic cascade. We unintentionally produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein in mycoplasma-infected cancer cells during the searching process of novel surface markers of CTCs. Mycoplasma-infected cells were enriched by CA27-conjugated magnetic beads in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and analyzed by confocal microscopy with anti-CD45 and CA27 antibodies. CD45-negative and CA27-positive cells were readily detected in three out of seven patients (range 12–30/8.5 ml blood), indicating that they are mycoplasma-infected circulating epithelial cells. CA27-positive cells had larger size than CD45-positive hematological lineage cells, high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios and irregular nuclear morphology, which identified them as CTCs. The results show for the first time the existence of mycoplasma-infected CTCs in patients with HCC and suggest a possible correlation between mycoplasma infection and the development of cancer metastasis.

  4. Molecular detection of Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' Infection in cats by direct PCR using whole blood without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Hisasue, Masaharu; Souma, Takehisa; Ohshiro, Shuichi; Yamada, Takatsugu; Tsuchiya, Ryo

    2008-10-01

    Detection of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. infection was attempted in cats by PCR using whole blood without DNA extraction. A total 46 of 54 (85%) cats with suspected Mycoplasma spp. infection showed a positive reaction, corresponding completely with the results of standard PCR testing. The direct PCR assay was sensitive enough to detect more than 0.0061% parasitemia for ;C. M. haemominutum' and 0.0075% parasitemia for M. haemofelis. These data indicate that the direct PCR assay might be sufficient for use as a tool in clinical examinations. PMID:18981667

  5. Antigen heterogeneity among isolates of Mycoplasma bovis is generated by high-frequency variation of diverse membrane surface proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, R; Behrens, A; Stetefeld, A; Heller, M; Ahrens, M; Sachse, K; Yogev, D; Kirchhoff, H

    1994-01-01

    The protein and antigen profiles of 11 isolates of Mycoplasma bovis were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis of whole organisms. The isolates examined included the type strain PG45 and 10 other filter-cloned strains or purified isolates both from animals without clinical signs and from clinical cases of bovine mastitis, arthritis, or pneumonia. While the overall protein patterns visualized by silver staining were very similar, marked differences in the antigen banding profiles were detected by rabbit antiserum prepared against whole organisms from one of the strains analyzed. This antigenic heterogeneity was shown to be independent of the geographical origin, the type of clinical disease, and the site of isolation and was also observed among serial isolates from a single animal. Antigen profiles were further monitored throughout sequentially subcloned populations of the PG45 strain. This clonal analysis revealed a high-frequency variation in the expression levels of several prominent antigens. All of these variable antigens were defined by detergent-phase fractionation with Triton X-114 as amphiphilic integral membrane proteins. A subset of different-sized membrane proteins was identified by a monoclonal antibody raised against a PG45 subclone expressing a 63- and a 46-kDa variant antigen within that set. The selective susceptibility of these proteins to trypsin treatment of intact organisms and their ability to bind the monoclonal antibody in colony immunoblots demonstrated that they were exposed on the cell surface. In addition, their preferential recognition by serum antibodies from individual cattle with naturally induced M. bovis mastitis or arthritis confirmed that they were major immunogens of this organism. These studies establish that the apparent antigenic heterogeneity among M. bovis isolates reported here does not represent stable phenotypic strain differences generated from accumulated mutational events but reflects distinct expression patterns of diverse, highly variable membrane surface proteins. Images PMID:7927789

  6. Identification of Haemobartonella felis (Mycoplasma haemofelis) in captive nondomestic cats.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Monika; Burke, Thomas J; Kitchell, Barbara E; Lamont, Leigh A; Schaeffer, David J; Behr, Melissa; Messick, Joanne B

    2003-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether Haemobartonella felis (Mycoplasma haemofelis), the causative bacterial agent of feline infectious anemia, infects nondomestic cats. Routine complete blood count and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to detect the gene for 16S ribosomal RNA for the organism. Sixty-four blood samples were collected from 54 nondomestic cats, including tigers (Panthera tigris), cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), lions (P. leo), mountain lions (Felis concolor), snow leopards (P. unica), and a jaguar (P. onca). Some cats were sampled on two or three different dates. Two tigers were positive for H. felis by PCR analysis. As previously described in domestic cats, the parasitemia appears to be intermittent in nondomestic cats. PMID:12885130

  7. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Winchell, Jonas M; Mitchell, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a significant cause of respiratory disease, accounting for approximately 20% of cases of community-acquired pneumonia. Although several diagnostic methods exist to detect M. pneumoniae in respiratory specimens, real-time PCR has emerged as a significant improvement for the rapid diagnosis of this pathogen. The method described herein details the procedure for the detection of M. pneumoniae by real-time PCR (qPCR). The qPCR assay described can be performed with three targets specific for M. pneumoniae (Mp181, Mp3, and Mp7) and one marker for the detection of the RNaseP gene found in human nucleic acid as an internal control reaction. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of this procedure to reliably identify this agent and facilitate the timely recognition of an outbreak. PMID:23104288

  8. Detection of Mycoplasma agassizii in the Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guthrie, Amanda L.; White, C. LeAnn; Brown, Mary B.; deMaar, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma agassizii causes upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in Texas tortoises (Gopherus berlandieri). To determine exposure to and shedding of M. agassizii, we collected blood samples and nasal swabs from 40 free-ranging Texas tortoises on public and private lands in Texas, USA, from May to October 2009. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect M. agassizii–specific antibodies. Eleven (28%) tortoises were antibody positive, three (8%) were suspect, and the remaining 26 (65%) were negative. Nasal lavage samples were collected from 35 of the 40 tortoises for M. agassizii culture and PCR to detect shedding of M. agassizii. Current infection with M. agassizii was confirmed in one tortoise that had mild clinical signs of URTD and was positive by ELISA (antibody titer >512), PCR, and culture. The clinical isolate was confirmed as M. agassizii by restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunobinding.

  9. A minor role of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the control of a primary infection of cattle with Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, is an important livestock disease in Africa. The current control measures rely on a vaccine with limited efficacy and occasional severe side effects. Knowledge of the protective arms of immunity involved in this disease will be beneficial for the development of an improved vaccine. In previous studies on cattle infected with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, a correlation was detected between the levels of mycoplasma-specific IFN-?-secreting CD4+ T lymphocytes and reduced clinical signs. However, no cause and effect has been established, and the role of such cells and of protective responses acquired during a primary infection is not known. We investigated the role of CD4+ T lymphocytes in CBPP by comparing disease patterns and post mortem findings between CD4+ T cell depleted and non-depleted cattle. The depletion was carried out using several injections of BoCD4 specific murine monoclonal antibody on day 6 after experimental endotracheal infection with the strain Afadé. All cattle were monitored clinically daily and sacrificed 28-30 days post-infection. Statistically significant but small differences were observed in the mortality rate between the depleted and non-depleted animals. However, no differences in clinical parameters (fever, signs of respiratory distress) and pathological lesions were observed, despite elimination of CD4+ T cells for more than a week. The slightly higher mortality in the depleted group suggests a minor role of CD4+ T cells in control of CBPP. PMID:21663697

  10. Mycoplasma corogypsi-associated polyarthritis and tenosynovitis in black vultures (Coragyps atratus).

    PubMed

    Van Wettere, A J; Ley, D H; Scott, D E; Buckanoff, H D; Degernes, L A

    2013-03-01

    Three wild American black vultures (Coragyps atratus) were presented to rehabilitation centers with swelling of multiple joints, including elbows, stifles, hocks, and carpal joints, and of the gastrocnemius tendons. Cytological examination of the joint fluid exudate indicated heterophilic arthritis. Radiographic examination in 2 vultures demonstrated periarticular soft tissue swelling in both birds and irregular articular surfaces with subchondral bone erosion in both elbows in 1 bird. Prolonged antibiotic therapy administered in 2 birds did not improve the clinical signs. Necropsy and histological examination demonstrated a chronic lymphoplasmacytic arthritis involving multiple joints and gastrocnemius tenosynovitis. Articular lesions varied in severity and ranged from moderate synovitis and cartilage erosion and fibrillation to severe synovitis, diffuse cartilage ulceration, subchondral bone loss and/or sclerosis, pannus, synovial cysts, and epiphyseal osteomyelitis. No walled bacteria were observed or isolated from the joints. However, mycoplasmas polymerase chain reactions were positive in at least 1 affected joint from each bird. Mycoplasmas were isolated from joints of 1 vulture that did not receive antibiotic therapy. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from joint samples and the mycoplasma isolate identified Mycoplasma corogypsi in 2 vultures and was suggestive in the third vulture. Mycoplasma corogypsi identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of mycoplasma isolates. This report provides further evidence that M. corogypsi is a likely cause of arthritis and tenosynovitis in American black vultures. Cases of arthritis and tenosynovitis in New World vultures should be investigated for presence of Mycoplasma spp, especially M. corogypsi. PMID:22903399

  11. Lack of cross-protection against Mycoplasma haemofelis infection and signs of enhancement in "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis"-recovered cats.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Julia; Novacco, Marilisa; Willi, Barbara; Riond, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-01-01

    "Mycoplasma haemofelis" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" are feline hemoplasmas that induce hemolytic anemia. Protection from homologous re-challenge was recently demonstrated in cats recovered from primary infection. Here, we determined if cats recovered from "Cand. M. turicensis" infection were protected against infections with the more pathogenic M. haemofelis. Ten specified pathogen-free cats were exposed to M. haemofelis. Five of the ten cats had recovered from "Cand. M. turicensis" bacteremia (group A), and five cats were naïve controls (group B). No cross-protection was observed. By contrast, the "Cand. M. turicensis"-recovered cats displayed faster M. haemofelis infection onset (earlier PCR-positive and anemic) than the controls. No "Cand. M. turicensis" was detected in any cat. M. haemofelis shedding was observed in saliva, feces and urine. In both groups, evidence of a Th1 response was observed (high IFN-?, low IL-4), but IL-10 levels were also high. In group A, total, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased within days after M. haemofelis exposure. At times of maximal bacteremia, macrocytic hypochromic anemia, neutropenia, monocytosis and a decrease in leukocyte, eosinophil, and lymphocyte counts and subsets thereof (B- and T-cells, CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD25+ cells) were particularly significant in group A. Moreover, an increase in protein concentrations, hypoalbuminemia and a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia were observed. Five of ten M. haemofelis-infected cats subsequently cleared bacteremia without antibiotic treatment. In conclusion, the study suggests that a previous hemoplasma infection, even when the cat has ostensibly recovered, may influence subsequent infections, lead to an enhancement phenomenon and other differences in infection kinetics. PMID:26403079

  12. Development and use of real-time PCR to detect and quantify Mycoplasma haemocanis and “Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum” in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Barker, E.N.; Tasker, S.; Day, M.J.; Warman, S.M.; Woolley, K.; Birtles, R.; Georges, K.C.; Ezeokoli, C.D.; Newaj-Fyzul, A.; Campbell, M.D.; Sparagano, O.A.E.; Cleaveland, S.; Helps, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Two canine haemoplasma species have been recognised to date; Mycoplasma haemocanis (Mhc), which has been associated with anaemia in splenectomised or immunocompromised dogs, and “Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum” (CMhp), recently described in an anaemic splenectomised dog undergoing chemotherapy. The study aim was to develop quantitative real-time PCR assays (qPCRs) incorporating an endogenous internal control to detect Mhc and CMhp and to apply these assays to DNA samples extracted from canine blood collected in Northern Tanzania (n = 100) and from dogs presented to a Trinidadian veterinary hospital (n = 185). QPCRs specific for Mhc and CMhp were designed using 16S rRNA gene sequence data, and each was duplexed with an assay specific for canine glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The assays detected ?10 copies of a sequence-specific haemoplasma plasmid per reaction and neither assay showed cross-reactivity with 106 copies of the sequence-specific plasmid from the non-target canine haemoplasma species. Nineteen of the 100 Tanzanian samples (19%) were positive for Mhc alone and one (1%) was dually infected. One Trinidadian sample was negative for canine GAPDH DNA and was excluded from the study. Of the 184 remaining Trinidadian samples, nine (4.9%) were positive for Mhc alone, five (2.7%) for CMhp alone, and two (1.1%) dually infected. This is the first report of canine haemoplasma qPCR assays that use an internal control to confirm the presence of amplifiable sample DNA, and their application to prevalence studies. Mhc was the most commonly detected canine haemoplasma species. PMID:19646827

  13. Mycoplasma suis infection results endothelial cell damage and activation: new insight into the cell tropism and pathogenicity of hemotrophic mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hemotrophic mycoplasmas (HM) are highly specialized red blood cell parasites that cause infectious anemia in a variety of mammals, including humans. To date, no in vitro cultivation systems for HM have been available, resulting in relatively little information about the pathogenesis of HM infection. In pigs, Mycoplasma suis-induced infectious anemia is associated with hemorrhagic diathesis, and coagulation dysfunction. However, intravasal coagulation and subsequent consumption coagulopathy can only partly explain the sequence of events leading to hemorrhagic diathesis manifesting as cyanosis, petechial bleeding, and ecchymosis, and to disseminated coagulation. The involvement of endothelial activation and damage in M. suis-associated pathogenesis was investigated using light and electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and cell sorting. M. suis interacted directly with endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Endothelial activation, widespread endothelial damage, and adherence of red blood cells to the endothelium were evident in M. suis-infected pigs. These alterations of the endothelium were accompanied by hemorrhage, intravascular coagulation, vascular occlusion, and massive morphological changes within the parenchyma. M. suis biofilm-like microcolonies formed on the surface of endothelial cells, and may represent a putative persistence mechanism of M. suis. In vitro analysis demonstrated that M. suis interacted with the endothelial cytoskeletal protein actin, and induced actin condensation and activation of endothelial cells, as determined by the up-regulation of ICAM, PECAM, E-selectin, and P-selectin. These findings demonstrate an additional cell tropism of HM for endothelial cells and suggest that M. suis interferes with the protective function of the endothelium, resulting in hemorrhagic diathesis. PMID:23398879

  14. Epizootic Pneumonia of Bighorn Sheep following Experimental Exposure to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Thomas E.; Cassirer, E. Frances; Potter, Kathleen A.; Lahmers, Kevin; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Foreyt, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchopneumonia is a population limiting disease of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). The cause of this disease has been a subject of debate. Leukotoxin expressing Mannheimia haemolytica and Bibersteinia trehalosi produce acute pneumonia after experimental challenge but are infrequently isolated from animals in natural outbreaks. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, epidemiologically implicated in naturally occurring outbreaks, has received little experimental evaluation as a primary agent of bighorn sheep pneumonia. Methodology/Principal Findings In two experiments, bighorn sheep housed in multiple pens 7.6 to 12 m apart were exposed to M. ovipneumoniae by introduction of a single infected or challenged animal to a single pen. Respiratory disease was monitored by observation of clinical signs and confirmed by necropsy. Bacterial involvement in the pneumonic lungs was evaluated by conventional aerobic bacteriology and by culture-independent methods. In both experiments the challenge strain of M. ovipneumoniae was transmitted to all animals both within and between pens and all infected bighorn sheep developed bronchopneumonia. In six bighorn sheep in which the disease was allowed to run its course, three died with bronchopneumonia 34, 65, and 109 days after M. ovipneumoniae introduction. Diverse bacterial populations, predominantly including multiple obligate anaerobic species, were present in pneumonic lung tissues at necropsy. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to a single M. ovipneumoniae infected animal resulted in transmission of infection to all bighorn sheep both within the pen and in adjacent pens, and all infected sheep developed bronchopneumonia. The epidemiologic, pathologic and microbiologic findings in these experimental animals resembled those seen in naturally occurring pneumonia outbreaks in free ranging bighorn sheep. PMID:25302992

  15. Characterization of the antigenic and functional domains of a Mycoplasma synoviae variant vlhA gene.

    PubMed

    Khiari, Awatef Béjaoui; Mardassi, Boutheina Ben Abdelmoumen

    2012-05-01

    The Mycoplasma synoviae haemagglutinin gene, vlhA, encodes two major immunodominant and surface-exposed membrane proteins, MSPB and MSPA. Both products are antigenically variable but only MSPA mediates binding to erythrocytes. Previously we have shown that M. synoviae type strain WVU 1853 could express a variant vlhA gene, referred to as MS2/28.1, with a considerably shorter and divergent MSPA region. A finding that prompted detailed characterization of its antigenic and functional properties. Here we mutagenized each of the six opal codons of the variant MS2/28.1 vlhA member into tryptophan, thus allowing its expression in Escherichia coli as well as its cleavage products, MSPB and MSPA. In addition, we expressed 5 contiguous regions of MS2/28.1 extending from the last part of MSPB to the C-terminus of MSPA. Colony immunostaining with region-specific antisera mapped antigenic variation to the N-terminal half of MS2/28.1 MSPA. No haemagglutinating activity was observed for MSPB, but consistent haemadsorption inhibition was mapped to the region extending from amino acid 325 to 344. Inhibition of both haemagglutination and haemadsorption activities were obtained with sera directed against the C-terminal region of MSPA, with the highest titers (1/320 and 1/160, respectively) being recorded for its last 60 residues. Importantly, antibodies to this region also yielded the highest metabolic inhibition titer of 1/1280. Overall, aside from mapping the functional domains of a M. synoviae highly divergent haemagglutinin gene, this study shows that the C-terminal half of its MSPA region induced the highest titers of antibodies inhibiting haemagglutination, haemadsorption, and metabolism. PMID:22176762

  16. Plant Viruses and Mycoplasmas. Proceedings of a Workshop on Plant Viruses and Mycoplasmas Held at the Botany Department, National University of Singapore, Singapore, May 24-27, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, G., Ed.; And Others

    A workshop on plant viruses and mycoplasmas brought together scientists and researchers working on these microorganisms in the countries of eastern Asia, and enabled them to discuss their studies, to exchange ideas, and to become familiar with their counterparts These proceedings of the workshop contain papers which include country reports,…

  17. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in the oropharynx and urine among sexually active men: a comparative study of infection by papillomavirus and other organisms, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma spp., and Ureaplasma spp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has shown a gradual increase in male predominance due to the increasing incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated OSCC. However, the mode of HPV transmission to the oral cavity is poorly understood, and little is known about the epidemiology of oral HPV infection in men. The prevalence rates of HPV, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma spp., and Ureaplasma spp. were compared in the oropharynx (oral cavity) and urine of male Japanese patients attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic. Methods The study population consisted of 213 men aged 16?–?70 years old (mean: 34.4 years old). Oropharyngeal gargles and urine were collected, and sedimented cells were preserved in liquid-based cytology solution. After DNA extraction, ?-globin and infectious organisms were analyzed by a PCR-based method. The HPV genotype was determined by HPV GenoArray test. Results ?-Globin was positive in 100% and 97.7% of oral and urine samples, respectively. HPV detection rates were 18.8% and 22.1% in oral and urine samples, respectively, suggesting that the prevalence of HPV infection in the oral cavity was similar to that in the urinary tract. N. gonorrhoeae was more prevalent in oral (15.6%) than urine samples (9.1%), whereas C. trachomatis was detected more frequently in urine (15.9%) than oral samples (4.2%). The detection rates of M. genitalium, M. hominis, and Ureaplasma spp. were 5.2%, 10.3%, and 16.0% in oral samples, and 7.7%, 6.3%, and 19.2% in urine, respectively. There were no significant differences in the detection rates of Mycoplasma spp. and Ureaplasma spp. between anatomical locations. The distribution of HPV types were similar in oral and urine samples, and HPV16 was the most common type. The majority of men with HPV infection in both the oral cavity and urine had concordant oral and urinary HPV infection. The presence of urinary HPV infection was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, with an odds ratio of 3.39 (95% CI: 1.49?–?7.71), whereas oral gonococcal infection was inversely correlated with oral HPV infection (odds ratio: 0.096; 95% CI: 0.01?–?0.77). Conclusions Oral HPV infection commonly occurs in sexually active men, and is significantly correlated with urinary HPV infection. PMID:24468054

  18. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-?. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments. PMID:26565413

  19. General N-and O-Linked Glycosylation of Lipoproteins in Mycoplasmas and Role of Exogenous Oligosaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Daubenspeck, James M.; Jordan, David S.; Simmons, Warren; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a cell wall, flagella, fimbria, and other extracellular appendages and the possession of only a single membrane render the mycoplasmas structurally simplistic and ideal model organisms for the study of glycoconjugates. Most species have genomes of about 800 kb and code for few proteins predicted to have a role in glycobiology. The murine pathogens Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma pulmonis have only a single gene annotated as coding for a glycosyltransferase but synthesize glycolipid, polysaccharide and glycoproteins. Previously, it was shown that M. arthritidis glycosylated surface lipoproteins through O-linkage. In the current study, O-linked glycoproteins were similarly found in M. pulmonis and both species of mycoplasma were found to also possess N-linked glycans at residues of asparagine and glutamine. Protein glycosylation occurred at numerous sites on surface-exposed lipoproteins with no apparent amino acid sequence specificity. The lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae also are glycosylated. Glycosylation was dependent on the glycosidic linkages from host oligosaccharides. As far as we are aware, N-linked glycoproteins have not been previously described in Gram-positive bacteria, the organisms to which the mycoplasmas are phylogenetically related. The findings indicate that the mycoplasma cell surface is heavily glycosylated with implications for the modulation of mycoplasma-host interactions. PMID:26599081

  20. Prevalence of hemotropic mycoplasmas in healthy and unhealthy cats and dogs in Spain.

    PubMed

    Roura, Xavier; Peters, Iain R; Altet, Laura; Tabar, Maria-Dolores; Barker, Emily N; Planellas, Marta; Helps, Chris R; Francino, Olga; Shaw, Susan E; Tasker, Séverine

    2010-03-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of hemoplasmas in cats and dogs from the Barcelona area of Spain with the use of species-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays and to evaluate any associations between hemoplasma infection, clinical presentation, and vector-borne infections. Blood samples from cats (191) and dogs (182) were included and were classified as healthy (149) or unhealthy (224). Ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid blood samples underwent DNA extraction and qPCR analysis. Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum', and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' were detected in cats, whereas Mycoplasma haemocanis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum' were detected in dogs, with prevalences of 3.7%, 9.9%, 0.5%, 14.3%, and 0.6%, respectively. In cats, no association between hemoplasma infection and health status, age, breed, presence of anemia, Feline leukemia virus status, and other vector-borne infections was found, but outdoor access (P = 0.009), male sex (P = 0.01), and Feline immunodeficiency virus status (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with hemoplasma infection. In dogs, sex, age, health status, presence of anemia, and breed were not significantly associated with hemoplasma infection, but a significant association was found between hemoplasma infection and vector-borne infections (P < 0.001). The present report documents the occurrence of feline 'Candidatus M. turicensis' and canine 'Candidatus M. haematoparvum' infections in Spain. PMID:20224091

  1. Treatment of mycoplasma contamination in a large panel of cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Drexler, H G; Gignac, S M; Hu, Z B; Hopert, A; Fleckenstein, E; Voges, M; Uphoff, C C

    1994-05-01

    Mycoplasmal contamination remains a significant impediment to the culture of eukaryotic cells. For certain cultures, attempts to eliminate the infection are feasible alternatives to the normally recommended disposal of the contaminated culture. Here, three antibiotic regimens for mycoplasmal decontamination were compared in a large panel of naturally infected cultures: a 1-wk treatment with the fluoroquinolone mycoplasma removal agent (MRA), a 2-wk treatment with the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin, and three rounds of a sequential 1-wk treatment with BM-Cyclin containing tiamulin and minocyclin. These antibiotic treatments had a high efficiency of permanent cure: MRA 69%, ciprofloxacin 75%, BM-Cyclin 87%. Resistance to mycoplasma eradication was observed in some cell cultures: BM-Cyclin 0%, MRA 20%, ciprofloxacin 20%. Nearly all resistant contaminants that could be identified belonged to the species Mycoplasma arginini and M. orale. Detrimental effects of the antibiotics were seen in the form of culture death caused by cytotoxicity (in 5 to 13% of the cultures). Alterations of the cellular phenotypic features or selective clonal outgrowth might represent further untoward side effects of exposure to these antibiotics. Overall, antibiotic decontamination of mycoplasmas is an efficient, inexpensive, reliable, and simple method: 150/200 (75%) chronically and heavily contaminated cultures were cured and 50/200 (25%) cultures could not be cleansed and were either lost or remained infected. It is concluded that eukaryotic cell cultures containing mycoplasmas are amenable to antibiotic treatment and that a cure rate of three-quarters is a reasonable expectation. PMID:8069460

  2. Mycoplasma pneumonia--associated mucocutaneous disease in children: dilemmas in classification.

    PubMed

    Prindaville, Brea; Newell, Brandon D; Nopper, Amy J; Horii, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    There is controversy regarding precise definitions for Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and erythema multiforme (EM) major because of overlap in clinical presentations. SJS and EM major associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported to occur in children, but Mycoplasma is more commonly reported with SJS. We sought to further characterize Mycoplasma-associated mucocutaneous disease. Through retrospective chart review over 10 years, six children hospitalized with a diagnosis of SJS who also tested positive for Mycoplasma infection were reviewed. Using documented physical examinations and photographs, diagnoses of SJS or EM major were retrospectively made based upon cutaneous lesional morphology employing the classification system proposed by Bastuji-Garin et al. The majority of patients were boys, with limited acral cutaneous lesions. All patients required prolonged hospitalization because of mucosal involvement and had good short-term outcomes. When the classification system was retrospectively applied, five of the six patients were reclassified with a diagnosis of EM major instead of SJS. Children with Mycoplasma-associated EM major and SJS in our small retrospective series appeared to have significant mucosal involvement but more limited cutaneous involvement with lesional morphology, which is more characteristic of EM major. PMID:25424207

  3. [Antibodies seroprevalence for mycoplasma pneumoniae antigens in patients with bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Friedek, Daniela; Ekiel, Alicja; Szulakowski, Patryk; Romanik, Ma?gorzata

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms causing respiratory system infections, mainly viruses but also bacteria, among which there are atypical such as Chlamydophila pneumoniae, play a role in etiopathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is suggested to take part in the initiation and the bronchial asthma exacerbation. The aim of the paper was to determine the frequency of occurrence of anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies in serum of patients suffering from bronchial asthma in comparison with the control group of healthy persons. The presence of IgG, IgM and IgA class anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies was assessed by immunoenzymatic assay ELISA. Serologic markers of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection were more frequently observed in patients with bronchial asthma (15%) than in the control group (5.13%). The diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is especially important in patients with bronchial asthma. The pathogen causing bronchial hyperreactivity is eliminated by the appropriate antibiotic therapy, which allows reducing the dose of inhaled corticosteroids. The immunoenzymatic assay determining the level and class of specific antibodies to find mycoplasmatic infection quickly and precisely. PMID:12182000

  4. Kinetic mechanism of L-?-glycerophosphate oxidase from Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Maenpuen, Somchart; Watthaisong, Pratchaya; Supon, Pacharee; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Parsonage, Derek; Karplus, P Andrew; Claiborne, Al; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2015-08-01

    L-?-glycerophosphate oxidase is an FAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-?-glycerophosphate (Glp) by molecular oxygen to generate dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The catalytic properties of recombinant His6-GlpO from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (His6-MpGlpO) were investigated through transient and steady-state kinetics and ligand binding studies. The results indicate that the reaction mechanism of His6-MpGlpO follows a ping-pong model. Double-mixing mode stopped-flow experiments show that, after flavin-mediated substrate oxidation, DHAP leaves rapidly prior to the oxygen reaction. The values determined for the individual rate constants and kcat (4.2 s(-1) at 4 °C), in addition to the finding that H2 O2 binds to the oxidized enzyme, suggest that H2O2 release is the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction. The results indicate that His6 -MpGlpO contains mixed populations of fast- and slow-reacting species. It is predominantly the fast-reacting species that participates in turnover. In contrast to other GlpO enzymes previously described, His6-MpGlpO is able to catalyze the reverse reaction of reduced enzyme and DHAP. This result may be explained by the standard reduction potential value of His6-MpGlpO (-167 ± 1 mV), which is lower than those of GlpO from other species. We found that D,L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAP) may be used as a substrate in the His6-MpGlpO reaction, although it exhibited an approximately 100-fold lower kcat value in comparison with the reaction of Glp. These results also imply involvement of GlpO in glycolysis, as well as in lipid and glycerol metabolism. The kinetic models and distinctive properties of His6-MpGlpO reported here should be useful for future drug development against Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. PMID:25712468

  5. Chlamydia trachomatis and Genital Mycoplasmas: Pathogens with an Impact on Human Reproductive Health

    PubMed Central

    Ljubin-Sternak, Sun?anica; Meštrovi?, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    The most prevalent, curable sexually important diseases are those caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) and genital mycoplasmas. An important characteristic of these infections is their ability to cause long-term sequels in upper genital tract, thus potentially affecting the reproductive health in both sexes. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), tubal factor infertility (TFI), and ectopic pregnancy (EP) are well documented complications of C. trachomatis infection in women. The role of genital mycoplasmas in development of PID, TFI, and EP requires further evaluation, but growing evidence supports a significant role for these in the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis, premature membrane rupture, and preterm labor in pregnant woman. Both C. trachomatis and genital mycoplasmas can affect the quality of sperm and possibly influence the fertility of men. For the purpose of this paper, basic, epidemiologic, clinical, therapeutic, and public health issue of these infections were reviewed and discussed, focusing on their impact on human reproductive health. PMID:25614838

  6. Rapid detection of haemotropic mycoplasma infection of feline erythrocytes using a novel flow cytometric approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The haemotropic mycoplasmas Mycoplasma haemofelis and Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum cause feline infectious anaemia with infection rates in feline populations reflecting widespread subclinical infection. Clinically significant infections are much rarer but can be life-threatening. Current diagnosis is dependent upon visualising organisms in stained blood smears, PCR or quantitative PCR (qPCR). These procedures are labour-intensive and time-consuming. Furthermore, PCR-based approaches offer limited insight into the disease burden of the infected animal. Methods We have developed a novel and rapid flow cytometric system that permits diagnosis of haemotropic mycoplasma infections and quantitation of the percentage of erythrocytes that are parasitized. The method exploits the fact that mature mammalian erythrocytes, the host cell for haemoplasmas, are enucleated and thus lack nucleic acid. DRAQ5 is a synthetic anthrocycline dye which rapidly crosses cell membranes and binds to nucleic acids. The presence of exogenous bacterial DNA in mammalian erythrocytes can, therefore, be detected by DRAQ5 uptake and flow cytometric detection of DRAQ5 fluorescence. Results Here, we show that this system can detect epi-erythrocytic infection of companion felines by haemotropic mycoplasma. Due to their differences in size, and hence the quantity of DNA, the two major feline hemoplasmas M. haemofelis and Candidatus M. haemominutum can be distinguished according to DRAQ5 fluorescence. We have also shown the usefulness of DRAQ5 uptake in monitoring a cat infected with M. haemofelis sequentially during treatment with doxycycline. Conclusions The technique described is the first report of a flow cytometric method for detecting haemotropic mycoplasmas in any species and could be applied to widespread screening of animal populations to assess infection by these epi-erythrocytic parasites. PMID:23725366

  7. Genome-Scale Analysis of Mycoplasma agalactiae Loci Involved in Interaction with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skapski, Agnès; Hygonenq, Marie-Claude; Sagné, Eveline; Guiral, Sébastien; Citti, Christine; Baranowski, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is an important pathogen of small ruminants, in which it causes contagious agalactia. It belongs to a large group of “minimal bacteria” with a small genome and reduced metabolic capacities that are dependent on their host for nutrients. Mycoplasma survival thus relies on intimate contact with host cells, but little is known about the factors involved in these interactions or in the more general infectious process. To address this issue, an assay based on goat epithelial and fibroblastic cells was used to screen a M. agalactiae knockout mutant library. Mutants with reduced growth capacities in cell culture were selected and 62 genomic loci were identified as contributing to this phenotype. As expected for minimal bacteria, “transport and metabolism” was the functional category most commonly implicated in this phenotype, but 50% of the selected mutants were disrupted in coding sequences (CDSs) with unknown functions, with surface lipoproteins being most commonly represented in this category. Since mycoplasmas lack a cell wall, lipoproteins are likely to be important in interactions with the host. A few intergenic regions were also identified that may act as regulatory sequences under co-culture conditions. Interestingly, some mutants mapped to gene clusters that are highly conserved across mycoplasma species but located in different positions. One of these clusters was found in a transcriptionally active region of the M. agalactiae chromosome, downstream of a cryptic promoter. A possible scenario for the evolution of these loci is discussed. Finally, several CDSs identified here are conserved in other important pathogenic mycoplasmas, and some were involved in horizontal gene transfer with phylogenetically distant species. These results provide a basis for further deciphering functions mediating mycoplasma-host interactions. PMID:21966487

  8. In vitro activity of florphenicol.

    PubMed

    Graham, R; Palmer, D; Pratt, B C; Hart, C A

    1988-10-01

    Florphenicol was active at a lower concentration than chloramphenicol against over half of 234 recent clinical bacterial isolates. The majority (98%) of the isolates were inhibited by florphenicol at a concentration of 8 mg/l or less. Florphenicol was particularly effective against chloramphenicol resistant strains of Haemophilus influenzae. Klebsiella aerogenes and Bacteroides spp. Florphenicol was bacteristatic for salmonellae and Escherichia coli but bactericidal for Haemophilus influenzae. Florphenicol was slightly more active than chloramphenicol against Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae but less active against Ureaplasma urealyticum. PMID:3143587

  9. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS Toxin Induces Pulmonary Eosinophilic and Lymphocytic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jorge L.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Brooks, Edward G.; Winter, Vicki T.; Chaparro, Adriana; Principe, Molly F. R.; Kannan, Thirumalai R.; Baseman, Joel B.

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes acute and chronic lung infections in humans, leading to a variety of pulmonary and extrapulmonary sequelae. Of the airway complications of M. pneumoniae infection, M. pneumoniae–associated exacerbation of asthma and pediatric wheezing are emerging as significant sources of human morbidity. However, M. pneumoniae products capable of promoting allergic inflammation are unknown. Recently, we reported that M. pneumoniae produces an ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating toxin termed the community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) toxin. Here we report that naive mice exposed to a single dose of recombinant CARDS (rCARDS) toxin respond with a robust inflammatory response consistent with allergic disease. rCARDS toxin induced 30-fold increased expression of the Th-2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 and 70- to 80-fold increased expression of the Th-2 chemokines CCL17 and CCL22, corresponding to a mixed cellular inflammatory response comprised of a robust eosinophilia, accumulation of T cells and B cells, and mucus metaplasia. The inflammatory responses correlate temporally with toxin-dependent increases in airway hyperreactivity characterized by increases in airway restriction and decreases in lung compliance. Furthermore, CARDS toxin–mediated changes in lung function and histopathology are dependent on CD4+ T cells. Altogether, the data suggest that rCARDS toxin is capable of inducing allergic-type inflammation in naive animals and may represent a causal factor in M. pneumoniae–associated asthma. PMID:22281984

  10. Experimental Mycoplasma gallisepticum infections in captive-reared wild turkeys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Yuill, Thomas M.; Amundson, Terry E.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infections on egg production, fertility, and hatchability were studied in captive-reared wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo). Three groups of adult birds, each consisting of four hens and two toms, were exposed to MG by the respiratory route at the beginning of their breeding season. Fourteen control birds received sterile growth medium. Although no mortality of infected or control birds occurred, egg production during the first breeding season after infection was reduced. The mean number of eggs/hen/day produced by infected groups the first breeding season postexposure (PE) was significantly lower than the control value. The mean number of eggs produced daily by the same hens 1 yr later was unaffected by MG infection. The pecentage of fertile eggs produced by infected groups was slightly reduced in both the first and second breeding seasons PE. Hatchability of fertile eggs from infected hens was significantly lower than eggs from control hens. Productivity may be impaired if MG infections occur in free-ranging wild turkey populations.

  11. Systematic Structural Analyses of Attachment Organelle in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Lisa; Miyata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a human pathogenic bacterium, glides on host cell surfaces by a unique and unknown mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a membrane protrusion composed of surface and internal structures, with a highly organized architecture. In the present study, we succeeded in isolating the internal structure of the organelle by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The negative-staining electron microscopy clarified the details and dimensions of the internal structure, which is composed of terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex from the end of cell front. Peptide mass fingerprinting of the structure suggested 25 novel components for the organelle, and 3 of them were suggested for their involvement in the structure through their subcellular localization determined by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) tagging. Thirteen component proteins including the previously reported ones were mapped on the organelle systematically for the first time, in nanometer order by EYFP tagging and immunoelectron microscopy. Two, three, and six specific proteins localized specifically to the terminal button, the paired plates, and the bowl, respectively and interestingly, HMW2 molecules were aligned parallel to form the plate. The integration of these results gave the whole image of the organelle and allowed us to discuss possible gliding mechanisms. PMID:26633540

  12. Systematic Structural Analyses of Attachment Organelle in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Daisuke; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Matsuo, Lisa; Miyata, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a human pathogenic bacterium, glides on host cell surfaces by a unique and unknown mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a membrane protrusion composed of surface and internal structures, with a highly organized architecture. In the present study, we succeeded in isolating the internal structure of the organelle by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The negative-staining electron microscopy clarified the details and dimensions of the internal structure, which is composed of terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex from the end of cell front. Peptide mass fingerprinting of the structure suggested 25 novel components for the organelle, and 3 of them were suggested for their involvement in the structure through their subcellular localization determined by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) tagging. Thirteen component proteins including the previously reported ones were mapped on the organelle systematically for the first time, in nanometer order by EYFP tagging and immunoelectron microscopy. Two, three, and six specific proteins localized specifically to the terminal button, the paired plates, and the bowl, respectively and interestingly, HMW2 molecules were aligned parallel to form the plate. The integration of these results gave the whole image of the organelle and allowed us to discuss possible gliding mechanisms. PMID:26633540

  13. Efficacy of Antimicrobial Therapy for Mycoplasma genitalium Infections.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Lisa E; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Golden, Matthew R; Martin, David H

    2015-12-15

    Mycoplasma genitalium has been causally linked with nongonococcal urethritis in men and cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, preterm birth, spontaneous abortion, and infertility in women, yet treatment has proven challenging. To inform treatment recommendations, we reviewed English-language studies describing antimicrobial susceptibility, resistance-associated mutations, and clinical efficacy of antibiotic therapy, identified via a systematic search of PubMed supplemented by expert referral. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) from some contemporary isolates exhibited high-level susceptibility to most macrolides and quinolones, and moderate susceptibility to most tetracyclines, whereas other contemporary isolates had high MICs to the same antibiotics. Randomized trials demonstrated poor efficacy of doxycycline and better, but declining, efficacy of single-dose azithromycin therapy. Treatment failures after extended doses of azithromycin similarly increased, and circulating macrolide resistance was present in high levels in several areas. Moxifloxacin remains the most effective therapy, but treatment failures and quinolone resistance are emerging. Surveillance of M. genitalium prevalence and antimicrobial resistance patterns is urgently needed. PMID:26602619

  14. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Its Role as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Talkington, Deborah F.

    2004-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a unique bacterium that does not always receive the attention it merits considering the number of illnesses it causes and the degree of morbidity associated with it in both children and adults. Serious infections requiring hospitalization, while rare, occur in both adults and children and may involve multiple organ systems. The severity of disease appears to be related to the degree to which the host immune response reacts to the infection. Extrapulmonary complications involving all of the major organ systems can occur in association with M. pneumoniae infection as a result of direct invasion and/or autoimmune response. The extrapulmonary manifestations are sometimes of greater severity and clinical importance than the primary respiratory infection. Evidence for this organism's contributory role in chronic lung conditions such as asthma is accumulating. Effective management of M. pneumoniae infections can usually be achieved with macrolides, tetracyclines, or fluoroquinolones. As more is learned about the pathogenesis and immune response elicited by M. pneumoniae, improvement in methods for diagnosis and prevention of disease due to this organism may occur. PMID:15489344

  15. Efficacy of combined vaccination against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in dually infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Bourry, Olivier; Fablet, Christelle; Simon, Gaëlle; Marois-Créhan, Corinne

    2015-11-18

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is one of the main causes of economic losses for swine producers. This complex is due to a combination of different pathogens and their interactions. Two major pathogens involved in PRDC are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The objectives of this study were (i) to develop an experimental model of dual Mhp/PRRSV infection in SPF pigs with European strains of Mhp and PRRSV and (ii) to assess and compare the effects of single Mhp, single PRRSV or combined Mhp/PRRSV vaccination against this dual infection. Pigs dually infected with Mhp and PRRSV showed a combination of symptoms characteristic of each pathogen but no significant exacerbation of pathogenicity. Thus, the co-infected pigs displayed coughing and pneumonia typical of Mhp infection in addition to PRRSV-related hyperthermia and decrease in average daily gain (ADG). Hyperthermia was reduced in PRRSV vaccinated animals (single or combined vaccination), whereas ADG was restored in Mhp/PRRSV vaccinated pigs only. Regarding respiratory symptoms and lung lesions, no vaccine decreased coughing. However, all vaccines reduced the pneumonia score but more so in animals receiving the Mhp vaccine, whether single or combined. This vaccine also decreased the Mhp load in the respiratory tract. In conclusion, combined vaccination against both Mhp and PRRSV efficiently pooled the efficacy of each single PRRSV and Mhp vaccination and could be an interesting tool to control PRDC in European swine production. PMID:26422712

  16. A novel Mycoplasma sp. associated with proliferative tracheitis and pneumonia in a Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus).

    PubMed

    Penner, J D; Jacobson, E R; Brown, D R; Adams, H P; Besch-Williford, C L

    1997-10-01

    Proliferative lymphocytic tracheitis and pneumonia were observed histologically in the respiratory tract of a captive Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus). A mycoplasma species was isolated from the respiratory tissue. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate showed 0.90 similarity to Mycoplasma agassizii, an organism previously shown to cause respiratory disease in reptiles. Based on these findings, a novel Mycoplasma species was suspected to be the causative agent of respiratory disease in this snake. PMID:9447490

  17. Abortion associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in a bison (Bison bison) herd

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant health threat in bison and is an increasing concern and source of economic loss for producers. Clinical manifestations of infection documented in bison include pneumonia, respiratory distress and polyarthritis. The current study des...

  18. 9 CFR 147.7 - Standard test procedures for mycoplasma. 5

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.7 Standard test procedures for mycoplasma. 5 5 For additional information... are accurately measured. (ii) Collect the turkey or chicken red blood cells (RBC's) in Alsever's... water and sterilized at 15 lbs. pressure for 15 minutes. Dissolve the dextrose in 200 ml distilled...

  19. 9 CFR 147.7 - Standard test procedures for mycoplasma. 5

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.7 Standard test procedures for mycoplasma. 5 5 For additional information... are accurately measured. (ii) Collect the turkey or chicken red blood cells (RBC's) in Alsever's... water and sterilized at 15 lbs. pressure for 15 minutes. Dissolve the dextrose in 200 ml distilled...

  20. 9 CFR 147.7 - Standard test procedures for mycoplasma. 5

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.7 Standard test procedures for mycoplasma. 5 5 For additional information... are accurately measured. (ii) Collect the turkey or chicken red blood cells (RBC's) in Alsever's... water and sterilized at 15 lbs. pressure for 15 minutes. Dissolve the dextrose in 200 ml distilled...

  1. 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' INFECTION: ROLE OF A SURFACE PROTEIN IN THE ATTACHMENT ORGANELLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Attachment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to host cells by means of a specialized terminus initiates infection. Monoclonal antibodies to a surface protein (Pl) inhibit this process, and react with a region of the tip covered with peplomer-like particles. Since antibodies against the Pl...

  2. COMPARISON OF CYTOKINE PROFILES IN PIGS SINGULARLY OR COINFECTED WITH PCV2, OR MYCOPLASMA HYOPNEUMONIAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine immune gene expression profiles in tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) following experimental infection with Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, and PCV2/M. hyopneumoniae coinfection and compare the profiles to those of uninfecte...

  3. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma bovis reveals host-specific genotypes in cattle versus bison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is the bacterium isolated most frequently from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant health problem in bison, causing necro...

  4. A multilocus sequence typing method and curated database for Mycoplasma bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is the bacterium isolated most frequently from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant problem in bison, causing necrotic pha...

  5. Relative virulence in bison and cattle of bison-associated genotypes of Mycoplasma bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Mycoplasma bovis is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle and the bacterium most frequently isolated from bovine respiratory disease complex. It has recently emerged as a major health problem in bison, causing pharyngitis, pneumonia, arthritis, dystocia and abortion. In cattle, M. b...

  6. Association of selenocysteine transfer RNA fragments with serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to identify transfer RNA fragments (tRFs) associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected...

  7. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae can predispose bighorn sheep to fatal Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae has been isolated from the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS). However experimental reproduction of fatal pneumonia in BHS with M. ovipneumoniae was not successful. Therefore the specific role, if any, of M. ovipneumoniae in BHS pneumonia is unclear. The objective of th...

  8. Necrotic pharyngitis associated with Mycoplasma bovis infections in American bison (Bison bison)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison, generally presenting as severe, caseonecrotic pneumonia. Here we describe three diagnostic cases in which M. bovis is strongly implicated as a causative agent of necrotic pharyngitis. ...

  9. Respiratory tract infections during the 2011 Mycoplasma pneumoniae epidemic.

    PubMed

    Reinton, N; Manley, L; Tjade, T; Moghaddam, A

    2013-06-01

    In 2011, Norway experienced a surge in community acquired Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections. Norway also has one of the highest rates of reported Bordetella pertussis infections, despite high vaccine coverage. We aimed to determine the prevalence of upper respiratory tract pathogens in patients attending primary care physicians for respiratory illness during the 2011 M. pneumoniae epidemic period. A retrospective analysis of data from 26,039 patients that have had nasopharyngeal swabs analysed by nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae and B. pertussis was performed. Subsets of samples were tested for additional pathogenic bacteria, including B. parapertussis and B. holmesii, as well as influenza virus. M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae and B. pertussis were detected in 2,484 (9.5 %), 261 (1.0 %) and 821 (3.2 %) patients, respectively. Co-infection of M. pneumoniae and B. pertussis was found in 50 (0.19 %) patients, C. pneumoniae and B. pertussis in 4 (0.02 %). Influenza virus was found in 899 (24.5 %) of 3,661 nasopharyngeal swabs. Co-infection of influenza virus and bacterial pathogens was common, although influenza virus co-infection with B. pertussis occurred significantly more often than with C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae (20.4 % versus 2.9 % and 9.1 %, respectively; p<0.005). Testing for Bordetella species genes IS1001, IS1002 and recA showed that B. holmesii was most likely misdiagnosed as B. pertussis in 5.8 % of cases. The most prevalent respiratory tract pathogen in the general population in 2011 was M. pneumoniae. B. pertussis was also found frequently as was B. pertussis and influenza virus co-infections. PMID:23354674

  10. Associations of radiological features in Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Yan; Zhou, Yi-Ping; Li, Ming; Chen, Xiao-Ke; Peng, Hong-Lin; Yu, Hai-Qiong; Liang, Li-Hua; Zhao, Qing-Zhou; Jiang, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The associations of radiological features with clinical and laboratory findings in Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the associations. Material and methods A retrospective cohort study of 1230 patients with community-acquired pneumonia was carried out between January 2005 and December 2009. The diagnosis of M. pneumoniae infection was made using the indirect microparticle agglutinin assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Females were more susceptible to M. pneumoniae infection. Ground-glass opacification on radiographs was positively associated with M. pneumoniae-IgM titres (rank correlation coefficient (r s) = 0.141, p = 0.006). The left upper lobe was more susceptible to infection with M. pneumoniae compared with other pathogens. More increases in the risk of multilobar opacities were found among older or male patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia (odds ratio, 1.065, 3.279; 95% confidence interval, 1.041–1.089, 1.812–5.934; p < 0.001, p < 0.001; respectively). Patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia showing multilobar opacities or consolidation had a significantly longer hospital length of stay (r s = 0.111, r s = 0.275; p = 0.033, p < 0.001; respectively), incurring significantly higher costs (r s = 0.119, r s = 0.200; p = 0.022, p < 0.001; respectively). Conclusions Our study highlighted female susceptibility to M. pneumoniae pneumonia and the association of ground-glass opacification with higher M. pneumoniae-IgM titres. The left upper lobe might be more susceptible to M. pneumoniae infection. Older or male patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were more likely to show multilobar opacities. Multilobar opacities and consolidation were positively associated with hospital length of stay and costs. PMID:25276157

  11. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1997-01-01

    Logarithmic strain is the preferred measure of strain used by materials scientists, who typically refer to it as the "true strain." It was Nadai who gave it the name "natural strain," which seems more appropriate. This strain measure was proposed by Ludwik for the one-dimensional extension of a rod with length l. It was defined via the integral of dl/l to which Ludwik gave the name "effective specific strain." Today, it is after Hencky, who extended Ludwik's measure to three-dimensional analysis by defining logarithmic strains for the three principal directions.

  12. Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Gopher Tortoise Is Caused by Mycoplasma agassizii†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. B.; McLaughlin, G. S.; Klein, P. A.; Crenshaw, B. C.; Schumacher, I. M.; Brown, D. R.; Jacobson, E. R.

    1999-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determine if Mycoplasma agassizii was an etiologic agent of URTD in the gopher tortoise and to determine the clinical course of the experimental infection in a dose-response infection study. Tortoises were inoculated intranasally with 0.5 ml (0.25 ml/nostril) of either sterile SP4 broth (control group; n = 10) or 108 color-changing units (CCU) (total dose) of M. agassizii 723 (experimental infection group; n = 9). M. agassizii caused clinical signs compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections. Clinical signs of URTD were evident in seven of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and in eight of nine experimentally infected tortoises by 8 weeks p.i. In the dose-response experiments, tortoises were inoculated intranasally with a low (101 CCU; n = 6), medium (103 CCU; n = 6), or high (105 CCU; n = 5) dose of M. agassizii 723 or with sterile SP4 broth (n = 10). At all time points p.i. in both experiments, M. agassizii could be isolated from the nares of at least 50% of the tortoises. All of the experimentally infected tortoises seroconverted, and levels of antibody were statistically higher in infected animals than in control animals for all time points of >4 weeks p.i. (P < 0.0001). Control tortoises in both experiments did not show clinical signs, did not seroconvert, and did not have detectable M. agassizii by either culture or PCR at any point in the study. Histological lesions were compatible with those observed in tortoises with natural infections. The numbers of M. agassizii 723 did not influence the clinical expression of URTD or the antibody response, suggesting that the strain chosen for these studies was highly virulent. On the basis of the results of the transmission studies, we conclude that M. agassizii is an etiologic agent of URTD in the gopher tortoise. PMID:10364595

  13. Development of multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of feline hemotropic mycoplasma in blood and tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Suksai, Parut; Sangkachai, Nareerat; Chatsiriwech, Jarin; Kanthasaewee, Oraphan; Sariya, Ladawan; Chaichoun, Kridsada

    2010-11-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the detection of feline hemotropic mycoplasmas which simultaneously differentiates infections of Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf), Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum (CMhm) and Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis (CMtc) in feline blood and spleen. These organisms are responsible for the cause of various pathogenicity of feline infectious anemia. These infections are difficult to be detected by microscopic examination, the most commonly used method for general laboratory diagnoses. Specific primers were designed by selected consensus 16S rDNA sequences of three distinct species. The multiplex PCR assay developed in this study was sensitive and specific with detection limit 100 copies/microl DNA of Mhf and CMhm and 10 copies/microl DNA of CMtc. No amplicons could be amplified for other blood parasites or bacterial pathogens. This multiplex PCR will allow studies of pathogenicity and the monitoring of clinical treatment. PMID:21329322

  14. 9 CFR 147.6 - Procedure for determining the status of flocks reacting to tests for Mycoplasma gallisepticum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma meleagridis. 147.6 Section 147.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...PROVISIONS ON NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.6 Procedure for...

  15. 9 CFR 147.6 - Procedure for determining the status of flocks reacting to tests for Mycoplasma gallisepticum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma meleagridis. 147.6 Section 147.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...PROVISIONS ON NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.6 Procedure for...

  16. 9 CFR 147.6 - Procedure for determining the status of flocks reacting to tests for Mycoplasma gallisepticum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma meleagridis. 147.6 Section 147.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...PROVISIONS ON NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.6 Procedure for...

  17. 9 CFR 147.6 - Procedure for determining the status of flocks reacting to tests for Mycoplasma gallisepticum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma meleagridis. 147.6 Section 147.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...PROVISIONS ON NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.6 Procedure for...

  18. 9 CFR 147.6 - Procedure for determining the status of flocks reacting to tests for Mycoplasma gallisepticum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma meleagridis. 147.6 Section 147.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...PROVISIONS ON NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.6 Procedure for...

  19. Effect of selected water temperatures used in Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine reconstitution on titer at selected time intervals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous methods are currently used throughout the poultry industry for the administration of vaccines. Each utilizes water for vaccine reconstitution and/or administration, including two of the three commercially available live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccines. Selected water temperatures w...

  20. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from tracheal swabs in PBS...Centrifuge as above and transfer the supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA...

  1. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from tracheal swabs in PBS...Centrifuge as above and transfer the supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA...

  2. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from tracheal swabs in PBS...Centrifuge as above and transfer the supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA...

  3. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  4. Effects of respiratory Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection on allergen-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness and lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hong Wei; Honour, Joyce M; Rawlinson, Catherine A; Harbeck, Ronald J; Martin, Richard J

    2003-03-01

    Airway mycoplasma infection may be associated with asthma pathophysiology. However, the direct effects of mycoplasma infection on asthma remain unknown. Using a murine allergic-asthma model, we evaluated the effects of different timing of airway Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection on bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), lung inflammation, and the protein levels of Th1 (gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) and Th2 (interleukin 4 [IL-4]) cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. When mycoplasma infection occurred 3 days before allergen (ovalbumin) sensitization and challenge, the infection reduced the BHR and inflammatory-cell influx into the lung. This was accompanied by a significant induction of Th1 responses (increased IFN-gamma and decreased IL-4 production). Conversely, when mycoplasma infection occurred 2 days after allergen sensitization and challenge, the infection initially caused a temporary reduction of BHR and then increased BHR, lung inflammation, and IL-4 levels. Our data suggest that mycoplasma infection could modulate both physiological and immunological responses in the murine asthma model. Our animal models may also provide a new means to understand the role of infection in asthma pathogenesis and give evidence for the asthma hygiene hypothesis. PMID:12595471

  5. Assessing the prevalence of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture via a survey of NCBI's RNA-seq archive

    PubMed Central

    Olarerin-George, Anthony O.; Hogenesch, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are notorious contaminants of cell culture and can have profound effects on host cell biology by depriving cells of nutrients and inducing global changes in gene expression. Over the last two decades, sentinel testing has revealed wide-ranging contamination rates in mammalian culture. To obtain an unbiased assessment from hundreds of labs, we analyzed sequence data from 9395 rodent and primate samples from 884 series in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive. We found 11% of these series were contaminated (defined as ?100 reads/million mapping to mycoplasma in one or more samples). Ninety percent of mycoplasma-mapped reads aligned to ribosomal RNA. This was unexpected given 37% of contaminated series used poly(A)-selection for mRNA enrichment. Lastly, we examined the relationship between mycoplasma contamination and host gene expression in a single cell RNA-seq dataset and found 61 host genes (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with mycoplasma-mapped read counts. In all, this study suggests mycoplasma contamination is still prevalent today and poses substantial risk to research quality. PMID:25712092

  6. Mycoplasma bovis infections in Swiss dairy cattle: a clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Aebi, Marlis; van den Borne, Bart H P; Raemy, Andreas; Steiner, Adrian; Pilo, Paola; Bodmer, Michèle

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis causes mastitis in dairy cows and is associated with pneumonia and polyarthritis in cattle. The present investigation included a retrospective case-control study to identify potential herd-level risk factors for M. bovis associated disease, and a prospective cohort study to evaluate the course of clinical disease in M. bovis infected dairy cattle herds in Switzerland. Eighteen herds with confirmed M. bovis cases were visited twice within an average interval of 75 d. One control herd with no history of clinical mycoplasmosis, matched for herd size, was randomly selected within a 10 km range for each case herd. Animal health data, production data, information on milking and feeding-management, housing and presence of potential stress- factors were collected. Composite quarter milk samples were aseptically collected from all lactating cows and 5% of all animals within each herd were sampled by nasal swabs. Organ samples of culled diseased cows were collected when logistically possible. All samples were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In case herds, incidence risk of pneumonia, arthritis and clinical mastitis prior to the first visit and incidence rates of clinical mastitis and clinical pneumonia between the two visits was estimated. Logistic regression was used to identify potential herd-level risk factors for M. bovis infection. In case herds, incidence risk of M. bovis mastitis prior to the first visit ranged from 2 to 15%, whereas 2 to 35% of the cows suffered from clinical pneumonia within the 12 months prior to the first herd visit. The incidence rates of mycoplasmal mastitis and clinical pneumonia between the two herd visits were low in case herds (0-0.1 per animal year at risk and 0.1-0.6 per animal year at risk, respectively). In the retrospective-case-control study high mean milk production, appropriate stimulation until milk-let-down, fore-stripping, animal movements (cattle shows and trade), presence of stress-factors, and use of a specific brand of milking equipment, were identified as potential herd-level risk factors. The prospective cohort study revealed a decreased incidence of clinical disease within three months and prolonged colonization of the nasal cavity by M. bovis in young stock. PMID:25884203

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" isolates from pet cats in the United Kingdom, Australia, and South Africa, with analysis of risk factors for infection.

    PubMed

    Willi, Barbara; Tasker, Séverine; Boretti, Felicitas S; Doherr, Marcus G; Cattori, Valentino; Meli, Marina L; Lobetti, Remo G; Malik, Richard; Reusch, Claudia E; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2006-12-01

    Two hemotropic mycoplasmas have been recognized in cats, Mycoplasma haemofelis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum." We recently described a third feline hemoplasma species, designated "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis," in a Swiss cat with hemolytic anemia. This isolate induced anemia after experimental transmission to two specific-pathogen-free cats and analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed its close relationship to rodent hemotropic mycoplasmas. The agent was recently shown to be prevalent in Swiss pet cats. We sought to investigate the presence and clinical importance of "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" infection in pet cats outside of Switzerland and to perform the molecular characterization of isolates from different countries. A "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis"-specific real-time PCR assay was applied to blood samples from 426 United Kingdom (UK), 147 Australian, and 69 South African pet cats. The 16S rRNA genes of isolates from different countries were sequenced and signalment and laboratory data for the cats were evaluated for associations with "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" infection. Infections were detected in samples from UK, Australian, and South African pet cats. Infection was associated with the male gender, and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" and M. haemofelis coinfection. Coinfected cats exhibited significantly lower packed cell volume (PCV) values than uninfected cats. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that some Australian and South African "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" isolates branched away from the remaining isolates. In summary, "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" infection in pet cats exists over a wide geographical area and significantly decreased PCV values are observed in cats coinfected with other feline hemoplasmas. PMID:17035497

  8. Subtype Analysis of Cryptosporidium Specimens from Sporadic Cases in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, and Iowa in 2007: Widespread Occurrence of One Cryptosporidium hominis Subtype and Case History of an Infection with the Cryptosporidium Horse Genotype?

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Hlavsa, Michele C.; Yoder, Jonathan; Ewers, Christina; Dearen, Theresa; Yang, Wenli; Nett, Randall; Harris, Stephanie; Brend, Sarah M.; Harris, Meghan; Onischuk, Lisa; Valderrama, Amy L.; Cosgrove, Shaun; Xavier, Karen; Hall, Nancy; Romero, Sylvia; Young, Stephen; Johnston, Stephanie P.; Arrowood, Michael; Roy, Sharon; Beach, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Subtyping was conducted in late 2007 on 57 Cryptosporidium specimens from sporadic cases in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, and Iowa. One previously rare Cryptosporidium hominis subtype was indentified in 40 cases (70%) from all four states, and the Cryptosporidium horse genotype was identified in a pet shop employee with severe clinical symptoms. PMID:19587303

  9. Treatment of pigs experimentally infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae with various antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Stipkovits, L; Miller, D; Glavits, R; Fodor, L; Burch, D

    2001-01-01

    The authors have performed a comparative study of the efficacy of various in-feed medications for the treatment of 5- to 6-week-old specific pathogen-free (SPF) piglets experimentally infected on day 1 with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, on day 8 with Pasteurella multocida (serotype A), and on day 15 with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (serotype 2). The treatment started on day 9 and continued for 12 consecutive days, then the piglets were euthanized for examination of macroscopic, histologic, and pathologic lesions and for the presence of mycoplasmas and bacteria in the lungs. Based on the results of clinical observations (respiratory signs, rectal temperature, body weight gain, and feed conversion efficiency), macroscopic and histologic lesions of the lungs, and microbiologic findings, the best results were obtained by treatment of pigs with Econor + chlortetracycline, followed by Tetramutin, Pulmotil, Cyfac, and lincomycin + chlortetracycline. PMID:11768127

  10. Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in drug-treated chickens: comparison of diagnosis methods including polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kempf, I; Gesbert, F; Guittet, M; Bennejean, G

    1994-11-01

    Ten chickens were inoculated with Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) and treated with enrofloxacine. On eight different dates post-inoculation (PI), tracheal swab samples were collected for mycoplasma culture or detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and blood samples were analysed by slide-agglutination test (SA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results showed that culture and PCR detected MG from 14/80 or 20/80 samples, respectively. The last culture-positive sample was collected on day 26 PI, whereas PCR still gave positive results on day 54 PI. This difference may be attributed to the high sensitivity of PCR and to its ability to detect non-viable or non-culturable pathogens. Sera were SA positive as early as 5 days PI and some of them remained positive up to day 47 PI. ELISA detected 53 suspicious or positive sera. PMID:7740859

  11. Molecular cloning of a Mycoplasma meleagridis-specific antigenic domain endowed with a serodiagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Mardassi, B Ben Abdelmoumen; Béjaoui Khiari, A; Oussaief, L; Landoulsi, A; Brik, C; Mlik, B; Amouna, F

    2007-01-17

    A recombinant phage library harbouring Mycoplasma meleagridis (MM) genomic DNA fragments was generated in the bacteriophage lambda gt11 expression vector. The library was screened for expression of MM specific antigens with a polyclonal antiserum that had been preadsorbed with antigens of the most common unrelated avian mycoplasma species. A 49-amino acid antigenic domain unique to MM was isolated, expressed in Escherichia coli, and its serodiagnostic potential was demonstrated. An antiserum raised against this MM-specific antigenic domain recognized a cluster of seven membrane-associated MM proteins with molecular masses ranging from 34 to 75 kDa. Overall, this study resulted in the identification of a potent serodiagnostic tool and revealed the complex antigenic nature of MM. PMID:16973309

  12. Co-occurrence of urogenital mycoplasmas and group B streptococci with chlamydial cervicitis.

    PubMed

    Friedek, Daniela; Ekiel, Alicja; Romanik, Ma?gorzata; Chelmicki, Zbigniew; Wiechula, Barbara; Wilk, Iwona; Józwiak, Jaros?aw; Martirosian, Gayane

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate whether in women with chlamydial cervicitis urogenital mycoplasmas and group B streptococci (GBS) colonization is found more often than among women with non-chlamydial cervicitis. This study included 351 (mean age 31.7 +/- 6.82) not pregnant, menstruating, sexually active women. We confirmed a high frequency (49.3%) of C. trachomatis infection among women with cervicitis. Cervical ectopia was confirmed in 26.5% of examined women, in half of them ectopia was associated with chlamydial infection. We did not notice differences in frequency of colonization by urogenital mycoplasmas and GBS among women with chlamydial and non-chlamydial cervicitis. PMID:16450843

  13. Survey of infectious agents in the endangered Darwin's fox (Lycalopex fulvipes): high prevalence and diversity of hemotrophic mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Javier; Altet, Laura; Napolitano, Constanza; Sastre, Natalia; Hidalgo, Ezequiel; Dávila, José Antonio; Millán, Javier

    2013-12-27

    Very little is known about the diseases affecting the Darwin's fox (Lycalopex fulvipes), which is considered to be one of the most endangered carnivores worldwide. Blood samples of 30 foxes captured on Chiloé Island (Chile) were tested with a battery of PCR assays targeting the following pathogens: Ehrlichia/Anaplasma sp., Rickettsia sp., Bartonella sp., Coxiella burnetti, Borrelia sp., Mycoplasma sp., Babesia sp., Hepatozoon canis, Hepatozoon felis, Leishmania donovani complex, and Filariae. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed the presence of Mycoplasma spp. in 17 samples (56.7%, 95% Confidence Intervals= 38.2-73.7). Of these, 15 infections were caused by a Mycoplasma belonging to the M. haemofelis/haemocanis (Mhf/Mhc) group, whereas two were caused by a Mycoplasma showing between 89% and 94% identity with different Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis from felids and rodents hemoplasmas. The analysis of the sequence of the RNA subunit of the RNase P gene of 10 of the foxes positive for Mhf/Mhc showed that eight were infected with M. haemocanis (Mhc), one with a Mycoplasma showing 94% identity with Mhc, and one by M. haemofelis (Mhf). One of the foxes positive for Mhc was infected with a Ricketssia closely related to R. felis. All foxes were negative for the other studied pathogens. Our results are of interest because of the unexpectedly high prevalence of Mycoplasma spp. detected, the variability of species identified, the presence of a potentially new species of hemoplasma, and the first time a hemoplasma considered to be a feline pathogen (Mhf) has been identified in a canid. Though external symptoms were not observed in any of the infected foxes, further clinical and epidemiological studies are necessary to determine the importance of hemoplasma infection in this unique species. PMID:24176254

  14. In vivo transmission studies of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' in the domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Museux, Kristina; Boretti, Felicitas S; Willi, Barbara; Riond, Barbara; Hoelzle, Katharina; Hoelzle, Ludwig E; Wittenbrink, Max M; Tasker, Séverine; Wengi, Nicole; Reusch, Claudia E; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2009-01-01

    The natural transmission routes of the three feline haemotropic mycoplasmas--Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum', and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' (CMt)--are largely unknown. Since CMt has been detected in the saliva of infected cats using PCR, we hypothesised that direct transmission via social or aggressive contact may occur. The aim of this study was to evaluate this transmission route. CMt-positive saliva and blood samples were obtained from three prednisolonetreated specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats that were infected intraperitoneally with CMt. Five SPF cats were inoculated with CMt-positive saliva or blood subcutaneously to mimic cat bites, and five cats were inoculated orally with blood or oronasally with saliva to mimic social contact. Blood samples were monitored for CMt infection using quantitative real-time PCR and for seroconversion using a novel western blot assay. Neither oronasal nor subcutaneous inoculation with CMt-positive saliva led to CMt infection in the recipient cats, as determined by PCR, independent of prior prednisolone treatment. However, when blood containing the same CMt dose was given subcutaneously, 4 of the 5 cats became PCR-positive, while none of the 5 cats inoculated orally with up to 500 microL of CMt-positive blood became PCR-positive. Subsequently, the latter cats were successfully subcutaneously infected with blood. All 13 CMt-exposed cats seroconverted. In conclusion, CMt transmission by social contact seems less likely than transmission by aggressive interaction. The latter transmission may occur if the recipient cat is exposed to blood from an infected cat. PMID:19505421

  15. Depletion of CG-Specific Methylation in Mycoplasma hyorhinis Genomic DNA after Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Andrei V.; Reyes, Leticia; Peterson, Scott; Strongin, Alex Y.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to the environment requires pathogenic bacteria to alter their gene expression in order to increase long-term survival in the host. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that bacterial DNA methylation affects the intracellular survival of pathogenic Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Using bisulfite sequencing, we identified that the M. hyorhinis DNA methylation landscape was distinct in free-living M. hyorhinis relative to the internalized bacteria surviving in the infected human cells. We determined that genomic GATC sites were consistently highly methylated in the bacterial chromosome suggesting that the bacterial GATC-specific 5-methylcytosine DNA methyltransferase was fully functional both pre- and post-infection. In contrast, only the low CG methylation pattern was observed in the mycoplasma genome in the infective bacteria that invaded and then survived in the host cells. In turn, two distinct populations, with either high or low CG methylation, were detected in the M. hyorhinis cultures continually grown in the rich medium independently of host cells. We also identified that M. hyorhinis efficiently evaded endosomal degradation and uses exocytosis to exit infected human cells enabling re-infection of additional cells. The well-orchestrated changes in the chromosome methylation landscape play a major regulatory role in the mycoplasma life cycle. PMID:26544880

  16. Field evaluation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Clavijo, Maria J; Oliveira, Simone; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Rendahl, Aaron; Rovira, Albert

    2014-11-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis has emerged as an important cause of systemic disease in nursery pigs. However, this bacterium can also be found in the upper respiratory tract of healthy swine. The current study describes the development of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of M. hyorhinis and the evaluation of the assay in both disease diagnosis and disease surveillance using a large number of field samples. The analytical sensitivity was estimated to be 12 genome equivalents/?l. The assay was highly specific, detecting all 25 M. hyorhinis isolates tested and none of the 19 nontarget species tested. Assay repeatability was evaluated by testing different matrices spiked with known amounts of M. hyorhinis. Overall, assessment of the repeatability of the assay showed suitable precision within and between runs for all matrices. The coefficient of variation ranged from 10% to 24%. Mycoplasma hyorhinis DNA was detected in 48% of samples (pericardium, pleura, joints, nasal cavity, and lungs) from pigs with systemic disease. Mycoplasma hyorhinis was detected in nasal (92%) and oropharyngeal swabs (66%), as well as in oral fluids (100%). Potential uses of this tool involve the characterization of the prevalence of this pathogen in swine herds as well as bacterial quantification to evaluate intervention efficacy. PMID:25319032

  17. Prevalence of feline haemotropic mycoplasmas in convenience samples of cats in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Natali; Balzer, Hans-Jörg; Thüre, Sibylle; Moritz, Andreas

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the prevalence of feline haemotropic mycoplasmas in Germany, to determine probable risk factors for these infections and to compare the diagnostic value of microscopic examination of blood smears to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For the prevalence study, convenience samples (Ethylene diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) blood) from 262 (64.5% male and 35.5% female) cats were included. A PCR for the detection of Mycoplasma haemofelis (MHF) and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMH) as well as a feline leukaemia virus (FeLV)/feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) enzyme-linked immunoassay was performed. Blood smears from 224 cats were examined and the sensitivity and specificity of the microscopic diagnosis were determined. The prevalence of CMH, MHF, and CMH/MHF co-infection was 22.5%, 4.5%, and 0.8%, respectively. CMH was significantly associated with male gender (P=0.047), older age (P=0.0015) and both FeLV (P=0.002) and FIV infections (P<0.0001). However, there was no association between the presence of anaemia and CMH/MHF infection. The respective sensitivity and specificity of the microscopic diagnosis were 10.3% and 87.1% for a CMH infection and 0.0% and 98.0% for MHF infection. PMID:18276180

  18. Sheep primary cells as in vitro models to investigate Mycoplasma agalactiae host cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Gabriel, Cordula; Kragl, Martin; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate infection models are imperative for the understanding of pathogens like mycoplasmas that are known for their strict host and tissue specificity, and lack of suitable cell and small animal models has hindered pathogenicity studies. This is particularly true for the economically important group of ruminant mycoplasmas whose virulence factors need to be elucidated for designing effective intervention strategies. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful role model especially because it is phylogenetically very close to M. bovis and causes similar symptoms by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we successfully prepared and characterized four different primary sheep cell lines, namely the epithelial and stromal cells from the mammary gland and uterus, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified vimentin and cytokeratin as specific markers to confirm the typical cell phenotypes of these primary cells. Furthermore, M. agalactiae’s consistent adhesion and invasion into these primary cells proves the reliability of these cell models. Mimicking natural infections, mammary epithelial and stromal cells showed higher invasion and adhesion rates compared to the uterine cells as also seen via double immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, we have generated promising in vitro cell models to study host–pathogen interactions of M. agalactiae and related ruminant pathogens in a more authentic manner.

  19. A specific DNA probe for detecting Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in experimentally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Abiven, P; Blanchard, B; Saillard, C; Kobisch, M; Bove, J M

    1992-10-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the primary agent of swine enzootic pneumonia. Because of fastidious growth requirements and its serological cross-reactions with other porcine mycoplasmas, we developed a specific DNA probe for its detection. A partial genomic library of M. hyopneumoniae was constructed in plasmid pBR 322 using Hind III chromosomal fragments. The recombinant plasmids were screened by differential hybridization with M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis genomic DNA probes. One non-hybridizing recombinant plasmid was selected and its 1.65 kbp insert (designated I141) tested for specificity against genomic DNA from numerous mycoplasmas, other bacteria species and DNA from lung tissue of specific pathogen free (SPF) piglets. The 32P labelled I141 could detect specifically down to 400 pg of M. hyopneumoniae genomic DNA. To test the suitability of the I141 probe for the laboratory diagnosis of M. hyopneumoniae infections, we used clinical tracheobronchial specimens from piglets which were experimentally infected with M. hyopneumoniae. The results with hybridization on each specimen were compared to findings with an immunofluorescence test. Of the clinical specimen tested, there was agreement in the two tests of 63%. PMID:1474981

  20. Characterization of a Unique ClpB Protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Its Impact on Growth?

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, T. R.; Musatovova, Oxana; Gowda, Pramod; Baseman, Joel B.

    2008-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae accounts for 20 to 30% of all community-acquired pneumonia and has been associated with other airway pathologies, including asthma, and a range of extrapulmonary manifestations. Although the entire genomic sequence of M. pneumoniae has been completed, the functions of many of these genes in mycoplasma physiology are unknown. In this study, we focused on clpB, a well-known heat shock gene in other bacteria, to examine its role in mycoplasma growth. Transcriptional and translational analyses of heat shock in M. pneumoniae indicated that clpB is significantly upregulated, reinforcing its status as a critical responder to heat stress. Interestingly, M. pneumoniae ClpB does not use dual translational start points for ClpB synthesis, like other ClpB-characterized bacteria. Biochemical characterization of purified M. pneumoniae recombinant ClpB revealed casein- and lysine-independent ATPase activity and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE-dependent chaperone activity. An M. pneumoniae mini-Tn4001-integrated, clpB-null mutant was impaired in its ability to replicate under permissive growth conditions, demonstrating the growth-promoting status of ClpB. PMID:18779336

  1. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detecting Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis in pen-based oral, tonsillar, and nasal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Leslie; Erickson, Barbara Z.; Wang, Chong; Raymond, Matthew; Strait, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae are pathogens known to cause disease in pigs post-weaning. Due to their fastidious nature, there is increased need for culture-independent diagnostic platforms to detect these microorganisms. Therefore, this study was performed to develop and optimize quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to rapidly detect M. hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae in pen-based oral fluids as well as nasal and tonsillar fluids as proxies for samples used in swine herd surveillance. Two methods of genomic DNA extraction, automated versus manual, were used to compare diagnostic test performance. A wean-to-finish longitudinal study was also carried out to demonstrate the reproducibility of using pen-based oral fluids. Overall, pen-based oral and tonsillar fluids were more likely to be positive for both types of bacteria whereas only M. hyorhinis was detected in nasal fluids. DNA extraction protocols were shown to significantly influence test result. Although the initial detection time somewhat differed, both organisms were repeatedly detected in the longitudinal study. Overall, this study evaluated two qPCR methods for rapid and specific detection of either mycoplasma. Results from the present investigation can serve as a foundation for future studies to determine the prevalence of the two microorganisms, environmental load, and effectiveness of veterinary interventions for infection control. PMID:25643803

  2. Acute phase response to Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection in FIV-infected and non-FIV-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Korman, R M; Cerón, J J; Knowles, T G; Barker, E N; Eckersall, P D; Tasker, S

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenicity of Haemoplasma spp. in cats varies with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) causing subclinical infection while Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) often induces haemolytic anaemia. The aims of this study were to characterise the acute phase response (APR) of the cat to experimental infection with Mhf or CMhm, and to determine whether chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection influences this response. The acute phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and ?-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations were measured pre-infection and every 7-14 days up to day 100 post-infection (pi) in cats infected with either Mhf or CMhm. Half of each group of cats (6/12) were chronically and subclinically infected with FIV. Marbofloxacin treatment was given on days 16-44 pi to half of the Mhf-infected cats, and on days 49-77 pi to half of the CMhm-infected cats. FIV-infected animals had significantly lower AGP concentrations, and significantly greater Hp concentrations than non-FIV-infected cats when infected with CMhm and Mhf, respectively. Both CMhm and Mhf infection were associated with significant increases in SAA concentrations, while AGP concentrations were only significantly increased by Mhf infection. Mhf-infected cats had significantly greater SAA concentrations than CMhm-infected animals. Both Mhf and CMhm infections were associated with an APR, with Mhf infection inducing a greater response. Chronic FIV infection appeared to modify the APR, which varied with the infecting Haemoplasma species. PMID:22763129

  3. Acute phase response to Mycoplasma haemofelis and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ infection in FIV-infected and non-FIV-infected cats

    PubMed Central

    Korman, R.M.; Cerón, J.J.; Knowles, T.G.; Barker, E.N.; Eckersall, P.D.; Tasker, S.

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Haemoplasma spp. in cats varies with ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ (CMhm) causing subclinical infection while Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) often induces haemolytic anaemia. The aims of this study were to characterise the acute phase response (APR) of the cat to experimental infection with Mhf or CMhm, and to determine whether chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection influences this response. The acute phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and ?-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations were measured pre-infection and every 7–14 days up to day 100 post-infection (pi) in cats infected with either Mhf or CMhm. Half of each group of cats (6/12) were chronically and subclinically infected with FIV. Marbofloxacin treatment was given on days 16–44 pi to half of the Mhf-infected cats, and on days 49–77 pi to half of the CMhm-infected cats. FIV-infected animals had significantly lower AGP concentrations, and significantly greater Hp concentrations than non-FIV-infected cats when infected with CMhm and Mhf, respectively. Both CMhm and Mhf infection were associated with significant increases in SAA concentrations, while AGP concentrations were only significantly increased by Mhf infection. Mhf-infected cats had significantly greater SAA concentrations than CMhm-infected animals. Both Mhf and CMhm infections were associated with an APR, with Mhf infection inducing a greater response. Chronic FIV infection appeared to modify the APR, which varied with the infecting Haemoplasma species. PMID:22763129

  4. A survey of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synovaie with avian influenza H9 subtype in meat-type chicken in Jordan between 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    Roussan, Dergham Ahmad; Khawaldeh, Ghassan; Shaheen, Ibrahim Ali

    2015-07-01

    Commercial chickens in Jordan suffer from respiratory disease of undetermined etiology. This study was designed to document the involvement of avian influenza virus (AIV) H9 subtype, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) in this respiratory disease. In this study, trachea swabs from 350 commercial broiler chicken flocks that suffered from respiratory disease were tested for AIV H9 subtype by using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and for MG and MS by using PCR. PCR and RT-PCR results showed that 23.7, 8.9, and 6.6% of these flocks were infected with AIV H9 subtype, MS, and MG, respectively, whereas 12.9 and 5.7% of these flocks were infected with both AIV H9 subtype and MS and AIV H9 subtype and MS, respectively. Furthermore, 42.3% of these flocks were negative for the above mentioned respiratory diseases. Further epidemiological studies are recommended to determine risk factors and evaluate the economic consequences of AIV H9 subtype, MG, and MS infections in the region. Furthermore, studies are required to isolate AIV H9 subtype, MG, and MS and develop vaccines against the local field isolates. PMID:25971950

  5. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia among Young Children with and without Diarrhea in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Tellevik, Marit G.; Moyo, Sabrina J.; Blomberg, Bjørn; Hjøllo, Torunn; Maselle, Samuel Y.; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Background Although enteroparasites are common causes of diarrheal illness, few studies have been performed among children in Tanzania. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia among young children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and identify risk factors for infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed an unmatched case-control study among children < 2 years of age in Dar es Salaam, recruited from August 2010 to July 2011. Detection and identification of protozoans were done by PCR techniques on DNA from stool specimens from 701 cases of children admitted due to diarrhea at the three study hospitals, and 558 controls of children with no history of diarrhea during the last month prior to enrollment. The prevalence of C. parvum/hominis was 10.4% (84.7% C. hominis), and that of G. lamblia 4.6%. E. histolytica was not detected. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium was significantly higher in cases (16.3%) than in controls (3.1%; P < 0.001; OR = 6.2; 95% CI: 3.7–10.4). G. lamblia was significantly more prevalent in controls (6.1%) than in cases (3.4%; P = 0.027; OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.1–3.1). Cryptosporidium infection was found more often in HIV-positive (24.2%) than in HIV-negative children (3.9%; P < 0.001; OR = 7.9; 95% CI: 3.1–20.5), and was also associated with rainfall (P < 0.001; OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.5–3.8). Among cases, stunted children had significantly higher risk of being infected with Cryptosporidium (P = 0.011; OR = 2.12; 95% CI: 1.2–3.8). G. lamblia infection was more prevalent in the cool season (P = 0.004; OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3–3.8), and more frequent among cases aged > 12 months (P = 0.003; OR = 3.5; 95% CI: 1.5–7.8). Among children aged 7–12 months, those who were breastfed had lower prevalence of G. lamblia infection than those who had been weaned (P = 0.012). Conclusions Cryptosporidium infection is common among young Tanzanian children with diarrhea, particularly those living with HIV, and infection is more frequent during the rainy season. G. lamblia is frequently implicated in asymptomatic infections, but rarely causes overt diarrheal illness, and its prevalence increases with age. PMID:26452235

  6. Profiles of serum amino acids to screen for catabolic and inflammation status in calves with Mycoplasma bronchopneumonia

    PubMed Central

    TSUKANO, Kenji; SUZUKI, Kazuyuki; SHIMAMORI, Toshio; SATO, Ayano; KUDO, Katsunori; ASANO, Ryuji; AJITO, Tadaharu; LAKRITZ, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between serum amino acid profiles in normal and calves with Mycoplasma bronchopneumonia. Serum free amino acid concentrations in serum obtained from 34 calves with or without Mycoplasma bronchopneumonia were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The calves with Mycoplasma were characterized by significantly lower total amino acid and total essential amino acid concentrations and molar ratios of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) to aromatic amino acid (BCAA/AAA) and BCAA to tyrosine (BTR), and by a significantly higher molar ratio of serine phosphorylation (SPR). The proposed diagnostic cutoffs for BCAA/AAA, BTR and SPR in serum based on ROC analysis for detection of catabolic states associated with Mycoplasma bronchopneumonia were set at <1.75, <2.86 and >0.85, respectively. Our results suggest that determining the profiles of amino acids, especially BTR and SPR, could provide useful diagnostic information in terms of predicting protein catabolism in Mycoplasma bronchopneumonia. PMID:25342635

  7. Clinical severity of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection is associated with bacterial load in oropharyngeal secretions but not with MP genotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Disease severity in Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection could potentially be related to bacterial factors such as MP genotype (MP1 or MP2; distinguished by different adhesions proteins) or bacterial load in airway secretions. We have compared these parameters in patients who were hospitalized for MP pneumonia, with outpatients with mild MP disease. Methods MP bacterial load was measured by real-time PCR in 45 in- and outpatients ("clinical study group") in whom MP DNA had been detected in oropharyngeal secretions by PCR. In addition, genotype and phylogenetic relationships were determined. The phylogenetical assessment was done by partial DNA sequencing of the P1 gene on isolates from 33 patients in the clinical study-group where sufficient DNA was available. The assessment was further extended to isolates from 13 MP-positive family members and 37 unselected MP positive patients from the two subsequent years and two different geographical locations. In total 83 strains were molecular characterized. Results Mean MP loads were significantly higher in 24 hospitalized patients than in 21 outpatients (1600 vs. 170 genomic equivalents/?L, p = 0.009). This difference remained significant after adjustment for age and days between disease onset and sampling. Hospitalized patients also had higher C-reactive protein levels. Mean levels were 188 vs 20 mg/L (p = 0,001). The genotype assessment showed MP genotype 1 in 17 of the 33 sequenced strains from the clinical study-group, and type 2 in 16 of these patients. Within each genotype, sequence differences were minimal. No association between disease severity and MP genotype was observed. In the extended genotype assessment, MP1 was found in similar proportions. In family contacts it was found in 53% and among patients from the two subsequent years 53% and 40%. Conclusions A higher MP bacterial load in throat secretions at diagnosis was associated with more advanced respiratory disease in patients, but MP genotype did not influence disease severity. Both MP genotypes co-circulated during recent outbreaks in Sweden. PMID:20184731

  8. Survey of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum, haemotropic mycoplasmas and other arthropod-borne pathogens in cats from Albania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Albania is a country on the western part of the Balkan Peninsula. The Mediterranean climate is favourable for the stable development of many arthropod species, which are incriminated as vectors for various agents. Recently, several papers have reported on epidemiological aspects of parasitic diseases including vector-borne disease agents of dogs with zoonotic characteristics in Albania. However, data on the epidemiology of feline parasitic and bacterial agents in Albania is scarce. Methods Serum and EDTA-blood samples collected from 146 domestic cats from Tirana during 2008 through 2010 were examined for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Leishmania infantum, and Anaplasma spp. with IFAT, for infection with L. infantum, A. phagocytophilum, Bartonella spp. and haemotropic mycoplasmas with conventional PCR and real-time PCR and for Dirofilaria immitis with antigen ELISA. Additionally blood smear microscopy was carried out for detection of blood-borne pathogens. Results Antibodies to T. gondii (titre ?1:100) were demonstrated in 91 cats (62.3%). Antibodies to N. caninum (titre ?1:100), L. infantum (titre ?1:64) and Anaplasma spp. (titre ?1:100) were found in the serum of 15 (10.3%), 1 (0.7%) or 3 (2.1%) cats, respectively. DNA of haemotropic mycoplasmas was detected in the blood of 45 cats (30.8%), namely Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum (21.9%), Mycoplasma haemofelis (10.3%), and Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis (5.5%), with ten cats harbouring co-infections of two mycoplasmas each; blood from one cat was PCR positive for Bartonella henselae. No DNA of Leishmania spp. and A. phagocytophilum or circulating D. immitis antigen was detected in any cat sample. The overall prevalence of haemotropic mycoplasmas was significantly higher in male compared to female cats (40.6% vs. 24.1%, p?=?0.0444); and age was associated positively with the prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii (p?=?0.0008) and the percentage of haemotropic mycoplasma infection (p?=?0.0454). Conclusions With the broad screening panel including direct and indirect methods applied in the present study, a wide spectrum of exposure to or infection with parasitic or bacterial agents was detected. PMID:24517118

  9. Evaluation of two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits for the detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kempf, I; Gesbert, F; Guittet, M; Bennejean, G; Stipkovits, L

    1994-06-01

    Sensitivity and specificity of two commercial Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, rapid slide agglutination (SA) and haemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests were compared using sera from specific pathogen free chickens, turkeys or ducks which had been inoculated with various avian mycoplasmas, bacteria or with a reovirus. Results show that sensitivity of SA was superior to ELISA and HI tests in the ability to detect antibodies formed in early response to MG infection. However, both ELISA kits and HI tests had a higher degree of specificity. PMID:18671097

  10. Prevalence of Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum', Bartonella species, Ehrlichia species, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum DNA in the blood of cats with anemia.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Anthony M; Radecki, Steve; Lappin, Michael R

    2007-02-01

    Hemoplasmas are known causes of anemia in some cats and some Bartonella species have been associated with anemia in people and in dogs. In this retrospective study, we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to determine the prevalence rates of Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus M haemominutum', A phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia species, and Bartonella species DNA in the blood of cats with anemia and a control group of healthy cats. DNA of the organisms was amplified from 22 of 89 cats with anemia (24.7%) and 20 of 87 healthy cats (23.0%). DNA of a hemoplasma was amplified from 18 of 89 cats with anemia (20.2%) and 13 of 87 healthy cats (14.9%); DNA of a Bartonella species was amplified from five of 89 cats with anemia (5.6%) and seven of 87 healthy cats (8.0%). There were no statistically significant differences detected between groups. PMID:16846745

  11. Establishment and characterization of a low-dose Mycoplasma haemofelis infection model.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Julia; Novacco, Marilisa; Riond, Barbara; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2013-12-27

    Hemotropic mycoplasma are small, cell-wall-free bacteria that can infect various mammalian species, including humans. They cannot be cultured in vitro; therefore, animal models play an important role, e.g. for pathogenesis studies. Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) is the most pathogenic of the three feline hemotropic mycoplasma species; it is known to induce severe hemolytic anemia in infected cats. The aims of this study were to establish and characterize a low-dose Mhf transmission model. Five specified pathogen-free cats were subcutaneously exposed to 1000 copies of Mhf per cat corresponding to 0.05 ?L of infectious blood with 2×10(7) copies/mL as determined by real-time PCR. All cats became PCR-positive within 34 days post-exposure and reached a maximum blood Mhf load of 10(9) copies/mL, similar to previously reported high-dose infections. In a selected sample of modified Wright-stained blood smears, small epicellular coccoid structures on the surface of the red blood cells were identified by light microscopy. Additionally, using an Mhf rDnaK ELISA, seroconversion was demonstrated in all cats within 4-5 weeks after Mhf exposure. Four out of five cats developed anemia. While three cats showed only mild clinical signs of hemoplasmosis, one cat developed severe anemia and required antibiotic treatment. Our study demonstrated that minimal contact with Mhf infectious blood was sufficient for transmission of the infection and the induction of hemoplasmosis. This low-dose Mhf infection might more accurately mirror the natural route of infection, i.e., by arthropod vectors or aggressive interaction among cats. We therefore recommend this protocol for use in future animal model studies. PMID:23998427

  12. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae - A Primary Cause of Severe Pneumonia Epizootics in the Norwegian Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) Population

    PubMed Central

    Handeland, Kjell; Tengs, Torstein; Kokotovic, Branko; Vikøren, Turid; Ayling, Roger D.; Bergsjø, Bjarne; Sigurðardóttir, Ólöf G.; Bretten, Tord

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population lives on the high mountain plateau of Dovre and originates from animals introduced from Greenland. In the late summers of 2006 and 2012, severe outbreaks of pneumonia with mortality rates of 25-30% occurred. During the 2012 epidemic high quality samples from culled sick animals were obtained for microbiological and pathological examinations. High throughput sequencing (pyrosequencing) of pneumonic lung tissue revealed high concentrations of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in all six animals examined by this method and Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida in four animals, whereas no virus sequences could be identified. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and P. multocida multocida were also isolated by culture. Using real time PCR on lung swabs, M. ovipneumoniae was detected in all of the 19 pneumonic lungs examined. Gross pathological examination revealed heavy consolidations primarily in the cranial parts of the lungs and it also identified one case of otitis media. Histologically, lung lesions were characterized as acute to subacute mixed exudative and moderately proliferative bronchoalveolar pneumonia. Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed high load of M. ovipneumoniae antigens within lung lesions, with particularly intensive staining in the neutrophils. Similar IHC finding were observed in archived lung tissue blocks from animals examined during the 2006 epidemic. An M. ovipneumoniae specific ELISA was applied on bio-banked muskox sera from stray muskoxen killed in the period 2004–2013 and sick muskoxen culled, as well as sera from wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) on Dovre and muskoxen from Greenland. Serology and mycoplasma culturing was also carried out on sheep that had been on pasture in the muskox area during the outbreak in 2012. Our findings indicated separate introductions of M. ovipneumoniae infection in 2006 and 2012 from infected co-grazing sheep. Salt licks shared by the two species were a possible route of transmitting infection. PMID:25198695

  13. Co-infection with Anaplasma platys, Bartonella henselae and Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum in a veterinarian

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During a two year period, a 27-year-old female veterinarian experienced migraine headaches, seizures, including status epilepticus, and other neurological and neurocognitive abnormalities. Prior to and during her illness, she had been actively involved in hospital-based work treating domestic animals, primarily cats and dogs, in Grenada and Ireland and anatomical research requiring the dissection of wild animals (including lions, giraffe, rabbits, mongoose, and other animals), mostly in South Africa. The woman reported contact with fleas, ticks, lice, biting flies, mosquitoes, spiders and mites and had also been scratched or bitten by dogs, cats, birds, horses, reptiles, rabbits and rodents. Prior diagnostic testing resulted in findings that were inconclusive or within normal reference ranges and no etiological diagnosis had been obtained to explain the patient’s symptoms. Methods PCR assays targeting Anaplasma spp. Bartonella spp. and hemotopic Mycoplasma spp. were used to test patient blood samples. PCR positive amplicons were sequenced directly and compared to GenBank sequences. In addition, Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM) enrichment blood culture was used to facilitate bacterial growth and Bartonella spp. serology was performed by indirect fluorescent antibody testing. Results Anaplasma platys, Bartonella henselae and Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum DNA was amplified and sequenced from the woman’s blood, serum or blood culture samples. Her serum was variably seroreactive to several Bartonella sp. antigens. Despite symptomatic improvement, six months of doxycycline most likely failed to eliminate the B. henselae infection, whereas A. platys and Candidatus M. haematoparvum DNA was no longer amplified from post-treatment samples. Conclusions As is typical of many veterinary professionals, this individual had frequent exposure to arthropod vectors and near daily contact with persistently bacteremic reservoir hosts, including cats, the primary reservoir host for B. henselae, and dogs, the presumed primary reservoir host for A. platys and Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum. Physicians caring for veterinarians should be aware of the occupational zoonotic risks associated with the daily activities of these animal health professionals. PMID:23587235

  14. Detection of mixed infections with "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" and Mycoplasma haemofelis using real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jane E; Drazenovich, Nicole L; Kyles, Andrew E; Ball, Louise M; Leutenegger, Christian M

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of real-time TaqMan PCR assays for detection of coinfections with "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" (Mhm), and Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf), in vitro and over time in experimentally infected cats. First, the ability of each real-time PCR assay to detect and quantify mixed infections was determined in vitro by testing mixtures of plasmids containing Mhm and Mhf 16S rDNA with each assay. Subsequently, 4 specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats, 2 of which were splenectomized, were inoculated with blood from a cat infected with both Mhm and Mhf. Sixteen blood samples were then collected from each cat over a 55-day period. Each of the 64 postinoculation samples was tested using both conventional polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) and real-time PCR for the 16S rRNA gene of each organism. When applied to mixtures of plasmid DNA from each species, the results of quantitation with each of the real-time PCR assays approximately reflected the number of plasmid copies present. Forty-nine of 64 post-inoculation samples (77%) were positive using both cPCR and real-time PCR, 4 (6%) were positive using cPCR only, and 3 (5%) were positive using real-time PCR only. Both organisms were detected in 23 samples using real-time PCR. Mixed infections were not detected using cPCR. The size of the corresponding cPCR products suggested infection with Mhm in 4 and Mhf in 18 of these samples. The use of multiple separate real-time PCR assays rather than cPCR alone should thus be considered for epidemiologic studies of hemoplasmosis in cats. PMID:17459853

  15. Cattle immunized against the pathogenic l-?-glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase of Mycoplasma mycoides subs. mycoides fail to generate neutralizing antibodies and succumb to disease on challenge?

    PubMed Central

    Mulongo, Musa M.; Frey, Joachim; Smith, Ken; Schnier, Christian; Wesonga, Hezron; Naessens, Jan; McKeever, Declan

    2013-01-01

    The membrane-associated enzyme l-?-glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GlpO) of Mycoplasma mycoides subs. mycoides (Mmm), the causal agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) has been identified as a virulence factor responsible for the release of toxic by-products such as H2O2 that mediate host cell injury. Since CBPP pathogenesis is based on host inflammatory reactions, we have determined the capacity of recombinant GlpO to generate in vivo protective responses against challenge in immunized cattle. We also investigated whether sera raised against recombinant GlpO in cattle and mice inhibit production of H2O2 by Mmm. Immunization of cattle with recombinant GlpO did not protect against challenge with a virulent strain of Mmm. Further, although both murine and bovine antisera raised against recombinant GlpO detected recombinant and native forms of GlpO in immunoblot assays with similar titres, only murine antibodies could neutralize GlpO enzymatic function. The data raise the possibility that Mmm has adapted to evade potential detrimental antibody responses in its definitive host. PMID:24035434

  16. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section 147.31 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY...

  17. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  18. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  19. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). 147.31 Section... Examination Procedures § 147.31 Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction... lp gene. (c) MGLP ReTi. Primers and probe should be utilized in a 25 µl reaction containing 12.5...

  20. Ascaris suum infection negatively affects the response to a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination and subsequent challenge infection in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is vital to understand the possible mechanisms that may impair optimal vaccine efficacy. The hypothesis posed in this study was that a concurrent Ascaris suum infection of pigs vaccinated with a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh) vaccine would modulate the protective immune response to a subsequent ch...

  1. Effect of infection route and concurrent infectious bronchitis virus vaccination on Mycoplasma gallisepticum disease pathology in an experimental model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infections is needed, not only to understand the disease process, but also to understand the mechanisms by which M. gallisepticum vaccines protect the host. Many model systems have been used to study the M. gallisepticum disease process. This work compared two...

  2. Antibiotic prescriptions and cycles of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in Norway: can a nationwide prescription register be used for surveillance?

    PubMed

    Blix, H S; Vestrheim, D F; Hjellvik, V; Skaare, D; Christensen, A; Steinbakk, M

    2015-07-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae outbreaks cause increased use of macrolides and tetracyclines. We aimed to investigate whether drug use data, in addition to laboratory data, could improve understanding of the spread of M. pneumoniae epidemics. Number of users of Mycoplasma antibiotics (erythromycin, doxycycline, clarithromycin) per week and county of residence in an indicator age group (6-12 years) was retrieved from the Norwegian prescription database for the epidemic season 2011-2012 and compared to non-epidemic seasons. In 2011, increased use of Mycoplasma antibiotics was first observed in September on the west coast of Norway. The Norwegian laboratory-based surveillance system showed the first increase in positive tests in August 2011 and an epidemic was announced on 25 October 2011. At that time the use of Mycoplasma antibiotics had already exceeded three times the use in non-epidemic periods. Data for three counties from the regional microbiological laboratories showed that the increase in number of positive samples coincided in time with the increase in prescription data. Laboratory data cannot accurately determine the extent of an epidemic, and drug use data cannot identify the cause. Establishing a systematic interaction between the two monitoring systems will enhance surveillance and probably contribute to improved infection control and prudent antibiotic prescribing. PMID:25388750

  3. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of Mycoplasma bovis-Specific antibody in bison sera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison. This report demonstrates that ELISAs for detection of M. bovis-specific antibody in cattle are not optimal for identification of seropositive bison. An ELISA optimized for use with bison sera is ...

  4. Isolation and Identification of Mycoplasma synoviae From Suspected Ostriches by Polymerase Chain Reaction, in Kerman Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Tebyanian, Hamid; Mirhosseiny, Seyed Hanif; Kheirkhah, Babak; Hassanshahian, Mehdi; farhadian, Hamze

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasma synoviae is an important avian pathogen which can cause both respiratory disease and synovial joint inflammation (synovitis) in poultry. Mycoplasmas spp. may cause the respiratory system infection in ostriches with symptoms such as inflammation of the nose, trachea and also damages of lungs. Objectives: The current study aimed to use the M. synoviae specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and microbiological methods in order to isolate and identify M. synoviae from suspected ostriches in Kerman Province, Iran, and compare the two methods (microbiological and PCR) employed to confirm Mycoplasmal contamination of ostrich lungs. Materials and Methods: Fifty three samples of different parts of lung and trachea were immediately collected after slaughtering the ostriches in Kerman Province six months. Samples were cultured in the same conditions in pleuropneumonia-like organism (PPLO) broth and to isolate and identify M. synoviae, PCR and microbiological methods were conducted. The identified isolates were confirmed by specific amplification of 16S rRNA gene (163 and 207 base pair). Results: In the current study, 25 and 17 out of 53 ostrich samples were identified as Mycoplasma-positive in the PCR and microbiological methods, respectively; and 13 out of 25 the mentioned Mycoplasma-positive samples were also confirmed by PCR method. Conclusions: The current study showed that PCR method is time consuming, effective, and efficient method to detect M. synoviae infection in ostriches. PCR method could be recommended as an alternative for culturing; M. synoviae was isolated from ostriches for first time in Kerman Province, Iran. PMID:25485069

  5. Survival of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) commingled with domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in the absence of mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To test the hypothesis that Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is an important agent of the bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) pneumonia that has previously inevitably followed experimental commingling with domestic sheep (Ovis aries), we commingled M. ovipneumoniae–free domestic and bighorn sheep (n=4 each). On...

  6. Outbreak of acute respiratory disease caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae on board a deployed U.S. navy ship.

    PubMed

    Sliman, Joseph A; Metzgar, David; Asseff, David C; Coon, Robert G; Faix, Dennis J; Lizewski, Stephen

    2009-12-01

    We identified 179 cases of acute respiratory illness including 50 cases of radiographically confirmed pneumonia over the course of 4 months on a deployed U.S. Navy vessel. Laboratory tests showed Mycoplasma pneumoniae to be the etiological agent. This report represents the first published description of a shipboard outbreak of this pathogen. PMID:19846632

  7. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from... supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA concentration and purity by spectrophotometric... primer (50 ?M), 1 ?l Forward primer (50 ?M). (2) Perform DNA amplification in a Perkin-Elmer...

  8. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from... supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA concentration and purity by spectrophotometric... primer (50 ?M), 1 ?l Forward primer (50 ?M). (2) Perform DNA amplification in a Perkin-Elmer...

  9. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from... supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA concentration and purity by spectrophotometric... primer (50 ?M), 1 ?l Forward primer (50 ?M). (2) Perform DNA amplification in a Perkin-Elmer...

  10. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from... supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA concentration and purity by spectrophotometric... primer (50 ?M), 1 ?l Forward primer (50 ?M). (2) Perform DNA amplification in a Perkin-Elmer...

  11. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from... supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA concentration and purity by spectrophotometric... primer (50 ?M), 1 ?l Forward primer (50 ?M). (2) Perform DNA amplification in a Perkin-Elmer...

  12. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from tracheal swabs in PBS...C. Centrifuge as above and transfer the supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA...

  13. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae. (a) DNA isolation. Isolate DNA from 1 mL of eluate from tracheal swabs in PBS...C. Centrifuge as above and transfer the supernatant DNA to a nuclease-free tube. Estimate the DNA...

  14. Evaluation of Three Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in an Outbreak Investigation?

    PubMed Central

    Winchell, Jonas M.; Thurman, Kathleen A.; Mitchell, Stephanie L.; Thacker, W. Lanier; Fields, Barry S.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the performances of three recently optimized real-time PCR assays derived from distinct genomic regions of Mycoplasma pneumoniae during an outbreak. Comprehensive evaluation established that a newly described toxin gene represents a superior target for detecting M. pneumoniae DNA in clinical specimens, although use of multiple targets may increase testing confidence. PMID:18614663

  15. Evaluation of Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae as Etiologic Agents of Persistent Cough in Adolescents and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wadowsky, Robert M.; Castilla, Elias A.; Laus, Stella; Kozy, Anita; Atchison, Robert W.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Ward, Joel I.; Greenberg, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were evaluated as agents of persistent cough in adolescents and adults (n = 491). Tests of 473 respiratory specimens by culture or PCR or both identified four episodes (0.8%) of M. pneumoniae-associated illness and no episodes of C. pneumoniae illness, suggesting that these bacteria do not frequently cause persistent cough. PMID:11825984

  16. Erythema Nodosum and Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections in Childhood: Further Observations in Two Patients and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Filippo; Catania, Roberta; Pira, Alice Le; Saporito, Marco; Scalora, Luisa; Aguglia, Maria Giovanna; Smilari, Pierluigi; Sorge, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Erythema nodosum (EN) is the most frequent panniculitis in childhood and has been associated with various conditions, such as infectious and autoimmune disorders, medications, and malignancies. The author reports on two children affected with EN associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, which occurred in one patient without pulmonary detection. The available literature on EN and M. pneumoniae infection in childhood is also reviewed. PMID:25699127

  17. First report of Mycoplasma conjunctivae from wild Caprinae with infectious keratoconjunctivitis in the Pyrenees (NE Spain).

    PubMed

    Marco, Ignasi; Mentaberre, Gregorio; Ballesteros, Cristina; Bischof, Daniela F; Lavín, Santiago; Vilei, Edy M

    2009-01-01

    Frequent outbreaks of infectious keratoconjunctivitis have been reported in wild Caprinae in Europe. While etiologic studies in the Alps indicate that the main etiologic agent is Mycoplasma conjunctivae, there are few reports from other mountain areas, such as the Pyrenees, where M. conjunctivae has never been reported. In 2006 and 2007, five adult Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica; two males and three females) and one adult male European mouflon (Ovis orientalis musimon) were studied; they exhibited clinical symptoms of infectious keratoconjunctivitis such as blindness, corneal opacity, and ulceration. In three of the five chamois tested, and in the mouflon, Mycoplasma conjunctivae was identified from conjunctival swabs by means of a TaqMan(R) polymerase chain reaction based on the lipoprotein gene lppS. Cluster analysis indicated that the three southern chamois isolates form a cluster that is distinct from the mouflon isolate. This is the first report of M. conjunctivae in Pyrenean chamois, and it supports the hypothesis that M. conjunctivae also could be the main cause of infectious keratoconjunctivitis in areas other than the Alps, such as the Pyrenees. PMID:19204357

  18. First molecular identification of 'Candidatus mycoplasma haemominutum' from a cat with fatal haemolytic anaemia in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Hornok, Sándor; Meli, Marina L; Gönczi, Eniko; Ignits, Eva; Willi, Barbara; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2008-12-01

    Although haemobartonellosis was previously reported in Hungary, until now the diagnosis (based on morphological identification in blood smears) has only been suggestive of the occurrence of the large species, recently reclassified as Mycoplasma haemofelis. However, in July 2007 a cat was presented at a small animal clinic with severe haemolytic anaemia, icterus and haemoglobinuria. While biochemical parameters were within the reference range, the cat had leukocytosis and rapidly decreasing haematocrit values, and eventually died 7 days after the sudden onset of aggravating clinical signs. From blood samples of the cat 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' was identified by molecular methods, according to its 100% 16S rRNA gene sequence homology with two Swiss isolates and one isolate from the UK. The rapid termination of the disease and the high pathogenicity of the causative agent observed in this case are unusual, taking into account that PCR results were negative for immunosuppressive viruses. This is the first record of this feline haemoplasma species in Hungary. PMID:19149099

  19. Development of an oriC vector for use in Mycoplasma synoviae.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad A; Marenda, Marc S; Markham, Philip F; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2014-08-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae, an important poultry pathogen, belonging to the class Mollicutes, causes airsacculitis, synovitis, decreased egg production and produces significant economic losses. Efforts to determine M. synoviae virulence factors and their role in pathogenicity require suitable tools for genetic manipulation of this pathogen. This study describes, for the first time, the identification and cloning of the origin of replication (oriC) of M. synoviae to develop a replicable oriC vector for this mycoplasma. Shuttle vectors containing different putative oriC regions along with tetracycline resistance gene tetM were constructed to transform M. synoviae. An oriC vector, pMAS-LoriC, harbouring the complete dnaA gene along with upstream and downstream DnaA boxes, successfully transformed M. synoviae at an average transformation frequency of 1.07×10(-8) transformants per colony-forming unit (CFU), and remained freely replicating as well as integrated at the chromosomal oriC. Plasmid copy number for pMAS-LoriC was estimated to be 62±29 (average±SD) per cell. This study also provided evidence of the occurrence of homologous recombination and the functionality of the heterologous tetM determinant in M. synoviae. The transformation technique and the oriC vector developed in this study have the potential to be used in targeted gene disruption, gene complementation and expression studies in this organism. PMID:24880130

  20. Serologic response of Rio Grande wild turkeys to experimental infections of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    The serologic response of Rio Grande wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) to Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) was determined. Free-ranging turkeys were caught in southern Texas, shipped to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and housed in isolation facilities. Fourteen birds were exposed to MG, by intratracheal and intranasal inoculation. Eight birds received sterile broth only. Two wk prior to the end of the experiment, MG exposed turkeys were stressed by challenge with a serologically unrelated mycoplasma. Serum from all exposed birds reacted positively for MG antibody by the rapid plate agglutination (RPA) procedure within 2 mo postexposure (PE) and all but one remained positive for 14 mo PE. Less than one half of the exposed birds developed positive MG antibody titers detectable by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test within 2 mo PE, and by 10 mo PE, none had positive titers. Antibody was detected by the HI test in two of 11 infected turkeys, 14 mo PE, and titers increased significantly within 2 wk. MG was isolated from tracheal swabs from two infected birds 2 mo PE, but attempts thereafter failed. However, at the termination of the experiment 15 mo later, MG was isolated from lung tissue of three of 11 exposed turkeys and from a blood clot found in the lower trachea of one bird.

  1. Rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with pneumonia by an immuno-chromatographic antigen assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Zhao, Yun; Tao, Ran; Li, Yonggang; Shang, Shiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a particularly important pathogen that causes community acquired pneumonia in children. In this study, a rapid test was developed to diagnose M. pneumoniae by using a colloidal gold-based immuno-chromatographic assay which targets a region of the P1 gene. 302 specimens were analyzed by the colloidal gold assay in parallel with real-time PCR. Interestingly, the colloidal gold assay allowed M. pneumoniae identification, with a detection limit of 1?×?10(3)?copies/ml. 76 samples were found to be positive in both real-time PCR and the colloidal gold assay; two specimens positive in real-time PCR were negative in the rapid colloidal gold assay. The specificity and sensitivity of the colloidal gold assay were 100% and 97.4%, respectively. These findings indicate that the newly developed immuno-chromatographic antigen assay is a rapid, sensitive and specific method for identifying M. pneumoniae, with potential clinical application in the early diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. PMID:26486047

  2. Rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with pneumonia by an immuno-chromatographic antigen assay

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Zhao, Yun; Tao, Ran; Li, Yonggang; Shang, Shiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a particularly important pathogen that causes community acquired pneumonia in children. In this study, a rapid test was developed to diagnose M. pneumoniae by using a colloidal gold-based immuno-chromatographic assay which targets a region of the P1 gene. 302 specimens were analyzed by the colloidal gold assay in parallel with real-time PCR. Interestingly, the colloidal gold assay allowed M. pneumoniae identification, with a detection limit of 1?×?103?copies/ml. 76 samples were found to be positive in both real-time PCR and the colloidal gold assay; two specimens positive in real-time PCR were negative in the rapid colloidal gold assay. The specificity and sensitivity of the colloidal gold assay were 100% and 97.4%, respectively. These findings indicate that the newly developed immuno-chromatographic antigen assay is a rapid, sensitive and specific method for identifying M. pneumoniae, with potential clinical application in the early diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. PMID:26486047

  3. Airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness after Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Martin, R J; Chu, H W; Honour, J M; Harbeck, R J

    2001-05-01

    The interaction between chronic infection and chronic asthma is receiving increased investigation as a factor in the pathophysiology of asthma. To further understand this interaction, we used an animal model (BALB/c mice) with a Mycoplasma pneumoniae respiratory infection. Mice were studied 3, 7, 14, and 21 d after infection. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) was assessed by methacholine challenge and was significantly heightened in the infected mice compared with saline controls at Days 3, 7, and 14. The associated inflammatory response was mainly neutrophils. The tissue inflammatory score significantly correlated to BHR (r = 0.78, P < 0.0001). Additionally, tissue interferon (IFN)-gamma was significantly suppressed at Days 3 and 7 in the infected group compared with controls; and at Days 3, 7, and 14 compared with Day 21 in the infected group. There was a significant negative correlation between lung tissue messenger RNA levels of IFN-gamma corrected for beta-actin and BHR (r = -0.50, P = 0.022). Thus, M. pneumoniae respiratory infection is associated with BHR in this murine model. It appears that acute mycoplasma infection suppresses IFN-gamma, which may be a pivotal factor in the control of BHR. PMID:11350827

  4. Sensitive and selective detection of mycoplasma in cell culture samples using cantilever sensors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sen; Sharma, Harsh; Mutharasan, Raj

    2010-04-15

    In this article we report a new biosensor-based method that is more sensitive and rapid than the current approach for detecting mycoplasma in cell culture samples. Piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized cantilever (PEMC) sensors respond to mass change via resonant frequency change. They are sensitive at femtogram level and can be used directly in liquid for label-free detection. Common cell culture contaminant, Acholeplasma laidlawii was detected in both buffer and cell culture medium. Two different sources (positive control from a commercial kit and ATCC 23206) were analyzed using antibody-immobilized PEMC sensor. Resonant frequency decrease caused by binding of A. laidlawii was monitored in real-time using an impedance analyzer. Positive detection was confirmed by a second antibody binding. The limit of detection (LOD) was lower than 10(3) CFU/mL in cell culture medium using PEMC sensor while parallel ELISA assays showed LOD as 10(7) CFU/mL. This study shows that PEMC sensor can be used for sensitive and rapid mycoplasma detection in cell culture samples. PMID:20014143

  5. A novel sigma factor reveals a unique regulon controlling cell-specific recombination in Mycoplasma genitalium

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Puig, Sergi; Broto, Alicia; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume; Pich, Oscar Q.

    2015-01-01

    The Mycoplasma genitalium MG428 protein shows homology to members of the sigma-70 family of sigma factors. Herein, we found that MG428 activates transcription of recA, ruvA and ruvB as well as several genes with unknown function. Deletion of MG_428 or some of the up-regulated unknown genes led to severe recombination defects. Single cell analyses revealed that activation of the MG428-regulon is a rare event under laboratory growth conditions. A conserved sequence with sigma-70 promoter architecture (TTGTCA-N18/19-ATTWAT) was identified in the upstream region of all of the MG428-regulated genes or operons. Primer extension analyses demonstrated that transcription initiates immediately downstream of this sigma70-type promoter in a MG428-dependent manner. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the conserved ?10 and ?35 elements corroborated the requirement of these regions for promoter function. Therefore, a new mycoplasma promoter directs transcription of a unique recombination regulon. Additionally, MG428 was found to interact with the RNAP core enzyme, reinforcing the predicted role of this protein as an alternative sigma factor. Finally, our results indicate that MG428 contributes to the generation of genetic diversity in this model organism. Since recombination is an important mechanism to generate antigenic variation, MG428 emerges as a novel factor contributing to M. genitalium virulence. PMID:25925568

  6. A novel sigma factor reveals a unique regulon controlling cell-specific recombination in Mycoplasma genitalium.

    PubMed

    Torres-Puig, Sergi; Broto, Alicia; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume; Pich, Oscar Q

    2015-05-26

    The Mycoplasma genitalium MG428 protein shows homology to members of the sigma-70 family of sigma factors. Herein, we found that MG428 activates transcription of recA, ruvA and ruvB as well as several genes with unknown function. Deletion of MG_428 or some of the up-regulated unknown genes led to severe recombination defects. Single cell analyses revealed that activation of the MG428-regulon is a rare event under laboratory growth conditions. A conserved sequence with sigma-70 promoter architecture (TTGTCA-N(18/19)-ATTWAT) was identified in the upstream region of all of the MG428-regulated genes or operons. Primer extension analyses demonstrated that transcription initiates immediately downstream of this sigma70-type promoter in a MG428-dependent manner. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the conserved -10 and -35 elements corroborated the requirement of these regions for promoter function. Therefore, a new mycoplasma promoter directs transcription of a unique recombination regulon. Additionally, MG428 was found to interact with the RNAP core enzyme, reinforcing the predicted role of this protein as an alternative sigma factor. Finally, our results indicate that MG428 contributes to the generation of genetic diversity in this model organism. Since recombination is an important mechanism to generate antigenic variation, MG428 emerges as a novel factor contributing to M. genitalium virulence. PMID:25925568

  7. Prevalence and co-infection of haemotropic mycoplasmas in Portuguese cats by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, Verónica L; Silvestre-Ferreira, Ana Cristina; Vilhena, Hugo; Pastor, Josep; Francino, Olga; Altet, Laura

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of feline haemoplasmosis has improved over the years, with several techniques enabling a clear and specific diagnosis, and where polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is considered as the 'gold standard'. The aim of this study was to survey the prevalence of feline haemoplasmas in 320 cats from the north-central region of Portugal by the use of real-time PCR, as well as to evaluate any associations between infection, clinical presentation and risk factors. The overall prevalence of infection by feline haemoplasmas was 43.43% (139/320), where 41.56% (133/320) corresponded to Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum (CMhm), 12.81% (41/320) to Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf), 4.38% (14/320) to Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum and 1.25% (4/320) to Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis. Almost 13% (47/320) of the samples were co-infected, with the most common co-infection being CMhm and Mhf (23.74%). Infection was found statistically significant with feline immunodeficiency/feline leukaemia virus status (P = 0.034), but no significant association was found for breed, sex, fertility status (neutered/spayed/entire), age, clinical status, living conditions (in/outdoor), anaemia status, or the presence/absence of ticks or fleas. Cats from north-central Portugal are infected with all the known feline haemoplasma species, with CMhm being the most common one. Prevalence of all feline haemoplasmas was higher than that reported previously in cats from other European countries, but similar to that described in Portugal for dogs. These data provide a better perspective regarding Mycoplasma species infection in Europe, and new information that helps us better understand feline haemoplasmosis. PMID:23482254

  8. Structure-Function Features of a Mycoplasma Glycolipid Synthase Derived from Structural Data Integration, Molecular Simulations, and Mutational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Romero-García, Javier; Francisco, Carles; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Glycoglycerolipids are structural components of mycoplasma membranes with a fundamental role in membrane properties and stability. Their biosynthesis is mediated by glycosyltransferases (GT) that catalyze the transfer of glycosyl units from a sugar nucleotide donor to diacylglycerol. The essential function of glycolipid synthases in mycoplasma viability, and the absence of glycoglycerolipids in animal host cells make these GT enzymes a target for drug discovery by designing specific inhibitors. However, rational drug design has been hampered by the lack of structural information for any mycoplasma GT. Most of the annotated GTs in pathogenic mycoplasmas belong to family GT2. We had previously shown that MG517 in Mycoplasma genitalium is a GT-A family GT2 membrane-associated glycolipid synthase. We present here a series of structural models of MG517 obtained by homology modeling following a multiple-template approach. The models have been validated by mutational analysis and refined by long scale molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the models, key structure-function relationships have been identified: The N-terminal GT domain has a GT-A topology that includes a non-conserved variable region involved in acceptor substrate binding. Glu193 is proposed as the catalytic base in the GT mechanism, and Asp40, Tyr126, Tyr169, Ile170 and Tyr218 define the substrates binding site. Mutation Y169F increases the enzyme activity and significantly alters the processivity (or sequential transferase activity) of the enzyme. This is the first structural model of a GT-A glycoglycerolipid synthase and provides preliminary insights into structure and function relationships in this family of enzymes. PMID:24312618

  9. The Effect of an Alternate Start Codon on Heterologous Expression of a PhoA Fusion Protein in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Indu S.; Browning, Glenn F.; Markham, Philip F.

    2015-01-01

    While the genomes of many Mycoplasma species have been sequenced, there are no collated data on translational start codon usage, and the effects of alternate start codons on gene expression have not been studied. Analysis of the annotated genomes found that ATG was the most prevalent translational start codon among Mycoplasma spp. However in Mycoplasma gallisepticum a GTG start codon is commonly used in the vlhA multigene family, which encodes a highly abundant, phase variable lipoprotein adhesin. Therefore, the effect of this alternate start codon on expression of a reporter PhoA lipoprotein was examined in M. gallisepticum. Mutation of the start codon from ATG to GTG resulted in a 2.5 fold reduction in the level of transcription of the phoA reporter, but the level of PhoA activity in the transformants containing phoA with a GTG start codon was only 63% of that of the transformants with a phoA with an ATG start codon, suggesting that GTG was a more efficient translational initiation codon. The effect of swapping the translational start codon in phoA reporter gene expression was less in M. gallisepticum than has been seen previously in Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis, suggesting the process of translational initiation in mycoplasmas may have some significant differences from those used in other bacteria. This is the first study of translational start codon usage in mycoplasmas and the impact of the use of an alternate start codon on expression in these bacteria. PMID:26010086

  10. Microsporidia and Cryptosporidium in horses and donkeys in Algeria: detection of a novel Cryptosporidium hominis subtype family (Ik) in a horse.

    PubMed

    Laatamna, Abd Elkarim; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Kv?to?ová, Dana; Xiao, Lihua; Rost, Michael; McEvoy, John; Saadi, Ahmed Rachid; Aissi, Meriem; Kvá?, Martin

    2015-03-15

    A total of 219 and 124 individual fecal samples of horses and donkeys, respectively, were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp., Encephalitozoon spp., and Enterocytozoon bieneusi DNA by genus-specific nested PCR. Isolates were genotyped by sequence analysis of SSU rRNA, GP60, TRAP-C1, COWP, and HSP70 loci in Cryptosporidium, and the ITS region in microsporidia. Cryptosporidium spp. was detected on 3/18 horse farms and 1/15 farms where donkeys were kept. Overall, five (2.3%) horse and two (1.6%) donkey specimens were PCR positive for Cryptosporidium. Genotyping at SSU and GP60 loci revealed that three isolates from horses and donkeys were C. parvum subtype family IIaA16G1R1, one isolate from a horse was, C. muris RN66, and one isolate from a donkey was C. muris TS03. An isolate from a horse shared 99.4% and 99.3% similarity with Cryptosporidium hominis and C. cuniculus, respectively, at the SSU locus. This isolate shared 100% identity with C. hominis at the TRAP-C1, COWP, and HSP70 loci, and it was from the novel gp60 subtype family IkA15G1. Microsporidia were found on 6/18 horse and 2/15 donkey farms. E. bieneusi was identified in 6.8% (15/219) and 1.6% (2/124), and Encephalitozoon cuniculi was identified in 1.8% (4/219) and 1.6% (2/124), of horses and donkeys, respectively. Three genotypes of E. cuniculi (I, II and III) were detected in horses, and E. cuniculi genotype II was detected in donkeys. Four genotypes of E. bieneusi (horse1, horse 2, CZ3, D) were described in horses. An additional five horses and two donkeys were positive for E. bieneusi, but the isolated were not genotyped. Neither Cryptosporidium nor microsporidia prevalence were affected by sex, age, type of breeding, or whether the host was a horse or a donkey. PMID:25638716

  11. Detection of humoral response using a recombinant heat shock protein 70, DnaK, of Mycoplasma haemofelis in experimentally and naturally hemoplasma-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Barker, Emily N; Helps, Chris R; Heesom, Kate J; Arthur, Christopher J; Peters, Iain R; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Tasker, Séverine

    2010-12-01

    Hemoplasmas is the trivial name given to a group of erythrocyte-parasitizing bacteria of the genus Mycoplasma. Of the feline hemoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic, while "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" are less pathogenic. Shotgun libraries of fragmented M. haemofelis genomic DNA were constructed, and random colonies were selected for DNA sequencing. In silico-translated amino acid sequences of putative open reading frames were compared to mass spectrometry data from M. haemofelis protein spots identified as being immunogenic by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Three of the spots matched the predicted sequences of a heat shock protein 70 (DnaK) homolog, elongation factor Ts, and a fragment of phosphoglycerate kinase found during library screening. A full-length copy of the M. haemofelis dnaK gene was cloned into Escherichia coli and recombinantly expressed. Recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK was purified and then used in Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the humoral immune response during acute infection in cats experimentally infected with M. haemofelis, "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum," or "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis". The recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK ELISA also was used to screen clinical samples submitted for hemoplasma PCR testing to a commercial laboratory (n = 254). Experimentally infected cats became seropositive following infection, with a greater and earlier antibody response seen in cats inoculated with M. haemofelis than those seen in cats inoculated with "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum" or "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis," by both Western blotting and ELISA. Of the clinical samples, 31.1% had antibodies detected by the ELISA but only 9.8% were positive by PCR for one or more hemoplasmas. PMID:20926695

  12. Detection of Humoral Response Using a Recombinant Heat Shock Protein 70, DnaK, of Mycoplasma haemofelis in Experimentally and Naturally Hemoplasma-Infected Cats? †

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Emily N.; Helps, Chris R.; Heesom, Kate J.; Arthur, Christopher J.; Peters, Iain R.; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Tasker, Séverine

    2010-01-01

    Hemoplasmas is the trivial name given to a group of erythrocyte-parasitizing bacteria of the genus Mycoplasma. Of the feline hemoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis is the most pathogenic, while “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum” and “Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis” are less pathogenic. Shotgun libraries of fragmented M. haemofelis genomic DNA were constructed, and random colonies were selected for DNA sequencing. In silico-translated amino acid sequences of putative open reading frames were compared to mass spectrometry data from M. haemofelis protein spots identified as being immunogenic by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Three of the spots matched the predicted sequences of a heat shock protein 70 (DnaK) homolog, elongation factor Ts, and a fragment of phosphoglycerate kinase found during library screening. A full-length copy of the M. haemofelis dnaK gene was cloned into Escherichia coli and recombinantly expressed. Recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK was purified and then used in Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the humoral immune response during acute infection in cats experimentally infected with M. haemofelis, “Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum,” or “Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis”. The recombinant M. haemofelis DnaK ELISA also was used to screen clinical samples submitted for hemoplasma PCR testing to a commercial laboratory (n = 254). Experimentally infected cats became seropositive following infection, with a greater and earlier antibody response seen in cats inoculated with M. haemofelis than those seen in cats inoculated with “Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum” or “Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis,” by both Western blotting and ELISA. Of the clinical samples, 31.1% had antibodies detected by the ELISA but only 9.8% were positive by PCR for one or more hemoplasmas. PMID:20926695

  13. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Cryoarchived Strains   Strain Number: 01XE8  Common Strain Name: P190 BCR-ABL  Strain Nomenclature: B6;CBA-Tg(BCR/ABL)623Hkp/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B1 , D Sample MTA for this strain Strain

  14. STRAIN GAGE TECHNICAL DATA STRAIN GAGE

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    and strain, an initially balanced bridge, and a known VIN. In reality, the VOUT-strain relationship of the strain gage prior to applying stress. Electrical noise and interference may alter your readings. Shielded

  15. Platelet aggregation induced by strains of various species of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Usui, Y; Ohshima, Y; Ichiman, Y; Ohtomo, T; Suganuma, M; Yoshida, K

    1991-01-01

    Major species of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were tested for their ability to induce platelet aggregation in rabbit platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Among 11 species of CNS tested, a majority of the strains of 10 species of CNS (S. epidermidis, S. simulans, S. capitis, S. hyicus, S. sciuri, S. cohnii, S. xylosus, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. warneri) caused induction of the platelet aggregation and serotonin release, while S. saprophyticus did not show such activity. The addition of aspirin (10 mM) or quinacrine (1 mM) to PRP resulted in no remarkable effect on the platelet aggregation induced by these strains and it was shown that the platelet aggregation did not require arachidonate pathways. Complement system components were shown to be one of the plasma factors required for platelet aggregation by ten strains of each species of CNS. The bacterial substance participating in the platelet aggregation by ten species of CNS tested was indicated to be heat-stable and trypsin-resistant, while the activity of a strain of S. epidermidis was susceptible to trypsin. PMID:1908038

  16. Chronic meningitis with intracranial hypertension and bilateral neuroretinitis following Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Karampatsas, Konstantinos; Patel, Himanshu; Basheer, Sheikh N; Prendergast, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of headache, nausea, vomiting and left-sided weakness. He subsequently developed meningism, right abducens nerve palsy, persistent papilloedema and reduced visual acuity in association with a bilateral macular star, consistent with neuroretinitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination indicated chronic meningitis and serological testing confirmed recent Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, although PCR in CSF was negative. He was treated for aseptic meningitis with ceftriaxone, aciclovir, azithromycin and acetazolamide for intracranial hypertension, with gradual improvement in clinical condition and visual acuity over several weeks. This is the first report of M. pneumoniae chronic meningitis further complicated with bilateral neuroretinitis and intracranial hypertension. Evidence of central nervous system inflammation in the absence of direct infection suggests an immune-mediated pathophysiology. Although the use of macrolides with antibiotic and immunomodulatory activity might be beneficial, it was not possible to ascertain whether it influenced clinical recovery in this case. PMID:25538215

  17. Pertussis Accompanying Recent Mycoplasma Infection in a 10-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Mi Kyung; Na, Hyunju; Han, Seung Beom; Kwon, Hyo Jin; Chun, Yoon Hong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the incidence of pertussis has been increasing; however, reports on mixed infection of pertussis with other respiratory pathogens are rare in highly immunized populations. We report the case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with cough, post-tussive emesis, and fever. She was subsequently diagnosed with bronchopneumonia. Although she had received five doses of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, polymerase chain reaction of her nasopharyngeal aspirate confirmed Bordetella pertussis infection. In addition, serologic testing for Mycoplasma pneumoniae was also positive. The patient was treated with roxithromycin without any complications. This is the first report of mixed B. pertussis and M. pneumoniae infection in Korea. To avoid under-diagnosis, pertussis should be considered in patients with chronic cough even when other respiratory pathogens have been documented. PMID:26483996

  18. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Aram; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Cho, Joong Bum; Kim, Yae-Jean; Jeon, Tae Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is responsible for approximately 20% to 30% of community-acquired pneumonia, and is well known for its diverse extrapulmonary manifestations. However, acute necrotizing pancreatits is an extremely rare extrapulmonary manifestation of M. pneumoniae infection. A 6-year-old girl was admitted due to abdominal pain, vomiting, fever, and confused mentality. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was diagnosed according to symptoms, laboratory test results, and abdominal computed tomography scans. M. pneumoniae infection was diagnosed by a 4-fold increase in antibodies to M. pneumoniae between acute and convalescent sera by particle agglutination antibody assay. No other etiologic factors or pathogens were detected. Despite the occurrence of a large infected pseudocyst during the course, the patient was able to discharge without morbidity by early aggressive supportive care. This is the first case in Korea of a child with acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with M. pneumoniae infection. PMID:26473143

  19. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS Toxin Is Internalized via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Manickam; Kannan, T. R.; Baseman, Joel B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial toxins possess specific mechanisms of binding and uptake by mammalian cells. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS (Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome) toxin is a 68 kDa protein, which demonstrates high binding affinity to human surfactant protein-A and exhibits specific biological activities including mono-ADP ribosylation and vacuolization. These properties lead to inflammatory processes in the airway and a range of cytopathologies including ciliostasis, loss of tissue integrity and injury, and cell death. However, the process by which CARDS toxin enters target cells is unknown. In this study, we show that CARDS toxin binds to mammalian cell surfaces and is internalized rapidly in a dose and time-dependent manner using a clathrin-mediated pathway, as indicated by inhibition of toxin internalization by monodansylcadaverine but not by methyl-?-cyclodextrin or filipin. Furthermore, the internalization of CARDS toxin was markedly inhibited in clathrin-depleted cells. PMID:23667510

  20. Pertussis Accompanying Recent Mycoplasma Infection in a 10-Year-Old Girl.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Mi Kyung; Na, Hyunju; Han, Seung Beom; Kwon, Hyo Jin; Chun, Yoon Hong; Kang, Jin Han

    2015-09-01

    Recently, the incidence of pertussis has been increasing; however, reports on mixed infection of pertussis with other respiratory pathogens are rare in highly immunized populations. We report the case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with cough, post-tussive emesis, and fever. She was subsequently diagnosed with bronchopneumonia. Although she had received five doses of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, polymerase chain reaction of her nasopharyngeal aspirate confirmed Bordetella pertussis infection. In addition, serologic testing for Mycoplasma pneumoniae was also positive. The patient was treated with roxithromycin without any complications. This is the first report of mixed B. pertussis and M. pneumoniae infection in Korea. To avoid under-diagnosis, pertussis should be considered in patients with chronic cough even when other respiratory pathogens have been documented. PMID:26483996

  1. Effects of Mycoplasma anatis and cold stress on hatching success and growth of mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Goldberg, D.R.; Thomas, C.B.; Sharp, P.

    1995-01-01

    We inoculated game-farm mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs and 1-day-old birds with Mycoplasma anatis to determine its effect on hatching success and growth rates of ducklings. Inoculations of eggs reduced hatching success, hatchling size, and duckling growth rates, compared to controls. Intratracheal inoculations of 1-day-old birds did not affect growth rates. Hatchlings and 1-day-old ducklings grew much slower for the first 7 to 10 days when raised at 17 to 19 C, compared to controls raised at 30 to 35 C. The effect of cold stress on growth was greater than the effect of M. anatis infection; we found no synergistic effects between cold stress and M. anatis infection.

  2. Production and Properties of Antisera to Membrane Glycolipids of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Razin, S.; Prescott, B.; James, W. D.; Caldes, G.; Valdesuso, J.; Chanock, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    The glycolipid haptens of Mycoplasma pneumoniae became immunogenic when bound to membrane proteins of Acholeplasma laidlawii by reaggregation. This process consisted of the solubilization of lipid-depleted A. laidlawii membranes and M. pneumoniae glycolipids in 20 mm sodium dodecyl sulfate and dialysis of the mixed solutions against 20 mm Mg2+. The antibodies produced in rabbits to the reaggregated glycolipids inhibited the metabolism of M. pneumoniae, fixed complement with M. pneumoniae glycolipids or whole cells, precipitated M. pneumoniae glycolipids, and agglutinated M. pneumoniae cells. All these antibody activities could be blocked or absorbed by the purified glycolipids but not by a series of carbohydrates containing glucose and galactose. It was concluded that the antiserum to the reaggregated glycolipids may be regarded as a specific serum to membrane glycolipids of M. pneumoniae, since the antibodies to A. laidlawii membrane proteins, present in this serum, did not react with the glycolipids or with any other cell component of M. pneumoniae. PMID:16557990

  3. Production and Properties of Antisera to Membrane Glycolipids of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Razin, S; Prescott, B; James, W D; Caldes, G; Valdesuso, J; Chanock, R M

    1971-03-01

    The glycolipid haptens of Mycoplasma pneumoniae became immunogenic when bound to membrane proteins of Acholeplasma laidlawii by reaggregation. This process consisted of the solubilization of lipid-depleted A. laidlawii membranes and M. pneumoniae glycolipids in 20 mm sodium dodecyl sulfate and dialysis of the mixed solutions against 20 mm Mg(2+). The antibodies produced in rabbits to the reaggregated glycolipids inhibited the metabolism of M. pneumoniae, fixed complement with M. pneumoniae glycolipids or whole cells, precipitated M. pneumoniae glycolipids, and agglutinated M. pneumoniae cells. All these antibody activities could be blocked or absorbed by the purified glycolipids but not by a series of carbohydrates containing glucose and galactose. It was concluded that the antiserum to the reaggregated glycolipids may be regarded as a specific serum to membrane glycolipids of M. pneumoniae, since the antibodies to A. laidlawii membrane proteins, present in this serum, did not react with the glycolipids or with any other cell component of M. pneumoniae. PMID:16557990

  4. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the rapid detection of Mycoplasma genitalium.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas; Burke, Patricia; Smalley, Helen B; Gillies, Liz; Longhurst, Denise; Vipond, Barry; Hobbs, Glyn

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmissible, pathogenic bacterium and a significant cause of nongonococcal urethritis in both men and women. Due to the difficulty of the culture of M. genitalium from clinical samples, the laboratory diagnosis of M. genitalium infection is almost exclusively carried out using nucleic acid amplification tests. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel nucleic acid amplification technology, utilising a set of 4 primers specific to 6 distinct regions of the target DNA sequence, in order to amplify target DNA in a highly specific and rapid manner. A LAMP assay was designed to the pdhD gene of M. genitalium, and the limit of detection of the assay was determined as 10 fg of M. genitalium genomic DNA, equating to ~16 copies of the M. genitalium genome, which was equally sensitive as a gold standard 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction assay. PMID:26072150

  5. Structure of the hypothetical Mycoplasma protein, MPN555, suggestsa chaperone function

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Aono, Shelly; Chen, Shengfeng; Yokota,Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-06-15

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein MPN555from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (gi pbar 1673958) has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom using anomalous diffraction data at the Sepeak wavelength. Structure determination revealed a mostly alpha-helical protein with a three-lobed shape. The three lobes or fingers delineate a central binding groove and additional grooves between lobes 1 and 3, and between lobes 2 and 3. For one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit,the central binding pocket was filled with a peptide from the uncleaved N-terminal affinity tag. The MPN555 structure has structural homology to two bacterial chaperone proteins, SurA and trigger factor from Escherichia coli. The structural data and the homology to other chaperone for MPN555.

  6. Three-Dimensional Superlocalization Imaging of Gliding Mycoplasma mobile by Extraordinary Light Transmission through Arrayed Nanoholes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonju; Kinosita, Yoshiaki; Oh, Youngjin; Mikami, Nagisa; Yang, Heejin; Miyata, Makoto; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-11-24

    In this paper, we describe super-resolved sampling of live bacteria based on extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) of light. EOT is produced by surface plasmon confinement and coupling with nanostructures. Bacterial fluorescence is excited by the localized fields for subdiffraction-limited sampling. The concept was applied to elucidating bacterial dynamics of gliding Mycoplasma mobile (M. mobile). The results analyzed with multiple M. mobile bacteria show individual characters and reveal that M. mobile undergoes a significant axial variation at 94 nm. The sampling error of the method is estimated to be much smaller than 1/10 of the diffraction limit both in the lateral and depth axis. The method provides a powerful tool for investigation of biomolecular dynamics at subwavelength precision. PMID:26469129

  7. Differential cytokine expression in natural and experimental mastitis induced by Mycoplasma agalactiae in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, F; Castro, P

    2015-02-01

    Cytokines, primarily produced by macrophages and lymphocytes, mobilize the immune system in response to infection, particularly at mucosal surfaces. Knowledge of the pathogenesis and persistence of Mycoplasma agalactiae (Ma) in the mammary gland is still insufficient. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of caprine mastitis caused by Ma. Cytokine expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical methods in the inflammatory lesions of 10 (5 naturally and 5 experimentally infected) goats with Ma-induced mastitis. Immunolabelling for IL-10, IFN-?, IL-4 and TNF-? was observed in inflammatory cells within the lumen of acini and ducts and in the interstitial spaces and was usually associated with the presence of Ma antigen. The results suggest that cytokines play a role in the pathophysiological processes during Ma infection as differential expression of these cytokines was detected in relation to the course of the infection. PMID:25400091

  8. The Mycoplasma hyorhinis p37 Protein Rapidly Induces Genes in Fibroblasts Associated with Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomersall, Amber Cathie; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W.

    2015-01-01

    The p37 protein at the surface of Mycoplasma hyorhinis cells forms part of a high-affinity transport system and has been found associated with animal and human cancers. Here we show in NIH3T3 fibroblasts, p37 rapidly induces the expression of genes implicated in inflammation and cancer progression. This gene activation was principally via the Tlr4 receptor. Activity was lost from p37 when the C-terminal 20 amino acids were removed or the four amino acids specific for the hydrogen bonding of thiamine pyrophosphate had been replaced by valine. Blocking the IL6 receptor or inhibiting STAT3 signalling resulted in increased p37-induced gene expression. Since cancer associated fibroblasts support growth, invasion and metastasis via their ability to regulate tumour-related inflammation, the rapid induction in fibroblasts of pro-inflammatory genes by p37 might be expected to influence cancer development. PMID:26512722

  9. Dynamics of an infectious keratoconjunctivitis outbreak by Mycoplasma conjunctivae on Pyrenean Chamois Rupicapra p. pyrenaica.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Maríacruz; Herrero, Juan; de la Fe, Christian; Revilla, Miguel; Prada, Carlos; Martínez-Durán, David; Gómez-Martín, Angel; Fernández-Arberas, Olatz; Amores, Joaquín; Contreras, Antonio; García-Serrano, Alicia; de Luco, Daniel Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2008, an outbreak of Infectious Keratoconjunctivitis (IKC) affected Pyrenean chamois Rupicapra p. pyrenaica, an endemic subspecies of mountain ungulate that lives in the Pyrenees. The study focused on 14 mountain massifs (180,000 ha) where the species' population is stable. Cases of IKC were detected in ten of the massifs and, in five of them, mortality was substantial. The outbreak spread quickly from the first location detected, with two peaks in mortality that affected one (2007) and three (2008) massifs. In the latter, the peak was seasonal (spring to autumn) and, in the former, the outbreak persisted through winter. To identify the outbreak's aetiology, we examined 105 Pyrenean chamois clinically affected with IKC. TaqMan rt-PCR identified Mycoplasma conjunctivae in 93 (88.5%) of the chamois. Another rt-PCR detected Chlamydophila spp. in 14 of chamois, and 12 of those had mixed infections with mycoplasmas. In the period 2000-2007, the chamois population increased slightly (? 1.026) but decreased significantly during the IKC outbreak (? 0.8, 2007-2008; ? 0.85, 2008-2009) before increasing significantly after the outbreak (? 1.1, 2009-2010). Sex-biased mortality shifted the adult sex ratio toward males (from 0.6 to 0.7 males per female) and reduced productivity slightly. Hunting was practically banned in the massifs where chamois experienced significant mortality and allowed again after the outbreak ended. Long-term monitoring of wild populations provides a basis for understanding the impacts of disease outbreaks and improves management decisions, particularly when species are subject to extractive exploitation. PMID:23637923

  10. Dynamics of an Infectious Keratoconjunctivitis Outbreak by Mycoplasma conjunctivae on Pyrenean Chamois Rupicapra p. pyrenaica

    PubMed Central

    de la Fe, Christian; Revilla, Miguel; Prada, Carlos; Martínez-Durán, David; Gómez-Martín, Ángel; Fernández-Arberas, Olatz; Amores, Joaquín; Contreras, Antonio; García-Serrano, Alicia; de Luco, Daniel Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2008, an outbreak of Infectious Keratoconjunctivitis (IKC) affected Pyrenean chamois Rupicapra p. pyrenaica, an endemic subspecies of mountain ungulate that lives in the Pyrenees. The study focused on 14 mountain massifs (180,000 ha) where the species’ population is stable. Cases of IKC were detected in ten of the massifs and, in five of them, mortality was substantial. The outbreak spread quickly from the first location detected, with two peaks in mortality that affected one (2007) and three (2008) massifs. In the latter, the peak was seasonal (spring to autumn) and, in the former, the outbreak persisted through winter. To identify the outbreak’s aetiology, we examined 105 Pyrenean chamois clinically affected with IKC. TaqMan rt-PCR identified Mycoplasma conjunctivae in 93 (88.5%) of the chamois. Another rt-PCR detected Chlamydophila spp. in 14 of chamois, and 12 of those had mixed infections with mycoplasmas. In the period 2000–2007, the chamois population increased slightly (? 1.026) but decreased significantly during the IKC outbreak (? 0.8, 2007–2008; ? 0.85, 2008–2009) before increasing significantly after the outbreak (? 1.1, 2009–2010). Sex-biased mortality shifted the adult sex ratio toward males (from 0.6 to 0.7 males per female) and reduced productivity slightly. Hunting was practically banned in the massifs where chamois experienced significant mortality and allowed again after the outbreak ended. Long-term monitoring of wild populations provides a basis for understanding the impacts of disease outbreaks and improves management decisions, particularly when species are subject to extractive exploitation. PMID:23637923

  11. Male Circumcision and Mycoplasma genitalium Infection in Female Partners: a Randomized Trial in Rakai, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Tobian, Aaron A. R.; Gaydos, Charlotte; Gray, Ronald H.; Kigozi, Godfrey; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Nicole; Grabowski, Mary K.; Musoke, Richard; Ndyanabo, Anthony; Nalugoda, Fred; Wawer, Maria J.; Quinn, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous randomized trial data have demonstrated that male circumcision reduces Mycoplasma genitalium prevalence in men. We assessed whether male circumcision also reduces M. genitalium infection in female partners of circumcised men. Methods HIV-negative men were enrolled and randomized to either male circumcision or control. Female partners of male trial participants from the intervention (n=437) and control (n=394) arms provided interview information and self-collected vaginal swabs that were tested for M. genitalium by APTIMA transcription-mediated-amplification-based assay. Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of M. genitalium prevalence in intervention versus control group were estimated using Poisson regression. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. An as-treated analysis was conducted to account for study-group crossovers. Results Male and female partner enrollment sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviors, and symptoms of STIs were similar between study arms. Female M. genitalium prevalence at year-two was 3.2% (14/437) in intervention arm and 3.6% (14/394) in control arm (PRR=0.90, 95%CI 0.43–1.89, p=0.78). In an as-treated analysis, the prevalence of M. genitalium was 3.4% in female partners of circumcised men and 3.3% in female partners of uncircumcised men (PRR= 1.01, 95%CI 0.48–2.12, p=0.97). Conclusions Contrary to findings in men, male circumcision did not affect Mycoplasma genitalium infection in female partners. PMID:24259189

  12. Clinical characteristics associated with Mycoplasma genitalium among female sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gomih-Alakija, Ayodele; Ting, Jie; Mugo, Nelly; Kwatampora, Jessie; Getman, Damon; Chitwa, Michael; Patel, Suha; Gokhale, Mugdha; Kimani, Joshua; Behets, Frieda S; Smith, Jennifer S

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium is high in vulnerable populations of women in low-resource settings. However, the epidemiology of infection in these populations is not well established. To determine the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium and its association with cervical cytology and other correlates, we recruited 350 female sex workers (FSW) who were 18 to 50 years old in Nairobi, Kenya, for a cross-sectional study. A questionnaire was administered at baseline to obtain information on sociodemographics and sexual behaviors. Women underwent a pelvic exam, during which a physician collected cervical-exfoliation samples for conventional cytology and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing. Samples were tested for M. genitalium and other STI organisms (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis) and the E6/E7 mRNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) by Aptima nucleic amplification assays. The prevalence of M. genitalium was 12.9%. FSW who engaged in sexual intercourse during menses were less likely to have M. genitalium infection than those who did not (odds ratio [OR], 0.3; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.1, 0.9). M. genitalium was also less prevalent among FSW who had worked in prostitution for >5 years (6.2%) than among those who had worked for <3 years (17.6%) (OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1, 0.8). FSW who reported more frequent condom use were more likely to be infected with M. genitalium than those who reported less frequent use (OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.2, 11.6). These correlates differ from those found in M. genitalium studies conducted with FSW from West Africa and China. Further longitudinal analyses assessing associations with persistent M. genitalium infection are needed. PMID:25100823

  13. Prevalence and Molecular Analyses of Hemotrophic Mycoplasma spp. (Hemoplasmas) Detected in Sika Deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis) in Japan

    PubMed Central

    TAGAWA, Michihito; MATSUMOTO, Kotaro; YOKOYAMA, Naoaki; INOKUMA, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hemotropic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas) are cell-wall deficient, epierythrocytic bacteria that cause infectious anemia in several mammalian species. The prevalence of hemoplasma species was examined by screening and species-specific PCR using blood samples collected from 51 sika deer in Hokkaido, Japan. Molecular analyses were performed for the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and RNase P RNA (rnpB) gene sequences. A total of 23/51 (45%) deer DNA samples were positive for hemoplasmas in the screening PCR. Using species-specific PCR, 12 and 17 samples were positive for ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemocervae’ and ‘Candidatus M. erythrocervae’, respectively. Sequencing and phylogenetic trees of those three genes indicate that the ‘Candidatus M. haemocervae’ and ‘Candidatus M. erythrocervae’ detected in Japanese deer are potentially different species from the cervine hemoplasma found in deer from America and Brazil. PMID:24270803

  14. [Prevalence of haemotropic Mycoplasma spp., Bartonella spp. and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in cats in Berlin/Brandenburg (Northeast Germany)].

    PubMed

    Morgenthal, Dinah; Hamel, Dietmar; Arndt, Gisela; Silaghi, Cornelia; Pfister, Kurt; Kempf, Volkhard A J; Kohn, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of Mycoplasma (M.) haemofelis, Candidatus Mycoplasma (C. M.) turicensis, C M. haemominutum, Bartonella spp. (B. henselae, B. clarridgeiae and B. quintana) and Anaplasma (A.) phagocytophilum in cats in Northeast Germany in relation to their living conditions (indoor/outdoor/ stray cat), and tick/flea exposure. 265 cats were included in the study (150 indoor, 99 outdoor access, 16 stray cats). A questionnaire provided the following data: derivation, housing environment, and previous flea/tick exposure. Serum antibody titers against A. phagocytophilum, B. henselae, and B. quintana were determined by an immunofluorescence test (IFT). PCR tests (EDTA blood) were used to test for A. phagocytophilum, M. haemofelis, C. M. turicensis, C. M. haemominutum, B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae. In 19 of 265 cats (7.2%) DNA of one or more Mycoplasma spp. was detected: C M. haemominutum (5.3%), M. haemofelis (1.5%) and C M. turicensis (1.1%); three of the cats were tested positive for the feline immunodeficiency virus. All cats were B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae PCR-negative in peripheral blood. However, 91 of 245 cats (37.1%) had antibody titers > 1:200 for B. henselae (Houston I, Marseille type) and 46 (18.8%) for B. quintana. Antibody titers > 1:64 against A. phagocytophilum were detected in 24 cats (9.1%); one cat (0.4%) was PCR-positive. Since infections with haemotropic Mycoplasma spp. and also with arthropodborne organisms (Bartonella spp., A. phagocytophilum) occur in cats from the area Berlin/Brandenburg (Germany) an appropriate arthropod-control is recommended. Further studies are needed to evaluate the relevance of these infectious agents for the individual cat. PMID:23045805

  15. Decoding system for the AUA codon by tRNAIle with the UAU anticodon in Mycoplasma mobile

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Takaaki; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Nakane, Daisuke; Miyata, Makoto; Muto, Akira; Nishimura, Susumu; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the genetic code is a fundamental process in all living organisms. In many bacteria, AUA codons are deciphered by tRNAIle2 bearing lysidine (L) at the wobble position. L is a modified cytidine introduced post-transcriptionally by tRNAIle-lysidine synthetase (TilS). Some bacteria, including Mycoplasma mobile, do not carry the tilS gene, indicating that they have established a different system to decode AUA codons. In this study, tRNAIle2 has been isolated from M. mobile and was found to contain a UAU anticodon without any modification. Mycoplasma mobile isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IleRS) recognized the UAU anticodon, whereas Escherichia coli IleRS did not efficiently aminoacylate tRNAIle2UAU. In M. mobile IleRS, a single Arg residue at position 865 was critical for specificity for the UAU anticodon and, when the corresponding site (W905) in E. coli IleRS was substituted with Arg, the W905R mutant efficiently aminoacylated tRNA with UAU anticodon. Mycoplasma mobile tRNAIle2 cannot distinguish between AUA and AUG codon on E. coli ribosome. However, on M. mobile ribosome, M. mobile tRNAIle2UAU specifically recognized AUA codon, and not AUG codon, suggesting M. mobile ribosome has a property that prevents misreading of AUG codon. These findings provide an insight into the evolutionary reorganization of the AUA decoding system. PMID:23295668

  16. Simultaneous Identification of Potential Pathogenicity Factors of Mycoplasma agalactiae in the Natural Ovine Host by Negative Selection.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Zimmermann, Martina; Flöck, Martina; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-07-01

    Mycoplasmas possess complex pathogenicity determinants that are largely unknown at the molecular level. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful model to study the molecular basis of mycoplasma pathogenicity. The generation and in vivo screening of a transposon mutant library of M. agalactiae were employed to unravel its host colonization factors. Tn4001mod mutants were sequenced using a novel sequencing method, and functionally heterogeneous pools containing 15 to 19 selected mutants were screened simultaneously through two successive cycles of sheep intramammary infections. A PCR-based negative selection method was employed to identify mutants that failed to colonize the udders and draining lymph nodes in the animals. A total of 14 different mutants found to be absent from ? 95% of samples were identified and subsequently verified via a second round of stringent confirmatory screening where 100% absence was considered attenuation. Using this criterion, seven mutants with insertions in genes MAG1050, MAG2540, MAG3390, uhpT, eutD, adhT, and MAG4460 were not recovered from any of the infected animals. Among the attenuated mutants, many contain disruptions in hypothetical genes, implying their previously unknown role in M. agalactiae pathogenicity. These data indicate the putative role of functionally different genes, including hypothetical ones, in the pathogenesis of M. agalactiae. Defining the precise functions of the identified genes is anticipated to increase our understanding of M. agalactiae infections and to develop successful intervention strategies against it. PMID:25916984

  17. Analysis of the Mycoplasma genitalium MgpB Adhesin to Predict Membrane Topology, Investigate Antibody Accessibility, Characterize Amino Acid Diversity, and Identify Functional and Immunogenic Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L.; Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted pathogen and is associated with reproductive tract disease that can be chronic in nature despite the induction of a strong antibody response. Persistent infection exacerbates the likelihood of transmission, increases the risk of ascension to the upper tract, and suggests that M. genitalium may possess immune evasion mechanism(s). Antibodies from infected patients predominantly target the MgpB adhesin, which is encoded by a gene that recombines with homologous donor sequences, thereby generating sequence variation within and among strains. We have previously characterized mgpB heterogeneity over the course of persistent infection and have correlated the induction of variant-specific antibodies with the loss of that particular variant from the infected host. In the current study, we examined the membrane topology, antibody accessibility, distribution of amino acid diversity, and the location of functional and antigenic epitopes within the MgpB adhesin. Our results indicate that MgpB contains a single transmembrane domain, that the majority of the protein is surface exposed and antibody accessible, and that the attachment domain is located within the extracellular C-terminus. Not unexpectedly, amino acid diversity was concentrated within and around the three previously defined variable regions (B, EF, and G) of MgpB; while nonsynonymous mutations were twice as frequent as synonymous mutations in regions B and G, region EF had equal numbers of nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations. Interestingly, antibodies produced during persistent infection reacted predominantly with the conserved C-terminus and variable region B. In contrast, infection-induced antibodies reacted poorly with the N-terminus, variable regions EF and G, and intervening conserved regions despite the presence of predicted B cell epitopes. Overall, this study provides an important foundation to define how different segments of the MgpB adhesin contribute to functionality, variability, and immunogenicity during persistent M. genitalium infection. PMID:26381903

  18. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... include any of the following: Chest pain Chills Cough , usually dry and not bloody Excessive sweating Fever ( ... NOT give aspirin to children. Do not take cough medicines without first talking to your doctor. Cough ...

  19. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XBL  Common Strain Name: Myf6-ires-cre knock-in  Strain Nomenclature: B6;129-Myf6tm2(cre)Mrc/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): C1 , D Sample MTA for this strain Animal

  20. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  1. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Cryoarchived Strains   Strain Number: 01X67  Common Strain Name: CAG-LSL-EGFR-WT  Strain Nomenclature: STOCK Col1a1tm1(CAG-EGFR)Char/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B3 , D Sample MTA for this

  2. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XJA  Common Strain Name: PML (conventional k/o) - C57BL/6  Strain Nomenclature: B6.129S7-Pmltm1Ppp>/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B3 , C1 Sample MTA for this strain Animal

  3. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XBU  Common Strain Name: p16INKa4a L   Strain Nomenclature: B6.129(Cg)-Cdkn2atm2.1Nesh/Nci/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B3 Sample MTA for this strain Animal Health

  4. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01X62  Common Strain Name: Arf floxed  Strain Nomenclature: B6.129-Cdkn2atm4Cjs/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B1 Sample MTA for this strain Animal Health Report in

  5. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XD8  Common Strain Name: Fabp1-Cre  Strain Nomenclature: FVB/N-Tg(Fabp1-Cre)1Jig/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B1 , D Sample MTA for this strain Animal Health Report

  6. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XB2  Common Strain Name: Ink4a/Arf null (FVB)  Strain Nomenclature: FVB.129-Cdkn2atm1Rdp/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): C3 Sample MTA for this strain Animal Health

  7. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  8. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  9. Mycoplasma hyorhinis Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome and Promotes Migration and Invasion of Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaomin; Xing, Yue; Wang, Xun; Zhong, Jin; Meng, Guangxun

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M.hyorhinis, M.hy) is associated with development of gastric and prostate cancers. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a protein complex controlling maturation of important pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-18, is also involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis of various cancers. Methodology/Principal Findings To clarify whether M.hy promoted tumor development via inflammasome activation, we analyzed monocytes for IL-1? and IL-18 production upon M.hy challenge. When exposed to M.hy, human monocytes exhibited rapid and robust IL-1? and IL-18 secretion. We further identified that lipid-associated membrane protein (LAMP) from M.hy was responsible for IL-1? induction. Applying competitive inhibitors, gene specific shRNA and gene targeted mice, we verified that M.hy induced IL-1? secretion was NLRP3-dependent in vitro and in vivo. Cathepsin B activity, K+ efflux, Ca2+ influx and ROS production were all required for the NLRP3 inflammasome activation by M.hy. Importantly, it is IL-1? but not IL-18 produced from macrophages challenged with M.hy promoted gastric cancer cell migration and invasion. Conclusions Our data suggest that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by M.hy may be associated with its promotion of gastric cancer metastasis, and anti-M.hy therapy or limiting NLRP3 signaling could be effective approach for control of gastric cancer progress. PMID:24223129

  10. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Results Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. Conclusions In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI. PMID:24903770

  11. Culture-Independent Detection and Genotyping of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Clinical Specimens from Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Liu, Liyong; Tao, Xiaoxia; He, Lihua; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    A duplex real-time PCR assay was designed for simultaneous detection and genotyping of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae). The detection/typing performance of this duplex PCR method, targeting specific genes for M. pneumoniae type 1 (mpn 459) and type 2 (mpna 5864), was compared to that of the previously published MpP1 real-time PCR assay and the genotyping method for the adhesin P1 gene (mpn 141). A total of 1,344 throat swab specimens collected from patients in Beijing, China were tested for M. pneumoniae by bacterial culture, MpP1 real-time PCR assay, and our duplex PCR assay, and positive detection rates of 26.9%, 34.4%, and 33.7%, respectively, were obtained. The duplex PCR method demonstrated high sensitivity and accuracy for detecting and genotyping M. pneumoniae, and significant differences in genotyping ability were observed when compared to the conventional P1 gene-based method. M. pneumoniae type 1 was the predominate genotype from 2008 to 2012 in Beijing, and a shift from type 1 to type 2 began to occur in 2013. To our knowledge, this is the first reported incidence of a type shift phenomenon of M. pneumoniae clinical isolates in China. These genotyping results provide important information for understanding recent changes in epidemiological characteristics of M. pneumoniae in Beijing. PMID:26509651

  12. Synergistic pathogenicity in sequential coinfection with Mycoplasma hyorhinis and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongjie; Wei, Yanwu; Huang, Liping; Wang, Yiping; Sun, Jianhui; Du, Wenjuan; Wu, Hongli; Liu, Changming

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the synergistic pathogenicity of Mycoplasma hyorhinis (Mhr) with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), thirty 35-day-old piglets were randomly distributed to six groups (n=5 each): Mhr/PCV2 (group 1, inoculated with Mhr and PCV2 1 week later), PCV2/Mhr (group 2, inoculated with PCV2 and Mhr 1 week later), Mhr-PCV2 (group 3, inoculated with PCV2 and Mhr concurrently), singular PCV2 group (group 4), singular Mhr group (group 5), and a uninfected control group (group 6). Mild transient lethargy, fever, coughing, inappetence, and decreased daily weight gain were observed in all dual-infected groups and the singular Mhr-infected group. There were significantly higher levels of PCV2 and Mhr antibodies, larger amounts and wider range of tissue distribution of PCV2 antigens and nucleic acids in the dual-infected groups compared to the single-infected and control groups. PCV2 and Mhr dual-infection resulted in significantly more severe macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions and wider PCV2 DNA distribution compared with piglets infected with PCV2 alone. Cytokine detection showed a significant change in tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin-2, and interleukin-6 levels in the infected groups, especially in the Mhr-PCV2 group, compared with the control group. Hence, Mhr potentiated the severity of PCV2-associated lung lesions, increased the amount and distribution of PCV2 DNA in tissues, and increased the incidence of porcine respiratory disease. PMID:26711038

  13. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jarocki, Veronica M.; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; Deutscher, Ania T.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25589579

  14. Anemia in cats with hemotropic mycoplasma infection: Retrospective evaluation of 23 cases (1996–2005)

    PubMed Central

    Nibblett, Belle Marie D.; Snead, Elisabeth C.; Waldner, Cheryl; Taylor, Susan M.; Jackson, Marion L.; Knorr, Laina M.

    2009-01-01

    This study summarizes the diagnostic findings from all anemic cats diagnosed with hemotropic mycoplasma (HM) infections at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine — Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 1996 and 2005. The objectives were to determine the frequency of HM-induced anemia among all cats presented with anemia during this period, the clinical findings and risk factors associated with clinical HM infection, and factors affecting or predicting survival. Medical records were examined from 23 cats with HM-induced anemia from the total of 170 cats diagnosed with anemia during this period. The frequency of HM-induced anemia was 14% (23/170) among all anemic cats. Cats with HM-induced anemia were less likely to be purebred (P = 0.04) than other cats with anemia. Of the cats with HM-induced anemia, those with positive retroviral status (P = 0.01), concurrent illness (P < 0.01), or lack of erythroid regeneration (P = 0.01) were most likely to die. The 1-year survival of HM-infected cats was 65% (13/20). PMID:20119543

  15. Distribution of Mycoplasma haemofelis in blood and tissues following experimental infection

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Séverine; Peters, Iain R.; Day, Michael J.; Willi, Barbara; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J.; Helps, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe blood and tissue copy number distribution during Mycoplasma haemofelis infection and determine if sequestration of organisms in body tissues could explain blood copy number cycling in infected cats. Thirteen domestic–shorthaired cats were used. Blood samples were regularly collected, and at a differing time point post-infection for each cat, tissue samples also collected, for quantitative PCR (qPCR). Absolute haemoplasma copy numbers were calculated for all blood and tissue samples, as well as an estimation of the ratio of tissue haemoplasma copy number to that expected in the tissue if a positive qPCR result arose due to tissue blood supply alone. Cats with high or moderate M. haemofelis blood copy numbers at the time of tissue collection had fewer M. haemofelis copies in most tissues than expected due to the tissue blood supply alone; only splenic and lung tissues consistently contained more M. haemofelis. However tissues collected from cats at a time of very low M. haemofelis blood copy numbers, when putative copy number cycling nadirs were occurring, were usually qPCR negative. Hence no evidence of significant tissue M. haemofelis sequestration was found in this study to explain the copy number cycling reported with this feline haemoplasma species. PMID:19782126

  16. Distribution of Mycoplasma haemofelis in blood and tissues following experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Séverine; Peters, Iain R; Day, Michael J; Willi, Barbara; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J; Helps, Chris R

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe blood and tissue copy number distribution during Mycoplasma haemofelis infection and determine if sequestration of organisms in body tissues could explain blood copy number cycling in infected cats. Thirteen domestic-shorthaired cats were used. Blood samples were regularly collected, and at a differing time point post-infection for each cat, tissue samples also collected, for quantitative PCR (qPCR). Absolute haemoplasma copy numbers were calculated for all blood and tissue samples, as well as an estimation of the ratio of tissue haemoplasma copy number to that expected in the tissue if a positive qPCR result arose due to tissue blood supply alone. Cats with high or moderate M. haemofelis blood copy numbers at the time of tissue collection had fewer M. haemofelis copies in most tissues than expected due to the tissue blood supply alone; only splenic and lung tissues consistently contained more M. haemofelis. However tissues collected from cats at a time of very low M. haemofelis blood copy numbers, when putative copy number cycling nadirs were occurring, were usually qPCR negative. Hence no evidence of significant tissue M. haemofelis sequestration was found in this study to explain the copy number cycling reported with this feline haemoplasma species. PMID:19782126

  17. Delineation of immunodominant and cytadherence segment(s) of Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adhesion of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) to host epithelial cells requires several adhesin proteins like P1, P30 and P116. Among these proteins, P1 protein has been inedited as one of the major adhesin and immunogenic protein present on the attachment organelle of M. pneumoniae. In the present study, we scanned the entire sequence of M. pneumoniae P1 protein to identify the immunodominant and cytadherence region(s). M. pneumoniae P1 gene was synthesized in four segments replacing all the UGA codons to UGG codons. Each of the four purified P1 protein fragment was analyzed for its immunogenicity with anti-M. pneumoniae M129 antibodies (Pab M129) and sera of M. pneumoniae infected patients by western blotting and ELISA. Antibodies were produced against all the P1 protein fragments and these antibodies were used for M. pneumoniae adhesion, M. pneumoniae adhesion inhibition and M. pneumoniae surface exposure assays using HEp-2 cells lines. Results Our results show that the immunodominant regions are distributed throughout the entire length of P1 protein, while only the N- and C- terminal region(s) of P1 protein are surface exposed and block cytadhesion to HEp-2 cells, while antibodies to two middle fragments failed to block cytadhesion. Conclusions These results have important implications in designing strategies to block the attachment of M. pneumoniae to epithelial cells, thus preventing the development of atypical pneumonia. PMID:24774062

  18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp. Infection in Community-Acquired Pneumonia, Germany, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Roger; Schnee, Christiane; Pletz, Mathias W.; Rupp, Jan; Jacobs, Enno; Sachse, Konrad; Group, CAPNETZ Study

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp., which are associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), are difficult to propagate, and can cause clinically indistinguishable disease patterns. During 2011–2012, we used molecular methods to test adult patients in Germany with confirmed CAP for infection with these 2 pathogens. Overall, 12.3% (96/783) of samples were positive for M. pneumoniae and 3.9% (31/794) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; C. psittaci (2.1%) was detected more frequently than C. pneumoniae (1.4%). M. pneumoniae P1 type 1 predominated, and levels of macrolide resistance were low (3.1%). Quarterly rates of M. pneumoniae–positive samples ranged from 1.5% to 27.3%, showing a strong epidemic peak for these infections, but of Chlamydia spp. detection was consistent throughout the year. M. pneumoniae–positive patients were younger and more frequently female, had fewer co-occurring conditions, and experienced milder disease than did patients who tested negative. Clinicians should be aware of the epidemiology of these pathogens in CAP. PMID:25693633

  19. A novel translation initiation region from Mycoplasma genitalium that functions in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Loechel, S; Inamine, J M; Hu, P C

    1991-01-01

    The tuf gene of Mycoplasma genitalium uses a signal other than a Shine-Dalgarno sequence to promote translation initiation. We have inserted the translation initiation region of this gene in front of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene and shown that it is recognized by the translational machinery of E. coli; the signal operates in vivo at roughly the same efficiency as a synthetic Shine-Dalgarno sequence. The M. genitalium sequence was also used to replace the native translation initiation region of the cat gene. When assayed in E. coli, the M. genitalium sequence is equivalent to a Shine-Dalgarno sequence in stimulating translation of this mRNA also. Site-directed mutagenesis enabled us to identify some of the bases that comprise the functional sequence. We propose that the sequence UUAACAACAU functions as a ribosome binding site by annealing to nucleotides 1082-1093 of the E. coli 16S rRNA. The activity of this sequence is enhanced when it is present in the loop of a stem-and-loop structure. Additional sequences both upstream and downstream of the initiation codon are also involved, but their role has not been elucidated. PMID:1762919

  20. Crystal structure of the DUF16 domain of MPN010 from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hae; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Yokota, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; kim, Sung-Hou

    2006-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of the DUF16 domain of unknown function encoded by the gene MPN010 of Mycoplasma pneumoniae at 1.8 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that this domain is composed of two separated homotrimeric coiled-coils. The shorter one consists of 11 highly conserved residues. The sequence comprises noncanonical heptad repeats that induce a right-handed coiled-coil structure. The longer one is composed of approximately nine heptad repeats. In this coiled-coil structure, there are three distinguishable regions that confer unique structural properties compared with other known homotrimeric coiled-coils. The first part, containing one stutter, is an unusual phenylalanine-rich region that is not found in any other coiled-coil structures. The second part is a highly conserved glutamine-rich region, frequently found in other trimeric coiled-coil structures. The last part is composed of prototype heptad repeats. The phylogenetic analysis of the DUF16 family together with a secondary structure prediction shows that the DUF16 family can be classified into five subclasses according to N-terminal sequences. Based on the structural comparison with other coiled-coil structures, a probable molecular function of the DUF16 family is discussed. PMID:16522803

  1. Parainfectious meningo-encephalo-radiculo-myelitis (cat scratch disease, Lyme borreliosis, brucellosis, botulism, legionellosis, pertussis, mycoplasma).

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, Daniel; Krupp, Lauren B; Belman, Anita L

    2013-01-01

    Parainfectious disorders of the nervous system encompass those meningo-encephalo-radiculomyelitic conditions that are temporally associated with a systemic infection, antigenic stimuli, or toxin exposure, in the absence of evidence of direct neuronal infection or invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) or peripheral nervous system (PNS). Pathogenetic mechanisms can be due to immune-mediated processes (such as bystander activation, molecular mimicy) or the inciting insult can be due to toxic factors, as in the case of botulism. A myriad of clinical manifestations can occur including headache, seizures, and mental status changes, ranging from mood and behavioral disturbances to varying levels of alteration in consciousness. Focal neurological deficits can include aphasia, hemiparesis, or paraparesis. The PNS can also be affected leading to cranial nerve involvement, focal or multifocal neuropathies, and dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. Diagnosis is based not only on the history, examination, laboratory, and neuroimaging data but also on epidemiological factors. The parainfectious disorders covered in this review are cat scratch disease, Lyme borreliosis, legionellosis, brucellosis, botulism, pertussis, and mycoplasma. Each is associated with a distinct organism, has both systemic and neurological manifestations, and has a different epidemiological profile. PMID:23622329

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium Plasma Antibodies in Relation to Epithelial Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Idahl, Annika; Lundin, Eva; Jurstrand, Margaretha; Kumlin, Urban; Elgh, Fredrik; Ohlson, Nina; Ottander, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To assess associations of Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium antibodies with epithelial ovarian tumors. Methods. Plasma samples from 291 women, undergoing surgery due to suspected ovarian pathology, were analyzed with respect to C. trachomatis IgG and IgA, chlamydial Heat Shock Protein 60-1 (cHSP60-1) IgG and M. genitalium IgG antibodies. Women with borderline tumors (n = 12), ovarian carcinoma (n = 45), or other pelvic malignancies (n = 11) were matched to four healthy controls each. Results. Overall, there were no associations of antibodies with EOC. However, chlamydial HSP60-1 IgG antibodies were associated with type II ovarian cancer (P = .002) in women with plasma samples obtained >1 year prior to diagnosis (n = 7). M. genitalium IgG antibodies were associated with borderline ovarian tumors (P = .01). Conclusion. Chlamydial HSP60-1 IgG and M. genitalium IgG antibodies are in this study associated with epithelial ovarian tumors in some subsets, which support the hypothesis linking upper-genital tract infections and ovarian tumor development. PMID:21811380

  3. A B cell-, T cell-linked epitope located on the adhesin of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, E; Röck, R; Dalehite, L

    1990-01-01

    The identification of specific T cell and B cell epitopes of the P1 protein, which functions as an adhesin and as a major antigen of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, has become of central interest for the design of synthetic vaccines. Here we report the isolation from guinea pigs infected intranasally with M. pneumoniae of hilar and bronchial T lymphocytes which proliferated after in vitro stimulation with sonicated M. pneumoniae whole-cell antigen and with the isolated P1 protein. For more detailed information on T cell epitopes, a 51-amino-acid region (histidine 821 to glycine 871; numbered from the NH2-terminal end) of the P1 protein was analyzed for a T cell epitope. An octapeptide, S-G-S-R-S-F-L-P (starting at amino acid 845), stimulated in vitro lymphocytes of bronchial washings and of hilar lymph nodes. Furthermore, this T cell-stimulating amino acid sequence was located at the C-terminal end of a B cell epitope with the sequence T-N-T (starting at amino acid 842). PMID:1695202

  4. Structure of CARDS toxin, a unique ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Argentina; Kannan, T. R.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Zhang, Yanfeng; Somarajan, Sudha R.; Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Holloway, Stephen P.; Baseman, Joel B.; Hart, P. John

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) infections cause tracheobronchitis and “walking” pneumonia, and are linked to asthma and other reactive airway diseases. As part of the infectious process, the bacterium expresses a 591-aa virulence factor with both mono-ADP ribosyltransferase (mART) and vacuolating activities known as Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome Toxin (CARDS TX). CARDS TX binds to human surfactant protein A and annexin A2 on airway epithelial cells and is internalized, leading to a range of pathogenetic events. Here we present the structure of CARDS TX, a triangular molecule in which N-terminal mART and C-terminal tandem ?-trefoil domains associate to form an overall architecture distinct from other well-recognized ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins. We demonstrate that CARDS TX binds phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin specifically over other membrane lipids, and that cell surface binding and internalization activities are housed within the C-terminal ?-trefoil domain. The results enhance our understanding of Mp pathogenicity and suggest a novel avenue for the development of therapies to treat Mp-associated asthma and other acute and chronic airway diseases. PMID:25848012

  5. Etiology of urethral discharge in West Africa: the role of Mycoplasma genitalium and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, J.; Sobéla, F.; Deslandes, S.; Alary, M.; Wegner, K.; Khonde, N.; Kintin, F.; Kamuragiye, A.; Sylla, M.; Zerbo, P. J.; Baganizi, E.; Koné, A.; Kane, F.; Mâsse, B.; Viens, P.; Frost, E.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the etiological role of pathogens other than Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis in urethral discharge in West African men. METHODS: Urethral swabs were obtained from 659 male patients presenting with urethral discharge in 72 primary health care facilities in seven West African countries, and in 339 controls presenting for complaints unrelated to the genitourinary tract. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect the presence of N. gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma genitalium, and Ureaplasma urealyticum. FINDINGS: N. gonorrhoeae, T. vaginalis, C. trachomatis, and M. genitalium--but not U. urealyticum--were found more frequently in men with urethral discharge than in asymptomatic controls, being present in 61.9%, 13.8%, 13.4% and 10.0%, respectively, of cases of urethral discharge. Multiple infections were common. Among patients with gonococcal infection, T. vaginalis was as frequent a coinfection as C. trachomatis. M. genitalium, T. vaginalis, and C. trachomatis caused a similar clinical syndrome to that associated with gonococcal infection, but with a less severe urethral discharge. CONCLUSIONS: M. genitalium and T. vaginalis are important etiological agents of urethral discharge in West Africa. The frequent occurrence of multiple infections with any combination of four pathogens strongly supports the syndromic approach. The optimal use of metronidazole in flowcharts for the syndromic management of urethral discharge needs to be explored in therapeutic trials. PMID:11242818

  6. A blocking ELISA using a monoclonal antibody for the serological detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Le Potier, M F; Abiven, P; Kobisch, M; Crevat, D; Desmettre, P

    1994-05-01

    A blocking ELISA was developed by using a monoclonal antibody (4082-05-344-18) which specifically detected an epitope on the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 40 kDa membrane protein without cross-reacting with M flocculare or M hyorhinis. The results obtained with sera from specific pathogen-free pigs inoculated with M flocculare or M hyorhinis confirmed the specificity of the assay. An immunoblotting procedure was used to characterise the antibody response of pigs experimentally infected with M hyopneumoniae. Antibodies to the 40 kDa antigen were detected two weeks after infection and remained as major markers for at least 20 weeks. Cross-reacting antibodies to this antigen were not detected in convalescent sera from piglets infected with M flocculare or M hyorhinis. Sera from experimentally infected pigs were compared by means of the blocking ELISA and an indirect ELISA. The kinetics of ELISA antibodies after experimental inoculation were also studied. The detection of antibody was rather more stable for a longer time with the blocking ELISA than with the indirect ELISA. In an evaluation of more than 1000 sera from the field there was excellent agreement between the two methods. PMID:8073186

  7. Expansion of intracellular IFN-? positive lymphocytes during Mycoplasma agalactiae infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    La Manna, M P; Agnone, A; Villari, S; Puleio, R; Vitale, M; Nicholas, R; Sireci, G; Dieli, F; Loria, G R

    2011-12-01

    A method to assess the expansion of antigen-specific intracellular IFN-? positive T cell subsets during the infection will be helpful for a better understanding of mycoplasmal infections physiopathology in the sheep. We analysed the percentage of antigen-specific lymphocytes positive for intracellular IFN-? during the infection of sheep with Mycoplasma agalactiae by culturing peripheral blood mononuclear cells of infected or uninfected animals with irradiated M. agalactiae. The expansion of antigen-specific IFN-? positive lymphocytes in infected sheep was initially sustained by CD4(+) T cells at day 15 after infection, when antigen specific IgG start to be detectable, followed by CD8/IFN-? double positive cells. ?? T-cells were not expanded at any time point analysed. IFN?(+) T cells disappear 60 days after infection, suggesting that antigen specific IFN?(+) T cells, mainly detected in the early phase of the disease, could be useful to understand the role of cell-mediated immunity during M. agalactiae infection. PMID:21354587

  8. Severe childhood Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection: a case series.

    PubMed

    Meyer Sauteur, Patrick M; Roodbol, Joyce; Hackenberg, Annette; de Wit, Marie-Claire Y; Vink, Cornelis; Berger, Christoph; Jacobs, Enno; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; Jacobs, Bart C

    2015-06-01

    We report seven children with recent Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection and severe Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) that presented to two European medical centres from 1992 to 2012. Severe GBS was defined as the occurrence of respiratory failure, central nervous system (CNS) involvement, or death. Five children had GBS, one Bickerstaff brain stem encephalitis (BBE), and one acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (A-CIDP). The five patients with severe GBS were derived from an original cohort of 66 children with GBS. In this cohort, 17 children (26%) had a severe form of GBS and 47% of patients with M. pneumoniae infection presented with severe GBS. Of the seven patients in this case series, five were mechanically ventilated and four had CNS involvement (two were comatose). Most patients presented with non-specific clinical symptoms (nuchal rigidity and ataxia) and showed a rapidly progressive disease course (71%). Antibodies against M. pneumoniae were detected in all patients and were found to be intrathecally synthesised in two cases (GBS and BBE), which proves intrathecal infection. One patient died and only two patients recovered completely. These cases illustrate that M. pneumoniae infection in children can be followed by severe and complicated forms of GBS. Non-specific clinical features of GBS in such patients may predispose a potentially life-threatening delay in diagnosis. PMID:26115201

  9. Increased Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Disease Prevalence in Domestic Hybrids Among Free-Living Wild Boar.

    PubMed

    Goedbloed, Daniel J; van Hooft, Pim; Lutz, Walburga; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; van Wieren, Sip E; Ydenberg, Ron C; Prins, Herbert H T

    2015-12-01

    Wildlife immune genes are subject to natural selection exerted by pathogens. In contrast, domestic immune genes are largely protected from pathogen selection by veterinary care. Introgression of domestic alleles into the wild could lead to increased disease susceptibility, but observations are scarce due to low introgression rates, low disease prevalence and reduced survival of domestic hybrids. Here we report the first observation of a deleterious effect of domestic introgression on disease prevalence in a free-living large mammal. A fraction of 462 randomly sampled free-living European wild boar (Sus scrofa) was genetically identified as recent wild boar-domestic pig hybrids based on 351 SNP data. Analysis of antibody prevalence against the bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhyo) showed an increased Mhyo prevalence in wild-domestic hybrids. We argue that the most likely mechanism explaining the observed association between domestic hybrid status and Mhyo antibody prevalence would be introgression of deleterious domestic alleles. We hypothesise that large-scale use of antibiotics in the swine breeding sector may have played a role in shaping the relatively deleterious properties of domestic swine immune genes and that domestic introgression may also lead to increased wildlife disease susceptibility in the case of other species. PMID:26391376

  10. SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 levels in children with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Lin-Hua; Lu, Quan; Han, Li-Ying; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the potential biomarkers from pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D), Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6), and 56-kD a human type I protein (HTI-56) in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. This retrospective study, self-controlled study enrolled 34 Chinese children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia. The levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were assessed and compared between patients with unilateral lung infection and contralateral lungs without any abnormal findings. Significant differences in the levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 were observed in infected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples compared with uninfected samples (all P<0.05); however, there was no correlation between the serum level of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 and their levels in infected and uninfected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples (P>0.05). Conclusion: The high levels of SP-D, KL-6, and HTI-56 in infected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples may reflect the injury of alveolar epithelium caused by M. pneumoniae. Instead of SP-D in uninfected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples obtained by invasive bronchoscopy, serum SP-D may serve as a convenient medium to distinguish lung infection caused by M. pneumoniae.

  11. Novel aspects on the pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Nakagaki, Kazuhide; Sasaki, Yoshiko; Niwa, Shoichi; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Nunokawa, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Kosuke; Tsujimoto, Naoki; Hirao, Susumu; Wada, Hiroo; Ishii, Haruyuki; Nakata, Koh; Kimura, Hirokazu; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Takizawa, Hajime; Goto, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) is a leading cause of community acquired pneumonia. Knowledge regarding Mp pneumonia obtained from animal models or human subjects has been discussed in many different reports. Accumulated expertise concerning this critical issue has been hard to apply clinically, and potential problems may remain undiscovered. Therefore, our multidisciplinary team extensively reviewed the literature regarding Mp pneumonia, and compared findings from animal models with those from human subjects. In human beings, the characteristic pathological features of Mp pneumonia have been reported as alveolar infiltration with neutrophils and lymphocytes and lymphocyte/plasma cell infiltrates in the peri-bronchovascular area. Herein, we demonstrated the novel aspects of Mp pneumonia that the severity of the Mp pneumonia seemed to depend on the host innate immunity to the Mp, which might be accelerated by antecedent Mp exposure (re-exposure or latent respiratory infection) through up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 2 expression on bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. The macrolides therapy might be beneficial for the patients with macrolide-resistant Mp pneumonia via not bacteriological but immunomodulative effects. This exhaustive review focuses on pathogenesis and extends to some therapeutic implications such as clarithromycin, and discusses the various diverse aspects of Mp pneumonia. It is our hope that this might lead to new insights into this common respiratory disease. PMID:25157244

  12. ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin of Mycoplasma pneumoniae represents unique virulence determinant among bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, T. R.; Baseman, Joel B.

    2006-01-01

    Unlike many bacterial pathogens, Mycoplasma pneumoniae is not known to produce classical toxins, and precisely how M. pneumoniae injures the respiratory epithelium has remained a mystery for >50 years. Here, we report the identification of a virulence factor (MPN372) possibly responsible for airway cellular damage and other sequelae associated with M. pneumoniae infections in humans. We show that M. pneumoniae MPN372 encodes a 68-kDa protein that possesses ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) activity. Within its N terminus, MPN372 contains key amino acids associated with NAD binding and ADP-ribosylating activity, similar to pertussis toxin (PTX) S1 subunit (PTX-S1). Interestingly, MPN372 ADP ribosylates both identical and distinct mammalian proteins when compared with PTX-S1. Remarkably, MPN372 elicits extensive vacuolization and ultimate cell death of mammalian cells, including distinct and progressive patterns of cytopathology in tracheal rings in organ culture that had been previously ascribed to infection with WT virulent M. pneumoniae. We observed dramatic seroconversion to MPN372 in patients diagnosed with M. pneumoniae-associated pneumonia, indicating that this toxin is synthesized in vivo and possesses highly immunogenic epitopes. PMID:16617115

  13. Transcription Analysis of the Porcine Alveolar Macrophage Response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Li; Luping, Du; Bing, Sun; Zhengyu, Yu; Maojun, Liu; Zhixin, Feng; Yanna, Wei; Haiyan, Wang; Guoqing, Shao; Kongwang, He

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod)-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25098731

  14. Global multilocus sequence typing analysis of Mycoplasma bovis isolates reveals two main population clusters.

    PubMed

    Rosales, R S; Churchward, C P; Schnee, C; Sachse, K; Lysnyansky, I; Catania, S; Iob, L; Ayling, R D; Nicholas, R A J

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a major bovine pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and is responsible for substantial economic losses worldwide. M. bovis is also associated with other clinical presentations in cattle, including mastitis, otitis, arthritis, and reproductive disorders. To gain a better understanding of the genetic diversity of this pathogen, a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed and applied to the characterization of 137 M. bovis isolates from diverse geographical origins, obtained from healthy or clinically infected cattle. After in silico analysis, a final set of 7 housekeeping genes was selected (dnaA, metS, recA, tufA, atpA, rpoD, and tkt). MLST analysis demonstrated the presence of 35 different sequence types (STs) distributed in two main clonal complexes (CCs), defined at the double-locus variant level, namely, CC1, which included most of the British and German isolates, and CC2, which was a more heterogeneous and geographically distant group of isolates, including European, Asian, and Australian samples. Index of association analysis confirmed the clonal nature of the investigated M. bovis population, based on MLST data. This scheme has demonstrated high discriminatory power, with the analysis showing the presence of genetically distant and divergent clusters of isolates predominantly associated with geographical origins. PMID:25540400

  15. Global Multilocus Sequence Typing Analysis of Mycoplasma bovis Isolates Reveals Two Main Population Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Churchward, C. P.; Schnee, C.; Sachse, K.; Lysnyansky, I.; Catania, S.; Iob, L.; Ayling, R. D.; Nicholas, R. A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a major bovine pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and is responsible for substantial economic losses worldwide. M. bovis is also associated with other clinical presentations in cattle, including mastitis, otitis, arthritis, and reproductive disorders. To gain a better understanding of the genetic diversity of this pathogen, a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed and applied to the characterization of 137 M. bovis isolates from diverse geographical origins, obtained from healthy or clinically infected cattle. After in silico analysis, a final set of 7 housekeeping genes was selected (dnaA, metS, recA, tufA, atpA, rpoD, and tkt). MLST analysis demonstrated the presence of 35 different sequence types (STs) distributed in two main clonal complexes (CCs), defined at the double-locus variant level, namely, CC1, which included most of the British and German isolates, and CC2, which was a more heterogeneous and geographically distant group of isolates, including European, Asian, and Australian samples. Index of association analysis confirmed the clonal nature of the investigated M. bovis population, based on MLST data. This scheme has demonstrated high discriminatory power, with the analysis showing the presence of genetically distant and divergent clusters of isolates predominantly associated with geographical origins. PMID:25540400

  16. Mycoplasma fermentans glycolipid-antigen as a pathogen of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahito, Yutaka; Ichinose, Sizuko; Sano, Hajime; Tsubouchi, Yasunori; Kohno, Masataka; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Hojo, Tatsuya; Harasawa, Ryo; Nakano, Teruaki; Matsuda, Kazuhiro

    2008-05-02

    Mycoplasma fermentans has been suspected as one of the causative pathogenic microorganisms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) however, the pathogenic mechanism is still unclear. We, previously, reported that glycolipid-antigens (GGPL-I and III) are the major antigens of M. fermentans. Monoclonal antibody against the GGPL-III could detect the existence of the GGPL-III antigens in synovial tissues from RA patients. GGPL-III antigens were detected in 38.1% (32/84) of RA patient's tissues, but not in osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that a part of GGPL-III antigens are located at endoplasmic reticulum. GGPL-III significantly induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 production from peripheral blood mononulear cells, and also proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Further study is necessary to prove that M. fermentans is a causative microorganism of RA; however, the new mechanisms of disease pathogenesis provides hope for the development of effective and safe immunotherapeutic strategies based on the lipid-antigen, GGPL-III, in the near future.

  17. Domain analysis of lipoprotein LppQ in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC

    PubMed Central

    Bonvin-Klotz, Laetitia; Kühni-Boghenbor, Kathrin; Kapp, Nadine; Frey, Joachim; Stoffel, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    The lipoprotein LppQ is the most prominent antigen of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (SC) during infection of cattle. This pathogen causes contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a devastating disease of considerable socio-economic importance in many countries worldwide. The dominant antigenicity and high specificity for M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC of lipoprotein LppQ have been exploited for serological diagnosis and for epidemiological investigations of CBPP. Scanning electron microscopy and immunogold labelling were used to provide ultrastructural evidence that LppQ is located to the cell membrane at the outer surface of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. The selectivity and specificity of this method were demonstrated through discriminating localization of extracellular (i.e., in the zone of contact with host cells) vs. integral membrane domains of LppQ. Thus, our findings support the suggestion that the accessible N-terminal domain of LppQ is surface exposed and such surface localization may be implicated in the pathogenesis of CBPP. PMID:17674137

  18. Short term exposure to NO sup 2 decreases intrapulmonary killing of Mycoplasma pulmonis by damaging alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.K.; Davidson, M.K.; Schoeb, T.R.; Lindsey, J.R. Veteran Administration Medical Center, Birmingham, AL )

    1991-03-11

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of pathogen free C57BL/6N mice to 5 or 10 ppm of NO{sub 2} increased severity of murine respiratory mycoplasmosis and that this effect was associated with decreased intrapulmonary killing (IPK) of Mycoplasma pulmonis (MP). The purposes of the present studies were to titrate the NO{sub 2} effect and to determine if the changes in IPK were due to the effects of NO{sub 2} on alveolar macrophages. Exposure to less than 5 ppm NO{sub 2} had no effect on IPK of MP. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells killed MP in vitro only if they were allowed to associate with mycoplasmas in vivo. Prior exposure to NO{sub 2} abrogated killing in this in vivo-in vitro model. Exposure to NO{sub 2} did not increase the protein content of BAL within 24 hours. Greater than 95% of the BAL cells were macrophages, and greater than 98% of the cell-associated mycoplasmas were on or in alveolar macrophages. Immediately after exposure, viability of alveolar macrophages, as measured by trypan blue exclusion and fluorescein diacetate uptake, was 89 {plus minus} 4% and 88 {plus minus} 4% in the control group, respectively; 56 {plus minus} 19% and 64 {plus minus} 11% in the group receiving MP alone; 23 {plus minus} 7% and 48 {plus minus} 9% in the group receiving 10 ppm NO{sub 2}; and 16 {plus minus} 6% and 25 {plus minus} 6% in the group receiving both MP and NO{sub 2} exposures. Viability was significantly decreased following exposure to 5 or 10 ppm NO{sub 2}, but not following exposure to 2 ppm. Viability did not return to normal until 7 days after exposure to NO{sub 2}, at which time IPK also returned to normal. The cellular target of NO{sub 2} exposure in relation to IPK of MP appears to be the alveolar macrophage.

  19. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae--a primary cause of severe pneumonia epizootics in the Norwegian Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population.

    PubMed

    Handeland, Kjell; Tengs, Torstein; Kokotovic, Branko; Vikøren, Turid; Ayling, Roger D; Bergsjø, Bjarne; Sigurðardóttir, Olöf G; Bretten, Tord

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population lives on the high mountain plateau of Dovre and originates from animals introduced from Greenland. In the late summers of 2006 and 2012, severe outbreaks of pneumonia with mortality rates of 25-30% occurred. During the 2012 epidemic high quality samples from culled sick animals were obtained for microbiological and pathological examinations. High throughput sequencing (pyrosequencing) of pneumonic lung tissue revealed high concentrations of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in all six animals examined by this method and Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida in four animals, whereas no virus sequences could be identified. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and P. multocida multocida were also isolated by culture. Using real time PCR on lung swabs, M. ovipneumoniae was detected in all of the 19 pneumonic lungs examined. Gross pathological examination revealed heavy consolidations primarily in the cranial parts of the lungs and it also identified one case of otitis media. Histologically, lung lesions were characterized as acute to subacute mixed exudative and moderately proliferative bronchoalveolar pneumonia. Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed high load of M. ovipneumoniae antigens within lung lesions, with particularly intensive staining in the neutrophils. Similar IHC finding were observed in archived lung tissue blocks from animals examined during the 2006 epidemic. An M. ovipneumoniae specific ELISA was applied on bio-banked muskox sera from stray muskoxen killed in the period 2004-2013 and sick muskoxen culled, as well as sera from wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) on Dovre and muskoxen from Greenland. Serology and mycoplasma culturing was also carried out on sheep that had been on pasture in the muskox area during the outbreak in 2012. Our findings indicated separate introductions of M. ovipneumoniae infection in 2006 and 2012 from infected co-grazing sheep. Salt licks shared by the two species were a possible route of transmitting infection. PMID:25198695

  20. Experimental pathology of T-2 toxicosis and mycoplasma infection on performance and hepatic functions of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Manafi, M; Pirany, N; Noor Ali, M; Hedayati, M; Khalaji, S; Yari, M

    2015-07-01

    This experiment was conducted using 192 day-old Ross 308 chicks, divided into 4 groups of 4 replicate consisting 48 birds. Group I was fed a control diet, Group II was fed control diet supplemented with 0.5 ppm T-2 toxin for 5 weeks, Group III was fed control diet supplemented with 8 × 10(8) cfu/mL of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and group IV was fed control diet supplemented by T-2 toxin and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Body weight and feed conversation ratio (FCR), relative organ weights, clinical signs, biochemical characteristics, and gross and histopathological lesions were recorded in the experimental groups at the end of the second and fifth weeks of age. Body weight and relative weights of bursa of Fabricius, thymus, and spleen decreased and FCR increased significantly (P ? 0.05), but the relative weights of liver and kidney showed no significant decrease (P ? 0.05) in the serum total proteins, albumin, and increase in aspartate aminotransferase and alanine transaminase were observed in T-2 toxin and T-2 accompanied with Mycoplasma fed birds when compared to the control group. Liver was enlarged, friable, and yellowish discoloration with distended gall bladder was noticed. Lymphoid organs such as bursa of Fabricius, thymus, and spleen were atrophied in group II and group IV throughout the study. Microscopically, liver showed vacuolar degeneration of hepatocytes, with increased Kupffer cell activity, bile duct epithelial hyperplasia, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Kidney showed vacuolar degeneration of tubular epithelium along with pyknotic nuclei. Lymphoid organs showed lymphocytolysis and depletion with prominent reticuloepithelial cells. Proventriculus revealed desquamation of villous epithelial cells and lymphoid infiltration in submucosa. Heart showed mild hemorrhage with infiltration of inflammatory cells. Lung showed edema and inflammatory cells in the bronchioles. Trachea showed desquamation and erosions of mucosa. Proliferation of mucosal glands with increased mucous secretion was obvious. Air sacs showed thickening with presence of inflammatory cells and edema. PMID:25910901