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Sample records for mycoplasma hominis strains

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma hominis Strain Sprott (ATCC 33131), Isolated from a Patient with Nongonococcal Urethritis.

    PubMed

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Presented here is the complete and annotated genome sequence of Mycoplasma hominis Sprott (ATCC 33131). The chromosome comprises 695,214bp, which is approximately 30kb larger than the syntenic genome of M.hominis PG21(T). Tetracycline resistance of strain Sprott is most probably conferred by the tetM determinant, harbored on a mosaic transposon-like structure. PMID:26159538

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to surface antigens of a pathogenic Mycoplasma hominis strain.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, L D; Shane, S W; Karpas, A A; Cunningham, T M; Probst, P S; Barile, M F

    1991-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared against an arthritogenic strain of Mycoplasma hominis isolated from the joint aspirates of a patient with chronic septic arthritis. Immunoblots of polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresed proteins before and after surface proteolysis showed that the predominant antigenic determinants were on surface-exposed polypeptides. These polypeptides have extensive hydrophobic characteristics, as demonstrated by Triton X-114 phase partitioning. The electrophoresed proteins from cells grown in medium containing [14C]palmitate were blotted onto nitrocellulose which was both reacted with the MAbs and exposed to X-ray film. Superimposable bands on both the immunoblots and the exposed film suggested that the proteins might be acylated. The MAbs were further tested for reactivity with 16 other strains of M. hominis isolated from patients with septic arthritis (1 strain), septicemia (10 strains), or nongonococcal urethritis (1 strain); from the cervix (1 strain), rectum (1 strain), or surgical wound (1 strain) of patients; and from a contaminated cell culture. No single protein was consistently recognized from strain to strain, although a 94-kDa protein from 16 of the 17 strains tested was bound by at least one of the MAbs. The apparent antigenic heterogeneity among strains of M. hominis, including those isolated from the same tissue source and/or from patients with the same type of clinical disease, might be misleading in that all strains express epitopes associated with a discrete number of proteins to which one, two, or all three MAbs bind. The expression of the epitopes on multiple proteins from the same or different strains may reflect a mechanism for generating antigenic diversity. Images PMID:1708355

  3. Detection and prevention of mycoplasma hominis infection

    DOEpatents

    DelVecchio, Vito G.; Gallia, Gary L.; McCleskey, Ferne K.

    1997-01-21

    The present invention is directed to a rapid and sensitive method for detecting Mycoplasma hominis using M. hominis-specific probes, oligonucleotides or antibodies. In particular a target sequence can be amplified by in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, detected by nucleic acid hybridization using the subject probes and oligonucleotides or detected by immunoassay using M. hominis-specific antibodies. M. hominis-specific nucleic acids which do not recognize or hybridize to genomic nucleic acid of other Mycoplasma species are also provided.

  4. Improved method for expression and isolation of the Mycoplasma hominis arginine deiminase from the recombinant strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fayura, Lyubov R; Boretsky, Yuriy R; Pynyaha, Yuriy V; Wheatley, Denys N; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2013-09-20

    Arginine deiminase is a promising anticancer drug active against melanoma, hepatocarcinoma and other tumors. Recombinant strains of Escherichia coli that express arginine deiminase from pathogenic bacteria Mycoplasma have been developed. However, production costs of heterologous arginine deiminase are high due to use of an expensive inducer and extraction buffer, as well as using diluted culture for enzyme induction. We report on a new advanced protocol for Mycoplasma hominis arginine deiminase expression, extraction and renaturation. The main improvements include manipulation with dense suspensions of E. coli, use of lactose instead of isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside as an inducer and a cheaper but not less efficient buffer for solubilization of arginine deiminase inclusion bodies. In addition, supplementation of the storage culture medium with glucose and substrate (arginine) significantly stabilized the recombinant arginine deiminase producer. Homogenous preparations of recombinant arginine deiminase were obtained using anion-exchange and hydrophobic chromatography. The purified enzyme retained a specific activity of 30-34 U/mg for 12 months when stored at 4°C in 20 mM sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.2 containing 1 M NaCl. PMID:23928331

  5. Isolation of Mycoplasma hominis from a brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Olson, D A; Tully, J G; Watson, H L; Cassell, G H; Gustafson, D R; Svien, K A; Smith, T F

    1997-04-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a commensal in the genital tract of women and has been associated with urogenital and extragenital infections. However, central nervous system infections with this organism in adults are very rare. Here we describe the recovery of M. hominis from a brain abscess associated with a postpartum infection. Seroconversion to the isolated strain was detected by both a metabolic inhibition test and an immunoblotting assay. This case demonstrates the pathogenic potential of M. hominis and the need for rapid recognition of the organism so that appropriate chemotherapeutic intervention can occur. PMID:9157171

  6. Association of Mycoplasma hominis infection with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barykova, Yulia A.; Logunov, Denis Yu.; Shmarov, Maxim M.; Vinarov, Andrei Z.; Fiev, Dmitry N.; Vinarova, Natalia A.; Rakovskaya, Irina V.; Baker, Patricia Stanhope; Shyshynova, Inna; Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Naroditsky, Boris S.; Gintsburg, Alexander L.; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of chronic inflammation preceding the development of prostate cancer (PCa) remains unknown. We investigated possible involvement of mycoplasma infection in PCa by screening prostate biopsies from two groups of Russian men undergoing PCa diagnosis. M. hominis was detected by standard PCR in 15% of the 125 patients in the first group and by quantitative real-time PCR in 37.4% of the 123 men in the second group. In both groups, stratification of patients according to diagnosis showed that M. hominis was present at three times higher frequency in patients with PCa than in those with benign prostatic hyperplasia. No M. hominis was detected in the prostates of 27 men without detectable prostate disease. In addition, PCa-positive men had higher titers of antibodies against M. hominis and average PSA levels were higher in M. hominis-positive men. These data, together with previous observations linking mycoplasma infection with cell transformation, genomic instability and resistance to apoptosis, suggest that M. hominis infection may be involved in PCa development and may, therefore, be a potential PCa marker and/or target for improved prevention and treatment of this disease. PMID:21471611

  7. Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma genitalium infections and semen quality of infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Gdoura, Radhouane; Kchaou, Wiem; Chaari, Chiraz; Znazen, Abir; Keskes, Leila; Rebai, Tarek; Hammami, Adnane

    2007-01-01

    Background Genital ureaplasmas (Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum) and mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma hominis) are potentially pathogenic species playing an etiologic role in both genital infections and male infertility. Reports are, however, controversial regarding the effects of these microorganisms infections in the sperm seminological variables. This study aimed at determining the frequency of genital ureplasmas and mycoplasmas in semen specimens collected from infertile men, and at comparing the seminological variables of semen from infected and non-infected men with these microorganisms. Methods A total of 120 semen samples collected from infertile men were investigated. Semen specimens were examined by in-house PCR-microtiter plate hybridization assay for the presence of genital ureaplasmas and mycoplasmas DNA. Semen analysis was assessed according to the guidelines of the World Health Organization. Standard parametric techniques (t-tests) and nonparametric techniques (Wilcoxon tests) were used for statistical analysis. Results The frequency of genital ureaplasmas and mycoplasmas detected in semen samples of infertile men was respectively 19.2% (23/120) and 15.8% (19/120). The frequency of Ureaplasma urealyticum (15%) was higher than that of Mycoplasma hominis (10.8%), Ureaplasma parvum (4.2%) and Mycoplasma genitalium (5%). Mixed species of mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas were detected in 6.7% of semen samples. Comparison of the parameters of the standard semen analysis between the male partners of the infertile couples with and without genital ureaplasmas and mycoplasmas infection showed that the presence of Mycoplasma hominis DNA in semen samples is associated with low sperm concentration (p = 0.007) and abnormal sperm morphology (p = 0.03) and a negative correlation between sperm concentration and the detection of Mycoplasma genitalium in semen samples of infertile men (p = 0.05). The mean values of seminal volume, pH, vitality, motility and leukocyte count were not significantly related either to the detection of genital mycoplasmas DNA or to the detection of ureaplasmas DNA in semen specimens. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that genital mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas seem to be widespread among the male partners of infertile couples in Tunisia. Genital mycoplasmas infections of the male genital tract could negatively influence semen quality. Our results also indicate that PCR-microtiter plate hybridization assay method provides a rapid and effective technique to detect human genital mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas which is useful for etiological and epidemiological studies of these pathogens. PMID:17988404

  8. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis Isolated From Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Azizmohammadi, Sima; Azizmohammadi, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum bring with them an increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as premature membrane rupture, vaginitis and preterm birth. Objectives: The present investigation was carried out to study the prevalence of M. hominis and U. urealyticum in pregnant women and to study their resistance against commonly used antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and fifty high vaginal swabs were taken from pregnant women. Commercial Mycoplasma IST-2 kit was used for bacterial isolation. The results of the kits were confirmed using the PCR. The pattern of antibiotic resistance was determined using the disk diffusion method. Results: Of 350 samples collected, 32 samples (9.14%) were positive for U. urealyticum and 10 samples (2.85%) were positive for M. hominis (P = 0.025). Both U. urealyticum and M. hominis were simultaneously detected in 1.14% of samples. In addition, 40 - 45-year-old pregnant women had the highest levels of U. urealyticum (27.5%), M. hominis (12.5%), and both bacteria (7.5%). U. urealyticum and M. hominis isolates harbored the highest levels of resistance against ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Both isolates were susceptible to pefloxacin, clarithromycin, josamycin, and pristinamycin. Conclusions: According to the direct correlation between the increase in the prevalence rate of genital mycoplasmas and increased age of pregnancy, initially, it is better to prevent pregnancy at older ages, and then, should a pregnancy occur, the highest levels of health cares should be provided to older pregnant women. PMID:26756001

  9. [Cytotoxic activity of melittin expressed by recombinant vectors in Acholeplasma laidlawii and Mycoplasma hominis cells].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, N M; Bevova, M R; Govorun, V M

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant plasmids containing the mellitin gene under the control of the lac and the tetM gene promoters were used for studying cytotoxic activity of mellitin in cells of mollicutes (mycoplasmas) and Escherichia coli. After transformation of Acholeplasma laidlawii and Mycoplasma hominis cells with recombinant plasmid DNAs by electroporation, cell growth was suppressed. The expression of the mellitin gene in A. laidlawii and M. hominis cells was demonstrated using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The possibility of using the mellitin gene in the recombinant vector as a potential antimycoplasmic gene-therapeutic agent with its selective expression in target cells is discussed. PMID:11234424

  10. Hematoma and abscess formation caused by Mycoplasma hominis following cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Hisato; Koshiba, Akemi; Daimon, Yasushi; Noguchi, Toshifumi; Iwasaku, Kazuhiro; Kitawaki, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma species cannot be identified by routine bacteriological culture methods and are resistant to common antimicrobial agents. Mycoplasma hominis usually colonizes the lower urogenital tract and causes pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, chorioamnionitis, rupture of fetal membranes, preterm labor, postpartum fever, postabortal fever, and neonatal infection. This organism is highly prevalent in cervicovaginal cultures of sexually active women. M. hominis, M. genitalis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and U. parvum may invade and infect placental and fetal tissues, leading to adverse pregnancy outcomes. M. hominis occasionally causes nongenitourinary infection of the blood, wounds, central nervous system, joints, or respiratory tract. We present a case of a 27-year-old woman who developed abdominal wound hematoma and abscess after cesarean section. The wound was drained, but her high fever persisted, in spite of antibiotic treatment using flomoxef sodium and imipenemcilastatin sodium. Because the exudate exhibited M. hominis growth in an anaerobic environment, we administered the quinolone ciprofloxacin. This therapy resolved her fever, and her white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level diminished to the normal ranges. To our knowledge, there are four published articles regarding the isolation of M. hominis from postcesarean incisions. Based on the current study and the literature, infection by this pathogen may cause hematoma formation with or without abscess after cesarean section or in immunosuppressed postoperative patients. In such cases, physicians may need to suspect Mycoplasma infection and initiate appropriate antibacterial treatment as soon as possible in order to avoid persistent fever. PMID:21339933

  11. Identification of a gene in Mycoplasma hominis associated with preterm birth and microbial burden in intra-amniotic infection

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Daniels, Matthew J.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Pflugner, Lindsey P.; Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Prestosa, Melissa A.; Koparde, Vishal N.; Brooks, J. Paul; Strauss, Jerome F.; Romero, Roberto; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Eschenbach, David A.; Buck, Gregory A.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity is associated with spontaneous preterm labor and adverse pregnancy outcome, and Mycoplasma hominis often is present. However, the pathogenic process by which M. hominis invades the amniotic cavity and gestational tissues, often resulting in chorioamnionitis and preterm birth, remains unknown. We hypothesized that strains of M. hominis vary genetically with regards to their potential to invade and colonize the amniotic cavity and placenta. Study Design We sequenced the entire genomes of 2 amniotic fluid isolates and a placental isolate of M. hominis from pregnancies that resulted in preterm births and compared them with the previously sequenced genome of the Type strain PG21. We identified genes that were specific to the amniotic fluid/placental isolates. We then determined the microbial burden and the presence of these genes in another set of subjects from whom samples of amniotic fluid had been collected and were positive for M. hominis. Results We identified 2 genes that encode surface-located membrane proteins (Lmp1 and Lmp-like) in the sequenced amniotic fluid/placental isolates that were severely truncated in PG21. We also identified, for the first time, a microbial gene of unknown function that is referred to in this study as gene of interest C that was significantly associated with bacterial burden in amniotic fluid and the risk of preterm delivery in patients with preterm labor. Conclusion A gene in M. hominis was identified that is associated significantly with colonization and/or infection of the upper reproductive tract during pregnancy and with preterm birth. PMID:25637842

  12. Host Cell Responses to Persistent Mycoplasmas - Different Stages in Infection of HeLa Cells with Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Hopfe, Miriam; Deenen, René; Degrandi, Daniel; Köhrer, Karl; Henrich, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a facultative human pathogen primarily associated with bacterial vaginosis and pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is also able to spread to other sites, leading to arthritis or, in neonates, meningitis. With a minimal set of 537 annotated genes, M. hominis is the second smallest self-replicating mycoplasma and thus an ideal model organism for studying the effects of an infectious agent on its host more closely. M. hominis adherence, colonisation and invasion of HeLa cells were characterised in a time-course study using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and microarray-based analysis of the HeLa cell transcriptome. At 4 h post infection, cytoadherence of M. hominis to the HeLa cell surface was accompanied by differential regulation of 723 host genes (>2 fold change in expression). Genes associated with immune responses and signal transduction pathways were mainly affected and components involved in cell-cycle regulation, growth and death were highly upregulated. At 48 h post infection, when mycoplasma invasion started, 1588 host genes were differentially expressed and expression of genes for lysosome-specific proteins associated with bacterial lysis was detected. In a chronically infected HeLa cell line (2 weeks), the proportion of intracellular mycoplasmas reached a maximum of 10% and M. hominis-filled protrusions of the host cell membrane were seen by confocal microscopy, suggesting exocytotic dissemination. Of the 1972 regulated host genes, components of the ECM-receptor interaction pathway and phagosome-related integrins were markedly increased. The immune response was quite different to that at the beginning of infection, with a prominent induction of IL1B gene expression, affecting pathways of MAPK signalling, and genes connected with cytokine-cytokine interactions and apoptosis. These data show for the first time the complex, time-dependent reaction of the host directed at mycoplasmal clearance and the counter measures of this pestering pathogen. PMID:23326599

  13. The presence of Mycoplasma hominis in isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis impacts significantly on DNA fingerprinting results.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J C; Xie, L F; Zhao, L; Fang, S L; Lun, Z R

    2008-03-01

    The genetic characterization of Trichomonas vaginalis (Protista: Trichomonadidae), the causative agent of trichomoniasis in humans, is central to understanding the epidemiology, treatment, drug resistance, and virulence as well as the diagnosis and control of this parasite. Various molecular approaches, including DNA fingerprinting, have been employed for this purpose, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) continues to be utilized. However, little attention has been paid to the fact that some T. vaginalis populations can harbor symbiotic Mycoplasma hominis and/or other agents, which could cause artifacts in the RAPD results. In the present study, we demonstrate clearly that the presence of M. hominis from T. vaginalis isolates impacts significantly on RAPD results and on the subsequent analyses and interpretation of data sets. Moreover, symbiotic M. hominis displays an isolate-to-isolate variability in RAPD profile before elimination, suggesting a variability of M. hominis infection. PMID:18058131

  14. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC)-Instill() with continuous irrigation for the treatment of Mycoplasma hominis mediastinitis.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Saziye; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2015-10-01

    A 56-year-old patient who underwent ascending aorta replacement postoperatively developed mediastinitis with atypical Mycoplasma hominis. We present the first successful treatment of M. hominis mediastinitis after cardiac surgery with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC)-Instill() therapy combined with dilute antiseptic irrigation for bacterial eradication. PMID:24684727

  15. Prevalence of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in High Vaginal Swab Samples of Infertile Females

    PubMed Central

    Seifoleslami, Mehri; Safari, Aghdas; Khayyat Khameneie, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are important causative agents of vaginitis, cervicitis, postpartum sepsis, reproductive infections and infertility in both males and females. Objectives: According to the uncertain prevalence of U. urealyticum and M. hominis in Iranian infertile females, the present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of U. urealyticum and M. hominis in high vaginal swab samples of fertile and infertile females. Patients and Methods: A total of 350 high vaginal swab specimens were taken from fertile and infertile females. Samples were cultured and those that were positive for bacteria were subjected to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for further confirmation. Results: Of the 350 collected samples, eleven were positive for M. hominis (3.14%), fifteen were positive for U. urealyticum (4.28%) and five were positive for both of them (1.42%). Prevalence of U. urealyticum and M. hominis in the high vaginal parts of infertile females was higher than fertile females (P < 0.05). The results of traditional method were also confirmed, using the PCR amplification of urease gene of U. urealyticum and 16SrRNA gene of the M. hominis. Ureaplasma urealyticum and M. hominis had a higher prevalence in the high vaginal samples collected during the summer season. Conclusions: Considerable prevalence of M. hominis and U. urealyticum in the high vaginal swab samples of infertile females compared to the low prevalence in fertile females may suggest that these two pathogens can be cause infertility. Application of the PCR method is recommended for rapid and sensitive detection of M. hominis and U. urealyticum in high vaginal swab samples. PMID:26756000

  16. A case report of Mycoplasma hominis brain abscess identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pailhoriès, H; Rabier, V; Eveillard, M; Mahaza, C; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Chennebault, J-M; Kempf, M; Lemarié, C

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man with a Mycoplasma hominis brain abscess occurring after a cranial trauma, which was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The presence of colonies on classic blood agar plates and the use of MALDI-TOF MS, a valuable diagnostic tool that identified M. hominis due to its presence in the VITEK MS database, allowed the rapid diagnosis of this infection. PMID:25449252

  17. Rapid PCR Detection of Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Ureaplasma parvum

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Scott A.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Rosenblatt, Jon E.; Patel, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We compared laboratory developed real-time PCR assays for detection of Mycoplasma hominis and for detection and differentiation of Ureaplasma urealyticum and parvum to culture using genitourinary specimens submitted for M. hominis and Ureaplasma culture. Methods. 283 genitourinary specimens received in the clinical bacteriology laboratory for M. hominis and Ureaplasma species culture were evaluated. Nucleic acids were extracted using the Total Nucleic Acid Kit on the MagNA Pure 2.0. 5 μL of the extracts were combined with 15 μL of each of the two master mixes. Assays were performed on the LightCycler 480 II system. Culture was performed using routine methods. Results.  M. hominis PCR detected 38/42 M. hominis culture-positive specimens, as well as 2 that were culture negative (sensitivity, 90.5%; specificity, 99.2%). Ureaplasma PCR detected 139/144 Ureaplasma culture-positive specimens, as well as 9 that were culture negative (sensitivity, 96.5%; specificity, 93.6%). Of the specimens that tested positive for Ureaplasma species, U. urealyticum alone was detected in 33, U. parvum alone in 109, and both in 6. Conclusion. The described PCR assays are rapid alternatives to culture for detection of M. hominis and Ureaplasma species, and, unlike culture, the Ureaplasma assay easily distinguishes U. urealyticum from parvum. PMID:26904723

  18. Host and pathogen interaction during vaginal infection by Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma hominis or Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, C; Sluiters, H J; van der Meijden, W I; van Beek, P; Peerbooms, P; Verbrugh, H; van Belkum, A

    2001-05-01

    Vaginal infections by Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma hominis have been shown to be associated. Since M. hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are similar pathogens, both belonging to the class of the mycoplasmata, we describe here a molecular study into the interdependence of U. urealyticum and T. vaginalis during infection. Susceptibility towards infection by U. urealyticum depends on genetic polymorphism in the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) gene. Now, we defined the relation between IL-1RA genotypes and infection by M. hominis and T. vaginalis. Finally, we also developed a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) tool for mapping variation in the T. vaginalis AP33 adhesin in order to define putative associations between parasite subtype and mycoplasmata or host. Studies using crudepellets from T. vaginalis culture broth clearly confirm the association between T. vaginalis and M. hominis infection. The association between IL-1RA genotype 2,2 and lack of U. urealyticum infection is corroborated as well. U. urealyticum infection and infection by T. vaginalis are independent. Furthermore, T. vaginalis and M. hominis infection are not depending on IL-1RA genotypes. Interestingly, one of the three AP33 RFLP types identified appeared to be associated with the absence of U. urealyticum infection. In conclusion, the complex interaction between bacterial and parasitic pathogens and the infected host is determined by genetic characteristics of host and microorganisms involved. PMID:11295198

  19. Symbiosis of Mycoplasma hominis in Trichomonas vaginalis may link metronidazole resistance in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J C; Xie, L F; Fang, S L; Gao, M Y; Zhu, Y; Song, L Y; Zhong, H M; Lun, Z R

    2006-12-01

    Fourteen of 28 Trichomonas vaginalis isolates collected from patients in Guangzhou, China from 2003 to 2004 were found to be naturally infected with Mycoplasma hominis, as determined by PCR using specific primers. In vitro metronidazole sensitivity assay of the 28 isolates revealed four displaying low susceptibility [minimum lethal concentration (MLC)= approximately 13-25 microg/ml] and another four displaying high resistance (MLC=50-100 microg/ml). The overwhelming majority of these resistant isolates (7/8) were mycoplasma-infected. The mean of MLCs of mycoplasma-infected isolates is approximately 10-fold higher than the mean of noninfected isolates (p=0.029). Sequence analyses of PCR-amplified small subunit-large subunit rRNA interspacer regions (ITS1/5.8S/ITS2) revealed that 23 of the 28 samples are identical, the remaining five being separable into two groups, each with a single point mutation. These internal transcribed spacer sequence variants are associated neither with mycoplasma infection nor with drug resistance. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of DNAs using 10 different primers showed that the drug-resistant isolates are clustered together in association with mycoplasma infection, albeit more loosely. Taken together, the results obtained from this study suggest that in vitro metronidazole resistance of T. vaginalis is related to mycoplasma infection of this protozoan. PMID:16847608

  20. Mycoplasma hominis and Gardnerella vaginalis display a significant synergistic relationship in bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Cox, C; Watt, A P; McKenna, J P; Coyle, P V

    2016-03-01

    Gardnerella vaginalis plays an important role in bacterial vaginosis (BV,) while the role of genital Mollicutes is less obvious. The diagnosis of BV by use of the current Gram stain Nugent score is also suboptimal for defining the role of Mollicutes that lack a cell wall. Since bacterial load and diversity is an important prerequisite for BV, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays enable these to be assessed. The purpose of this study was to define the role of genital Mollicutes and potential patterns of synergy with G. vaginalis in women with BV. Vaginal swabs from 130 women categorised by Nugent score as BV (n = 28), intermediate (n = 22) and non-BV (n = 80) were tested against four qPCR TaqMan assays targeting G. vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, M. genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. parvum. Statistical analyses were used to compare bacterial prevalence and load between the three groups of women. Mycoplasma hominis and G. vaginalis co-infection was significantly more common in BV (60.7 %) compared to intermediate (36.4 %) and non-BV (8.8 %) Nugent scores (p < 0.001). Significantly higher loads of M. hominis (p = 0.001) and G. vaginalis (p < 0.001) were detected in women with BV and the respective loads in M. hominis and G. vaginalis co-infections displayed a significant positive correlation (p < 0.001; r = 0.60). No significant associations were seen with the other Mollicutes. The findings strengthen the evidence of a role for M. hominis in BV and a potential synergy with G. vaginalis. This synergy could be an important trigger of the condition and sexual contact the conduit for the transmission of an otherwise commensal bacterium that could initiate it. PMID:26796553

  1. The Alabama Preterm Birth Study: Umbilical Cord Blood Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis Cultures in Very Preterm Newborns

    PubMed Central

    GOLDENBERG, Robert L.; ANDREWS, William W.; GOEPFERT, Alice R.; FAYE-PETERSEN, Ona; CLIVER, Suzanne P.; CARLO, Waldemar A; HAUTH, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the frequency of umbilical cord blood infections with Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in preterm 23 to 32 week births and to determine their association with various obstetric conditions, markers of placental inflammation, and newborn outcomes. Study Design 351 mother/infant dyads with deliveries between 23 and 32 weeks gestational age (GA) who had cord blood cultures for Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis had their medical records abstracted, other placental cultures performed, cord IL-6 levels determined, placentas evaluated histologically, and infant outcomes determined. Results Ureaplasma urealyticum and/or Mycoplasma hominis were present in 23% of cord blood cultures. Positive cultures were more common in infants of nonwhite women (27.9 vs 16.8%, p = 0.016), in women less than 20 years of age, in those undergoing a spontaneous compared to an indicated preterm delivery (34.7 vs 3.2%, p = 0.0001), and in those delivering at earlier gestational ages. Intrauterine infection and inflammation were more common among infants with a positive Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis culture as evidenced by placental cultures for these and other bacteria, elevated cord blood IL-6 levels, and placental histology. Infants with positive cord blood Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis cultures were more likely to have neonatal SIRS (41.3 vs 25.7%, p = 0.007, AOR 1.86, 1.08 3.21) and probably BPD (26.8 vs 10.1%, p = 0.0001, AOR 1.99, 0.91 4.37), but were not significantly different for other neonatal outcomes including RDS, IVH or death. Conclusion Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis cord blood infections are far more common in spontaneous versus indicated preterm deliveries and are strongly associated with markers of acute placental inflammation. Positive cultures are associated with neonatal systemic inflammatory response syndrome and probably bronchopulmonary dysplasia. PMID:18166302

  2. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, S A; Christiansen, G

    1994-01-01

    The homolog of the gyrB gene, which has been reported to be present in the vicinity of the initiation site of replication in bacteria, was mapped on the Mycoplasma hominis genome, and the region was subsequently sequenced. Five open reading frames were identified flanking the gyrB gene, one of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene. PMID:7521872

  3. Microbial and vaginal determinants influencing Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum genital colonization in a population of female patients.

    PubMed

    Leli, Christian; Meucci, Marta; Vento, Simona; D'Al, Francesco; Farinelli, Senia; Perito, Stefano; Bistoni, Francesco; Mencacci, Antonella

    2013-09-01

    Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are associated with chorioamnionitis, preterm delivery and pelvic inflammatory disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible risk factors of co-colonization by M. hominis in patients already colonized by U. urealyticum and compare demographic parameters, vaginal pH and microbiota of women colonized by U. urealyticum or M. hominis. A total of 452 patients positive for U. urealyticum or M. hominis were analysed, 421 (93.1%) of whom were positive for U. urealyticum and 31 (6.9%) for M. hominis. Patients positive for M. hominis compared to patients positive for U. urealyticum were more frequently colonized by Gardnerella vaginalis (71% vs 18.5%; p 0.0001), less frequently by lactobacilli (16.1% vs 61.5%; p 0.0001), and more frequently had a pH value higher than 4.5 (96.8% vs 57%; p 0.0001), all conditions associated to bacterial vaginosis (BV). Logistic regression analysis showed that only G. vaginalis colonization and pH higher than 4.5 were independently related to M. hominis colonization (respectively p 0.0001 and p 0.016). Thus, in women colonized by U. urealyticum, BV is an independent risk factor for M. hominis co-colonization. PMID:24008852

  4. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. associated endocarditis with myocardial necrosis in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) in Manitoba in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Krzysztof M.; Copeland, Shelagh; Postey, Rosemary; Ngeleka, Musangu

    2015-01-01

    Severe endocarditis with myonecrosis, moderate to severe pleural and pericardial effusions, and mild ascites were found on necropsy in 3 alpacas. Mycoplasma hominis ssp. was detected on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fresh affected endocardial tissue in 1 alpaca. PMID:25694661

  5. Ureaplasma parvum or Mycoplasma hominis as sole pathogens cause chorioamnionitis, preterm delivery, and fetal pneumonia in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Novy, Miles J; Duffy, Lynn; Axthelm, Michael K; Sadowsky, Drew W; Witkin, Steven S; Gravett, Michael G; Cassell, Gail H; Waites, Kenneth B

    2009-01-01

    The authors assess causal, cellular and inflammatory links between intraamniotic infection with Ureaplasma parvum or Mycoplasma hominis and preterm labor in a nonhuman primate model. Long-term catheterized rhesus monkeys received intraamniotic inoculations of clinical isolates of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 1, M hominis, media control or physiological saline. Genital mycoplasmas were quantified in amniotic fluid (AF) and documented in fetal tissues by culture and PCR. In association with elevated AF colony counts for U parvum or M hominis, there was a sequential upregulation of AF leukocytes, proinflammatory cytokines, prostaglandin E2 and F2a, metalloproteinase-9 and uterine activity ( P< .05). Fetal membranes and lung were uniformly positive for both microorganisms; fetal blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures and PCR were more often positive for M hominis than U parvum. Histopathologic findings of chorioamnionitis, a systemic fetal inflammatory response and pneumonitis worsen with duration of in utero infection. U parvum or M hominis, as sole pathogens, elicit a robust proinflammatory response which contributes to preterm labor and fetal lung injury. PMID:19122105

  6. Rapid detection of coinfections by Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum by a new multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Nicia; Dess, Daniele; Dessole, Salvatore; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Rappelli, Paola

    2010-05-01

    We developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) assay to simultaneously detect Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum. The test is extremely specific and has a sensitivity of 10 cells for T. vaginalis and U. urealyticum and of 1 cell for M. hominis. The technique was validated on vaginal swabs from 240 women presenting symptoms of vaginitis, and results were compared with data obtained using microscopic and culture techniques on the same patients. The M-PCR revealed to be greatly more sensitive and specific than traditional techniques. It has been well demonstrated, in vitro, that T. vaginalis can establish a symbiosis with M. hominis; our data confirm in vivo this strict association: in fact, M. hominis has been detected in 78.6% of all samples positive for T. vaginalis, as compared to only 4.8% of women without trichomoniasis. The species specificity of this association has been confirmed by the absence of any significant correlation between T. vaginalis and U. urealyticum. PMID:20385350

  7. Rapid detection of Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum, and Ureaplasma urealyticum organisms in genitourinary samples by PCR-microtiter plate hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takashi; Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Deguchi, Takashi; Miyazawa, Takamaro; Ishiko, Hiroaki

    2003-05-01

    We present a method for detecting the presence of Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum, and Ureaplasma urealyticum organisms, which are thought to be associated with nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) and other genitourinary infections, in clinical samples. This method consists of PCR amplification of a part of the 16S rRNA gene followed by 96-well microtiter plate hybridization assay using four species-specific capture probes to detect the targets. To test the efficacy of this method, we applied it to the detection of the four species in the urine of patients with NGU. There were no cross-reactions with other human mycoplasmas or ureaplasmas, and the PCR-microtiter plate hybridization assay detected as few as 10 copies of the 16S rRNA gene of each of the four species. Based on these results, this PCR-microtiter plate hybridization assay can be considered an effective tool for the diagnosis of genitourinary infections with mycoplasmas or ureaplasmas. PMID:12734216

  8. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Dolzhikova, Inna V.; Shcherbinin, Dmitry N.; Zubkova, Olga V.; Ivanova, Tatiana I.; Tukhvatulin, Amir I.; Shmarov, Maxim M.; Logunov, Denis Y.; Naroditsky, Boris S.; Gintsburg, Aleksandr L.

    2016-01-01

    Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies) is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh), for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection. PMID:26962869

  9. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed

    Burmistrova, Daria A; Tillib, Sergey V; Shcheblyakov, Dmitry V; Dolzhikova, Inna V; Shcherbinin, Dmitry N; Zubkova, Olga V; Ivanova, Tatiana I; Tukhvatulin, Amir I; Shmarov, Maxim M; Logunov, Denis Y; Naroditsky, Boris S; Gintsburg, Aleksandr L

    2016-01-01

    Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies) is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh), for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection. PMID:26962869

  10. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma spp., Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma hominis among outpatients in central Greece: absence of tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) over a 4-year period study

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomidis, A.; Venetis, C.; Georgantzis, D.; Giaslakiotis, V.; Kolovos, V.; Efstathiou, K.; Moschou, M.; ?outsiaris, ?.; Panopoulou, M.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 301 men and women attending local urologists and gynaecologists in the state of Thessaly, central Greece, were tested for Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma spp., Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma hominis DNA. Investigation of the tet(M) gene, which confers tetracycline resistance in these genera, was also performed. Low incidence of C.trachomatis and Mycoplasma spp. as well as high prevalence of Ureaplasma spp., especially among women, were found. The tet(M) gene was absent in all cases, notably in a region where doxycycline administration remains the first therapeutic option unless special medical conditions direct otherwise. PMID:26862428

  11. Characteristics of Mycoplasma strains isolated from stallion semen.

    PubMed

    Zgrniak-Nowosielska, I; Kosiniak, K; Slagowska, A

    1985-01-01

    Eleven mycoplasma strains were isolated from the semen of 24 stallions. Eight of these strains were identified as Mycoplasma equigenitalium. Three strains which hydrolized arginine could not be identified. The growth inhibition test with immune sera against M. arginini and M. equirhinis was negative. Antibiotic sensitivity test showed that all strains were sensitive to four antibiotic of tetracycline group (oxytetracyclin, minocycline, transcycline and vibramycin). Lincomycin and gentamycin appeared to be the most active against all the strains. Comparative analysis of routine semen examination did not reveal any difference between ejaculates infected with mycoplasma and free of these organisms. However, the levels of certain biochemical components of the semen plasma (glycerylphosphorylcholine, ergothioneine, fructose and of the semen plasma (glycerylphosphorylcholine, ergothioneine, fructose and total protein) from mycoplasma-positive ejaculates were significantly lower than in the semen plasma from mycoplasma free ejaculates. PMID:3833120

  12. Genomic Analysis of Blastocystis hominis Strains Isolated from Two Long-Term Health Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Hisao; Abe, Niichiro; Iwasawa, Mizue; Kitano, Syoko; Nagano, Isao; Wu, Zhiliang; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2000-01-01

    The genotype Blastocystis hominis is highly polymorphic. Therefore, a genetic marker would be a powerful tool for the identification or classification of B. hominis subtypes and could be used as a means to resolve the transmission route or origin of the parasite. To this end, 32 B. hominis isolates were collected from patients and/or staff members of two long-term health care facilities (facilities A and B), and these organisms were subjected to genotype analysis based on diagnostic PCR primers and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of small subunit rRNA gene (rDNA). Based on PCR amplification using diagnostic primers which were developed from randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of known strains of B. hominis, the 32 isolates of B. hominis were classified into three different subtypes. Thirty isolates, including twenty-four that were isolated from patients and a staff member, from facility A and all isolates isolated from six patients from facility B showed the same genotype. Two of six patients of facility B had been transferred from facility A, and these two patients also had the same-genotype B. hominis that corresponded to 24 isolates from facility A. This genotype strain may have been transmitted by these two patients from facility A to facility B, suggesting human-to-human transmission. In contrast, 2 of 26 isolates from facility A showed distinct genotypes, suggesting that the colonization by these two isolates is attributable to another infectious route. These different subtypes were subjected to RFLP analysis, and the RFLP profiles were correlated with the results obtained by diagnostic PCR primers. This study presents the first molecular evidence of possible human-to-human B. hominis infection between and/or among two small communities. PMID:10747102

  13. Biochemical diversity of Mycoplasma fermentans strains.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, S A; Miles, R

    1999-07-01

    In this study, the metabolism of a diverse range of Mycoplasma fermentans strains was investigated. It was shown that the ability to utilise glucose, fructose and N-acetylglucosamine differentiated strains, and that the patterns and kinetics of substrate utilisation were correlated with the site of isolation, i.e. joint fluid, respiratory tract, urinary tract or cell culture. Interestingly, isolates from the urogenital tract of AIDS patients used fructose in preference to glucose. There was also some correlation of fructose and N-acetylglucosamine utilisation of isolates with M. fermentans sub-groups, identified in an independent study, and based on the distribution of insertion sequence-like elements in the M. fermentans genome. PMID:10418144

  14. Diversity of Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates from Bordeaux, France, as assessed by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hominis is an opportunistic human mycoplasma species that can cause various urogenital infections and, less frequently, extragenital infections. The objective of this work was to study the genetic diversity of this species using a molecular typing method based on multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). Results The genome content of M. hominis PG21 was analysed for tandem repeats (TRs), and five of the 130 TRs identified were selected for use in an MLVA assay. The method was based on GeneScan analysis of VNTR loci using multiplex PCR with fluorescent dyes and resolution by capillary electrophoresis. This approach was used on a collection of 210 urogenital and extragenital French clinical isolates collected between 1987 and 2009. Forty MLVA types were found. The discriminatory index of our MLVA scheme was 0.924. Using this new typing tool, persistent infection was suggested for six patients and new infection for one patient. Furthermore, mother-to-child transmission was confirmed in the two cases studied. Application of MLVA to a wide range of M. hominis isolates revealed high genotypic diversity and no obvious link between the MLVA type and the isolate year of collection, the patient’s age or sex, the anatomical origin of the isolates or resistance to antibiotics was found. Conclusions Our MLVA scheme highlights the high genetic heterogeneity of the M. hominis species. It seems too discriminatory to be used for large epidemiological studies but has proven its usefulness for molecular studies at the individual level. PMID:23710536

  15. Mycoplasma hominis infection of Trichomonas vaginalis is not associated with metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis in clinical isolates from the United States.

    PubMed

    Butler, Sara E; Augostini, Peter; Secor, W Evan

    2010-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that is the cause of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease, trichomoniasis. Metronidazole and tinidazole are the only drugs approved for treatment of T. vaginalis infections in the USA. However, drug resistance exists and some patients are allergic to these medications. Furthermore, the exact mechanism of metronidazole resistance remains undefined and current testing methods require several weeks before results are available. Identification of the mechanism of drug resistance may lead to the development of molecular tools to detect drug resistance, and quicker results for clinical treatment. In a recent study, Chinese T. vaginalis isolates that were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for Mycoplasma hominis DNA demonstrated greater in vitro resistance to metronidazole than isolates with no evidence of M. hominis infection. To evaluate this finding in isolates from a distinct epidemiologic setting, we tested 55 T. vaginalis isolates collected from patients in the USA through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention metronidazole susceptibility testing service. One half of the isolates demonstrated resistance to metronidazole by an in vitro sensitivity assay. Of the metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis isolates, 18% were PCR positive for M. hominis, as were 22% of the metronidazole-susceptible T. vaginalis isolates (p = 0.746). We also observed no change in metronidazole sensitivity of two infected T. vaginalis isolates after they were cleared of their M. hominis infection by culturing the isolates in antibiotics. Thus, M. hominis infection of USA T. vaginalis isolates did not correlate with in vitro resistance to metronidazole. PMID:20652315

  16. Swine and Poultry Pathogens: the Complete Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a Strain of Mycoplasma synoviae

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R.; Ferreira, Henrique B.; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Carvalho, Marcos O.; Pinto, Paulo M.; Almeida, Darcy F.; Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Almeida, Rosana; Alves-Filho, Leonardo; Assuno, Enedina N.; Azevedo, Vasco A. C.; Bogo, Maurcio R.; Brigido, Marcelo M.; Brocchi, Marcelo; Burity, Helio A.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Camargo, Sandro S.; Carepo, Marta S.; Carraro, Dirce M.; de Mattos Cascardo, Jlio C.; Castro, Luiza A.; Cavalcanti, Gisele; Chemale, Gustavo; Collevatti, Rosane G.; Cunha, Cristina W.; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; Dambrs, Bibiana P.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Falco, Clarissa; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Felipe, Maria S. S.; Fiorentin, Laurimar; Franco, Gloria R.; Freitas, Nara S. A.; Fras, Diego; Grangeiro, Thalles B.; Grisard, Edmundo C.; Guimares, Claudia T.; Hungria, Mariangela; Jardim, Slvia N.; Krieger, Marco A.; Laurino, Jomar P.; Lima, Lucymara F. A.; Lopes, Maryellen I.; Loreto, lgion L. S.; Madeira, Humberto M. F.; Manfio, Gilson P.; Maranho, Andrea Q.; Martinkovics, Christyanne T.; Medeiros, Slvia R. B.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Neiva, Mrcia; Ramalho-Neto, Cicero E.; Nicols, Marisa F.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Paixo, Roger F. C.; Pedrosa, Fbio O.; Pena, Srgio D. J.; Pereira, Maristela; Pereira-Ferrari, Lilian; Piffer, Itamar; Pinto, Luciano S.; Potrich, Deise P.; Salim, Anna C. M.; Santos, Fabrcio R.; Schmitt, Renata; Schneider, Maria P. C.; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene S.; Schuck, Adriana F.; Seuanez, Hector N.; Silva, Denise W.; Silva, Rosane; Silva, Srgio C.; Soares, Clia M. A.; Souza, Kelly R. L.; Souza, Rangel C.; Staats, Charley C.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.; Urmenyi, Turan P.; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Zuccherato, Luciana W.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2005-01-01

    This work reports the results of analyses of three complete mycoplasma genomes, a pathogenic (7448) and a nonpathogenic (J) strain of the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a strain of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae; the genome sizes of the three strains were 920,079 bp, 897,405 bp, and 799,476 bp, respectively. These genomes were compared with other sequenced mycoplasma genomes reported in the literature to examine several aspects of mycoplasma evolution. Strain-specific regions, including integrative and conjugal elements, and genome rearrangements and alterations in adhesin sequences were observed in the M. hyopneumoniae strains, and all of these were potentially related to pathogenicity. Genomic comparisons revealed that reduction in genome size implied loss of redundant metabolic pathways, with maintenance of alternative routes in different species. Horizontal gene transfer was consistently observed between M. synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Our analyses indicated a likely transfer event of hemagglutinin-coding DNA sequences from M. gallisepticum to M. synoviae. PMID:16077101

  17. Swine and poultry pathogens: the complete genome sequences of two strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a strain of Mycoplasma synoviae.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Ferreira, Henrique B; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Bonatto, Sandro L; Carvalho, Marcos O; Pinto, Paulo M; Almeida, Darcy F; Almeida, Luiz G P; Almeida, Rosana; Alves-Filho, Leonardo; Assuno, Enedina N; Azevedo, Vasco A C; Bogo, Maurcio R; Brigido, Marcelo M; Brocchi, Marcelo; Burity, Helio A; Camargo, Anamaria A; Camargo, Sandro S; Carepo, Marta S; Carraro, Dirce M; de Mattos Cascardo, Jlio C; Castro, Luiza A; Cavalcanti, Gisele; Chemale, Gustavo; Collevatti, Rosane G; Cunha, Cristina W; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; Dambrs, Bibiana P; Dellagostin, Odir A; Falco, Clarissa; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Felipe, Maria S S; Fiorentin, Laurimar; Franco, Gloria R; Freitas, Nara S A; Fras, Diego; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Grisard, Edmundo C; Guimares, Claudia T; Hungria, Mariangela; Jardim, Slvia N; Krieger, Marco A; Laurino, Jomar P; Lima, Lucymara F A; Lopes, Maryellen I; Loreto, Elgion L S; Madeira, Humberto M F; Manfio, Gilson P; Maranho, Andrea Q; Martinkovics, Christyanne T; Medeiros, Slvia R B; Moreira, Miguel A M; Neiva, Mrcia; Ramalho-Neto, Cicero E; Nicols, Marisa F; Oliveira, Sergio C; Paixo, Roger F C; Pedrosa, Fbio O; Pena, Srgio D J; Pereira, Maristela; Pereira-Ferrari, Lilian; Piffer, Itamar; Pinto, Luciano S; Potrich, Deise P; Salim, Anna C M; Santos, Fabrcio R; Schmitt, Renata; Schneider, Maria P C; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene S; Schuck, Adriana F; Seuanez, Hector N; Silva, Denise W; Silva, Rosane; Silva, Srgio C; Soares, Clia M A; Souza, Kelly R L; Souza, Rangel C; Staats, Charley C; Steffens, Maria B R; Teixeira, Santuza M R; Urmenyi, Turan P; Vainstein, Marilene H; Zuccherato, Luciana W; Simpson, Andrew J G; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2005-08-01

    This work reports the results of analyses of three complete mycoplasma genomes, a pathogenic (7448) and a nonpathogenic (J) strain of the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a strain of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae; the genome sizes of the three strains were 920,079 bp, 897,405 bp, and 799,476 bp, respectively. These genomes were compared with other sequenced mycoplasma genomes reported in the literature to examine several aspects of mycoplasma evolution. Strain-specific regions, including integrative and conjugal elements, and genome rearrangements and alterations in adhesin sequences were observed in the M. hyopneumoniae strains, and all of these were potentially related to pathogenicity. Genomic comparisons revealed that reduction in genome size implied loss of redundant metabolic pathways, with maintenance of alternative routes in different species. Horizontal gene transfer was consistently observed between M. synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Our analyses indicated a likely transfer event of hemagglutinin-coding DNA sequences from M. gallisepticum to M. synoviae. PMID:16077101

  18. Proteomic analysis of Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The persistence and displacement abilities of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F (F-strain) are well documented. Understanding the mechanism(s) of colonization and persistence of F-strain will aid in the current intervention strategies to diagnose and control MG infections in poultry. In ...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma synoviae Strain WVU 1853T

    PubMed Central

    Kutish, Gerald F.; Barbet, Anthony F.; Michaels, Dina L.

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid sequence assembly of the complete Mycoplasma synoviae type strain WVU 1853T genome was compared to that of strain MS53. The findings support prior conclusions about M. synoviae, based on the genome of that otherwise uncharacterized field strain, and provide the first evidence of epigenetic modifications in M. synoviae. PMID:26021934

  20. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline. PMID:8452363

  1. Heterogeneity among strains of Mycoplasma granularum and identification of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, sp. n.

    PubMed

    Ross, R F; Karmon, J A

    1970-09-01

    Twelve filtrable, pleomorphic organisms isolated from swine joints and respiratory tracts had typical colonial and microscopic characteristics of mycoplasmas. They resisted penicillin and did not revert to cell wall-producing bacterial forms in media devoid of bacterial inhibitors. The morphological and growth characteristics of these mycoplasmas were similar to those described previously for Mycoplasma granularum. However, a new name, M. hyosynoviae, is proposed for them since they differed biologically, serologically, and electrophoretically from the prototype strain of M. granularum. M. hyosynoviae required sterols, was stimulated by gastric mucin, and metabolized arginine; however, it did not metabolize urea, ferment glucose, or reduce tetrazolium. The organism produced "film and spots" on horse serum-supplemented medium and produced alpha hemolysis of guinea pig and sheep erythrocytes; however, it did not digest serum, produce phosphatase, or hemadsorb guinea pig or swine erythrocytes. M. hyosynoviae was distinguished from three other swine mycoplasmas, M. granularum, M. hyorhinis, and M. laidlawii, by means of acrylamide gel electrophoresis, growth inhibition, metabolic inhibition, and immunodiffusion techniques. It was also serologically and electrophoretically distinct from 13 additional non-swine mycoplasmas which require sterols and metabolize arginine. PMID:4991614

  2. Heterogeneity Among Strains of Mycoplasma granularum and Identification of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, sp. n

    PubMed Central

    Ross, R. F.; Karmon, Judith A.

    1970-01-01

    Twelve filtrable, pleomorphic organisms isolated from swine joints and respiratory tracts had typical colonial and microscopic characteristics of mycoplasmas. They resisted penicillin and did not revert to cell wall-producing bacterial forms in media devoid of bacterial inhibitors. The morphological and growth characteristics of these mycoplasmas were similar to those described previously for Mycoplasma granularum. However, a new name, M. hyosynoviae, is proposed for them since they differed biologically, serologically, and electrophoretically from the prototype strain of M. granularum. M. hyosynoviae required sterols, was stimulated by gastric mucin, and metabolized arginine; however, it did not metabolize urea, ferment glucose, or reduce tetrazolium. The organism produced film and spots on horse serum-supplemented medium and produced alpha hemolysis of guinea pig and sheep erythrocytes; however, it did not digest serum, produce phosphatase, or hemadsorb guinea pig or swine erythrocytes. M. hyosynoviae was distinguished from three other swine mycoplasmas, M. granularum, M. hyorhinis, and M. laidlawii, by means of acrylamide gel electrophoresis, growth inhibition, metabolic inhibition, and immunodiffusion techniques. It was also serologically and electrophoretically distinct from 13 additional non-swine mycoplasmas which require sterols and metabolize arginine. Images PMID:4991614

  3. Highly specific and efficient primers for in-house multiplex PCR detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although sophisticated methodologies are available, the use of endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect 16S rDNA genes remains a good approach for estimating the incidence and prevalence of specific infections and for monitoring infections. Considering the importance of the early diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), the development of a sensitive and affordable method for identifying pathogens in clinical samples is needed. Highly specific and efficient primers for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) system were designed in silico to detect the 16S rDNA genes of four bacteria that cause genital infections, and the PCR method was developed. Methods The Genosensor Probe Designer (GPD) (version 1.0a) software was initially used to design highly specific and efficient primers for in-house m-PCR. Single-locus PCR reactions were performed and standardised, and then primers for each locus in turn were added individually in subsequent amplifications until m-PCR was achieved. Amplicons of the expected size were obtained from each of the four bacterial gene fragments. Finally, the analytical specificity and limits of detection were tested. Results Because they did not amplify any product from non-STI tested species, the primers were specific. The detection limits for the Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum primer sets were 5.12??105, 3.9??103, 61.19??106 and 6.37??105 copies of a DNA template, respectively. Conclusions The methodology designed and standardised here could be applied satisfactorily for the simultaneous or individual detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. This method is at least as efficient as other previously described methods; however, this method is more affordable for low-income countries. PMID:24997675

  4. Genome Sequence of a Mycoplasma meleagridis Field Strain.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ticiana S; Bertolotti, Luigi; Catania, Salvatore; Pourquier, Philippe; Rosati, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma meleagridis is a major cause of disease and economic loss in turkeys. Here, we report the genome sequence of an M. meleagridis field strain, which enlarges the knowledge about this bacterium and helps the identification of possible coding sequences for drug resistance genes and specific antigens. PMID:26941131

  5. Genome Sequence of a Mycoplasma meleagridis Field Strain

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotti, Luigi; Catania, Salvatore; Pourquier, Philippe; Rosati, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma meleagridis is a major cause of disease and economic loss in turkeys. Here, we report the genome sequence of an M. meleagridis field strain, which enlarges the knowledge about this bacterium and helps the identification of possible coding sequences for drug resistance genes and specific antigens. PMID:26941131

  6. Phylogenetic relationships of the porcine mycoplasmas Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and Mycoplasma hyopharyngis.

    PubMed

    Blank, W A; Erickson, B Z; Stemke, G W

    1996-10-01

    The phylogenetic positions of the porcine mycoplasmas Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and Mycoplasma hyopharyngis were determined by using PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences. M. hyosynoviae is a member of the Mycoplasma hominis group, while M. hyopharyngis belongs to the Mycoplasma fermentans group of mollicutes. Neither species is closely related to previously characterized porcine mycoplasmas belonging to the Mycoplasma hyorhinis group. PMID:8863455

  7. Amplified-fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting of Mycoplasma species.

    PubMed

    Kokotovic, B; Friis, N F; Jensen, J S; Ahrens, P

    1999-10-01

    Amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a whole-genome fingerprinting method based on selective amplification of restriction fragments. The potential of the method for the characterization of mycoplasmas was investigated in a total of 50 strains of human and animal origin, including Mycoplasma genitalium (n = 11), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 5), Mycoplasma hominis (n = 5), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (n = 9), Myco plasma flocculare (n = 5), Mycoplasma hyosynoviae (n = 10), and Mycoplasma dispar (n = 5). AFLP templates were prepared by the digestion of mycoplasmal DNA with BglII and MfeI restriction endonucleases and subsequent ligation of corresponding site-specific adapters. The amplification of AFLP templates with a single set of nonselective primers resulted in reproducible fingerprints of approximately 60 to 80 fragments in the size range of 50 to 500 bp. The method was able to discriminate the analyzed strains at species and intraspecies levels as well. Each of the tested Mycoplasma species developed a banding pattern entirely different from those obtained from other species under analysis. Subtle intraspecies genomic differences were detected among strains of all of the Mycoplasma species analyzed. The extent of polymorphism varied markedly between the analyzed mycoplasmas, comprising pattern similarity levels from 61.7% detected among M. dispar strains to 95.9% detected among M. genitalium strains. The results of the present study provide evidence of the high discriminatory power of AFLP analysis, suggesting the possible applicability of this method to the molecular characterization of mycoplasmas. PMID:10488196

  8. Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism Fingerprinting of Mycoplasma Species

    PubMed Central

    Kokotovic, Branko; Friis, Niels F.; Jensen, Jrgen S.; Ahrens, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a whole-genome fingerprinting method based on selective amplification of restriction fragments. The potential of the method for the characterization of mycoplasmas was investigated in a total of 50 strains of human and animal origin, including Mycoplasma genitalium (n = 11), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 5), Mycoplasma hominis (n = 5), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (n = 9), Myco plasma flocculare (n = 5), Mycoplasma hyosynoviae (n = 10), and Mycoplasma dispar (n = 5). AFLP templates were prepared by the digestion of mycoplasmal DNA with BglII and MfeI restriction endonucleases and subsequent ligation of corresponding site-specific adapters. The amplification of AFLP templates with a single set of nonselective primers resulted in reproducible fingerprints of approximately 60 to 80 fragments in the size range of 50 to 500 bp. The method was able to discriminate the analyzed strains at species and intraspecies levels as well. Each of the tested Mycoplasma species developed a banding pattern entirely different from those obtained from other species under analysis. Subtle intraspecies genomic differences were detected among strains of all of the Mycoplasma species analyzed. The extent of polymorphism varied markedly between the analyzed mycoplasmas, comprising pattern similarity levels from 61.7% detected among M. dispar strains to 95.9% detected among M. genitalium strains. The results of the present study provide evidence of the high discriminatory power of AFLP analysis, suggesting the possible applicability of this method to the molecular characterization of mycoplasmas. PMID:10488196

  9. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus hominis strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Szczuka, Ewa; Makowska, Nicoletta; Bosacka, Karolina; Słotwińska, Anna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the most frequently isolated bacteria from the blood and the predominant cause of nosocomial infections. Macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics, especially erythromycin and clindamycin, are important therapeutic agents in the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci infections. Among CoNS, Staphylococcus hominis represents the third most common organism. In spite of its clinical significance, very little is known about its mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics, especially MLSB. Fifty-five S. hominis isolates from the blood and the surgical wounds of hospitalized patients were studied. The erm(C) gene was predominant in erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates. The methylase genes, erm(A) and erm(B), were present in 15 and 25 % of clinical isolates, respectively. A combination of various erythromycin resistance methylase (erm) genes was detected in 15 % S. hominis isolates. The efflux gene msr(A) was detected in 18 % of isolates, alone in four isolates, and in different combinations in a further six. The lnu(A) gene, responsible for enzymatic inactivation of lincosamides was carried by 31 % of the isolates. No erythromycin resistance that could not be attributed to the genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C) and msr(A) was detected. In S. hominis, 75 and 84 %, respectively, were erythromycin resistant and clindamycin susceptible. Among erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates, 68 % of these strains showed the inducible MLSB phenotype. Four isolates harbouring the msr(A) genes alone displayed the MSB phenotype. These studies indicated that resistance to MLSB in S. hominis is mostly based on the ribosomal target modification mechanism mediated by erm genes, mainly the erm(C), and enzymatic drug inactivation mediated by lnu(A). PMID:26253583

  10. MLVA typing of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and field strains.

    PubMed

    Tamiozzo, P; Zamora, R; Lucchesi, P M A; Estanguet, A; Parada, J; Carranza, A; Camacho, P; Ambrogi, A

    2015-01-01

    Because of the lack of information about both the genetic characteristics of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae commercial vaccines and their relationship with field strains, the authors attempted to identify genetic subtypes of some M hyopneumoniae bacterins, and to compare them with M. hyopneumoniae field strains. Six commercial M hyopneumoniae bacterins and 28 bronchoalveolar lavages from pigs at slaughter from three herds were analysed by Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) on p146R1, p146R3, H4, H5 and p95 loci. The results obtained showed the presence of more than one M hyopneumoniae genotype in some pigs and also in one of the bacterins analysed. It is also worth noting that MLVA typing allowed the distinction among circulating field strains and also when comparing them with vaccine strains, which, knowing the relatedness among them, could be useful in the research of the efficacy of the vaccines. PMID:26495127

  11. MLVA typing of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and field strains

    PubMed Central

    Tamiozzo, P.; Zamora, R.; Lucchesi, P. M. A.; Estanguet, A.; Parada, J.; Carranza, A.; Camacho, P.; Ambrogi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the lack of information about both the genetic characteristics of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae commercial vaccines and their relationship with field strains, the authors attempted to identify genetic subtypes of some M hyopneumoniae bacterins, and to compare them with M. hyopneumoniae field strains. Six commercial M hyopneumoniae bacterins and 28 bronchoalveolar lavages from pigs at slaughter from three herds were analysed by Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) on p146R1, p146R3, H4, H5 and p95 loci. The results obtained showed the presence of more than one M hyopneumoniae genotype in some pigs and also in one of the bacterins analysed. It is also worth noting that MLVA typing allowed the distinction among circulating field strains and also when comparing them with vaccine strains, which, knowing the relatedness among them, could be useful in the research of the efficacy of the vaccines. PMID:26495127

  12. Electrophoretic Analysis of Cell Proteins of T-Strain Mycoplasmas Isolated from Man

    PubMed Central

    Razin, S.; Valdesuso, J.; Purcell, R. H.; Chanock, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Electrophoretic patterns of the cell proteins of 12 T-strain mycoplasmas isolated from man showed a remarkable similarity. This finding suggests that these strains are genetically closely related and supports their classification in a single species. PMID:5482398

  13. Electrophoretic analysis of cell proteins of T-strain mycoplasmas isolated from man.

    PubMed

    Razin, S; Valdesuso, J; Purcell, R H; Chanock, R M

    1970-09-01

    Electrophoretic patterns of the cell proteins of 12 T-strain mycoplasmas isolated from man showed a remarkable similarity. This finding suggests that these strains are genetically closely related and supports their classification in a single species. PMID:5482398

  14. Effects of vaccination with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum on egg production and quality parameters of commercial layer hens previously vaccinated with 6/85-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of overlaying (revaccinating) F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) at 22 or 45 weeks of age on commercial leghorn hens previously vaccinated with 6/85 strain MG at 10 weeks of age. The treatment groups include unvaccinated hens (group 1), hens r...

  15. Decontamination of mycoplasma-contaminated Orientia tsutsugamushi strains by repeating passages through cell cultures with antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasmas-contamination of Orientia tsutsugamushi, one of the obligated intracellular bacteria, is a very serious problem in in vitro studies using cell cultures because mycoplasmas have significant influence on the results of scientific studies. Only a recommended decontamination method is to passage the contaminated O. tsutsugamushi strains through mice to eliminate only mycoplasmas under influence of their immunity. However, this method sometimes does not work especially for low virulent strains of O. tsutsugamushi which are difficult to propagate in mice. In this study, we tried to eliminate mycoplasmas contaminants from both high virulent and low virulent strains of the contaminated O. tsutsugamushi by repeating passage through cell cultures with antibiotics in vitro. Results We cultured a contaminated, high virulent strain of O. tsutsugamushi using a mouse lung fibroblasts cell line, L-929 cell in the culture medium containing lincomycin at various concentrations and repeated passages about every seven days. At the passage 5 only with 10 ?g/ml of lincomycin, we did not detect mycoplasmas by two PCR based methods whereas O. tsutsugamushi continued good growth. During following four passages without lincomycin, mycoplasmas did not recover. These results suggested that mycoplasmas were completely eliminated from the high virulent strain of O. tsutsugamushi. Furthermore, by the same procedures with 10 ?g/ml of lincomycin, we also eliminated mycoplasmas from a contaminated, low virulent strain of O. tsutsugamushi. Our additional assay showed that 50 ?g/ml of lyncomycin did not inhibit the growth of O. tsutsugamushi, although MICs of many mycoplasmas contaminants were less than 6 ?g/ml as shown previously. Conclusion Our results showed an alternative method to eliminate mycoplasmas from the contaminated O. tsutsugamushi strains in place of in vivo passage through mice. Especially this notable method works for the decontamination not only from the high virulent strain also from the low virulent strain of O. tsutsugamushi. For further elimination, lincomycin at the limit concentration, which does not inhibit the growth of O. tsutsugamushi, can possibly eliminate most mycoplasmas from contaminated O. tsutsugamushi strains. PMID:23394970

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of seven Mycoplasma hyosynoviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Bumgardner, Eric A; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Bumgarner, Roger E; Lawrence, Paulraj K

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Mycoplasma hyosynoviae can result in debilitating arthritis in pigs, particularly those aged 10 weeks or older. Strategies for controlling this pathogen are becoming increasingly important due to the rise in the number of cases of arthritis that have been attributed to infection in recent years. In order to begin to develop interventions to prevent arthritis caused by M. hyosynoviae, more information regarding the specific proteins and potential virulence factors that its genome encodes was needed. However, the genome of this emerging swine pathogen had not been sequenced previously. In this report, we present a comparative analysis of the genomes of seven strains of M. hyosynoviae isolated from different locations in North America during the years 2010 to 2013. We identified several putative virulence factors that may contribute to the ability of this pathogen to adhere to host cells. Additionally, we discovered several prophage genes present within the genomes of three strains that show significant similarity to MAV1, a phage isolated from the related species, M. arthritidis. We also identified CRISPR-Cas and type III restriction and modification systems present in two strains that may contribute to their ability to defend against phage infection. PMID:25693846

  17. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase activity in two strains of Mycoplasma fermentans and in Mycoplasma pirum.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, S; Maor, R; Priel, E

    1997-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases (topos) are essential enzymes that participate in many cellular processes involving DNA. The presence of the DNA-gyrase genes in various mycoplasmas has been reported elsewhere. However, the characterization of DNA topo activity in mycoplasmas has not been previously undertaken. In this study, we characterized the topo activity in extracts of Mycoplasma fermentans K7 and incognitus and in Mycoplasma pirum, as well as in partially purified extract of M. fermentans K7. The topo activity in these microorganisms had the following properties. (i) The relaxation of supercoiled DNA was ATP dependent. (ii) ATP independent relaxation activity was not detected. (iii) Supercoiling of relaxed topoisomers was not observed. (iv) The relaxation activity was inhibited by DNA gyrase and topo IV antagonists (novobiocin and oxolinic acid) and by eukaryotic topo II (m-AMSA [4'-(9-acridylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide]) and topo I antagonists (camptothecin). Other eukaryotic topo II antagonists (teniposide and etoposide) did not affect the topo relaxation activity. (v) Two polypeptides of 66 and 180 kDa were found to be associated with the mycoplasma topo activity. These results suggest that the properties of the topo enzyme in these mycoplasma species resemble those of the bacterial topo IV and the eukaryotic and the bacteriophage T4 topo II. The findings that mycoplasma topo is inhibited by both eukaryotic topo II and topo I antagonists and that m-AMSA and camptothecin inhibited the growth of M. fermentans K7 in culture support our conclusion that these mycoplasma species have topo with unique properties. PMID:9352909

  18. Differentiation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strains ts-11 and 6/85 from commonly used Mycoplasma gallisepticum challenge strains by PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses within the poultry layer industry. In an effort to develop tools to aid in MG research and diagnostics, we have compared available sequences of the attenuated MG vaccine strain ts-11 to those of commonl...

  19. A comparative study of live attenuated F strain-derived Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  20. Chronological development of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infections in cultures of a swine synovial cell strain.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, L N; Frey, M L; Ross, R F

    1972-04-01

    The sequential development of Mycroplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae was observed in cultures of a swine synovial fluid cell strain. An early transitory filamentous phase was observed with M. hyorhinis infection followed by the development of cell-associated, relatively large, round structures and some ring forms. Infection with M. hyorhinis was characterized by a generalized distribution of the organism and a severe cytopathic effect. Infection with M. hyosynoviae was represented by the development of circumscribed foci of small pleomorphic structures and a milder effect on the cells. At a high multiplicity of infection, this organism became associated with the cytoplasmic membranes of the cells. PMID:4259928

  1. Differential and strain-specific triggering of bovine alveolar macrophage effector functions by mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Jungi, T W; Krampe, M; Sileghem, M; Griot, C; Nicolet, J

    1996-12-01

    Mycoplasma strains being considered as pathogenic or non-pathogenic for cattle were tested on their capacity to activate bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro. Of particular interest was the behaviour of Mycoplasma mycoides ssp. mycoides small colony type (M.m.m. SC), the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). Increases in procoagulant activity (PCA), tumor necrosis factor-alpha- (TNF-alpha) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) generation were tested. To minimize an influence of macrophage activation by mycoplasma growth media, mycoplasmas were cultured on embryonic calf nose epithelial cells. The three macrophage functions tested were not correlated, but were differentially induced in strain-specific manner. Four out of seven strains induced PCA, regardless of pathogenicity, and all strains promoted moderate NO generation at high concentrations. All tested M.m.m. SC strains (Afad, L2 and PG1), and the pathogenic M. bovis, induced TNF-alpha production at low concentrations (10(6) colony forming units per ml). M.sp. serogroup 7 and the non-pathogenic M. bovirhinis and Acholeplasma laidlawii did not induce TNF-alpha up to 10(8) cfu/ml. Thus, strain-specific differences are reflected in differential macrophage activation patterns. The findings are consistent with an important role for TNF-alpha in pathogenesis of CBPP. PMID:8971688

  2. Collaborative study report: evaluation of the ATCC experimental mycoplasma reference strains panel prepared for comparison of NAT-based and conventional mycoplasma detection methods.

    PubMed

    Dabrazhynetskaya, Alena; Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Lin, Tsai-Lien; Beck, Brian; Gupta, Rajesh K; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    The main goal of this collaborative study was to evaluate the experimental panel of cryopreserved mycoplasma reference strains recently prepared by the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC()) in order to assess the viability and dispersion of cells in the mycoplasma stocks by measuring the ratio between the number of genomic copies (GC) and the number of colony forming units (CFU) in the reference preparations. The employment of microbial reference cultures with low GC/CFU ratios is critical for unbiased and reliable comparison of mycoplasma testing methods based on different methodological approaches, i.e., Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) and compendial culture-based techniques. The experimental panel included ten different mycoplasma species known to represent potential human and animal pathogens as well as common contaminants of mammalian and avian cell substrates used in research, development, and manufacture of biological products. Fifteen laboratories with expertise in field of mycoplasma titration and quantification of mycoplasmal genomic DNA participated in the study conducted from February to October of 2012. The results of this study demonstrated the feasibility of preparing highly viable and dispersed (possessing low GC/CFU ratios) frozen stocks of mycoplasma reference materials, required for reliable comparison of NAT-based and conventional mycoplasma detection methods. PMID:23910092

  3. Comparative genomic analyses of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae pathogenic 168 strain and its high-passaged attenuated strain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a mild, chronic pneumonia of swine. Despite presenting with low direct mortality, EP is responsible for major economic losses in the pig industry. To identify the virulence-associated determinants of M. hyopneumoniae, we determined the whole genome sequence of M. hyopneumoniae strain 168 and its attenuated high-passage strain 168-L and carried out comparative genomic analyses. Results We performed the first comprehensive analysis of M. hyopneumoniae strain 168 and its attenuated strain and made a preliminary survey of coding sequences (CDSs) that may be related to virulence. The 168-L genome has a highly similar gene content and order to that of 168, but is 4,483 bp smaller because there are 60 insertions and 43 deletions in 168-L. Besides these indels, 227 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were identified. We further investigated the variants that affected CDSs, and compared them to reported virulence determinants. Notably, almost all of the reported virulence determinants are included in these variants affected CDSs. In addition to variations previously described in mycoplasma adhesins (P97, P102, P146, P159, P216, and LppT), cell envelope proteins (P95), cell surface antigens (P36), secreted proteins and chaperone protein (DnaK), mutations in genes related to metabolism and growth may also contribute to the attenuated virulence in 168-L. Furthermore, many mutations were located in the previously described repeat motif, which may be of primary importance for virulence. Conclusions We studied the virulence attenuation mechanism of M. hyopneumoniae by comparative genomic analysis of virulent strain 168 and its attenuated high-passage strain 168-L. Our findings provide a preliminary survey of CDSs that may be related to virulence. While these include reported virulence-related genes, other novel virulence determinants were also detected. This new information will form the foundation of future investigations into the pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and facilitate the design of new vaccines. PMID:23384176

  4. Chronological Development of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae Infections in Cultures of a Swine Synovial Cell Strain

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, L. N. D.; Frey, M. L.; Ross, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The sequential development of Mycroplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae was observed in cultures of a swine synovial fluid cell strain. An early transitory filamentous phase was observed with M. hyorhinis infection followed by the development of cell-associated, relatively large, round structures and some ring forms. Infection with M. hyorhinis was characterized by a generalized distribution of the organism and a severe cytopathic effect. Infection with M. hyosynoviae was represented by the development of circumscribed foci of small pleomorphic structures and a milder effect on the cells. At a high multiplicity of infection, this organism became associated with the cytoplasmic membranes of the cells. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:4259928

  5. A rapid chromogenic microtitre assay of arginine aminopeptidase activity in Mycoplasma strains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Ching; Miles, Roger J; Nicholas, Robin A J; Wood, Ann P

    2006-11-01

    Arginine-utilizing strains of Mycoplasma can be screened by assay of their arginine aminopeptidase activity. A standardized chromogenic method is described that enables enzyme detection in small volumes of cell suspension in less than 3 h. Cell suspensions (10 microl) in 96-well microtitre plates are incubated at 37 degrees C, pH 8.0, with 0.1 mM arginyl-beta-naphthylamide (100 microl). This is hydrolysed to release beta-naphthylamine, which gives a coloured product on diazotization with fast garnet. M. alkalescens can be detected in this way with as few as 1.1 x 10(5) viable cells and M. fermentans with 2.3 x 10(6) cells. The method has been shown to enable division of 28 strains into three groups of fermentative and arginine-hydrolysing mycoplasmas. This procedure has potential for routine laboratory use. PMID:16448797

  6. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae Strain S355, Isolated in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaoli; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Baoli; Lv, Na; Xue, Guanhua

    2016-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae plays an important role in refractory M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Here, we present the whole-genome sequencing of the macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae strain S355. The annotated full-genome sequence might provide a new insight into drug resistance in M. pneumoniae and can help pediatricians recognize the disease earlier. PMID:26988036

  7. [Staphylococcal coagglutination reaction in the identification of mycoplasma].

    PubMed

    Timenetsky, J; Curcio, M

    1993-01-01

    Staphylococcal Coagglutination was used as method for a rapid identification of mycoplasmas that could be performed by non specialized laboratories. Suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus (Cowan I) sensitized with rabbit antibodies against NCTC mycoplasma strains have identified these microorganisms and the strains isolated from humans, cell cultures rats and mice in concentrated suspensions from cultures of 4.0 ml. Fourty eight strains of M.pulmonis, 6 of M. arthritidis, 8 of M.arginini, 3 of M.orale, 15 of A.laidlawii, 8 of M.hominis and 3 of M.pneumoniae were identified by staphylococcal coagglutination and confirmed by Growth Inhibition Test. Optimal parameters of coagglutination were established and the stability of the conjugates were preserved for 90 days when added with acetyl cysteine. The reaction was visualized without optical resources. The sera were previously absorbed with heterologous NCTC strains and with the pellet of the sterile broth. PMID:7997760

  8. Analysis of membrane proteins of Mycoplasma capricolum strains by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Benkirane, A; Amghar, S; Kirchhoff, H

    1993-03-01

    Sixteen moroccan and five other Mycoplasma (M.) capricolum strains were characterized by SDS-PAGE as well as by the immunobinding assay and immunoblotting, using antisera against M. capricolum California Kid (CK) and M. mycoides YG. There was a strong reaction of all 21 strains with antiserum against M. capricolum CK and of 18 strains with antiserum against M. mycoides YG in the immunobinding assay, confirming the cross-reactivity between these two species observed earlier. A marked heterogeneity among the M. capricolum strains appeared in SDS-PAGE and in immunoblotting, characterized by different protein patterns and different strengths of identical protein bands. All M. capricolum strains investigated revealed, however, at least three strong protein bands with mol. weights of about 30, 42 and 52 KD reacting in immunoblotting with antiserum against M. capricolum CK but not with antiserum against M. mycoides YG. These proteins may represent antigens suitable for the identification and differentiation of M. capricolum strains. PMID:8322544

  9. [In vitro antibiosensitivity of different strains of Mycoplasma capricolum].

    PubMed

    Benkirane, A; Amghar, S

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro sensitivity of 20 wild strains of M. capricolum and that of the reference strain (California kid) against 14 antibiotics was investigated by means of a micromethod. The technique is based on the determination of the inhibitory minimum concentration (IMC) in a liquid medium as revealed by the inhibition of glucose metabolism. The following results were obtained: all strains were sensitive to five antibiotics (tylosin, oxytetracyclin, gentamycin, neomycin, nalidixic acid) with an IMC varying from 0.06 to 8 meq/ml. The variation in the IMC values from 8 to 32 meq/ml for spiramycin and erythromycin indicated that some of these strains were sensitive and other resistant to these two drugs. All strains were resistant to seven antibiotics (streptomycin, bacitracin, polymyxin, chloramphenicol, lincomycine, rifampicine and novobiocine), sometimes at a concentration exceeding 128 meg/ml. PMID:2132784

  10. Genomic diversity among Danish field strains of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae assessed by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokotovic, Branko; Friis, Niels F; Nielsen, Elisabeth O; Ahrens, Peter

    2002-03-22

    Genomic diversity among strains of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae isolated in Denmark was assessed by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Ninety-six strains, obtained from different specimens and geographical locations during 30 years and the type strain of M. hyosynoviae S16(T) were concurrently examined for variance in BglII-MfeI and EcoRI-Csp6I-A AFLP markers. A total of 56 different genomic fingerprints having an overall similarity between 77 and 96% were detected. No correlation between AFLP variability and period of isolation or anatomical site of isolation could be demonstrated. An examination of the clonal appearance of M. hyosynoviae isolates recovered from seven herds affected with arthritis revealed presence of several genotypically distinct variants of the organism in a single herd, indicating that different strains may simultaneously be involved in an outbreak of the disease. PMID:11852189

  11. Phospholipids and Glycolipids of Sterol-requiring Mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Koostra, Walter L.

    1967-01-01

    The phospholipids of Mycoplasma hominis type 2 strain 07 are composed almost entirely of phosphatidyl glycerol. Traces of other glycerophospholipids may exist. No glycolipids are found. The phospholipids of Mycoplasma sp. avian strain J are composed of diphosphatidyl glycerol, which predominates in older cultures, a monoacyl glycerophosphoryl glycerophosphate, which may serve as a precursor of diphosphatidyl glycerol, and phosphatidyl glycerophosphate. This organism also contains cholesteryl glucoside and an unidentified glycolipid which appears to be similar to a monoglucosyl diglyceride. No turnover or radioisotope labeling of the phospholipids occurs during metabolism. This lack of turnover during growth is indicative of a structural role for these glycerophospholipids. A concomitant decrease of monoacyl glycerophosphoryl glycerophosphate and increase of diphosphatidyl glycerol occurs during growth. PMID:6025304

  12. Integrative Conjugative Elements Are Widespread in Field Isolates of Mycoplasma Species Pathogenic for Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Virginie; Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Marenda, Marc Serge; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Blanchard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics have revealed massive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between Mycoplasma species sharing common ruminant hosts. Further results pointed toward an integrative conjugative element (ICE) as an important contributor of HGT in the small-ruminant-pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae. To estimate the prevalence of ICEs in ruminant mycoplasmas, we surveyed their occurrence in a collection of 166 field strains representing 4 (sub)species that are recognized as major pathogens. Based on available sequenced genomes, we first defined the conserved, minimal ICE backbone as composed of 4 coding sequences (CDSs) that are evenly distributed and predicted to be essential for ICE chromosomal integration-excision and horizontal transfer. Screening of the strain collection revealed that these 4 CDSs are well represented in ruminant Mycoplasma species, suggesting widespread occurrence of ICEs. Yet their prevalence varies within and among species, with no correlation found with the individual strain history. Extrachromosomal ICE forms were also often detected, suggesting that ICEs are able to circularize in all species, a first and essential step in ICE horizontal transfer. Examination of the junction of the circular forms and comparative sequence analysis of conserved CDSs clearly pointed toward two types of ICE, the hominis and spiroplasma types, most likely differing in their mechanism of excision-integration. Overall, our data indicate the occurrence and maintenance of functional ICEs in a large number of field isolates of ruminant mycoplasmas. These may contribute to genome plasticity and gene exchanges and, presumably, to the emergence of diverse genotypes within pathogenic mycoplasmas of veterinary importance. PMID:25527550

  13. A rapid biochemical test to aid identification of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony (SC) strains.

    PubMed

    Rice, P; Houshaymi, B M; Nicholas, R A; Miles, R J

    2000-01-01

    The ability to utilize maltose, as determined by measurement of oxygen uptake, is used to differentiate Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony (SC) and M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (all strains negative) from other members of the M. mycoides cluster (M. mycoides subsp. capri, M. mycoides subsp. mycoides large colony (LC), M. capricolum subsp. capricolum; and bovine serogroup 7; 94% of strains positive). Rapid tests for maltose utilizing ability were developed, based on hydrolysis of a chromogenic alpha-glucosidase (maltase) substrate (p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside, colourless) to give a brightly coloured product (p-nitrophenol, yellow). On agar plates, colonies of maltose-utilizing strains became coloured within 40 min. PMID:10728565

  14. Mycoplasma gallisepticum transmission: Comparison of commercial F-strain vaccine versus layer complex-derived field strains in a tunnel ventilated house

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two simultaneous trials were conducted using a commercially available, live, F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccine [Trial 1] or two inocula of layer complex-derived MG strains (LCD-MG) [Trial 2]. In each of the two trials, four commercial turkeys were housed in each of two adjoining pens ...

  15. Effects of Prelay 6/85-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation Alone or in Conjunction with the Inoculation of F-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum During Lay on the Blood Characteristics of Commercial Egg-Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 6/85 Mycoplasma gallisepticum (6/85MG) inoculation alone or in conjunction with F-strain M. Gallisepticum (FMG) overlays and their timing on the blood characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens were investigated. Control birds received sham inoculations at 10 wk of age. Birds in ...

  16. Changes in pathogenicity and immunogenicity of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides strains revealed by comparative genomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Wang, Yang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yongqiang; Liu, Suli; Wang, Qi; Shao, Jiari; Chen, Ying; Gao, Liping; Zhou, Changping; Liu, Henggui; Wang, Xiumei; Zheng, Huajun; Xin, Jiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. A pathogenic strain BEN-1 was isolated from bovine lung and underwent continuous passages in rabbits for 468?generations. During this process, the strain's strong virulence became weak and, gradually, it lost the ability to confer protective immunity in cattle but developed virulence in rabbits. In order to gain insight into the mechanisms behind the reduction in virulence and the loss of immunogenicity, we sequenced five representative strains of the BEN series, including the original strain (BEN-1), the strain generation that first acquired virulence in rabbits (BEN-50), the two vaccine strain generations (BEN-181 and BEN-326), and the strain generation showing the greatest loss of immunogenicity (BEN-468). The gene mutation rate in the four different propagation stages varied greatly, and over half of variations observed in each generation were removed during the propagation process. However, the variation maintained in the BEN-468 generation might contribute to its changes in virulence and immunogenicity. We thus identified 18 genes associated with host adaptation, six genes contributing to virulence in cattle, and 35 genes participating in conferring immunity in cattle. These findings might help us optimize the vaccine to obtain more effective immunization results. PMID:26750304

  17. EFFECTS OF BROILER REARING ENVIRONMENT ON TRANSMISSION OF F-STRAIN MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM FROM COMMERCIAL LAYER HENS TO BROILER CHICKENS: ROLE OF ACID-BASE BALANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted concurrently to determine and compare, blood pH, blood gases, hematocrit, and hemoglobin in mycoplasma-free, F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation layers, and FMG contact-infected broilers. FMG-inoculated layers had the highest partial pressure of O2 and the l...

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bovine Mastitis Pathogen Mycoplasma californicum Strain ST-6T (ATCC 33461T).

    PubMed

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F; Fox, Lawrence K

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma californicum is one of several mycoplasmal species associated with bovine mastitis. The complete genome sequence of 793,841bp has been determined and annotated for the M.californicum ST-6 type strain, providing a resource for the identification of surface antigens and putative pathoadaptive features. PMID:24994797

  19. Changes in pathogenicity and immunogenicity of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides strains revealed by comparative genomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Wang, Yang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yongqiang; Liu, Suli; Wang, Qi; Shao, Jiari; Chen, Ying; Gao, Liping; Zhou, Changping; Liu, Henggui; Wang, Xiumei; Zheng, Huajun; Xin, Jiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. A pathogenic strain BEN-1 was isolated from bovine lung and underwent continuous passages in rabbits for 468 generations. During this process, the strain’s strong virulence became weak and, gradually, it lost the ability to confer protective immunity in cattle but developed virulence in rabbits. In order to gain insight into the mechanisms behind the reduction in virulence and the loss of immunogenicity, we sequenced five representative strains of the BEN series, including the original strain (BEN-1), the strain generation that first acquired virulence in rabbits (BEN-50), the two vaccine strain generations (BEN-181 and BEN-326), and the strain generation showing the greatest loss of immunogenicity (BEN-468). The gene mutation rate in the four different propagation stages varied greatly, and over half of variations observed in each generation were removed during the propagation process. However, the variation maintained in the BEN-468 generation might contribute to its changes in virulence and immunogenicity. We thus identified 18 genes associated with host adaptation, six genes contributing to virulence in cattle, and 35 genes participating in conferring immunity in cattle. These findings might help us optimize the vaccine to obtain more effective immunization results. PMID:26750304

  20. Emergence of Atypical Mycoplasma agalactiae Strains Harboring a New Prophage and Associated with an Alpine Wild Ungulate Mortality Episode

    PubMed Central

    Tardy, Florence; Baranowski, Eric; Nouvel, Laurent-Xavier; Mick, Virginie; Manso-Silvn, Luca; Thiaucourt, Franois; Thbault, Patricia; Breton, Marc; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Blanchard, Alain; Garnier, Alexandre; Gibert, Philippe; Game, Yvette; Poumarat, Franois

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Mycoplasma agalactiae is responsible for contagious agalactia (CA) in small domestic ruminants, a syndrome listed by the World Organization for Animal Health and responsible for severe damage to the dairy industry. Recently, we frequently isolated this pathogen from lung lesions of ibexes during a mortality episode in the French Alps. This situation was unusual in terms of host specificity and tissue tropism, raising the question of M. agalactiae emergence in wildlife. To address this issue, the ibex isolates were characterized using a combination of approaches that included antigenic profiles, molecular typing, optical mapping, and whole-genome sequencing. Genome analyses showed the presence of a new, large prophage containing 35 coding sequences (CDS) that was detected in most but not all ibex strains and has a homolog in Mycoplasma conjunctivae, a species causing keratoconjunctivitis in wild ungulates. This and the presence in all strains of large integrated conjugative elements suggested highly dynamic genomes. Nevertheless, M. agalactiae strains circulating in the ibex population were shown to be highly related, most likely originating from a single parental clone that has also spread to another wild ungulate species of the same geographical area, the chamois. These strains clearly differ from strains described in Europe so far, including those found nearby, before CA eradication a few years ago. While M. agalactiae pathogenicity in ibexes remains unclear, our data showed the emergence of atypical strains in Alpine wild ungulates, raising the question of a role for the wild fauna as a potential reservoir of pathogenic mycoplasmas. PMID:22522685

  1. Characterisation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains involved in respiratory disease in pheasants and peafowl.

    PubMed

    Bencina, D; Mrzel, I; RoJs, O Zorman; Bidovec, A; Dovc, A

    2003-02-22

    Two cases of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in different avian species in backyard gamebird operations in Slovenia were investigated. In the first case, M gallisepticum was associated with severe respiratory disease with almost 20 per cent mortality in pheasants, whereas the infection was less pathogenic for chickens and turkeys reared at the same site. The M gallisepticum isolates from pheasants had a unique pMGA gene sequence containing a repeat of 12 nucleotides, and they contained only small amounts of the cytadhesins MGC1 and MGC3 and no PvpA protein. However, they expressed some typical M gallisepticum proteins and several proteins which were immunogenic for pheasants, chickens and turkeys. A strain of M gallisepticum isolated from the sinus of a pheasant was highly pathogenic for chicken embryos. In the second case, the M gallisepticum strain that was associated with respiratory disease and mortality in peafowl also affected chickens. M gallisepticum strain ULB 992 was isolated from the infraorbital sinus of a dead peafowl. The ULB 992 strain synthesised a small amount of MGC3, a truncated form of MGC1 and lacked PvpA. However, it expressed several proteins which were immunogenic for the birds infected with M gallisepticum at both gamebird operations. PMID:12625537

  2. Use of antibodies against the P36 protein of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae for the identification of M. hyopneumoniae strains.

    PubMed

    Stipkovits, L; Nicolet, J; Haldimann, A; Frey, J

    1991-12-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the principal aetiological agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, synthesizes a 36 kDa protein (P36) which is an early and strong immunogenic factor in experimentally and naturally infected swine. Polyclonal antibodies were made against the recombinant P36 protein in rabbits and used for the identification of M. hyopneumoniae by the immunoblot technique. The proteins from the M. hyopneumoniae reference strains and from 13 M. hyopneumoniae field strains isolated from naturally infected pigs in Switzerland, Hungary, France and Canada were analysed by the immunoblot technique using anti-P36 antibodies. All 13 field strains and the three reference J strains of M. hyopneumoniae, received from different collections and laboratories, exhibited a strong reaction with a protein of 36 kDa indicating that the P36 protein is a common M. hyopneumoniae antigen. None of the different porcine Mycoplasma species including M. flocculare, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae, A. axanthum, A. laidlawii and A. granularum showed any reaction on the immunoblot with the anti-P36 antibodies. In addition, we have found no reaction with anti-P36 antibodies using 47 different Mycoplasma or Acholeplasma species isolated from human, mice, rat, poultry, ruminant, dog and cat. In conclusion we have shown that P36 is a protein that is a common antigen of M. hyopneumoniae strains and is not found in other Mycoplasma or Acholeplasma species tested. Because of its high specificity, P36 protein, or antibodies made against this protein can be used for the identification of M. hyopneumoniae strains. PMID:1723490

  3. Genome Sequences of Staphylococcus hominis Strains ShAs1, ShAs2, and ShAs3, Isolated from the Asian Malaria Mosquito Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Grant L; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Koundal, Vikas; Rasgon, Jason L; Mwangi, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus hominis is a culturable component of the bacterial microbiome of Anopheles stephensi. Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequences of three S. hominis isolates from A. stephensi. These genomic resources will facilitate experiments to further our understanding of the role of bacteria in mosquito biology. PMID:26966197

  4. Genome Sequences of Staphylococcus hominis Strains ShAs1, ShAs2, and ShAs3, Isolated from the Asian Malaria Mosquito Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Grant L.; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Koundal, Vikas; Mwangi, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus hominis is a culturable component of the bacterial microbiome of Anopheles stephensi. Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequences of three S. hominis isolates from A. stephensi. These genomic resources will facilitate experiments to further our understanding of the role of bacteria in mosquito biology. PMID:26966197

  5. Search for the presence of six Mycoplasma species in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of subjects seropositive and seronegative for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, R; Launay, V; Tuppin, P; Lafeuillade, A; Feuillie, V; Montagnier, L; Grau, O

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of Mycoplasma fermentans, Mycoplasma pirum, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Mycoplasma penetrans was investigated by using specific PCR assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects infected or not infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Only M. fermentans was detected in 5.8% of 154 HIV-seropositive and 11.1% of 90 HIV-seronegative subjects. PMID:8784596

  6. Isolation and characterisation of an Indian strain of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides type LC from a case of caprine arthritis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijendra P; Srivastava, N C; Kumar, Manoj; Sunder, M Jai; Varshney, J P

    2004-07-01

    Isolation and characterisation of an Indian strain of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC from a case of caprine arthritis is reported in the study. The isolate was identified based on biochemical, digitonin sensitivity and growth inhibition tests. The virulence of the organism was studied by pathogenicity test in mice and goat. The antigenic and genomic profile of the isolate was compared with that of the standard strain (Y-Goat). Using different sets of primers, polymerase chain reaction was employed for rapid detection of the strain. PMID:15178001

  7. In vitro activity of tylvalosin against Spanish field strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tavío, M M; Poveda, C; Assunção, P; Ramírez, A S; Poveda, J B

    2014-11-29

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is involved in the porcine enzootic pneumonia and respiratory disease complex; therefore, the search for new treatment options that contribute to the control of this organism is relevant. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations of tylvalosin and 19 other antimicrobial agents against 20 Spanish field isolates of M. hyopneumoniae were determined using the broth microdilution method, with the type strain (J) as a control strain. Tylvalosin had MIC50 and MIC90 values of 0.016 and 0.06 µg/ml, respectively, and was the second-most effective of the assayed antibiotics, after valnemulin. Tiamulin, tylosin and lincomycin were also among the antibiotics with the lowest MIC50 and MIC90 values against the 20 field isolates (0.06-0.25 µg/ml). However, resistance to tylosin and spiramycin, which like tylvalosin, are 16-membered macrolides, was observed. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin ranged from 0.125 to 1 µg/ml; the corresponding values ranged from 2 to 4 µg/ml for oxytetracyline, which was the most active tetracycline. Furthermore, tylvalosin and valnemulin exhibited the highest bactericidal activities. In conclusion, the macrolide tylvalosin and the pleuromutilin valnemulin exhibited the highest in vitro antimicrobial activities against M. hyopneumoniae field isolates in comparison with the other tested antibiotics. PMID:25185108

  8. [Ribonucleolytic activity of mycoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Il'inskaya, O N; Sokurenko, Yu V; Ul'yanova, V V; Vershinina, V I; Zelenikhin, P V; Kolpakov, A I; Medvedeva, E S; Baranova, N B; Davydova, M N; Muzykantov, A A; Chernova, O A; Chernov, V M

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are incapable of de novo synthesis of nucleotides and must therefore secrete nucleases in order to replenish the pool of nucleic acid precursors. The nucleolytic activity of mycoplasmas is an important factor in their pathogenicity. Bacterial ribonucleases (RNases) may produce a broad spectrum of biological effects, including antiviral and antitumor activity. Mycoplasma RNases are therefore of interest. In the present work, capacity of Acholeplasma laidlawii and Mycoplasma hominis for RNase synthesis and secretion was studied. During the stationary growth phase, these organisms were found to synthesize Mg(2+)-dependent RNases, with their highest activity detected outside the cells. Localization of A. laidlawii RNases was determined: almost 90% of the RNase activity was found to be associated with the membrane vesicles. Bioinformational analysis revealed homology between the nucleotide sequences of 14 Bacillus subtilis genes encoding the products with RNase activity and the genes of the mycoplasmas under study. Amino acid sequences of 4 A. laidlawii proteins with ribonuclease activity and the Bsn RNase was also established. PMID:25844442

  9. Real-time PCR assays to address genetic diversity among strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Strait, Erin L; Madsen, Melissa L; Minion, F Chris; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Dammen, Matthew; Jones, Katherine R; Thacker, Eileen L

    2008-08-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is an important cause of pneumonia in pigs around the world, but confirming its presence in (or absence from) pigs can be difficult. Culture for diagnosis is impractical, and seroconversion is often delayed after natural infection, limiting the use of serology. Numerous PCR assays for the detection of M. hyopneumoniae have been developed, targeting several different genes. Recently, genetic diversity among strains of M. hyopneumoniae was demonstrated. The effect of this diversity on the accuracy and sensitivity of the M. hyopneumoniae PCR assays could result in false-negative results in current PCR tests. In this study, a panel of isolates of M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare, M. hyorhinis, and M. hyosynoviae were tested with a number of M. hyopneumoniae-specific PCR assays. Some M. hyopneumoniae PCR assays tested did not detect all isolates of M. hyopneumoniae. To increase the efficiency of PCR testing, two new real-time PCR assays that are specific and capable of detecting all of the M. hyopneumoniae isolates used in this study were developed. PMID:18524960

  10. Real-Time PCR Assays To Address Genetic Diversity among Strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae?

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Erin L.; Madsen, Melissa L.; Minion, F. Chris; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Dammen, Matthew; Jones, Katherine R.; Thacker, Eileen L.

    2008-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is an important cause of pneumonia in pigs around the world, but confirming its presence in (or absence from) pigs can be difficult. Culture for diagnosis is impractical, and seroconversion is often delayed after natural infection, limiting the use of serology. Numerous PCR assays for the detection of M. hyopneumoniae have been developed, targeting several different genes. Recently, genetic diversity among strains of M. hyopneumoniae was demonstrated. The effect of this diversity on the accuracy and sensitivity of the M. hyopneumoniae PCR assays could result in false-negative results in current PCR tests. In this study, a panel of isolates of M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare, M. hyorhinis, and M. hyosynoviae were tested with a number of M. hyopneumoniae-specific PCR assays. Some M. hyopneumoniae PCR assays tested did not detect all isolates of M. hyopneumoniae. To increase the efficiency of PCR testing, two new real-time PCR assays that are specific and capable of detecting all of the M. hyopneumoniae isolates used in this study were developed. PMID:18524960

  11. Human Diseases Associated with MycoplasmasWith an Appendix on Simple Culture Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Harwick, Herbert J.; Kalmanson, George M.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1972-01-01

    The mycoplasmas (formerly called pleuropneumonia-like organisms, or pplo) are a group of pleomorphic micro-organisms characterized by lack of cell wall and ability to form colonies on agar resembling tiny fried eggs. They have been recognized as pathogens of lower mammals since 1898. Of the more than 40 known veterinary species, many are pathogens, commonly causing pneumonia, arthritis or arteritis. Of the mycoplasmas found in man, Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the only well established human pathogen. It is responsible for a variety of respiratory syndromes, of which the most frequently recognized is cold agglutinin-positive atypical pneumonia. Hematologic, neurologic and dermatologic complications of this infection have been noted. M. hominis has been implicated as a causative factor in various febrile complications of pregnancy, such as septic abortion and amnionitis. T-strain mycoplasmas are ubiquitous in the human genitourinary tract, but attempts to link their presence to disease have thus far been unsuccessful. Mycoplasmas also have been associated with neoplastic disease and with rheumatoid arthritis. The validity of these latter findings is unclear, and additional study is needed. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:4565394

  12. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Mycoplasma hyorhinis Strains Identified by a Real-Time TaqMan PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Tocqueville, Vronique; Ferr, Sverine; Nguyen, Ngoc Hong Phuc

    2014-01-01

    A real-time TaqMan PCR assay based on the gene encoding the protein p37 was developed to detect Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Its specificity was validated with 29 epidemiologically unrelated M. hyorhinis strains (28 field strains and one reference strain) and other mycoplasma species or with other microorganisms commonly found in pigs. The estimated detection limit of this qPCR assay was 125 microorganism equivalents/?l. The same 29 epidemiologically unrelated M. hyorhinis strains and four previously fully sequenced strains were typed by two portable typing methods, the sequencing of the p37 gene and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. The first method revealed 18 distinct nucleotide sequences and insufficient discriminatory power (0.934). The MLST scheme was developed with the sequenced genomes of the M. hyorhinis strains HUB-1, GDL-1, MCLD, and SK76 and based on the genes dnaA, rpoB, gyrB, gltX, adk, and gmk. In total, 2,304 bp of sequence was analyzed for each strain. MLST was capable of subdividing the 33 strains into 29 distinct sequence types. The discriminatory power of the method was >0.95, which is the threshold value for interpreting typing results with confidence (D = 0.989). Population analysis showed that recombination in M. hyorhinis occurs and that strains are diverse but with a certain clonality (one unique clonal complex was identified). The new qPCR assay and the robust MLST scheme are available for the acquisition of new knowledge on M. hyorhinis epidemiology. A web-accessible database has been set up for the M. hyorhinis MLST scheme at http://pubmlst.org/mhyorhinis/. PMID:24622092

  13. Cultivation of Mycoplasmas on glass.

    PubMed

    Purcell, R H; Valdesuso, J R; Cline, W L; James, W D; Chanock, R M

    1971-02-01

    Eight Mycoplasma species of human origin were successfully cultivated on glass. Complement-fixing (CF) antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas were potent, specific, and free from anticomplementary activity. PPLO broth medium supplemented with 1 to 5% PPLO serum fraction (bovine), 2.5% fresh yeast extract, and 1% glucose (glycolytic species) or 1% arginine (arginine-utilizing species) supported moderate to luxuriant growth of mycoplasmas on glass. The potency of CF antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas varied with the species of Mycoplasma tested and the duration of incubation. When the potency of CF antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas was compared with that material sedimented from the broth phase of the same culture, three patterns of growth were observed: M. hominis and M. orale type 2 grew preferentially in the broth phase; M. salivarium, M. orale types 1 and 3, M. pneumoniae, and M. lipophilum preferentially adhered to the glass; and M. fermentans was biphasic. The growth of mycoplasmas on glass provides a simple means of concentrating and purifying such organisms for immunological and biochemical studies. PMID:5547544

  14. Cultivation of Mycoplasmas on Glass

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, R. H.; Valdesuso, J. R.; Cline, W. L.; James, W. D.; Chanock, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    Eight Mycoplasma species of human origin were successfully cultivated on glass. Complement-fixing (CF) antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas were potent, specific, and free from anticomplementary activity. PPLO broth medium supplemented with 1 to 5% PPLO serum fraction (bovine), 2.5% fresh yeast extract, and 1% glucose (glycolytic species) or 1% arginine (arginine-utilizing species) supported moderate to luxuriant growth of mycoplasmas on glass. The potency of CF antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas varied with the species of Mycoplasma tested and the duration of incubation. When the potency of CF antigens prepared from glass-adherent mycoplasmas was compared with that material sedimented from the broth phase of the same culture, three patterns of growth were observed: M. hominis and M. orale type 2 grew preferentially in the broth phase; M. salivarium, M. orale types 1 and 3, M. pneumoniae, and M. lipophilum preferentially adhered to the glass; and M. fermentans was biphasic. The growth of mycoplasmas on glass provides a simple means of concentrating and purifying such organisms for immunological and biochemical studies. PMID:5547544

  15. Animal model of Mycoplasma fermentans respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with respiratory, genitourinary tract infections and rheumatoid diseases but its role as pathogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to probe that Mycoplasma fermentans is able to produce respiratory tract infection and migrate to several organs on an experimental infection model in hamsters. One hundred and twenty six hamsters were divided in six groups (A-F) of 21 hamsters each. Animals of groups A, B, C were intratracheally injected with one of the mycoplasma strains: Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 (wild strain), Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18 (type strain) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae Eaton strain. Groups D, E, F were the negative, media, and sham controls. Fragments of trachea, lungs, kidney, heart, brain and spleen were cultured and used for the histopathological study. U frequency test was used to compare recovery of mycoplasmas from organs. Results Mycoplasmas were detected by culture and PCR. The three mycoplasma strains induced an interstitial pneumonia; they also migrated to several organs and persisted there for at least 50 days. Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 induced a more severe damage in lungs than Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae produced severe damage in lungs and renal damage. Conclusions Mycoplasma fermentans induced a respiratory tract infection and persisted in different organs for several weeks in hamsters. This finding may help to explain the ability of Mycoplasma fermentans to induce pneumonia and chronic infectious diseases in humans. PMID:23298636

  16. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePLUS

    Mycoplasma pneumonia is an infection of the lungs by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) . This type of pneumonia is ... Mycoplasma pneumonia usually affects people younger than 40. People who live or work in crowded areas such ...

  17. Genome Sequences of Seven Mycoplasma hyosynoviae Strains Isolated from the Joint Tissue of Infected Swine (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Bumgardner, Eric; Bey, Russell F; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Bumgarner, Roger E; Lawrence, Paulraj K

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyosynoviae is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause debilitating arthritis in swine. Currently, there are no M.hyosynoviae genome sequences in the GenBank database, which makes it impossible to understand its pathogenesis, nutrition, or colonization characteristics, or to devise an effective strategy for its control. Here, we report the genome sequences of seven strains of M.hyosynoviae. Within each genome, several virulence factors were identified that may prove important in the pathogenesis of M.hyosynoviae-mediated arthritis and serve as potential virulence markers that may be critical in vaccine development. PMID:24903877

  18. Genome Sequences of Seven Mycoplasma hyosynoviae Strains Isolated from the Joint Tissue of Infected Swine (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Bumgardner, Eric; Bey, Russell F.; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Bumgarner, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyosynoviae is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause debilitating arthritis in swine. Currently, there are no M.hyosynoviae genome sequences in the GenBank database, which makes it impossible to understand its pathogenesis, nutrition, or colonization characteristics, or to devise an effective strategy for its control. Here, we report the genome sequences of seven strains of M.hyosynoviae. Within each genome, several virulence factors were identified that may prove important in the pathogenesis of M.hyosynoviae-mediated arthritis and serve as potential virulence markers that may be critical in vaccine development. PMID:24903877

  19. Characterization of the 16S rRNA genes from Mycoplasma sp. strain F38 and development of an identification system based on PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Bascuana, C R; Mattsson, J G; Blske, G; Johansson, K E

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma sp. (strain F38) is the causative agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia, which is a goat disease of great global concern. Strain F38 belongs to the so-called "Mycoplasma mycoides cluster," and the members of this cluster have many biochemical and serological properties in common, which makes it difficult to differentiate between them by conventional methods. Their phylogenetic interrelationship are thus uncertain. The 16S rRNA gene of the rrnB operon from strain F38 was cloned and sequenced. The sequence was compared with the 16S rRNA sequences of related mycoplasmas, and phylogenetic trees were constructed by parsimony analysis. A three-way ambiguity among strain F38, Mycoplasma capricolum, and Mycoplasma sp. strain PG50 was observed in the trees. This observation is in agreement with a recent proposal to reclassify strain F38 and M. capricolum. A primer set was designed for in vitro amplification by PCR of a fragment of the 16S rRNA genes from the M. mycoides cluster. The amplimers of strain F38 could be distinguished easily from the corresponding amplimers from other members of the M. mycoides cluster by restriction enzyme analysis with PstI. This observation was utilized to design an identification system for strain F38. Part of the 16S rRNA gene of the rrnA operon from strain F38 was also cloned, and several sequence differences between the two rRNA operons were discovered, revealing microheterogeneity between the two 16S rRNA genes of this organism. Images PMID:8169205

  20. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Kelley C; Benitez, Alvaro J; Ratliff, Amy E; Crabb, Donna M; Sheppard, Edward S; Winchell, Jonas M; Dluhy, Richard A; Waites, Ken B; Atkinson, T Prescott; Krause, Duncan C

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/?l) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 1 cells/?l. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains. PMID:26121242

  1. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kelley C.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Ratliff, Amy E.; Crabb, Donna M.; Sheppard, Edward S.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Dluhy, Richard A.; Waites, Ken B.; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Krause, Duncan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains. PMID:26121242

  2. Characterization of a chromosomal region of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 strain PG50 encoding a glycerol transport locus (gtsABC).

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Steven P; Vilei, Edy M; Frey, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    Mycoplasma species bovine group 7, represented by the type strain PG50, is one of six members of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster and has been implicated in sporadic and outbreak cases of polyarthritis and mastitis in Australian dairy cattle. This study describes cloning and sequencing a 7.9 kb region of the PG50 chromosome and identification of genes involved in glycerol transport (gtsA, gtsB and gtsC) that are followed by a putative lipoprotein gene lppB and a genomic locus containing two ORFs encoding putative membrane proteins. Long range PCR using primers spanning gtsABC and downstream flanking genes, and Southern hybridization analyses using a suite of probes derived from M. mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (SC) strain Afad for gtsA, gtsB and gtsC, lppB and the two downstream genes confirmed that these genes were conserved among Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 isolates and mycoplasmas belonging to the M. mycoides subcluster [M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, M. mycoides subsp. mycoides large colony type (LC) and M. mycoides subsp. capri] but were absent in mycoplasmas belonging to the Mycoplasma capricolum subcluster (M. capricolum subsp. capricolum and M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae). M. capricolum subsp. capricolum type strain California kid did not hybridize with the probe for gtsA and gave only weak or no hybridization signals with probes derived from the loci downstream of gtsABC, suggesting that this region has diverged in mycoplasmas belonging to subspecies of M. capricolum. It is shown that PG50, after the addition of a physiological concentration of glycerol to the growth medium, generates H(2)O(2) at levels comparable with strain Afad, implying that the glycerol transport system is functional in Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7. This suggests that in PG50, as in M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, glycerol uptake is followed by phosphorylation to glycerol 3-phosphate and then conversion to dihydroxyacetone phosphate, catalysed by L-alpha-glycerophosphate oxidase, resulting in the production of H(2)O(2). The ability of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 to generate significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide may be important in pathogenesis. PMID:12576593

  3. Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Is a Suitable Tool for Differentiation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Strains without Cultivation?

    PubMed Central

    Vranckx, K.; Maes, D.; Calus, D.; Villarreal, I.; Pasmans, F.; Haesebrouck, F.

    2011-01-01

    An assay based on multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis allowed differentiating and studying diversity and persistence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains in pig herds without prior cultivation. The test had a discriminatory index of >0.99 and was applied reliably to porcine bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and tracheal swabs. PMID:21389157

  4. EFFECTS OF F-STRAIN MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM INOCULATION AT TWELVE WEEKS OF AGE ON EGG YOLK COMPOSITION IN COMMERCIAL EGG LAYING HENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In two trials, the effects of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) on the content of egg yolks from commercial Single Combed White Leghorn laying hens were investigated over a production cycle. Ten hens were assigned to each of eight (Trial 1) or sixteen (Trial 2) negative pressure fiberglass bi...

  5. Influence of Supplemental Dietary Poultry Fat on the Yolk Characteristics of Commercial Layers Inoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with F-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation and 1.5 % supplemental dietary poultry fat (PF) on the egg yolk characteristics of commercial layers between 24 and 58 wk of age were investigated. Sham and FMG inoculations were administered at 12 (before lay) and 22 (early in lay)...

  6. Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) caused by vaccine strain T1/44 of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC.

    PubMed

    Mbulu, Rosa-Stella; Tjipura-Zaire, Georgina; Lelli, Rosella; Frey, Joachim; Pilo, Paola; Vilei, Edy M; Mettler, Felix; Nicholas, Robin A J; Huebschle, Otto J B

    2004-03-01

    A study was carried out on four adult cattle to assess the pathogenicity of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC strain T1/44, currently used as a vaccine for the control of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in Namibia. Post mortem examination 9 weeks after endobronchial inoculation of the vaccine strain to three of the four animals revealed unilateral pleuropneumonic lesions, pleuritis and well-developed sequesters in two of the three inoculated animals and several small sequesters surrounded by pleuropneumonic lesions in the diaphragmatic and apical lobes in one animal. The fourth animal, which was not directly inoculated but was in close contact with the inoculated animals, revealed only an adhesion area of the lung to the ribcage. Serological examination carried out using the complement fixation test (CFT) detected positive titres in all three intubated animals and the indirect CBPP-LppQ-ELISA was positive for two of the three inoculated animals. The contact animal showed no seroconversion. M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC was isolated from the sequesters of two of the inoculated animals. Isolation of mycoplasmas was not possible from the third inoculated animal due to heavy contamination of the samples by other bacteria, but the presence of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC could be evidenced by PCR from clinical samples. The identity of the T1/44 vaccine strain isolated from the sequesters of two animals was confirmed by T1/44-specific PCR analysis and by IS1296 typing using Southern blot. These results clearly show that inoculation of T1/44 vaccine via the endobronchial route can lead to CBPP. PMID:15036531

  7. [Blastocystis hominis- parasites or commensals? ].

    PubMed

    Duda, Aleksandra; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Lanocha, Natalia; Szymański, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis (B. hominis) is a cosmopolitan pro- tozoa which parasitizes the human large intestine. This parasite had been considered to be commensal of the large intestine for a long time, because even an intense invasion may be asymptomatic. However, this species is now being regarded as a parasitic organism. In this paper the latest data concerning the epidemiology, diagnostics and treatment of B. hominis invasion have been cited and discussed. PMID:25518089

  8. Blastocystis hominis revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Stenzel, D J; Boreham, P F

    1996-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis is a unicellular organism found commonly in the intestinal tract of humans and many other animals. Very little is known of the basic biology of the organism, and controversy surrounds its taxonomy and pathogenicity. There morphological forms (vacuolar, granular, and ameboid) have been recognized, but recent studies have revealed several additional forms (cyst, avacuolar, and multivacuolar). The biochemistry of the organism has not been studied to any extent, and organelles and structures of unknown function and composition are present in the cells. Several life cycles have been proposed but not experimentally validated. The form used for transmission has not been defined. Infections with the organism are worldwide and appear in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient individuals. Symptoms generally attributed to B. hominis infection are nonspecific, and the need for treatment is debated. If treatment appears warranted, metronidazole is suggested as the drug of choice, although failures of this drug in eradicating the organism have been reported. Infection is diagnosed by light microscopic examination of stained smears or wet mounts of fecal material. Most laboratories identify B. hominis by observing the vacuolar form, although morphological studies indicate that other forms, such as the cyst form and multivacuolar form, also should be sought for diagnosis. PMID:8894352

  9. Molecular Variability of the Adhesin-Encoding Gene pvpA among Mycoplasma gallisepticum Strains and Its Application in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T.; Garca, M.; Levisohn, S.; Yogev, D.; Kleven, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is an important pathogen of chickens and turkeys that causes considerable economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide. The reemergence of M. gallisepticum outbreaks among poultry, the increased use of live M. gallisepticum vaccines, and the detection of M. gallisepticum in game and free-flying song birds has strengthened the need for molecular diagnostic and strain differentiation tests. Molecular techniques, including restriction fragment length polymorphism of genomic DNA (RFLP) and PCR-based random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), have already been utilized as powerful tools to detect intraspecies variation. However, certain intrinsic drawbacks constrain the application of these methods. The main goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of using an M. gallisepticum-specific gene encoding a phase-variable putative adhesin protein (PvpA) as the target for molecular typing. This was accomplished using a pvpA PCR-RFLP assay. Size variations among PCR products and nucleotide divergence of the C-terminus-encoding region of the pvpA gene were the basis for strain differentiation. This method can be used for rapid differentiation of vaccine strains from field isolates by amplification directly from clinical samples without the need for isolation by culture. Moreover, molecular epidemiology of M. gallisepticum outbreaks can be performed using RFLP and/or sequence analysis of the pvpA gene. PMID:11326008

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Dermabacter hominis 1368

    PubMed Central

    Albersmeier, Andreas; Bomholt, Christina; Glaub, Alina; Rckert, Christian; Soriano, Francisco; Fernndez-Natal, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Dermabacter hominis is a common colonizer of the healthy human skin and is rarely detected as an opportunistic human pathogen. The genome sequence of the multidrug-resistant D.hominis strain 1368, isolated from blood cultures of a pyelonephritis patient, provides insights into the repertoire of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:25059872

  11. Identification of novel immunogenic proteins in Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. Capripneumoniae strain M1601.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; He, Ying; Chu, Yue-feng; Gao, Peng-cheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Nian-zhang; Zhao, Hai-yan; Zhang, Ke-shan; Lu, Zhong-xin

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain immunogenic proteins and potential proteins of interest that were isolated from Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. One-dimensional SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of whole cell preparation were conducted, and membrane proteome maps were prepared by immunoblotting. One-dimensional SDS-PAGE identified three immunogenic proteins with molecular masses in the range 29-97.2 kDa, two of which were in the membrane protein fraction. After two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, 20 highly immunogenic proteins were identified in the whole cell protein preparation while 9 immunogenic proteins were identified in the membrane protein fraction. This indicated that membrane proteins were the principle immunogenic proteins in Mccp. These proteins may have potential for the development of improved diagnostic tests and possible vaccines. PMID:22673397

  12. Floor pen study to evaluate the serological response of broiler breeders after vaccination with ts-11 strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine.

    PubMed

    Collett, S R; Thomson, D K; York, D; Bisschop, S P R

    2005-03-01

    To determine the Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) rapid serum plate agglutination (RSPA) test response of broiler breeders after ts-11 strain vaccination, 55 Cobb pullets derived from a nonvaccinated, MG-negative, commercial, broiler breeder grandparent flock were monitored from 8 to 20 wk of age (over a 12-wk trial period). To evaluate the effect of lateral spread of the ts-11 vaccine strain on RSPA test results from commingled and adjacently penned birds, treatment groups included (A) birds vaccinated with ts-11strain MG at 8 wk of age, (B) commingled nonvaccinates in the same pen as the vaccinated birds, (C) nonvaccinates in a second pen separated from the first pen by a distance of 2 m, and (D) birds vaccinated with ts-11 strain MG at 8 wk of age and kept in a separate room. Rapid serum plate agglutination tests were performed once a week for 6 wk and then every 2 wk for 6 more wk, postvaccination. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay specific fbr ts-11 strain MG was used to confirm vaccination, and a second PCR specific for non-ts-11 strain MG was used to confirm the absence of field infection. Seroconversion was first detected by the RSPA test 2 wk postvaccination and attained maximum positive rates of 58% at 12 wk postvaccination in treatment A and 60% at 8 wk postvaccination in treatment D. Seroconversion rates in nonvaccinated, commingled pullets was 10% at 5 wk and 30% at 12 wk after the vaccination of pen mates. The ts-11-specific PCR detected the vaccine strain in 80%-100% of the vaccinated birds 2 wk after vaccination. One of 15 nonvaccinated birds penned 2 m from vaccinated birds yielded ts-11 by PCR assay 12 wk after vaccination, which indicates that the spread of ts-11 over short distances may be possible in situations in which there is a common caretaker. PCR on tracheal swabs taken 12 wk postvaccination detected ts-l1 in 50% and 60% of the vaccinated birds in treatments A and D, respectively; in 30% of the commingled nonvaccinates; and in 6.6% of the separately penned nonvaccinates. In contrast, choanal swabs collected from vaccinated birds at 12 wk were 21% and 40% PCR positive for ts-11 strain MG, while those from nonvaccinates were negative. All samples were PCR negative for field strain MG. The pattern of seroconversion as measured by RSPA test in small groups of broiler breeders was different from that previously reported for leghorns. Lateral spread of the ts-11 strain to commingled pen mates occurred rapidly, causing RSPA seroconversion patterns that mimicked those of the vaccinated pen mates. PMID:15839426

  13. Strain differences in sensitivity of rats to Mycoplasma arthritidis ISR 1 infection are under multiple gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, A; Grtner, K; Hedrich, H J; Hermanns, W; Kirchhoff, H; Wonigeit, K

    1990-01-01

    At least 5 female rats from each of 24 inbred (ACI, AS, BDIX, BH, BN, BS, BUF, DA, LE, LEW, MWF, OM, SPRD-Cu3, W-Krypt, and WKY), RT1 congenic [BH.1L(LEW), LEW.1A(AVN), LEW.1C(WIST), LEW.1LV3(BH), LEW.1K(SHR), and LEW.1N(BN)], and F1 hybrid [(LEW x BN)F1, (LEW.1W x LEW.1A)F1, and (LEW x LEW.1W)F1] strains, representing eight independent major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes (a, b, c, dv1, k, l, n, and u) and five related RT1 haplotypes (av1, lv1, lv3, uv2, and uv3), were inoculated intravenously with Mycoplasma arthritidis, and the severity of the polyarthritis that developed was determined by estimating arthritis scores and weight reductions. The 24 inbred, congenic, and F1 hybrid rat strains differed considerably in their sensitivity to infection with M. arthritidis and in the severity of the polyarthritis that they developed. Statistical evaluation showed that in the acute phase (days 1 to 42 after infection) as well as in the chronic phase (days 39 to 121 after infection) of the disease, the means of the arthritis scores for the strains form a continuous variation without significant interruptions, with the very sensitive LEW rats, the RT1 congenic rats on LEW background, the F1 hybrids with LEW, and the MWF, BS, BH, and DA rats on one end and the resistant WKY, BUF, W-Krypt, LE, and OM rats on the other end. A continuous variation was also observed for the means of the growth rates. There were, however, no significant differences between the sensitive and the resistant rat strains in the antibody titers determined by complement fixation test and enzyme immunoassay. Heritabilities of arthritis scores were calculated for all strains (h2 = 0.39 to 0.62), for the RT1 congenic strains (h2 = 0.04 to 0.14), and for several strains with identical MHC genes (h2 = 0.61 to 0.93). The results show that non-MHC genes are probably responsible for the sensitivity of rats to infection with M. arthritidis. PMID:2111282

  14. Analysis of immune responses to recombinant proteins from strains of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Perez-Casal, Jose; Prysliak, Tracy; Maina, Teresa; Wang, Yejun; Townsend, Hugh; Berverov, Emil; Nkando, Isabel; Wesonga, Hezron; Liljander, Anne; Jores, Joerg; Naessens, Jan; Gerdts, Volker; Potter, Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Current contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) vaccines are based on live-attenuated strains of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). These vaccines have shortcomings in terms of efficacy, duration of immunity and in some cases show severe side effects at the inoculation site; hence the need to develop new vaccines to combat the disease. Reverse vaccinology approaches were used and identified 66 candidate Mycoplasma proteins using available Mmm genome data. These proteins were ranked by their ability to be recognized by serum from CBPP-positive cattle and thereafter used to inoculate nave cattle. We report here the inoculation of cattle with recombinant proteins and the subsequent humoral and T-cell-mediated immune responses to these proteins and conclude that a subset of these proteins are candidate molecules for recombinant protein-based subunit vaccines for CBPP control. PMID:26384697

  15. A chronicle of serologic response in commercial layer chickens to vaccination with commercial F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initial efforts by the poultry industry at controlling and containing Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) included testing and slaughter of reactor flocks. Ultimately, using the aforementioned measures coupled with heat treatment of hatching eggs together with biosecurity and biosurveillance procedures, ...

  16. One test microbial diagnostic microarray for identification of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and other Mycoplasma species.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, A; Sacchini, F; Krasteva, I; Zilli, K; Scacchia, M; Beaurepaire, C; Nantel, A; Pini, A

    2012-11-01

    The present study describes the use of microarray technology for rapid identification and differentiation of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from other mycoplasmas that may be pathogenic to ruminants, including those of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster, genetically and antigenically strictly correlated with Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. A microarray containing genetic sequences of 55 different bacterial species from Acholeplasma, Mycoplasma, Spiroplasma and Ureaplasma genera was constructed. Sequences to genes of interest were collected in FASTA format from NCBI. The collected sequences were processed with OligoPicker software. Oligonucleotides were then checked for their selectivity with BLAST searches in GenBank. The microarray was tested with ATCC/NCTC strains of Mycoplasma spp. of veterinary importance in ruminants including Mycoplasma belonging to the mycoides cluster as well as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri field strains. The results showed that but one ATCC/NCTC reference strains hybridized with their species-specific sequences showed a profile/signature different and distinct from each other. The heat-map of the hybridization results for the nine genes interrogated for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides demonstrated that the reference strain Mycoplasma mycoides subsp mycoides PG1 was positive for all of the gene sequences spotted on the microarray. CBPP field, vaccine and reference strains were all typed to be M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, and seven of the nine strains gave positive hybridization results for all of the nine genes. Two Italian strains were negative for some of the genes. Comparison with non-Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides reference strains showed some positive signals or considerable homology to Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides genes. As expected, some correlations were observed between the strictly genetically and antigenically correlated Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri strains. Specifically, we observed that some Italian Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides strains were positive for two out of the three Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri genes, differently from what has been observed for other European or African Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides strains. This study highlighted the use of microarray technology as a simple and effective method for a single-step identification and differentiation of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from other mycoplasmas that may be pathogenic to ruminants, including those of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster, genetically and antigenically strictly correlated with Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. The opportunity to discriminate several mycoplasmas in a single analysis enhances diagnostic rapidity and may represent a useful tool to screen occasionally mycoplasmas affecting animal farming in territories where diagnostic laboratory support is limited. The heat-map of the hybridization results of the comparative genomic hybridizations DNA-designed chip clearly indicates that the microarray performs well for the identification of the tested Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides reference and field strains, discriminating them from other mycoplasmas. PMID:22271459

  17. Genetic evolution of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strains and molecular epidemiology of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by sequencing of locus H2.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, S; Wesonga, H; Ygesu, Laikemariam; Tekleghiorgis, Tesfaalem; Maikano, Y; Angaya, M; Hendrikx, P; Thiaucourt, F

    2002-03-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a major threat to goat farming in developing countries. Its exact distribution is not well known, despite the fact that new diagnostic tools such as PCR and competitive ELISA are now available. The authors developed a study of the molecular epidemiology of the disease, based on the amplification of a 2400 bp long fragment containing two duplicated gene coding for a putative membrane protein. The sequence of this fragment, obtained on 19 Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) strains from various geographical locations, gave 11 polymorphic positions. The three mutations found on gene H2prim were silent and did not appear to induce any amino acid modifications in the putative translated protein. The second gene may be a pseudogene not translated in vivo, as it bore a deletion of the ATG codon found in the other members of the "Mycoplasma mycoides cluster" and as the six mutations evidenced in the Mccp strains would induce modifications in the translated amino acids. In addition, an Mccp strain isolated in the United Arab Emirates showed a deletion of the whole pseudogene, a further indication that this gene is not compulsory for mycoplasma growth. Four lineages were defined, based on the nucleotide sequence. These correlated relatively well with the geographical origin of the strains: North, Central or East Africa. The strain of Turkish origin had a sequence similar to that found in North African strains, while strains isolated in Oman had sequences similar to those of North or East African strains. The latter is possibly due to the regular import of goats of various origins. Similar molecular epidemiology tools have been developed by sequencing the two operons of the 16S rRNA gene or by AFLP. All these various techniques give complementary results. One (16S rRNA) offers the likelihood of a finer identification of strains circulating in a region, another (H2) of determining the geographical origin of the strains. These tools can make a very useful contribution to understanding the epidemiology of CCPP. PMID:11844618

  18. Comparison of immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 168 strain in pigs

    PubMed Central

    LI, Pengcheng; LI, Yunfeng; SHAO, Guoqing; YU, Qinghua; YANG, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune responses to intranasal and intrapulmonary vaccinations with the attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) 168 strain in the local respiratory tract in pigs. Twenty-four pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups: an intranasal immunization group, an intrapulmonary immunization group, an intramuscular immunization group and a control group. The levels of local respiratory tract cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated. The levels of interleukin (IL)-6 in the early stage of immunization (P<0.01), local specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in nasal swab samples (P<0.01); and IgA- and IgG-secreting cells in the nasal mucosa and trachea were higher after intranasal vaccination (P<0.01) than in the control group. Interestingly, intrapulmonary immunization induced much stronger immune responses than intranasal immunization. Intrapulmonary immunization also significantly increased the secretion of IL-6 and local specific sIgA and the numbers of IgA- and IgG-secreting cells. The levels of IL-10 and interferon-? in the nasal swab samples and the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the lung and hilar lymph nodes were significantly increased by intrapulmonary immunization compared with those in the control group (P<0.01). These data suggest that intrapulmonary immunization with attenuated Mhp is effective in evoking local cellular and humoral immune responses in the respiratory tract. Intrapulmonary immunization with Mhp may be a promising route for defense against Mhp in pigs. PMID:25649413

  19. Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HS strain) surface lipoprotein pMGA interacts with host apolipoprotein A-I during infection in chicken.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fuli; Zhao, Chengcheng; Bi, Dingren; Tian, Wei; Chen, Jiao; Sun, Jianjun; Peng, Xiuli

    2016-02-01

    The adhesin protein from Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HS strain), namely pMGA1.2, is required for M. gallisepticum (MG) infection in chicken. However, the host factor(s) that interact with pMGA1.2 is not known. In this study, we prepared the membrane fraction of trachea epithelial cells from chicken embryos. Using an improved virus overlay protein blot assay (VOPBA) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assay, we found that pMGA1.2 specifically bound to a ∼30 kDa host protein. This host protein was further identified by mass spectrometry as chicken apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I). We expressed and purified the recombinant ApoA-I protein in Escherichia coli and confirmed that it bound to the purified pMGA1.2 protein in vitro. Transiently expressed pMGA1.2 and ApoA-I were colocalized in HeLa cells. Finally, we designed small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules to knock down the expression of either ApoA-I or pMGA1.2, which inhibited the MG-induced cell cycle disruption in cells of chicken embryo fibroblast cell line (DF-1). Similarly, knockdown of ApoA-I inhibited the cilia loss and damage in chicken trachea cells in MG infection. In summary, ApoA-I may be an essential host factor in MG infection through interacting with pMGA1.2. PMID:26549235

  20. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ? 0.63 ?g/mL to tylosin and with MIC ? 1.25 ?g/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  1. Effects of prelay ts11-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation and time specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation overlays on internal egg and eggshell characteristics of commercial laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma infections are pandemic in multiage layer chicken flocks with M. gallisepticum being the species of greatest concern to commercial egg producers. Live M. gallisepticum vaccines are presently being used to help control M. gallisepticum outbreaks. However, vaccination of layers with F-str...

  2. Characterization of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae strains by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kokotovic, B; Friis, N F; Ahrens, P

    2002-06-01

    Mycoplasma hyospnoviae strains from Denmark, Germany, Japan, Sweden, the Netherlands and the UK were examined for variations in the genomic DNA and within the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. Variations in the chromosomal DNA among 57 isolates recovered from the respiratory tract and joints of pigs, were investigated by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms of the Bg/II and MfeI restriction sites and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of a BssHII digest of chromosomal DNA. Both methods allowed unambiguous differentiation of the analysed strains and showed similar discriminatory potential for the differentiation of M. hyosynoviae isolates. Concordant results obtained with the two whole-genome fingerprinting techniques evidence the considerable intraspecies genetic heterogeneity of M. hyosynoviae. Sixteen field strains of M. hyosynoviae and the type strain S16(T) were further examined for variation within the 16S rRNA gene. Ten field strains possessed the 16S rDNA sequences identical to the type strain, while the remaining six strains had sequences that differed by one to two nucleotides from that obtained from the type strain. PMID:12121046

  3. Evaluation of the Capacity of PCR and High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis for Identification of Mixed Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ghorashi, Seyed A.; Kanci, Anna; Noormohammadi, Amir H.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenicity and presentation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infection may differ from one strain to another and this may have implications on control measures. Infection of individual birds with more than one MG strain has been reported. A PCR followed by high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis has been developed in our laboratory and routinely used for detection and differentiation of MG strains. However the potential of this test for identification of MG strains in a mixed specimen has not been evaluated. In the present study, the capability of PCR-HRM curve analysis technique, targeting vlhA and pvpA genes was assessed for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed population. Different DNA ratios of two MG strains from 1 to 10-4 ng were tested with some generated conventional and normalized curves distinct from those of individual strains alone. Using genotype confidence percentages (GCP) generated from HRM curve analysis, it was found that vlhA PCR-HRM was more consistent than pvpA PCR-HRM for the detection of MG ts-11 vaccine strain mixed with any of the MG strains 6/85, F, S6 or a field isolate. The potential of vlhA PCR-HRM to detect mixed MG strains in a specimen was found to be primarily dependent on quantity and proportion of the target DNAs in the mixture. This is the first study examining the capacity of PCR-HRM technique for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed strain population. PMID:25970590

  4. Evaluation of the Capacity of PCR and High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis for Identification of Mixed Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum Strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Kanci, Anna; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenicity and presentation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infection may differ from one strain to another and this may have implications on control measures. Infection of individual birds with more than one MG strain has been reported. A PCR followed by high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis has been developed in our laboratory and routinely used for detection and differentiation of MG strains. However the potential of this test for identification of MG strains in a mixed specimen has not been evaluated. In the present study, the capability of PCR-HRM curve analysis technique, targeting vlhA and pvpA genes was assessed for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed population. Different DNA ratios of two MG strains from 1 to 10(-4) ng were tested with some generated conventional and normalized curves distinct from those of individual strains alone. Using genotype confidence percentages (GCP) generated from HRM curve analysis, it was found that vlhA PCR-HRM was more consistent than pvpA PCR-HRM for the detection of MG ts-11 vaccine strain mixed with any of the MG strains 6/85, F, S6 or a field isolate. The potential of vlhA PCR-HRM to detect mixed MG strains in a specimen was found to be primarily dependent on quantity and proportion of the target DNAs in the mixture. This is the first study examining the capacity of PCR-HRM technique for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed strain population. PMID:25970590

  5. Dietary poultry fat, phytase, and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol influence the digestive and reproductive organ characteristic of commercial...at the onset of lay with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum 1 , 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT Effects of 2 supplemental concentrations of dietary poultry fat (PF) and the combination of PF, phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D] on the gross digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial layers inoculated with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) w...

  6. Influence of Supplemental Dietary Poultry Fat, Phytase, and 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol on the Performance of Commercial Layers Inoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with F-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 2 levels of supplemental dietary poultry fat (PF) and the combination of PF, phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (D3) on the performance of commercial layers inoculated with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were investigated in 2 trials. Sham and FMG inoculations were ...

  7. Influence of supplemental dietary poultry fat, phytase, and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on the egg characteristics of commercial layers inoculated before or at the onset of lay with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 2 supplemental levels of dietary poultry fat (PF) and the combination of PF, phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (D3) on the egg characteristics of commercial layers inoculated with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were investigated in 2 trials. Sham and FMG inoculatio...

  8. EFFECTS OF S6-STRAIN MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM INOCULATION AT TEN, TWENTY-TWO, OR FORTY-FIVE WEEKS OF AGE ON THE BLOOD CHARACTERISTICS OF COMMERCIAL EGG LAYING HENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In two consecutive trials of the current study, the effect of the age of application of S6-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (S6MG) inoculation on the blood characteristics of commercial layers housed and maintained under controlled conditions was determined. The ages of inoculation compared were tho...

  9. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Phytase and 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol on the Digestive and Reproductive Organ Characteristics of Commercial Layers Inoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with the F-Strain of Mycoplasma galli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 3 trials, the effects of dietary supple mentation with phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-D3) on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial layers that were inoculated pre-lay (12 wk of age) or at the onset of lay (22 wk of age) with F-strain Mycoplasma gallis...

  10. Influence of supplemental dietary poultry fat, phytase, and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on the blood characteristics of commercial layers inoculated before or at the onset of lay with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 2 supplemental levels of dietary poultry fat (PF) and the combination of PF, phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D] on the blood characteristics of commercial layers inoculated with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were investigated in 2 trials. Sham and FMG ino...

  11. Influence of Supplemental Dietary Poultry Fat on the Digestive and Reproductive Organ Characteristics of Commercial Layers Inoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with F-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation and 1.5 % supplemental dietary poultry fat (PF) on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial layers at 58 wk of age were investigated. Sham and FMG inoculations were administered at 12 (before lay) and 22 (e...

  12. Mycoplasma gallisepticum transmission: comparison of commercial F-strain vaccine versus layer complex-derived field strains in a tunnel ventilated house.

    PubMed

    Purswell, J L; Evans, J D; Leigh, S A; Collier, S D; Olanrewaju, H A; Kim, E J; Pharr, G T; Peebles, E D; Branton, S L

    2012-12-01

    Two simultaneous trials were conducted using a commercially available, live, F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccine (trial 1) or 2 inocula of layer complex-derived MG strains (LCD-MG; trial 2). In each of the 2 trials, 4 commercial turkeys were housed in each of 2 adjoining pens immediately adjacent to air inlets. The turkeys (8/trial) were inoculated in the right eye with either a 1× dose of FMG (trial 1) or with 0.02 mL of 1 of 2 actively growing LCD-MG inocula (4 turkeys/inoculum; trial 2). In each of the 2 trials, one pen housing 4 inoculated turkeys was maintained without the addition of other poultry, whereas 16 MG-free broilers and 4 MG-free layers were added to the other pen of 4 inoculated turkeys. Within each of the trials and at increasing intervals, either 4 layers (3 pens) or 4 turkeys (3 pens) were placed down-airstream from the inoculated pens. The distance of the first pen from the inoculated turkeys was separated by the width of one pen that was empty. Succeeding down-airstream pens were situated such that the empty distance (absence of any poultry) between pens that contained poultry doubled from one pen to the next such that the final pen that contained poultry had 4 empty pens between it and the next up-airstream pen that also contained poultry. At 106 d postinoculation, all poultry were bled, swabbed for MG from the choanal cleft, and then euthanized and necropsied. No commingled poultry in trial 1 (FMG), whether inoculated (turkeys) or commingled (layers and broilers), died during the course of the trial, and 5 of the 8 FMG-vaccinated turkeys exhibited serological but not cultural evidence of mycoplasmosis. In trial 2 (LCD-MG), 2 commingled broilers died and no inoculated turkeys exhibited either serological or cultural evidence of mycoplasmosis. In both trials, no poultry housed down-airstream from the inoculated poultry showed evidence of clinical signs of mycocplasmosis and none showed either serological or cultural evidence of mycoplasmosis. PMID:23155015

  13. High rates of genital mycoplasma infection in the highlands of Papua New Guinea determined both by culture and by a commercial detection kit.

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, A; Passey, M; Yoannes, M; Michael, A

    1997-01-01

    Duplicate vaginal swabs were collected from 100 women, and comparisons were made between an in-house broth-agar culture system and a commercially available kit, the Mycoplasma IST kit (bioMrieux), for the detection of Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. There was good agreement between the two systems for detection of the genital mycoplasmas in terms of sensitivity, with values of > 92% being obtained. In terms of specificity, the mutual comparisons were less favorable, though specificity values of > 72% were obtained. Statistically there was no significant difference in the performance of the two tests (P < 0.1 for both M. hominis and U. urealyticum). While the broth-agar culture system was considerably less expensive than the kit, the Mycoplasma IST kit provided additional information on antibiotic susceptibilities and had the advantages of a shelf life of up to 12 months and not requiring the preparation of culture media. The prevalences of colonization obtained for M. hominis and U. urealyticum were extremely high in this randomly selected group of women from periurban and rural settlements in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, being > or = 70% for M. hominis and > or = 78% for U. urealyticum. colonization with both genital mycoplasmas simultaneously was also very common, with > or = 60% of women being colonized by both M. hominis and U. urealyticum. PMID:8968907

  14. Use of mgc2-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism for rapid differentiation between field isolates and vaccine strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in Israel.

    PubMed

    Lysnyansky, Inna; Garcia, Maricarmen; Levisohn, Sharon

    2005-06-01

    Increasing use of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) live vaccines has led to a need for a rapid test for differentiation of MG field strains from the live vaccine strains ts-11 and 6/85. We examined the differentiating potential of diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers targeted to the gene mgc2, encoding a cytadherence-related surface protein uniquely present in MG. The mgc2-PCR diagnostic primers are specific for MG in tests of all avian mycoplasmas or bacteria present in the chicken trachea and are sensitive enough to readily detect MG in tracheal swabs from field outbreaks. Differentiation of vaccine strain ts-11 was based on identification of restriction enzyme sites in the 300-base-pair (bp) mgc2-PCR amplicon present in ts-11 and missing in MG isolates from field outbreaks in Israel. Restriction sites for the enzymes HaeII and SfaN1 were identified in the amplified region in strain ts-11 and were not found in 28 field isolates of MG, comprising a representative cross section of all the MG isolates from the period 1997-2003. In practice, differential diagnosis of MG is achieved within 1 day of submission of tracheal swab samples by mgc2-PCR amplification and restriction of the amplicon with HaeII, giving a 270-bp fragment for ts-11 or no restriction for other MG strains tested. Application of the mgc2-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (mgc2-PCR-RFLP) assay enabled differential diagnosis of both components of a mixture of ts-11 and non-ts-11 DNA, detecting the field strain in the presence of a large excess of ts-11. The test was successfully applied in vivo for monitoring vaccinates in a ts-11 vaccine trial. In principle, the test may also be used to identify the 6/85 vaccine strain, which yields a 237-bp product, readily differentiated from the approximately 300-bp PCR product of all other strains tested. Further testing of field isolates will be necessary to determine the applicability of this test in the United States and other countries. PMID:16094829

  15. Facklamia hominis scapula abscess, Marseille, France

    PubMed Central

    Abat, C.; Garcia, V.; Rolain, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Facklamia hominis is a Gram-positive bacterium that was first isolated from various human samples, excluding abscesses of the scapula. Wehere report the first scapular abscess infection due to F. hominis, found in Marseille, France. We also reviewed all cases published in the literature.

  16. gga-miR-101-3p Plays a Key Role in Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HS Strain) Infection of Chicken.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zaiwei; Bi, Dingren; Hou, Yue; Zhao, Yabo; Sun, Jianjun; Peng, Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), one of the most pathogenic Mycoplasma, has caused tremendous economic loss in the poultry industry. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are involved in microbial pathogenesis. However, little is known about potential roles of miRNAs in MG infection of chicken. In the present study, using miRNA Solexa sequencing we have found that gga-miR-101-3p was up-regulated in the lungs of MG-infected chicken embryos. Moreover, gga-miR-101-3p regulated expression of the host enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) through binding to the 3' un-translated region (3'-UTR) of EZH2 gene. Over-expression of gga-miR-101-3p significantly inhibited EZH2 expression and hence inhibited proliferation of chicken embryonic fibroblast (DF-1 cells) by blocking the G1-to-S phase transition. Similar results were obtained in MG-infected chicken embryos and DF-1 cells, where gga-miR-101-3p was significantly up-regulated, while EZH2 was significantly down-regulated. This study reveals that gga-miR-101-3p plays an important role in MG infection through regulation of EZH2 expression and provides a new insight into the mechanisms of MG pathogenesis. PMID:26633386

  17. gga-miR-101-3p Plays a Key Role in Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HS Strain) Infection of Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zaiwei; Bi, Dingren; Hou, Yue; Zhao, Yabo; Sun, Jianjun; Peng, Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), one of the most pathogenic Mycoplasma, has caused tremendous economic loss in the poultry industry. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are involved in microbial pathogenesis. However, little is known about potential roles of miRNAs in MG infection of chicken. In the present study, using miRNA Solexa sequencing we have found that gga-miR-101-3p was up-regulated in the lungs of MG-infected chicken embryos. Moreover, gga-miR-101-3p regulated expression of the host enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) through binding to the 3’ un-translated region (3’-UTR) of EZH2 gene. Over-expression of gga-miR-101-3p significantly inhibited EZH2 expression and hence inhibited proliferation of chicken embryonic fibroblast (DF-1 cells) by blocking the G1-to-S phase transition. Similar results were obtained in MG-infected chicken embryos and DF-1 cells, where gga-miR-101-3p was significantly up-regulated, while EZH2 was significantly down-regulated. This study reveals that gga-miR-101-3p plays an important role in MG infection through regulation of EZH2 expression and provides a new insight into the mechanisms of MG pathogenesis. PMID:26633386

  18. Simultaneous detection and identification of common cell culture contaminant and pathogenic mollicutes strains by reverse line blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; James, Gregory; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay to detect and identify the commonest mollicutes causing cell line contamination (Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma fermentans, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma orale, and Acholeplasma laidlawii) and human infection (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma parvum, and Ureaplasma urealyticum). We developed a nested PCR assay with "universal" primers targeting the mollicute 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. Amplified biotin-labeled PCR products were hybridized to membrane-bound species-specific oligonucleotide probes. The assay correctly identified reference strains of 10 mollicute species. Cell cultures submitted for detection of mollicute contamination, clinical specimens, and clinical isolates were initially tested by PCR assay targeting a presumed mollicute-specific sequence of the 16S rRNA gene. Any that were positive were assessed by the RLB assay, with species-specific PCR assay as the reference method. Initially, 100 clinical and 88 of 92 cell culture specimens gave concordant results, including 18 in which two or more mollicute species were detected by both methods. PCR and sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and subsequent retesting by species-specific PCR assay of the four cell culture specimens for which results were initially discrepant confirmed the original RLB results. Sequencing of amplicons from 12 cell culture specimens that were positive in the 16S rRNA PCR assay but negative by both the RLB and species-specific PCR assays failed to identify any mollicute species. The RLB hybridization assay is sensitive and specific and able to rapidly detect and identify mollicute species from clinical and cell line specimens. PMID:15006769

  19. Mycoplasma agassizii Strain Variation and Distinct Host Antibody Responses Explain Differences between Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays and Western Blot Assays ?

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, Lori D.; Klein, Paul A.; Jacobson, Elliott R.; Brown, Mary B.

    2010-01-01

    The precarious status of desert (Gopherus agassizii) and gopher (G. polyphemus) tortoises has resulted in conservation efforts that now include health assessment as an important component of management decision-making. Mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) is one of very few diseases in chelonians for which comprehensive and rigorously validated diagnostic tests exist. In this study, serum samples obtained from eight Gopherus tortoises documented at necropsy to (i) be enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) seropositive using the PS6 antigen, (ii) be infected with Mycoplasma agassizii as indicated by direct isolation of the pathogen from the respiratory surfaces, and (iii) have histological lesions of mycoplasmal URTD were used to evaluate four distinct clinical isolates of M. agassizii as antigens for ELISA and Western blot analyses. Each animal sample reacted in the Western blot with its homologous M. agassizii strain, but recognition of heterologous M. agassizii strains was variable. Further, individual animals varied significantly with respect to the specific proteins recognized by the humoral immune response. An additional 114 Gopherus serum samples were evaluated using ELISA antigens prepared from the four distinct M. agassizii strains; A405 values were significantly correlated (r2 goodness of fit range, 0.708 to 0.771; P < 0.0001) for all antigens tested. The results confirm that strain variation is responsible for the observed differences between Western blot binding patterns. Thus, reliance on a single M. agassizii strain as an antigen in Western blot assays may provide false-negative results. This could have adverse consequences for the well-being of these environmentally sensitive hosts if false-negative animals were relocated to sites consisting of true-negative populations. PMID:20810678

  20. Survey of Surface Proteins from the Pathogenic Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Strain 7448 Using a Biotin Cell Surface Labeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reolon, Luciano Antonio; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Schrank, Irene Silveira; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of the repertoire of proteins exposed on the cell surface by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae), the etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, is critical to understand physiological processes associated with bacterial infection capacity, survival and pathogenesis. Previous in silico studies predicted that about a third of the genes in the M. hyopneumoniae genome code for surface proteins, but so far, just a few of them have experimental confirmation of their expression and surface localization. In this work, M. hyopneumoniae surface proteins were labeled in intact cells with biotin, and affinity-captured biotin-labeled proteins were identified by a gel-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach. A total of 20 gel slices were separately analyzed by mass spectrometry, resulting in 165 protein identifications corresponding to 59 different protein species. The identified surface exposed proteins better defined the set of M. hyopneumoniae proteins exposed to the host and added confidence to in silico predictions. Several proteins potentially related to pathogenesis, were identified, including known adhesins and also hypothetical proteins with adhesin-like topologies, consisting of a transmembrane helix and a large tail exposed at the cell surface. The results provided a better picture of the M. hyopneumoniae cell surface that will help in the understanding of processes important for bacterial pathogenesis. Considering the experimental demonstration of surface exposure, adhesion-like topology predictions and absence of orthologs in the closely related, non-pathogenic species Mycoplasma flocculare, several proteins could be proposed as potential targets for the development of drugs, vaccines and/or immunodiagnostic tests for enzootic pneumonia. PMID:25386928

  1. Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov., a fast growing Mycoplasma species isolated from wild Caprinae.

    PubMed

    Jores, Joerg; Fischer, Anne; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Thomann, Andreas; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth M; Schnee, Christiane; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Heller, Martin; Frey, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    Five Mycoplasma strains from wild Caprinae were analyzed: four from Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) which died at the Berlin Zoo between 1993 and 1994, one from a Rocky Mountain goat collected in the USA prior to 1987. These five strains represented a population different from the populations belonging to the 'Mycoplasma mycoides cluster' as tested using multi locus sequence typing, Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene (rrs), genomic sequence based in silico as well as laboratory DNA-DNA hybridization, and the analysis of phenotypic traits in particular their exceptionally rapid growth all confirmed that they do not belong to any Mycoplasma species described to date. We therefore suggest these strains represent a novel species, for which we propose the name Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov. The type strain is G5847(T) (=DSM 26019(T)=NCTC 13622(T)) [corrected]. PMID:24016869

  2. Isolation and molecular identification of mycoplasma genitalium from the secretion of genital tract in infertile male and female

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni Moghadam, Naeime; Kheirkhah, Babak; Mirshekari, Toraj Reza; Fasihi Harandi, Majid; Tafsiri, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasmas can cause acute and chronic diseases at multiple sites with wide-range complications and have been implicated as cofactors in diseases. The infections influenced form genital mycoplasmas specifically Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma genitalium potentially affect reproductive disorders, and infertility. Objective: Isolation and molecular identification of Mycoplasma genitalium from the genital tract of infertile male and vaginal discharge of infertile female referred to Infertility Center of Kerman in 2013. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, prospective study. We included 100 infertile male and 100 infertile female that were referred to the Infertility Center of Kerman. Then for isolation and molecular identification of Mycoplasma genitalium from urethral and vaginal discharge polymerase chain reaction was performed on Mycoplasma genus and genitalium. Results: From a total of 100 semen samples 45 patients (45%) were mycoplasma-positive and 13 (28.8%) were genitalium species positive. Also, from a total of 100 women samples 43 women (43%) were mycoplasma-positive and 10 (23.2%) were genitalium species positive. Positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetic tree was drawn. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, a high percentage of infertile male and female were infected with the Mycoplasma genitalium. For prevention of harmful and significant consequences of this infection, we suggest a screening program in symptomatic infertile couples. PMID:25469132

  3. Comparison of multiple genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region for their capacity in high resolution melt curve analysis to differentiate Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 from field strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Bradbury, Janet M; Ferguson-Noel, Naola M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-12-27

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses in the global poultry industry. In an attempt to compare and evaluate existing genotyping methods for differentiation of MG strains/isolates, high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was applied to 5 different PCR methods targeting vlhA, pvpA, gapA, mgc2 genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region (IGSR). To assess the discriminatory power of PCR-HRM of examined genes and IGSR, MG strains ts-11, F, 6/85 and S6, and, initially, 8 field isolates were tested. All MG strains/isolates were differentiated using PCR-HRM curve analysis and genotype confidence percentage (GCP) values of vlhA and pvpA genes, while only 0, 3 and 4 out of 12 MG strains/isolates were differentiated using gapA, mgc2 genes and IGSR, respectively. The HRM curve analysis of vlhA and pvpA genes was found to be highly correlated with the genetic diversity of the targeted genes confirmed by sequence analysis of amplicons generated from MG strains. The potential of the vlhA and pvpA genes was also demonstrated for genotyping of 12 additional MG strains from Europe and the USA. Results from this study provide a direct comparison between genes previously used in sequencing-based genotyping methods for MG strain identification and highlight the usefulness of vlhA and pvpA HRM curve analyses as rapid and reliable tools specially for diagnosis and differentiation of MG strains used here. PMID:24238667

  4. Epidemiology and pathogenicity of Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, P W; Helgason, M M; Mathias, R G; Proctor, E M

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on a large outpatient population to evaluate the epidemiology and pathogenicity of Blastocystis hominis. Patients with stool specimens positive for B. hominis and negative for other bacterial and parasitic pathogens were sent a questionnaire and were requested to submit a follow-up specimen for ova-and-parasite examination. B. hominis was identified in 530 of 16,545 specimens (3.2%). There was a spectrum of clinical-pathological presentations in the 143 patients evaluated. An asymptomatic carrier state was seen in 19 patients. Fifteen patients had an illness consistent with acute self-limited B. hominis gastroenteritis, and 21 patients had chronic gastroenteritis associated with B. hominis. In the epidemiological evaluation of 130 patients, the most common symptoms were watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, and gas. We did not find a statistically significant association between the number of organisms present and the disease state. In summary, our results are consistent with a role for B. hominis in acute and chronic gastroenteritis; however, further detailed studies are necessary to determine whether that role is one of association or causation. PMID:2298869

  5. Ultrastructural visualization of anionic sites on mycoplasma membranes by polycationic ferritin.

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, H G; Krauss, H; Brunner, H; Gerhardt, U

    1976-01-01

    Anionic sites on mycoplasma membranes were visualized in the electron microscope by a polycationized ferritin derivative. The technique of thin sectioning was used. Staining prior to fixation led to clustering of ferritin granules on the mycoplasma cell surface. On glutaraldehyde-fixed Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri, M. gallisepticum, M. pneumoniae, and Acholeplasma laidlawii, the anionic sites were uniformly distributed over the entire membrane surface. M. hominis did not bind the polycationic ferritin label. Chemical and enzymatic treatments of the mycoplasmas indicated that the anionic sites may be lipid phosphate groups. Isolated M. mycoides subsp. capri membranes were labeled exclusively on only one membrane surface, presumably the outer one. Liposomes prepared from diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine were also labeled by the polycationic ferritin. Images PMID:776936

  6. Effects of 6/85-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation alone at 10 weeks of age or in conjunction with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation overlays at 22 or 45 weeks of age on the performance of commercial ....

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 6/85-strain M. gallisepticum (6/85MG) inoculation alone or in conjunction with a F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) over-lay and its timing on the performance of commercial egg laying hens were investigated. Control birds received sham inoculations at 10 wk of age. A second treated gro...

  7. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections Page Content Article Body Some lung ... walking pneumonia), are caused by an organism called Mycoplasma pneumoniae. It is spread from person to person ...

  8. Extensive Variation and Rapid Shift of the MG192 Sequence in Mycoplasma genitalium Strains from Patients with Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Miriam; Williams, James A.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Jia, Qiuyao; Myers, Leann; Martin, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium causes persistent urogenital tract infection in humans. Antigenic variation of the protein encoded by the MG192 gene has been proposed as one of the mechanisms for persistence. The aims of this study were to determine MG192 sequence variation in patients with chronic M. genitalium infection and to analyze the sequence structural features of the MG192 gene and its encoded protein. Urogenital specimens were obtained from 13 patients who were followed for 10 days to 14 months. The variable region of the MG192 gene was PCR amplified, subcloned into plasmids, and sequenced. Sequence analysis of 220 plasmid clones yielded 97 unique MG192 variant sequences. MG192 sequence shift was identified between sequential specimens from all but one patient. Despite great variation of the MG192 gene among and within clinical specimens from different patients, MG192 sequences were more related within M. genitalium specimens from an individual patient than between patients. The MG192 variable region consisted of 11 discrete subvariable regions with different degrees of variability. Analysis of the two most variable regions (V4 and V6) in five sequential specimens from one patient showed that sequence changes increased over time and that most sequences were present at only one time point, suggesting immune selection. Topology analysis of the deduced MG192 protein predicted a surface-exposed membrane protein. Extensive variation of the MG192 sequence may not only change the antigenicity of the protein to allow immune evasion but also alter the mobility and adhesion ability of the organism to adapt to diverse host microenvironments, thus facilitating persistent infection. PMID:24396043

  9. Specific Evolution of F1-Like ATPases in Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Dautant, Alain; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Labroussaa, Fabien; Sköllermo, Anna; Persson, Anja; Blanchard, Alain; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    F1F0 ATPases have been identified in most bacteria, including mycoplasmas which have very small genomes associated with a host-dependent lifestyle. In addition to the typical operon of eight genes encoding genuine F1F0 ATPase (Type 1), we identified related clusters of seven genes in many mycoplasma species. Four of the encoded proteins have predicted structures similar to the α, β, γ and ε subunits of F1 ATPases and could form an F1-like ATPase. The other three proteins display no similarity to any other known proteins. Two of these proteins are probably located in the membrane, as they have three and twelve predicted transmembrane helices. Phylogenomic studies identified two types of F1-like ATPase clusters, Type 2 and Type 3, characterized by a rapid evolution of sequences with the conservation of structural features. Clusters encoding Type 2 and Type 3 ATPases were assumed to originate from the Hominis group of mycoplasmas. We suggest that Type 3 ATPase clusters may spread to other phylogenetic groups by horizontal gene transfer between mycoplasmas in the same host, based on phylogeny and genomic context. Functional analyses in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides showed that the Type 3 cluster genes were organized into an operon. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that the seven encoded proteins were produced during growth in axenic media. Mutagenesis and complementation studies demonstrated an association of the Type 3 cluster with a major ATPase activity of membrane fractions. Thus, despite their tendency toward genome reduction, mycoplasmas have evolved and exchanged specific F1-like ATPases with no known equivalent in other bacteria. We propose a model, in which the F1-like structure is associated with a hypothetical X0 sector located in the membrane of mycoplasma cells. PMID:22685606

  10. Mycoplasma gallisepticum: Control by live attenuated vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  11. Effects of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation at twelve weeks of age on performance and egg characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens.

    PubMed

    Burnham, M R; Branton, S L; Peebles, E D; Lott, B D; Gerard, P D

    2002-10-01

    The effects of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation during the pullet period on the subsequent performance and egg characteristics of commercial Single Combed White Leghorn hens were evaluated. In two trials, BW, feed consumption, egg production (EP), egg weight, egg size class, relative eggshell water vapor conductance, and relative percentages of eggshell, yolk and albumen weights were determined through approximately 60 wk of age. In each trial, pullets at 12 wk of age were randomly assigned to negative pressure biological isolation units. Birds in one-half of the total units were inoculated with FMG, and the other half were sham-inoculated with sterile media. In both trials, onset of lay was delayed approximately 1 wk in layers inoculated with FMG. Control birds that had not been previously inoculated with FMG laid their first egg at 18 wk of age, while birds that had been previously inoculated with FMG laid their first egg at 19 wk of age. In Trial 1, FMG-inoculated hens laid significantly fewer total eggs, which became apparent at each week after Week 42. In Trial 2, a numerical decrease in total EP occurred, and the percentage of undersized eggs laid by FMG-inoculated birds was significantly lower at 19 wk of age but was higher at 20 and 21 wk when compared to controls. Mortality was not significantly different between the treatments in either trial. These data demonstrate that when birds are housed in isolation facilities and inoculated with FMG at 12 wk of age, onset of lay is delayed. These data also suggest that FMG may lead to delays in undersize EP and decreases in total EP. However, because significant FMG effects on these parameters were observed in only one trial, additional studies may be necessary to verify these effects. PMID:12412912

  12. Ether-linked lipids of Dermabacter hominis, a human skin actinobacterium.

    PubMed

    Valero-Guillén, Pedro L; Fernández-Natal, Isabel; Marrodán-Ciordia, Teresa; Tauch, Andreas; Soriano, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    Dermabacter hominis is a medically important actinobacterial inhabitant of human skin, although it is rarely implicated in infections. The lipid composition of D. hominis is revisited in this study in the context of its natural resistance to daptomycin, an antibiotic whose activity is influenced by membrane lipids. Thin layer chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed that this species contains phospholipids and glycolipids. Using electrospray ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (exact mass) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, the major phospholipid of D. hominis was identified as plasmanyl-phosphatidylglycerol (pPG), because it presented one alkyl chain and one acyl chain in the glycerol moiety of the molecule. The structure of the major glycolipid (GL1) was studied by combined gas-liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, and was established as galactosyl-α-(1→2)-glucosyl-alkyl-acyl-glycerol. Lipid analyses showed differences between one daptomycin-resistant (DAP-R) strain and one daptomycin-sensitive (DAP-S) strain growing in the presence of the antibiotic: DAP-R tended to accumulate GL1 and to reduce pPG, whereas DAP-S maintained high proportions of pPG. The results demonstrate the existence of ether-linked lipids in D. hominis and reveal a differential distribution of phospholipids and glycolipids according to the sensitivity or resistance to daptomycin, although the mechanism(s) operating in the resistance to the antibiotic remain(s) to be elucidated. PMID:26867985

  13. Mycoplasma-dependent activation of normal lymphocytes: mitogenic potential of mycoplasmas for mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Aldridge, K E; Ward, J R

    1977-01-01

    Nonviable preparations of a wide variety of glucose-utilizing mycoplasma species, including Acholeplasma laidlawii and Spiroplasma citri, were found to be mitogenic for mouse lymphocytes. Particularly strong reactions were obtained with Mycoplasma synoviae, M. gallisepticum, M. pneumoniae, S. citri, and a strain of M. fermentans that was previously isolated from a leukemic patient. Nonviable preparations of arginine-utilizing mycoplasmas inhibited the uptake of [3H]thymidine by lymphocytes, but this effect could be reversed by heat treatment or arginine supplementation, and a stimulatory effect was then observed. Viable M. arthritidis was also found to have a mitogenic effect, as detected by an increased uptake of [3H]thymidine by normal lymphocytes and by autoradiographic techniques in which an increase in the numbers of transformed cells was seen. These observations provide the potential for enhanced immunological responsiveness or lymphokine-mediated inflammation in mycoplasma-infected hosts. PMID:924676

  14. Avian mycoplasmosis (Mycoplasma gallisepticum).

    PubMed

    Levisohn, S; Kleven, S H

    2000-08-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most economically significant mycoplasma pathogen of poultry, and has a world-wide distribution. In common with other mycoplasmas, M. gallisepticum is minute in size with minimal genetic information and with a total lack of a bacterial cell wall. These properties are reflected in a high degree of interdependence between M. gallisepticum and the host animal, and in the fastidious nature of the organism in vitro. Strains of M. gallisepticum differ markedly with respect to important biological properties such as pathogenicity, infectivity, tissue tropism and transmissibility. In addition, phenotypic variation of major surface antigens occurs at high frequency, which is a probable explanation for chronic infection by M. gallisepticum despite a strong immune response. Infection with M. gallisepticum has a wide variety of clinical manifestations, but even in the absence of overt clinical signs, the economic impact may be significant. The most dramatic disease presentation of M. gallisepticum is chronic respiratory disease in meat-type birds, often as one of several aetiological agents in a multi-factorial disease complex. Transmission of M. gallisepticum in ovo from infected breeder birds to progeny is the major route of dissemination of the infection, and is the prime consideration for international trade. In most countries, control programmes for M. gallisepticum are based on maintaining commercial breeding stock free of infection. In instances where control of M. gallisepticum infection is not feasible, vaccination, especially with newly developed live M. gallisepticum vaccines, is being evaluated as an option. Major advances in diagnostic methods have been made in recent years. Control programmes have been based on serological methods, with screening for infection usually accomplished by the slide plate agglutination (SPA) test or by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Further serological testing and/or demonstration of the presence of the organism must be used to confirm SPA suspected positive tests. In principle, detection of the presence of the M. gallisepticum organism can be by isolation of the organism or detection of the deoxyribonucleic acid by molecular methods. Polymerase chain reaction represents a rapid and sensitive alternative to traditional culture methods, which require time-consuming specialised techniques. The development of molecular typing methods affords new opportunities for epidemiological studies and identification of reservoirs of infection. PMID:10935272

  15. Mycoplasma gallisepticum in the commercial egg-laying hen: an historical perspective considering effects of pathogen strain, age of bird at inoculation, and diet on performance and physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), a pathogenic organism, primarily causes respiratory distress, but can also spread systemically to subsequently reduce egg production and egg quality in laying hens. However, the effects of MG on the performance and physiology of the commercial laying hen have been sho...

  16. Serologic response of roosters to gradient dosage levels of a commercially available live F strain-derived Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray application is a commonly used time- and labor-efficient means to deliver live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccine to laying hens in commercial production facilities. The dosage of vaccine received by spray vaccinated birds can vary due to variation in the spray plume and vaccine suspension...

  17. Blastocystis hominis--past and future.

    PubMed Central

    Zierdt, C H

    1991-01-01

    The history of B. hominis is unique. Few infectious agents have provoked the many misconceptions that plague this enigmatic parasitic ameba. Conflicting descriptions of its nature and pathogenesis have continued throughout the 20th century. As seen by the greatly expanded number of reports in recent years, B. hominis is now a major subject of study, particularly for evidence of disease causation. Physicians are treating patients with intestinal disease caused by B. hominis. Many mild cases resolve in about 3 days without treatment, but others are acute and chronic disease is common. As with E. histolytica, the carrier state is often seen without symptoms. Treatment is usually with metronidazole, but emetine (for refractory infections), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and pentamidine are also effective. In fecal samples, this complex protozoan appears in a variety of cell forms which makes microscopic diagnosis difficult. As yet, no specific fluorescent-antibody test is available for diagnosis. A culture method to demonstrate the more easily recognized CB form is available, but probably not feasible for most diagnostic laboratories. The common cell forms are the CB form, the granular (mitochondria) form, and the ameba form. The unexpected size range of these forms in clinical material, from yeast size (ca. 7 microns) to giant cells of 20 to 40 microns, makes diagnosis difficult Pseudopodia may be demonstrated by the ameba form in heated microscope stage culture chambers. The anaerobic B. hominis has no cyst form. Its mitochondria are uniquely anaerobic and have no cytochrome protein or oxidative mitochondrial enzymes. Because of its many cell forms and anaerobic mitochondria, B. hominis is an organism of great interest for morphologic and biochemical study. Reproduction is asexual, usually by binary fission. Shizogony occurs in cultured cells. The CB appears to be an organelle whose specific purpose is for reproduction by shizogony. From 2 to 30 progeny are derived from schizogony. The ameba form reproduces by plasmotomy; it has no CB. The pathology of B. hominis infections has been studied in gnotobiotic guinea pigs in which inflammation of the intestinal mucosa and invasion of the superficial layers were seen. Only limited studies of human pathology are available. Those who have studied mucosal histopathology report inflammation and cellular changes that resolve after treatment. More study in this area is strongly indicated (32, 44, 57, 62, 67, 75). Ultrastructural details of B. hominis major forms, except for the schizont, are complete. The organism has no cell wall. The concentric CB takes up as much as 95% of the cell. The major organelles, which include multiple nuclei, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, fat, and other inclusions, are confined in two or four opposed pods in a thin band of peripheral cytoplasm between the spherical entire plasma membrane and the CB membrane. The pods buldge the CB membrane inward. There is evidence of a bacteroid endosymbiont. Education about B. hominis is needed. Entry of recent findings into new textbooks is imperative for its understanding among medical practitioners. Laboratory workers need to be aware of it for many reasons. The College of American Pathologists includes B. hominis in its proficiency testing samples and requires that it be reported from clinical samples. Images PMID:2004348

  18. Influences of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine on productive and reproductive performance of commercial parent broiler chicken breeders on a multi-age farm.

    PubMed

    Liu, J J; Ding, L; Wei, J Z; Li, Y

    2013-06-01

    The influences of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccine inoculation during the pullet period on the subsequent productive and reproductive performance of parent broiler chicken breeders on a multi-age farm were evaluated. Three thousand breeders were randomly divided into 2 treatment groups that were either vaccinated with FMG (FMG-vaccinated group) or not vaccinated with FMG (FMG-free group). Body weight and egg production were determined through approximately 50 wk of age. Egg weight and feed conversion was determined at 26, 32, 35, 38, and 43 wk of age. Egg quality parameters, including eggshell strength, egg-specific gravity, egg shape index, blood-meat spots, Haugh unit score, eggshell thickness, yolk:albumen ratio, percentage yolk, albumen and eggshell weights, and percentage fertility, hatchability, and second-quality chicks were determined at 26, 32, and 43 wk of age. Air sacs were examined and lesions were scored at 20, 32, and 50 wk of age. The number of mature ovarian follicles, histologies of ovary, and lengths, and histologies of the infundibulum, magnum, isthmus, uterus, and vagina were determined. In the present study, an increase in egg production of broiler breeder hens in the FMG-vaccinated group during peak of lay was compared with the FMG-free group. Feed conversion of hens in the FMG-vaccinated group was significantly less at 32, 35, 38, and 43 wk of age. Eggs from hens in the FMG-vaccinated group had a significantly higher Haugh units score at 26 wk of age and had a significantly higher eggshell thickness and lower incidence of blood-meat spots at 32 wk. Hatching eggs from hens in the FMG-vaccinated group had a significantly higher hatchability. The mean lesion score of air-sac lesion of birds in the FMG-vaccinated group was significantly less than FMG-vaccinated group. Uteruses of hens in the FMG-vaccinated group had a significantly longer length compared with the FMG-free group at 32 wk of age. The results indicate that inoculation of commercial parent broiler chicken breeders with the FMG vaccine before laying may prevent infection by field M. gallisepticum, and facilitate productive and reproductive performance. PMID:23687149

  19. Sialidase Activity in Mycoplasma synoviae

    PubMed Central

    May, Meghan; Kleven, Stanley H.; Brown, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Eleven strains of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae were evaluated for the presence of sialidase activity by using the fluorogenic substrate 2?-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-?-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid and the sialidase inhibitor 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid. The kinetics of in vitro growth in modified Freys medium were also assessed for each strain. Five strains had been isolated from clinically symptomatic chickens, and strains WVU1853T and K3344 have been demonstrated to be capable of reproducing disease in specific pathogen-free chickens. All strains exhibited sialidase activity, although the amount varied 65 fold (P < 0.0001) from 1.3 x 10?7 to 2.0 x 10?9 activity units/colony-forming unit among strains. Strains originally isolated from clinically symptomatic birds had more (P < 0.05) sialidase activity than strains from asymptomatic birds. Strain WVU1853T exhibited the most sialidase activity (P < 0.0001) and grew to the highest culture density (P < 0.0001) among strains, but across strains the rank correlation of growth rate with sialidase activity was not significant. Negligible activity was detected in conditioned culture supernatant fluid. This is the first report of sialidase activity in pathogenic strains of M. synoviae, which suggests a potential enzymatic basis for virulence of the organism. PMID:18251389

  20. Flat Gel Polyacrylamide Electrophoresis of Porcine Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Wreghitt, T. G.; Windsor, G. D.; Butler, M.

    1974-01-01

    The flat gel acrylamide electrophoresis technique was standardized and applied to the comparison of four species of porcine mycoplasmas. Clear differences were observed between these species, and differences were seen among the strains of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae. The clarity of the patterns and the number of bands developed was influenced by the amount of protein in the extract and the age of the culture. The technique allows the comparison of several protein extracts in parallel without the problems associated with the rearrangement of separate gel columns. Images PMID:4472455

  1. Flat gel polyacrylamide electrophoresis of porcine mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Wreghitt, T G; Windsor, G D; Butler, M

    1974-10-01

    The flat gel acrylamide electrophoresis technique was standardized and applied to the comparison of four species of porcine mycoplasmas. Clear differences were observed between these species, and differences were seen among the strains of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae. The clarity of the patterns and the number of bands developed was influenced by the amount of protein in the extract and the age of the culture. The technique allows the comparison of several protein extracts in parallel without the problems associated with the rearrangement of separate gel columns. PMID:4472455

  2. A New Integrative Conjugative Element Occurs in Mycoplasma agalactiae as Chromosomal and Free Circular Forms

    PubMed Central

    Marenda, Marc; Barbe, Valrie; Gourgues, Graldine; Mangenot, Sophie; Sagne, Evelyne; Citti, Christine

    2006-01-01

    An integrative conjugative element, ICEA, was characterized in Mycoplasma agalactiae strain 5632, in which it occurs as multiple chromosomal copies and as a free circular form. The distribution of ICEA sequences in M. agalactiae strains and their occurrence in Mycoplasma bovis suggest the spreading of the element within or between species. PMID:16707706

  3. In Vitro Cell Invasion of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Winner, Florian; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    2000-01-01

    The ability of the widespread avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum to invade cultured human epithelial cells (HeLa-229) and chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) was investigated by using the gentamicin invasion assay and a double immunofluorescence microscopic technique for accurate localization of cell-associated mycoplasmas. The presence of intracellular mycoplasmas in both cell lines was clearly demonstrated, with organisms entering the eukaryotic cells within 20 min. Internalized mycoplasmas have the ability to leave the cell, but also to survive within the intracellular space over a 48-h period. Frequencies of invasion were shown to differ between the two cell lines, but were also considerably dependent on the mycoplasma input population. Of the prototype strain R, a low-passage population in artificial medium, Rlow, was capable of active cell invasion, while a high-passage population, Rhigh, showed adherence to but nearly no uptake into HeLa-229 and CEF. By passaging Rlow and Rhigh multiple times through HeLa-229 cells, the invasion frequency was significantly increased. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that M. gallisepticum has the capability of entering nonphagocytic host cells that may provide this pathogen with the opportunity for resisting host defenses and selective antibiotic therapy, establishing chronic infections, and passing through the respiratory mucosal barrier to cause systemic infections. PMID:10858241

  4. Revisiting the reference genomes of human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species: reannotation of C. parvum Iowa and a new C. hominis reference

    PubMed Central

    Isaza, Juan P.; Galván, Ana Luz; Polanco, Victor; Huang, Bernice; Matveyev, Andrey V.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Manque, Patricio; Buck, Gregory A.; Alzate, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis are the most relevant species of this genus for human health. Both cause a self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent individuals, but cause potentially life-threatening disease in the immunocompromised. Despite the importance of these pathogens, only one reference genome of each has been analyzed and published. These two reference genomes were sequenced using automated capillary sequencing; as of yet, no next generation sequencing technology has been applied to improve their assemblies and annotations. For C. hominis, the main challenge that prevents a larger number of genomes to be sequenced is its resistance to axenic culture. In the present study, we employed next generation technology to analyse the genomic DNA and RNA to generate a new reference genome sequence of a C. hominis strain isolated directly from human stool and a new genome annotation of the C. parvum Iowa reference genome. PMID:26549794

  5. Detection of Blastocystis hominis: a controversial human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Basak, Silpi; Rajurkar, Monali N; Mallick, Sanjay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis has been reclassified as a protozoan parasite. Its role as a human pathogen is somewhat controversial. There has been a dramatic increase in the frequency of B. hominis infection in association with diarrhea especially in immunocompromised hosts like AIDS patients, travelers, homosexuals, day care children, animal handlers especially zoo keepers, etc. Recent reports suggest that B. hominis is an emerging pathogen; hence, we have undertaken this study to detect B. hominis from stool samples of patients attending our hospital. About 200 stool samples were tested by light microscopic examination, for observing wet mounts with saline and Lugol's iodine. Permanent staining of fecal smear by Gram's staining and modified acid fast staining was done. The stool sample which was microscopically positive for B. hominis was cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen's (LJ) medium. In one patient, the vacuolated form of B. hominis was observed in wet mount with saline preparation of stool sample. This was very clearly seen in wet mount with Lugol's iodine. In Gram's stained preparation, also the vacuolated form was observed. Detection of B. hominis was not possible by modified acid fast staining. B. hominis was also grown on LJ medium which is an egg-containing medium. Clinical microbiology laboratories should start screening of stool samples for B. hominis as it is an emerging pathogen. PMID:24169810

  6. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA from mycoplasmas by direct solid-phase DNA sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, B; Johansson, K E; Uhln, M

    1994-01-01

    Automated solid-phase DNA sequencing was used for determination of partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of mycoplasmas. The sequence information was used to establish phylogenetic relationships of 11 different mycoplasmas whose 16S rRNA sequences had not been determined earlier. A biotinylated fragment corresponding to positions 344 to 939 in the Escherichia coli sequence was generated by PCR. The PCR product was immobilized onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and direct sequencing was performed in both directions. One previously unclassified avian mycoplasma was found to belong to the Mycoplasma lipophilum cluster of the hominis group. Microheterogeneities were discovered in the rRNA operons of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (SC type), confirming the existence of two different rRNA operons. The 16S rRNA sequence of M. mycoides subsp. capri was identical to that of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides (type SC), except that no microheterogeneities were revealed. Furthermore, automated solid-phase DNA sequencing was used to identify a mycoplasmal contamination of a cell culture as Mycoplasma hyorhinis, which proved to be very difficult by conventional methods. The results suggest that the direct solid-phase DNA sequencing procedure is a powerful tool for identification of mycoplasmas and is also useful in taxonomic studies. Images PMID:7521158

  7. In vitro activity of tiamulin against porcine mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, R F

    1985-01-01

    The activity of tiamulin against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M flocculare, M hyorhinis and M hyosynoviae grown in liquid medium was assessed in vitro. With the first three of these mycoplasmas, the activity of tylosin and oxytetracycline was observed in parallel. Tiamulin was more active against M hyopneumoniae and M flocculare, but there was less disparity between the three antibiotics with the strain of M hyorhinis tested. Tiamulin was notably more active against M hyosynoviae than against M hyopneumoniae. It was more difficult to suppress M hyopneumoniae than the other mycoplasmas with tiamulin. This persistence of M hyopneumoniae was more striking when M hyopneumoniae and M hyosynoviae were tested in parallel. PMID:3975477

  8. Physical map of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, E; Minion, F C

    1994-01-01

    Physical chromosomal maps of two Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains, R and ATCC 19610, were constructed by using field inversion gel electrophoresis. To assist in the ordering of chromosomal fragments and the construction of the chromosomal maps, the gram-positive transposon Tn4001 was modified to serve as a mobile restriction site. The total sizes of the M. gallisepticum R and ATCC 19610 genomes were estimated to be 1,037 and 998 kb, respectively. The restriction enzyme locations for EagI and SmaI were determined along with several transposon insertion sites. The two strain maps were similar except for three small deletions and one additional EagI site in strain ATCC 19610. PMID:8021195

  9. Cardiobacterium hominis bioprosthetic mitral valve endocarditis presenting as septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Johnson, Raymond M; Braverman, Alan C; Dunne, William Michael; Little, J Russell

    2002-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Cardiobacterium hominis bioprosthetic valve endocarditis presenting as septic arthritis. This remarkable presentation had clinical features consistent with endocarditis generally associated with highly virulent pathogens. A literature search has failed to disclose a report of septic arthiritis as a manifestation of C. hominis endocarditis. PMID:11821177

  10. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM HOMINIS N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE) FROM HUMANS, HOMO SAPIENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on biological and molecular data, the species of Cryptosporidium infecting the intestine of humans is considered a new species for which the name Cryptosporidium hominis is proposed. The structure and infectivity of the oocysts of C. hominis from the feces of humans are described. Oocysts are ...

  11. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma acquisition in male HIV-1 infected patients: a multistage cross-sectional survey in Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, L-S; Wu, J-R; Wang, B; Yang, T; Yuan, R; Zhao, Y-Y; Xu, J-S; Guo, H-X; Huan, X-P

    2015-11-01

    Mycoplasma infections are most frequently associated with disease in the urogenital or respiratory tracts and, in most cases, mycoplasmas infect the host persistently. In HIV-infected individuals the prevalence and role of genital mycoplasmas has not been well studied. To investigate the six species of Mycoplasma and the risk factors for infection in Jiangsu province, first-void urine and venous blood samples were collected and epidemiological questionnaires were administered after informed consent. A total of 1541 HIV/AIDS patients were recruited in this study. The overall infection rates of six Mycoplasma species were: Ureaplasma urealyticum (26·7%), Mycoplasma hominis (25·3%), M. fermentans (5·1%), M. genitalium (20·1%), M. penetrans (1·6%) and M. pirum (15·4%). The Mycoplasma infection rate in the unmarried group was lower than that of the married, divorced and widowed groups [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·432, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·077-1·904, P < 0·05]. The patients who refused highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) had a much higher risk of Mucoplasma infection (aOR 1·357, 95% CI 1·097-1·679, P < 0·05). Otherwise, a high CD4+ T cell count was a protective factor against Mycoplasma infection (aOR 0·576, 95% CI 0·460-0·719, P < 0·05). Further research will be required to confirm a causal relationship and to identify risk factors for Mycoplasma infection in HIV/AIDS populations. PMID:25792346

  12. Identification of mycoplasma isolates by ELISA.

    PubMed

    May, J D; Branton, S L

    1997-01-01

    An antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the rapid identification of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae. Two trials were conducted to compare the ELISA with the conventional fluorescent antibody technique. In trial 1, broilers were inoculated with M. gallisepticum F, M. gallisepticum S6, and M. synoviae. In trial 2, hens were inoculated with M. gallisepticum F, M. synoviae, and a combination of the two. Swab isolates were obtained from the choanal cleft and cultures were grown in broth media with a pH indicator. The organisms were bound to 96-well plates for the ELISA or cultured on agar for the fluorescent antibody test. Monoclonal antibodies directed to M. gallisepticum F, M. gallisepticum S6, and M. synoviae were reacted with the ELISA aliquots. The ELISA test identified the mycoplasmas in these samples and was completed within 8 hr but did not identify as many isolates as the fluorescent antibody procedure. The principal advantage of this ELISA is the ability to identify the strain of mycoplasma. PMID:9087324

  13. Comparative genomics of mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Razin, S

    1997-08-01

    The mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest self-replicating organisms. The goal of defining in molecular terms the entire machinery of a living cell by using mycoplasmas as models was put forward by Harold Morowitz in 1984. The recent complete sequencing of the genomes of the human pathogens Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma pneumoniae brings us much closer to achieving this goal. The M. genitalium genome contains only 479 predicted protein coding sequences (genes) and that of M. pneumoniae 677, as compared with 1703 in Haemophilus influenzae and about 4000 in E. coli. Thus, M. genitalium is apparently the simplest organism capable of independent life with a minimal set of genes. The drastic economization in genetic information must have been associated with the parasitic mode of life of the mycoplasmas. During their reductive evolution from Gram-positive bacteria the mycoplasmas have lost the cell wall and many biosynthetic systems involved in synthesis of macromolecule building blocks provided by their host. Thus, the M. genitalium and M. pneumoniae genomes do not carry any gene involved in amino acid biosynthesis, and very few genes for vitamin, nucleic acid precursor and fatty acid biosynthesis. The mycoplasma genomes carry a minimal set of energy metabolism genes, being content with a restricted supply of ATP needed for their parasitic mode of life. Nevertheless, these minimal organisms carry the essential genes for DNA replication, transcription and translation, but even here gene saving is expressed by a minimal number of rRNA and tRNA genes. A genomic price had been paid to maintain parasitism, so that a significant number of mycoplasmal genes is devoted to adhesins, attachment organelles and variable membrane surface antigens directed towards evasion of the host immune system. PMID:9286058

  14. Classification of Mycoplasma synoviae strains using single-strand conformation polymorphism and high-resolution melting-curve analysis of the vlhA gene single-copy region.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Nathan; Gasser, Robin B; Steer, Penelope A; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2007-08-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae is an economically important pathogen of poultry worldwide, causing respiratory infection and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. Identification of M. synoviae isolates is of critical importance, particularly in countries in which poultry flocks are vaccinated with the live attenuated M. synoviae strain MS-H. Using oligonucleotide primers complementary to the single-copy conserved 5' end of the variable lipoprotein and haemagglutinin gene (vlhA), amplicons of approximately 400 bp were generated from 35 different M. synoviae strains/isolates from chickens and subjected to mutation scanning analysis. Analysis of the amplicons by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) revealed 10 distinct profiles (A-J). Sequencing of the amplicons representing these profiles revealed that each profile related to a unique sequence, some differing from each other by only one base-pair substitution. Comparative high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis of the amplicons using SYTO 9 green fluorescent dye also displayed profiles which were concordant with the same 10 SSCP profiles (A-J) and their sequences. For both mutation detection methods, the Australian M. synoviae strains represented one of the A, B, C or D profiles, while the USA strains represented one of the E, F, G, H, I or J profiles. The results presented in this study show that the PCR-based SSCP or HRM curve analyses of vlhA provide high-resolution mutation detection tools for the detection and identification of M. synoviae strains. In particular, the HRM curve analysis is a rapid and effective technique which can be performed in a single test tube in less than 2 h. PMID:17660432

  15. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma species isolated from the genital tract of Dorper sheep in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kalshingi, Habu A; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Gouws, Johan; van Vuuren, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular analysis were conducted on 34 strains of Mycoplasma species isolated between 2003 and 2009 from the genital tract of clinically healthy Dorper sheep and sheep with ulcerative vulvitis and balanitis. Earlier publications identified the causative agent as Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides large colony (MmmLC) and Arcanobacterium pyogenes. The aims of the study were to characterise Mycoplasma species isolated from the genital tract of Dorper sheep with polymerase chain reaction assay, cloning and gene sequencing. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) results revealed six predominant Mycoplasma species: Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, Arcanobacterium laidlawii, MmmLC, Mycoplasma sp. ovine/caprine serogroup II and M. canadense. Sequencing of the 34 isolates were analysed using phylogenetic methods, and 18 (50%) were identified as M. arginini with 99% - 100% similarity to M. arginini from England and Sweden. Six isolates showed 99% similarity to M. bovigenitalium strains from Turkey and Germany. Two isolates had 99% similarity to an M. sp. ovine/caprine sero group II from the United Kingdom. BLAST for two isolates revealed 99% similarity to Acholeplasma laidlawii from India, another two were 99% similar to MmmLC strain from Sweden, two showed 98% similarity to Mycoplasma sp. Usp 120 from Brazil, and two isolates have a 97% - 99% similarity to M. mm. Jcv1 strain from the United States of America. Finally, one isolate showed similarity of 99% to Mycoplasma canadense strain from Italy. The findings support the hypothesis that ulcerative vulvitis and balanitis of Dorper sheep in South Africa (SA) is a multifactorial disease with involvement of different Mycoplasma species. PMID:26244581

  16. Mycoplasma leachii sp. nov. as a new species designation for Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 of Leach, and reclassification of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC as a serovar of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    PubMed

    Manso-Silvn, L; Vilei, E M; Sachse, K; Djordjevic, S P; Thiaucourt, F; Frey, J

    2009-06-01

    The Mycoplasma mycoides cluster consists of six pathogenic mycoplasmas causing disease in ruminants, which share many genotypic and phenotypic traits. The M. mycoides cluster comprises five recognized taxa: Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC), M. mycoides subsp. mycoides Large Colony (MmmLC), M. mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc), Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum (Mcc) and M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp). The group of strains known as Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 of Leach (MBG7) has remained unassigned, due to conflicting data obtained by different classification methods. In the present paper, all available data, including recent phylogenetic analyses, have been reviewed, resulting in a proposal for an emended taxonomy of this cluster: (i) the MBG7 strains, although related phylogenetically to M. capricolum, hold sufficient characteristic traits to be assigned as a separate species, i.e. Mycoplasma leachii sp. nov. (type strain, PG50(T) = N29(T) = NCTC 10133(T) = DSM 21131(T)); (ii) MmmLC and Mmc, which can only be distinguished by serological methods and are related more distantly to MmmSC, should be combined into a single subspecies, i.e. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri, leaving M. mycoides subsp. mycoides (MmmSC) as the exclusive designation for the agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. A taxonomic description of M. leachii sp. nov. and emended descriptions of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides and M. mycoides subsp. capri are presented. As a result of these emendments, the M. mycoides cluster will hereafter be composed of five taxa comprising three subclusters, which correspond to the M. mycoides subspecies, the M. capricolum subspecies and the novel species M. leachii. PMID:19502315

  17. Role of Vpma phase variation in Mycoplasma agalactiae pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Baumgartner, Martina; Gamper, Erika; Innerebner, Carmen; Zimmermann, Martina; Schilcher, Franz; Tichy, Alexander; Winter, Petra; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Compared with other bacterial pathogens, the molecular mechanisms of mycoplasma pathogenicity are largely unknown. Several studies in the past have shown that pathogenic mycoplasmas are equipped with sophisticated genetic systems that allow them to undergo high-frequency surface antigenic variations. Although never clearly proven, these variable mycoplasma surface components are often implicated in host immune evasion and adaptation. Vpma surface lipoproteins of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae are encoded on a genomic pathogenicity island–like locus and are considered as one of the well-characterized model systems of mycoplasma surface antigenic variation. The present study assesses the role of these phase-variable Vpmas in the molecular pathogenesis of M. agalactiae by testing the wild-type strain PG2 in comparison with the xer1-disrupted Vpma ‘phase-locked’ mutants in sheep infection models. The data clearly illustrate that although Xer1 recombinase is not a virulence factor of M. agalactiae and Vpma phase variation is not necessary for establishing an infection, it might critically influence the survival and persistence of the pathogen under natural field conditions, mainly due to a better capacity for dissemination and evoking systemic responses. This is the first study where mycoplasma ‘phase-locked’ mutants are tested in vivo to elucidate the role of phase variation during infection. PMID:22809092

  18. Genomic repeats, genome plasticity and the dynamics of Mycoplasma evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Blanchard, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Mycoplasmas evolved by a drastic reduction in genome size, but their genomes contain numerous repeated sequences with important roles in their evolution. We have established a bioinformatic strategy to detect the major recombination hot-spots in the genomes of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma pulmonis. This allowed the identification of large numbers of potentially variable regions, as well as a comparison of the relative recombination potentials of different genomic regions. Different trends are perceptible among mycoplasmas, probably due to different functional and structural constraints. The largest potential for illegitimate recombination in M.pulmonis is found at the vsa locus and its comparison in two different strains reveals numerous changes since divergence. On the other hand, the main M.pneumoniae and M.genitalium adhesins rely on large distant repeats and, hence, homologous recombination for variation. However, the relation between the existence of repeats and antigenic variation is not necessarily straightforward, since repeats of P1 adhesin were found to be anti-correlated with epitopes recognized by patient antibodies. These different strategies have important consequences for the structures of genomes, since large distant repeats correlate well with the major chromosomal rearrangements. Probably to avoid such events, mycoplasmas strongly avoid inverse repeats, in comparison to co-oriented repeats. PMID:11972343

  19. [Identification of Placenta hominis and its adulterants using COI barcode].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Jia, Jing; Xu, Xiao-Lan; Xin, Tian-Yi; Zhang, Hong-Yin; Shi, Lin-Chun; Yao, Hui; Liu, Dong; Wu, Zhen-Hong

    2014-06-01

    In order to provide a new method for the identification of Placenta hominis, the COI barcode has been employed to identify the P. hominis medicinal materials and its adulterants. Genomic DNA was extracted from the experimental samples. The COI sequences were amplified and sequenced bi-directionally. Sequence assembly and consensus sequence generation were performed using the CodonCode Aligner. NJ tree was constructed by MEGA6.0 software. COI sequences can be successfully obtained from all experimental samples. The intra-specific variation and inter-specific divergence were calculated. The average intra-specific K2P distance of P. hominis was 0.001 and the maximum intra-specific distance was 0.008. The cluster dendrogram constructed can be seen that the same genus is together, and distinguished from its adulterants. It is concluded that P. hominis and its adulterants can be correctly identified by DNA barcoding method. PMID:25244745

  20. Cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis acquired in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, S; Francia, C; Persico, M C; La Vela, V

    2009-12-01

    The authors describe a case of cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis in a 23-year-old Italian woman who contracted the infestation during a tour in Jamaica. The infestation was located on the back and was characterized clinically by a single inflammatory nodule. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cutaneous myiasis due to Dermatobia hominis acquired in Jamaica. PMID:20583696

  1. [Fine Structures Of Trichomonas Tenax And Trichomonas Hominis

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Min; Cho, Kee Mok

    1973-04-01

    Trichomonas tenax(T. tenax) and Trichomonas hominis (T. hominis) were collected, cultured and sampled for comparative microscopical studies using electron microscope. 1. Both flagellates were oval in shape and surrounded by a distinct outer membrane. Five recurrent flagella and one anterior flagellum had, each, 9 paris of peripheral and 1 pair of central fibrils, Undulating membrane was curved over the recurrent flagella, and bended in the middle at right angles with cell surface. Cytostome, engulfing bacteria, was observed in T. hominis. 2. In the cytoplasm, there were fine dense glycogen particles, and vacuoles containing ingested materials. Dense pigment rods were also observed in both flagellates, but the rods were not distributed around the vacuoles in T. hominis. 3. In T. tenax axostyle appeared as a cup-shaped structure comprising a single row of 41 fibrils, each about 120 a in diameter. It enclosed glycogen particles, and the open side was faced to the nucleus. 4. Endoplasmic reticulum was observed around the nucleus, but it was less developed in T. hominis. 5. Nucleus was ovoid having double nuclear membrane, which was clearly defined in T. hominis. 6. Blepharoplast, parabasal body, Golgi appartus and mitochondrion was not observed in both flagellates. PMID:12913492

  2. Mycoplasma gallisepticum invades chicken erythrocytes during infection.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Gunther; Plaickner, Astrid; Szathmary, Susan; Stipkovits, Lszl; Rosengarten, Renate; Szostak, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated using in vitro assays that the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum is able to invade nonphagocytic cells. It was also shown that this mycoplasma can survive and multiply intracellularly for at least 48 h and that this cell invasion capacity contributes to the systemic spread of M. gallisepticum from the respiratory tract to the inner organs. Using the gentamicin invasion assay and a differential immunofluorescence technique combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy, we were able to demonstrate in in vitro experiments that M. gallisepticum is also capable of invading sheep and chicken erythrocytes. The frequencies of invasion of three well-defined M. gallisepticum strains were examined over a period of 24 h, and a significant increase in invasiveness occurred after 8 h of infection. In addition, blood samples derived from chickens experimentally infected via the aerosol route with the virulent strain M. gallisepticum R(low) were analyzed. Surprisingly, M. gallisepticum R(low) was detected in the bloodstream of infected chickens by nested PCR, as well as by differential immunofluorescence and interference contrast microscopy that showed that mycoplasmas were not only on the surface but also inside chicken erythrocytes. This finding provides novel insight into the pathomechanism of M. gallisepticum and may have implications for the development of preventive strategies. PMID:17954728

  3. Filamentous Structures of Type 2 Herpesvirus hominis Infection of the Chorioallantoic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Ernest F.; Nahmias, André J.

    1969-01-01

    In view of recent recognition of the existence of two Herpesvirus hominis (HVH) types with antigenic and biological differences, an electron microscopic study was undertaken of pocks produced on the choriallantoic membrane of embryonated eggs after infection with type 1 and type 2 HVH strains. Besides the typical morphological features of herpesvirus infection noted by several investigators, it was observed that type 2 HVH also produced microtubules measuring approximately 19 nm in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Although the nature of these filamentous structures is still unclear, consideration is given in this paper to the possibility that they may represent viral structural subunits, aberrant forms or neoantigens. Images PMID:4304447

  4. Experimental studies on the pathogenicity of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini for the respiratory tract of goats.

    PubMed Central

    Goltz, J P; Rosendal, S; McCraw, B M; Ruhnke, H L

    1986-01-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were the species of Mollicutes most commonly isolated from 175 goats with respiratory disease in Ontario. The pathogenicity of M. ovipneumoniae, strain B321B and M. arginini, strain D53e, was assessed in goats following endobronchial inoculation. One out of three two year old goats developed fever after inoculation with a pure culture of strain B321B, and it had extensive subacute fibrinous pleuritis when necropsied three weeks later. Neither of the remaining goats had lesions in the respiratory tract. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae was recovered from one of the animals four days after inoculation, but not at necropsy from any of the goats, at which time a marked humoral immune response with growth inhibiting antibodies was detected. In a second experiment three four to five week old goats were inoculated with the same strain and three other goats were given placebo treatment. One experimental goat developed fever and coughing, and it had extensive subacute fibrinous pleuritis in the right side and pneumonia. Another goat had focal pneumonia in the left diaphragmatic lobe. Microscopically there was subacute hyperplastic suppurative bronchiolitis, atelectasis and nonsuppurative alveolitis. The infected animals did not clear the mycoplasma and not all of them produced antibodies. Mycoplasma arginini, strain D53e, did not induce lesions in any of four goat kids within 14 days after inoculation but did cause transient elevations in rectal temperature, circulating monocytes, circulating neutrophils and blood fibrinogen. Mycoplasma arginini was infective and immunogenic for all inoculated animals and showed a particular affinity for the tonsil. Thus, this study provides the first evidence that M. ovipneumoniae is pathogenic for goats causing pneumonia and pleuritis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3742358

  5. Interaction of porcine mycoplasmas with fresh animal serum

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    When fresh animal serum was dropped onto seeded mycoplasma agar plates, inhibition of growth frequently occurred. This effect was dependent on the mycoplasma serotype and on the animal species from which the fresh serum came. This activity of fresh animal serum was heat-labile and would not diffuse through the agar medium. Growth of all the porcine mycoplasma serotypes was inhibited by fresh sheep serum. M. hyorhinis, M. hyopneumoniae, B 3 and the P 45 strains were insensitive to fresh horse serum. The addition of fresh horse serum to specific M. hyorhinis rabbit antiserum-impregnated disks appeared to have a synergistic effect and the combination of M. hyorhinis antiserum-impregnated disk and fresh horse serum always inhibited the growth of M. hyorhinis strains. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5285939

  6. Mycoplasma bovis research update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis in bison is a newly emerging and potentially devastating threat to the bison industry. This bacterium is increasingly being identified, both in the United States and Canada, as the cause of severe respiratory disease outbreaks with devastating consequences for the health of the ani...

  7. Unusually low prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium in urine samples from infertile men and healthy controls: a prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    Plecko, Vanda; Zele-Starcevic, Lidija; Tripkovic, Vesna; Skerlev, Mihael; Ljubojevic, Suzana; Plesko, Sanja; Marekovic, Ivana; Jensen, Jorgen Skov

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect Mycoplasma genitalium in urine samples of infertile men and men without any signs of infection in order to investigate whether M. genitalium and other genital mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma spp) are found more often in urine samples of infertile men than in asymptomatic controls and to determine resistance to macrolides. Methods The study included first void urine samples taken from 145 infertile men and 49 men with no symptoms of urethritis. M. genitalium, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were detected by commercial PCR. Trichomonas vaginalis was detected by microscopy and culture. M. hominis and Ureaplasma spp were detected by culture. M. genitalium was detected by in-house conventional and real-time PCR. Results Two M. genitalium positive samples were found among samples obtained from infertile men. All asymptomatic men were M. genitalium negative. Macrolide resistance was not found in either of the two positive samples. Conclusions In comparison with reported data, an unusually low prevalence of M. genitalium was found in infertile men. The reasons for this unexpected result are not known; possibly, local demographic and social characteristics of the population influenced the result. Further studies to investigate M. genitalium in infertile and other groups of patients are needed. PMID:25157184

  8. [Furunculoid myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis].

    PubMed

    Mirande, L M; Landolfi, J M; Pedemonte, L H; Pepe, C M

    1976-01-01

    The authors report a case of forunculoid miasis by "Dermatobia hominis" ("Ura" fly). a process that being not very common in the Argentine Republic is sometimes misjudged as a furunculosis. The patient reported, a white woman, 51, travelled to a zone where this parasitose is endemid. After some time of her stay there, she noted three small nodes in her vulvar region. They grew on until reaching nearly the size of a walnut. At her first consultation with a gynecologist it was taken as a case of furuncolosis and treated with antibiotics. As the treatment didn't prove succesful, she asked for dermatological advice. It was then possible to verify the presence of three nodes. In the central hole of one of them, there could be seen a whitish body that soon disappeared inwards. This lead to the diagnosis of forunculoid miasis. An accurate and easy-to-perform treatment was carried out: a 1% solution of formaldehyde in distilled water was infused through the central hole of each node. This determined the larva's caudal extremity to appear in search of air. It was taken advantage of this situation to remove the larvae with a pair of nippers. "Dermatobia hominis" is widely spread in the warm-climated Argentine northern provinces of Chaco, Formosa and Misiones, as well as in Brazil, Paraguay and some regions of Uruguay. It is also known under the name of "Ura". It is a large fly, yellow faced, with dark-blue thorax; an almost rombic metallic-blue abdomen, orange antennae and legs, and dark-brown wings. It lives on the nutrients spared during its larval stage and both fecundation and oviposition, take place along its week-long life. The fecundated female catches different haematophagus insects on the wing, sticking sets of eggs to their abdomens. An embryo developes in each egg, being ready to emerge in a week but does this only when the bearer insect settles on a homeothermal being piercing and penetrating the skin of the new guest in about 10 minutes. PMID:1035397

  9. A minimized motile machinery for Mycoplasma genitalium.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Luis; González-González, Luis; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume

    2016-04-01

    The cell wall-less bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium uses specialized adhesins located at the terminal organelle to adhere to host cells and surfaces. The terminal organelle is a polar structure protruding from the cell body that is internally supported by a cytoskeleton and also has an important role in cell motility. We have engineered a M. genitalium null mutant for MG491 protein showing a massive downstream destabilization of proteins involved in the terminal organelle organization. This mutant strain exhibited striking similarities with the previously isolated MG_218 null mutant strain. Upon introduction of an extra copy of MG_318 gene in both strains, the amount of main adhesins P140 and P110 dramatically increased. These strains were characterized by microcinematography, epifluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron microcopy, revealing the presence of motile cells and filaments in the absence of many proteins considered essential for cell adhesion and motility. These results indicate that adhesin complexes play a major role in the motile machinery of M. genitalium and demonstrate that the rod element of the cytoskeleton core is not the molecular motor propelling mycoplasma cells. These strains containing a minimized motile machinery also provide a valuable cell model to investigate the adhesion and gliding properties of this human pathogen. PMID:26712501

  10. Development and immunogenicity of recombinant GapA(+) Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 expressing infectious bronchitis virus-S1 glycoprotein and chicken interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Shil, Pollob K; Kanci, Anna; Browning, Glenn F; Markham, Philip F

    2011-04-12

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major pathogen of poultry that causes chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys. A live attenuated vaccine, ts-11, has been used for the control of MG in several countries. The efficacy of this vaccine is highly dose dependent and the flock antibody response is weak. To improve the functionality of the vaccine and investigate its potential as a delivery vector for foreign antigens and immunomodulatory proteins, we developed a derivative of ts-11 expressing infectious bronchitis virus-S1 glycoprotein (IBV-S1) and releasing chicken interleukin-6 into the extracellular milieu (MG ts-11 C3 (+CS)) using a transposon-based delivery vector. Following administration of MG ts-11 C3 (+CS) to chickens by eye-drop, an antibody response to MG and IBV-S1, as determined by the rapid serum agglutination test (RSA) and Western blotting, respectively, could be detected. Birds inoculated with the recombinant vaccine had significantly enhanced weight gain and were partially protected against damage by pathogenic IBV. These results indicate that the ChIL-6 released by MG ts-11 C3 (+CS) may have had a non-specific effect on growth rate. They also suggest that ts-11 is a promising vaccine vector, capable of delivering heterologous protective antigens, and may also provide non-specific benefits when engineered to express immunomodulatory proteins. With some improvements in the expression system, it could be used to induce a targeted immune response against specific mucosal pathogens, and co-expression of several antigens would allow development of a novel multivalent vaccine. PMID:21354248

  11. Evaluation of the transmission mode of B. hominis by using PCR method.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Fadime; Koltas, Ismail Soner

    2010-09-01

    Blastocystis hominis is a common intestinal parasite observed in fecal examination. On the other hand, the transmission of this parasite is certainly unknown. The transmission of B. hominis can be realized by animal contact and the contamination by water and food with excreted cysts from the reservoir hosts. B. hominis isolated from 25 humans, their pets, and tap water was identified by polymerase chain reaction using sequenced tag site primers in this study. B. hominis isolates obtained from humans and pets were identified as subtype1, subtype2, and subtype3 while B. hominis isolates obtained from tap water were also identified as subtype1. The B. hominis isolates obtained from humans in this study were defined as the same as the subtypes of the B. hominis isolates obtained from the pets, of which these people keep at their homes, and the tap water. These findings reveal that the source of B. hominis infection could be pets and tap water. PMID:20544220

  12. In Vitro Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma putrefaciens Field Isolates?

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, N. T.; Tavo, M. M.; Mercier, P.; Ayling, R. D.; Al-Momani, W.; Assuno, P.; Rosales, R. S.; Poveda, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    MICs were determined for 15 antimicrobial agents against 37 Mycoplasma putrefaciens isolates. The most effective antimicrobial drug classes were the fluoroquinolones, the tetracyclines, the lincosamide lincomycin, and the macrolides. The susceptibility profile of the isolates correlated with the geographic origin. This is the first report of decreased susceptibility to the macrolides, lincomycin, and the tetracyclines in M. putrefaciens strains. PMID:17638695

  13. Pentatrichomonas hominis in laboratory-bred common marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takashi; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Yasuda, Masahiko; Sasaki, Erika; Itoh, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonadid protozoa have been found in the intestinal tracts of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). However, there is little information available on species identification and the pathogenicity of these trichomonads. In this study, we conducted a fecal survey of a common marmoset colony maintained as laboratory animals in Japan and identified the trichomonad species. Screening using a fecal smear examination revealed that 66% (58/88) of the marmosets had trichomonadid trophozoites in their feces. The trichomonads were found in both normal feces (31/49, 63%) and diarrhea (27/39, 69%), with no significant difference in frequency. The protozoa were identified as Pentatrichomonas hominis using morphological characters and the 100% identity of the nucleotide sequence of the partial 18S rRNA gene (297 bp). The intraspecific genetic variability between P. hominis from the marmosets in this study and P. hominis from other reported mammal hosts was ?1% in the nucleotide sequence, including the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS-2 (293 bp). P. hominis inhabits the large intestine of various mammalian hosts, including primates, and is considered nonpathogenic. These results suggest that P. hominis is transmitted among marmosets and other mammals but is not a primary cause of bowel disease in marmosets. PMID:26156572

  14. Clinical significance and prevalence of Blastocystis hominis in Van, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Beyhan, Yunus E.; Yilmaz, Hasan; Cengiz, Zeynep T.; Ekici, Abdurrahman

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the associated clinical symptoms and prevalence of Blastocystis hominis (B. hominis). Methods: Stool samples of 50,185 patients (26,784 males and 23,401 females) who were received at the Parasitology Laboratory of Yuzuncu Yil University Faculty of Medicine, Van, Turkey in the last 5 years were inspected microscopically using saline and iodine-stained wet-mount preparations. Age, gender, and symptoms of patients were recorded and their significance was evaluated. Results: The prevalence of B. hominis in the total sample was 0.54% (275/50185). Out of 275 infected patients, 143 (52%) were males, and 132 (48%) were female (χ2=0.884; p=0.348). The distribution of B. hominis infection was high in 7-13 aged children (34.9%) (χ2=306.8; p=0.001). Blastocystis was higher among symptomatic patients (70.2%) compared with asymptomatic patients (29.8%) (χ2=107.13; p=0.001). The most frequent clinical symptoms associated with the disease were abdominal pain (27.3%) and diarrhea (19.6%) followed by anorexia, fever, saliva, anal itching, and nausea. Conclusion: Blastocystis hominis is considered a causative agent of human disease in patients with recurrent symptoms. Due to the significant risk for zoonotic transmission, molecular techniques must be used to determine the route and source of infection. PMID:26318472

  15. Comparative Genomics and Phylogenomics of Hemotrophic Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Ana M. S.; Santos, Andrea P.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; Timenetsky, Jorge; Messick, Joanne B.

    2014-01-01

    Hemotrophic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas) are a group of animal pathogens of the Mollicutes class. Recently, the genomes of 8 hemoplasmas have been completely sequenced. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of their genomic features and relationship to other Mycoplasma species. The genome structure and dynamics of hemoplasmas were analyzed by evaluating gene synteny, adaptive evolution of paralogous gene families (PGF) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The Mollicutes class was then phylogenetically analyzed by constructing a distance matrix of the 16S rRNA genes and a phylogenetic tree with 32 conserved, concatenated proteins. Our results suggest that the hemoplasmas have dynamic genomes. The genome size variation (from 547 to 1,545 genes) indicates substantial gene gain/loss throughout evolution. Poorly conserved gene syntenies among hemoplasmas, positional shuffling of paralogous genes between strains, HGT, and codons under positive selection in PGFs were also observed. When compared to other Mollicutes species, the hemoplasmas experienced further metabolic reduction, and the 16S rRNA gene distance matrix of the available mollicutes suggests that these organisms presently constitute the most divergent clade within its class. Our phylogenetic tree of concatenated proteins showed some differences when compared to the 16S rRNA gene tree, but non-mycoplasma organisms, such as Ureaplasma spp. and Mesoplasma spp., continue to branch within Mycoplasma clades. In conclusion, while the hemoplasmas experienced further metabolic shrinkage through gene loss, PGFs with positively selected codons are likely beneficial to these species. Phylogeny of the mollicutes based on 16S rRNA genes or concatenated proteins do not obey the current taxonomy. The metabolism and genetic diversity of the mollicutes, the presence of HGT, and lack of standard for genus circumscription are likely to hinder attempts to classify these organisms based on phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24642917

  16. Fulminant Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, E D; Welsh, C H

    1995-01-01

    The frequency of fulminant pneumonia due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of Mycoplasma species infection in the general population. We recently encountered such a case and have reviewed the English-language literature on cases of M pneumoniae pneumonia that have resulted in respiratory failure or death. Due to host factors or on epidemiologic grounds, fulminant cases seem to be more common in young healthy adults, in males, and possibly in smokers among the 46 patients we found. An enhanced host cellular immune response may be responsible for the development of severe cases. A spectrum of small airways disease is characteristic, including cellular bronchiolitis and bronchiolitis obliterans with and without organizing pneumonia. Based largely on anecdotal experience, corticosteroid use may be salutary in patients with respiratory failure. For reasons that are not well known, the incidence of pulmonary thromboembolism is increased in fatal cases. Images PMID:7725685

  17. Increasing the value of hominy feed as a coproduct by fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hominy feed is a low value ($83.7/metric ton) coproduct of the corn dry milling process that accounts for nearly 35% of the starting corn quantity. The average composition of hominy feed on a dry basis is 56.9% starch, 25.2% neutral detergent fiber, 11.1% protein, and 5.3% fat. Starch in hominy fe...

  18. Immunostimulation by phospholipopeptide biosurfactant from Staphylococcus hominis in Oreochromis mossambicus.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Veluchamy; Kalaivani Priyadarshini, Sekaran; Saranya, Viswanathan; Suguna, Ponnusamy; Shenbagarathai, Rajaiah

    2016-01-01

    The immunostimulatory effect of phospholipopeptide biosurfactant from Staphylococcus hominis (GenBank Accession No: KJ564272) was assessed with Oreochromis mossambicus. The non-specific (serum lysozyme activity, serum antiprotease activity, serum peroxidase activity and serum bactericidal activity), specific (bacterial agglutination assay) immune responses and disease resistance activity against Aeromonas hydrophila were examined. Fish were intraperitonially injected with water soluble secondary metabolite (biosurfactant) of S.hominis at a dose of 2mg, 20mg and 200mgkg(-1) body weight. Commercial surfactant surfactin (sigma) at 20mgkg(-1) was used as standard and saline as negative control. All the doses of water soluble biosurfactant tested, significantly enhanced the specific, nonspecific immunity and disease resistance from the day of post administration of phospholipopeptide biosurfactant till the tail of the experimental period. These results clearly indicated that the secondary metabolite isolated from S.hominis stimulates the immunity of finfish thereby could enhance aquaculture production. PMID:26549172

  19. Mycoplasma-Latex Agglutination Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Harry E.

    1966-01-01

    Morton, Harry E. (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia). Mycoplasma-latex agglutination reaction. J. Bacteriol. 92:1196–1205. 1966.—The building up of Mycoplasma cell mass through adsorption to carrier particles as a method for enhancing the agglutination reaction to identify Mycoplasma is described. Mycoplasma cells of human, avian, swine, goat, sewage, and tissue-culture origin were adsorbed to latex particles (0.81 μ) and then were agglutinated by immune sera. The adsorption was demonstrated by electron microscopy. Either the cells or their antibodies, depending on which came into contact with the latex particles first, were adsorbed. The test, completed in less than 2 hr, consisted of serially diluting immune sera with buffered saline, adding the antigen, incubating in a water bath, centrifuging, and reading the reaction under 50 × microscope magnification. The antigen in each reaction tube, representing the growth from about 1.6 ml of culture, was estimated to contain 23 μg of protein (approximately one-tenth the amount of Mycoplasma cells needed for a direct agglutination reaction). In the sera from rabbits undergoing immunization with Mycoplasma antigens, the presence of anti-Mycoplasma antibodies was detected much sooner in the Mycoplasma-latex agglutination reaction test than in the agar-gel diffusion reaction and the growth inhibition tests. Four different lots of latex particles showed excellent uniformity of behavior and stability during storage and testing. Images PMID:4959043

  20. Comparison of the illumigene Mycoplasma DNA amplification assay and culture for detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Amy E; Duffy, Lynn B; Waites, Ken B

    2014-04-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) system, the illumigene Mycoplasma DNA amplification assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Cincinnati, OH) was evaluated to determine its analytical sensitivity, specificity, and clinical application in comparison to historic culture in a collection of archived respiratory specimens. The illumigene limit of detection was ?88 CFU/reaction for 10 Mycoplasma pneumoniae reference strains. This assay correctly identified 36 M. pneumoniae reference strains and clinical isolates from various geographic origins, including both of the main subtypes. No cross-reactions were detected with other mycoplasmas, ureaplasmas, other bacterial species, viruses, yeasts, or human DNA. Among 214 respiratory specimens previously cultured for M. pneumoniae, when real-time PCR with bidirectional sequencing of the PCR products was used to resolve discrepancies, the sensitivity was 22 of 22 (100%) and the specificity was 190 of 192 (99%). This commercial LAMP assay is a useful rapid method for detecting M. pneumoniae in clinical specimens. Additional prospective clinical trials with direct comparison to culture and PCR are warranted. PMID:24430454

  1. Comparison of the illumigene Mycoplasma DNA Amplification Assay and Culture for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Amy E.; Duffy, Lynn B.

    2014-01-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) system, the illumigene Mycoplasma DNA amplification assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Cincinnati, OH) was evaluated to determine its analytical sensitivity, specificity, and clinical application in comparison to historic culture in a collection of archived respiratory specimens. The illumigene limit of detection was ?88 CFU/reaction for 10 Mycoplasma pneumoniae reference strains. This assay correctly identified 36 M. pneumoniae reference strains and clinical isolates from various geographic origins, including both of the main subtypes. No cross-reactions were detected with other mycoplasmas, ureaplasmas, other bacterial species, viruses, yeasts, or human DNA. Among 214 respiratory specimens previously cultured for M. pneumoniae, when real-time PCR with bidirectional sequencing of the PCR products was used to resolve discrepancies, the sensitivity was 22 of 22 (100%) and the specificity was 190 of 192 (99%). This commercial LAMP assay is a useful rapid method for detecting M. pneumoniae in clinical specimens. Additional prospective clinical trials with direct comparison to culture and PCR are warranted. PMID:24430454

  2. Is Mycoplasma synoviae outrunning Mycoplasma gallisepticum? A viewpoint from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Landman, Wil J M

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae are the most relevant mycoplasma species for commercial poultry from the clinical and economic point of view. Although the importance of M. gallisepticum was recognized many decades ago, the relevance of M. synoviae has been a matter of debate. Until the turn of the century, only the respiratory and synovitis forms of the disease were reported, while the majority of infections were subclinical. Since the year 2000 M. synoviae strains with oviduct tropism, able to induce eggshell apex abnormalities and egg drops, have been encountered worldwide. A decreasing incidence of M. gallisepticum has been observed, at least in breeding stock, in countries with control and eradication programmes for this Mycoplasma species. In contrast, the sero-prevalence of M. synoviae is much higher, especially in layer flocks, and in most continents exceeds 70%. Given the emergence of virulent M. synoviae strains with oviduct tropism, its ability to also induce joint and respiratory disease, to act synergistically with other pathogens as well as its much higher sero-prevalence, it seems that M. synoviae is outrunning M. gallisepticum, at least in countries with control and eradication programmes for the latter. This stresses the need to update M. synoviae prevention and control strategies. Thus, in January 2013, the Dutch poultry industry implemented a mandatory control and eradication programme for M. synoviae at all levels of poultry farming with the exception of broilers. PMID:24397240

  3. Infection With Cryptosporidium hominis Provides Incomplete Protection of the Host Against Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Wiffin, Anthony; Widmer, Giovanni; Singh, Pradeep; Tzipori, Saul

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, which infect humans equally, are genetically/antigenically almost identical. It remains unclear, however, whether infection with C. hominis protects against C. parvum. Gnotobiotic piglets were used to investigate cross-protection. After ?3 days of recovery from C. hominis infection, the piglets were completely protected against subsequent challenge with C. hominis but only partially against challenge with C. parvum, as compared with age-matched control animals challenged with either species. In conclusion, C. hominisspecific immunity was sufficient to completely protect against challenge with the same species but insufficient to provide the same level of protection against C. parvum. PMID:22279124

  4. The Recognition of a vlhA Protein from the F-Strain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum with Monoclonal Antibody 6F10

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this project is to identify the genes encoding M. gallisepticum F-strain surface proteins recognized by specific antibody reagents to characterize the individual role of each gene product in host colonization. Here we report the characterization of a 70-kDa surface protein recognized by ...

  5. Mycoplasma pneumoniae in hamster tracheal organ culture studied by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Muse, K E; Powell, D A; Collier, A M

    1976-01-01

    Hamster tracheal rings in organ culture were inoculated with a virulent strain of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and examined by scanning electron microscopy. A progressive increase in epithelial cell injury was detected from 48 to 96 h post-inoculation and was characterized by apparent loss of the apical portion of ciliated cells. M. pneumoniae attaching to the epithelial cell surfaces could be identified by comparison with the surface morphology of mycoplasmas grown on glass cover slips. Images PMID:1248872

  6. First identification of Sarcocystis hominis in Iranian traditional hamburger.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, M Moghaddam; Hajimohammadi, B; Eslami, G; Oryan, A; Yasini Ardakani, S A; Zohourtabar, A; Zare, S

    2015-12-01

    Zoonotic concerns of cattle sarcocystosis are of importance, because humans are the final host for Sarcocystis hominis. Therefore the meat products containing beef may encompass sarcocysts which endanger food safety. In this study, we described the first report of molecular identification of S. hominis in Iranian traditional hamburgers using PCR-RFLP. Throughout a pilot research that was carried out to setup a molecular approach to identify the Sarcocystis spp., using PCR-RFLP, a sample of raw Iranian traditional hamburger was purchased from a street food seller located in Yazd, central Iran in May 2013. DNA extraction was done, by salting out method; briefly, the sample was lysed with NET buffer. The DNA purification and precipitation was then performed. Amplicon and digestion results were analyzed, using gel agarose electrophoresis. The results showed a PCR product with 926bp in length after amplification and 376 and 550bp in length after digestion. This product was identified as S. hominis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of S. hominis infection in Iranian hamburger. PMID:26688649

  7. Association of Blastocystis hominis genetic subtypes with urticaria.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Dina M Abdel; Hassanin, Omayma M; Zuel-Fakkar, Nehal Mohamed

    2011-03-01

    Although intestinal parasites are a possible cause of skin disorders, there are few case reports concerning the role of Blastocystis hominis in urticaria. To clarify this association, we determined the frequency of B. hominis genetic subtype in urticarial patients by stool culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and evaluated the clinical and parasitological recovery of urticarial patients after treatment with metronidazole. Of 54 urticarial patients (group I), 18 (33.3%) were diagnosed as acute urticaria (group IA) and 36 (66.7%) were diagnosed as chronic (group IB). Thirty-three (61.1%) out of 54 urticarial (group I) patients were Blastocystis positive by stool culture and PCR. Out of these 33 patients, 21 were symptomatic and 12 were asymptomatic. The amoeboid form was found in 20 (95.2%) out of 21 symptomatic Blastocystis urticarial patients assuring their pathogenic potential. Of 50 normal control group (group II), four (8%) Blastocystis isolates were found with no amoeboid form. B. hominis subtype 3 was the only detected genotype in both groups. Of 20 symptomatic Blastocystis urticarial patients, 12 (60%) patients recovered symptomatically and parasitologically after one course of metronidazole. Recovery reached 100% on repeating the treatment for a second course with disappearance of the amoeboid form. It was concluded that acute urticaria of unknown etiology and chronic idiopathic urticaria patients who are resistant to the ordinary regimen of urticaria treatment might be examined for infection with B. hominis, in order to prescribe the proper specific anti-protozoan treatment. PMID:20922413

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Human Gut Symbiont Roseburia hominis

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Anthony J.; Kelly, Denise; Flint, Harry J.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the human gut symbiont Roseburia hominis A2-183T (= DSM 16839T = NCIMB 14029T), isolated from human feces. The genome is represented by a 3,592,125-bp chromosome with 3,405 coding sequences. A number of potential functions contributing to host-microbe interaction are identified. PMID:26543119

  9. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of horses.

    PubMed Central

    Allam, N. M.; Lemcke, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Ten mycoplasmas were isolated from 130 nasopharyngeal swabs from thoroughbred horses with acute respiratory disease and three from 198 apparently normal horses. Two mycoplasmas were isolated from 21 tracheal swabs taken at necropsy. These mycoplasmas, together with six isolated from the equine respiratory tract by other workers, were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Other properties examined in certain representative strains were appearance under the electron microscope, ability to adsorb or agglutinate the erythrocytes of various animal species and the electrophoretic pattern of the cell proteins. On the basis of these test, mycoplasmas from the equine respiratory tract were divided into seven species. Three species belonged to the genus Acholeplasma, members of which do not require sterol for growth, and were identified as A. laidlawii, A. oculi (formerly A. oculusi) originally isolated from the eyes of goats, and a recently named species A. equifoetale, previously isolated from aborted equine fetuses. Of the four sterol-dependent Mycoplasma species, one was indentified as M. pulmonis, a common rodent pathogen. Another cross-reacted serologically with M. felis and should probably be classified as that species. The other two species probably represent new species peculiar to the horse. One of these, represented by the strains N3 and N11, ferments glucose and is serologically distinct from 19 recognized species of glucose-utilizing mycoplasmas and from two species which do not metabolize either glucose or arginine. The other species, represented by four strains, hydrolyses arginine and, because it is serologically distinct from all the named arginine-hydrolysing Mycoplasma species, the name M. equirhinis sp.nov. is proposed for it. Of the seven species, only M. pulmonis and the glucose-utilizing species represented by N3 and N11 were found exclusively in horses with acute respiratory disease. A. oculi was isolated from an apparently normal horse. The other four species were found in normal horses as well as those with respiratory disease, although three out of the four strains of M. equirhinis were from sick horses. Images Plate 2 Plate 5 Plate 3 Plate 1 Plate 4 PMID:807616

  10. Membrane-associated nuclease activities in mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Minion, F C; Jarvill-Taylor, K J; Billings, D E; Tigges, E

    1993-01-01

    Membrane-associated nucleases of various mycoplasmal species were investigated by using two nuclease assays. A lambda DNA assay was developed to measure nuclease activity associated with whole-cell suspensions, activity released from intact cells, and activity associated with detergent-disrupted cells. In most species, nuclease activities were entirely membrane associated, and disruption by a detergent had a stimulatory effect on these activities. All mycoplasmal species contained nuclease activity, but Mycoplasma capricolum was unusual because its activity was dependent upon magnesium and was inhibited by calcium. We developed a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system that produced reproducible nuclease patterns, and this system was used to determine the apparent molecular weights of the nuclease proteins. An examination of 20 mycoplasmal species failed to identify common bands in their nuclease patterns. An examination of 11 Mycoplasma pulmonis strains, however, indicated that nuclease patterns on polyacrylamide gels may provide a means for categorizing strains within a species. Our results suggest that nucleases are important constituents of mycoplasmal membranes and may be involved in the acquisition of host nucleic acids required for growth. Images PMID:8253673

  11. Alterations in the metabolism of hamster tracheas in organ culture after infection by virulent Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hu, P C; Collier, A M; Baseman, J B

    1975-04-01

    Exposure of hamster tracheal rings in organ culture to virulent Mycoplasma pneumoniae organisms leads to alterations in macromolecular biosynthesis and metabolic activity of the respiratory epithelial cells. Avirulent organisms derived from the same parent strain do not produce these effects. During the course of infection by virulent mycoplasmas, tracheal rings show an initial increase in [14C]galactose uptake followed by a significant decline as infection progresses which is also accompanied by abnormal processing of galactose as evidenced by amounts of 14CO2 released. Parallel decreases in the rate of [3H]orotic acid and [3H]amino acid uptake are observed. Within 24 h after infection of tracheal rings by virulent mycoplasmas, inhibition of host cell ribonucleic acid and protien synthesis is evident. Ribonucleic acid synthesis in infected cells, analyzed by gel electrophoresis, is reduced by 80% at 48 h and is negligible by 96 h. The course of mycoplasma infection can be interrupted or reversed by erythromycin after the initial mycoplasma-host cell interaction since addition of erythromycin 24 h or earlier after infection prevents the onset of abnormal orotic acid uptake. However, 48 h after infection, rescue of host cells by erythromycin cannot occur and cytopathology becomes evident. These data suggest that mediation of host cell injury requires continued protein synthesis by attached mycoplasmas, and the primary effect of mycoplasma infection on tracheal organ culture may be at a transcriptional or translational level. PMID:1120610

  12. Effects of mycoplasma contamination on phenotypic expression of mitochondrial mutants in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doersen, C.J.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1981-04-01

    HeLa cells sensitive to the mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibitors erythromycin (ERY) and chloramphenicol (CAP) and HeLa variants resistant to the effects of these drugs were purposefully infected with drug-sensitive and -resistnat mycoplasma strains. Mycoplasma hyorhinis and the ERY-resistant strain of Mycoplasma orale, MO-ERY/sup r/, did not influence the growth of HeLa and ERY-resistant ERY2301 cells in the presence or absence of ERY. M. hyorhinis also did not affect the growth of HeLa and CAP-resistant Cap-2 cells in the presence or absence of CAP. However, both HeLa and Cap-2 cells infected with the CAP-resistant strain of M. hyorhinis, MH-CAP/sup r/, were more sensitive to the cytotoxix effect of CAP. This maybe due to the glucose dependence of the cells, which was compromised by the increased utilization of glucose by MH-CAP/sup r/ in these infected cell cultures. In vitro protein synthesis by isolated mitochondria was significantly altered by mycoplasma infection of the various cell lines. A substantial number of mycoplasmas copurified with the mitochondria, resulting in up to a sevenfold increase in the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. More importantly, the apparent drug sensitivity or resistance of mitchondrial preparations from mycoplasma-infected cells reflected the drug sensitivity or resistance of the contaminating mycoplasmas. These results illustrate the hazards in interpreting mitochondrial protein synthesis data derived from mycoplasma-infected cell lines, particularly putative mitochondrially encoded mutants resistant to inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  13. Short communication: The effect of centrifugation and resuspension on the recovery of Mycoplasma species from milk.

    PubMed

    Punyapornwithaya, V; Fox, L K; Gay, G M; Hancock, D D; Alldredge, J R

    2009-09-01

    Low sensitivity of a single bulk tank milk culture is a major limitation for detection of mycoplasma organisms. We hypothesized that sedimentation of Mycoplasma spp. in a milk sample by centrifugation followed by resuspension in a small volume of fluid before agar plating would increase the ability to detect Mycoplasma spp. compared with direct conventional culture. The experiment was conducted to determine recovery of Mycoplasma spp. from milk as affected by 1) treatment (centrifugation vs. conventional method); 2) 2 species (Mycoplasma bovis and Mycoplasma californicum and 4 strains for each species); and 3) 4 different concentrations of Mycoplasma spp. (1,000, 100, 10, and 1 cfu/mL). A 5-mL portion of mycoplasma suspension from each strain was inoculated into 45 mL of fresh bulk tank milk to achieve concentrations of 1,000, 100, 10, and 1 cfu/mL. Treatment samples were vigorously mixed and centrifuged at 5,000 x g for 30 min. Control samples were vigorously mixed. All samples were plated on modified Hayflick agar. Plates were incubated at 37 degrees C and 5% CO(2) for 5 d. Mean (+/-SE) log(10) mycoplasma counts (cfu/mL) in the treatment groups (1.91 +/- 0.15) were higher than those in the control groups (1.70 +/- 0.16). Recovery of at least 1 mycoplasma colony on agar culture was 100% in both treatment and control groups at high, medium, and low concentrations. At the lowest concentration, recovery of at least 1 mycoplasma colony on agar culture in treatment and control groups was 75% (n = 12/16) and 18.75% (n = 3/16), respectively. Centrifugation of milk followed by suspension in a smaller volume of saline before conventional culture increased the ability to detect mycoplasma microorganisms in the milk sample compared with controls. Recovery by centrifugation appeared best at the lowest concentration where detection of a positive sample was 4 times more likely than when conventional methods were used. PMID:19700705

  14. Effects of 6/85-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccination Alone at Ten Weeks of Age or in Conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays at 22 or 45 Weeks of Age on the Reproductive and Digestive....Hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay 6/85-strain M. gallisepticum (6/85MG) vaccination alone or in conjunction with time specific F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays on the gross reproductive and digestive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens...

  15. Effects of Time Specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays on Prelay ts-11-strain M. gallisepticum Vaccination on Digestive and Reproductive Organ Characteristics of Commercial Egg-Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay ts11-strain M. gallisepticum (ts11MG) vaccination alone or in conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays at 2 different age periods during lay on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commerci...

  16. The Origin of the Mycoplasma mycoides Cluster Coincides with Domestication of Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Anne; Shapiro, Beth; Muriuki, Cecilia; Heller, Martin; Schnee, Christiane; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Vilei, Edy M.; Frey, Joachim; Jores, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    The Mycoplasma mycoides cluster comprises the ruminant pathogens Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae the agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum, Mycoplasma leachii and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri. CBPP and CCPP are major livestock diseases and impact the agricultural sector especially in developing countries through reduced food-supply and international trade restrictions. In addition, these diseases are a threat to disease-free countries. We used a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach to gain insights into the demographic history of and phylogenetic relationships among the members of the M. mycoides cluster. We collected partial sequences from seven housekeeping genes representing a total of 3,816 base pairs from 118 strains within this cluster, and five strains isolated from wild Caprinae. Strikingly, the origin of the M. mycoides cluster dates to about 10,000 years ago, suggesting that the establishment and spread of the cluster coincided with livestock domestication. In addition, we show that hybridization and recombination may be important factors in the evolutionary history of the cluster. PMID:22558362

  17. Intestinal colonization of symptomatic and asymptomatic schoolchildren with Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed Central

    Nimri, L; Batchoun, R

    1994-01-01

    A study of single stool specimens was done to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among 1,000 primary school children. A questionnaire was completed by each child's parents. Specimens were examined by using wet-mount preparation, formaline-ether concentration, and Sheather's flotation technique. Trichrome and acid-fast stains were done. Blastocystis hominis was observed in 203 (20.3%) of the specimens examined, and 175 specimens contained this organism in the absence of other pathogenic parasites. Older children had fewer B. hominis infections (6 to 7 years old, 50% infection rate; 8 to 9 years, 27.5%; 10 to 12 years, 9.5%). The most common complaints reported by 75 children harboring the parasite were a mild recurrent diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, anorexia, and fatigue. Blastocystosis is quite common among schoolchildren. Contaminated drinking water is suspected to be the source of infection. PMID:7852590

  18. Dermatobia hominis: Small Migrants Hidden in Your Skin

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Viligiardi, Riccardo; Strohmeyer, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Myiasis is a parasitic infestation of vertebrate animal tissues due to maggots of two-winged flies (Diptera) that feed on living or necrotic tissue. Dermatobia hominis occurs widely in tropical parts of Latin America; it is the most common cause of furuncular myiasis in this region. The continuous increase in international travel has increased the possibility of observing this pathology outside endemic countries, especially in travelers returning from the tropics. If clinicians are aware of the possibility of the disease and its treatment options, this dermatosis can be easily managed. However, diagnostic delay is very common because the disease is often misdiagnosed as a bacterial skin infection. Here, we report 2 cases of furuncular myiasis caused by D. hominis in travelers returning to Italy from Latin America. Surgical and noninvasive treatment approaches are also described. PMID:25324659

  19. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on blood characteristics in commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. When administered before lay, F-strain MG (FMG) can reduce egg production during lay, but the ts-11 strain of MG (ts11MG) does not exert this effect. Two trials were conducted to determine the effects ...

  20. Mycoplasma synoviae infection on Newcastle disease vaccination of chickens

    PubMed Central

    de Cssia Figueira Silva, Rita; do Nascimento, Elmiro Rosendo; de Almeida Pereira, Virgnia Lo; Barreto, Maria Lcia; do Nascimento, Maria da Graa Fichel

    2008-01-01

    Newcastle disease is characterized by respiratory manifestations in association with nervous and/or digestive symptoms. Its prevention is done by vaccination with live attenuated (lentogenic strains) and/or killed vaccines. The lentogenic strains can lead to strong post-vaccination reaction, principally due to the presence of other pathogenic agents. Among them, Mycoplasma synoviae is worldwide important, mainly in Brazil. The dissemination of this agent in poultry flocks has been achieved due to difficulties in diagnosis and disease reproduction, virulence variations among different M.synoviae strains, and attribution of typical M.synoviae disease manifestation to other disease agents. This experimental study in SPF chicks (Gallus gallus), previously infected by M.synoviae and thereafter vaccinated against Newcastle disease, was done with the objective of evaluating M.synoviae pathogenicity through assessment of post-vaccinal respiratory reactions and serologic responses to Newcastle disease virus vaccine in the absence of environmental factors. A total of 86 three days old chicks were used, being 57 infected by eye and nostril drop, with chicken activated M. synoviae strain WVU 1853. Seven days later, 21 mycoplasma infected birds plus 29 not mycoplasma infected ones were vaccinated against Newcastle disease. As results, the not infected and vaccinated birds yielded, significantly, higher and longer lasting serologic responses to Newcastle disease vaccine virus than those infected and vaccinated. Similarly, the infected and vaccinated birds yielded lower serologic reactions to M.synoviae than those only mycoplasma infected. No post-vaccinal respiratory reaction was observed in the vaccinated birds. PMID:24031234

  1. Mycoplasma-induced arthritis in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Gourlay, R N

    1981-07-01

    Mycoplasma-induced arthritis in farm animals is rarely diagnosed. When recognized, it is usually associated with mycoplasma infections at other anatomical sites such as the respiratory tract and mammary glands and presumably follows bacteremia. Cases do occur where arthritis appears to be the primary lesion, but this may only reflect a failure to recognize infection at other sites. In cattle, the mycoplasma species causing arthritis are M. bovis, M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, Mycoplasma spp. Group 7 and Mycoplasma spp. serotype L. In sheep and goats, M. capricolum can cause severe polyarthritis, while M. hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae have been incriminated in arthritis in pigs. PMID:7287404

  2. Mycoplasma suis Invades Porcine Erythrocytes?

    PubMed Central

    Groebel, K.; Hoelzle, K.; Wittenbrink, M. M.; Ziegler, U.; Hoelzle, L. E.

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma suis belongs to the hemotrophic mycoplasma group and causes infectious anemia in pigs. According to the present state of knowledge, this organism adheres to the surface of erythrocytes but does not invade them. We found a novel M. suis isolate that caused severe anemia in pigs with a fatal disease course. Interestingly, only marginal numbers of the bacteria were visible on and between the erythrocytes in acridine orange-stained blood smears for acutely diseased pigs, whereas very high loads of M. suis were detected in the same blood samples by quantitative PCR. These findings indicated that M. suis is capable of invading erythrocytes. By use of fluorescent labeling of M. suis and examination by confocal laser scanning microscopy, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, we proved that the localization of M. suis was intracellular. This organism invades erythrocytes in an endocytosis-like process and is initially surrounded by two membranes, and it was also found floating freely in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, we were able to prove for the first time that a member of the hemotrophic mycoplasma group is able to invade the erythrocytes of its host. Such colonization should protect the bacterial cells from the host's immune response and hamper antibiotic treatment. In addition, an intracellular life cycle may explain the chronic nature of hemotrophic mycoplasma infections and should serve as the foundation for novel strategies in hemotrophic mycoplasma research (e.g., treatment or prophylaxis). PMID:19015255

  3. [Mycoplasma pneumoniae epidemic as zoonosis].

    PubMed

    Mikola, I; Balogh, G; Nagy, A; Mtys, M; Glvits, R; Stipkovits, L

    1997-11-16

    At a secondary school in Budapest, in the first class, 30 students became sick with fever and upper respiratory catarrhal symptoms between September 19 and October 31, 1995. Two children were hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia, in case of the two children treated at the Szent Lszl Hospital, suspect of Mycoplasma infection raised which was also confirmed by cold agglutination test. During the epizootiological examination on the spot they found a terrarium in the classroom where the students raised a Syrian gold hamster family. Mycoplasmas were isolated from the lung samples of the hamsters during the pathological examination which proved to be Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Owing to the close etiologic relationships between epidemiological anamnesis, characteristics of the epidemic, as well as findings of patients and pathological or histological findings in the hamsters together with the results of bacteriological examinations, the epidemic should be considered as a zoonosis. PMID:9432641

  4. Cloning, expression, and antigenic characterization of recombinant protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rocha, T S; Tramuta, C; Catania, S; Matucci, A; Giuffrida, M G; Baro, C; Profiti, M; Bertolotti, L; Rosati, S

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a member of the most important avian mycoplasmas, causing chronic respiratory disease in chickens and leading to important economic losses in the poultry industry. Recombinant technology represents a strategic approach used to achieve highly reliable and specific diagnostic tests in veterinary diseases control: in particular this aspect is crucial for confirming mycoplasma infection and for maintaining mycoplasma-free breeder flocks. In this study, we identified a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (i.e., E2) protein by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), characterized it in immunoblotting assays, and analyzed its recombinant (r-E2) in a rec-ELISA test. For full-length protein expression in Escherichia coli (EC) a point mutation was introduced. A rabbit antiserum produced against r-E2 was tested in a Western Blot using different samples of Mycoplasma species. The results showed the applicability of site-directed mutagenesis, with a good yield of the r-E2 after purification. Also, anti-E2 serum reacted with all the tested MG strains showing no cross reaction with other mycoplasmas. The developed E2 ELISA test was capable of detecting MG antibodies in the sera examined. Those results demonstrate the antigenic stability of the E2 protein which could represent a recombinant antigen with potential diagnostic applications. PMID:25667423

  5. A filter immunobinding technique for the rapid detection and simultaneous identification of avian and bovine mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Takahata, T; Kato, M; Nagatomo, H; Shimizu, T

    1997-11-01

    A filter immunobinding (FIB) method was developed for the detection and identification of mycoplasmas. Type strains of a total of 18 avian and bovine mycoplasma species propagated in broth media were diluted and immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane as antigens for investigating the specificity with rabbit hyperimmune sera. Non-specific FIB reactions were easily eliminated by the procedure of absorbing rabbit hyperimmune sera in the broth. Absorbed rabbit hyperimmune sera exhibited clear species-specificity with mycoplasma antigens by the FIB. These specific reactions always agreed with the results of identification by tests of biochemical properties and growth inhibition for the isolates of M. bovirhinis, M. bovis, M. columbinum, M. columborale, M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae. Some bovine mycoplasma species, which were impossible to identify by growth inhibition test, because of their strong production of film and spots on the agar, specifically reacted with absorbed rabbit hyperimmune sera against M. bovis in the FIB. The detection limit of mycoplasmas by this method was about 10(4)-10(5) colony-forming units/ml, which is lower than that of colony determination on agar. The FIB seems to be a useful technique for rapid detection and simultaneous identification of mycoplasmas. PMID:9409509

  6. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the internal egg and eggshell characteristics of commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Live F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccines are presently being used to help control field strain MG outbreaks. However, they may exert some adverse effects on egg production. Live strains of MG of lesser virulence as well as killed vaccines have little or no effect on egg production, bu...

  7. Lipids of a Sterol-Nonrequiring Mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Plackett, P.; Smith, P. F.; Mayberry, W. R.

    1970-01-01

    The lipids of the sterol nonrequiring Mycoplasma strain S743 were found to include both ester glycerophosphatides (phosphatidylglycerol, acylphosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol) and ceramide glycerophosphate compounds containing N-hydroxyacyl groups. The major phosphosphingolipid was tentatively identified as a hydroxyceramidephosphorylglycerol containing an O-acyl group. These compounds became labeled during growth in the presence of 32P-orthophosphate, 14C-glycerol, or 14C-palmitate. The lipid fraction also contained free long-chain base. 14C-palmitate was converted to labeled sphinganine. The long-chain base composition of the lipids was modified by growing the organisms in media containing different fatty acids, which were converted to bases containing two more C atoms per molecule. Ninety per cent of the long-chain base from cells grown in medium supplemented with elaidate consisted of monounsaturated C20 base. Images PMID:5489436

  8. Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis is not infectious for SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Durand-Joly, Isabelle; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Recourt, Céline; Guyot, Karine; François, Nadine; Wauquier, Michèle; Camus, Daniel; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2002-05-01

    The infectious power of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis was explored by inoculating SCID mice intranasally with either P. carinii f. sp. hominis or P. carinii f. sp. muris isolates. Only mice inoculated with mouse parasites developed Pneumocystis pneumonia, as assessed by microscopy and PCR. These results suggest that humans do not contract pneumocystosis from animals. PMID:11980979

  9. Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis Is Not Infectious for SCID mice

    PubMed Central

    Durand-Joly, Isabelle; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Recourt, Céline; Guyot, Karine; François, Nadine; Wauquier, Michèle; Camus, Daniel; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    The infectious power of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis was explored by inoculating SCID mice intranasally with either P. carinii f. sp. hominis or P. carinii f. sp. muris isolates. Only mice inoculated with mouse parasites developed Pneumocystis pneumonia, as assessed by microscopy and PCR. These results suggest that humans do not contract pneumocystosis from animals. PMID:11980979

  10. Mycoplasma infections and different human carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Su; Li, Ji-You; Wu, Jan; Meng, Lin; Shou, Cheng-Chao

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To explore relationships between human carcinomas and mycoplasma infection. METHODS: Monoclonal antibody PD4, which specifically recognizes a distinct protein from mycoplasma hyorhinis, was used to detect mycoplasma infection in different paraffin embedded carcinoma tissues with immunohistochemistry. PCR was applied to amplify the mycoplasma DNA from the positive samples for confirming immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Fifty of 90 cases (56%) of gastric carcinoma were positive for mycoplasma hyorhinis. In other gastric diseases, the mycoplasma infection ratio was 28% (18/49) in chronic superficial gastritis, 30% (14/46) in gastric ulcer and 37% (18/49) in intestinal metaplasia. The difference is significant with gastric cancer (?2 = 12.06, P < 0.05). In colon carcinoma, the mycoplasma infection ratio was 55.1% (32/58),but it was 20.9% (10/ 49) in adenomarous polyp (?2 = 13.46, P < 0.005). Gastric and colon cancers with high differentiation had a higher mycoplasma infection ratio than those with low differentiation (P < 0.05). Mycoplasma infection in esophageal cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer and glioma was 50.9% (27/53), 52.6% (31/ 59), 39.7% (25/63)and 41% (38/91), respectively. The mycoplasma DNA was successfully amplified with the DNA extracted from the cancer tissues that were positive for mycoplasma infection (detected with antibody PD4). CONCLUSION: There was high correlation between mycoplasma infection and different cancers, which suggests the possibility of an association between the two. The mechanism involved in oncogenesis by mycoplasma remains unknown. PMID:11819772

  11. Nongenital Mycoplasma Infections in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    A brief definition and classification of the organisms is followed by a history of their isolation and general role in disease. Diseases associated with various types of mycoplasma are discussed under respiratory tract, mastitis, arthritis and keratoconjunctivitis. Descriptions include methods of infection, clinical signs, lesions and prognosis. PMID:7337907

  12. Iron storage in Mycoplasma capricolum.

    PubMed Central

    Bauminger, E R; Cohen, S G; Labenski de Kanter, F; Levy, A; Ofer, S; Kessel, M; Rottem, S

    1980-01-01

    Considerable quantities or iron were incorporated into the Mycoplasma capricolum cell membrane. Mossbauer studies showed that the iron is in a form which becomes magnetically ordered at low temperatures. The iron-enriched cells contained membrane-bound electron-dense particles of about 6.0 nm in diameter. Images PMID:7354003

  13. Prevalence and Clinical Features of Blastocystis hominis Infection among Patients in Sebha, Libya

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fellani, Mohammed A; Khan, Abdul H; Al-Gazoui, Rugaia M; Zaid, Mabrouk K; Al-Ferjani, Mahmoud A

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and seasonal variation, and to assess the clinical manifestations and treatment of blastocystosis in Libyan patients. Methods: Three thousand six hundred and forty five stool samples were screened for Blastocystis hominis using normal saline and iodine solution preparations. The clinical features of 108 patients were described, in whom B. hominis was the only parasite isolated. Fifty symptomatic patients were treated with 1500 mg metronidazole daily for 7 days and their stools were re-investigated for B. hominis. Results: B. hominis was found in 969 (26.58 %) of 3645 stool specimens examined. The infection of B. hominis was significantly more (p < 0.05) in summer than in winter over a three year period. In a prospective study of 108 patients, the most common symptoms with stools positive only for B. hominis were diarrhoea (84.94 %), abdominal pain (66.66 %), flatulence (17.20 %) and vomiting (16.12 %). High concentration of B. hominis cells were found more in symptomatic patients than asymptomatic ones (9.20 cells per 40 X field versus 4.06 respectively) with statistically significant differences (p < 0.001). Patients with B. hominis responded to metronidazole and were fully cured after 7 days. Conclusion: The occurrence of B. hominis infections in outpatients are probably related to weather conditions, with the suggestion that the hot, dry weather of the Sebha region favors the development and transmission of this organism. B. hominis infections might have a role in some pathological conditions, resulting in gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:21654943

  14. Mycoplasma agassizii sp., nov., isolated from the upper respiratory tract of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Mary E.; Brown, D.R.; Kelin, P.A.; McLaughlin, G.S.; Schumacher, I.M.; Jacobson, E.R.; Adams, H.P.; Tully, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Biochemical, serological and molecular genetic studies were performed on seven mycoplasma isolates that were recovered from the upper respiratory tract of clinically ill desert tortoises. The isolates were serologically related to each other but serologically distinct from previously described species. Unique mycoplasma species-specific 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences were found in the proposed type strain. The name Mycoplasma agassizii is proposed for these isolates. The type strain is PS6T (=ATCC 700616T) which caused upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in experimentally infected tortoises.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells infected with Mycoplasma arginini secrete complement C3 to regulate immunoglobulin production in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, D-S; Yi, T G; Lee, H-J; Kim, S-N; Park, S; Jeon, M-S; Song, S U

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunomodulatory functions such as the suppression of T and B cells. MSCs suppress immunoglobulin (Ig) production by B cells via cell-cell contact as well as via secretion of soluble factors. Our study showed that the conditioned medium (CM) of MSCs infected with a mycoplasma strain, Mycoplasma arginini, has marked inhibitory effects on Ig production by lipopolysaccharide/interleukin-4-induced B cells compared with mycoplasma-free MSC-CM. We analyzed mycoplasma-infected MSC-CM by fast protein liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography to screen the molecules responsible for Ig inhibition. Complement C3 (C3) was the most critical molecule among the candidates identified. C3 was shown to be involved in the suppression of the Ig production of B cells. C3 was secreted by mycoplasma-infected MSCs, but not by mycoplasma-free MSCs or B cells. It was able to directly inhibit Ig production by B cells. In the presence of a C3 inhibitor, Ig inhibition by MSC-CM was abrogated. This inhibitory effect was concomitant with the downregulation of B-cell-induced maturation protein-1, which is a regulator of the differentiation of antibody-secreting plasma cells. These results suggest that C3 secreted from mycoplasma-infected MSCs has an important role in the immunomodulatory functions of MSCs. However, its role in vivo needs to be explored. PMID:24763049

  16. Protective effect of vaccines on Mycoplasma pulmonis-induced respiratory disease of mice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G; Howard, C J; Gourlay, R N

    1977-05-01

    Mice inoculated intranasally with either a virulent or an avirulent strain of live Mycoplasma pulmonis were resistant to respiratory disease induced by a subsequent intranasal challenge with virulent organisms. Similarly, mice inoculated intravenously with the virulent strain were resistant to intranasal challenge with the same strain. In contrast, mice inoculated intravenously with avirulent M. pulmonis were not resistant to intranasal challenge with the virulent mycoplasma strain. Studies on mice inoculated intravenously with the two strains of M. pulmonis indicated that persistance of mycoplasmas in the respiratory tract may be important in inducing resistance to intranasal challenge with M. pulmonis. These observations, together with the lack of correlation between the level of serum antibodies and resistance to M. pulmonis-induced respiratory disease, suggested that local immune mechanisms were important in resistance. It is proposed that an effective vaccination schedule to protect mice against M. pulmonis-induced respiratory disease may be one that stimulates both systemic and local immune defenses. This suggestion is supported by the observation that systemic followed by local administration of inactivated M. pulmonis was more effective in inducing resistance in mice to intranasal challenge with live organisms than was systemic administration alone. In addition, mice inoculated solely by the intranasal route with inactivated mycoplasmas were resistant to M. pulmonis-induced respiratory disease. These studies indicate the importance of local defense mechanisms in the induction of resistance to M. pulmonis-induced respiratory disease in mice. PMID:558962

  17. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Laleh; Farzaneh, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affect cell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research, industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contamination and detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the ways in which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species in cell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture; 3. the importance of mycoplasma tests in cell culture; 4. different methods to identify mycoplasma contamination; 5. the consequences of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture and 6. available methods to eliminate mycoplasma contamination. Awareness about the sources of mycoplasma and pursuing aseptic techniques in cell culture along with reliable detection methods of mycoplasma contamination can provide an appropriate situation to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture. PMID:23508237

  18. Mycoplasma lactucae sp. nov., a sterol-requiring mollicute from a plant surface.

    PubMed

    Rose, D L; Kocka, J P; Somerson, N L; Tully, J G; Whitcomb, R F; Carle, P; Bov, J M; Colflesh, D E; Williamson, D L

    1990-04-01

    Strain 831-C4T (T = type strain), isolated from the surface of lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa) obtained from a retail food market, was shown to be a sterol-requiring mollicute. Morphological examination of this organism by electron and dark-field microscopic techniques showed that it consists of small, nonhelical, nonmotile, pleomorphic coccoid cells, with individual cells surrounded by a single cytoplasmic membrane. No evidence of a cell wall was observed. The organism grew rapidly in all conventional culture medium formulations for mollicutes in either aerobic or anaerobic environments. The optimum temperature for growth was 30 degrees C, but multiplication occurred at 18 to 37 degrees C. Strain 831-C4T catabolized glucose, but hydrolysis of arginine or urea could not be demonstrated. The genome size of strain 831-C4T was determined to be about 569 megadaltons, while the base composition (guanine-plus-cytosine content) of the DNA was 30.0 mol%. Recent studies in which we compared the 16S rRNA sequences of strain 831-C4T with those of more than 40 other mollicutes indicated that this organism is phylogenetically related to the Spiroplasma-Mycoplasma mycoides clade. Strain 831-C4T was serologically unrelated to the type strains of previously described Mycoplasma species and to 18 other unclassified sterol-requiring isolates cultivated from various animal, plant, or insect sources. Strain 831-C4T (= ATCC 49193) is the type strain of Mycoplasma lactucae sp. nov. PMID:2223606

  19. Comparison of culture, PCR, and different serologic tests for detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae infections.

    PubMed

    Feberwee, A; Mekkes, D R; de Wit, J J; Hartman, E G; Pijpers, A

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the technical performance of culture, two commercially available polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, rapid plate agglutination (RPA) test, hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, and eight commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were compared for the detection of avian mycoplasma infections from 3 days postinfection (d.p.i.) through 35 d.p.i. The tests were carried out on samples from specified pathogen-free layers that were infected at 66 wk of age with recent Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) and Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) field strains, MS and MG ATCC strains, and Mycoplasma imitans (MIM), respectively. Results showed a high percentage of positive samples in the homologous infected groups and a high percentage of negative samples (100%) in the uninfected and heterologous infected groups during 35 d.p.i. of both culture and PCR tests. For the group infected with the MG 15302 ATCC strain, serology was more sensitive than bacteriology. All MG and MS tests, with the exception of MG ELISA kit D showed a lower percentage of positive samples during 35 d.p.i. for the detection of the MG and MS ATCC strain infection compared with that of the field strains. Also, the number of cross-reactions (false positives) in the serologic tests was lower after infection with an ATCC strain than after an infection with the MG or MS field strain. Contradictory to other studies, the ELISAs and the RPA test using undiluted serum showed a relatively high number of false-positive results. The MG ELISAs (except ELISA kit D) showed more false-positive results (up to 37%) in the MIM-infected group than in the MS-infected groups. This was not unexpected, as MIM and MG have a close antigenic relationship. The results of the serologic tests in this study showed that a certain level of false-positive results can be expected in about any serologic test. Although the level of false-positive results varied between several serologic tests, this study showed that it is not advisable to rely completely on one test (system) only. PMID:16094832

  20. Mycoplasma infection of ducks and geese.

    PubMed

    Stipkovits, L; Szathmary, S

    2012-11-01

    Production of ducks and geese in certain parts of the world is very important. Mycoplasma diseases cause significant losses to the duck and goose industry. This review summarizes the epidemiological, clinical, and pathomorphological characteristics of mycoplasma diseases of ducks and geese and the involvement of the various mycoplasma species in their pathogenesis. The role of mycoplasma infections in the development of clinical signs, pathological lesions, and mortality of challenged birds is demonstrated in challenge experiments. Transmission of mycoplasma in the ovary and eggs resulting in the reduction of egg production and an increase of embryo mortality has been shown in challenge experiments as well as in field studies. The susceptibility of many mycoplasma isolates of the most important mycoplasma species of duck and goose origin were tested and showed relatively high average minimum inhibitory concentrations of lincomycin, tilosin, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, and enrofloxacin but not for tiamulin. The successful treatment of mycoplasma infections with antibiotics in ducks and geese should be selected based on the minimum inhibitory concentration values against the mycoplasmas isolated from the flock. PMID:23091137

  1. [Diagnosis of mycoplasma infections using directed amplification].

    PubMed

    Zhulanova, E Iu; Vonski?, M S; Lisin, V V; Efremova, T N; Borkhsenius, S N

    1993-01-01

    Test systems for rapid detection of mycoplasmas in biological samples have been elaborated on the base of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Amplification of the conservative rDNA sequences was used for testing of cell cultures for mycoplasmal contamination. Mycoplasma pneumoniae detection system has been developed based on amplification of the species-specific DNA sequences. Inversions of some repeated sequences in the Mycoplasma pneumoniae genome make it possible to run the PCR with a single primer. The revealed spacer length polymorphism for 16S-23S rDNA operons can be used in the mycoplasmas identification. PMID:8515751

  2. INDUCTION OF A MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM PMGA GENE IN THE CHICKEN TRACHEAL RING ORGAN CULTURE MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To search for Mycoplasma gallisepticum genes involved in colonization of the poultry respiratory tract, a transposon containing a promoterless lacZ gene was employed as a transcriptional reporter. The transposon was used to randomly mutagenize the chromosome of the M. gallisepticum S6 strain and a ...

  3. Comparative Analysis of Gene Content Evolution in Phytoplasmas and Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chan-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas are two groups of important pathogens in the bacterial class Mollicutes. Because of their economical and clinical importance, these obligate pathogens have attracted much research attention. However, difficulties involved in the empirical study of these bacteria, particularly the fact that phytoplasmas have not yet been successfully cultivated outside of their hosts despite decades of attempts, have greatly hampered research progress. With the rapid advancements in genome sequencing, comparative genome analysis provides a new approach to facilitate our understanding of these bacteria. In this study, our main focus is to investigate the evolution of gene content in phytoplasmas, mycoplasmas, and their common ancestor. By using a phylogenetic framework for comparative analysis of 12 complete genome sequences, we characterized the putative gains and losses of genes in these obligate parasites. Our results demonstrated that the degradation of metabolic capacities in these bacteria has occurred predominantly in the common ancestor of Mollicutes, prior to the evolutionary split of phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas. Furthermore, we identified a list of genes that are acquired by the common ancestor of phytoplasmas and are conserved across all strains with complete genome sequences available. These genes include several putative effectors for the interactions with hosts and may be good candidates for future functional characterization. PMID:22479625

  4. An Emerging Mycoplasma Associated with Trichomoniasis, Vaginal Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J. Paul; Glascock, Abigail L.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as “Mnola.” In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name “Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii” for this potential new pathogen. PMID:25337710

  5. Population identification of Sarcoptes hominis and Sarcoptes canis in China using DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, YaE; Cao, ZhiGuo; Cheng, Juan; Hu, Li; Ma, JunXian; Yang, YuanJun; Wang, XiaoPeng; Zeng, JiHui; Wang, TianPing

    2015-03-01

    There has been no consistent conclusion on whether Sarcoptes mites parasitizing in humans and animals are the same species. To identify Sarcoptes (S.) hominis and S. canis in China, gDNA was extracted from individual mites (five from patients with scabies and five from dogs with mange) for amplification of rDNA ITS2, mtDNA 16S, and cox1 fragment sequences. Then, the sequences obtained were aligned with those from different hosts and geographical locations retrieved from GenBank and sequence analyses were conducted. Phylogenetic trees based on 317-bp mtDNA cox1 showed five distinctive branches (species) of Sarcoptes mites, four for S. hominis (S. hominis Chinese, S. nr. hominis Chinese, S. hominis Australian, and S. hominis Panamanian) and one for S. animal (S. animal). S. animal included mites from nine animal species, with S. canis China, S. canis Australia, and S. canis USA clustering as a subbranch. Further sequence divergence analysis revealed no overlap between intraspecific (? 2.6 %) and interspecific (2.6-10.5 %) divergences in 317-bp mtDNA cox1. However, overlap was detected between intra- and interspecific divergences in 311-bp rDNA ITS2 or 275-bp mtDNA 16S when the divergences exceeded 1.0 %, which resulted in failure in identification of Sarcoptes. The results showed that the 317-bp mtDNA cox1 could be used as a DNA barcode for molecular identification of Sarcoptes mites. In addition, geographical isolation was observed between S. hominis Chinese, S. hominis Australian, and S. hominis Panamanian, but not between all S. canis. S. canis and the other S. animal belonged to the same species. PMID:25547078

  6. Evaluation of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the identification of Mycoplasma species

    PubMed Central

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vicca, Jo; Butaye, Patrick; Maes, Dominiek; De Baere, Thierry; Verhelst, Rita; Peeters, Johan; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Background Mycoplasmas are present worldwide in a large number of animal hosts. Due to their small genome and parasitic lifestyle, Mycoplasma spp. require complex isolation media. Nevertheless, already over 100 different species have been identified and characterized and their number increases as more hosts are sampled. We studied the applicability of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the identification of all 116 acknowledged Mycoplasma species and subspecies. Methods Based upon available 16S rDNA sequences, we calculated and compared theoretical ARDRA profiles. To check the validity of these theoretically calculated profiles, we performed ARDRA on 60 strains of 27 different species and subspecies of the genus Mycoplasma. Results In silico digestion with the restriction endonuclease AluI (AG^CT) was found to be most discriminative and generated from 3 to 13 fragments depending on the Mycoplasma species. Although 73 Mycoplasma species could be differentiated using AluI, other species gave undistinguishable patterns. For these, an additional restriction digestion, typically with BfaI (C^TAG) or HpyF10VI (GCNNNNN^NNGC), was needed for a final identification. All in vitro obtained restriction profiles were in accordance with the calculated fragments based on only one 16S rDNA sequence, except for two isolates of M. columbinum and two isolates of the M. mycoides cluster, for which correct ARDRA profiles were only obtained if the sequences of both rrn operons were taken into account. Conclusion Theoretically, restriction digestion of the amplified rDNA was found to enable differentiation of all described Mycoplasma species and this could be confirmed by application of ARDRA on a total of 27 species and subspecies. PMID:15955250

  7. Genetic and Serological Analysis of Lipoprotein LppA in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri

    PubMed Central

    Monnerat, Marie-Pierre; Thiaucourt, Franois; Poveda, Jose B.; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    1999-01-01

    The genes encoding the 62-kDa lipoproteins from the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large-colony type (LC) strain Y-goat and the M. mycoides subsp. capri strain PG3 were cloned and analyzed by sequencing. These two lipoproteins have been named LppA[MmymyLC] and LppA[Mmyca], and their corresponding genes have been named lppA[MmymyLC] and lppA[Mmyca], respectively. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of these two lipoproteins showed a very high degree of similarity between these two mycoplasmas. Given the sequence data, LppA seems to fulfill the same structural functions as the previously described major lipoproteins P72 of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides small-colony type and P67 of the Mycoplasma species bovine group 7. Based on lppA gene sequences of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and M. mycoides subsp. capri type strains, a specific PCR assay was developed so that it amplified this gene in all field strains of the two species analyzed in this study but not in the other members of the M. mycoides cluster. Analysis of the PCR-amplified lppA genes with frequently cutting restriction enzymes showed a certain degree of genetic variability which, however, did not cluster the two subspecies. This PCR therefore allows a rapid identification of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and M. mycoides subsp. capri but does not distinguish between these two closely related subspecies. LppA was expressed in Escherichia coli K-12 and used for the production of polyclonal mouse antiserum. Antibodies against recombinant LppA[MmymyLC] reacted with a 62-kDa protein in all M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and M. mycoides subsp. capri type strains and field strains tested but not with the other members of the M. mycoides cluster, thus showing the antigenic specificity of LppA and further supporting the concept that a close relationship exists between these two mycoplasmas. PMID:10066658

  8. Molecular Biology and Pathogenicity of Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Razin, Shmuel; Yogev, David; Naot, Yehudith

    1998-01-01

    The recent sequencing of the entire genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae has attracted considerable attention to the molecular biology of mycoplasmas, the smallest self-replicating organisms. It appears that we are now much closer to the goal of defining, in molecular terms, the entire machinery of a self-replicating cell. Comparative genomics based on comparison of the genomic makeup of mycoplasmal genomes with those of other bacteria, has opened new ways of looking at the evolutionary history of the mycoplasmas. There is now solid genetic support for the hypothesis that mycoplasmas have evolved as a branch of gram-positive bacteria by a process of reductive evolution. During this process, the mycoplasmas lost considerable portions of their ancestors’ chromosomes but retained the genes essential for life. Thus, the mycoplasmal genomes carry a high percentage of conserved genes, greatly facilitating gene annotation. The significant genome compaction that occurred in mycoplasmas was made possible by adopting a parasitic mode of life. The supply of nutrients from their hosts apparently enabled mycoplasmas to lose, during evolution, the genes for many assimilative processes. During their evolution and adaptation to a parasitic mode of life, the mycoplasmas have developed various genetic systems providing a highly plastic set of variable surface proteins to evade the host immune system. The uniqueness of the mycoplasmal systems is manifested by the presence of highly mutable modules combined with an ability to expand the antigenic repertoire by generating structural alternatives, all compressed into limited genomic sequences. In the absence of a cell wall and a periplasmic space, the majority of surface variable antigens in mycoplasmas are lipoproteins. Apart from providing specific antimycoplasmal defense, the host immune system is also involved in the development of pathogenic lesions and exacerbation of mycoplasma induced diseases. Mycoplasmas are able to stimulate as well as suppress lymphocytes in a nonspecific, polyclonal manner, both in vitro and in vivo. As well as to affecting various subsets of lymphocytes, mycoplasmas and mycoplasma-derived cell components modulate the activities of monocytes/macrophages and NK cells and trigger the production of a wide variety of up-regulating and down-regulating cytokines and chemokines. Mycoplasma-mediated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6, by macrophages and of up-regulating cytokines by mitogenically stimulated lymphocytes plays a major role in mycoplasma-induced immune system modulation and inflammatory responses. PMID:9841667

  9. Mycoplasmas, plants, insect vectors: a matrimonial triangle.

    PubMed

    Garnier, M; Foissac, X; Gaurivaud, P; Laigret, F; Renaudin, J; Saillard, C; Bov, J M

    2001-10-01

    Plant pathogenic mycoplasmas were discovered by electron microscopy, in 1967, long after the discovery and culture in 1898 of the first pathogenic mycoplasma of animal origin, Mycoplasma mycoides. Mycoplasmas are Eubacteria of the class Mollicutes, a group of organisms phylogenetically related to Gram-positive bacteria. Their more characteristic features reside in the small size of their genomes, the low guanine (G) plus cytosine (C) content of their genomic DNA and the lack of a cell wall. Plant pathogenic mycoplasmas are responsible for several hundred diseases and belong to two groups: the phytoplasmas and the spiroplasmas. The phytoplasmas (previously called MLOs, for mycoplasma like organisms) were discovered first; they are pleiomorphic, and have so far resisted in vitro cultivation. Phytoplasmas represent the largest group of plant pathogenic Mollicutes. Only three plant pathogenic spiroplasmas are known today. Spiroplasma citri, the agent of citrus stubborn was discovered and cultured in 1970 and shown to be helical and motile. S. kunkelii is the causal agent of corn stunt. S. phoeniceum, responsible for periwinkle yellows, was discovered in Syria. There are many other spiroplasmas associated with insects and ticks. Plant pathogenic mycoplasmas are restricted to the phloem sieve tubes in which circulates the photosynthetically-enriched sap, the food for many phloem-feeding insects (aphids, leafhoppers, psyllids, etc.). Interestingly, phytopathogenic mycoplasmas are very specifically transmitted by leafhoppers or psyllid species. In this paper, the most recent knowledge on phytopathogenic mycoplasmas in relation with their insect and plant habitats is presented as well as the experiments carried out to control plant mycoplasma diseases, by expression of mycoplasma-directed-antibodies in plants (plantibodies). PMID:11570280

  10. Effects of live and killed vaccines against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the performance characteristics of commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. Different strains of MG have been used as vaccines in multiple-age commercial layer farms in an effort to protect the birds against more virulent field strains. The lower level of protection afforded b...

  11. Highly dynamic genomic loci drive the synthesis of two types of capsular or secreted polysaccharides within the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silvn, Luca; Tardy, Florence; Poumarat, Franois; Citti, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Gaurivaud, Patrice; Thiaucourt, Franois

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster are all ruminant pathogens. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is responsible for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and is known to produce capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS). Previous studies have strongly suggested a role for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides polysaccharides in pathogenicity. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted EPS was recently characterized as a ?(1?6)-galactofuranose homopolymer (galactan) identical to the capsular product. Here, we extended the characterization of secreted polysaccharides to all other members of the M. mycoides cluster: M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum, M. leachii, and M. mycoides subsp. capri (including the LC and Capri serovars). Extracted EPS was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, resulting in the identification of a homopolymer of ?(1?2)-glucopyranose (glucan) in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii. Monoclonal antibodies specific for this glucan and for the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted galactan were used to detect the two polysaccharides. While M. mycoides subsp. capri strains of serovar LC produced only capsular galactan, no polysaccharide could be detected in strains of serovar Capri. All strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii produced glucan CPS and EPS, whereas glucan production and localization varied among M. capricolum subsp. capricolum strains. Genes associated with polysaccharide synthesis and forming a biosynthetic pathway were predicted in all cluster members. These genes were organized in clusters within two loci representing genetic variability hot spots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that some of these genes, notably galE and glf, were acquired via horizontal gene transfer. These findings call for a reassessment of the specificity of the serological tests based on mycoplasma polysaccharides. PMID:25398856

  12. Highly Dynamic Genomic Loci Drive the Synthesis of Two Types of Capsular or Secreted Polysaccharides within the Mycoplasma mycoides Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silvn, Luca; Tardy, Florence; Poumarat, Franois; Citti, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster are all ruminant pathogens. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is responsible for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and is known to produce capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS). Previous studies have strongly suggested a role for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides polysaccharides in pathogenicity. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted EPS was recently characterized as a ?(1?6)-galactofuranose homopolymer (galactan) identical to the capsular product. Here, we extended the characterization of secreted polysaccharides to all other members of the M. mycoides cluster: M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum, M. leachii, and M. mycoides subsp. capri (including the LC and Capri serovars). Extracted EPS was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, resulting in the identification of a homopolymer of ?(1?2)-glucopyranose (glucan) in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii. Monoclonal antibodies specific for this glucan and for the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted galactan were used to detect the two polysaccharides. While M. mycoides subsp. capri strains of serovar LC produced only capsular galactan, no polysaccharide could be detected in strains of serovar Capri. All strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii produced glucan CPS and EPS, whereas glucan production and localization varied among M. capricolum subsp. capricolum strains. Genes associated with polysaccharide synthesis and forming a biosynthetic pathway were predicted in all cluster members. These genes were organized in clusters within two loci representing genetic variability hot spots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that some of these genes, notably galE and glf, were acquired via horizontal gene transfer. These findings call for a reassessment of the specificity of the serological tests based on mycoplasma polysaccharides. PMID:25398856

  13. Mycoplasma genitalium in Toronto, Ont

    PubMed Central

    Gesink, Dionne; Racey, C. Sarai; Seah, Christine; Zittermann, Sandra; Mitterni, Leo; Juzkiw, Jerry; Jamieson, Heather; Greer, Jane; Singh, Sudesh; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Allen, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium in Toronto, Ont; detect mutations associated with macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance; and describe treatment outcomes. Design Prospective, cross-sectional study. Setting A sexual health clinic in Toronto. Participants A consecutive sample of men and women attending the sexual health clinic between September 1, 2013, and December 20, 2013. Interventions Participants underwent testing for M genitalium, along with standard sexually transmitted infection screening. All samples that had positive results for M genitalium were tested for mutations associated with resistance to macrolides and fluoroquinolones. Mycoplasma genitalium treatment was based on resistance profile and verified with a test of cure. Main outcome measures Positive results for M genitalium and antibiotic resistance. Results A total of 1193 men and women participated in the study. Overall, 4.5% of the 884 men and 3.2% of the 309 women had positive test results for M genitalium. Asymptomatic infection was common (52.0%). Macrolide resistance–mediating mutations were found in 58.0% of the M genitalium infections. No treatment failure was observed for azithromycin-treated cases. Treatment failure was suspected for 16.7% of cases treated with moxifloxacin. Conclusion Mycoplasma genitalium is present in Canada, with a prevalence comparable to chlamydia and gonorrhea, and has high macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance.

  14. Rapid identification of mycoplasmas by indirect immunoperoxidase test using small square filter paper.

    PubMed Central

    Imada, Y; Uchida, I; Hashimoto, K

    1987-01-01

    The indirect immunoperoxidase test using small, square filter paper was used for rapid identification of mycoplasmas. Colonies of type strains of 22 mycoplasma species, 3 acholeplasma species, and three Ureaplasma diversum serogroups were stained by this test with high sensitivity and specificity. All of 49 isolates from bovine materials and cell cultures were easily identified by this test, and the results agreed with those obtained by growth inhibition test. Use of filter paper made it possible to add different kinds of antisera or conjugates to the same agar plate simultaneously and also to save antiserum and conjugate. This test proved to be a simple and useful technique for rapid identification of many mycoplasma species grown on agar medium. PMID:3539989

  15. Recent Advances in Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccine Administration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines to layer chickens generally occurs at 9 to 10 weeks of age. Mycoplasma organisms are extremely fastidious in the laboratory and difficult to grow. Very little attention has been accorded to optimizing parameters for vaccine administration in th...

  16. Mycoplasma neophronis sp. nov., isolated from the upper respiratory tract of Canarian Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus majorensis).

    PubMed

    Surez-Prez, A; Ramrez, A S; Rosales, R S; Calabuig, P; Poveda, C; Rossell-Mra, R; Nicholas, R A J; Poveda, J B

    2012-06-01

    Six strains with the typical characteristics of mycoplasmas were isolated from the tracheae of six Canarian Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus majorensis). The results of biochemical, serological and molecular genetic studies showed that the isolates were nearly identical and that they could be considered as representing a novel species of the genus Mycoplasma. Colonies possessed the typical fried-egg appearance and electron micrographs revealed a pleomorphic cellular morphology with the lack of a cell wall. The isolates hydrolysed arginine and required sterol for growth but did not ferment glucose or hydrolyse urea. We propose that the isolates be assigned to a novel species,Mycoplasma neophronis sp. nov. The type strain is G.A.(T) ( = DSM 24097(T) = ATCC BAA-2157(T)). The antiserum of strain G.A.(T) has been deposited in the Mollicutes collection at Purdue University (Indiana, USA). PMID:21828019

  17. [Development of specific technics for the prevention of mycoplasma infections in swine].

    PubMed

    Sobko, A I; Nastenko, V D; Berdnik, V P; Schimmel, D; Pftzner, H

    1989-01-01

    Four experimental series were run in 2 experiments with 44 unweaned piglets to test non-inactivated vaccine from ts-mutant M-60 of Mycoplasma (M.) arginini and from attenuated strains of CH-2 M. hyorhinis, EP-29 M. hyosynoviae, M. suipneumoniae, and B-1 Acholeplasma laidlawii. Similar deviations of clinical and immunological parameters were recorded from piglets inoculated with the above vaccine and infected with pathogenic mycoplasma cultures. These deviations, however, were less strongly pronounced in animals which had been inoculated. Mycoplasma species were re-isolated from bronchial lymph nodes and lungs of 62.5% of inoculated piglets. Lasting residual virulence was recorded from the attenuated mycoplasma strains. That residual virulence had no substantial impact upon growth and development of the piglets under laboratory conditions, throughout the period of observation. The above results are likely to suggest the advisability of further studies for the development of a vaccine from ts-mutants and attenuated strains of pathogens of mycoplasmosis in swine. PMID:2619458

  18. Decrease in catalase activity of cultured cells by Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection.

    PubMed

    Nunoya, T; Tajima, M; Yagihashi, T

    1987-04-01

    The effect of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection on the host cell catalase activity was histochemically examined in cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) and kidney cells. The activity in normal cells was detected as fine, brown granules in the cytoplasm, which appeared ultrastructurally to correspond to anucleoid microbodies. By infecting cultured cells with a CEF-passaged strain of M. gallisepticum, the catalase-positive granules clearly decreased in amount, whereas the UV light-killed mycoplasma and the original strain failed to decrease the granules. The cell-passaged strain was able to induce cytopathic effects and this appeared to be due to its enhanced adherent ability as compared with the original strain. These findings suggest that attachment of viable organisms to cells is crucial to decrease the catalase activity and that the decreased activity may be an important process for the subsequent development of cytopathic effects. PMID:3604054

  19. Association of Blastocystis hominis with signs and symptoms of human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, D J; Raucher, B G; McKitrick, J C

    1986-01-01

    Purged stools from 389 patients were evaluated microscopically for the presence of Blastocystis hominis. A total of five or more B. hominis cells per 40X field were observed in 43 patients (11%), and B. hominis was the only intestinal parasite present in 23 (6%) of these patients. Of the 23 patients, 19 had symptoms which included abdominal discomfort (15 patients), anorexia (10 patients), diarrhea (9 patients), and flatus (9 patients). The remaining four patients were asymptomatic. The proportion of eosinophils in the peripheral blood ranged from 4 to 12% in 11 (58%) of the symptomatic patients. Absolute eosinophil counts were greater than 250/microliter in 8 patients and greater than 400/microliter in 5 patients. Eosinophilia was not observed in the remaining symptomatic or asymptomatic patients. This study supports the emerging concept of the role of B. hominis as an intestinal parasite causative of human disease. PMID:3771743

  20. Blastocystis hominis and Endolimax nana Co-Infection Resulting in Chronic Diarrhea in an Immunocompetent Male

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mitanshu; Tan, Christopher Bryan; Rajan, Dhyan; Ahmed, Shadab; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Rizvon, Kaleem; Mustacchia, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis and Endolimax nana exist as two separate parasitic organisms; however co-infection with the two individual parasites has been well documented. Although often symptomatic in immunocompromised individuals, the pathogenicity of the organisms in immunocompetent subjects causing gastrointestinal symptoms has been debated, with studies revealing mixed results. Clinically, both B. hominis and E. nana infection may result in acute or chronic diarrhea, generalized abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, flatulence and anorexia. We report the case of a 24-year-old immunocompetent male presenting with chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain secondary to B. hominis and E. nana treated with metronidazole, resulting in symptom resolution and eradication of the organisms. Our case illustrates that clinicians should be cognizant of both B. hominis and E. nana infection as a cause of chronic diarrhea in an immunocompetent host. Such awareness will aid in a timely diagnosis and possible parasitic eradication with resolution of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:22740811

  1. [The case of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura associated with Blastocystis hominis].

    PubMed

    Tutanç, Murat; Silfeler, Ibrahim; Ozgür, Tümay; Motor, Vicdan Köksaldı; Kurtoğlu, Ahmet Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis (B. hominis) is a parasite that often causes gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with immune deficiency and has a controversial pathogenicity in healthy people, although some symptoms are reported outside of the gastrointestinal system in healthy persons. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP) vasculitis is an acute autoimmune disease characterised by IgA storage of small vessels that is believed to include infectious factors in its aetiology. A 30-month follow-up with a boy diagnosed with HSP being treated with steroid therapy showed that he had recurrent symptoms within two days, and B. hominis was detected in the faecal analysis. His symptoms including rash, abdominal pain, and arthritis improved after treatment with steroid and co-trimaksazol. This paper is the first to present a case of HSP associated with B. hominis. PMID:23955912

  2. Six ulcerative colitis patients with refractory symptoms co-infective with Blastocystis hominis in China.

    PubMed

    Tai, Wei-Ping; Hu, Pin-Jin; Wu, Jing; Lin, Xiang-Chun

    2011-05-01

    Blastocystis hominis is an enteric parasite which has long been considered as an innocuous commensal living in the intestinal tract. Our research was to explore the role of B. hominis in refractory ulcerative colitis. Our department admitted 122 cases of ulcerative colitis patients. In these patients, there were 73 cases of patients who were responsive to sulfasalazinec, mesalazine in a standard dosage, according to the symptoms change. There was one patient who was detected to have B. hominis infection through stool detection. There were 49 patients with relapse symptoms. In this group, there were six patients who were detected with B. hominis infection through stool detection. The six patients of refractory ulcerative colitis were treated with metronidazole for 10-14 days. They almost completely recovered 3 weeks later. Patients diagnosed with ulcerative colitis should always consider this parasite infection when the symptoms are refractory and cannot be released. PMID:21104272

  3. Infective Endocarditis Complicated with Progressive Heart Failure due to ?-Lactamase-Producing Cardiobacterium hominis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Po-Liang; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Hung, Chien-Ching; Teng, Lee-Jene; Jang, Tsrang-Neng; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2000-01-01

    We describe a 66-year-old woman with infective endocarditis due to Cardiobacterium hominis whose condition, complicated by severe aortic regurgitation and congestive heart failure, necessitated aortic valve replacement despite treatment with ceftriaxone followed by ciprofloxacin. The blood isolate of C. hominis produced ?-lactamase and exhibited high-level resistance to penicillin (MIC, ?256 ?g/ml) and reduced susceptibility to vancomycin (MIC, 8 ?g/ml). PMID:10790145

  4. Distribution of haematological indices among subjects with Blastocystis hominis infection compared to controls

    PubMed Central

    Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Soltani, Shahrzad; Torabizadeh, Mehdi; Yousefi, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Some studies suggest Blastocystis hominis is a potentially pathogenic protozoa. Blastocystis hominis contributed to anaemia in children aged 8–10 years old in one study. Aim To compare haematological indices in cases with blastocystis hominis infection with healthy controls. Material and methods From 2001 to 2012, 97600 stool examinations were done in 4 university hospitals. Parasites were observed in 46,200 specimens. Of these cases, subjects with complete laboratory investigation (complete blood count – CBC, ferritin, total iron binding capacity – TIBC, and serum) and blastocystis hominis infection were included in this study as the case group. Of these cases, 6851 cases had only B. hominis infection. In the control group, 3615 subjects without parasite infestation were included. Age, haemoglobin (Hb), serum iron, TIBC, white blood cell (WBC), platelet (PLT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), haematocrit (HCT) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were recorded for cases and controls. SPSS software version 13.0 was used for analysis. Independent sample t-test and χ2 tests were used for comparison. Results Erythrocyte sedimentation rate level was significantly higher in cases with B. hominis infection (p < 0.05). C-reactive protein level was positive in 1.46% of cases and 0.5% of controls, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Frequency of serum iron < 120 was significantly higher in cases with B. hominis infection compared to controls. Occult blood was positive in 0.93% of cases and in none of the controls (p < 0.05). Conclusions The ESR, CRP and occult blood was significantly higher in cases with B. hominis infection. PMID:24868297

  5. Stress Exacerbates Infectivity and Pathogenicity of Blastocystis hominis: In Vitro and In Vivo Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Chandramathi, Samudi; Suresh, Kumar; Sivanandam, Sinnadurai; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress alters the oxidant-antioxidant state and immune cell responses which disrupts its function to combat infection. Blastocystis hominis, a common intestinal protozoan has been reported to be opportunistic in immunocompromised patients namely cancer. B. hominis infectivity in other altered immune system conditions especially stress is unknown. We aimed to demonstrate the stress effects towards the susceptibility and pathogenicity of B. hominis infection. Methods/Findings Three-week-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (a)control; (b)stress-induced; (c)B. hominis infected; (d)stress-induced with B. hominis infection; (n = 20 respectively). Stress was induced for an hour daily (30 days) using a Belly Dancer Shaker. Weight gain was monitored, stool samples were collected for B. hominis screening and blood for the determination of differential count, levels of immunoglobulin, oxidative damage, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation upon induction with solubilized antigen of B. hominis (Blasto-Ag). Group (b) exhibited the highest level of weight gain. Group (d) had higher levels of parasite cyst count in stools, serum IgE, oxidized protein and lipid compared to the group (c). Levels of monocyte and antioxidant in group (d) were decreased and their PBMCs showed highest inhibition of proliferation level when exposed to Blasto-Ag. Monocyte level in Group (b) showed insignificant difference compared to group (a) but was significantly lower compared to group (c). Antioxidant levels in group (c) were generally lower compared to group (a) and (b). Inhibition level exhibited by Blasto-Ag treated PBMCs of group (c) was higher compared to group (a) and (b). Conclusion The pathogenicity and augmentation of B. hominis infection is enhanced when stress is present. Lifestyles today are becoming increasingly stressed and the present findings suggest that the parasite which has been reported to be one of the most common organisms seen in stool surveys, namely in developing countries, may tend to be more pathogenic in stressful situations. PMID:24788756

  6. Blastocystis hominis and Dientamoeba fragilis in patients fulfilling irritable bowel syndrome criteria.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Jafri, Wasim; Beg, Mohammad Asim; Abbas, Zaigham; Naz, Shagufta; Islam, Muhammad; Khan, Rustam

    2010-08-01

    Studies have suggested a possible role for Blastocystis hominis and Dientamoeba fragilis in the etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We studied the prevalence of B. hominis and D. fragilis in patients with IBS-diarrhea (IBS-D). Three hundred and thirty patients were enrolled, 171 (52%) with IBS-D and 159 (48%) were controls, respectively. Stool microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for B. hominis and D. fragilis were done. B. hominis was positive by stool microscopy in 49% (83/171) of IBS compared to 24% (27/159) in control (p < 0.001). B. hominis culture was positive in 53% (90/171) in IBS compared to 16% (25/159) in control (p < 0.001). B. hominis PCR was positive in 44% (75/171) in IBS compared to 21% (33/159) in control (p < 0.001). D. fragilis microscopy was positive in 3.5% (6/171) in IBS-D compared to 0.6% (1/159) in control (p = 0.123). D. fragilis culture was positive in 4% (7/171) in IBS compared to 1.3% (2/159) in control (p = 0.176). D. fragilis PCR was positive in 4% (6/171) in IBS-D compared to 0% (0/159) in control (p = 0.030). B. hominis is common, while D. fragilis was less prevalent in our patients with IBS-D. B. hominis and D. fragilis culture had a better yield compared to stool microscopy and PCR. PMID:20532564

  7. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcription Unit Organization: Genome Survey and Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is associated with swine respiratory diseases. Although gene organization and regulation are well known in many prokaryotic organisms, knowledge on mycoplasma is limited. This study performed a comparative analysis of three strains of M. hyopneumoniae (7448, J and 232), with a focus on genome organization and gene comparison for open read frame (ORF) cluster (OC) identification. An in silico analysis of gene organization demonstrated 117 OCs and 34 single ORFs in M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and J, while 116 OCs and 36 single ORFs were identified in M. hyopneumoniae 232. Genomic comparison revealed high synteny and conservation of gene order between the OCs defined for 7448 and J strains as well as for 7448 and 232 strains. Twenty-one OCs were chosen and experimentally confirmed by reverse transcription–PCR from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 genome, validating our prediction. A subset of the ORFs within an OC could be independently transcribed due to the presence of internal promoters. Our results suggest that transcription occurs in ‘run-on’ from an upstream promoter in M. hyopneumoniae, thus forming large ORF clusters (from 2 to 29 ORFs in the same orientation) and indicating a complex transcriptional organization. PMID:22086999

  8. Adaptation of Mycoplasmas to Antimicrobial Agents: Acholeplasma laidlawii Extracellular Vesicles Mediate the Export of Ciprofloxacin and a Mutant Gene Related to the Antibiotic Target

    PubMed Central

    Medvedeva, Elena S.; Baranova, Natalia B.; Mouzykantov, Alexey A.; Grigorieva, Tatiana Yu.; Davydova, Marina N.; Trushin, Maxim V.; Chernova, Olga A.; Chernov, Vladislav M.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrated that extracellular membrane vesicles are involved with the development of resistance to fluoroquinolones by mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes). This study assessed the differences in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among strains of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8. The mechanisms of mycoplasma resistance to antibiotics may be associated with a mutation in a gene related to the target of quinolones, which could modulate the vesiculation level. A. laidlawii extracellular vesicles mediated the export of the nucleotide sequences of the antibiotic target gene as well as the traffic of ciprofloxacin. These results may facilitate the development of effective approaches to control mycoplasma infections, as well as the contamination of cell cultures and vaccine preparations. PMID:24605048

  9. Adaptation of mycoplasmas to antimicrobial agents: Acholeplasma laidlawii extracellular vesicles mediate the export of ciprofloxacin and a mutant gene related to the antibiotic target.

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, Elena S; Baranova, Natalia B; Mouzykantov, Alexey A; Grigorieva, Tatiana Yu; Davydova, Marina N; Trushin, Maxim V; Chernova, Olga A; Chernov, Vladislav M

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrated that extracellular membrane vesicles are involved with the development of resistance to fluoroquinolones by mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes). This study assessed the differences in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among strains of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8. The mechanisms of mycoplasma resistance to antibiotics may be associated with a mutation in a gene related to the target of quinolones, which could modulate the vesiculation level. A. laidlawii extracellular vesicles mediated the export of the nucleotide sequences of the antibiotic target gene as well as the traffic of ciprofloxacin. These results may facilitate the development of effective approaches to control mycoplasma infections, as well as the contamination of cell cultures and vaccine preparations. PMID:24605048

  10. A study on Blastocystis hominis in food-handlers: diagnosis and potential pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Fathy, Fouad M

    2011-08-01

    Proper diagnosis of Blastocystis hominis in not performed routinely in medical laboratories of developing countries; consequently clinical significance of this common intestinal protozoon is liable to remain unsettled. Food-handlers are more prone to get and transmit this feco-oral infection. This work compared the sensitivity of direct diagnostic methods to detect B. hominis in stool, estimate the true prevalence among food-handlers in Sirte-Libya, to clarify the association between the parasite and gastrointestinal symptoms and the response to specific treatment. A total of 400 male food-handlers aged 18-50 year were included. Each was subjected to clinical questionnaire and 3 stool examinations by different methods. The results showed high prevalence of B. hominis in food-handlers (35.5%). Short- term in vitro culture (on Boeck and Derbholav's medium) was the most sensitive method for detection of B. hominis (35.5%), followed by permanent Trichrome-stained smear (27.5%); saline-sedimentation concentrated smear (21%) and direct iodine smear (14%). Of 108 cases having B. hominis alone, 68.5% were symptomatic. Diarrhea was the most frequent symptom (75.6%), followed by abdominal pain (66.2%) and flatulence (43.2%). Fecal parasite-load was significantly higher in symptomatic cases than asymptomatic; parasite and symptoms disappeared after metronidazole treatment. So, culture should be used on routine basis to detect B. hominis which should be considered pathogenic particularly when present alone in large numbers in symptomatic patients. PMID:21980782

  11. Interaction of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum with Primary Human and Bovine Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Amna; Mulcahy, Grace; Bourke, Billy; Clyne, Marguerite

    2006-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis in humans is caused by the zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum and the anthroponotic pathogen Cryptosporidium hominis. To what extent the recently recognized C. hominis species differs from C. parvum is unknown. In this study we compared the mechanisms of C. parvum and C. hominis invasion using a primary cell model of infection. Cultured primary bovine and human epithelial intestinal cells were infected with C. parvum or C. hominis. The effects of the carbohydrate lectin galactose-N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) and inhibitors of cytoskeletal function and signal transduction mechanisms on entry of the parasites into host cells were tested. HCT-8 cells (human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells) were used for the purpose of comparison. Pretreatment of parasites with Gal/GalNAc inhibited entry of C. parvum into HCT-8 cells and primary bovine cells but had no effect on entry of either C. parvum or C. hominis into primary human cells or on entry of C. hominis into HCT-8 cells. Both Cryptosporidium species entered primary cells by a protein kinase C (PKC)- and actin-dependent mechanism. Staurosporine, in particular, attenuated infection, likely through a combination of PKC inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Diversity in the mechanisms used by Cryptosporidium species to infect cells of different origins has important implications for understanding the relevance of in vitro studies of Cryptosporidium pathogenesis. PMID:16368962

  12. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae contains a novel lipoyl domain arrangement.

    PubMed

    Matic, Jake N; Wilton, Jody L; Towers, Rebecca J; Scarman, Anthony L; Minion, F Chris; Walker, Mark J; Djordjevic, Steve P

    2003-11-13

    The genes encoding the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (pdhA, pdhB, pdhC and pdhD) from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae have been cloned and sequenced. The genes are arranged into two operons, designated pdhAB and pdhCD, which are not found together in the chromosome. The pdhA, pdhB, pdhC and pdhD genes encode proteins of predicted molecular masses of 44.2 kDa (pyruvate dehydrogenase major subunit; E1alpha), 36.6 kDa (pyruvate dehydrogenase minor subunit; E1beta), 33.1 kDa (dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase; E2) and 66.3 kDa (dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase; E3), respectively. Sequence analysis of the pdhCD operon revealed the presence of a lipoyl-binding domain in pdhD but not in pdhC. The lipoyl domain is believed to act as a "swinging arm" that spans the gaps between the catalytic domains of each of the subunits. Portions of the N-terminal regions of pdhA and pdhD were expressed as 6xHis-tag fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The purified proteins were used to raise antibodies in rabbits, and Western blot analysis was performed with the polyclonal rabbit antiserum. Both the pdhA and pdhD genes were expressed among various strains of M. hyopneumoniae as well as the porcine mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma flocculare. Southern hybridisation analysis using probes from pdhA and pdhD detected one copy of each gene in the chromosome of M. hyopneumoniae. Since previous studies have shown pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in M. hyopneumoniae [J. Gen. Microbiol. 134 (1988) 791], it appears likely that a functional lipoyl-binding domain in the N terminus of PdhC is not an absolute prerequisite for pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity. We hypothesise that the lipoyl-binding domain of PdhD is performing the enzymatic function normally attributed to the PdhC lipoyl-binding domain in other organisms. Searches of pyruvate dehydrogenase gene sequences derived from other Mycoplasma species showed that a putative lipoyl domain was absent in the pdhC gene from Mycoplasma pulmonis. However, like other bacterial species, pdhC gene sequences from Mycoplasma capricolum, Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma pneumoniae contain a putative lipoyl domain. PMID:14597175

  13. Mycoplasma pneumonia-associated mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Cyril; Sharain, Korosh; Skalski, Joseph; Ramar, Kannan

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a young man with severe mucositis following an upper respiratory tract infection limited to the ophthalmic and oral mucosa while sparing the rest of the skin, genitalia and perianal regions. Investigations revealed that the mucositis was a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. He had progressive vision-threatening symptoms despite antibiotics and best supportive care and thus was treated with intravenous corticosteroids, immunoglobulins, temporary ocular amniotic membrane grafts and tarsorrhaphy. The patient made an almost complete recovery over 6 weeks. PMID:24626386

  14. Optimized PCR-based detection of mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolny, Paige L; Bess, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of contamination-free cell lines is essential to cell-based research. Among the biggest contaminant concerns are mycoplasma contamination. Although mycoplasma do not usually kill contaminated cells, they are difficult to detect and can cause a variety of effects on cultured cells, including altered metabolism, slowed proliferation and chromosomal aberrations. In short, mycoplasma contamination compromises the value of those cell lines in providing accurate data for life science research. The sources of mycoplasma contamination in the laboratory are very challenging to completely control. As certain mycoplasma species are found on human skin, they can be introduced through poor aseptic technique. Additionally, they can come from contaminated supplements such as fetal bovine serum, and most importantly from other contaminated cell cultures. Once mycoplasma contaminates a culture, it can quickly spread to contaminate other areas of the lab. Strict adherence to good laboratory practices such as good aseptic technique are key, and routine testing for mycoplasma is highly recommended for successful control of mycoplasma contamination. PCR-based detection of mycoplasma has become a very popular method for routine cell line maintenance. PCR-based detection methods are highly sensitive and can provide rapid results, which allows researchers to respond quickly to isolate and eliminate contamination once it is detected in comparison to the time required using microbiological techniques. The LookOut Mycoplasma PCR Detection Kit is highly sensitive, with a detection limit of only 2 genomes per ?l. Taking advantage of the highly specific JumpStart Taq DNA Polymerase and a proprietary primer design, false positives are greatly reduced. The convenient 8-tube format, strips pre-coated with dNTPs, and associated primers helps increase the throughput to meet the needs of customers with larger collections of cell lines. Given the extreme sensitivity of the kit, great care must be taken to prevent inadvertent contamination of samples and reagents. The step-by-step protocol we demonstrate highlights the precautions and practices required for reliable mycoplasma detection. We also show and discuss typical results and their interpretation. Our goal is to ensure the success of researchers using the LookOut Mycoplasma PCR Detection Kit. PMID:21712802

  15. Genomic Investigations Unmask Mycoplasma amphoriforme, a New Respiratory Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Stephen H.; Ling, Clare L.; Oravcova, Katarina; Pinheiro, Miguel; Wells, Louise; Bryant, Josephine M.; McHugh, Timothy D.; Bbar, Cecile; Webster, David; Harris, Simon R.; Seth-Smith, Helena M. B.; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Mycoplasma amphoriforme has been associated with infection in patients with primary antibody deficiency (PAD). Little is known about the natural history of infection with this organism and its ability to be transmitted in the community. Methods.?The bacterial load was estimated in sequential sputum samples from 9 patients by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The genomes of all available isolates, originating from patients in the United Kingdom, France, and Tunisia, were sequenced along with the type strain. Genomic data were assembled and annotated, and a high-resolution phylogenetic tree was constructed. Results.?By using high-resolution whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data, we show that patients can be chronically infected with M. amphoriforme manifesting as a relapsing-remitting bacterial load, interspersed by periods when the organism is undetectable. Importantly, we demonstrate transmission of strains within a clinical environment. Antibiotic resistance mutations accumulate in isolates taken from patients who received multiple courses of antibiotics. Conclusions.?Mycoplasma amphoriforme isolates form a closely related species responsible for a chronic relapsing and remitting infection in PAD patients in the United Kingdom and from immunocompetent patients in other countries. We provide strong evidence of transmission between patients attending the same clinic, suggesting that screening and isolation may be necessary for susceptible patients. This work demonstrates the critical role that WGS can play in rapidly unraveling the biology of a novel pathogen. PMID:25344534

  16. Severe Mycoplasma bovis outbreak in an Austrian dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Pothmann, Harald; Spergser, Joachim; Elmer, Josef; Prunner, Isabella; Iwersen, Michael; Klein-Jbstl, Daniela; Drillich, Marc

    2015-11-01

    A conventional dairy farm, housing 19 Austrian Simmental cows, experienced a spontaneous outbreak of a Mycoplasma bovis infection, showing severe clinical signs of respiratory tract disease, clinical mastitis, and tremendous drop in milk production. Despite intensive therapy, 5 cows died within 2 weeks or were euthanized. From the remaining cows, bacteriological culture and polymerase chain reaction revealed M. bovis in 10 of 14 milk samples. Mycoplasma bovis was found in 1 of 5 randomly collected nasal swabs. Autopsy of 1 cow revealed infection of the lungs and the udder with M. bovis. The 13 M. bovis isolates from milk samples, nasal swabs, lungs, and udder were genotyped by multilocus variable number of tandem-repeat analysis, and indicated that described infections were caused by a single M. bovis strain. The virulent M. bovis strain resulted in dramatic economic loss to the farmer. To control the disease, culling of all animals, including heifers and calves, was recommended, and strict hygienic measures were implemented before introducing new animals to the farm. PMID:26450838

  17. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Antonio; Yez, Antonio; Len-Tello, Gloria; Gil, Constantino; Giono, Silvia; Barba, Eduardo; Cedillo, Lilia

    2002-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients. PMID:12057023

  18. Specific real-time PCR assays for the detection and quantification of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, Sophie; Manso-Silvn, Luca; Thiaucourt, Franois

    2008-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and contagious caprine pleuropneumonia are two severe respiratory infections of ruminants due to infection by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC (MmmSC) and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp), respectively. They are included in the OIE list of notifiable diseases. Here we describe the development of rapid, sensitive, and specific real-time PCR assays for the detection and quantification of MmmSC and Mccp DNA. MmmSC PCR primers were designed after whole genome comparisons between the published sequence of MmmSC strain type PG1(T) and the sequence of an M. mycoides subsp. mycoides large colony strain. For Mccp, previously published conventional PCR primers were applied. SYBR green was used as a detection agent for both assays. The assays specifically detected the targeted species in both cultures and clinical samples, and no cross-amplifications were obtained from either heterologous mycoplasma strain cultures or European field samples. The sensitivity of these new assays was estimated at 3-80 colony forming units per reaction and 4-80fg of DNA, representing a 2-3log increase in sensitivity compared to established conventional PCR tests. These new real-time PCR assays will be invaluable for application in various fields such as direct detection in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:18678244

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characterization of macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from multiple provinces in China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Cong; Gao, Duo; Jia, Bo-Yan; Wang, Zi; Gao, Yun-Hang; Pei, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Shu-Ming; Xin, Jiu-Qing; Ma, Hong-Xia

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma bovis has spread widely throughout the world via animal movement and has become an important pathogen of bovine respiratory disease. However, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials for Mycoplasma bovis have not been studied in China. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolated from young cattle with respiratory infection in China. Mycoplasma bovis was detected in 32/45 bovine respiratory infection outbreaks at beef farms in 8 provinces in China. The isolates were susceptible or had medium sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and doxycycline, but were frequently resistant to macrolides (13/32, 41%). An A2058G (Escherichia coli Numbering) mutation located in the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA was observed in strains that were resistant to macrolides. This single mutations at the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA may play an important role in the resistance of Mycoplasma bovis strains to macrolides. PMID:26346744

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characterization of macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from multiple provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    KONG, Ling-Cong; GAO, Duo; JIA, Bo-Yan; WANG, Zi; GAO, Yun-Hang; PEI, Zhi-Hua; LIU, Shu-Ming; XIN, Jiu-Qing; MA, Hong-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis has spread widely throughout the world via animal movement and has become an important pathogen of bovine respiratory disease. However, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials for Mycoplasma bovis have not been studied in China. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolated from young cattle with respiratory infection in China. Mycoplasma bovis was detected in 32/45 bovine respiratory infection outbreaks at beef farms in 8 provinces in China. The isolates were susceptible or had medium sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and doxycycline, but were frequently resistant to macrolides (13/32, 41%). An A2058G (Escherichia coli Numbering) mutation located in the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA was observed in strains that were resistant to macrolides. This single mutations at the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA may play an important role in the resistance of Mycoplasma bovis strains to macrolides. PMID:26346744

  1. Diagnosis of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by detection and identification of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae by PCR and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed

    Blske, G; Mattsson, J G; Bascuana, C R; Bergstrm, K; Wesonga, H; Johansson, K E

    1996-04-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), one of the most serious and dramatic diseases of goats, is caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (M. capripneumoniae). This organism is very difficult to isolate and to correctly identify. In a previous report we described a method for the rapid detection and identification of M. capripneumoniae. This method is based on a PCR system by which a segment of the 16S rRNA gene from all mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster can be amplified. The PCR product is then analyzed by restriction enzyme cleavage for the identification of M. capripneumoniae DNA. This system has now been further evaluated with respect to specificity and diagnostic efficacy for the identification and direct detection of the organism in clinical material. Identification by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified DNA from mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster was verified for 55 strains, among which were 15 strains of M. capripneumoniae. The PCR was applied to clinical samples from the nose, ear, pharynx, pleural fluid, and lung tissue containing M. capripneumoniae or other mycoplasmas. As expected, mycoplasmas belonging to the M. mycoides cluster could be detected by the PCR. Restriction enzyme analysis of the PCR products could then be applied for the identification of M. capripneumoniae. Clinical samples and cultures containing M. capripneumoniae were dried on filter paper, to try an easier sample transport method, and were tested by PCR. M. capripneumoniae DNA could be detected in the dried specimens, but the sensitivity of the PCR test was reduced. PMID:8815084

  2. A College Epidemic of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, David; Cochran, Burt

    1979-01-01

    The article reports on an outbreak of mycoplasma pneumoniae at the California Polytechnic State University including a historical background of the disease, clinical features, laboratory findings for treated patients, treatment, and clinical clues for diagnosis. (JMF)

  3. O-Linked Protein Glycosylation in Mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, David S.; Daubenspeck, James M.; Laube, Audra H.; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Although mycoplasmas have a paucity of glycosyltransferases and nucleotidyltransferases recognizable by bioinformatics, these bacteria are known to produce polysaccharides and glycolipids. We show here that mycoplasmas also produce glycoproteins and hence have glycomes more complex than previously realized. Proteins from several species of Mycoplasma reacted with a glycoprotein stain, and the murine pathogen Mycoplasma arthritidis was chosen for further study. The presence of M. arthritidis glycoproteins was confirmed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. O-linked glycosylation was clearly identified at both serine and threonine residues. No consensus amino acid sequence was evident for the glycosylation sites of the glycoproteins. A single hexose was identified as the O-linked modification, and glucose was inferred by 13C labeling to be the hexose at several of the glycosylation sites. This is the first study to conclusively identify sites of protein glycosylation in any of the mollicutes. PMID:24118505

  4. The prevalence of Blastocystis hominis and other protozoan parasites in soldiers returning from peacekeeping missions.

    PubMed

    Duda, Aleksandra; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Lanocha-Arendarczyk, Natalia; Kołodziejczyk, Lidia; Lanocha, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    Blastocystis hominis is a common intestinal parasite found in humans living in poor sanitary conditions, living in tropical and subtropical climates, exposed to infected animals, or consuming contaminated food or water. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of B. hominis in Polish military personnel returning from peacekeeping missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. In total, 1,826 stool samples were examined. Gastrointestinal parasites were detected in 17% of the soldiers. The examined stool samples most frequently contained vacuolar forms of B. hominis (15.3%) and cysts of Entamoeba coli (1.0%) or Giardia lamblia (0.7%). In 97.1% of stool samples from infected soldiers, we observed less than five developmental forms of B. hominis in the field of view (40×). The parasite infections in soldiers were diagnosed in the autumn and the spring. There was no statistical correlation between age and B. hominis infection. Our results show that peacekeeping missions in countries with tropical or subtropical climates could be associated with risk for parasitic diseases, including blastocystosis. PMID:25732683

  5. Comparison of single- and multilocus genetic diversity in the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Giovanni; Lee, Yongsun

    2010-10-01

    The genotyping of numerous isolates of Cryptosporidium parasites has led to the definition of new species and a better understanding of the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis. A single-locus genotyping method based on the partial sequence of a polymorphic sporozoite surface glycoprotein gene (GP60) has been favored by many for surveying Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis populations. Since genetically distinct Cryptosporidium parasites recombine in nature, it is unclear whether single-locus classifications can adequately represent intraspecies diversity. To address this question, we investigated whether multilocus genotypes of C. parvum and C. hominis cluster according to the GP60 genotype. C. hominis multilocus genotypes did not segregate according to this marker, indicating that for this species the GP60 sequence is not a valid surrogate for multilocus typing methods. In contrast, in C. parvum the previously described "anthroponotic" genotype was confirmed as a genetically distinct subspecies cluster characterized by a diagnostic GP60 allele. However, as in C. hominis, several C. parvum GP60 alleles did not correlate with distinct subpopulations. Given the rarity of some C. parvum GP60 alleles in our sample, the existence of additional C. parvum subgroups with unique GP60 alleles cannot be ruled out. We conclude that with the exception of genotypically distinct C. parvum subgroups, multilocus genotyping methods are needed to characterize C. parvum and C. hominis populations. Unless parasite virulence is controlled at the GP60 locus, attempts to find associations within species or subspecies between GP60 and phenotype are unlikely to be successful. PMID:20709840

  6. Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas as Neonatal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Katz, Brenda; Schelonka, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mycoplasmas represent a complex and unique group of microorganisms that have been associated with a wide array of infectious diseases in adults and infants. The lack of conclusive knowledge regarding the pathogenic potential of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp. in many conditions is due to a general unfamiliarity of physicians and microbiology laboratories with their fastidious growth requirements, leading to difficulty in their detection; their high prevalence in healthy persons; the poor design of research studies attempting to base association with disease on the mere presence of the organisms in the lower urogenital tract; the failure to consider multifactorial aspects of diseases; and considering these genital mycoplasmas only as a last resort. The situation is now changing because of a greater appreciation of the genital mycoplasmas as perinatal pathogens and improvements in laboratory detection, particularly with regard to the development of powerful molecular nucleic acid amplification tests. This review summarizes the epidemiology of genital mycoplasmas as causes of neonatal infections and premature birth; evidence linking ureaplasmas with bronchopulmonary dysplasia; recent changes in the taxonomy of the genus Ureaplasma; the neonatal host response to mycoplasma and ureaplasma infections; advances in laboratory detection, including molecular methods; and therapeutic considerations for treatment of systemic diseases. PMID:16223956

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum antigens in turkey respiratory tissues.

    PubMed

    Radi, Z A; Trampel, D W; Smith, B S; Rosenbusch, R F; Goll, F

    2000-01-01

    An avidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase diagnostic test was developed to facilitate rapid identification of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in respiratory tissues of turkeys. This procedure used polyclonal primary antibodies produced in rabbits. Turkeys were inoculated into the infraorbital sinus and trachea with the R strain of M. gallisepticum, Mycoplasma synoviae, Mycoplasma meleagridis, or Frey's media. The outer walls of the infraorbital sinuses, lungs, and tracheas were collected and fixed in either 10% neutral formalin or pentanedial methyl glycol at 1, 2, 3, and 4 wk postinoculation. Tissues were subdivided and remained in each fixative for 6 or 24 hr. The avidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase diagnostic test was sufficiently sensitive to detect M. gallisepticum antigen at 1, 2, 3, and 4 wk postinoculation. Staining of M. gallisepticum was significantly more intense on infraorbital sinus epithelium than on respiratory epithelium from the trachea or lung. Statistical analysis indicated that the 6-hr fixation time offered better antigen preservation than 24 hr in a fixative. There was no difference in intensity of M. gallisepticum antigen staining in tissues fixed in methyl pentanedial glycol when compared with tissues fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Significant differences in staining intensity were observed between weeks. Specificity of the avidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase test was not complete. None of the tissues from the M. meleagridis and control groups showed staining. No staining was observed in the ciliated brush border of infraorbital sinus epithelial cells from turkeys infected with M. synoviae. However, weak to moderate staining was observed in several tracheas of turkeys inoculated with M. synoviae. Improved specificity of an avidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase diagnostic test to detect M. gallisepticum in respiratory tissues of turkeys probably will require the use of multiple monoclonal antibodies directed against several different epitopes specific to the cell membrane of M. gallisepticum. PMID:10879921

  8. Mycoplasmas hyorhinis in different regions of cuba. diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Evelyn; Poveda, Carlos; Gupta, Rakesh; Suarez, Alejandro; Hernndez, Yenney; Ramrez, Ana; Poveda, Jos B.

    2011-01-01

    M. hyorhinis is considered one of the etiological agents of arthritis in sucking pigs, but recently as seen, some strains can produce pneumonia that could not be distinguished from the mycoplasmosis caused by M. hyopneumoniae. The study was conducted to research the presence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis ) in different regions of the country from exudates of pig lungs with typical EP lesions. Exudates from 280 pig lungs with typical EP lesions were studied using molecular techniques such as PCR, real time PCR and amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA. It was detected that the 66% of the samples studied resulted positive to M. hyorhinis, and the presence of this species was detected in all the provinces. Amplification and studies on the intergenic region 16S-23S of M. hyorhinis rRNA demonstrated the existing variability among strains of a same species. This study is the first report on M. hyorhinis detection in Cuba. PMID:24031686

  9. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT WITH MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a common human respiratory pathogen, has been studied experimentally for years using intranasal inoculation of the golden Sytrian hamster. Because of recent evidence outlining the role in pulmonary immune development of particle size and depth of mycoplasma...

  10. Morphological diversity of Blastocystis hominis in sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin-preserved stool samples stained with iron hematoxylin.

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, D W; MacQueen, W M

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the morphological characteristics of Blastocystis hominis in sodium acetate-acetic acid-Formalin-preserved stool samples. Routinely processed samples were examined for morphological detail, including size, shape, nuclear detail, and central body characteristics. Morphological findings revealing the importance of recognizing B. hominis in the diagnostic laboratory are described. PMID:7510311

  11. Associations among Haemophilus parasuis, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infections in pigs with polyserositis

    PubMed Central

    Palzer, Andreas; Haedke, Kristina; Heinritzi, Karl; Zoels, Susanne; Ladinig, Andrea; Ritzmann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the associations among Haemophilus parasuis, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (EU-field strain) infections in 95 pigs with polyserositis. A significant association between H. parasuis and M. hyorhinis was identified. H. parasuis and M. hyorhinis were significantly more often detected in PRRS virus positive pigs. PMID:25750450

  12. Effect of Dosage and Vaccination Route on Transmission of a Live Attenuated Mycoplasma gallesepticum Vaccine: A Broiler Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an economically significant pathogen of poultry species and among the table egg sector of the poultry industry, live attenuated strains of MG are commonly utilized to limit production losses associated with MG-induced disease. The vaccine, however, may be problemati...

  13. Molecular identification of Sarcocystis hominis in native cattle of central Iran: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hajimohammadi, B; Eslami, G; Oryan, A; Zohourtabar, A; Pourmirzaei Tafti, H; Moghaddam Ahmadi, M

    2014-03-01

    Sarcocystis spp. are two-host protozoan parasites belonging to the phylum Apicomplexa. Among different known species of Sarcocystis in cattle, only Sarcocystis hominis is important from the public health viewpoint, because of its zoonotic characteristics. This study presents the first molecular identification of S. hominis in native cattle in central Iran. A sample of diaphragm muscle from a 6-year-old native cow slaughtered at Yazd Slaughterhouse, Yazd, central Iran, was collected in May 2013. DNA extraction was performed, using the salting-out method. DNA purification and precipitation were performed consecutively. The amplicon and digestion results were analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis. A PCR product with 926 bp in length was obtained after amplification, and 376 bp and 550 bp in length after digestion that identified S. hominis. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first of its kind to be reported from Iran. PMID:24862059

  14. Evidence of an epidemic of Blastocystis hominis infections in preschool children in northern Jordan.

    PubMed Central

    Nimri, L F

    1993-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis is now gaining acceptance as an agent of human intestinal disease. A case-control study of the cause of gastroenteritis in children less than 6 years old was conducted. A total of 500 stool specimens were examined by wet mount preparation, formalin-ether concentration, Sheather's sugar flotation technique, and permanent stains when necessary. B. hominis was found in 63 (25%) of 250 stool specimens of the cases examined; 38 (15%) of these specimens contained this parasite alone. The appearance of severe symptoms was associated with increased numbers of the parasite in the diarrheic specimens (more than five parasites per field at a magnification of x 400). The most common symptoms were abdominal pain, recurrent diarrhea, cramps, anorexia, and fatigue. Contaminated water was suspected to be the major source of infection, since several cases were associated with Giardia infection. These findings support the concept of B. hominis pathogenicity in children with gastroenteritis. PMID:8253970

  15. Eradication of Blastocystis hominis prevents the development of symptomatic Hashimoto's thyroiditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rajič, Borko; Arapović, Jurica; Raguž, Kazimir; Bošković, Mladen; Babić, Senaida Marina; Maslać, Suzana

    2015-07-01

    In this case report we describe a 49 year-old man who presented with chronic urticaria, angioedema and soft stool consistency. During diagnostic examinations Hashimoto's thyroiditis was found even though the patient never had clear symptoms of this disease. Blastocystis hominis was isolated through a stool microbiologic examination, implicating that this parasite can cause the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and chronic urticaria. After two-weeks treatment with metronidazole the Blastocystis hominis was eradicated, then urticaria and angioedema disappeared. During the four years of follow-up, the patient presented without any symptoms, whereas thyroid hormones were normalized and anti-thyroid antibodies declined. For the first time in the literature we show that eradication of Blastocystis hominis can prevent the development of both symptomatic Hashimoto's thyroiditis and chronic urticaria. PMID:26230132

  16. Experimental Infections with Mycoplasma agalactiae Identify Key Factors Involved in Host-Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Eric; Bergonier, Dominique; Sagn, Eveline; Hygonenq, Marie-Claude; Ronsin, Patricia; Berthelot, Xavier; Citti, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying pathogenic processes in mycoplasma infections are poorly understood, mainly because of limited sequence similarities with classical, bacterial virulence factors. Recently, large-scale transposon mutagenesis in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae identified the NIF locus, including nifS and nifU, as essential for mycoplasma growth in cell culture, while dispensable in axenic media. To evaluate the importance of this locus in vivo, the infectivity of two knock-out mutants was tested upon experimental infection in the natural host. In this model, the parental PG2 strain was able to establish a systemic infection in lactating ewes, colonizing various body sites such as lymph nodes and the mammary gland, even when inoculated at low doses. In these PG2-infected ewes, we observed over the course of infection (i) the development of a specific antibody response and (ii) dynamic changes in expression of M. agalactiae surface variable proteins (Vpma), with multiple Vpma profiles co-existing in the same animal. In contrast and despite a sensitive model, none of the knock-out mutants were able to survive and colonize the host. The extreme avirulent phenotype of the two mutants was further supported by the absence of an IgG response in inoculated animals. The exact role of the NIF locus remains to be elucidated but these data demonstrate that it plays a key role in the infectious process of M. agalactiae and most likely of other pathogenic mycoplasma species as many carry closely related homologs. PMID:24699671

  17. Experimental infections with Mycoplasma agalactiae identify key factors involved in host-colonization.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Eric; Bergonier, Dominique; Sagn, Eveline; Hygonenq, Marie-Claude; Ronsin, Patricia; Berthelot, Xavier; Citti, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying pathogenic processes in mycoplasma infections are poorly understood, mainly because of limited sequence similarities with classical, bacterial virulence factors. Recently, large-scale transposon mutagenesis in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae identified the NIF locus, including nifS and nifU, as essential for mycoplasma growth in cell culture, while dispensable in axenic media. To evaluate the importance of this locus in vivo, the infectivity of two knock-out mutants was tested upon experimental infection in the natural host. In this model, the parental PG2 strain was able to establish a systemic infection in lactating ewes, colonizing various body sites such as lymph nodes and the mammary gland, even when inoculated at low doses. In these PG2-infected ewes, we observed over the course of infection (i) the development of a specific antibody response and (ii) dynamic changes in expression of M. agalactiae surface variable proteins (Vpma), with multiple Vpma profiles co-existing in the same animal. In contrast and despite a sensitive model, none of the knock-out mutants were able to survive and colonize the host. The extreme avirulent phenotype of the two mutants was further supported by the absence of an IgG response in inoculated animals. The exact role of the NIF locus remains to be elucidated but these data demonstrate that it plays a key role in the infectious process of M. agalactiae and most likely of other pathogenic mycoplasma species as many carry closely related homologs. PMID:24699671

  18. A PCR assay and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism combination identifying the 3 primary Mycoplasma species causing mastitis.

    PubMed

    Boonyayatra, S; Fox, L K; Besser, T E; Sawant, A; Gay, J M; Raviv, Z

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the current research was to develop real-time PCR assays with improved sensitivity and the capacity to simultaneously speciate the 3 most common mycoplasma mastitis agents: Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma californicum, and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium. Real-time PCR was chosen because it provides rapid results. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used as the gold standard for evaluating candidate real-time PCR assays. To ascertain the real-time PCR assay specificity, reference strains of Mycoplasma species, Acholeplasma axanthum, and common gram-positive and gram-negative mastitis pathogens were tested. No cross-reactions were observed. Mycoplasma spp. isolated from bovine milk samples (n=228) and other organ sites (n=40) were tested by the real-time PCR assays and the partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing assay. Overall accuracy of this novel real-time PCR was 98.51%; 4 of 228 isolates identified as M. bovis by the partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing assay were identified as both M. bovis and M. californicum by real-time PCR. Subsequent amplicon sequencing suggested the presence of both M. bovis and M. californicum in these 4 samples. Using a cycle threshold of 37, the detection limits for real-time PCR were 10 copies of DNA template for both M. bovis and M. bovigenitalium, and 1 copy for M. californicum. This real-time PCR assay is a diagnostic technique that may be used as a screening tool or as a confirmation test for mycoplasma mastitis. PMID:22192198

  19. In vitro sensitivity of Blastocystis hominis to garlic, ginger, white cumin, and black pepper used in diet.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Beg, Muhammad Asim; Naz, Shagufta; Awan, Safia; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2011-08-01

    To determine the growth pattern and in vitro susceptibility of Blastocystis hominis to metronidazole (MTZ), garlic, ginger, white cumin, and black pepper. Stool specimens were collected from 16 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 10 controls between July-November 2010. Stool microscopy and culture for B. hominis was performed. Drug susceptibility assays was done using 0.01 and 0.1 mg/ml of MTZ, garlic, ginger, white cumin, and black pepper. Effect was assessed on B. hominis culture after 48 h. Stool DNA was extracted using stool DNA extraction kit (Qiagen) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) done using subtype-specific sequence-tagged-site primers. B. hominis genotype 3 and coinfection of 1 and 3 tended to grow well in culture compared to isolated type 1 infection. Exposed to MTZ at a concentration of 0.01 mg/ml, 38% (6/16) B. hominis from IBS did not grow in culture compared to 100% (10/10) of B. hominis from control (p = 0.001). When they were exposed to MTZ at 0.1 mg/ml, 56% (9/16) B. hominis from IBS did not grow in cultures compared to 100% (10/10) from control (p = 0.01). Forty-four percent (7/16) B. hominis from IBS did not grow in culture compared to 100% (10/10) B. hominis from control when exposed to garlic at a concentration of 0.01 mg/ml (p = 0.003) and following exposure to garlic at 0.1 mg/ml, 38% (6/16) B. hominis from IBS did not grow in cultures compared to 100% (10/10) from control (p = 0.001). B. hominis isolates from IBS had a cell count of 6,625 at a MTZ concentration of 0.01 mg/ml that reduced to 1,250 as MTZ concentration was increased to 0.1 mg/ml (p = 0.08). B. hominis from IBS with a mean cell count of 3 10(5) at baseline decreased to 1 10(4) when exposed to garlic at 0.01 mg/ml (p < 0.001) and to 1 10(3) (p < 0.001) when garlic was 0.1 mg/ml. B. hominis from IBS cell count decreased to 1 10(5) when exposed to white cumin at 0.01 mg/ml (p = 0.01) and to 1 10(5) (p < 0.001) when white cumin was 0.1 mg/ml. Exposed to black pepper at 0.1 mg/ml, cell count of B. hominis from IBS decreased to 1 10(5) (p = 0.01). B. hominis from IBS decreased to 1.3 10(5) exposed to ginger at 0.01 mg/ml (p = 0.001). B. hominis isolates were mostly genotypes 3, type 1 and 3 coinfection, and non-typeable B. hominis isolates. B. hominis isolates from IBS mostly genotype 1 demonstrated an increased sensitivity to garlic at 0.01 mg/ml with a B. hominis cell count of 3,714 compared to 6,142 when exposed to 0.01 mg/ml of MTZ. However, this sensitivity did not increase as garlic concentration was increased to 0.1 mg/ml, for B. hominis cell count was 6,000 compared to 1,428 as MTZ was increased to 0.1 mg/ml. PMID:21431384

  20. In vitro susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and M. hyorhinis to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Sonmez, N; Morozumi, T; Mitani, K; Ito, N; Shiono, H; Yamamoto, K

    1996-11-01

    Fifty-four Japanese strains of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae isolated from porkers during 1980 to 1995, and 107 Japanese strains of M. hyorhinis isolated from piglets with respiratory disease during 1991 to 1994 were investigated for the in vitro activities of 13 antimicrobial agents [josamycin, tylosin, spiramycin, kitasamycin, erythromycin, lincomycin (LCM), kanamycin (KM), chloramphenicol (CP), thiamphenicol (TP), tiamulin (TML), oxytetracycline (OTC), chlortetracycline (CTC), and enrofloxacin (ERFX)] by the agar dilution method. Of the drugs tested TML showed the highest activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.013 to 0.1 microgram/ m/ (MIC90; 0.05 microgram/ml) against strains of M. hyosynoviae, and 0.2 to 0.78 microgram/ml (MIC90; 0.39 microgram/ml) against strains of M. hyorhinis. ERFX, LCM, most of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotics and tetracyclines also showed low MICs against both mycoplasma species. The susceptibility of KM, CP and TP to the mycoplasmas was considered to be of a secondary grade. Two of 54 strains of M. hyosynoviae, and 11 of 107 strains of M. hyorhinis showed resistance to all 14- and 16-membered macrolide antibiotics tested. Tetracyclines (OTC and CTC) showed a relatively broad MIC distribution from 0.1 to 6.25 micrograms/ml against the M. hyosynoviae strains tested. All of the strains isolated during 1980 to 1984 were susceptible at the concentration of 0.78 microgram/ml or less (MIC90; 0.78 microgram/ml) to OTC and 1.56 micrograms/ml or less (MIC90; 1.56 micrograms/ml) to CTC, while the susceptibility of strains isolated recently, during 1994 to 1995, was more than 0.78 microgram/ml (MIC90; 3.13 micrograms/ml) to OTC, and more than 1.56 micrograms/ml (MIC90; 6.25 micrograms/ml) to CTC. PMID:8959659

  1. Experimental evaluation of inactivated and live attenuated vaccines against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides.

    PubMed

    Mwirigi, Martin; Nkando, Isabel; Aye, Racheal; Soi, Reuben; Ochanda, Horace; Berberov, Emil; Potter, Andrew; Gerdts, Volker; Perez-Casal, Jose; Naessens, Jan; Wesonga, Hezron

    2016-01-01

    The current control method for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) in Africa is vaccination with a live, attenuated strain of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). However, this method is not very efficient and often causes serious adverse reactions. Several studies have attempted to induce protection using inactivated mycoplasma, but with widely contradictory results. Therefore, we compared the protective capacity of the live T1/44 vaccine with two inactivated preparations of Mmm strain Afad, inoculated with an adjuvant. Protection was measured after a challenge with Afad. The protection levels were 31%, 80.8% and 74.1% for the formalin-inactivated, heat-inactivated and live attenuated preparations, respectively. These findings indicate that low doses of heat-inactivated Mmm can offer protection to a level similar to the current live attenuated (T1/44) vaccine formulation. PMID:26827840

  2. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. When administered before lay, F-strain MG (FMG) can reduce egg production during lay, but the ts-11 strain of MG (ts11MG) does not exert this effect. Two trials were conducted to determine the effects ...

  3. The importance of B-cells and ecto-5′nucleotidase in Mycoplasma fermentans infection and the relevance to rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheena M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to discover if Mycoplasma fermentans, which is known to infect B cells, could be the cause of the raised ecto-5′-nucleotidase observed in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients. The ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity in the patients' serum has been shown to correlate with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and DNA from the mycoplasma has been found in the synovial fluid. B lymphoblastoid cell lines were exposed to 16 strains of Mycoplasma fermentans and their ecto-5′-nucleotidase, CD73, was measured both biochemically and by mouse antibodies to human ecto 5′-nucleotidase using the fluorescence activated cell sorter. The type strain, PG 18, did not grow with the B cells. Some of the mycoplasma strains (9/15) increased the cellular ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity from twice to 17 fold, and usually showed 5′-nucleotidase activity themselves. At least one strain, M106, induced human 5′-nucleotidase on the normally 5′-nucleotidase negative Daudi and Raji Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, and increased sevenfold the 5′-nucleotidase on the monocyte/macrophage cell line THP-1. Growing the cells in aged medium increased the level of mycoplasma infection. This mycoplasma-induced enzyme showed a conformational change and an increase in activity with a glycosylation change involving mannose groups. The other group of strains, mostly of respiratory or cell culture origin, usually did not have any 5′-nucleotidase of their own and decreased the B-cell enzyme activity by about half. Electron microscopy and flow cytometry showed that the strain M106 was filamentous and could be found inside the B-cells. The 5′-nucleotidase-inducing strains of M. fermentans may be important in the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17680797

  4. First identification of proteins involved in motility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Indikova, Ivana; Vronka, Martin; Szostak, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, the most pathogenic mycoplasma in poultry, is able to glide over solid surfaces. Although this gliding motility was first observed in 1968, no specific protein has yet been shown to be involved in gliding. We examined M. gallisepticum strains and clonal variants for motility and found that the cytadherence proteins GapA and CrmA were required for gliding. Loss of GapA or CrmA resulted in the loss of motility and hemadsorption and led to drastic changes in the characteristic flask-shape of the cells. To identify further genes involved in motility, a transposon mutant library of M. gallisepticum was generated and screened for motility-deficient mutants, using a screening assay based on colony morphology. Motility-deficient mutants had transposon insertions in gapA and the neighbouring downstream gene crmA. In addition, insertions were seen in gene mgc2, immediately upstream of gapA, in two motility-deficient mutants. In contrast to the GapA/CrmA mutants, the mgc2 motility mutants still possessed the ability to hemadsorb. Complementation of these mutants with a mgc2-hexahistidine fusion gene restored the motile phenotype. This is the first report assigning specific M. gallisepticum proteins to involvement in gliding motility. PMID:25323771

  5. In vitro susceptibilities of recent field isolates of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae to valnemulin (Econor), tiamulin and enrofloxacin and the in vitro development of resistance to certain antimicrobial agents in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hannan, P C; Windsor, H M; Ripley, P H

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activities of valnemulin (Econor) and two other antimicrobial agents were determined against recent field strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae using a broth microdilution method. Valnemulin showed exceptional activity against M hyopneumoniae (MIC90 0.0005 microgram ml-1) and M hyosynoviae (MIC range 0.0001 microgram ml-1 to 0.00025 microgram ml-1) field strains. Tiamulin was 100-fold less active (MIC90 0.05 microgram ml-1) and enrofloxacin 20-fold less active (MIC90 0.01 microgram ml-1) than valnemulin against M hyopneumoniae field isolates and 20-fold to 25-fold less active (MIC range 0.0025 microgram ml-1 to 0.005 microgram ml-1) and 400-fold to 500-fold less active (MIC range 0.05 microgram ml-1 to 0.1 microgram ml-1) respectively against M hyosynoviae field isolates. No significant resistance developed to valnemulin or tiamulin in the type strain of M hyopneumoniae (strain J) or in a recent field isolate (MEVT G23) exposed to 10 in vitro passages in broths containing these antibiotics. Only slight resistance to oxytetracycline was observed. High resistance to tylosin developed in both M hyopneumoniae strains within five to seven in vitro passages in tylosin-containing broth. Providing that similar results are obtained in vivo under field conditions, valnemulin may well prove to be effective in the treatment of enzootic pneumonia and acute polyarthritis in pigs. PMID:9429250

  6. Interferon production in cocultures between mouse spleen cells and tumor cells: possible role of mycoplasmas in interferon induction.

    PubMed

    Beck, J; Engler, H; Brunner, H; Kirchner, H

    1980-01-01

    Interferon production was measured in the murine mixed lymphocyte tumor cell interaction (MLTI) using spleen cells of three inbred mouse strains and a number of in vitro grown lymphoma cells. No difference in interferon production was observed when syngeneic or allogeneic combinations were compared. Interferon was not detectable during the first 6 h of culture and reached its maximum after 12--24 h. In contrast, natural killer cell activity of spleen cells against one of these lymphoma lines (YAC-1) was already high after 4h. A cell line that was not susceptible to natural killing (MDAY-D2) induced the same amount of interferon as YAC-1. These findings suggest that natural killer cell activity and interferon induction in the MLTI are not correlated. Several lymphoma cell lines induced interferon in the MLTI whereas some others did not. All lines that were inductive were found to contain mycoplasmas. Furthermore, even the cell-free supernatants of inducing lines contained mycoplasmas and induced interferon. Purified mycoplasmas and membranes thereof were able to induce interferon production in mouse spleen cells. Our data strongly suggest that interferon production in the MLTI is caused by mycoplasmas. This artifact is the relevance for three reasons. First, cocultures between lymphoma cells and lymphocytes are widely studied in immunology. Secondly, contamination with mycoplasmas is extremely common and often goes unnoticed in immunological laboratories. Thirdly, interferon is known to affect profoundly a number of in vitro functions of immunocompetent cells. PMID:6161192

  7. The minimal cellular genome of mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Razin, S

    1997-01-01

    The mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest self-replicating organisms, being built of a plasma membrane, ribosomes, and a circular double-stranded DNA molecule-the typical prokaryotic genome. The idea of using mycoplasmas as models for defining in molecular terms the entire machinery of a living cell was raised by Morowitz in 1984. The goal has been to prove the dogma of the completeness of molecular biology, that is, that the logic of life is finite, relatively simple and subject to full exploration. The recent complete sequencing of the genome of the human pathogen Mycoplasma genitalium brings us much closer to achieving this goal. The M. genitalium genome is only 580 kb long and contains only 470 predicted coding sequences(genes), as compared with 1727 in Haemophilus influenzae and about 4000 in E. coli. Thus, M. genitalium is apparently the simplest organism capable of independent life with a minimal set of genes. The drastic economization in genetic information must be associated with the parasitic mode of life of the mycoplasmas. Mycoplasmas evolved by reductive evolution from Gram-positive bacteria with low G + C genomes. During evolution the mycoplasmas have lost the cell wall and many biosynthetic systems involved in synthesis of macromolecule building blocks provided by their host. Thus, the M. genitalium genome carries only one gene involved in amino acid biosynthesis, and very few genes for vitamin and nucleic acid precursors; the lack of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, leads to dependence on exogenous fatty acids, enabling the introduction of controlled variations in membrane acyl chains and the use of mycoplasmas as models in studying membrane fluidity. Moreover, the dependence of mycoplasmas on exogenous cholesterol for growth was exploited to show the role of cholesterol as a buffer of membrane fluidity. The mycoplasma genome carries the minimal set of energy metabolism genes, being content with a restricted supply of ATP needed for their parasitic mode of life. Being limited by a single permeability barrier enabled the saving of a considerable number of transport system genes. Nevertheless, these minimal organisms were shown to carry all the essential genes needed for DNA replication, transcription and translation, but even here gene saving is expressed in a minimal number of rRNA and tRNA genes. A genomic price had been paid to maintain parasitism, so that a significant number of mycoplasmal genes is devoted to adhesins, attachment organelles and variable membrane surface antigens directed towards evasion of the host immune system. PMID:9343940

  8. Multiplex PCR testing detection of higher-than-expected rates of cervical mycoplasma, ureaplasma, and trichomonas and viral agent infections in sexually active australian women.

    PubMed

    McIver, Christopher J; Rismanto, Nikolas; Smith, Catherine; Naing, Zin Wai; Rayner, Ben; Lusk, M Josephine; Konecny, Pamela; White, Peter A; Rawlinson, William D

    2009-05-01

    Knowing the prevalence of potential etiologic agents of nongonococcal and nonchlamydial cervicitis is important for improving the efficacy of empirical treatments for this commonly encountered condition. We describe four multiplex PCRs (mPCRs), designated VDL05, VDL06, VDL07, and VDL09, which facilitate the detection of a wide range of agents either known to be or putatively associated with cervicitis, including cytomegalovirus (CMV), enterovirus (EV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) (VDL05); Ureaplasma parvum, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma genitalium, and Mycoplasma hominis (VDL06); Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Treponema pallidum, and group B streptococci (VDL07); and adenovirus species A to E (VDL09). The mPCRs were used to test 233 cervical swabs from 175 women attending a sexual-health clinic in Sydney, Australia, during 2006 and 2007. The agents detected alone or in combination in all cervical swabs (percentage of total swabs) included CMV (6.0), EV (2.1), EBV (2.6), VZV (4.7), HSV-1 (2.6), HSV-2 (0.8), HSV-2 and VZV (0.4), U. parvum (57.0), U. urealyticum (6.1), M. genitalium (1.3), M. hominis (13.7), C. trachomatis (0.4), T. vaginalis (3.4), and group B streptococci (0.4). Adenovirus species A to E and T. pallidum were not detected. These assays are adaptable for routine diagnostic laboratories and provide an opportunity to measure the true prevalence of microorganisms potentially associated with cervicitis and other genital infections. PMID:19261782

  9. The occurrence of mycoplasmas in selected wild North American waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.; Thomas, C.B.; Sharp, P.; Krapu, G.L.; Robb, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of mycoplasma infection in breeding mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) hens and their broods from the central United States (1988 to 1990); and wintering American black duck (Anas rubripes) and mallard hens from the eastern United States (1990 to 1993). Mycoplasmas were isolated by culturing tracheal swabs from 656 live birds and tissue samples from 112 dead waterfowl. Nine (18%) of 51 mycoplasma isolates were identified as Mycoplasma anatis; M. anatis was recovered from four mallards, a black duck, and a gadwall (Anas strepera) duckling. Nineteen (37%) of 51 mycoplasma isolates were identified as Mycoplasma cloacale; these isolates were obtained from mallard, canvasback, and black duck adults, and from a mallard duckling. Additional unspeciated mycoplasmas were isolated from mallards, black ducks, and one canvasback.

  10. Infection of the finger-nail by Pyrenochaeta unguis-hominis.

    PubMed

    English, M P

    1980-07-01

    Infection of the finger-nail of an elderly woman by Pyrenochaeta unguis-hominis is reported. The small lesion was extending slowly into the healthy nail plate. The fungus has been isolated from diseased toe-nails on two previous occasions but its extra-human habitat is unknown. PMID:7426409

  11. Epidemiological survey of Giardia spp. and Blastocystis hominis in an Argentinian rural community

    PubMed Central

    Minvielle, Marta Cecilia; Pezzani, Betina Cecilia; Cordoba, María Alejandra; De Luca, María Marta; Apezteguia, María Carmen

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate personal data, socio-cultural and environmental characteristics, and the presence of symptoms/signs with the frequencies of Giardia spp. and Blastocystis hominis among a rural population in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Of the surveyed population (350), 3.7% were infected with only Giardia spp. or 22.9% with B. hominis, and 2.3% were infected with both protozoa. The frequency of infection according to sex; 6.1% of males were infected and 1.6% of females by Giardia spp., 26.7% and 19.5% by B. hominis, and 2.4% and 2.2% by both parasites, respectively. Giardia spp. was detected in only three adults (over 14 years), but B. hominis was more frequent in adults than in children. The prevalences of these protozoa in this community are lower than those reported by other Argentinean studies, which is probably associated with the low density of the studied population (5.95 inhab/km2). Statistical analysis revealed that a male sex, flooding of the home, the use of a latrine, and an abdominal pain were correlated with the presence of these parasites, which indicate the importance of these factors in rural communities. PMID:15381860

  12. Sarcocystis rommeli, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) from cattle (Bos taurus) and its differentiation from Sarcocystis hominis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle (Bos taurus) are intermediate hosts for three named species of Sarcocystis, S. cruzi, S. hirsuta, and S. hominis. Recently, a fourth species was identified and named S. sinensis. However, S. sinensis originally named a species of Sarcocystis in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in China. Based ...

  13. Synergism between upregulation of Rab7 and inhibition of autophagic degradation caused by mycoplasma facilitates intracellular mycoplasma infection

    PubMed Central

    HU, XIAOPENG; YU, JIE; ZHOU, XIANG; LI, ZHAOMING; XIA, YUN; LUO, ZHIYONG; WU, YAQUN

    2014-01-01

    Following fusion of a mycoplasma with a host cell membrane, the inserted components of mycoplasma may then be transported through the endocytic pathway. However, the effects of mycoplasmas on the host cell endomembrane system are largely unknown. In this study, mycoplasma-induced changes in the dynamics of endocytic and autophagic systems were investigated. Endocytosis and autophagy are two major processes involved in the survival of intracellular prokaryotic pathogens. It was found that, immediately following infection, mycoplasmas induce endocytosis in the host cell; however, in the long term the mycoplasmas suppress turnover of the components of the endocytic pathway. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that Rab7 and LC3-II are recruited to the intracellular mycoplasma-containing compartments. Western blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that mycoplasmas increase expression of Rab7 by upregulating transcription, but increase levels of LC3-II and p62 by post-translational regulation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that mycoplasma infection causes inhibition of autophagic degradation of LC3-II and p62. In addition, it was found that upregulation of Rab7 and inhibition of autophagic degradation synergistically contributes to intracellular mycoplasma accumulation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that mycoplasmas may manipulate host cell endosomal and autophagic systems in order to facilitate intracellular infection. PMID:24452847

  14. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya’an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis. PMID:26509708

  15. Comparative susceptibilities of various animal-pathogenic mycoplasmas to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, P C; Windsor, G D; de Jong, A; Schmeer, N; Stegemann, M

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activities of six antimicrobial agents were tested against 162 mycoplasma strains of eight species isolated from poultry and livestock at different geographic sites. Tiamulin was most active (MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited [MIC90s], 0.025 to 0.25 microg/ml); enrofloxacin and danofloxacin had near equivalent activities (MIC90s, 0.05 to 1.0 microg/ml), but were much more active than flumequine (MIC90s, 1 to 50 microg/ml). The MIC90s of tylosin and oxytetracycline were 0.25 to > 100 microg/ml and 0.25 to 100 microg/ml, respectively. PMID:9303412

  16. Characterization of the in vitro core surface proteome of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Ivanka; Liljander, Anne; Fischer, Anne; Smith, David G E; Inglis, Neil F; Scacchia, Massimo; Pini, Attilio; Jores, Joerg; Sacchini, Flavio

    2014-01-10

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is a severe cattle disease, present in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The development of improved diagnostic tests and vaccines for CBPP control remains a research priority. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to characterize the Triton X-114 soluble proteome of nine Mmm strains isolated from Europe or Africa. Of a total of 250 proteins detected, 67 were present in all strains investigated. Of these, 44 were predicted to be lipoproteins or cytoplasmic membrane-associated proteins and are thus likely to be members of the core in vitro surface membrane-associated proteome of Mmm. Moreover, the presence of all identified proteins in other ruminant Mycoplasma pathogens were investigated. Two proteins of the core proteome were identified only in other cattle pathogens of the genus Mycoplasma pointing towards a role in host-pathogen interactions. The data generated will facilitate the identification and prioritization of candidate Mycoplasma antigens for improved control measures, as it is likely that surface-exposed membrane proteins will include those that are involved in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:24332827

  17. Preparation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, S; Yagihashi, T; Seto, K

    1989-01-01

    Methods of preparation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect specific antibody, and properties of the antigens, are described. The reactivity and specificity of antigen prepared by Sephacryl S-300 column chromatography after treatment of M. hyopneumoniae cells with Tween 20 (S-300 antigen) were superior to those of antigen prepared by Sephadex G-25 column chromatography after treatment with Tween 20, or to lipid antigen. There were no differences among strains MI-3, J and VPP11 of M. hyopneumoniae. The S-300 antigen did not show cross-reactivity against porcine hyperimmune sera produced by M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae, M. hyopharyngis, M. flocculare and Acholeplasma granularum. Antibody was first detected in sera of pigs inoculated intranasally with M. hyopneumoniae at two to four weeks after inoculation and seven to eight weeks after pigs were contact-exposed to the same mycoplasma. PMID:2523756

  18. Preparation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Kazama, S; Yagihashi, T; Seto, K

    1989-04-01

    Methods of preparation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect specific antibody, and properties of the antigens, are described. The reactivity and specificity of antigen prepared by Sephacryl S-300 column chromatography after treatment of M. hyopneumoniae cells with Tween 20 (S-300 antigen) were superior to those of antigen prepared by Sephadex G-25 column chromatography after treatment with Tween 20, or to lipid antigen. There were no differences among strains MI-3, J and VPP11 of M. hyopneumoniae. The S-300 antigen did not show cross-reactivity against porcine hyperimmune sera produced by M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae, M. hyopharyngis, M. flocculare and Acholeplasma granularum. Antibody was first detected in sera of pigs inoculated intranasally with M. hyopneumoniae at two to four weeks after inoculation and seven to eight weeks after pigs were contact-exposed to the same mycoplasma. PMID:2523756

  19. Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae, United States.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaotian; Lee, Stella; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yi-Wei; Stiles, Jeffrey; Hong, Tao; Todd, Kathleen; Ratliff, Amy E; Crabb, Donna M; Xiao, Li; Atkinson, T Prescott; Waites, Ken B

    2015-08-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is highly prevalent in Asia and is now being reported from Europe. Few data on MRMP are available in the United States. Using genotypic and phenotypic methods, we detected high-level MRMP in 13.2% of 91 M. pneumoniae--positive specimens from 6 US locations. PMID:26196107

  20. Rescue of mutant fitness defects using in vitro reconstituted designer transposons in Mycoplasma mycoides.

    PubMed

    Karas, Bogumil J; Wise, Kim S; Sun, Lijie; Venter, J Craig; Glass, John I; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Suzuki, Yo

    2014-01-01

    With only hundreds of genes contained within their genomes, mycoplasmas have become model organisms for precise understanding of cellular processes, as well as platform organisms for predictable engineering of microbial functions for mission-critical applications. Despite the availability of "whole genome writing" in Mycoplasma mycoides, some traditional methods for genetic engineering are underdeveloped in mycoplasmas. Here we demonstrate two facile transposon-mediated approaches for introducing genes into the synthetic cell based on M. mycoides. The marker-less approach involves preparing a fragment containing only a small genomic region of interest with flanking transposase-binding sites, followed by in vitro transposase loading and introduction into the cells. The marker-driven approach involves cloning an open reading frame (ORF) of interest into a vector containing a marker for mycoplasma transformation, as well as sites for transposase loading and random genomic integration. An innovative feature of this construct is to use a single promoter to express the transformation marker and the introduced ORF. The marker-driven approach can be conveniently applied to any exogenous or synthetic gene without any information on the effect of the gene on the strain, whereas the marker-less approach requires that the fragment has a recognizable effect. Using the marker-less method, we found that a region containing the nusG gene rescues a slow growth phenotype of a strain containing a larger deletion encompassing this gene. Using the marker-driven approach, we better defined this finding, thereby establishing that nusG is required for a normal growth rate in synthetic M. mycoides. These methods are suitable for complementation tests to identify genes responsible for assorted functions lacking in deletion mutants. These approaches are also expected to facilitate rapid testing of various natural and engineered genes or gene clusters from numerous sources in M. mycoides. PMID:25101070

  1. Rescue of mutant fitness defects using in vitro reconstituted designer transposons in Mycoplasma mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Bogumil J.; Wise, Kim S.; Sun, Lijie; Venter, J. Craig; Glass, John I.; Hutchison, Clyde A.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Suzuki, Yo

    2014-01-01

    With only hundreds of genes contained within their genomes, mycoplasmas have become model organisms for precise understanding of cellular processes, as well as platform organisms for predictable engineering of microbial functions for mission-critical applications. Despite the availability of whole genome writing in Mycoplasma mycoides, some traditional methods for genetic engineering are underdeveloped in mycoplasmas. Here we demonstrate two facile transposon-mediated approaches for introducing genes into the synthetic cell based on M. mycoides. The marker-less approach involves preparing a fragment containing only a small genomic region of interest with flanking transposase-binding sites, followed by in vitro transposase loading and introduction into the cells. The marker-driven approach involves cloning an open reading frame (ORF) of interest into a vector containing a marker for mycoplasma transformation, as well as sites for transposase loading and random genomic integration. An innovative feature of this construct is to use a single promoter to express the transformation marker and the introduced ORF. The marker-driven approach can be conveniently applied to any exogenous or synthetic gene without any information on the effect of the gene on the strain, whereas the marker-less approach requires that the fragment has a recognizable effect. Using the marker-less method, we found that a region containing the nusG gene rescues a slow growth phenotype of a strain containing a larger deletion encompassing this gene. Using the marker-driven approach, we better defined this finding, thereby establishing that nusG is required for a normal growth rate in synthetic M. mycoides. These methods are suitable for complementation tests to identify genes responsible for assorted functions lacking in deletion mutants. These approaches are also expected to facilitate rapid testing of various natural and engineered genes or gene clusters from numerous sources in M. mycoides. PMID:25101070

  2. [Comparative immunoelectrophoretic studies of total water-soluble extracts of Trichomonas vaginalis, T. tenax and T. hominis].

    PubMed

    Cvetkova, A; Komandarev, S; Mihov, L; Andreeva, N; Isev, V

    1987-05-01

    An antigen characterization was carried out by the method of two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis, and on this basis the antigen community and the antigenic differences between the 3 Trichomonas species parasitic in man were investigated. In the homologous antigen-antibody-systems a maximum number of precipitation curves is formed--21 in T. vaginalis and 20 each in T. tenax and T. hominis. According to our setting of the experiment T. vaginalis has 5 specific antigens in regard to T. tenax and 3 in regard to T. hominis. T. tenax has 2 specific antigens in regard to T. vaginalis and 7 in regard to T. hominis, T. hominis has 2 specific antigens in regard to T. vaginalis and 3 in regard to T. tenax. The presence of antigenic differences is important for the immunological characterization of the 3 species and demonstrates their validity. PMID:3497593

  3. Clinical efficacy of Saccharomyces boulardii or metronidazole in symptomatic children with Blastocystis hominis infection.

    PubMed

    Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Eren, Makbule; Dogan, Nihal; Reyhanioglu, Serap; Yargic, Zeynel Abidin; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2011-03-01

    Although many Blastocystis infections remain asymptomatic, recent data suggest it also causes frequent symptoms. Therapy should be limited to patients with persistent symptoms and a complete workup for alternative etiologies. The goal of this study was to compare the natural evolution (no treatment) to the efficacy of Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) or metronidazole for the duration of diarrhea and the duration of colonization in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and positive stool examination for Blastocystis hominis. This randomized single-blinded clinical trial included children presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea-vomiting, flatulence) more than 2 weeks and confirmed B. hominis by stool examination (B. hominis cysts in the stool with microscopic examination of the fresh stool). The primary end points were clinical evaluation and result of microscopic stool examination at day 15. Secondary end points were the same end points at day 30. Randomization was performed by alternating inclusion: group A, S. boulardii (250 mg twice a day, Reflor®) during 10 days; group B, metronidazole (30 mg/kg twice daily) for 10 days; group C, no treatment. At day 15 and 30 after inclusion, the patients were re-evaluated, and stool samples were examined microscopically. On day 15, children that were still symptomatic and/or were still B. hominis-infected in group C were treated with metronidazole for 10 days. There was no statistically significant difference between the three study groups for age, gender, and the presence of diarrhea and abdominal pain. On day 15, clinical cure was observed in 77.7% in group A (n, 18); in 66.6% in group B (n, 15); and 40% in group C (n:15) (p < 0.031, between groups A and C). Disappearance of the cysts from the stools on day 15 was 80% in group B, 72.2% in group A, and 26.6% in group C (p = 0.011, between group B and group C; p = 0.013, between group A and group C). At the end of the first month after inclusion, clinical cure rate was 94.4% in group A and 73.3% in group B (p = 0.11). Parasitological cure rate for B. hominis was very comparable between both groups (94.4% vs. 93.3%, p = 0.43). Metronidazole or S. boulardii has potential beneficial effects in B. hominis infection (symptoms, presence of parasites). These findings challenge the actual guidelines. PMID:20922415

  4. Experimental infection and transmissibility of Mycoplasma synoviae with delayed serologic response in chickens.

    PubMed

    Ewing, M L; Cookson, K C; Phillips, R A; Turner, K R; Kleven, S H

    1998-01-01

    Fifteen mycoplasma-free chickens were contact exposed to five chickens that had been experimentally infected with one of three different strains (two field strains and one laboratory strain) of Mycoplasma synoviae (MS). Culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were positive by 3 days postinoculation (PI) in the experimentally infected birds. Lateral transmission was found by 7-14 days postexposure. Positive serum plate agglutination (SPA) results were detected 3-4 wk after positive culture and/or PCR in individual birds. By 42 days PI, all the birds in the groups exposed to field strain K1858 or K3344 had become infected as determined by culture and PCR, whereas only half of the birds in the group exposed to laboratory strain WUV1853 had become infected. Because of the unanticipated lack of seroconversion to hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in infected chickens, the study was extended. Each group was split into two groups of 10 birds each, one of which was vaccinated with a live B1/LaSota Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine virus to determine if a viral respiratory challenge might incite a stronger antibody response to the mycoplasma infection. All the birds were tested for seroconversion 14 and 21 days later. Of the birds vaccinated for ND, a slightly greater number were MS positive by SPA than the nonvaccinated birds. This effect was not present 21 days after vaccination, and there was no significant difference in the MS HI results from these groups, suggesting that the viral respiratory infection had little direct impact on seroconversion. The virulent field strain (K3344) elicited a stronger MS antibody response than the other strains. All results from the MS ELISA were negative in all groups through 9 wk. Positive results from PCR analysis correlated well with culture results, whereas serologic tests did not detect MS infection for several weeks. Monitoring programs solely dependent on seroconversion may be inadequate for diagnosis and control of mycoplasma infections. PMID:9645313

  5. Mycoplasma pneumonia an unusual cause of acute myocarditis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Formosa, Gouder M; Bailey, M; Barbara, C; Muscat, C; Grech, V

    2006-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is primarily a respiratory pathogen but may affect exhibit a diverse range of presentations from asymptomatic infection to life threatening conditions. Myocarditis of varying severity is an unusual complication. We report a 6 year old with mycoplasma myocarditis, a rare age for such a presentation, and who responded well to treatment with no sequelae. Serological testing for Mycoplasma pneumoniae should be part of the routine work-up for myocarditis. PMID:22368666

  6. Change in antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum field isolates.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Al-Rashdan, Mohammad

    2011-06-01

    This study compares the antimicrobial susceptibility over time between two groups of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) isolates from the same geographical area. Minimum inhibitory concentration of 13 antimicrobials was determined against two groups of MG isolates from chickens. Group 1 strains (n=22) were isolated in 2004-2005 while group 2 strains (n=7) were isolated in 2007-2008. Minimum inhibitory concentration 50 for group 1 versus group 2 was 4/4, 0.5/0.5, ≤ 0.031/≥ 64, ≤ 0.031/2, ≤ 0.031/0.125, 1/0.5, 1/1, ≤ 0.031/≤ 0.031, ≤ 0.031/2, ≤ 0.031/2, 1/4, ≤ 0.031/0.062, and 0.062/2 μg/ml against gentamicin, spectinomycin, erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, florfenicol, thiamphenicol, tiamulin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline, respectively. There was a statistically significant increase in resistance of group 2 to erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline. This dramatic increase in resistance against 8 antimicrobials belonging to three different families of antimicrobials in a relatively short period of time appears to be rare and of concern. The cause of this increased resistance observed in group 2 of MG isolates was not determined and should be further investigated. Monitoring of MG field strain susceptibility is highly recommended to implement successful treatment and prophylaxis programs in endemic areas. PMID:21382675

  7. Arcanobacterium haemolyticum and Mycoplasma pneumoniae co-infection.

    PubMed

    Stacey, A; Bradlow, A

    1999-01-01

    Systemic infection caused by Arcanobacterium haemolyticum is uncommon. We report a case of empyema and bacteraemia caused by this organism concomitant with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. PMID:10090506

  8. Infections of Blastocystis hominis and microsporidia in cancer patients: are they opportunistic?

    PubMed

    Chandramathi, Samudi; Suresh, Kumar; Anita, Zarina Bustam; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2012-04-01

    Chemotherapy can cause immunosuppression, which may trigger latent intestinal parasitic infections in stools to emerge. This study investigated whether intestinal parasites can emerge as opportunistic infections in breast and colorectal cancer patients (n=46 and n=15, respectively) undergoing chemotherapy treatment. Breast cancer patients were receiving a 5-fluorouracil/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide (FEC) regimen (6 chemotherapy cycles), and colorectal cancer patients were receiving either an oxaliplatin/5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (FOLFOX) regimen (12 cycles) or a 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (Mayo) regimen (6 cycles). Patients had Blastocystis hominis and microsporidia infections that were only present during the intermediate chemotherapy cycles. Thus, cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy should be screened repeatedly for intestinal parasites, namely B. hominis and microsporidia, as they may reduce the efficacy of chemotherapy treatments. PMID:22340948

  9. Identification and differentiation of canine Mycoplasma isolates by 16S-23S rDNA PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Spergser, J; Rosengarten, R

    2007-11-15

    Conventional serological methods for the identification of canine mycoplasma isolates depend on the availability of a panel of species-specific diagnostic antisera and are not always reliable in terms of specificity. To enable simultaneous identification of field isolates, PCR-RFLP analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region was used to characterize the type strains of the 12 currently described canine mycoplasmas of the Genus Mycoplasma which represent the "classic" non-hemotropic species. The use of 16S-23S rDNA PCR in the first step of this analysis revealed specific size differences of amplicons which allowed to classify these 12 canine Mycoplasma species into three groups. Depending on the length of the amplicon, subsequent RFLP analysis of PCR products using two restriction endonucleases in a single digest (ApoI/DdeI or TaqI/VspI) generated unique banding patterns. For further evaluation of the 16S-23S rDNA PCR-RFLP assay system as identification and differentiation tool, a total of 262 field isolates collected from the canine genital tract were tested. PCR-RFLP results for 251 field isolates correlated with traditional serological test results. The remaining 11 isolates had an RFLP pattern distinct from the type strains included in this study and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as closely related to M. sp. HRC689. The PCR-RFLP assay established in this study enabled a rapid, accurate and easily performed identification and differentiation of all 12 currently described non-hemotropic canine Mycoplasma species. PMID:17544231

  10. Antibody to Herpesvirus hominis in Patients with Carcinoma of the Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Najem, S. N.; Barton, I. G.; Al-Omar, L. S.; Potter, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA test was used to measure the levels of antibody to Herpesvirus hominis in a group of women with carcinoma of the cervix. The results were compared to those in a similar group of age-matched controls. The mean titre of antibody in the patients with carcinoma of the cervix was significantly greater than in the corresponding control group using both HSV-1 and HSV-2 antigens. PMID:6293526

  11. Effects of single and combined Mycoplasma gallisepticums vaccinations on blood electrolytes and acid-base balance in commercial egg-laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study, it was shown to occur in response to an F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation layers from our laboratory a significant increase in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), which is generally associated with an oxygen-dependent improvement in tissue oxygenation to...

  12. Field-Applicable Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingyan; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Heller, Martin; Nepper, Julia F.; Weibel, Douglas B.; Gluecks, Ilona; Younan, Mario; Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent; Jores, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a highly contagious disease caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae that affects goats in Africa and Asia. Current available methods for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma infection, including cultivation, serological assays, and PCR, are time-consuming and require fully equipped stationary laboratories, which make them incompatible with testing in the resource-poor settings that are most relevant to this disease. We report a rapid, specific, and sensitive assay employing isothermal DNA amplification using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) for the detection of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. We developed the assay using a specific target sequence in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, as found in the genome sequence of the field strain ILRI181 and the type strain F38 and that was further evidenced in 10 field strains from different geographical regions. Detection limits corresponding to 5 × 103 and 5 × 104 cells/ml were obtained using genomic DNA and bacterial culture from M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain ILRI181, while no amplification was obtained from 71 related Mycoplasma isolates or from the Acholeplasma or the Pasteurella isolates, demonstrating a high degree of specificity. The assay produces a fluorescent signal within 15 to 20 min and worked well using pleural fluid obtained directly from CCPP-positive animals without prior DNA extraction. We demonstrate that the diagnosis of CCPP can be achieved, with a short sample preparation time and a simple read-out device that can be powered by a car battery, in <45 min in a simulated field setting. PMID:26085615

  13. Field-Applicable Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Liljander, Anne; Yu, Mingyan; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Heller, Martin; Nepper, Julia F; Weibel, Douglas B; Gluecks, Ilona; Younan, Mario; Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent; Jores, Joerg

    2015-09-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a highly contagious disease caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae that affects goats in Africa and Asia. Current available methods for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma infection, including cultivation, serological assays, and PCR, are time-consuming and require fully equipped stationary laboratories, which make them incompatible with testing in the resource-poor settings that are most relevant to this disease. We report a rapid, specific, and sensitive assay employing isothermal DNA amplification using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) for the detection of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. We developed the assay using a specific target sequence in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, as found in the genome sequence of the field strain ILRI181 and the type strain F38 and that was further evidenced in 10 field strains from different geographical regions. Detection limits corresponding to 5 × 10(3) and 5 × 10(4) cells/ml were obtained using genomic DNA and bacterial culture from M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain ILRI181, while no amplification was obtained from 71 related Mycoplasma isolates or from the Acholeplasma or the Pasteurella isolates, demonstrating a high degree of specificity. The assay produces a fluorescent signal within 15 to 20 min and worked well using pleural fluid obtained directly from CCPP-positive animals without prior DNA extraction. We demonstrate that the diagnosis of CCPP can be achieved, with a short sample preparation time and a simple read-out device that can be powered by a car battery, in <45 min in a simulated field setting. PMID:26085615

  14. [Refinement and study of the performance of a "Mycoplasma UG" kit for the research on urogenital Mycoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Melzi, A; Atieh, S; Benyahia, H

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenic role of genital Mycoplasmas is no more disputably. The diagnosis is based on the culture which may present some technical difficulties. The present study consist in a perfecting of a miniaturised system called "Mycoplasma UG" for the research, identification and titration of genital Mycoplasmas. The performance of the kit is studied with an important number of different types samples by comparison with the commercial kit "Mycoplasma Duo" and the classic reference method. The results obtained are satisfactory and constitute an important element in favour of a more advanced validation before the kit's trading. PMID:11256318

  15. Protein profile and morphometry of cultured human Blastocystis hominis from children with gastroenteritis and healthy ones.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, M M; Maklouf, L M; El Hamshary, E M; Dawoud, H A; Eida, A M

    2008-08-01

    A total of 180 children of age group 5-12 years old in both sexes, of whom 90 were symptomatic and negative for other parasites, rotavirus or pathogenic bacteria. Another 90 children were asymptomatic, but with B. hominis in stools. Direct smear, formaline-ethyl acetate sedimentation concentration, kinyon carbol-fuchin stain, stool culture, enzyme immunoassay, culturing, morphometric study, gel electrophoresis and experimental infection of mice were done. The results showed that the central body cysts (CB), granular and multivacuolar forms isolated from symptomatic patients were larger than those from asymptomatic ones. The CB form was common compared to other forms and isolated from 104 cases. B. hominis infection was prevalent among males rather than females (60.5% versus 39.5%). The clinical data showed that diarrhea was the most common symptom (58.9%). The infection intensity had a direct relation with illness duration. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that isolates from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients ranged between 24-130 kDa. All isolates showed similar banding patterns. Only minor differences was in low MW (30, 50 kDa) and in high MW (118 kDa) in samples from symptomatic patients. The histopathological examination of caecum, colon and small intestine of B. hominis mice infected from symptommatic patients showed infiltration with inflammatory cells and tissue invasion by the parasite. PMID:18853619

  16. [Blastocystis hominis and nonpathogenic enteric protozoa in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and those with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Davis, N A; Islamova, Zh I; Giiasov, Kh Z; Badalova, N S; Takhtokhodzhaeva, G R; Latipov, R R; Osipova, S O

    2010-01-01

    Blastocystis hominis and nonpathogenic enteric protozoa were diagnosed in 300 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis mainly of its infiltrative form and 500 with Stages II and III HIV infection; the patients received antituberculosis therapy (ATT) and antiretroviral therapy (ART), respectively. Control groups included 200 Tashkent dwellers and 350 patients with various noninfectious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Triple coproscopy was made. B. hominis was significantly more frequently detected in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and those with HIV infection than in healthy individuals: in 53.6 +/- 2.9, 42.2 +/- 2.2, and 18.0 +/- 2.5, respectively (P < 0.01). Only did the tuberculosis or HIV-infected patients show a high intensity of B. hominis infection, which was accompanied by recurring diarrhea and nausea. The high activity of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase was observed in 20% of the patients with tuberculosis + blastocytosis; that of alkaline phosphatase was seen in 25%. The tuberculosis or HIV-infected patients were more frequently found to have Chylomastix mesnili, Jodamoeba butschlii, and Endolimax nana. The specific features of intestinal colonization seem to reflect changes in local immunity; the drugs included into ATT and ART have no substantial effects on the viability of protozoa. PMID:20873179

  17. Programmed cell death in Blastocystis hominis occurs independently of caspase and mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    Nasirudeen, A M A; Tan, Kevin S W

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrated previously that a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1D5 elicits a programmed cell death (PCD) response in Blastocystis hominis and showed that caspase-3-like protease influences but is not essential for PCD in MAb 1D5-treated B. hominis. We also showed that mitochondrial dysregulation played a role in cell death. In the current study, we further analyzed the signaling pathways involved in PCD mediated by MAb 1D5. B. hominis cells were treated with MAb 1D5 or control MAb 5, either with or without pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk, and/or a mitochondrial transition pore blocker, cyclosporine A (CA). Flow cytometric examination of cell size, mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi(m)), caspase activation and in situ DNA fragmentation showed that zVAD.fmk and CA, used independently or in combination, failed to inhibit MAb 1D5-mediated PCD. Interestingly, cell exposure to either inhibitor resulted in partial inhibition of DNA fragmentation while combined exposure of cells to inhibitors abolished DNA fragmentation completely. This study sheds new light on the conserved nature of PCD pathways in parasitic protozoa and is also the first report describing caspase- and mitochondria-independent cell death pathways in a protozoan parasite. PMID:15913879

  18. The complete genome sequence of the murine respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis

    PubMed Central

    Chambaud, Isabelle; Heilig, Roland; Ferris, Stphane; Barbe, Valrie; Samson, Delphine; Galisson, Frdrique; Moszer, Ivan; Dybvig, Kevin; Wrblewski, Henri; Viari, Alain; P.C. Rocha, Eduardo; Blanchard, Alain

    2001-01-01

    Mycoplasma pulmonis is a wall-less eubacterium belonging to the Mollicutes (trivial name, mycoplasmas) and responsible for murine respiratory diseases. The genome of strain UAB CTIP is composed of a single circular 963 879 bp chromosome with a G + C content of 26.6 mol%, i.e. the lowest reported among bacteria, Ureaplasma urealyticum apart. This genome contains 782 putative coding sequences (CDSs) covering 91.4% of its length and a function could be assigned to 486 CDSs whilst 92 matched the gene sequences of hypothetical proteins, leaving 204 CDSs without significant database match. The genome contains a single set of rRNA genes and only 29 tRNAs genes. The replication origin oriC was localized by sequence analysis and by using the G + C skew method. Sequence polymorphisms within stretches of repeated nucleotides generate phase-variable protein antigens whilst a recombinase gene is likely to catalyse the site-specific DNA inversions in major M.pulmonis surface antigens. Furthermore, a hemolysin, secreted nucleases and a glyco-protease are predicted virulence factors. Surprisingly, several of the genes previously reported to be essential for a self-replicating minimal cell are missing in the M.pulmonis genome although this one is larger than the other mycoplasma genomes fully sequenced until now. PMID:11353084

  19. Comparative Geno-Plasticity Analysis of Mycoplasma bovis HB0801 (Chinese Isolate)

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jingjing; Guo, Aizhen; Cui, Peng; Chen, Yingyu; Mustafa, Riaz; Ba, Xiaoliang; Hu, Changmin; Bai, Zhidi; Chen, Xi; Shi, Lei; Chen, Huanchun

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis pneumonia in cattle has been epidemic in China since 2008. To investigate M. bovis pathogenesis, we completed genome sequencing of strain HB0801 isolated from a lesioned bovine lung from Hubei, China. The genomic plasticity was determined by comparing HB0801 with M. bovis strain ATCC® 25523™/PG45 from cow mastitis milk, Chinese strain Hubei-1 from lesioned lung tissue, and 16 other Mycoplasmas species. Compared to PG45, the genome size of HB0801 was reduced by 11.7 kb. Furthermore, a large chromosome inversion (580 kb) was confirmed in all Chinese isolates including HB0801, HB1007, a strain from cow mastitis milk, and Hubei-1. In addition, the variable surface lipoproteins (vsp) gene cluster existed in HB0801, but contained less than half of the genes, and had poor identity to that in PG45, but they had conserved structures. Further inter-strain comparisons revealed other mechanisms of gene acquisition and loss in HB0801 that primarily involved insertion sequence (IS) elements, integrative conjugative element, restriction and modification systems, and some lipoproteins and transmembrane proteins. Subsequently, PG45 and HB0801 virulence in cattle was compared. Results indicated that both strains were pathogenic to cattle. The scores of gross pathological assessment for the control group, and the PG45- and HB0801-infected groups were 3, 13 and 9, respectively. Meanwhile the scores of lung lesion for these three groups were 36, 70, and 69, respectively. In addition, immunohistochemistry detection demonstrated that both strains were similarly distributed in lungs and lymph nodes. Although PG45 showed slightly higher virulence in calves than HB0801, there was no statistical difference between the strains (P>0.05). Compared to Hubei-1, a total of 122 SNP loci were disclosed in HB0801. In conclusion, although genomic plasticity was thought to be an evolutionary advantage, it did not apparently affect virulence of M. bovis strains in cattle. PMID:22693604

  20. Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adults in Zhejiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zibo; Li, Xiangzhi; Chen, Xiaojian; Luo, Fangjun; Pan, Changwang; Zheng, Xiaoping; Tan, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major pathogen causing community-acquired pneumoniae (CAP), which is generally treated with macrolides. In recent years, however, although macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae has been reported frequently, particularly in China, very little is known about the prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection in adults. In this study, we survey the macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in adults in Zhejiang province and characterize the mechanisms of resistance to macrolide. Six hundred fifty throat swab samples were collected from adult patients with CAP from January 2012 to August 2014. These samples were assayed by nested PCR and then cultivated for M. pneumoniae. All isolates were sequenced to determine the mutation in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. The activities of 10 antibiotics against macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae isolates were also investigated in vitro. Moreover, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the amplified P1 gene was used to type 50 resistant strains. One hundred percent (71/71) of M. pneumoniae strains isolated from adults with CAP were resistant to erythromycin (MIC=128 to >256 μg/ml), clarithromycin (MIC=128 to >256 μg/ml), and azithromycin (MIC=32 to >64 μg/ml). Furthermore, all macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae strains identified had an A2063G mutation in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. Forty-six resistant strains (92.0%) were classified into type I strain on the basis of P1 gene PCR-RFLP analysis. According to these findings, it is suggested that macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection is very prevalence among adults in Zhejiang province. Thus, there is necessary to perform the epidemiological monitoring of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in the future. PMID:25451048

  1. Genetic Variation in Sialidase and Linkage to N-acetylneuraminate Catabolism in Mycoplasma synoviae

    PubMed Central

    May, Meghan; Brown, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the genetic basis for intraspecific variation in mycoplasmal sialidase activity that correlates with virulence, and its potentially advantageous linkage to nutrient catabolism. Polymorphism in N-acetylneuraminate scavenging and degradation genes (sialidase, N-acetylneuraminate lyase, N-acetylmannosamine kinase, N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate epimerase, N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase, and glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase) was evident among eight strains of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae. Most differences were single nucleotide polymorphisms, ranging from 0.34 0.04 substitutions per 100 bp for N-acetylmannosamine kinase to 0.65 0.03 for the single-copy sialidase gene nanI. Missense mutations were twice as common as silent mutations in nanI; 26% resulted in amino acids dissimilar to consensus; and there was a 12-base deletion near the nanI promoter in strain WVU1853T, supporting a complex genetic basis for differences in sialidase activity. Two strains had identical frameshifts in the N-acetylneuraminate lyase gene nanA, resulting in nonsense mutations, and both had downstream deletions in nanA. Such genetic lesions uncouple extracellular liberation of sialic acid from generation of fructose-6-phosphate and pyruvate via intracellular N-acetylneuraminate degradation. Retention of nanI by such strains, but not others in the M. synoviae phylogenetic cluster, is evidence that sialidase has an important non-nutritional role in the ecology of M. synoviae and certain other mycoplasmas. PMID:18490131

  2. Blastocystis hominis infection in a post-cardiotomy patient on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hsuan; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Chou, Nai-Kuan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Opportunistic pathogens can cause severe damage leading to irreversible complications in immune-compromised patients. Here we describe a patient who sustained Blastocystis hominis infection resulting in severe sepsis while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support, and the course of treatment taken to treat him. PRESENTATION OF CASE Our case, a 34-year-old Filipino man, was hospitalized for valvular disease and received valve replacements. ECMO and an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) were implemented when the patient developed progressive heart failure after cardiac surgery. Unfortunately, the patient suffered from sepsis with persistent fever and diarrhea, and subsequent examinations indicated the patient was infected by B. hominis. After adequate administration of the antibiotic metronidazole, the patient's symptoms subsided and he was discharged. DISCUSSION Blastocystis hominis is a unicellular protozoa commonly found in the intestinal tract, and the prevalence of B. hominis is 1.5–10% in developed countries and 30–50% in developing countries. The patient needed the support of ECMO and IABP, was immunocompromised to a certain extent; B. hominis can be a harmful opportunistic pathogen for them and lead to severe irreversible complications such as death. CONCLUSION This is the first published article showing that the opportunistic pathogen, B. hominis, can cause severe infection in patients on ECMO support, a result that should be kept in mind when patients come from a place with a high prevalence of B. hominis. The prophylactic medication should be administered routinely when patients live in the region and extracorporeal life-support is used. PMID:25160800

  3. An epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Mason, S J; Maiers, J D

    1984-01-01

    A major epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum occurred in the Monroe, North Carolina, area between January and June of 1983. The outbreak involved 304,000 turkeys of various ages, which were slaughtered in the eradication program at a cost of more than $550,000 to growers and poultry companies. An infected peafowl was the likely source of infection on the first farm. Traffic between farms by growers and company personnel was theorized to be the means of further spread. PMID:6487195

  4. Characterization of the gene for an immunodominant 72 kDa lipoprotein of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Nicolet, J; Miserez, R; Kuhnert, P; Krampe, M; Pilloud, T; Abdo, E M; Griot, C; Frey, J

    1996-12-01

    With the aim of characterizing specific immunogenic proteins of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony (SC) type, the aetiological agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, a gene encoding a major immunogenic protein of 72 kDa named P72 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was of the same apparent molecular mass as that produced by the parent strain. The predicted molecular mass of P72, based on the DNA-deduced amino acid sequence, was 61.118 kDa, significantly lower than the apparent molecular mass of endogenous or recombinant P72 on SDS-PAGE. Analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed a typical prokaryotic signal peptidase II-membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site and a transmembrane structure domain in the leader sequence at the amino-terminal end of the protein. P72 was shown to be a lipoprotein and its surface location was confirmed by trypsin treatment of whole cells. An unassigned gene encoding a peptide with some similarity to P72 was found on the genome sequence of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum but not on that of Mycoplasma genitalium. The P72 gene was detected in 11/11 M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC strains. Antiserum against recombinant P72 reacted strongly with 12/12 strains of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, weakly with Mycoplasma bovine group 7 strain PG50, but not with other members of the 'mycoides cluster' or closely related mycoplasmas. Cows experimentally contact-infected with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC developed a humoral response against P72 within 35 d. P72 is a specific antigenic membrane lipoprotein of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC with potential for use in development of diagnostic reagents. It seems to belong to a family of lipoproteins of the "mycoides cluster'. PMID:9004514

  5. Mycoplasmas and cancer: focus on nucleoside metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Balzarini, Jan; Liekens, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for patients suffering cancer often includes treatment with nucleoside analogues (NAs). NAs are internalized by cell-specific nucleobase/nucleoside transporters and, after enzymatic activation (often one or more phosphorylation steps), interfere with cellular nucleo(s)(t)ide metabolism and DNA/RNA synthesis. Therefore, their efficacy is highly dependent on the expression and activity of nucleo(s)(t)ide-metabolizing enzymes, and alterations thereof (e.g. by down/upregulated expression or mutations) may change the susceptibility to NA-based therapy and/or confer drug resistance. Apart from host cell factors, several other variables including microbial presence may determine the metabolome (i.e. metabolite concentrations) of human tissues. Studying the diversity of microorganisms that are associated with the human body has already provided new insights in several diseases (e.g. diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease) and the metabolic exchange between tissues and their specific microbiota was found to affect the bioavailability and toxicity of certain anticancer drugs, including NAs. Several studies report a preferential colonization of tumor tissues with some mycoplasma species (mostly Mycoplasma hyorhinis). These prokaryotes are also a common source of cell culture contamination and alter the cytostatic activity of some NAs in vitro due to the expression of nucleoside-catabolizing enzymes. Mycoplasma infection may therefore bias experimental work with NAs, and their presence in the tumor microenvironment could be of significance when optimizing nucleoside-based cancer treatment. PMID:26417262

  6. Characterization of western X-disease mycoplasma-like organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    The causal agent of western X-disease, an important disease of cherry (Prunus avium) and peach (Prunus persica) in the western United States, was shown to be a non-culturable, mycoplasma-like organism (WX-MLO). Procedures were developed to purify WX-MLOs from celery and leafhoppers infected with a greenhouse-maintained isolate of the peach yellow leaf roll (ghPYLR) strain of western X-disease. WX-MLOs, purified from ghPYLR-infected leafhoppers, elicited the production of specific antisera (WX antisera) when injected into rabbits. When used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), WX antisera quantitatively detected WX-MLOs in celery, periwinkle, and leafhoppers experimentally infected with either ghPYLR or the Green Valley (GVX) strain of western X-disease. Recombinant clones were screened by colony, dot and southern hybridizations using /sup 32/P-nick translated DNA extracted from healthy and ghPYLR-infected celery and leafhoppers. Twenty-four clones were identified which hybridized with DNA from diseased but not healthy hosts. DNA hybridization assays, using radiolabeled, cloned WX-MLO DNA, readily detected WX-MLOs in celery, periwinkle, and leafhoppers infected with either GVX or ghPYLR and in cherry and peach with symptoms of GVX.

  7. Microtiter plate adherence assay and receptor analogs for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Q; Young, T F; Ross, R F

    1994-01-01

    A microtiter plate adherence assay for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was established by use of purified swine tracheal cilia which contained receptors for the mycoplasmas. M. hyopneumoniae bound specifically to plates coated with solubilized cilia. The binding was dependent on both the concentration of cilia and the number of mycoplasmas. Dextran sulfate, heparin, chondroitin sulfate, laminin, mucin, and fucoidan significantly inhibited the binding of the mycoplasmas. The six inhibitors also disrupted the adherence of the mycoplasmas to intact ciliated cells. Preincubation with either mycoplasmas or cilia indicated that heparin, mucin, fucoidan, and chondroitin sulfate interacted with the adhesive molecules on the surface of the mycoplasmas, while laminin blocked the receptors in cilia. The basis for the inhibition induced by dextran sulfate was unknown. Treatment of cilia with neuraminidase appeared to promote adherence of the mycoplasmas, whereas treatment of cilia with sodium metaperiodate decreased binding. These results indicate that receptors for M. hyopneumoniae in the ciliated epithelium of the respiratory tract of pigs are glycoconjugate in nature. PMID:8168922

  8. [Positive phase periods of ImmunoCard Mycoplasma tests].

    PubMed

    Okimoto, Niro; Kibayashi, Takashi; Kishimoto, Michihiro; Yamato, Kenji; Kurihara, Takeyuki; Mimura, Kimihiro; Honda, Yoshihiro; Osaki, Kohichi; Asaoka, Naoko

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated the positive phase period of ImmunoCard Mycoplasma tests. The subjects were 74 penumonia patients (male : 38, female : 36, 17-94 years old) with positive ImmunoCard Mycoplasma tests. ImmunoCard Mycoplasma tests were performed every week for 8 weeks later, then every 4 weeks until negative conversion. The positive phase period was within a week in 30 of 74 patients (40.5%) and within 4 weeks in 52 patients (70.3%). In each generation the positive phase period of the most patients was within a week. The positive phase period of the elderly had no tendency to be longer than that of the young patients. These results indicated that about half of the patients with positive ImmunoCard Mycoplasma tests showed Mycoplasma infection which occurred within the past 1 week. PMID:17682464

  9. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in children with acute respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Vijaya D; Upadhyaya, Santosh A; Rao, Sugandhi P; Shobha, K L

    2005-08-01

    A prospective study was performed on 93 children admitted to Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Manipal and TMA Pai Rotary Hospital of Udupi and Karkala. Blood samples from 93 children admitted to the ward with no respiratory illness were taken as age-matched controls for the inpatients, IgM antibody against Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected using a commercial kit (Virion-Serion ELISA, Germany) following the manufacturer's instructions. 23.96% of the inpatients with respiratory tract symptoms had IgM antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The highest infection rate was found to be in the 2-5 and 5-10 year age group. The most common mode of presentation was an upper respiratory focus of infection with cervical lymphadenopathy. Bronchial breathing signifying pneumonic consolidation was significantly less in the Mycoplasma positive group (p = 0.006). There was no statistically significant difference in the radiological findings in the Mycoplasma positive and Mycoplasma negative groups. PMID:15980029

  10. Comparative antibiotic eradication of mycoplasma infections from continuous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2002-02-01

    Accumulating data implicate mycoplasma contamination as the single biggest problem in the culture of continuous cell lines. Mycoplasma infection can affect virtually every parameter and functional activity of the eukaryotic cells. A successful alternative to discarding infected cultures is to attempt to eliminate the contaminants by treatment with specific and efficient antimycoplasma antibiotics. The addition of antibiotics to the culture medium during a limited period of time (1-3 wk) is a simple, inexpensive, and very practical approach for decontaminating continuous cell lines. Here, we examined the effectiveness of several antibiotic treatment protocols that we have employed routinely in our cell lines bank. On an aggregate, 673 cultures from 236 chronically mycoplasma-positive cell lines were exposed to one of the following five antibiotic regimens: mycoplasma removal agent (quinolone; a 1-wk treatment), enrofloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), sparfloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), ciprofloxacin (quinolone; 2 wk), and BM-Cyclin (alternating tiamulin and minocycline; 3 wk). The mycoplasma infection was permanently (as determined by three solid mycoplasma detection assays) eliminated by the various antibiotics in 66-85% of the cultures treated. Mycoplasma resistance was seen in 7-21%, and loss of the culture as a result of cytotoxically caused cell death occurred in 3-11% of the cultures treated. Overall, 223 of the 236 mycoplasma-positive cell lines could be cured in a first round of antibiotic treatment with at least one regimen. Taken together, 95% of the mycoplasma-infected cell lines were permanently cleansed of the contaminants by antibiotic treatment, which validates this approach as an efficient and technically simple mycoplasma eradication method. PMID:11929000

  11. Hemotropic mycoplasmas in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemotropic mycoplasmas are epicellular erythrocytic bacteria that can cause infectious anemia in some mammalian species. Worldwide, hemotropic mycoplasmas are emerging or re-emerging zoonotic pathogens potentially causing serious and significant health problems in wildlife. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasma species in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with and without Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destrucans, the causative agent of white nose syndrome (WNS) that causes significant mortality events in bats. Methods In order to establish the prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasma species in a population of 68 little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with (n?=?53) and without (n?=?15) white-nose syndrome (WNS), PCR was performed targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Results The overall prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasmas in bats was 47%, with similar (p?=?0.5725) prevalence between bats with WNS (49%) and without WNS (40%). 16S rDNA sequence analysis (~1,200bp) supports the presence of a novel hemotropic Mycoplasma species with 91.75% sequence homology with Mycoplasma haemomuris. No differences were found in gene sequences generated from WNS and non-WNS animals. Conclusions Gene sequences generated from WNS and non-WNS animals suggest that little brown bats could serve as a natural reservoir for this potentially novel Mycoplasma species. Currently, there is minimal information about the prevalence, host-specificity, or the route of transmission of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. among bats. Finally, the potential role of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. as co-factors in the development of disease manifestations in bats, including WNS in Myotis lucifugus, remains to be elucidated. PMID:24655520

  12. Molecular characterisation of the Mycoplasma cynos haemagglutinin HapA.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Saa; Cizelj, Ivanka; Narat, Mojca; Tozon, Nataa; Chalker, Victoria J; Lysnyansky, Inna; Spergser, Joachim; Ben?ina, Duan

    2015-01-30

    Mycoplasma (M.) cynos is a proven pathogen of dogs causing respiratory infections including pneumonia. We examined 19 M. cynos strains isolated from different organs of dogs in Austria, Denmark and Israel. All strains agglutinated mammalian and chicken erythrocytes. Using erythrocytes of chickens or dogs as specific ligands we isolated an approximately 65 kDa protein from cell-free supernatants of 3 M. cynos strains, which showed an apparent capacity for haemagglutination. The N-terminal sequence of a 25 kDa fragment of this protein was identified as NNEMTPKVTVEAKSMELLLSVEK. The identical amino acid sequence is encoded by the gene MCYN_0308 in the genome of M. cynos C142. This gene belongs to a family of some 20 genes which encode putative lipoproteins with proline-rich regions (PRR) in the first third of their molecules. We termed the 65 kDa haemagglutinin HapA and sequenced hapA gene homologues of 16 M. cynos strains. Analyses of hapA gene homologues revealed similar but not identical sequences, some having insertions and/or deletions in the PRR. We produced a recombinant HapA protein (rHapA) and also mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing HapA. However, enzyme immunoassays using native M. cynos colonies and mAbs 5G2 or 3B7 showed variable expression of HapA in all M. cynos strains. This was further confirmed by Western blot analyses which showed different HapA quantities and also size-variation of HapA among strains. Analyses of cDNA of the expressed hapA genes showed that besides the hapA gene cultures of M. cynos (strains 105, 2002, 2297) can also express other forms of hap genes. In addition, in cloned cultures of strain 2297 altered HapA epitopes for mAbs 5G2 and 3B7 with distinct hapA gene mutations that resulted in altered HapA amino acid sequence were found. Most of the dogs examined had serum antibodies to rHapA. In conclusion, we characterized the M. cynos haemagglutinin HapA protein and encoding gene hapA, a factor involved in cytadherence to host cells and therefore important for M. cynos infection, and showed that expression of HapA is varied in M. cynos by two distinct mechanisms; differential gene expression and nucleic acid substitution within hapA homologues. PMID:25465173

  13. Antigenic and Genetic Characterization of Lipoprotein LppQ from Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, El-Mostafa; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    Lipoprotein LppQ, a predominant 48-kDa antigen, and its corresponding gene, lppQ, were characterized in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, the etiological agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. The lppQ gene is specific to M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC and was found in the type strain and in field strains isolated in Europe, Africa, and Australia, as well as in vaccinal strains. LppQ is encoded as a precursor with a consensus sequence for prokaryotic signal peptidase II and a lipid attachment site. The leader sequence shows significant prominent transmembrane helix structure with a predicted outside-to-inside helix formation capacity. The N-terminal domain of the mature LppQ was shown to be surface exposed. It induced a strong, specific, early, and persistent immune response in naturally and experimentally infected animals. The C-terminal domain of LppQ possesses an integral membrane structure built up of repeated units, rich in hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids, which have a pore formation potential. A recombinant peptide representing the N-terminal domain of LppQ was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of nine Mycoplasma-specific TGA (Trp) codons into universal TGG (Trp) codons and expression in Escherichia coli hosts. It was used for serodetection of cattle infected with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, in which it was detected postinfection for significantly longer than conventional serological test reactions. PMID:10882657

  14. Human Coinfection with Bartonella henselae and Two Hemotropic Mycoplasma Variants Resembling Mycoplasma ovis?

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Jane E.; Lindsay, LeAnn L.; Maggi, Ricardo G.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

    2010-01-01

    Two variants of an organism resembling the ovine hemoplasma, Mycoplasma ovis, were detected by PCR in blood samples from a veterinarian in Texas. Coinfection with similar variants has been described in sheep. This represents the first report of human infection with this organism. The veterinarian was coinfected with Bartonella henselae. PMID:20702675

  15. [Evaluation of ImmnoCard mycoplasma for diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Etsu Tsuzuki; Genma, Hitoshi; Sato, Masaki; Suzuki, Yuzo; Koshimizu, Naoki; Uemura, Keiichi; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2007-12-01

    We compared the differences of two tests, for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection a rapid detection kit for Mycoplasma pneumoniae-specific IgM antibody, ImmunoCard (IC) Mycoplasma test (Meridian Bioscience-USA), and a particle agglutination (PA) test in a retrospective study among 57 patients. They were all suspected to be suffering from atypical bacterial respiratory infection and were checked by the IC test at the Fukuroi Municipal Hospital from January 2004 to January 2006. In this study, the concordance of IC and PA results showed a great difference in children and adults. All children, whose IC test was positive, showed positive PA results. It was particularly difficult to obtain convalescent serum samples in children and IC was useful for children because it was judged by acute phase serum. On the other hand, some in 20% (7/35) of adults, results of the IC test were not concordant with that of the PA test, therefore, diagnosis in adults should be made based on 4-fold rises in titers between paired sera for serological diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. PMID:18186238

  16. Detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae antibodies in the sera of indigenous chickens by rapid serum agglutination test at Mmopane, Gaborone, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Mushi, E Z; Binta, M G; Chabo, R G; Mathaio, M; Ndebele, R T

    1999-12-01

    The mean flock size was ten chickens per rural farmer. Antibodies to Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae were detected in 57.88% and 67.33% of the chicken sera respectively. PMID:10689706

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Blastocystis hominis isolates implicates subtype 3 as a subtype with pathogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Tan, T C; Suresh, K G; Smith, H V

    2008-12-01

    Despite frequent reports on the presence of Blastocystis hominis in human intestinal tract, its pathogenicity remains a matter of intense debate. These discrepancies may be due to the varying pathogenic potential or virulence of the isolates studied. The present study represents the first to investigate both phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of B. hominis obtained from symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. Symptomatic isolates had a significantly greater size range and lower growth rate in Jones' medium than asymptomatic isolates. The parasite cells of symptomatic isolates exhibited rougher surface topography and greater binding affinity to Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) and Helix pomatia (HPA). The present study also identifies further phenotypic characteristics, which aided in differentiating the pathogenic forms from the non-pathogenic forms of B. hominis. Blastocystis subtype 3 was found to be correlated well with the disease. PMID:18795333

  18. In vitro effect of some Egyptian herbal extracts against Blastocystis hominis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Ahmad, Azza K; Andelgelil, Noha H; Abdellatif, Manal Z M; Kamal, Amany M; Mohamed, Rabie M

    2015-04-01

    Blastocystis hominis is an enteric parasite that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of humans and many animals. This emerging parasite has a worldwide distribution. It is often identified as the most common eukaryotic organism reported in human fecal samples that showed a dramatic increase in recent years. Metronidazole is the main therapy for blastocystosis. However, frequent reports of treatment failure suggesting isolates resistance to metronidazole. This study determined the growth pattern and in vitro susceptibility of B. hominis to nitazoxanide (NTZ), garlic, ginger, onion and turmeric. Fecal samples positive for Blastocystis were collected from patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and processed for culture. Cultured samples were subjected to examination by light microscopy. Herbs' extracts was freshly prepared. Drug susceptibility assays was done using 0.1 mg/ml of NTZ, garlic, ginger, onion and turmeric. Effects assessed on parasite culture after 24 hr. and 48 hr. Cultured fecal samples of B. hominis have identified several forms of the organism; vacuolar, granular, amoeboid and cyst forms within 24 hr. Nitazoxanide treatment significantly (P < 0.001) lowered the parasite number after 48 hr. (mean, 337.5 ± 17.67) /ml. The reduction rate after 48 hr. compared to PBS was 93.33%. Ginger treatment significantly (P < 0.002) lowered the number of the parasite after 48 hr. (mean, 335 ± 7.07)/ml. Moreover, garlic treatment also significantly (P < 0.002) lowered the number of the parasite after 48 hr. (mean, 382.5 ± 10.60)/ml. The reduction rates after 48 hr. in these treated samples compared to PBS were 92.98% and 92.44% respectively. However, onion, and turmeric treatments insignificantly lowered the number of the parasite after 48 hr. (P < 0.15 & < 0.22 respectively). PMID:26012223

  19. In situ hybridisation for identification and differentiation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis in formalin-fixed porcine tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Boye, M; Jensen, T K; Ahrens, P; Hagedorn-Olsen, T; Friis, N F

    2001-10-01

    Oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S ribosomal RNA were designed for species-specific identification of the porcine mycoplasmas Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma hyosynoviae using a fluorescent in situ hybridisation assay. The specificity of the probes was evaluated using pure cultures as well as porcine tissue sections with artificial presence of mycoplasma, and the probes were found specific for the target organisms. The assay was applied on sections of 28 tissue samples from pigs infected with one or more of the three Mycoplasma species as determined by cultivation. M. hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis were identified in accordance with cultivation in lung sections from nine pigs affected by catarrhal to purulent bronchopneumonia. Likewise, in eight cases of fibrinous pericarditis, M. hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis and M. hyosynoviae were the infectious agents according to cultivation and were correctly identified by in situ hybridisation. Out of 11 joints cultivation positive for M. hyosynoviae, the probe was only able to identify M. hyosynoviae in eight cases probably due to a low number of microorganisms in the tissue sections. The in situ hybridisation assay is well suited for use in diagnostic and experimental work as well as a tool for pathogenesis studies. PMID:11890568

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Biofilm Cells and Molecular Characterisation of Staphylococcus hominis Isolates from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Olazarán, Soraya; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; González, Gloria M.; Casillas-Vega, Néstor; Garza-González, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to characterise the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, genetic relatedness, biofilm formation and composition, icaADBC genes detection, icaD expression, and antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus hominis isolates from blood. Methods The study included 67 S. hominis blood isolates. Methicillin resistance was evaluated with the cefoxitin disk test. mecA gene and SCCmec were detected by multiplex PCR. Genetic relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Biofilm formation and composition were evaluated by staining with crystal violet and by detachment assay, respectively; and the biofilm index (BI) was determined. Detection and expression of icaADBC genes were performed by multiplex PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibilities of planktonic cells (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC) and biofilm cells (minimum biofilm eradication concentration, MBEC) were determined by the broth dilution method. Results Eighty-five percent (57/67) of isolates were methicillin resistant and mecA positive. Of the mecA-positive isolates, 66.7% (38/57) carried a new putative SCCmec type. Four clones were detected, with two to five isolates each. Among all isolates, 91% (61/67) were categorised as strong biofilm producers. Biofilm biomass composition was heterogeneous (polysaccharides, proteins and DNA). All isolates presented the icaD gene, and 6.66% (1/15) isolates expressed icaD. This isolate presented the five genes of ica operon. Higher BI and MBEC values than the MIC values were observed for amikacin, vancomycin, linezolid, oxacillin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions S. hominis isolates were highly resistant to methicillin and other antimicrobials. Most of the detected SCCmec types were different than those described for S. aureus. Isolates indicated low clonality. The results indicate that S. hominis is a strong biofilm producer with an extracellular matrix with similar composition of proteins, DNA and N-acetylglucosamine; and presents high frequency and low expression of icaD gene. Biofilm production is associated with increased antibiotic resistance. PMID:26659110

  1. Synthesis, integration, and restriction and modification of mycoplasma virus L2 DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dybvig, K.

    1981-01-01

    Mycoplasma virus L2 is an enveloped, nonlytic virus containing double-stranded, superhelical DNA. The L2 virion contains about 7 to 8 major proteins identified by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but the virion has no discernible capsid structure. It has been suggested that the L2 virion is a DNA-protein condensation surrounded by a lipid-protein membrane. The host for mycoplasma virus L2 is Acholeplasma laidlawii. A. laidlawii has no cell wall and contains a small genome, 1 x 10/sup 9/ daltons, which is two to three times smaller than that of most bacteria. Infection of A. laidlawii by L2 is nonlytic. The studies in this thesis show that L2 DNA synthesis begins at about 1 hour of infection and lasts throughout the infection. Viral DNA synthesis is inhibited by chloramphenicol, streptomycin, and novobiocin. Packaging of L2 DNA into progeny virus is also inhibited by chloramphenicol and novobiocin. It is concluded that protein synthesis and probably DNA gyrase activity are required for L2 DNA synthesis, and for packaging of L2 DNA into progeny virus. DNA-DNA hybridization studies demonstrate that L2 DNA integrates into the host cell during infection, and subsequent to infection the cells are mycoplasma virus L2 lysogens. The viral site of integration has been roughly mapped. L2 virus is restricted and modified by A. laidlawii strains JA1 and K2. The nature of the modification in strain K2 has been elucidated. Two L2 variants containing insertions in the viral DNA were identified in these studies. Restriction endonuclease cleavage maps of these variants have been determined. DNA from L2 and another isolate of L2, MV-Lg-L 172, are compared in these studies. 74 references, 33 figures, 6 tables. (ACR)

  2. Chromosomal Transfers in Mycoplasmas: When Minimal Genomes Go Mobile

    PubMed Central

    Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Sagn, Eveline; Baranowski, Eric; Breton, Marc; Nouvel, Laurent Xavier; Blanchard, Alain; Marenda, Marc Serge; Tardy, Florence; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a main driving force of bacterial evolution and innovation. This phenomenon was long thought to be marginal in mycoplasmas, a large group of self-replicating bacteria characterized by minute genomes as a result of successive gene losses during evolution. Recent comparative genomic analyses challenged this paradigm, but the occurrence of chromosomal exchanges had never been formally addressed in mycoplasmas. Here, we demonstrated the conjugal transfer of large chromosomal regions within and among ruminant mycoplasma species, with the incorporation of the incoming DNA occurring by homologous recombination into the recipient chromosome. By combining classical mating experiments with high-throughput next-generation sequencing, we documented the transfer of almost every position of the mycoplasma chromosome. Mycoplasma conjugation relies on the occurrence of an integrative conjugative element (ICE) in at least one parent cell. While ICE propagates horizontally from ICE-positive to ICE-negative cells, chromosomal transfers (CTs) occurred in the opposite direction, from ICE-negative to ICE-positive cells, independently of ICE movement. These findings challenged the classical mechanisms proposed for other bacteria in which conjugative CTs are driven by conjugative elements, bringing into the spotlight a new means for rapid mycoplasma innovation. Overall, they radically change our current views concerning the evolution of mycoplasmas, with particularly far-reaching implications given that over 50 species are human or animal pathogens. PMID:25425234

  3. Diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in children.

    PubMed

    Waris, M E; Toikka, P; Saarinen, T; Nikkari, S; Meurman, O; Vainionp, R; Mertsola, J; Ruuskanen, O

    1998-11-01

    We evaluated a commercial immunoglobulin M (IgM)-capture immunoassay for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in 278 pediatric patients with community-acquired, radiographically defined pneumonia. Acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples were collected from all patients and were tested for M. pneumoniae-specific IgM and IgG antibodies by Platelia enzyme immunoassays (Sanofi Diagnostica Pasteur, Marnes la Coquette, France). Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected at the time of admission to the hospital. A total of 227 NPAs were subjected to the detection of M. pneumoniae DNA by PCR, and 191 NPAs were cultured by using the Pneumofast kit (International Mycoplasma, Signeswere, France). Southern hybridization of PCR products and the IgM test with solid-phase antigen (Serion Immunodiagnostica, Wrzburg, Germany) were used for additional confirmation of a positive result, which required agreement of at least two different methods. A total of 24 (9%) confirmed diagnoses of mycoplasma infection were made, 5 (21%) of which were in children <5 years of age. Of the positive children, 24 of 24 (sensitivity, 100%) were positive by the IgM-capture test with convalescent-phase serum, 19 of 24 (79%) were positive by the IgM-capture test with acute-phase serum, 19 of 24 (79%) were positive by IgG serology, 10 of 20 (50%) were positive by PCR, and 8 of 17 (47%) were positive by culture. An additional 5 (of 254) children were positive by the Platelia IgM test alone (specificity, 98%). When the PCR with Southern hybridization result was combined with the IgM-capture test result with the acute-phase sera, the sensitivity of rapid laboratory diagnosis increased to 95%. In conclusion, the IgM serology test was the single most valuable tool for the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in children of any age. PMID:9774556

  4. Development of a sensitive nested PCR method for the specific detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC.

    PubMed

    Miserez, R; Pilloud, T; Cheng, X; Nicolet, J; Griot, C; Frey, J

    1997-04-01

    A specific and sensitive test for the detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (SC), the aetiological agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) was developed using two nested PCR reactions. The PCR reactions are based on the nucleotide sequence of lipoprotein P72 of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. The two specific oligonucleotide primer pairs were chosen to match those sequence segments of the P72 gene which differ most from the gene of the closely related lipoprotein P67 of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 (strain PG50). The nested PCR reacted with all of the 34 different strains of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC analysed, and gave no amplification product with any of the closely related mycoplasmas tested, showing its high specificity. In bronchial lavage fluid experimentally contaminated with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC, the assay was able to detect as few as two viable cells per ml using a simple lysis procedure prior to the amplification step. With clinical samples, the sensitivity of the nested PCR was about 10(4)-10(5) higher than that of single PCR amplifications performed under the same conditions. The assay was also successfully used to detect M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in bronchial lavage fluid of experimentally infected cattle and proved to be more sensitive than classical culture methods. PMID:9160324

  5. In vitro evaluation of various quinolone antibacterial agents against veterinary mycoplasmas and porcine respiratory bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hannan, P C; O'Hanlon, P J; Rogers, N H

    1989-03-01

    The in vitro activities of 12 quinolones and four antibiotics were determined against 15 veterinary mycoplasmal species and four species of bacteria commonly involved in respiratory infections in pigs. The newer quinolones were markedly more active in vitro against a wide range of mycoplasmas than nalidixic acid and the earlier quinolones. Against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae ciprofloxacin was the most active quinolone with a geometric mean minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against 16 strains of 0.01 microgram ml-1 compared with 0.04 microgram ml-1 for tiamulin, 0.06 microgram ml-1 for tylosin, 0.17 microgram ml-1 for oxytetracycline and 0.23 microgram ml-1 for gentamicin. M hyosynoviae was less sensitive to the quinolones with mean MICs of 0.6 microgram ml-1 for ofloxacin and 0.7 microgram ml-1 for ciprofloxacin compared with 0.034 microgram ml-1, or less, for tiamulin. Norfloxacin and its 6-chloro analogue were both mycoplasmacidal in vitro at five or 10 times their MICs against M hyopneumoniae UCD4. Tiamulin was mycoplasmastatic. The quinolones were also active against porcine Bordetella bronchiseptica and Pasteurella multocida strains and Haemophilus species. Ciprofloxacin was the most active quinolone with mean MICs of 0.58 microgram ml-1 against B bronchiseptica (nine strains), 0.026 microgram ml-1 against P multocida (five strains) and 0.01 microgram ml-1, or less, against Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae (nine strains) and H parasuis (two strains) compared with mean MICs of from 0.5 microgram ml-1 to 64 micrograms ml-1, or more, for the antibiotics. This combination of excellent mycoplasmacidal activity against M hyopneumoniae and good antibacterial activity, suggests that the quinolones have great potential for treating respiratory infections in pigs, including enzootic pneumonia. PMID:2704885

  6. The minimal gene complement of mycoplasma genitalium

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, C.M.; Gocayne, J.D.; White, O.

    1995-10-20

    The complete nucleotide sequence (580,070 base pairs) of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome, the smallest known genome of any free-living organism, has been determined by whole-genome random sequencing and assembly. A total of only 470 predicted coding regions were identified that include genes required for DNA replication, transcription and translation, DNA repair, cellular transport, and energy metabolism. Comparison of this genome to that of Haemophilus influenzae suggests that differences in genome content are reflected as profound differences in physiology and metabolic capacity between these two organisms. 43 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  8. Attachment of killed Mycoplasma gallisepticum cells and membranes to erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Banai, M.; Kahane, I.; Feldner, J.; Razin, S.

    1981-11-01

    To correlate viability with attachment capacity, Mycoplasma gallisepticum cells harvested at different growth phases and treated by various agents were tested for their capacity to attach to human erythrocytes. The results show that viability per se is not essential for M. gallisepticum attachment to erythrocytes, as cells killed by ultraviolet irradiation and membranes isolated by lysing M. gallisepticum cells by various means retained attachment capacity. However, treatment of the mycoplasmas by protein-denaturing agents, such as heart, glutaraldehyde, or prolonged exposure to low pH, drastically affected or even abolished attachment, supporting the protein nature of the mycoplasma membrane components responsible for specific binding to the sialoglycoprotein receptors on the erythrocytes.

  9. Immunobinding assay for detection of Mycoplasma bovis in milk.

    PubMed Central

    Infante Martinez, F; Jasper, D E; Stott, J L; Cullor, J S; Dellinger, J D

    1990-01-01

    An immunobinding dot-blot assay (IBA) was developed for the detection of mycoplasma in milk. The test was highly species specific when monoclonal antibody preparations were employed in the assay system. Reactions were obtained with all mycoplasma species tested when polyclonal antisera preparations were used. Preincubation for 48-72 hours was necessary with milk samples containing only a few mycoplasma. Time from sample receipt to diagnosis in most positive samples could be reduced from several days by culture to a few hours by the IBA, thus enabling control procedures to be quickly initiated. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2357663

  10. Catalase Enhances Growth and Biofilm Production of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Warren L; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes chronic respiratory disease in humans. Factors thought to be important for colonization include the ability of the mycoplasma to form a biofilm on epithelial surfaces and the production of hydrogen peroxide to damage host tissue. Almost all of the mycoplasmas, including M. pneumoniae, lack superoxide dismutase and catalase and a balance should exist between peroxide production and growth. We show here that the addition of catalase to cultures enhanced the formation of biofilms and altered the structure. The incorporation of catalase in agar increased the number of colony-forming units detected and hence could improve the clinical diagnosis of mycoplasmal diseases. PMID:25894997

  11. Highlights of mycoplasma research--an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Razin, Shmuel; Hayflick, Leonard

    2010-03-01

    This brief historical development of the biology of the mycoplasmas begins with their discovery in 1898 to the present. Mycoplasmas are the smallest free-living microorganisms and for years were thought to be viruses because they passed through the usual bacterial filters. They lack a cell wall, are widespread in nature and many are animal, plant and human pathogens. The extensive use of cell cultures in the last fifty years and their frequent contamination with mycoplasmas, together with their possession of the smallest genome of any free-living organism, has drawn enormous attention to these organisms and has revealed considerably more about their biology. PMID:20149687

  12. Rapid detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Kursa, Olimpia; Woźniakowski, Grzegorz; Tomczyk, Grzegorz; Sawicka, Anna; Minta, Zenon

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) remains a serious concern in production of poultry and affects world production of chickens and turkeys. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA has been recently used for the identification of different economically important avian pathogens. The aim of this study was to develop LAMP for simple and inexpensive detection of MS strains in poultry using specifically designed primers targeting hemagglutin A (vlh) gene. The assay was conducted in a water bath for 1 h at 63 °C. The results were visualized after addition of SYBR Green(®) fluorescent dye. LAMP was specific exclusively for MS without cross-reactivity with other Mycoplasma species. The sensitivity of LAMP was determined as 10(-1) CFU/ml and was 1,000 times higher than MS-specific polymerase chain reaction. LAMP assay was conducted on 18 MS field strains to ensure its reliability and usefulness. This is the first report on LAMP development and application for the rapid detection of MS isolated from chickens. This simple method may be applied by diagnostic laboratories without access to expensive equipment. PMID:25413672

  13. Antibody Response to Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Protection of Host and Influence on Outbreaks?

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Roger; Jacobs, Enno

    2016-01-01

    In humans of all ages, the cell wall-less and genome-reduced species Mycoplasma pneumoniae can cause infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract. The well-documented occurrence of major peaks in the incidence of community-acquired pneumonia cases reported world-wide, the multifaceted clinical manifestations of infection and the increasing number of resistant strains provide reasons for ongoing interest in the pathogenesis of mycoplasmal disease. The results of recent studies have provided insights into the interaction of the limited virulence factors of the bacterium with its host. In addition, the availability of complete M. pneumoniae genomes from patient isolates and the development of proteomic methods for investigation of mycoplasmas have not only allowed characterization of sequence divergences between strains but have also shown the importance of proteins and protein parts for induction of the immune reaction after infection. This review focuses on selected aspects of the humoral host immune response as a factor that might influence the clinical course of infections, subsequent protection in cases of re-infections and changes of epidemiological pattern of infections. The characterization of antibodies directed to defined antigens and approaches to promote their induction in the respiratory mucosa are also preconditions for the development of a vaccine to protect risk populations from severe disease due to M. pneumoniae. PMID:26858711

  14. [Imported myiasis: 7 cases of cutaneous parasitism caused by Dermatobia hominis flie larvas].

    PubMed

    Schenone, H; Apt, W; Vlez, R; Bustamante, S; Seplveda, C; Montaldo, G; Salinas, E

    2001-07-01

    Myiasis is the parasitism of organs and tissues of warm-blooded vertebrates by flies larvae. D hominis is a flie geographically restricted to tropical America from Mexico to northern Argentina. The adult flie, which is not hematophagous, needs to put its eggs on the abdominal surface of hematophagous arthropods which serve as carriers of future larvae which are deposited on the skin of the hosts (mammals, birds and accidentally men) when biting. Seven patients (two females) aged 7 to 35 years old, of different nationalities, recalled receiving mosquito bites, after staying in tropical American areas in the previous forty days. They presented furuncle-like lesions in exposed surfaces of the body. These lesions, 2-3 cm long, pruritic and mildly tender, broke and released a serous or serohematic fluid. Through the resulting opening, it was possible to partially observe the larva. Larvae were extracted by manual pressure (4) or surgical incision (3) and identified as D hominis larvae. Diagnosis of dermatobiasis, an imported myiasis, must be based on the characteristics of lesions and the previous residence in endemic areas of America. PMID:11552448

  15. Inferences about the Global Population Structures of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis?

    PubMed Central

    Tanr?verdi, Sultan; Grinberg, Alex; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Hunter, Paul R.; Petrovic, Zorana; Akiyoshi, Donna E.; London, Eric; Zhang, Linghui; Tzipori, Saul; Tumwine, James K.; Widmer, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis are two related species of apicomplexan protozoa responsible for the majority of human cases of cryptosporidiosis. In spite of their considerable public health impact, little is known about the population structures of these species. In this study, a battery of C. parvum and C. hominis isolates from seven countries was genotyped using a nine-locus DNA subtyping scheme. To assess the existence of geographical partitions, the multilocus genotype data were mined using a cluster analysis based on the nearest-neighbor principle. Within each country, the population genetic structures were explored by combining diversity statistical tests, linkage disequilibrium, and eBURST analysis. For both parasite species, a quasi-complete phylogenetic segregation was observed among the countries. Cluster analysis accurately identified recently introduced isolates. Rather than conforming to a strict paradigm of either a clonal or a panmictic population structure, data are consistent with a flexible reproductive strategy characterized by the cooccurrence of both propagation patterns. The relative contribution of each pattern appears to vary between the regions, perhaps dependent on the prevailing ecological determinants of transmission. PMID:18836013

  16. Simple and effective field extraction of human botfly, Dermatobia hominis, using a venom extractor.

    PubMed

    West, Jonathan K

    2013-03-01

    After a trip to Belize, a 25-year-old man noticed an erythematous papule on his upper right chest that enlarged over a 6-week period and formed a central aperture. The patient reported feeling movement and intermittent lancinating pains under the skin. The history and examination were consistent with cutaneous myiasis, likely secondary to the human botfly, Dermatobia hominis. The objective of reporting this case is to present a simple method of extraction of a botfly larva using a commercial venom extractor. The patient's upper chest was prepared, and an occlusive dressing was placed over the lesion for 30 minutes. The Extractor Pump (Sawyer Products, Safety Harbor, FL) was applied and activated, and the larva was rapidly extracted completely intact with no significant discomfort to the patient. The wound fully healed without complication. D hominis is a common etiology of cutaneous myiasis endemic to Belize. The larva burrows under the skin of mammals where it develops for a period of weeks before erupting and falling to the soil to pupate. The diagnosis and treatment of botfly infestation is pertinent to doctors in the United States as Central and South America are common travel destinations for North Americans. In this case, a commercially available venom extractor was demonstrated to be a safe, noninvasive, and painless method for botfly extraction in the field without use of hospital resources. PMID:23246347

  17. Genotypic Characterization of Cryptosporidium hominis from Water Samples in So Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Arajo, Ronalda S.; Dropa, Milena; Fernandes, Licia N.; Carvalho, Terezinha T.; Sato, Maria Ins Z.; Soares, Rodrigo M.; Matt, Glavur R.; Matt, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium has emerged as one of the most important water contaminants, causing waterborne outbreaks of diarrheal diseases worldwide. The small size of oocysts under the microscope and the possibility of changes in characteristics of oocysts, mainly in environmental samples, make the taxonomy of the genus difficult if morphologic characteristics are considered. This limitation encouraged the application of molecular methods to identify this microorganism. The aim of this study was to detect and identify by nested-polymerase chain reaction oocysts of Cryptosporidium present in water samples in the state of So Paulo, Brazil. Water samples were concentrated through a membrane filter, DNA was extracted by using a standard technique, and both amplification reactions used forward and reverse oligonucleotides that were complementary to Cryptosporidium 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Thirty water samples from different sites of collection in the state of So Paulo were evaluated. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 30% of the samples. By genoptyping, C. hominis and Cryptosporidium sp. were identified in recreational water and C. meleagridis was identified in surface water samples. This is the first report of C. hominis in environmental samples in Brazil. Although identification of Cryptosporidium is still a difficult task, molecular methods are essential for specific identification and are a helpful tool to aid to understand the epidemiology of this parasite in Brazil. PMID:22049036

  18. Improved microscopy of Mycoplasma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, J C; Kite, J H

    1971-07-01

    Techniques were developed for continuous microscopic observation of mycoplasmata growing in vitro in Rose chambers by using an inverted phase microscope. The methods permitted direct microscopic observation of undisturbed growth of mycoplasmata in liquid medium. Inocula of mycoplasmata were passed through 0.22-mum filters before culture to provide a suspension of discrete particles. The sequential growth of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was followed from points or single straight lines, with development of branching, a net-like confluence of filaments, large bodies occurring in the center of developing colonies, and finally coccoid forms. Other species of Mycoplasma which did not attach as readily to glass could be observed also by inverted phase microscopy. Umbonation of colonies (a "friedegg" appearance) occurred in liquid medium, indicating that this appearance was not due simply to interaction with the agar medium, but may reflect a qualitative difference in growth patterns between center and periphery. For growth on solid medium, direct observation of colonies in uncovered plates of agar medium was made by using inverted phase microscopy. This was found helpful in detecting small colonies and in observing relationships between colonies. PMID:4939120

  19. New insights on the biology of swine respiratory tract mycoplasmas from a comparative genome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis live in swine respiratory tracts. M. flocculare, a commensal bacterium, is genetically closely related to M. hyopneumoniae, the causative agent of enzootic porcine pneumonia. M. hyorhinis is also pathogenic, causing polyserositis and arthritis. In this work, we present the genome sequences of M. flocculare and M. hyopneumoniae strain 7422, and we compare these genomes with the genomes of other M. hyoponeumoniae strain and to the a M. hyorhinis genome. These analyses were performed to identify possible characteristics that may help to explain the different behaviors of these species in swine respiratory tracts. Results The overall genome organization of three species was analyzed, revealing that the ORF clusters (OCs) differ considerably and that inversions and rearrangements are common. Although M. flocculare and M. hyopneumoniae display a high degree of similarity with respect to the gene content, only some genomic regions display considerable synteny. Genes encoding proteins that may be involved in host-cell adhesion in M. hyopneumoniae and M. flocculare display differences in genomic structure and organization. Some genes encoding adhesins of the P97 family are absent in M. flocculare and some contain sequence differences or lack of domains that are considered to be important for adhesion to host cells. The phylogenetic relationship of the three species was confirmed by a phylogenomic approach. The set of genes involved in metabolism, especially in the uptake of precursors for nucleic acids synthesis and nucleotide metabolism, display some differences in copy number and the presence/absence in the three species. Conclusions The comparative analyses of three mycoplasma species that inhabit the swine respiratory tract facilitated the identification of some characteristics that may be related to their different behaviors. M. hyopneumoniae and M. flocculare display many differences that may help to explain why one species is pathogenic and the other is considered to be commensal. However, it was not possible to identify specific virulence determinant factors that could explain the differences in the pathogenicity of the analyzed species. The M. hyorhinis genome contains differences in some components involved in metabolism and evasion of the hosts immune system that may contribute to its growth aggressiveness. Several horizontal gene transfer events were identified. The phylogenomic analysis places M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis in the hyopneumoniae clade. PMID:23497205

  20. The linear chromosome of the plant-pathogenic mycoplasma 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali'

    PubMed Central

    Kube, Michael; Schneider, Bernd; Kuhl, Heiner; Dandekar, Thomas; Heitmann, Katja; Migdoll, Alexander M; Reinhardt, Richard; Seemller, Erich

    2008-01-01

    Background Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted, uncultivable bacterial plant pathogens that cause diseases in hundreds of economically important plants. They represent a monophyletic group within the class Mollicutes (trivial name mycoplasmas) and are characterized by a small genome with a low GC content, and the lack of a firm cell wall. All mycoplasmas, including strains of 'Candidatus (Ca.) Phytoplasma asteris' and 'Ca. P. australiense', examined so far have circular chromosomes, as is the case for almost all walled bacteria. Results Our work has shown that 'Ca. Phytoplasma mali', the causative agent of apple proliferation disease, has a linear chromosome. Linear chromosomes were also identified in the closely related provisional species 'Ca. P. pyri' and 'Ca. P. prunorum'. The chromosome of 'Ca. P. mali' strain AT is 601,943 bp in size and has a GC content of 21.4%. The chromosome is further characterized by large terminal inverted repeats and covalently closed hairpin ends. Analysis of the protein-coding genes revealed that glycolysis, the major energy-yielding pathway supposed for 'Ca. P. asteris', is incomplete in 'Ca. P. mali'. Due to the apparent lack of other metabolic pathways present in mycoplasmas, it is proposed that maltose and malate are utilized as carbon and energy sources. However, complete ATP-yielding pathways were not identified. 'Ca. P. mali' also differs from 'Ca. P. asteris' by a smaller genome, a lower GC content, a lower number of paralogous genes, fewer insertions of potential mobile DNA elements, and a strongly reduced number of ABC transporters for amino acids. In contrast, 'Ca. P. mali' has an extended set of genes for homologous recombination, excision repair and SOS response than 'Ca. P. asteris'. Conclusion The small linear chromosome with large terminal inverted repeats and covalently closed hairpin ends, the extremely low GC content and the limited metabolic capabilities reflect unique features of 'Ca. P. mali', not only within phytoplasmas, but all mycoplasmas. It is expected that the genome information obtained here will contribute to a better understanding of the reduced metabolism of phytoplasmas, their fastidious nutrition requirements that prevented axenic cultivation, and the mechanisms involved in pathogenicity. PMID:18582369

  1. [Testing for Mycoplasma pneumonia using the ImmunoCard Mycoplasma rapid test].

    PubMed

    Okimoto, Niro; Kibayashi, Takashi; Kishimoto, Michihiro; Yamato, Kenji; Kurihara, Takeyuki; Mimura, Kimihiro; Honda, Yoshihiro; Osaki, Kohichi; Asaoka, Naoko

    2007-03-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of ImmunoCard Mycoplasma rapid tests in all patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) between January, 2004 and December, 2005. ImmunoCard Mycoplasma rapid tests were performed on the 1st day of admission and we analyzed the frequency of positive cases among CAP cases according to month and age. A total of 82 of 270 (33.7%) and 41 of 257 (16.0%) were positive among CAP cases in 2004 and 2005, respectively. More positive cases were seen between spring and early summer and in cases aged 70 years or more, especially those over 80 years old. These results indicated that further evaluation is required among positive cases in elder group. PMID:17419434

  2. Mycoplasma Infection Alters Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gedye, Craig; Cardwell, Tracy; Dimopoulos, Nektaria; Tan, Bee Shin; Jackson, Heather; Svobodová, Suzanne; Anaka, Matthew; Behren, Andreas; Maher, Christopher; Hofmann, Oliver; Hide, Winston; Caballero, Otavia; Davis, Ian D; Cebon, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cell lines can be useful to model cancer stem cells. Infection with Mycoplasma species is an insidious problem in mammalian cell culture. While investigating stem-like properties in early passage melanoma cell lines, we noted poorly reproducible results from an aliquot of a cell line that was later found to be infected with Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Deliberate infection of other early passage melanoma cell lines aliquots induced variable and unpredictable effects on expression of putative cancer stem cell markers, clonogenicity, proliferation and global gene expression. Cell lines established in stem cell media (SCM) were equally susceptible. Mycoplasma status is rarely reported in publications using cultured cells to study the cancer stem cell hypothesis. Our work highlights the importance of surveillance for Mycoplasma infection while using any cultured cells to interrogate tumor heterogeneity. PMID:26514153

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF IMMUNOGENS OF 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' BY PROTEIN BLOTTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to a nitrocellulose sheet by blotting. Sera obtained from infected hamsters and immunized rabbits were then incubated with the nitrocellulose strips. Proteins which are capa...

  4. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

  5. Warble? Whats a Warble? A recap of the human bot fly, Dermatobia hominis (L. Jr. 1781)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human bot fly, Dermatobia hominis (Linnaeus Jr., 1781) is a major pest of livestock in Mexico, Central and South America. Myiasis caused by the larvae result in economic losses due to hide damage and reductions in weight gain and milk production. They have a broad host range which includes wildl...

  6. Prevalence and Genotype Characterization of Blastocystis hominis Among the Baghmalek People in Southwestern Iran in 2013 - 2014

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnood, Saleh; Rafiei, Abdollah; Saki, Jasem; Alizadeh, Kobra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blastocystis hominis is a common globally distributed parasite. The prevalence of this parasite has been shown to vary among different countries. Molecular studies have also shown that there is a high level of genetic diversity among Blastocystis spp. isolated from humans and animals. Extensive information on parasitic genotypes will aid in devising more effective strategies for the identification and potential control of these pathogenic parasites. Objectives: This study aimed to gain information on the prevalence and abundance of Blastocystis subtypes in Iran. Materials and Methods: Over a period of 3 months, 1,410 stool samples were collected and examined by microscopy. Samples found to be positive for B. hominis were concentrated and phylogenetic analysis was subsequently performed. A questionnaire was completed by all study participants. Results: Blastocystis hominis was found to have a prevalence of 3.33% in the study population. There was no significant association of Blastocystis infection with age (P = 0.3) or gender (P = 0.57). The Blastocystis subtypes (ST) identified in this study were ST3, ST4, ST5, and ST7 with the most prevalent being ST4 (40.9%). Conclusions: The prevalence of B. hominis in the study area was lower than that reported for most developed countries, and unlike in other countries in the Middle East, ST4 was the most prevalent subtype. PMID:26587213

  7. Selective inhibition of DNA amplification in nonadhering Mycoplasma pneumoniae cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Zigangirova, N.A.; Solov`eva, S.V.; Rakovskaya, I.V.

    1995-08-01

    Inhibition of amplification of various genome regions of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was observed in the polymerase chain reaction, and was dependent on cultivation conditions. A protein stably associated with DNA is responsible for the inhibitory effect. It is assumed that when the protein selectively associates with separate DNA regions, it can inhibit genes encoding pathogenicity factors, thus promoting mycoplasma transformation into persistent variants. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  8. A Mycoplasma species of Emydidae turtles in the northeastern USA.

    PubMed

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Raphael, Bonnie L; Ammazzalorso, Alyssa D; Seimon, Tracie A; Niederriter, Holly; Zarate, Brian; Newton, Alisa L; McAloose, Denise

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality in captive and wild chelonians. As part of a health assessment of endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) in the northeastern US, choanal and cloacal swabs from these and other sympatric species, including spotted turtles (Clemmys guttata), eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina), wood turtles (Glyptemys insculpta), and common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) from 10 sampling sites in the states (US) of Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, were tested by PCR for Mycoplasma. Of 108 turtles tested, 63 (58.3%) were PCR positive for Mycoplasma including 58 of 83 bog turtles (70%), three of three (100%) eastern box turtles, and two of 11 (18%) spotted turtles; all snapping turtles (n = 7) and wood turtles (n = 4) were negative. Sequence analysis of portions of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region and the 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed a single, unclassified species of Mycoplasma that has been previously reported in eastern box turtles, ornate box turtles (Terrapene ornata ornata), western pond turtles (Emys marmorata), and red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans). We document a high incidence of Mycoplasma, in the absence of clinical disease, in wild emydid turtles. These findings, along with wide distribution of the identified Mycoplasma sp. across a broad geographic region, suggest this bacterium is likely a commensal inhabitant of bog turtles, and possibly other species of emydid turtles, in the northeastern US. PMID:25574806

  9. Detection of Tritrichomonas foetus and Pentatrichomonas hominis in intestinal tissue specimens of cats by chromogenic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mostegl, Meike M; Wetscher, Andreas; Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Dinhopl, Nora; Weissenbck, Herbert

    2012-02-10

    In this retrospective study 102 cats were analyzed for the presence of trichomonads in intestinal tissue sections using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). Two intestinal trichomonad species are described in cats: Pentatrichomonas hominis and Tritrichomonas foetus. While P. hominis is considered a mere commensal, T. foetus has been found to be the causative agent of feline large-bowel diarrhea. For the detection of both agents within intestinal tissue CISH assays using three different probes were performed. In the first CISH run a probe specific for all relevant members of the order Trichomonadida (OT probe) was used. In a second CISH run all positive samples were further examined on three consecutive tissue sections using the OT probe, a probe specific for the family of Tritrichomonadidae (Tritri probe) and a newly designed probe specifically detecting P. hominis (Penta hom probe). In total, four of the 102 cats were found to be positive with the OT probe. Thereof, one cat gave a positive reaction with the P. hominis probe and three cats were positive with the T. foetus probe. All Trichomonas-positive cats were pure-bred and between 8 and 32 weeks of age. In one cat positive for T. foetus large amounts of parasites were found in the gut lumen and invading the intestinal mucosa. The species of the detected trichomonads were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing of a part of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. In this study, the usefulness of CISH to detect intestinal trichomonads within feline tissue samples was shown. Additionally, the specific detection of P. hominis using CISH was established. Generally, it was shown that CISH is well suited for detection and differentiation of trichomonosis in retrospective studies using tissue samples. PMID:21856079

  10. A Pilot Study on Single-dose Toxicity Testing of Hominis placenta Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo-Hwan; Yoon, Hyun-Min; Jang, Kyung-Jeon; Kim, Cheol-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the toxicity and to find the lethal dose of the test substance Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture when used as a single-dose in 6 week old, male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech (Chungwon, Korea), an institution authorized to perform non clinical studies, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). SD rats were chosen for the pilot study. Doses of Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture extracts, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mL, were administered to the experimental group, and 0.5 mL doses of normal saline solution were administered to the control group. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths or abnormalities occurred in any of the groups. Also, no significant changes in body weights were observed among the groups, and no significant differences in hematology/biochemistry, necropsy, and histopathology results were noted. Hematologically, some changes in the male rats in two experimental groups were observed, but those changes had no clinical or toxicological meaning because they were not dose dependent. Histopathological tests on the injected parts showed cell infiltration in the male rats in one of the experimental groups; however, that result was due to spontaneous generation and had no toxicological meaning. Therefore, this study showed that Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy. Conclusion: As a result of single-dose tests of the test substance Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture in 4 groups of rats, the lethal dose for both males and females exceeded 0.5 mL/animal. Therefore, the above findings suggest that treatment with Hominis placenta pharmacopuncture is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject are needed. PMID:26120488

  11. Detection of Tritrichomonas foetus and Pentatrichomonas hominis in intestinal tissue specimens of cats by chromogenic in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Mostegl, Meike M.; Wetscher, Andreas; Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Dinhopl, Nora; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    In this retrospective study 102 cats were analyzed for the presence of trichomonads in intestinal tissue sections using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). Two intestinal trichomonad species are described in cats: Pentatrichomonas hominis and Tritrichomonas foetus. While P. hominis is considered a mere commensal, T. foetus has been found to be the causative agent of feline large-bowel diarrhea. For the detection of both agents within intestinal tissue CISH assays using three different probes were performed. In the first CISH run a probe specific for all relevant members of the order Trichomonadida (OT probe) was used. In a second CISH run all positive samples were further examined on three consecutive tissue sections using the OT probe, a probe specific for the family of Tritrichomonadidae (Tritri probe) and a newly designed probe specifically detecting P. hominis (Penta hom probe). In total, four of the 102 cats were found to be positive with the OT probe. Thereof, one cat gave a positive reaction with the P. hominis probe and three cats were positive with the T. foetus probe. All Trichomonas-positive cats were pure-bred and between 8 and 32 weeks of age. In one cat positive for T. foetus large amounts of parasites were found in the gut lumen and invading the intestinal mucosa. The species of the detected trichomonads were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing of a part of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. In this study, the usefulness of CISH to detect intestinal trichomonads within feline tissue samples was shown. Additionally, the specific detection of P. hominis using CISH was established. Generally, it was shown that CISH is well suited for detection and differentiation of trichomonosis in retrospective studies using tissue samples. PMID:21856079

  12. Epidemiological survey of Blastocystis hominis in Huainan City, Anhui Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Xia; Li, Chao-Pin; Wang, Jian; Cui, Yu-Bao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To provide scientific evidence for prevention and controlling of blastocystosis, the infection of Blastocystis homonis and to study its clinical significance in Huainan City, Anhui Province, China. METHODS: Blastocystis homonis in fresh stools taken from 100 infants, 100 pupils, 100 middle school students and 403 patients with diarrhea was smeared and detected with method of iodine staining and hematoxylin staining. After preliminary direct microscopy, the shape and size of Blastocystis homonis were observed with high power lens. The cellular immune function of the patients with blastocystosis was detected with biotin-streptavidin (BSA). RESULTS: The positive rates of Blastocystis homonis in fresh stools taken from the infants, pupils, middle school students and the patients with diarrhea, were 1.0% (1/100), 1.0% (1/100), 0% (0/100) and 5.96% (24/403) respectively. Furthermore, the positive rates of Blastocystis homonis in the stool samples taken from the patients with mild diarrhea, intermediate diarrhea, severe diarrhea and obstinate diarrhea were 6.03% (14/232), 2.25% (2/89), 0% (0/17) and 12.31% (8/65) respectively. The positive rates of Blastocystis homonis in fresh stools of male and female patients with diarrhea were 7.52% (17/226) and 3.95% (7/177) respectively, and those of patients in urban and rural areas were 4.56% (11/241) and 8.02% (13/162) respectively. There was no significant difference between them (P > 0.05). The positive rates of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ in serum of Blastocystis homonis-positive and-negative individuals were 0.64 ± 0.06, 0.44 ± 0.06, 0.28 ± 0.04 and 0.60 ± 0.05, 0.40 ± 0.05 and 0.30 ± 0.05 respectively, and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ of the two groups were 1.53 ± 0.34 and 1.27 ± 0.22. There was significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of Blastocystis hominis as an enteric pathogen in human seems not to be associated with gender and living environment, and that Blastocystis hominis is more common in stool samples of the patients with diarrhea, especially with chronic diarrhea or obstinate diarrhea. When patients with diarrhea infected by Blastocystis hominis, their cellular immune function decreases, which make it more difficult to be cured. PMID:12378644

  13. Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma fermentans induce cell apoptosis and changes in gene expression profiles of 32D cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbin; Shou, Chengchao

    2011-01-01

    Infection of mycoplasmas has been linked to various human diseases including arthritis, pneumonia, infertility and cancer. While Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma fermentans have been detected in gastric adenocarcinomas, the mechanisms underlyine the pathogenesis are unknown. In this study, cell growth kinetics, Hoechst 33258 staining, DNA ladder assays, Western blotting analysis and cDNA microarray assays were performed to investigate the roles of M. hyorhinis and M. fermentans during infection of mammalian cells. Our data demonstrated that these mycoplasmas inhibid the growth of immortalised cell lines (32D and COS-7) ane tumor cell lines (HeLa and AGS). In addition, the infection of the 32D cell line with M. hyorhinis and M. fermentans induced compression of the nucleus, degradation of the cell genome and dysregulation of the expression of genes related to proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, signaling pathway and metabolism. Apoptosis related proteins Bcl-2, Bid and p53 were down-regulated, Fas was up-regulated and Bax was dysregulated in mycoplasma-infected 32D cells. Together, our data demonstrated that infection of mycoplasmas inhibitd cele growts through modification of gene expression profiles and post-translation modification of proliferation and apoptosis related proteins. PMID:22446603

  14. Identification of Mycoplasma fermentans in Synovial Fluid Samples from Arthritis Patients with Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheena; Sidebottom, David; Bruckner, Felix; Collins, David

    2000-01-01

    Since 1970 Mycoplasma fermentans has been suspected of being associated with rheumatoid arthritis. However, this association has been difficult to prove, and this has been our goal. The distribution of M. fermentans was studied in the synovial fluid of patients suffering from different arthritides. Samples of synovial fluid were taken from patients with well-defined disease and a clear diagnosis. After removal of the inflammatory cells and hyaluran, they were treated with proteinase K and tested by a single or fully nested PCR with primers directed against part of the two 16S rRNA genes of M. fermentans. The product was sequenced automatically, by using an ALF Express automatic sequencer, to confirm the mycoplasma species and to identify the strain since the two genes were usually found to be polymorphic. This was also true of the type strain, strain PG18. M. fermentans was detected in 23 of 26 (88%) rheumatoid arthritis patients, and four different strains were found. It was also found in 7 of 8 (88%) of the nonrheumatoid inflammatory arthritis patient group, which consisted of one patient with reactive arthritis, one patient with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis, two patients with gout, two patients with ankylosing spondylitis, and two patients with psoriatic arthritis, only one of whom was infected with M. fermentans. It was not detected in any of the 10 osteoarthritis patients. M. fermentans was therefore found to be a variable and very common organism in arthritic patients with inflammatory joint exudates and may well prove to be important in the etiology of the diseases. PMID:10618069

  15. Pharmacodynamics of Antimicrobials against Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides Small Colony, the Causative Agent of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John D.; McKellar, Quintin A.; McKeever, Declan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC) is the causative agent of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a disease of substantial economic importance in sub-Saharan Africa. Failure of vaccination to curtail spread of this disease has led to calls for evaluation of the role of antimicrobials in CBPP control. Three major classes of antimicrobial are effective against mycoplasmas, namely tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones and macrolides. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effector kinetics of oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin against two MmmSC field strains in artificial medium and adult bovine serum. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined for oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin against MmmSC strains B237 and Tan8 using a macrodilution technique, and time-kill curves were constructed for various multiples of the MIC over a 24 hour period in artificial medium and serum. Data were fitted to sigmoid Emax models to obtain 24 hour-area under curve/MIC ratios for mycoplasmastasis and, where appropriate, for mycoplasmacidal activity and virtual mycoplasmal elimination. Results Minimum inhibitory concentrations against B237 were 20-fold higher, 2-fold higher and approximately 330-fold lower in serum than in artificial medium for oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin, respectively. Such differences were mirrored in experiments using Tan8. Oxytetracycline was mycoplasmastatic against both strains in both matrices. Danofloxacin elicited mycoplasmacidal activity against B237 and virtual elimination of Tan8; similar maximum antimycoplasmal effects were observed in artificial medium and serum. Tulathromycin effected virtual elimination of B237 but was mycoplasmastatic against Tan8 in artificial medium. However, this drug was mycoplasmastatic against both strains in the more physiologically relevant matrix of serum. Conclusions Oxytetracycline, danofloxacin and tulathromycin are all suitable candidates for further investigation as potential treatments for CBPP. This study also highlights the importance of testing drug activity in biological matrices as well as artificial media. PMID:22952911

  16. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Phytase and 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol on the Blood Characteristics of Commercial Layers Innoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with the F-Stain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 3 trials, the effects of dietary supplementation with phytase and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on BW and the blood characteristics of commercial layers that were inoculated pre-lay (12 wk of age) or at the onset of lay (22 wk of age) with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were assessed at 34, ...

  17. Insights into the Gene Expression Profile of Uncultivable Hemotrophic Mycoplasma suis during Acute Infection, Obtained Using Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Kathrin M.; Carranza, Paula M.; Gehrig, Peter M.; Roschitzki, Bernd; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Hoelzle, Katharina; Riedel, Katharina; Kube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hemotrophic mycoplasmas, bacteria without cell walls whose niche is the erythrocytes of their hosts, have never been cultivated in vitro. Therefore, knowledge of their pathogenesis is fundamental. Mycoplasma suis infects pigs, causing either acute fatal hemolytic anemia or chronic low-grade anemia, growth retardation, and immune suppression. Recently, the complete genomes of two hemotrophic mycoplasma species, M. suis and M. haemofelis, were sequenced, offering new strategies for the analysis of their pathogenesis. In this study we implemented a proteomic approach to identify M. suis proteins during acute infection by using tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-two percent of the predicted proteins encoded in M. suis strain KI_3806 were identified. These included nearly all encoded proteins of glycolysis and nucleotide metabolism. The proteins for lipid metabolism, however, were underrepresented. A high proportion of the detected proteins are involved in information storage and processing (72.6%). In addition, several proteins of different functionalities, i.e., posttranslational modification, membrane genesis, signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, inorganic ion transport, and defense mechanisms, were identified. In its reduced genome, M. suis harbors 65.3% (strain Illinois) and 65.9% (strain KI_3806) of the genes encode hypothetical proteins. Of these, only 6.3% were identified at the proteome level. All proteins identified in this study are present in both M. suis strains and are encoded in more highly conserved regions of the genome sequence. In conclusion, our proteome approach is a further step toward the elucidation of the pathogenesis and life cycle of M. suis as well as the establishment of an in vitro cultivation system. PMID:22267506

  18. DNA probes and PCR in diagnosis of mycoplasma infections.

    PubMed

    Razin, S

    1994-12-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of mycoplasma infections is hampered by the difficulty or total failure to cultivate the organisms in vitro, and by the frequently weak and poorly specific serological response of the host. DNA probes consisting of cloned ribosomal RNA genes, cDNA to mycoplasmal rRNA, synthetic 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences, or cloned mycoplasmal protein genes, have been developed and applied as diagnostic tools in a variety of human and animal mycoplasma infections. These included primary atypical pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae, urogenital infections associated with M. genitalium and Ureaplasma urealyticum, and infections with M. fermentans, M. penetrans or M. pirum--mycoplasmas recently incriminated as cofactors in AIDS. DNA probes were also designed to aid in diagnosis of mycoplasma diseases of farm and laboratory animals, and the hard-to-diagnose mycoplasma infections of cell cultures. Sensitivity of mycoplasma detection by the different probes ranged between 10(3) and 10(6) colony-forming units, a level which may not be sufficiently high for use in a clinical laboratory. The introduction of PCR has pushed aside the previously developed DNA probes, by providing faster and much more sensitive tests. The sensitive level of a PCR test can be as low as a single organism, enabling detection of mycoplasmas in patients treated with antibiotics and in asymptomatic patients. PCR becomes positive prior to serological response and is also effective in immunocompromised hosts. PCR was shown to be most valuable in detection and identification of the non-culturable plant and insect mycoplasma-like organisms (MLOs). Nevertheless, false-negative PCR results are rather common due to inhibitors of the PCR reaction in the clinical specimen, while false-positive results may occur due to contamination of the reagents with target DNA. In conclusion, the PCR procedure is still too complex to be carried out in a routine diagnostic laboratory. PCR prepackaged quality-controlled diagnostic kits are now in the process of rapid development. Once these kits become available, and at a reasonable cost, PCR will certainly take its place as a major diagnostic tool in the routine diagnosis of mycoplasma infections. PMID:7700272

  19. Mycoplasma mycoides, from "mycoides Small Colony" to "capri". A microevolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Mycoplasma mycoides cluster consists of five species or subspecies that are ruminant pathogens. One subspecies, Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC), is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. Its very close relative, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc), is a more ubiquitous pathogen in small ruminants causing mastitis, arthritis, keratitis, pneumonia and septicaemia and is also found as saprophyte in the ear canal. To understand the genetics underlying these phenotypic differences, we compared the MmmSC PG1 type strain genome, which was already available, with the genome of an Mmc field strain (95010) that was sequenced in this study. We also compared the 95010 genome with the recently published genome of another Mmc strain (GM12) to evaluate Mmc strain diversity. Results The MmmSC PG1 genome is 1,212 kbp and that of Mmc 95010 is ca. 58 kbp shorter. Most of the sequences present in PG1 but not 95010 are highly repeated Insertion Sequences (three types of IS) and large duplicated DNA fragments. The 95010 genome contains five types of IS, present in fewer copies than in PG1, and two copies of an integrative conjugative element. These mobile genetic elements have played a key role in genome plasticity, leading to inversions of large DNA fragments. Comparison of the two genomes suggested a marked decay of the PG1 genome that seems to be correlated with a greater number of IS. The repertoire of gene families encoding surface proteins is smaller in PG1. Several genes involved in polysaccharide metabolism and protein degradation are also absent from, or degraded in, PG1. Conclusions The genome of MmmSC PG1 is larger than that of Mmc 95010, its very close relative, but has less coding capacity. This is the result of large genetic rearrangements due to mobile elements that have also led to marked gene decay. This is consistent with a non-adaptative genomic complexity theory, allowing duplications or pseudogenes to be maintained in the absence of adaptive selection that would lead to purifying selection and genome streamlining over longer evolutionary times. These findings also suggest that MmmSC only recently adapted to its bovine host. PMID:21324191

  20. Rare extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Kiran; Enright, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnsons syndrome (SJS) is a rare extra-pulmonary complication of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. We present the case of a 26-year-old man with fever, cough, extensive oral mucosal ulceration and a widespread truncal rash. He was diagnosed with M. pneumoniae-induced SJS. He responded well to antibiotics and steroids initially, but went on to develop pseudomembranous conjunctivitis requiring bilateral amniotic membrane grafting.SJS is most commonly drug-induced, however, M. pneumoniae is the commonest infectious cause and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. It is also important to get specialist care involved early to minimise the long-term effects of any complications. PMID:26837942

  1. Cytoskeletal elements in the bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegermann, Jan; Herrmann, Richard; Mayer, Frank

    2002-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a pathogenic eubacterium lacking a cell wall. Three decades ago, a "rod", an intracellular cytoskeletal structure, was discovered that was assumed to define and stabilize the elongated cell shape. Later, by treatment with detergent, a "Triton shell" (i.e. a fraction of detergent-insoluble cell material) could be obtained, believed to contain additional cytoskeletal elements. Now, by application of a modified Triton X-100 treatment, we are able to demonstrate that M. pneumoniae possesses a cytoskeleton consisting of a blade-like rod and a peripheral lining located close to the inner face of the cytoplasmic membrane, exhibiting features of a highly regular network. Attached "stalks" may support the cytoplasmic membrane. The rod was connected to the cell periphery by "spokes" and showed a defined ultrastructure. Its proximal end was found to be attached to a wheel-like complex. Fibrils extended from the proximal end of the rod into the cytoplasm.

  2. Lung abscess caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Omae, Takashi; Matsubayashi, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy with West syndrome was referred to hospital because of high fever and cough. Chest X-ray and computed tomography showed consolidation with an abscess in the right upper lobe. Laboratory data indicated cytokine storm. Various antibacterial agents and additional corticosteroid were unable to control the hypercytokinemia, which was suppressed after cyclosporine A was started. The lung abscess remained, however, and right upper lobectomy was performed. Culture from the abscess showed no growth, while polymerase chain reaction assay indicated Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA. Serum passive agglutinin titer for M. pneumoniae was significantly elevated in the convalescent phase. These findings are strong evidence that the lung abscess was caused by M. pneumoniae infection. PMID:26177124

  3. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from pigs using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguti, Maurício; Oliveira, Rosângela C; Marques, Lucas M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Buim, Marcos R; Neto, Renata L; Guimarães, Ana Márcia S; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Economic loss in pig breeding is common due to respiratory disorders, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, namely, are the most common infectious agents. The aim of this study is to recover these mollicutes and detect their genotypic variations by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing the 16 s rRNA gene. One hundred and twenty-six swabs from tonsil and nasal mucus of pigs with respiratory disorders were analysed. A total of 78 lungs were sampled, as well as two trachea and two tonsils obtained from animals with respiratory disorder. A total of 59 isolates were obtained: 1 (1.70 per cent) of M hyopneumoniae, 2 (3.40 per cent) of Mycoplasma flocculare and 56 (94.90 per cent) of M hyorhinis. The PFGE for M hyorhinis showed 10 profiles with enzyme AvaI and 9 profiles with XhoI. A low polymorphism of the 16sRNS gene was detected in M hyorhinis isolates compared with the type strain in the GenBank. M hyorhinis isolates of different herds showed a large heterogenicity with enzymes AvaI and XhoI. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed for analysing the interspecific and intraspecific variations of isolated mycoplasmas. PMID:26688737

  4. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from pigs using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yamaguti, Maurcio; Oliveira, Rosngela C; Marques, Lucas M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Buim, Marcos R; Neto, Renata L; Guimares, Ana Mrcia S; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Economic loss in pig breeding is common due to respiratory disorders, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, namely, are the most common infectious agents. The aim of this study is to recover these mollicutes and detect their genotypic variations by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing the 16?s rRNA gene. One hundred and twenty-six swabs from tonsil and nasal mucus of pigs with respiratory disorders were analysed. A total of 78 lungs were sampled, as well as two trachea and two tonsils obtained from animals with respiratory disorder. A total of 59 isolates were obtained: 1 (1.70 per cent) of M hyopneumoniae, 2 (3.40 per cent) of Mycoplasma flocculare and 56 (94.90 per cent) of M hyorhinis. The PFGE for M hyorhinis showed 10 profiles with enzyme AvaI and 9 profiles with XhoI. A low polymorphism of the 16sRNS gene was detected in M hyorhinis isolates compared with the type strain in the GenBank. M hyorhinis isolates of different herds showed a large heterogenicity with enzymes AvaI and XhoI. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed for analysing the interspecific and intraspecific variations of isolated mycoplasmas. PMID:26688737

  5. Pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: An update.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, R; Ghosh, A; Chandolia, A

    2016-01-01

    Genus Mycoplasma, belonging to the class Mollicutes, encompasses unique lifeforms comprising of a small genome of 8,00,000 base pairs and the inability to produce a cell wall under any circumstances. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is the most common pathogenic species infecting humans. It is an atypical respiratory bacteria causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children and adults of all ages. Although atypical pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae can be managed in outpatient settings, complications affecting multiple organ systems can lead to hospitalization in vulnerable population. M. pneumoniae infection has also been associated with chronic lung disease and bronchial asthma. With the advent of molecular methods of diagnosis and genetic, immunological and ultrastructural assays that study infectious disease pathogenesis at subcellular level, newer virulence factors of M. pneumoniae have been recognized by researchers. Structure of the attachment organelle of the organism, that mediates the crucial initial step of cytadherence to respiratory tract epithelium through complex interaction between different adhesins and accessory adhesion proteins, has been decoded. Several subsequent virulence mechanisms like intracellular localization, direct cytotoxicity and activation of the inflammatory cascade through toll-like receptors (TLRs) leading to inflammatory cytokine mediated tissue injury, have also been demonstrated to play an essential role in pathogenesis. The most significant update in the knowledge of pathogenesis has been the discovery of Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome toxin (CARDS toxin) of M. pneumoniae and its ability of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosylation and inflammosome activation, thus initiating airway inflammation. Advances have also been made in terms of the different pathways behind the genesis of extrapulmonary complications. This article aims to comprehensively review the recent advances in the knowledge of pathogenesis of this organism, that had remained elusive during the era of serological diagnosis. Elucidation of virulence mechanisms of M. pneumoniae will help researchers to design effective vaccine candidates and newer therapeutic targets against this agent. PMID:26776112

  6. Proteomics inference of genes involved in host adaptation of Mycoplasma gallinarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different from most other host-specific mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma gallinarum has been isolated from various hosts, such as poultry, pig, cattle, and sheep. The wide distribution among different hosts, the low pathogenesis, and the weak host immunological responses suggest this mycoplasma has a unique ...

  7. [100 years of Mycoplasma--pathogenicity for domestic and farm animals].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, H; Runge, M

    1998-10-01

    The paper presents a short description of the history of mycoplasmology, the systematic and characteristics of mycoplasmas and the diseases caused by mycoplasmas in cattle, sheep and goats, swine, poultry, and rats and mice. The pathogenicity of mycoplasmas for cats, dogs and horses is discussed. PMID:9818461

  8. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri associated with goat respiratory disease and high flock mortality

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Laura; St-Jacques, Marcel; Ontiveros, Lourdes; Acosta, Jorge; Handel, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Abstract A high mortality outbreak of respiratory mycoplasmosis occurred in goats in Mexico. The clinicopathologic presentation resembled contagious caprine pleuropneumonia caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae. By using a battery of polymerase chain reaction assays, the mycoplasma associated with this outbreak was identified as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri. PMID:16642877

  9. Large Outbreak of Cryptosporidium hominis Infection Transmitted through the Public Water Supply, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Schnning, Caroline; Lilja, Mikael; Lebbad, Marianne; Ljung, Thomas; Allestam, Grel; Ferm, Martin; Bjrkholm, Britta; Hansen, Anette; Hiltula, Jari; Lngmark, Jonas; Lfdahl, Margareta; Omberg, Maria; Reuterwall, Christina; Samuelsson, Eva; Widgren, Katarina; Wallensten, Anders; Lindh, Johan

    2014-01-01

    In November 2010, ?27,000 (?45%) inhabitants of stersund, Sweden, were affected by a waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis. The outbreak was characterized by a rapid onset and high attack rate, especially among young and middle-aged persons. Young age, number of infected family members, amount of water consumed daily, and gluten intolerance were identified as risk factors for acquiring cryptosporidiosis. Also, chronic intestinal disease and young age were significantly associated with prolonged diarrhea. Identification of Cryptosporidium hominis subtype IbA10G2 in human and environmental samples and consistently low numbers of oocysts in drinking water confirmed insufficient reduction of parasites by the municipal water treatment plant. The current outbreak shows that use of inadequate microbial barriers at water treatment plants can have serious consequences for public health. This risk can be minimized by optimizing control of raw water quality and employing multiple barriers that remove or inactivate all groups of pathogens. PMID:24655474

  10. Antibodies to Herpesvirus hominis types 1 and 2 in malnourished Nigerian children.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A O; Salimonu, L S; Osunkoya, B O

    1981-01-01

    Antibodies to Herpesvirus hominis (HVH) types 1 and 2 were determined by a micro-neutralisation method in 37 children with kwashiorkor, 16 with marasmus, and in 64 well-nourished control children. All the children were aged between 1 and 4 years. The prevalence of antibodies was similar in the two sexes and at different ages. HVH-1 antibodies were present in 51% of children with kwashiorkor, in 44% with marasmus, and in 26% of well-nourished children, reflecting the very poor socioeconomic conditions of malnourished children. HVH-2 antibodies too were present in about 19% of children with kwashiorkor, and in 2% of well-nourished controls; they were absent in marasmic children. It is suggested that HVH-2 infection in malnourished children is facilitated by the communal use of fomites--such as bedclothes and underwear. PMID:6258486

  11. [PCR-based genotype classification of Blastocystis hominis isolates from college students of Guangxi].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ting-Zheng; Liu, Teng; Shi, Huan-Huan; He, Shan-Shan; Yan, Hui; Liu, Deng-Yu

    2014-06-01

    Fifty-three Blastocystis hominis isolates were separated from the fecal specimens of carriers in college students from Guangxi and cultivated in vitro, and the genetic DNA was extracted. All the isolates were genotyped by PCR using seven pairs of known sequence-tagged site (STS) primers. The results showed there were five subtypes in the 53 isolates. Subtype 3 was the most popular one (32.1%, 17/53), followed by subtype 7 (9.4%, 5/53). Subtypes 1 (7.6%, 4/53), 4 (7.6%, 4/53), and 6 (1.9%, 1/53) were detected, while subtypes 2 and 5 were not detected. The genotypes of the other 22 isolates were unknown which were negative to all the STS primers. PMID:25223057

  12. Blastocystis Isolates from a Pig and a Horse Are Closely Related to Blastocystis hominis

    PubMed Central

    Thathaisong, Umaporn; Worapong, Jeerapun; Mungthin, Mathirut; Tan-Ariya, Peerapan; Viputtigul, Kwanjai; Sudatis, Apichart; Noonai, Adisak; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2003-01-01

    Blastocystis has a widespread distribution in a variety of animals, which is a potential source of infection for humans. However, the contribution of zoonotic transmission remains unclear due to the absence of molecular proof of these organisms being identical to those found in humans. We report herein the similar subgroup of Blastocystis isolates from humans, pigs, and a horse using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of partial small-subunit ribosomal DNA (ssu rDNA). Additionally, sequence and phylogenic analysis of partial ssu rDNA of Blastocystis from a human, a pig, and a horse sharing a common subgroup shows that Blastocystis isolates from a pig and a horse were monophyletic and closely related to B. hominis, with 92 to 94% identity. These results suggest the possibility of zoonotic potential of Blastocystis. PMID:12624017

  13. Large outbreak of Cryptosporidium hominis infection transmitted through the public water supply, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Widerström, Micael; Schönning, Caroline; Lilja, Mikael; Lebbad, Marianne; Ljung, Thomas; Allestam, Görel; Ferm, Martin; Björkholm, Britta; Hansen, Anette; Hiltula, Jari; Långmark, Jonas; Löfdahl, Margareta; Omberg, Maria; Reuterwall, Christina; Samuelsson, Eva; Widgren, Katarina; Wallensten, Anders; Lindh, Johan

    2014-04-01

    In November 2010, ≈27,000 (≈45%) inhabitants of Östersund, Sweden, were affected by a waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis. The outbreak was characterized by a rapid onset and high attack rate, especially among young and middle-aged persons. Young age, number of infected family members, amount of water consumed daily, and gluten intolerance were identified as risk factors for acquiring cryptosporidiosis. Also, chronic intestinal disease and young age were significantly associated with prolonged diarrhea. Identification of Cryptosporidium hominis subtype IbA10G2 in human and environmental samples and consistently low numbers of oocysts in drinking water confirmed insufficient reduction of parasites by the municipal water treatment plant. The current outbreak shows that use of inadequate microbial barriers at water treatment plants can have serious consequences for public health. This risk can be minimized by optimizing control of raw water quality and employing multiple barriers that remove or inactivate all groups of pathogens. PMID:24655474

  14. Isolation of Mycoplasma genitalium from patients with urogenital infections: first report from the Latin-American region

    PubMed Central

    Mondeja, B A; Jensen, J S; Rodrguez, I; Morier, L F; Kour, V; Rodrguez, N M; Fernndez, C

    2013-01-01

    Isolation of Mycoplasma genitalium from clinical specimens remains difficult. We describe a modified culture system based on Vero cells grown in medium 199 with 2% foetal bovine serum (FBS). The culture system was evaluated using early passage M. genitalium strains M6271 and M6311 with growth monitoring by quantitative TaqMan PCR. Eleven endocervical swabs and one male urethral swab positive by 16S rRNA and MgPa13 PCRs were quantified and inoculated into Vero cell suspensions in medium 199 supplemented with 2% FBS and antibiotics. Cultures were incubated for 14 days. Cell passages and growth monitoring by TaqMan PCR were performed until the growth of M. genitalium reached ?106 geq/mL. Confirmation of the new M. genitalium strains was performed by sequencing a 281 bp fragment of mgpB. The growth of Mycoplasma genitalium strains was recorded for all urogenital swab specimens in the modified cell-culture system. Growth of M. genitalium was obtained within 2 months and yielded 12 M. genitalium strains with all 11 isolates from females of an identical, but unique genotype. To our knowledge, this is the first successful isolation of M. genitalium in the Latin-American region. The use of Vero cell culture in 199 medium with 2% FBS is a method comparable to the Ultroser G culture system for isolation of M. genitalium. Genotyping of clinical samples and isolates should be performed to document the absence of cross-contamination. PMID:25356322

  15. Determination of sensitivity of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae to tylosin and selected antibacterial drugs by a microtiter technique.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, B J; Ross, R F

    1975-01-01

    A microtiter technique was used for determination of the sensitivity of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae to antibiotics and other drugs. Use of a biphasic agar-broth medium in microtiter plates allowed direct visualization of growth. Results were more reproducible with this system than when broth alone was used and evaluation based on color change was required. Attempts to adapt the test for use with Mycoplasma hyorhinis were not successful. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of 12 drugs and drug combinations for 12 strains of M. hyosynoviae are presented. Drugs with the lowest minimal inhibitory concentrations were tylosin (0.37 mcg/ml)and lincomycin (0.88 mcg/ml), both of which have been used for treatment and control of M. hyosynoviae arthritis. Comparison of the minimal inhibitory concentrations of tylosin for 43 isolates of M. hyosynoviae obtained in 1959 and 1960 and from 1966 through 1971 indicated the possibilty of decreasing sensitivity to the drug although differences between recent isolates and earlier ones were not statistically significant. PMID:122911

  16. Updating the proteome of the uncultivable hemotrophic Mycoplasma suis in experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Stefanie; Lassek, Christian; Mack, Sarah-Lena; Ritzmann, Mathias; Stadler, Julia; Becher, Dörte; Hoelzle, Katharina; Riedel, Katharina; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma suis belongs to the hemotrophic mycoplasmas that are associated with acute and chronic anemia in a wide range of livestock and wild animals. The inability to culture M. suis in vitro has hindered its characterization at the molecular level. Since the publication of M. suis genome sequences in 2011 only one proteome study has been published. Aim of the presented study was to significantly extend the proteome coverage of M. suis strain KI_3806 during acute infection by applying three different protein extraction methods followed by 1D SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. A total of 404 of 795 M. suis KI_3806 proteins (50.8%) were identified. Data analysis revealed the expression of 83.7% of the predicted ORFs with assigned functions but also highlights the expression of 179 of 523 (34.2%) hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. Computational analyses identified expressed membrane-associated hypothetical proteins that might be involved in adhesion or host-pathogen interaction. Furthermore, analyses of the expressed proteins indicated the existence of a hexose-6-phosphate-transporter and an ECF transporter. In conclusion, our proteome study provides a further step toward the elucidation of the unique life cycle of M. suis and the establishment of an in vitro culture. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002294 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002294). PMID:26678042

  17. Detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides SC in clinical material by a rapid colorimetric PCR.

    PubMed

    Bashiruddin, J B; De Santis, P; Vacciana, A; Santini, F G

    1999-02-01

    A colorimetric polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for the detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC (Mmm SC), the cause of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), was used to test clinical samples from suspect and known cases of the disease. A commercially available detection kit, pleuro TRAP from AMRAD, Australia, which captures amplified double stranded DNA in the wells of a microtitre plate was used. Tissues tested from animals ranging from a variety of anatomical locations included lung, lymph node, kidney, spleen, pleural fluid and nasal swabs. Polymerase chain reaction was conducted on DNA extracted from tissues as well as on culture-derived mycoplasmas. Positive results could be seen by the development of a yellow colour in microtitre wells after the enzymatic detection procedure indicating the presence of specifically amplified products. Spectrophotometric values of OD450for positive samples ranged from 0.211 to 1.409 compared to negative values of around 0.020 which reduced the subjectivity in the interpretation of results. Mmm SC was successfully identified from cultures of reference and field strains, nasal swabs and excised tissue by amplification with primers supplied in the kit. The system is suitable for automation and may be a cost effective alternative to gel electrophoresis for the screening of moderately large sample numbers as is the case in surveillance programmes. PMID:10024429

  18. Experimental infection of house finches with Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Kollias, George V; Sydenstricker, Keila V; Kollias, Heidi W; Ley, David H; Hosseini, Parviez R; Connolly, Vronique; Dhondt, Andr A

    2004-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) has caused an endemic upper respiratory and ocular infection in the eastern house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) after the epidemic first described in 1994. The disease has been studied by a number of investigators at a population level and reports describe experimental infection in group-housed MG-free house finches. Because detailed observation and evaluation of individual birds in group-housed passerines is problematic, we studied individually housed house finches that were experimentally inoculated with the finch strain of MG in a controlled environment. To accomplish this, a study was conducted spanning the period of November 2001-April 2002 with 20 MG-free (confirmed by the rapid plate agglutination assay and polymerase chain reaction [PCR] assay) eastern house finches captured in the Cayuga Basin area of central New York (USA) in the summer of 2001. After a period of acclimatization and observation (12 wk), 20 finches were inoculated with a 0.05-ml aliquot of MG (3.24 x 10(5) colony-forming units/ml) via bilateral conjunctival sac instillations. Two additional finches acted as controls and were inoculated in the same manner with preservative-free sterile saline solution. After inoculation, all finches except the controls exhibited clinical signs of conjunctivitis within 2-6 days. The progression of the disease was evaluated by several methods, including PCR, behavioral observations, and physical examination including eye scoring, body weight, and body condition index. Over a period of 21 wk, MG-infected finches developed signs of disease and recovered (80%), developed signs of disease and progressed to become chronically infected (15%), or died (5%). We hypothesize that the high survival rate and recovery of these finches after infection was associated with the use of controlled environmental conditions, acclimatization, a high plane of nutrition, and low stocking (housing) density, all of which are factors documented to be important in the outcome of MG infections in domestic poultry and other species. PMID:15137491

  19. Treatment of Mycoplasma genitalium. Observations from a Swedish STD Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Anagrius, Carin; Loré, Britta; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate therapy for Mycoplasma genitalium infection with doxycycline or azithromycin 1 g compared to five days of azithromycin (total dose 1.5 g). Methods A retrospective case study was performed among patients attending the STD-clinic in Falun, Sweden 1998–2005. All patients with a positive PCR test for M. genitalium were routinely offered a test of cure (toc). Response to doxycycline for 9 days, azithromycin 1 g single dose and extended azithromycin (500 mg on day 1 followed by 250 mg o.d. for 4 days) was determined. In patients with treatment failure after azithromycin, macrolide resistance was monitored before and after treatment. Furthermore, the rate of macrolide resistance was monitored for positive specimens available from 2006–2011. Results The eradication rate after doxycycline was 43% (48% for women and 38% for men), for azithromycin 1 g 91% (96% for women and 88% for men) and for extended azithromycin 99% (100% for women and 93% for men). Macrolide resistance developed in 7/7 examined (100%) of those testing positive after azithromycin 1 g, but in none of those treated with extended azithromycin. Macrolide resistance before treatment increased from 0% in 2006 and 2007 to 18% in 2011. Conclusions These findings confirm the results from other studies showing that doxycycline is inefficient in eradicating M. genitalium. Although azithromycin 1 g was not significantly less efficient than extended dosage, it was associated with selection of macrolide resistant M. genitalium strains and should not be used as first line therapy for M. genitalium. Monitoring of M. genitalium macrolide resistance should be encouraged. PMID:23593483

  20. Detection of Mycoplasma genitalium by PCR Amplification of the 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jrgen Skov; Borre, Martin B.; Dohn, Birthe

    2003-01-01

    In order to develop a species-specific PCR for the detection of Mycoplasma genitalium, the sequence of 1,490 bases of the 16S rRNA gene was determined for M. genitalium G37 (type strain) and four Danish isolates of M. genitalium. The sequences of the four Danish strains, mutually different with respect to their MgPa gene, were 100% homologous, although they carried a single common base substitution compared to the type strain. Among members of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae phylogenetic cluster, M. genitalium showed the most-prominent homology to the 16S rRNA sequence of M. pneumoniae (98% homology). From regions showing the least homology to the M. pneumoniae 16S rRNA gene sequence, primers were chosen to amplify DNA from M. genitalium only. Two sets of primers were selected for their ability to detect <10 to 50 M. genitalium genome copies without cross-reactions with M. pneumoniae. The performance of these primers was compared to the performance of two pairs of primers amplifying parts of the MgPa adhesin gene; 1,030 randomly selected specimens submitted for Chlamydia trachomatis culture were screened with one of the 16S rRNA gene primer sets. A total of 41 specimens were found to be positive for this gene; 40 of these could be confirmed by one of the MgPa primer sets, whereas the other MgPa primer set detected only 21 positive specimens out of 40. These results indicate that estimates of the prevalence of M. genitalium in various populations using MgPa PCR primers could be incorrectly low if the PCR primers are located in variable regions of the MgPa gene. PMID:12517858

  1. Detection of antibodies to Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine ts-11 by an autologous pMGA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Noormohammadi, Amir H; Browning, Glenn F; Cowling, Peter J; O'Rourke, Denise; Whithear, Kevin G; Markham, Philip F

    2002-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a poultry pathogen that causes respiratory disease and loss of egg production worldwide. A live attenuated vaccine, ts-11, has been used for control of M. gallisepticum in several countries. The rapid serum agglutination test is usually used as an indicator of flock response to vaccination; however, in some flocks, the detected response may be weak or absent. With the use of specific monoclonal antibodies against M. gallisepticum strain S6 pMGA in immunoaffinity purification, the major membrane antigen of ts-11 was purified. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed with the purified antigen, and its potential for detection of antibodies induced after ts-11 vaccination was compared with an indirect ELISA with M. gallisepticum strain S6 pMGA. In the presence of high levels of ts-11-induced antibodies, both antigens detected similar numbers of positive sera. However, when lower levels of antibodies were present, ts-11 pMGA showed a higher sensitivity than S6 pMGA. Further examination of ts-11 pMGA with Mycoplasma synoviae-infected chicken sera revealed that ts-11 pMGA is specific for M. gallisepticum antibodies. With a panel of sera from ts-11-vaccinated or non-ts-11-vaccinated field chickens, the ts-11 pMGA ELISA was found to be more sensitive than the commercial rapid serum agglutination test in detecting antibodies to ts-11 vaccine. The results from this study suggest that the major membrane antigen of M. gallisepticum may have slightly different antigenic profiles in different strains, thereby necessitating the use of autologous antigens in serodiagnostic assays to increase sensitivity of the tests for mycoplasma antibodies. Thus, the low level of antibody response after ts-11 vaccination is, at least partially, due to the low ability of the current diagnostic antigens to bind ts-11 antibodies. PMID:12061651

  2. Mosaic genome of endobacteria in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: Transkingdom gene transfer in an ancient mycoplasma-fungus association.

    PubMed

    Torres-Cortés, Gloria; Ghignone, Stefano; Bonfante, Paola; Schüßler, Arthur

    2015-06-23

    For more than 450 million years, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have formed intimate, mutualistic symbioses with the vast majority of land plants and are major drivers in almost all terrestrial ecosystems. The obligate plant-symbiotic AMF host additional symbionts, so-called Mollicutes-related endobacteria (MRE). To uncover putative functional roles of these widespread but yet enigmatic MRE, we sequenced the genome of DhMRE living in the AMF Dentiscutata heterogama. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses showed that MRE form a previously unidentified lineage sister to the hominis group of Mycoplasma species. DhMRE possesses a strongly reduced metabolic capacity with 55% of the proteins having unknown function, which reflects unique adaptations to an intracellular lifestyle. We found evidence for transkingdom gene transfer between MRE and their AMF host. At least 27 annotated DhMRE proteins show similarities to nuclear-encoded proteins of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis, which itself lacks MRE. Nuclear-encoded homologs could moreover be identified for another AMF, Gigaspora margarita, and surprisingly, also the non-AMF Mortierella verticillata. Our data indicate a possible origin of the MRE-fungus association in ancestors of the Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina. The DhMRE genome encodes an arsenal of putative regulatory proteins with eukaryotic-like domains, some of them encoded in putative genomic islands. MRE are highly interesting candidates to study the evolution and interactions between an ancient, obligate endosymbiotic prokaryote with its obligate plant-symbiotic fungal host. Our data moreover may be used for further targeted searches for ancient effector-like proteins that may be key components in the regulation of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis. PMID:25964335

  3. Mosaic genome of endobacteria in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: Transkingdom gene transfer in an ancient mycoplasma-fungus association

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cortés, Gloria; Ghignone, Stefano; Bonfante, Paola; Schüßler, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    For more than 450 million years, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have formed intimate, mutualistic symbioses with the vast majority of land plants and are major drivers in almost all terrestrial ecosystems. The obligate plant-symbiotic AMF host additional symbionts, so-called Mollicutes-related endobacteria (MRE). To uncover putative functional roles of these widespread but yet enigmatic MRE, we sequenced the genome of DhMRE living in the AMF Dentiscutata heterogama. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses showed that MRE form a previously unidentified lineage sister to the hominis group of Mycoplasma species. DhMRE possesses a strongly reduced metabolic capacity with 55% of the proteins having unknown function, which reflects unique adaptations to an intracellular lifestyle. We found evidence for transkingdom gene transfer between MRE and their AMF host. At least 27 annotated DhMRE proteins show similarities to nuclear-encoded proteins of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis, which itself lacks MRE. Nuclear-encoded homologs could moreover be identified for another AMF, Gigaspora margarita, and surprisingly, also the non-AMF Mortierella verticillata. Our data indicate a possible origin of the MRE-fungus association in ancestors of the Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina. The DhMRE genome encodes an arsenal of putative regulatory proteins with eukaryotic-like domains, some of them encoded in putative genomic islands. MRE are highly interesting candidates to study the evolution and interactions between an ancient, obligate endosymbiotic prokaryote with its obligate plant-symbiotic fungal host. Our data moreover may be used for further targeted searches for ancient effector-like proteins that may be key components in the regulation of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis. PMID:25964335

  4. Extended survival times of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae on kanekalon synthetic hair fibres.

    PubMed

    Abolnik, Celia; Gouws, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The survival times of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (Mg) and Mycoplasma synoviae (Ms) on washed and unwashed natural and synthetic kanekalon hair samples over a 5-d period were evaluated using the color changing unit method for comparison with results of previous studies conducted on natural hair. Regardless of whether synthetic or natural hair samples prewashed with a disinfectant shampoo were spiked with Mg or Ms, all viable organisms rapidly dropped below a count of 1 10(1)/mL of culture. Unwashed natural hair seeded with a titer of approximately 1 10(6)/mL of viable Mg or Ms decreased to 6 10(5)/mL and 6 10(3)/mL, respectively, by 4 h postseeding, but no viable Mg or Ms were detected on natural hair from 8 h onwards. By contrast, the titers of Mg and Ms on synthetic hair did not decline from the initial 1 10(6)/mL seed dose up to 96 h postseeding, and, in fact, viable Mg and Ms was still detectable at 9 d postinfection. Application of a real-time quantitative single-tube duplex PCR assay confirmed that no proliferation of Mg or Ms had occurred on the synthetic hair samples, the cells simply remained viable. The unexpected finding that Mg and Ms survive for extended periods on synthetic kanekalon hair fibers raises the question of whether attachment to a surface is a prerequisite for the survival and persistence of Mg and Ms in the extra-host environment. Future studies should be aimed at determining whether other synthetic hair types or indeed other types of plastics commonly found in the poultry house offer similar survival advantages to mycoplasmas. PMID:24570416

  5. Inactivation of mycoplasmas by long-chain alcohols.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, R D; Gilbertson, J R; Albers, A C; White, J D

    1981-01-01

    In this report, we describe the inhibitory activity of long-chain alcohols on the growth of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Peak inhibition was recorded with saturated primary alcohols (64 microM) varying in chain length from 16 to 19 carbon atoms. The unsaturated alcohols (oleyl, linoleyl, and linolenyl) and the secondary alcohol (pentadecan-2-ol), when employed in the same test conditions, were considerably less effective growth inhibitors than the primary saturated alcohols. Stearic and palmitic acids were also ineffective as growth inhibitors of M. pneumoniae and M. gallisepticum at a 128 microM concentration. Because these antimycoplasma agents are fatty alcohols and cholesterol is known to be required for the growth of some mycoplasmas, additional cholesterol was added in an attempt to reverse the inhibition observed with these agents. Cholesterol at a 128 microM concentration did not significantly relieve the growth inhibition observed with stearyl alcohol at a 48 microM concentration. Mammalian cell cultures were found to be significantly more resistant to the effects of these inhibitory alcohols than were the mycoplasmas. Electron micrographs showed that inclusion of stearyl alcohol in the culture medium produced changes in the cellular morphology of the treated mycoplasmas. Images PMID:6794448

  6. International Mycoplasma pneumoniae typing study: interpretation of M. pneumoniae multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Chalker, V J; Pereyre, S; Dumke, R; Winchell, J; Khosla, P; Sun, H; Yan, C; Vink, C; Bébéar, C

    2015-09-01

    Typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is increasingly in use. However, no specific internationally agreed guidance is available. Thirty M. pneumoniae DNA samples including serial dilutions of a type strain were sent to six international laboratories to perform MLVA and results were compared. Good correlation was observed, indicating that this methodology can be robustly performed in multiple sites. However, differences due to interpretation of fragment size, repeat sequence identification and repeat numbering led to inconsistency in the final profiles assigned by laboratories. We propose guidelines for interpreting M. pneumoniae MLVA typing and assigning the number of repeats. PMID:26236493

  7. Proteomic analysis of tylosin-resistant Mycoplasma gallisepticum reveals enzymatic activities associated with resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Cui, Yaowen; Kang, Mengjiao; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a significant pathogenic bacterium that infects poultry, causing chronic respiratory disease and sinusitis in chickens and turkeys, respectively. M. gallisepticum infection poses a substantial economic threat to the poultry industry, and this threat is made worse by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. The mechanisms of resistance are often difficult to determine; for example, little is known about antibiotic resistance of M. gallisepticum at the proteome level. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analyses of an antibiotic (tylosin)-resistant M. gallisepticum mutant and a susceptible parent strain using a combination of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were identified as differentially expressed in the resistant strain compared to the susceptible strain. Most of these proteins were related to catalytic activity, including catalysis that promotes the formylation of initiator tRNA and energy production. Elongation factors Tu and G were over-expressed in the resistant strains, and this could promote the binding of tRNA to ribosomes and catalyze ribosomal translocation, the coordinated movement of tRNA, and conformational changes in the ribosome. Taken together, our results indicate that M. gallisepticum develops resistance to tylosin by regulating associated enzymatic activities. PMID:26584633

  8. Proteomic analysis of tylosin-resistant Mycoplasma gallisepticum reveals enzymatic activities associated with resistance.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Cui, Yaowen; Kang, Mengjiao; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a significant pathogenic bacterium that infects poultry, causing chronic respiratory disease and sinusitis in chickens and turkeys, respectively. M. gallisepticum infection poses a substantial economic threat to the poultry industry, and this threat is made worse by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. The mechanisms of resistance are often difficult to determine; for example, little is known about antibiotic resistance of M. gallisepticum at the proteome level. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analyses of an antibiotic (tylosin)-resistant M. gallisepticum mutant and a susceptible parent strain using a combination of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were identified as differentially expressed in the resistant strain compared to the susceptible strain. Most of these proteins were related to catalytic activity, including catalysis that promotes the formylation of initiator tRNA and energy production. Elongation factors Tu and G were over-expressed in the resistant strains, and this could promote the binding of tRNA to ribosomes and catalyze ribosomal translocation, the coordinated movement of tRNA, and conformational changes in the ribosome. Taken together, our results indicate that M. gallisepticum develops resistance to tylosin by regulating associated enzymatic activities. PMID:26584633

  9. Genotypic analyses of Mycoplasma gallisepticum isolates from songbirds by random amplification of polymorphic DNA and amplified-fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cherry, John J; Ley, David H; Altizer, Sonia

    2006-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) conjunctivitis emerged in 1994 as a disease of free-ranging house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) in North America and has also been isolated from other songbirds with conjunctivitis. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) of house finch and other songbird isolates has suggested that a single 'strain' initiated this outbreak. To explore the possibility of genomic variability among house finch isolates of MG and to evaluate the utility of a second technique for MG genotyping, we selected samples from our archive of reference strains and wild songbird isolates to analyze using both RAPD and amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP); this is a newer technique that has been successfully used to explore the genomic variability of several Mycoplasma species. Both RAPD and AFLP results confirmed previous observations that during the initial stages of the MG epidemic in songbirds, isolates from different geographic locations and songbird species had genotypes that appeared to be highly similar, further supporting a single point source of origin. One 2001 isolate from New York was clearly different from the other songbird samples and clustered together with the vaccine and reference strains, indicating that substantial molecular evolution or a separate introduction has occurred. PMID:16870869

  10. Specific and quantitative detection and identification of Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum in clinical and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Murphy, Cain; Song, Yong; Ng-Hublin, Josephine; Estcourt, Annika; Hijjawi, Nawal; Chalmers, Rachel; Hadfield, Stephen; Bath, Andrew; Gordon, Cameron; Ryan, Una

    2013-09-01

    Cryptosporidium is an enteric protozoan parasite that is resistant to inactivation by commonly used drinking water disinfectants. Between 2004 and 2010, it was responsible for 60% of all waterborne protozoan parasitic outbreaks reported worldwide. Most sporadic infections in humans and almost all outbreaks are caused by Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis. We report the development and validation of a quantitative qPCR assay using minor groove binder (MGB)-probes targeting a unique Cryptosporidium specific protein-coding gene, that directly detects, quantitates and identifies C. hominis and C. parvum in environmental and faecal samples. An internal amplification control (IAC) was also developed and included in this assay. The qPCR assay was compared with an 18S nested PCR assay for sensitivity and specificity. The analytical sensitivity for the qPCR assay was 1 oocyst and 1-10 oocysts for the 18S assay. Evaluation of analytical specificity of the qPCR assay revealed no cross-reactions with other genera and detected all C. parvum and C. hominis isolates correctly. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the qPCR was 100% compared to 96.9% and 98.4%, respectively for the 18S assay. The qPCR assay was also highly reproducible with RSD (relative standard deviation) values of 1.4-9.4%, when the assay was performed by four different technicians. When tested on water samples, the qPCR assay was more sensitive than the 18S assay, detecting positives in 37 of 138 water samples compared to 35 for the 18S locus. This qPCR assay should be a valuable tool for the detection and differentiation of C. hominis and C. parvum in both clinical and environmental samples. PMID:23838581

  11. Cryptosporidium genotype and subtype distribution in raw wastewater in Shanghai, China: evidence for possible unique Cryptosporidium hominis transmission.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaoyu; Li, Na; Duan, Liping; Xiao, Lihua

    2009-01-01

    To identify the genotype and subtype distributions of Cryptosporidium oocysts in domestic wastewater in Shanghai, China, and to facilitate the characterization of the endemic transmission of cryptosporidiosis, raw domestic wastewater samples were collected from four wastewater treatment plants in Shanghai, China, from December 2006 to April 2007. Genotypes of Cryptosporidium species were detected based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analyses of the small-subunit rRNA gene. Samples that contained Cryptosporidium hominis were further subtyped by DNA sequencing of the 60-kDa glycoprotein gene. Among a total of 90 samples analyzed, 63 were PCR positive, 10 of which had mixed genotypes. Fifty-nine (93.7%) of the PCR-positive samples had C. hominis, and 7 (11.1%) had C. meleagridis. The other seven Cryptosporidium species/genotypes identified included C. baileyi, C. parvum, C. suis, C. muris, rat genotype, avian genotype III, and a novel genotype. Forty-seven of the 59 C. hominis-positive samples were successfully subtyped, with 29 having subtype family Ib and the remaining belonging to subtype families Ia, Id, Ie, and If. The three Ib subtypes identified, IbA19G2, IbA20G2, and IbA21G2, were very different from the two common Ib subtypes (IbA9G3 and IbA10G2) found in other areas of the world. Likewise, the Ie subtype IeA12G3T3 was also different from the common IeA11G3T3 subtype. Thus, the presence of multiple subtype families and unique Ib, Ie, and If subtypes indicates that there might be endemic transmission of cryptosporidiosis in the study area and that C. hominis populations there might be very different from those in other areas. PMID:19005143

  12. A unique case of facial burn superinfected with Dermatobia Hominis larvae resulting in a bilateral enucleation of the eyes.

    PubMed

    Pinos, Victor Hugo; Ortiz-Prado, Esteban; Bermeo, Carlos; Len, Juan; Armijos, Luciana; Almeida, Estibaliz

    2014-10-01

    We present a case of a female Ecuadorian patient who presented a deep facial burn injury complicated with a severe infestation of Dermatobia Hominis larvae. The burn injury was complicated by severe myiasis attributable to the poor management of the wound received at home, using tropical plants, which caused a secondary infection and severe necrosis of the tissue involving the forehead, cheeks, chin, scalp, nose, mouth and the eyes resulting in a bilateral enucleation and long inpatient hospital care. PMID:24728977

  13. Lipoproteins as substitutes for serum in Mycoplasma culture medium.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Somerson, N L

    1979-01-01

    Crude lipoprotein-containing fractions obtained from sera of three different animal species were tested, in combination with bovine serum in Mycoplasma pneumoniae culture medium. All sera yielded at least one lipoprotein-containing component which was considerably more effective in promoting mycoplasma growth than the unfractionated serum sample from which it was derived. The very low activity of certain whole-serum samples tested in this investigation suggests that toxic substances may be present in whole serum which are not contained in the lipoprotein preparations. The greatest activity appeared in the high-density lipoprotein-containing components of bovine and horse sera and the low-density lipoprotein-containing components of human serum. The high degree of growth-supporting activity of these crude lipoprotein-containing serum components suggests that they may be useful as serum substitutes in mycoplasma culture media. PMID:231051

  14. Rapid detection of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia by a Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC capsular polysaccharide-specific antigen detection latex agglutination test.

    PubMed

    March, John B; Kerr, Karen; Lema, Benedict

    2003-03-01

    A latex agglutination test (LAT) has been developed for the diagnosis of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). The latex microspheres were coated with MmmSC polyclonal immunoglobulin G antiserum and detected MmmSC antigen in the serum of cattle infected with CBPP and in growth medium containing MmmSC. The specific antigen recognized by this test appeared to be the capsular polysaccharide (CPS). The LAT recognized all 23 strains of MmmSC examined in this study, with a sensitivity level of 2 ng of CPS, or the equivalent of 5 x 10(3) CFU, in a reaction volume of 0.03 ml. Therefore, rapid identification of MmmSC cultures should be possible. Agglutination was also observed with the related goat pathogens and "Mycoplasma mycoides" cluster members Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large colony biotype (four of six strains positive) and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (three of six strains positive), in agreement with the suggestion that these latter two mycoplasmas may in fact represent a single species (although collectively exhibiting two capsular serotypes). Comparisons in diagnosis with the complement fixation test (CFT) were made by using African field sera from CBPP-infected cattle. After 2 (or 3) min of incubation, the test detected 55% (or 61%) of CFT-positive sera and 29% (or 40%) of CFT-negative sera, with an overall correlation in diagnosis of 62% (or 61%). The rates for false-positive diagnoses made by using "known" CBPP-negative sera from the United Kingdom were 3 or 13% after 2 or 3 min of incubation, respectively. The data agree with previous findings that some CBPP CFT-negative misdiagnoses may occur due to "antibody eclipsing" by excess circulating antigen. The LAT combines low cost and high specificity with ease of application in the field, without the need for any specialist training or equipment. PMID:12626448

  15. Mycoplasma and host interaction: In vitro gene expression modulation in Mycoplasma synoviae and infected chicken chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cizelj, Ivanka; Dušanić, Daliborka; Benčina, Dušan; Narat, Mojca

    2016-03-01

    The complex interplay between Mycoplasma synoviae and chicken chondrocytes (CCH), which come into direct contact during infectious synovitis, has been examined at the level of gene expression. Our previous studies demonstrated a significant influence of M. synoviae on the level of CCH gene expression. Here, we show for the first time that in vitro co-cultivation of M. synoviae and CCH also induces upregulation of gene expression in this mycoplasma. We observed significantly increased expression of genes important for M. synoviae pathogenicity, including cysteine protease cysP, neuraminidase nanH, haemagglutinin vlhA, and the putative nuclease MS53_0284. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression was dependent on the infection environment. In CCH, significant changes in the expression of genes encoding catabolic enzymes of the cartilage extracellular matrix (cathepsins B, K and L, aggrecanase ADAM10, and matrix metalloproteinase MMP2) were demonstrated. Infection of CCH with M. synoviae also elevated the expression of the gene encoding peptidyl arginine deiminase, type III (PADI3), which is responsible for the post-translational citrullination of proteins. PMID:26919139

  16. Comprehensive Methylome Characterization of Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma pneumoniae at Single-Base Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Llorns-Rico, Vernica; Delgado, Javier; Fang, Gang; Spittle, Kristi; Clark, Tyson A.; Schadt, Eric; Turner, Stephen W.; Korlach, Jonas; Serrano, Luis

    2013-01-01

    In the bacterial world, methylation is most commonly associated with restriction-modification systems that provide a defense mechanism against invading foreign genomes. In addition, it is known that methylation plays functionally important roles, including timing of DNA replication, chromosome partitioning, DNA repair, and regulation of gene expression. However, full DNA methylome analyses are scarce due to a lack of a simple methodology for rapid and sensitive detection of common epigenetic marks (ie N6-methyladenine (6 mA) and N4-methylcytosine (4 mC)), in these organisms. Here, we use Single-Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing to determine the methylomes of two related human pathogen species, Mycoplasma genitalium G-37 and Mycoplasma pneumoniae M129, with single-base resolution. Our analysis identified two new methylation motifs not previously described in bacteria: a widespread 6 mA methylation motif common to both bacteria (5?-CTAT-3?), as well as a more complex Type I m6A sequence motif in M. pneumoniae (5?-GAN7TAY-3?/3?-CTN7ATR-5?). We identify the methyltransferase responsible for the common motif and suggest the one involved in M. pneumoniae only. Analysis of the distribution of methylation sites across the genome of M. pneumoniae suggests a potential role for methylation in regulating the cell cycle, as well as in regulation of gene expression. To our knowledge, this is one of the first direct methylome profiling studies with single-base resolution from a bacterial organism. PMID:23300489

  17. Gliding Motility of Mycoplasma mobile on Uniform Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Taishi; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The binding and gliding of Mycoplasma mobile on a plastic plate covered by 53 uniform oligosaccharides were analyzed. Mycoplasmas bound to and glided on only 21 of the fixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs), showing that sialic acid is essential as the binding target. The affinities were mostly consistent with our previous results on the inhibitory effects of free SOs and suggested that M. mobile recognizes SOs from the nonreducing end with four continuous sites as follows. (i and ii) A sialic acid at the nonreducing end is tightly recognized by tandemly connected two sites. (iii) The third site is recognized by a loose groove that may be affected by branches. (iv) The fourth site is recognized by a large groove that may be enhanced by branches, especially those with a negative charge. The cells glided on uniform SOs in manners apparently similar to those of the gliding on mixed SOs. The gliding speed was related inversely to the mycoplasma's affinity for SO, suggesting that the detaching step may be one of the speed determinants. The cells glided faster and with smaller fluctuations on the uniform SOs than on the mixtures, suggesting that the drag caused by the variation in SOs influences gliding behaviors. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasma is a group of bacteria generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide in the direction of the protrusion. These procedures are essential for parasitism. Usually, mycoplasmas glide on mixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs) derived from glycoprotein and glycolipid. Since gliding motility on uniform oligosaccharides has never been observed, this study gives critical information about recognition and interaction between receptors and SOs. PMID:26148712

  18. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324(T), 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496(T), and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300(T). A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844(T) = CCUG 67100(T) = LMG 28801(T). PMID:26763962

  19. Cloning, Expression, Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Mycoplasma Genitalium Protein MG289

    SciTech Connect

    Sippel, K.; Boehlein, S; Sakai, Y; Quirit, J; Agbandje-McKenna, M; Rosser, C; McKenna, R

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a human pathogen that is associated with nongonococcal urethritis in men and cervicitis in women. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the protein MG289 from M. genitalium strain G37 are reported here. Crystals of MG289 diffracted X-rays to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.7, b = 90.9, c = 176.1 {angstrom}. The diffraction data after processing had an overall R{sub merge} of 8.7%. The crystal structure of Cypl, the ortholog of MG289 from M. hyorhinis, has recently been determined, providing a reasonable phasing model; molecular replacement is currently under way.

  20. Mycoplasma hyosynoviae in joints with arthritis in abattoir baconers.

    PubMed

    Friis, N F; Hansen, K K; Schirmer, A L; Aabo, S

    1992-01-01

    The occurrence of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae in synovial fluid of baconers with chronic arthritis was studied at an abattoir. Cultural examination of synovial fluid samples from diseased tarsal joints of 50 animals from 42 herds yielded M. hyosynoviae in 10 cases from 8 herds. Streptococci were found in 6 cases from 6 other herds. M. hyosynoviae antigen was found in 1 of 47 of the samples, and antibody to the mycoplasma was found in 14 of 40 of the samples by ELISA test. The presence of M. hyosynoviae in a joint was usually accompanied by the corresponding antibody. In joints with streptococcal infection antibody to M. hyosynoviae could not be found. PMID:1442367

  1. Erosive polyarthritis associated with Mycoplasma gateae in a cat.

    PubMed

    Zeugswetter, Florian; Hittmair, Katharina M; de Arespacochaga, Abigail G; Shibly, Sarina; Spergser, Joachim

    2007-06-01

    Erosive polyarthritis was diagnosed in an 11-month-old neutered male Egyptian Mau-cross cat with concurrent glucocorticoid-responsive dermatitis. Clinical signs, synovial fluid analysis, serological tests and radiographic appearance could not differentiate between immune-mediated and infective arthritis. Mycoplasma gateae was isolated by strictly anaerobic culture of the synovial fluid. Treatment with Enrofloxacin led to a rapid improvement of the cat's condition. Two months later the cat was euthanased because of severe glomerulonephritis and direct Coombs' test positive anaemia, possibly caused by mycoplasma infection. M gateae could not be isolated at post-mortem examination. PMID:17175189

  2. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection with Neurologic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Yimenicio?lu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu; Bora Carman, Kursat; Cagr? Dinleyici, Ener

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection include encephalitis, optic neuritis, acute psychosis, stroke, cranial nerve palsies, aseptic meningitis and also it may be implicated in immune mediated neurological diseases such as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome and transverse myelitis. Case Presentation: We present five cases with acute neurological diseases after M. pneumoniae infection. The clinical presentations were characterized by encephalitis in 2 patients, Gullain-Barre syndrome in 2 patients, transverse myelitis in 1 patient. M. pneumoniae infection was detected in serum by serological method. Only two patients had respiratory symptoms preceding M. pneumoniae infection. Brain MRI revealed hyperintensities on corpus striatum and mesencephalon in one patient with encephalitis, the other had front parietal coalescent periventricular white matter lesions on T2 images. The patient with transverse myelitis had cervical, dorsal and lumbar scattered hyperintense lesions on T2 images. Two patients were treated with high dose steroid, the other two patients received treatment with intravenous immune globuline. Conclusion: M. pneumoniae may reveal different neurologic complications with different radiologic findings. PMID:25793076

  3. Mechanisms of volume regulation in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, a cell wall-less bacterium, must confront the problem of colloid osmotic swelling. Cell volume was determined by optical density and intracellular water measurements. Transmembrane pH and electrical gradients were determined by the distribution of the weak acid benzoate and lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium respectively. Cells incubated in sodium chloride without glucose exhibited a progressive fall in ATP over several hours. When ATP fell below 40 uM the cells swelled, leaked protein and became permeable to inulin. Subsequent addition of glucose induced shrinkage and restored the original permeability properties. Energized cells exhibited an electrochemical gradient of protons of up to 130 mV, inside negative and alkaline. The proton-ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), which collapsed the chemical and electrical components of the proton gradient, induced rapid swelling despite high ATP levels thus implicating the proton gradient in volume regulation. Either the pH gradient or the membrane potential could maintain volume. Energy-dependent sodium efflux in exchange for protons was demonstrated in sodium-loaded cells using radioactive sodium and 9-aminoacridine fluorescence to follow sodium and proton translocation respectively.

  4. [Serologic diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections].

    PubMed

    Matas Andreu, Lurdes; Molinos Abs, Sonia; Fernndez Rivas, Gema; Gonzlez Soler, Victoria; Ausina Ruiz, Vicente

    2006-10-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen with worldwide distribution. This microorganism is a common cause (10-30%) of community-acquired pneumonia, also called primary atypical pneumonia because of the spectrum of clinical and radiological findings. The immune response is mainly based on rapid antibody production against peptide and glycolipid antigens derived from this microorganism. During the primary infection, IgM levels generally rise within the first week, and are then followed by an IgG response. Titers of IgG and IgA increase in reinfections. Microbiological diagnosis is based on specific antibody detection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques performed on sputum or pharyngeal/nasopharyngeal exudates, as well as the development of multiplex PCR reactions allowing identification of M. pneumoniae and other respiratory pathogens, would by highly useful in routine diagnosis. The most common serological techniques are complement fixation, immunofluorescence, particle agglutination, and enzyme immunoassay. Diagnosis should be performed by selecting the most appropriate test according to functional criteria and population groups. Specific detection of IgM antibodies should not be included in the differential diagnosis in adults and young people. Diagnostic criteria including seroconversion or rising IgG titers may not be clinically useful, because of the time delay and the difficulty of obtaining a second serum specimen for testing, given the mildness of the clinical symptoms. PMID:17125664

  5. Mycoplasma genitalium: An Emerging Sexually Transmitted Infection

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Jessian L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium has been recognized as a cause of male urethritis, and there is now evidence suggesting that it causes cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease in women. M. genitalium is a slow growing organism, and, with the advent of nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT), more studies are being performed, and knowledge about the pathogenicity of this organism elucidated. With NAAT detection, treatment modalities have been studied, and the next challenge is to determine the most effective antimicrobial therapy. Doxycycline, the first-line antibiotic for urethritis, is largely ineffective in the treatment of M. genitalium and furthermore, resistance to macrolide has also emerged. The most effective drug is Moxifloxacin although there are emerging reports of resistance to it in various parts of the world. This paper not only highlights the current research and knowledge, but also reviews the diversity of health implications on the health of men and women infected with M. genitalium. Alternate antibiotics and the impact of M. genitalium on infertility are areas that require more studies as we continue to research into this microorganism.

  6. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A (MsrA) Deficient Mycoplasma genitalium Shows Decreased Interactions with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; De la Garza, Georgina; Maffi, Shivani; Saikolappan, Sankaralingam; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important sexually transmitted pathogen that affects both men and women. In genital-mucosal tissues, it initiates colonization of epithelial cells by attaching itself to host cells via several identified bacterial ligands and host cell surface receptors. We have previously shown that a mutant form of M. genitalium lacking methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme which converts oxidized methionine (Met(O)) into methionine (Met), shows decreased viability in infected animals. To gain more insights into the mechanisms by which MsrA controls M. genitalium virulence, we compared the wild-type M. genitalium strain (G37) with an msrA mutant (MS5) strain for their ability to interact with target cervical epithelial cell lines (HeLa and C33A) and THP-1 monocytic cells. Infection of epithelial cell lines with both strains revealed that MS5 was less cytotoxic to HeLa and C33A cell lines than the G37 strain. Also, the MS5 strain was more susceptible to phagocytosis by THP-1 cells than wild type strain (G37). Further, MS5 was less able to induce aggregation and differentiation in THP-1 cells than the wild type strain, as determined by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling of the cells, followed by counting of cells attached to the culture dish using image analysis. Finally, MS5 was observed to induce less proinflammatory cytokine TNF-? by THP-1 cells than wild type G37 strain. These results indicate that MsrA affects the virulence properties of M. genitalium by modulating its interaction with host cells. PMID:22558404

  7. Expression and immunological characteristics of the surface-localized pyruvate kinase in Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    He, Suibin; Qi, Jingjing; Yu, Shengqing; Yin, Yuncong; Tan, Lei; Bao, Shijun; Qiu, Xvsheng; Wang, Xiaolan; Fei, Rongmei; Ding, Chan

    2015-12-01

    The widespread avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a causative agent of respiratory disease. The wall-less prokaryotes lack some tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, therefore, the glycolysis metabolic pathway is of great importance to these organisms. Pyruvate kinase (PK) is one of the key enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, and its immunological characteristics in Mycoplasma are not well known. In this study, the M.gallisepticum pyruvate kinase fusion protein (PykF) was expressed in a pET system. The full-length of the gene was subcloned into the expression vector pET28a(+) to construct the pET28a-rMGPykF plasmid, which was then transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) cells. The expression of the 62kDa recombinant protein of rMGPykF in E.coli strain BL21 (DE3) was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Coomassie blue staining. Purified rMGPykF exhibited PK catalytic activity, which could re?ect the conversion of NADH to NAD(+). Mouse anti-PykF antibodies were generated by immunization of mice with rMGPykF. Immunoblot and immunoelectron microscopy assays identified PykF as an immunogenic protein expressed on the surface of M.gallisepticum cells. Bactericidal assay showed that anti-rMGPykF antiserum killed 70.55% of M.gallisepticum cells, suggesting the protective potential of PykF. Adherence inhibition assay on immortalized chicken fibroblasts (DF-1) cells revealed more than 39.31% inhibition of adhesion in the presence of anti-rMGPykF antiserum, suggesting that PykF of M.gallisepticum participates in bacterial adhesion to DF-1cells. PMID:26456557

  8. In vitro pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin against Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides Small Colony.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John D; Goh, Shan; McKellar, Quintin A; McKeever, Declan J

    2013-09-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides Small Colony (MmmSC) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), which is responsible for major economic losses in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control relies on live attenuated vaccines, which are of limited efficacy, and antimicrobials are now being assessed as an alternative or adjunct to vaccination. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro effector kinetics of the macrolide antimicrobial, gamithromycin, against MmmSC in artificial medium and adult bovine serum. Furthermore, it was determined if any differences in gamithromycin activity between these two matrices were mirrored by the older macrolides, tylosin and tilmicosin. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin against MmmSC strains B237 and Tan8 were determined in artificial medium and serum. Time-kill curves were constructed at concentrations corresponding to multiples of the MIC for all three macrolides in artificial medium and for gamithromycin in serum. Data were fitted to sigmoid Emax models. Post-antibiotic effects (PAE) were established by exposing strain B237 to antimicrobials at 10× MIC for 1h and monitoring mycoplasma growth thereafter. MICs for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin were 64-, 8- and 64-fold lower, respectively, in serum than in artificial medium at an inoculum size of 10(6)cfu/mL B237. A similar pattern emerged for Tan8. All three antimicrobials were mycoplasmastatic with maximum effects of -0.44, -0.32 and -0.49log10(cfu/mL) units for gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin, respectively, against B237 in artificial medium. Tylosin and tilmicosin elicited longer PAEs than gamithromycin. In conclusion, gamithromycin, tylosin and tilmicosin all demonstrated in vitro efficacy against MmmSC and represent potential candidates for clinical studies to assess their therapeutic effect against CBPP. PMID:23810743

  9. Mycoplasma bovis outbreak in a herd of North American bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Janardhan, Kyathanahalli S; Hays, Mike; Dyer, Neil; Oberst, Richard D; Debey, Brad M

    2010-09-01

    A disease outbreak of high morbidity and high mortality in bison (Bison bison) was investigated. Clinical signs included lameness, swollen joints, respiratory distress, and lethargy. Fifty-three of 194 animals died. Cows between 5 and 10 years of age were the most affected group, in which 40 of 88 animals died. Necropsies were performed on several animals. There were abscesses in the lung and liver, as well as fibrinosuppurative pleuritis, polyarthritis, and disseminated microabscesses in various organs. No significant bacteria were isolated by routine aerobic cultures of lung and liver from 2 representative cases. However, Mycoplasma cultures were positive. Polymerase chain reaction tests on the isolated bacteria were positive for Mycoplasma bovis. Histologically, the abscesses were characterized by areas of necrosis with variable mineralization rimmed by granulomatous inflammation and fibrous tissue. No new animals had been introduced into the herd, but a cattle herd was present adjacent to the affected bison herd. Two restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques were used to compare the bison isolate and another bison isolate from an outbreak in North Dakota with a field isolate of M. bovis from cattle and with a laboratory control strain of M. bovis; the isolates and control strain were found to be similar. The isolates and the control were sequenced and compared with sequences in GenBank. Bison isolates were more than 99% homologous to M. bovis sequences in GenBank. It was concluded that M. bovis in bison can cause disseminated infection with a high morbidity and mortality and that bison isolates are similar to bovine M. bovis isolates. PMID:20807947

  10. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on blood characteristics in commercial layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Peebles, E David; Jacob, Roymon; Branton, Scott L; Evans, Jeffrey D; Leigh, Spencer A; Gerard, Patrick D

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. When administered before lay, F-strain MG (FMG) can reduce egg production during lay, but the ts-11 strain of MG (ts11MG) does not exert this effect. Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of pre-lay vaccinations of ts11MG, MG-Bacterin (MGBac), or their combination, in conjunction with an FMG challenge overlay after peak production on the blood characteristics of commercial layers. In each trial, 160 mycoplasma-free Hy-Line W-36 layers were housed in negative-pressure biological isolation units (4 units per treatment, 10 birds per unit) from 9 through 52 wk of age (woa). The following vaccination treatments were administered at 10 woa: 1) Control (no vaccinations); 2) MGBac; 3) ts11MG; and 4) ts11MG and MGBac combination (ts11MG+MGBac). At 45 woa, half of the birds were challenged with a laboratory stock of high-passage FMG. Parameters measured in both trials were whole-blood hematocrit and serum concentrations of cholesterol (SCHOL), triglycerides, calcium, and total protein (STP). An agetreatment interaction (P=0.04) was observed for STP between 23 and 43 woa. The STP concentration in the ts11MG and ts11MG+MGBac groups was higher at 33 woa, but was lower at 43 woa, in comparison to the Control group. Also, at 38 woa, the STP of the ts11MG+MGBac group was higher than that of the MGBac group. Although use of the ts11MG vaccine alone or in combination with MGBac may influence circulating STP concentrations when administered before lay, it remains effective in protecting layers against the adverse effect of a post-peak challenge of FMG on egg production, as was observed in a previous companion study. PMID:26217033

  11. The immune response of bovine mammary epithelial cells to live or heat-inactivated Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Christina; Pilo, Paola; Frey, Joachim; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Wellnitz, Olga

    2015-09-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is an emerging bacterial agent causing bovine mastitis. Although these cell wall-free bacteria lack classical virulence factors, they are able to activate the immune system of the host. However, effects on the bovine mammary immune system are not yet well characterized and detailed knowledge would improve the prevention and therapy of mycoplasmal mastitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunogenic effects of M. bovis on the mammary gland in an established primary bovine mammary epithelial cell (bMEC) culture system. Primary bMEC of four different cows were challenged with live and heat-inactivated M. bovis strain JF4278 isolated from acute bovine mastitis, as well as with the type strain PG45. The immune response was evaluated 6 and 24h after mycoplasmal challenge by measuring the relative mRNA expression of selected immune factors by quantitative PCR. M. bovis triggered an immune response in bMEC, reflected by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin(IL)-1?, IL-6, IL-8, lactoferrin, Toll-like receptor-2, RANTES, and serum amyloid A mRNA. Interestingly, this cellular reaction was only observed in response to live, but not to heat-inactivated M. bovis, in contrast to other bacterial pathogens of mastitis such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study provides evidence that bMEC exhibit a strong inflammatory reaction in response to live M. bovis. The lack of a cellular response to heat-inactivated M. bovis supports the current hypothesis that mycoplasmas activate the immune system through secreted secondary metabolites. PMID:26211967

  12. A Novel Rapid DNA Microarray Assay Enables Identification of 37 Mycoplasma Species and Highlights Multiple Mycoplasma Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, Christiane; Schulsse, Samuel; Hotzel, Helmut; Ayling, Roger D.; Nicholas, Robin A. J.; Schubert, Evelyn; Heller, Martin; Ehricht, Ralf; Sachse, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasmas comprise a conglomerate of pathogens and commensals occurring in humans and animals. The genus Mycoplasma alone contains more than 120 species at present, and new members are continuously being discovered. Therefore, it seems promising to use a single highly parallel detection assay rather than develop separate tests for each individual species. In this study, we have designed a DNA microarray carrying 70 oligonucleotide probes derived from the 23S rRNA gene and 86 probes from the tuf gene target regions. Following a PCR amplification and biotinylation step, hybridization on the array was shown to specifically identify 31 Mycoplasma spp., as well as 3 Acholeplasma spp. and 3 Ureaplasma spp. Members of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster can be recognized at subgroup level. This procedure enables parallel detection of Mollicutes spp. occurring in humans, animals or cell culture, from mono- and multiple infections, in a single run. The main advantages of the microarray assay include ease of operation, rapidity, high information content, and affordability. The new test's analytical sensitivity is equivalent to that of real-time PCR and allows examination of field samples without the need for culture. When 60 field samples from ruminants and birds previously analyzed by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were tested by the microarray assay both tests identified the same agent in 98.3% of the cases. Notably, microarray testing revealed an unexpectedly high proportion (35%) of multiple mycoplasma infections, i.e., substantially more than DGGE (15%). Two of the samples were found to contain four different Mycoplasma spp. This phenomenon deserves more attention, particularly its implications for epidemiology and treatment. PMID:22479374

  13. Nanotransformation of the haemotrophic Mycoplasma suis during in vitro cultivation attempts using modified cell free Mycoplasma media.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Sabrina A; Hoelzle, Katharina; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Hamburger, Anja; Wittenbrink, Max M; Kramer, Manuela M; Sokoli, Albina; Felder, Kathrin M; Groebel, Katrin; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2012-11-01

    Mycoplasma suis belongs to haemotrophic mycoplasmas (HMs) which cause infectious anaemia in a large variety of mammals. To date, no in vitro cultivation system for M. suis or other HMs has been established. We hypothesised that M. suis could grow in classical Mycoplasma media supplemented with nutrients (e.g. glucose, iron-binding proteins) which are naturally available from its host environment, the porcine blood. Blood from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs was used to inoculate either standard SP-4 Mycoplasma medium supplemented with iron-binding proteins (transferrin, haemin, and haemoglobin) or glucose-enriched Hayflick Mycoplasma medium. A quantitative M. suis-specific real-time PCR assay was applied to determine and quantify M. suis loads weekly during 12 week-incubation. The first 2 weeks after inoculation M. suis loads decreased remarkably and then persisted at a stationary level over the observation time of 12 weeks in iron-binding protein- or glucose supplemented media variants. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of liquid M. suis sub-cultures on Hayflick agar showed small, densely-packed microcolonies of irregular M. suis cells of reduced size (0.2-0.6?m) indicating nanotransformation. The partial 16S rDNA sequence of these cultured M. suis nanocells was 99.9% identical to M. suis. M. suis cells derived from liquid cultures interact in vitro with porcine erythrocytes by fibril-like structures. We conclude, that the modified Mycoplasma media used for M. suis cultivation are obviously unfavourable for growth but lead to culture persistence. M. suis adapt to inappropriate culture conditions by alteration into nanoforms. PMID:22682998

  14. Effect of duration of incubation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum cultures on the sensitivity and specificity of antigens for ELISA and microimmunofluorescence tests.

    PubMed

    Loughnane, J P; Bradbury, J M; Jordan, F T

    1993-09-01

    In the production of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (Mg) antigens for ELISA and microimmunofluorescence (MIF) tests, two strains of Mg, S6 and PG31, were grown in broth culture and harvested at intervals from 18 to 138 h. The effect of duration of incubation of culture on antigen sensitivity and specificity was assessed using homologous sera (against Mg S6), and sera prepared against Mycoplasma synoviae (Ms), and against mycoplasma media. It was found, in both Mg S6 and PG31 ELISAs, that in the period 18 to 70 h of incubation, sensitivity declined with homologous sera, but little thereafter. A more rapid and greater decline occurred with PG31 antigen than S6. The antigens showed a lack of specificity since antisera to Ms gave positive reactions. These were not influenced by duration of incubation of Mg culture. In the Mg S6 ELISA lack of specificity was also shown by positive reactions with sera against media components. These increased in the first 42 h of cultivation. In the MIF test there was no loss of sensitivity with Mg S6 antigen with increasing duration of incubation of culture but it occurred with PG31 antigen. The non-specific reactions with antisera to Ms increased with increased duration of incubation of both strains of Mg. This work demonstrates that the most sensitive antigens are produced by harvesting organisms early in culture, although this does not eliminate the Ms cross reactions. PMID:18671032

  15. The immunodominant 90-kilodalton protein is localized on the terminal tip structure of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Franzoso, G; Hu, P C; Meloni, G A; Barile, M F

    1993-01-01

    Immunoblot analysis of convalescent-phase sera of experimentally infected chimpanzees or monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the 90- and 40-kDa proteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae indicated that both proteins were present in cytadsorbing, pathogenic strains PI-1428, M129, and FH but absent in noncytadsorbing, nonpathogenic strain M129-B176. Adsorption of convalescent-phase chimpanzee sera with virulent strain PI-1428 removed reactivity, whereas adsorption with avirulent strain M129-B176 did not remove reactivity to these two proteins. By using proteolysis and specific MAbs, we demonstrated that the 90- and 40-kDa proteins were surface exposed. Immunoelectron microscopy employing specific MAbs showed that the 90-kDa protein is localized on the terminal tip attachment apparatus. However, the MAb specific for the 40-kDa protein failed to indicate a similar localization. Nevertheless, these data, taken together, indicate that the immunodominant 90- and 40-kDa proteins are surface exposed, are localized on the terminal tip apparatus, and might be involved in the attachment mechanism. Images PMID:8454358

  16. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    SciTech Connect

    Wise K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-12-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface /sup 125/I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with (/sup 35/S) methionine, /sup 14/C-amino acids, or (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11.

  17. Myositis associated with a newly described microsporidian, Trachipleistophora hominis, in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Field, A S; Marriott, D J; Milliken, S T; Brew, B J; Canning, E U; Kench, J G; Darveniza, P; Harkness, J L

    1996-01-01

    Microsporidia are zoonotic protozoa which were rare human pathogens prior to 1985, when Enterocytozoon bieneusi was described in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with chronic diarrhea. Another species, Encephalitozoon (Septata) intestinalis, is associated with diarrhea and chronic sinusitis, and approximately 25 cases have been reported in the literature. However, other microsporidial infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients remain extremely rare. We report the first case of a Pleistophora sp.-like microsporidian infection presenting as a progressive severe myosotis associated with fever and weight loss. The organism was demonstrated by light microscopy and electron microscopy in corneal scrapings, skeletal muscle, and nasal discharge. Electron microscopy showed an electron-dense surface coat with "sunflare"-like projections surrounding all stages of development of meronts (two to four nuclei, dividing by binary fission), sporonts, and sporoblasts. Division of sporonts, in which sporonts separate from the thick outer coat, creating a sporophorous vesicle, is by binary fission, differentiating this organism from Pleistophora sp. The spore measures 4.0 by 2.5 microns and has a rugose exospore. A new genus and species, Trachipleistophora hominis, has been established for this parasite. The patient was treated with albendazole, sulfadiazine, and pyrimethamine, and the clinical symptoms resolved. PMID:8897186

  18. Myositis associated with a newly described microsporidian, Trachipleistophora hominis, in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Field, A S; Marriott, D J; Milliken, S T; Brew, B J; Canning, E U; Kench, J G; Darveniza, P; Harkness, J L

    1996-11-01

    Microsporidia are zoonotic protozoa which were rare human pathogens prior to 1985, when Enterocytozoon bieneusi was described in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with chronic diarrhea. Another species, Encephalitozoon (Septata) intestinalis, is associated with diarrhea and chronic sinusitis, and approximately 25 cases have been reported in the literature. However, other microsporidial infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients remain extremely rare. We report the first case of a Pleistophora sp.-like microsporidian infection presenting as a progressive severe myosotis associated with fever and weight loss. The organism was demonstrated by light microscopy and electron microscopy in corneal scrapings, skeletal muscle, and nasal discharge. Electron microscopy showed an electron-dense surface coat with "sunflare"-like projections surrounding all stages of development of meronts (two to four nuclei, dividing by binary fission), sporonts, and sporoblasts. Division of sporonts, in which sporonts separate from the thick outer coat, creating a sporophorous vesicle, is by binary fission, differentiating this organism from Pleistophora sp. The spore measures 4.0 by 2.5 microns and has a rugose exospore. A new genus and species, Trachipleistophora hominis, has been established for this parasite. The patient was treated with albendazole, sulfadiazine, and pyrimethamine, and the clinical symptoms resolved. PMID:8897186

  19. Study of Blastocystis hominis isolates in urticaria: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zuel-Fakkar, N M; Abdel Hameed, D M; Hassanin, O M

    2011-12-01

    Blastocystis hominis is a common intestinal parasite, with a prevalence in developing countries of up to 50%. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of this parasite with urticaria by determining the genotypic isotypes in the Egyptian population. In total, 54 patients with urticaria and 50 controls were enrolled in the study. Stool samples were examined and assessed by PCR. The parasite was detected in a significantly higher number (P < 0.001) of the patient group than the control group. There was no significant difference between the patients with acute and those with chronic urticaria (P = 0.2). The amoeboid form was found in 60.6% of Blastocystis-positive patients with urticaria, but in none of the healthy controls. Subtype 3 was the only isolate found in both the patient and control groups. We recommend treatment for Blastocystis-positive patients with urticaria in developing countries. The prevalence is much lower (around 10%) in developed countries, where treatment should only be considered in the absence of other possible causes of urticaria. PMID:21790724

  20. Comparative analysis of the Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum GM508D genome reveals subrogation of phase-variable contingency genes and a novel integrated genetic element.

    PubMed

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F

    2015-08-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capricolum is both a pathogen of small ruminants and a model recipient organism for gene transplantation and synthetic biology. With the availability of the complete genome of the type strain California kid (released in 2005), a draft genome of strain GM508D was determined to investigate genomic variation in this subspecies. Differences in mobile genetic element location and complement, catabolic pathway genes, contingency loci, surface antigen genes and type II restriction-modification systems highlight the plasticity and diversity within this taxon. PMID:26040761

  1. Species-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies to Escherichia coli-Expressed p36 Cytosolic Protein of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Caron, J.; Sawyer, N.; Moumen, B. Ben Abdel; Bouh, K. Cheikh Saad; Dea, S.

    2000-01-01

    The p36 protein of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a cytosolic protein carrying species-specific antigenic determinants. Based on the genomic sequence of the reference strain ATCC 25934, primers were designed for PCR amplification of the p36-encoding gene (948 bp). These primers were shown to be specific to M. hyopneumoniae since no DNA amplicons could be obtained with other mycoplasma species and pathogenic bacteria that commonly colonize the porcine respiratory tract. The amplified p36 gene was subcloned into the pGEX-4T-1 vector to be expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The GST-p36 recombinant fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and cut by thrombin, and the enriched p36 protein was used to immunize female BALB/c mice for the production of anti-p36 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The polypeptide specificity of the nine MAbs obtained was confirmed by Western immunoblotting with cell lysates prepared from the homologous strain. Cross-reactivity studies of the anti-p36 MAbs towards two other M. hyopneumoniae reference strains (ATCC 25095 and J strains) and Quebec field strains that had been isolated in culture suggested that these anti-p36 MAbs were directed against a highly conserved epitope, or closely located epitopes, of the p36 protein. No reactivity was demonstrated against other mycoplasma species tested. Clinical signs and lesions suggestive of enzootic pneumonia were reproduced in specific-pathogen-free pigs infected experimentally with a virulent Quebec field strain (IAF-DM9827) of M. hyopneumoniae. The bacteria could be recovered from lung homogenates of pigs that were killed after the 3-week observation period by both PCR and cultivation procedures. Furthermore, the anti-p36 MAbs permitted effective detection by indirect immunofluorescence of M. hyopneumoniae in frozen lung sections from experimentally infected pigs. However, attempts to use the recombinant p36 protein as an antigen in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies in sera from convalescent pigs showed no correlation with clinical and pathological findings. PMID:10882646

  2. Fatal Outbreak of Mycoplasma capricolum Pneumonia in Endangered Markhors

    PubMed Central

    Thiaucourt, Francois; Amirbekov, Mulojon; Mahmadshoev, Abdurahmon; Manso-Silvn, Luca; Dupuy, Virginie; Vahobov, Dustmurod; Ziyoev, Orom; Michel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    A pneumonia outbreak reduced the numbers of a wild population of endangered markhors (Capra falconeri) in Tajikistan in 2010. The infection was diagnosed by histologic examination and bacteriologic testing. Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum was the sole infectious agent detected. Cross-species transmission from domestic goats may have occurred. PMID:22172532

  3. Detection of Mycoplasma gallinarum by real-time PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallinarum colonizes poultry as well as mammals, but is considered to have a commensal relationship with its hosts. Though unable to cause poultry disease by itself, reports have been published suggesting a synergism during mixed infections between M. gallinarum and respiratory viruses or...

  4. In Vitro Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Vicca, J.; Stakenborg, T.; Maes, D.; Butaye, P.; Peeters, J.; de Kruif, A.; Haesebrouck, F.

    2004-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 21 Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae field isolates were determined using a broth microdilution technique. One isolate showed acquired resistance to lincomycin, tilmicosin, and tylosin, while five isolates were resistant to flumequine and enrofloxacin. Acquired resistance against these antimicrobials in M. hyopneumoniae field isolates was not reported previously. PMID:15504886

  5. Isolation of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae from pneumonic lung of swine.

    PubMed

    Dahlia, H; Tan, L J; Zarrahimah, Z; Maria, J

    2009-12-01

    The isolation of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae from a piglet with severe pneumonia is described. This is the first report of M. hyosynoviae isolation in the country. The lung sample where the isolation was made was severely consolidated, suppurative and pleurisy. The pathogenicity of the M. hyosynoviae isolated has yet to be determined. PMID:20237449

  6. Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae, United States1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stella; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yi-Wei; Stiles, Jeffrey; Hong, Tao; Todd, Kathleen; Ratliff, Amy E.; Crabb, Donna M.; Xiao, Li; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Waites, Ken B.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is highly prevalent in Asia and is now being reported from Europe. Few data on MRMP are available in the United States. Using genotypic and phenotypic methods, we detected high-level MRMP in 13.2% of 91 M. pneumoniae­–positive specimens from 6 US locations. PMID:26196107

  7. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  10. Unravelling the Transcriptome Profile of the Swine Respiratory Tract Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Gerber, Alexandra Lehmkuhl; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga; Schrank, Irene Silveira; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    The swine respiratory ciliary epithelium is mainly colonized by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis. While colonization by M. flocculare is virtually asymptomatic, M. hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis infections may cause respiratory disease. Information regarding transcript structure and gene abundance provides valuable insight into gene function and regulation, which has not yet been analyzed on a genome-wide scale in these Mycoplasma species. In this study, we report the construction of transcriptome maps for M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, which represent data for conducting comparative studies on the transcriptional repertory. For each species, three cDNA libraries were generated, yielding averages of 415,265, 695,313 and 93,578 reads for M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, respectively, with an average read length of 274 bp. The reads mapping showed that 92%, 98% and 96% of the predicted genes were transcribed in the M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis genomes, respectively. Moreover, we showed that the majority of the genes are co-expressed, confirming the previously predicted transcription units. Finally, our data defined the RNA populations in detail, with the map transcript boundaries and transcription unit structures on a genome-wide scale. PMID:25333523

  11. Mycoplasma hyorhinis induces proinflammatory responses in mice lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kornspan, Jonathan D; Tsur, Maayan; Tarshis, Mark; Rottem, Shlomo; Brenner, Talma

    2015-05-01

    Mycoplasmas are frequent contaminants of cultured cells, leading to alterations in cellular gene expression, protein synthesis, signal transduction, and metabolic pathways. Mycoplasma hyorhinis, the major contaminant of tissue cultures, has been implicated in a variety of diseases in swine. Most human and animal mycoplasmas remain attached to the surface of epithelial cells. Nonetheless, we have recently shown that M. hyorhinis is able to invade nonphagocytic melanoma cells. In the present study, we show by confocal laser scanning microscopy, that by exposing mice splenocytes to intact M. hyorhinis, intracellular mycoplasmas were detected. Mycoplasmal components were not detected within splenocytes after exposure to heat inactivated M. hyorhinis or to a purified M. hyorhinis lipoprotein (LPP) fraction. However, incubation of the splenocytes with intact M. hyorhinis cells, heat inactivated cells or M. hyorhinis LPP fraction induced accelerated cell proliferation and the secretion of interferon gamma and interleukin 17. Thus, M. hyorhinis and its LPPs can be added to the list of infectious agents causing direct stimulation of proinflammatory responses by mammalian lymphocytes. PMID:25042355

  12. The Attempted Immunization of Turkey Hens with Viable Mycoplasma meleagridis

    PubMed Central

    Bigland, C. H.; Vlaovic, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    The attempted immunization of 53 female Broad Breasted White turkeys with five weekly 1.0 ml injections of viable Mycoplasma meleagridis, when combined with insemination with M. meleagridis infected semen, did not produce immunity but only imposed additional infection. This was detrimental to the offspring by increasing the incidence and severity of air sac lesions. PMID:4260949

  13. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  15. Transient presence of lupus anticoagulant associated with mycoplasma pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wang Chun, Kwok; See Wan, Yan; Poon Chuen, Wong

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of asymptomatic transient presence of lupus anticoagulant with isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time in a 30-year-old lady with pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae. After treatment of pneumonia, lupus anticoagulant was not detected and the activated partial thromboplastin time normalized. PMID:26744491

  16. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma faucium DNA in the Human Oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Edouard, Sophie; Courtois, Galle Denis; Gautret, Philippe; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Minodier, Philippe; Nol, Guilhem; Roch, Antoine; Brouqui, Philippe; Stein, Andreas; Drancourt, Michel; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma faucium has recently been associated with brain abscesses and seems to originate from the mouth. We evaluated its prevalence by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) in the oropharynxes of 644 subjects and found that 25% harbored M. faucium, probably constituting the gateway for entrance of the bacteria into cerebral abscesses. PMID:26511735

  17. Stability of rehydrated Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine homogeneity over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper vaccine application is required to maximize the results of the vaccination, with maintenance of a homogenous solution is critical to obtain uniform results. This study was designed to analyze the need for continued mixing of a Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine solution in order to maintain a ...

  18. Two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Cryptosporidium hominis reveal proteinligand interactions including a structural basis for observed antifolate resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Amy C.

    2005-03-01

    An analysis of the proteinligand interactions in two crystal structures of DHFR-TS from C. hominis reveals a possible structural basis for observed antifolate resistance in C. hominis DHFR. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals residue substitutions that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors. Cryptosporidium hominis is a protozoan parasite that causes acute gastrointestinal illness. There are no effective therapies for cryptosporidiosis, highlighting the need for new drug-lead discovery. An analysis of the proteinligand interactions in two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) from C. hominis, determined at 2.8 and 2.87 resolution, reveals that the interactions of residues Ile29, Thr58 and Cys113 in the active site of C. hominis DHFR provide a possible structural basis for the observed antifolate resistance. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals active-site differences that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors.

  19. Comparison of detection procedures of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma hyorhinis in lungs, tonsils, and synovial fluid of slaughtered pigs and their distributions in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Makhanon, Metta; Tummaruk, Padet; Thongkamkoon, Pacharee; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether direct PCR (DP) gave similar results to culture prior to PCR (CPP) for detecting mycoplasmas in different types of pig tissues. A total of 724 samples obtained from lungs, tonsils, or synovial fluids from 270 slaughtered pigs were used. The history of clinical signs, lung score, and the presence of joint lesions were recorded during sample collection. The rates of detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma hyorhinis using both procedures were evaluated. The overall prevalences of M. hyopneumoniae, M. hyosynoviae, and M. hyorhinis were 40.3%, 12.3%, and 64.6%, respectively, and the detection rate depended on the sample type and the procedure used. With lung tissue, DP gave a higher detection rate for M. hyopneumoniae (77.4%) than CPP (38.5%). M. hyorhinis was detected by CPP at 15.6% and 18.1% and by DP at 31.5% and 5.2%, respectively. The positive rate derived from tonsil from CPP was closed to that of DP. Using synovial fluid could not yield any positive M. hyorhinis from CPP whereas 37.2% was positive from DP. In contrast, using sample tissue from lung and tonsil by CPP could show much higher positive number than that of DP. There was a significant relationship between joint lesion and M. hyorhinis detection by DP (P < 0.05) but not for M. hyosynoviae and M. hyorhinis detected by CPP. We speculated that lung was a proper sample for M. hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis detection by DP and CPP, respectively. Tonsil was likely the community of persistent M. hyosynoviae and M. hyorhinis with highly detection by CPP. Synovial fluid was apparently unsuitable for mycoplasmal culture. The accuracy of mycoplasmal detection may depend upon the type of sample relevant to the detection procedure used. PMID:22116666

  20. Infection with Hemotropic Mycoplasma Species in Patients with or without Extensive Arthropod or Animal Contact

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Sarah M.; Trull, Chelsea L.; Mascarelli, Patricia E.; Mozayeni, B. Robert; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    PCR amplification targeting the 16S rRNA gene was used to test individuals with and without extensive arthropod and animal contact for the possibility of hemotropic mycoplasma infection. The prevalence of hemotropic mycoplasma infection (4.7%) was significantly greater in previously reported cohorts of veterinarians, veterinary technicians, spouses of veterinary professionals, and others with extensive arthropod exposure and/or frequent animal contact than in a previously reported cohort of patients examined by a rheumatologist because of chronic joint pain or evidence of small-vessel disease (0.7%). Based upon DNA sequence analysis, a Mycoplasma ovis-like species was the most prevalent organism detected; however, infection with Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum and a potentially novel, but incompletely characterized, hemotropic Mycoplasma species was also documented. Historical exposure to animals and arthropod vectors that can harbor hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. should be considered during epidemiological investigations and in the evaluation of individual patients. PMID:23863574

  1. What are mycoplasmas: the relationship of tempo and mode in bacterial evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Ludwig, W.

    1984-01-01

    In phenotype the mycoplasmas are very different from ordinary bacteria. However, genotypically (i.e., phylogenetically) they are not. On the basis of ribosomal RNA homologies the mycoplasmas belong with the clostridia, and indeed have specific clostridial relatives. Mycoplasmas are, however, unlike almost all other bacteria in the evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs. These RNAs contain relatively few of the highly conserved oligonucleotide sequences characteristic of normal eubacterial ribosomal RNAs. This is interpreted to be a reflection of an elevated mutation rate in mycoplasma lines of descent. A general consequence of this would be that the variation associated with a mycoplasma population is augmented both in number and kind, which in turn would lead to an unusual evolutionary course, one unique in all respects. Mycoplasmas, then, are actually tachytelic bacteria. The unusual evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs are the imprints of their rapid evolution.

  2. What are mycoplasmas - The relationship of tempo and mode in bacterial evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Stackebrand, E.; Ludwig, W.

    1985-01-01

    In phenotype the mycoplasmas are very different from ordinary bacteria. However, genotypically (i.e., phylogenetically) they are not. On the basis of ribosomal RNA homologies the mycoplasmas belong with the clostridia, and indeed have specific clostridial relatives. Mycoplasmas are, however, unlike almost all other bacteria in the evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs. These RNAs contain relatively few of the highly conserved oligonucleotide sequences characteristic of normal eubacterial ribosomal RNAs. This is interpreted to be a reflection of an elevated mutation rate in mycoplasma lines of descent. A general consequence of this would be that the variation associated with a mycoplasma population is augmented both in number and kind, which in turn would lead to an unusual evolutionary course, one unique in all respects. Mycoplasmas, then, are actually tachytelic bacteria. The unusual evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs are the imprints of their rapid evolution.

  3. Recovery of Mycoplasma spp. from the Reproductive Tract of the Mare during the Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, Victor; Miller, Richard; Johnson, Walter; Rosendal, Soren; Ruhnke, Louise

    1987-01-01

    The sites in the genital tract from which mycoplasmas could be recovered at various stages of the estrous cycle were studied in five Standardbred mares naturally infected with Mycoplasma. Mycoplasma equigenitalium and Mycoplasma subdolum were most frequently isolated from the clitoral fossa as compared to the vagina, cervix, and uterus. The lowest isolation prevalence was observed in the uterus. The recovery of Mycoplasma spp. from the clitoral fossa did not differ at any stage of the estrous cycle; however, recovery from the vagina, cervix, and uterus was variable during the cycle and more organisms were recovered on the day of ovulation than at any other time. From these results it was concluded that the clitoral fossa is the most likely ecological niche for Mycoplasma spp. in the mare. Ureaplasmas were not isolated. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17422844

  4. A review of the occurrence of hemoplasmas (hemotrophic mycoplasmas) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Alexander Welker; Dos Santos, Andrea Pires; Guimares, Ana Marcia S; Vieira, Rafael Felipe da Costa; Vidotto, Odilon; Macieira, Daniel de Barros; Almosny, Ndia Regina Pereira; Molento, Marcelo Beltro; Timenetsky, Jorge; de Morais, Helio Autran; Gonzlez, Flix Hilrio Diz; Messick, Joanne Belle

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have been conducted in Brazil using molecular techniques for the detection of hemotrophic mycoplasmas in several mammals. In domestic cats, Mycoplasma haemofelis, "Candidatus M. haemominutum", and "Candidatus M. turicensis" infections have been identified. These species have also been found in free-ranging and captive neotropical felid species. Two canine hemoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemocanis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum", have been identified in dogs. In commercial swine populations, Mycoplasma suis was found to be highly prevalent, especially in sows. Moreover, novel mycoplasma species have been identified in Brazilian commercial pigs and domestic dogs. A hemoplasma infection in a human patient infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was also recently documented. In conclusion, hemoplasma species are common and important infectious agents in Brazil. Further studies should be conducted to better understand their impact on pets, production animals, and wildlife fauna, as well as their role as zoonotic agents, particularly in immunocompromised patients. PMID:19772768

  5. Distribution and diversity of mycoplasma plasmids: lessons from cryptic genetic elements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolution of mycoplasmas from a common ancestor with Firmicutes has been characterized not only by genome down-sizing but also by horizontal gene transfer between mycoplasma species sharing a common host. The mechanisms of these gene transfers remain unclear because our knowledge of the mycoplasma mobile genetic elements is limited. In particular, only a few plasmids have been described within the Mycoplasma genus. Results We have shown that several species of ruminant mycoplasmas carry plasmids that are members of a large family of elements and replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism. All plasmids were isolated from species that either belonged or were closely related to the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster; none was from the Mycoplasma bovis-Mycoplasma agalactiae group. Twenty one plasmids were completely sequenced, named and compared with each other and with the five mycoplasma plasmids previously reported. All plasmids share similar size and genetic organization, and present a mosaic structure. A peculiar case is that of the plasmid pMyBK1 from M. yeatsii; it is larger in size and is predicted to be mobilizable. Its origin of replication and replication protein were identified. In addition, pMyBK1 derivatives were shown to replicate in various species of the M. mycoides cluster, and therefore hold considerable promise for developing gene vectors. The phylogenetic analysis of these plasmids confirms the uniqueness of pMyBK1 and indicates that the other mycoplasma plasmids cluster together, apart from the related replicons found in phytoplasmas and in species of the clade Firmicutes. Conclusions Our results unraveled a totally new picture of mycoplasma plasmids. Although they probably play a limited role in the gene exchanges that participate in mycoplasma evolution, they are abundant in some species. Evidence for the occurrence of frequent genetic recombination strongly suggests they are transmitted between species sharing a common host or niche. PMID:23145790

  6. P19 contributes to Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides adhesion to EBL cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yumei; Wang, Yang; Li, Yuan; Nick, Nwankpa; Zou, Xiaohui; Bai, Fan; Wu, Jindi; Xin, Jiuqing

    2016-04-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). The virulent Mmm Ben-1 strain was isolated from the lung of a CBPP-infected cow in China in the 1950s. To attenuate the virulence of the Ben-1 strain and preserve its protective ability, the isolate was re-isolated after inoculation into the testicles of rabbits and into the rabbit thorax. As a result, after the subsequent isolates were continuously passaged 468 times in rabbits, its pathogenicity to cattle decreased. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to attenuation of the Mmm Ben-1 remain unknown. We compared the entire genomes of the Ben-1 strain and the 468th generation strain passaged in rabbits (Ben-468) and discovered that a putative protein gene named p19 was absent from the Ben-468 strain. The p19 gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli to obtain recombinant P19 (rP19). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the P19 protein is detected in the cell-membrane fraction, the cell-soluble cytosolic fraction and whole-cell lysate of the Mmm Ben-1 strain. The rP19 can interact with international standard serum against CBPP. Immunostaining visualised via confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that P19 is able to adhere to embryonic bovine lung (EBL) cells, and this finding was also confirmed by a sandwich ELISA. We also found that anti-rP19 serum could inhibit the adhesion of the Mmm Ben-1 total proteins to EBL cells. PMID:26806796

  7. Sensitive and Specific Detection of Mycoplasma species by Consensus Polymerase Chain Reaction and Dot Blot Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sunhwa; Lee, Hyun-A; Park, Sang-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are highly fastidious bacteria, difficult to culture and slow growing. Many species of mycoplasmas are important pathogens that cause respiratory infection in laboratory animals and that are known to affect experimental results obtained with contaminated animals. The aim of the present study was to develop a sensitive and specific assay for the detection of mycoplasma species. To this end, we developed a polymerase chain reaction and dot blot hybridization assay (PCR/DBH) for detecting mycoplasma DNA and evaluated it for its sensitivity and specificity. Mycoplasma consensus primer pairs were used for the amplification of target DNA. When PCR product was visually detected, the limit of detection of the PCR test was 102 pg of mycoplasma purified DNA. For DBH, the amplified DNA was labeled by incorporation of digoxigenin (DIG). This DIG-labeled probe was capable of detecting 104 pg of purified mycoplasma DNA by DBH. PCR/DBH was more sensitive than PCR or DBH alone and was also very specific. Our PCR/DBH assay can be applied efficiently to confirm the presence of mycoplasma species on clinical samples and to differentiate between mycoplasma species infection and other bacterial infections. PMID:21826174

  8. Quantification of mycoplasmas in broth medium with sybr green-I and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Assuno, Patrcia; Rosales, Ruben S; Rifatbegovi?, Maid; Antunes, Nuno T; de la Fe, Christian; Ruiz de Galarreta, Carlos M; Poveda, Jos B

    2006-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest organisms known. They form a large group of bacteria that can infect humans, animals, and plants. Even though several techniques have been proposed to enumerate mycoplasmas in broth medium, the determination of mycoplasma growth still remains a difficult task. The potential of using flow cytometry (FC) for rapidly estimating several species of mycoplasmas, M. agalactiae (Ma), M. putrefaciens (Mp), M. capricolum subsp. capricolum (Mcc), M. bovis (Mb), M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) and M. hyopneumoniae (Mh) in broth medium was examined. The FC analysis was performed by staining the mycoplasma cells with a fluorescent dye, SYBR green-I (SYBR), and the results were compared with plate count (Colony Forming Units--CFU) or Colour Changing Units (CCU) methods, depending on the mycoplasma species. There was a good correlation between mycoplasma counts determined by FC (cells ml(-1)) and by traditional plate count (CFU) or CCU methods. A correlation of 0.841, 0.981, 0.960, 0.913, 0.954, and 0.844 was obtained for Ma, Mp, Mcc, Mb, Mccp and Mh, respectively. FC method allowed results in 20-30 min, while 24-72 h was necessary for plate count method and 15 days for CCU method. FC was found to be a very useful, practical and fast technique to count mycoplasmas. These findings suggest that FC can be a good alternative to replace other time-consuming techniques that are currently used to enumerate mycoplasmas in broth medium. PMID:16146746

  9. Mycoplasma detection and isolation from one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Mederos-Iriarte, Lidia E; Poveda, Jos B; Poveda, Carlos G; Vega-Orellana, Orestes M; Gutirrez, Carlos; Corbera, Juan A; Ramrez, Ana S

    2014-10-01

    In scientific literature, a small amount of information is found concerning mycoplasmosis in camel species. Mycoplasma (M.) arginini, Acholeplasma (A.) laidlawii, and Acholeplasma oculi have been reported to be isolated from these host species. Serologically positive results have been reported for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC type, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, and M. mycoides subsp. capri. The aims of this study were to detect, isolate, and identify mycoplasmas from camels (Camelus dromedarius). Initially, saliva and ear smears plus conjunctival and vaginal secretions were taken from five female animals, but only conjunctival secretions in three male animals, all belonging to the same farm. An unknown mycoplasma was isolated from one of the vagina samples. Additionally, another unknown and uncultured mycoplasma was detected with molecular biology in the same sample. In the second stage, 23 vaginal secretions were taken from the same farm plus another secretion from a different one. Ten isolates of the same unknown and previously isolated mycoplasma were detected, nine of them recovered from the vagina of female camels. Some mycoplasmas have been related to reproductive disorders; however, there is no evidence that the isolated mycoplasmas are related to such disorders. PMID:25059705

  10. Development of a real-time PCR for detection of Mycoplasma bovis in bovine milk and lung samples.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hugh Y; Bell-Rogers, Patricia; Parker, Lois; Prescott, John F

    2005-11-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using hybridization probes on a LightCycler platform was developed for detection of Mycoplasma bovis from individual bovine mastitis milk and pneumonic lung tissues. The detection limit was 550 colony forming units (cfu)/ml of milk and 650 cfu/25 mg of lung tissue. A panel of bovine Mycoplasma and of other bovine-origin bacteria were tested; only M. bovis strains were positive, with a melting peak of 66.6 degrees C. Mycoplasma agalactiae PG2 was also positive and could be distinguished because it had a melting peak of 63.1 degrees C. In validation testing of clinical samples, the relative sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 99.3% for individual milks and 96.6% and 100% for the lung tissue. Using M. bovis real-time PCR, the M. bovis culture-positive milk samples were estimated to contain between 5 x 10(4) and 7.7 x 10(8) cfu/ml and the M. bovis culture-positive lungs between 1 x 10(3) and 1 x 10(9) cfu/25 mg. Isolation, confirmed with the real-time PCR and colony fluorescent antibody test, showed that at the herd level, the proportion of samples positive for M. bovis isolation in mastitis milk samples submitted to the Mastitis Laboratory, Animal Health Laboratory, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, was 2.4% (5/201). We conclude that this probe-based real-time PCR assay is a sensitive, specific, and rapid method to identify M. bovis infection in bovine milk and pneumonic lungs. PMID:16475511

  11. Disseminated Herpesvirus hominis (Herpes simplex) infection: retrospective diagnosis by light and electron microscopy of paraffin wax-embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A. G.; Becker, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Disseminated Herpesvirus hominis infection had previously been reported from other parts of the world, but the disease was initially recognized at necropsy in Cape Town in 1957 (McKenzie, Hansen, and Becker, 1959). The present retrospective study established that the disease had been occurring before 1957 but that its aetiology had not been recognized. An awareness of the disease, together with an adequate knowledge of the clinical history, the morbid anatomy, and histology of the lesions, usually allows a confident diagnosis to be made. Images PMID:4111406

  12. First report of furuncular myiasis caused by the larva of botfly, Dermatobia hominis, in a Taiwanese traveler.

    PubMed

    Hu, Je-Ming; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chao, Li-Lian; Lee, Chung-Shinn; Shih, Chien-Ming

    2013-03-01

    A case of furuncular myiasis was reported for the first time in a 29-year-old young Taiwanese traveler returning from an ecotourism in Peru. Furuncle-like lesions were observed on the top of his head and he complained of crawling sensations within his scalp. The invasive larva of botfly, Dermatobia hominis, was extruded from the furuncular lesion of the patient. Awareness of cutaneous myiasis for clinicians should be considered for a patient who has a furuncular lesion and has recently returned from a botfly-endemic area. PMID:23620844

  13. Novel strategy for typing Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates by use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry coupled with ClinProTools.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Huifang; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-08-01

    The typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae mainly relies on the detection of nucleic acid, which is limited by the use of a single gene target, complex operation procedures, and a lengthy assay time. Here, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) coupled to ClinProTools was used to discover MALDI-TOF MS biomarker peaks and to generate a classification model based on a genetic algorithm (GA) to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 M. pneumoniae isolates. Twenty-five M. pneumoniae strains were used to construct an analysis model, and 43 Mycoplasma strains were used for validation. For the GA typing model, the cross-validation values, which reflect the ability of the model to handle variability among the test spectra and the recognition capability value, which reflects the model's ability to correctly identify its component spectra, were all 100%. This model contained 7 biomarker peaks (m/z 3,318.8, 3,215.0, 5,091.8, 5,766.8, 6,337.1, 6,431.1, and 6,979.9) used to correctly identify 31 type 1 and 7 type 2 M. pneumoniae isolates from 43 Mycoplasma strains with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The strain distribution map and principle component analysis based on the GA classification model also clearly showed that the type 1 and type 2 M. pneumoniae isolates can be divided into two categories based on their peptide mass fingerprints. With the obvious advantages of being rapid, highly accurate, and highly sensitive and having a low cost and high throughput, MALDI-TOF MS ClinProTools is a powerful and reliable tool for M. pneumoniae typing. PMID:24920781

  14. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  15. Detection of feline Mycoplasma species in cats with feline asthma and chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Bianka S; Richter, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S; Wess, Gerhard; Zenker, Isabella; Hartmann, Katrin

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the aetiology of inflammatory lower airway disease in cats. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Mycoplasma species in cats with feline asthma (FA) and chronic bronchitis (CB). The study population consisted of 17 cats with FA/CB, and 14 sick cats without clinical and historical signs of respiratory disease, which were euthanased for various other reasons. Nasal swabs, nasal lavage and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples were taken from patients from both groups. Mycoplasma species culture with modified Hayflick agar and Mycoplasma polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed on all samples followed by sequencing of all Mycoplasma species-positive samples for differentiation of subspecies. PCR testing detected significantly more Mycoplasma species-positive BALF samples than Mycoplasma culture (P = 0.021). When cats with oropharyngeal contamination were excluded from comparison, the numbers of Mycoplasma species-positive BALF samples in the group with FA/CB (6/17) and the control group (4/9) were not significantly different (P = 0.6924). While all nasal samples of the cats with FA/CB were negative for Mycoplasma organisms, five samples in the control group (P = 0.041) were positive on PCR. Sequencing revealed Mycoplasma felis in all PCR-positive samples. Mycoplasma species can be detected in the lower airways of cats with FA/CB, as well as in the BALF of sick cats without respiratory signs. Further studies are warranted to investigate the possibility that Mycoplasma species represent commensals of the lower respiratory tract of cats. PMID:24574148

  16. Mycoplasma synoviae induces upregulation of apoptotic genes, secretion of nitric oxide and appearance of an apoptotic phenotype in infected chicken chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Dusanic, Daliborka; Bencina, Dusan; Oven, Irena; Cizelj, Ivanka; Bencina, Mojca; Narat, Mojca

    2012-01-01

    The role of chondrocytes in the development of infectious arthritis is not well understood. Several examples of mycoplasma-induced arthritis in animals indicate that chondrocytes come into direct contact with bacteria. The objective of this study was to analyze the interaction of an arthrogenic Mycoplasma synoviae strain WVU 1853 with chicken chondrocytes. We found that M. synoviae significantly reduces chondrocyte respiration. This was accompanied by alterations in chondrocyte morphology, namely cell shrinkage and cytoplasm condensation, as well as nuclear condensation and formation of plasma membrane invaginations containing nuclear material, which appeared to cleave off the cell surface. In concordance with these apoptosis-like events in chondrocytes, transcription was increased in several pro-apoptotic genes. Twenty-four hours after infection, strong upregulation was assayed in NOS2, Mapk11, CASP8 and Casp3 genes. Twenty-four and 72 h incubation of chondrocytes with M. synoviae induced upregulation of AIFM1, NFκB1, htrA3 and BCL2. Casp3 and NOS2 remained upregulated, but upregulation ceased for Mapk11 and CASP8 genes. Increased production of nitric oxide was also confirmed in cell supernates. The data suggests that chicken chondrocytes infected with M. synoviae die by apoptosis involving production of nitric oxide, caspase 3 activation and mitochondrial inactivation. The results of this study show for the first time that mycoplasmas could cause chondrocyte apoptosis. This could contribute to tissue destruction and influence the development of arthritic conditions. Hence, the study gives new insights into the role of mycoplasma infection on chondrocyte biology and development of infectious arthritis in chickens and potentially in humans. PMID:22280251

  17. Prospects for the gliding mechanism of Mycoplasma mobile.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Makoto; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma mobile forms gliding machinery at a cell pole and glides continuously in the direction of the cell pole at up to 4.5μm per second on solid surfaces such as animal cells. This motility system is not related to those of any other bacteria or eukaryotes. M. mobile uses ATP energy to repeatedly catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides on host cells with its approximately 50-nm long legs. The gliding machinery is a large structure composed of huge surface proteins and internal jellyfish-like structure. This system may have developed from an accidental combination between an adhesin and a rotary ATPase, both of which are essential for the adhesive parasitic life of Mycoplasmas. PMID:26500189

  18. Mycoplasma testudineum in free-ranging desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Elliott R.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2012-01-01

    We performed clinico-pathological evaluations of 11 wild Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) from a translocation project in the central Mojave Desert, California, USA. Group 1 consisted of nine tortoises that were selected primarily due to serologic status, indicating exposure to Mycoplasma testudineum (seven) or both M. agassizii and M. testudineum (two), and secondarily due to clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD). Group 2 consisted of two tortoises that were antibody-negative for Mycoplasma and had no clinical signs of URTD, but did have other signs of illness. Of the Group 1 tortoises, M. testudineum, but not M. agassizii, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and DNA fingerprinted from two tortoises. Using light microscopy, mild to severe pathologic changes were observed in one or more histologic sections of either one or both nasal cavities of each tortoise in Group 1. Our findings support a causal relationship between M. testudineum and URTD in desert tortoises.

  19. Further western spread of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection of house finches.

    PubMed

    Ley, David H; Sheaffer, Deborah S; Dhondt, Andr A

    2006-04-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, an important pathogen of poultry, especially chickens and turkeys, emerged in 1994 as the cause of conjunctivitis in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) in their eastern range of North America. The resulting epidemic of M. gallisepticum conjunctivitis severely decreased house finch abundance and the continuing endemic disease in the eastern range has been associated with repeating seasonal peaks of conjunctivitis and limitation of host populations. Mycoplasma gallisepticum conjunctivitis was first confirmed in the western native range of house finches in 2002 in a Missoula, Montana, population. Herein, we report further western expansion of M. gallisepticum conjunctivitis in the native range of house finches based on positive polymerase chain reaction results with samples from birds captured in 2004 and 2005 near Portland, Oregon. PMID:16870870

  20. Nonconserved Residues Ala287 and Ser290 of the Cryptosporidium hominis Thymidylate Synthase Domain Facilitate Its Rapid Rate of Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doan,L.; Martucci, W.; Vargo, M.; Atreya, C.; Anderson, K.

    2007-01-01

    Cryptosporidium hominis TS-DHFR exhibits an unusually high rate of catalysis at the TS domain, at least 10-fold greater than those of other TS enzymes. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have mutated residues Ala287 and Ser290 in the folate-binding helix to phenylalanine and glycine, respectively, the corresponding residues in human and most other TS enzymes. Our results show that the mutant A287F, the mutant S290G, and the double mutant all have reduced affinities for methylene tetrahydrofolate and reduced rates of reaction at the TS domain. Interestingly, the S290G mutant enzyme had the lowest TS activity, with a catalytic efficiency {approx}200-fold lower than that of the wild type (WT). The rate of conformational change of the S290G mutant is {approx}80 times slower than that of WT, resulting in a change in the rate-limiting step from hydride transfer to covalent ternary complex formation. We have determined the crystal structure of ligand-bound S290G mutant enzyme, which shows that the primary effect of the mutation is an increase in the distance between the TS ligands. The kinetic and crystal structure data presented here provide the first evidence explaining the unusually fast TS rate in C. hominis.