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Sample records for mycosis fungoides bullosa

  1. Unusual variants of mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Abeldaño, Alejandra; Arias, Mariana; Benedetti, Adriana; Ochoa, Karina; Maskin, Matías; Pellerano, Graciela; Kien, María Cristina; Chouela, Edgardo

    2011-01-01

    Unusual variants of mycosis fungoides (MF) differ substantially from the classical presentation, and most of them resemble other dermatologic diseases. The authors reviewed files of patients with MF who consulted our clinic between November 1995 and June 2010 to evaluate the relative frequency and clinical behavior of these variants. Among 98 patients with MF, 32 (32.65%) had unusual variants. The most common types included follicular MF (31.25%), hypopigmented MF (18.75%), poiquilodermic MF (15.6%), and erythrodermic MF (12.5%). Less common variants included unilesional MF, bullosa MF, ichthyosiform MF, granulomatous slack skin, and pigmented purpura-like MF. Progressive disease and MF-related death were most commonly associated with follicular MF, bullosa MF, and erythrodermic MF. PMID:21980706

  2. Phototherapy of Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Hodak, Emmilia; Pavlovsky, Lev

    2015-10-01

    Therapies based on ultraviolet light have long been established in mycosis fungoides (MF). They have traditionally included whole-body ultraviolet light B, both broad-band and narrow-band, and psoralen plus ultraviolet A. Phototherapy may be applied alone in early stage MF or in combination with systemic therapy in refractory early stage MF and advanced MF. This article reviews the most frequently used forms of phototherapy for MF with emphasis on efficacy, safety, and practical considerations. PMID:26433842

  3. Mycosis fungoides: classic disease and variant presentations.

    PubMed

    Howard, M S; Smoller, B R

    2000-06-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a peripheral non-Hodgkin's T-cell neoplastic process, representing the most common type of primary cutaneous malignant lymphoma. Neoplastic lesions classically show skin predilection and characteristic clinical and histologic features in patch, plaque, and tumor stages. In addition, several clinicopathologic variants of mycosis fungoides have been delineated, including poikiloderma atrophicans vasculare (parapsoriasis variegata), Sézary syndrome, granulomatous mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, folliculocentric mycosis fungoides, syringotropic mycosis fungoides, and Woringer Kolopp disease. We will review the salient features of patch, plaque, and tumor stage mycosis fungoides in this article and follow with a discussion of these variant clinicopathologic presentations and of therapeutic modalities. PMID:10892710

  4. Mycosis Fungoides Variants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Escala, M Estela; González, Belén Rubio; Guitart, Joan

    2014-06-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that usually manifests as patches and plaques with a propensity for nonphotoexposed areas. MF is a common mimicker of inflammatory and infectious skin diseases, because it can be manifested with a wide variety of clinical and pathologic presentations. These atypical presentations of MF may be difficult to diagnose, requiring a high level of suspicion and careful clinicopathologic correlation. Within this array of clinical presentations, the World Health Organization classification recognizes 3 MF variants: folliculotropic MF, pagetoid reticulosis, and granulomatous slack skin. These 3 variants, as well as hypopigmented MF, are addressed in this article. PMID:26837197

  5. "Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides" is not always mycosis fungoides!

    PubMed

    Werner, Betina; Brown, Sonya; Ackerman, A Bernard

    2005-02-01

    We conducted a critical review of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in historical perspective with emphasis on criteria clinical and histopathologic for diagnosis of that lymphoma as they are set forth in every article ever written about it. Toward that end, we undertook analysis of each article in the medical literature that mentioned hypopigmentation in mycosis fungoides (34 in toto). Each was scrutinized regarding content, photographs of lesions clinical pictured, and photomicrographs. On the basis of all the information in the 34 publications available to us, we made a determination about which patients had mycosis fungoides without doubt, which surely did not, and which about whom no judgment could be made by us because too little data requisite for such a decision was provided, especially in terms of photographs of lesions clinical and of photomicrographs. To date, 106 patients with "hypopigmented mycosis fungoides" have been reported on. Features clinical and findings histopathologic in 23 of those 106 patients were sufficient to permit us to determine, with a high degree of confidence, whether or not a particular patient truly had mycosis fungoides. In our judgment, 19 patients did have mycosis fungoides, whereas at least four patients did not. In regard to the other 83 patients, the information provided by the authors simply was not sufficient to allow us to come to a decision that we could justify. PMID:15677981

  6. Genetics Home Reference: mycosis fungoides

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as environmental exposure or certain bacterial or viral infections, are involved in the development of mycosis fungoides . ... behaviors. Blood. 2010 Aug 5;116(5):767-71. doi: 10.1182/blood-2009-11-251926. Epub ...

  7. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, I M; Ramos-Caro, F A; Hassanein, A M

    2000-01-01

    We present a case of purely hypopigmented mycosis fungoides of 8-years duration in an 18-year-old woman who responded readily to psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) treatment. The literature pertaining to hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is reviewed. PMID:11085673

  8. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Stage IB-IVB Mycosis Fungoides or Sezary Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-21

    Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome

  9. Mycosis fungoides presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Shannon; Walsh, Noreen; D'Intino, Yolanda; Langley, Richard G B

    2006-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides, a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, typically presents as indolent, progressive, and persistent erythematous patches or plaques with mild scaling and over time can evolve into tumor stage with tumor nodules. Other presentations include eczematous, psoriasiform, poikilodermatous, and hypopigmented patches. We report Mycosis fungoides in a 14-year-old boy presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis and review the relevant literature. This is a rare presentation of a condition that is uncommon in the pediatric population. In our patient, histologic features were typical of Mycosis fungoides presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis. The clinical features, pathology, molecular biology, and the relationship between these two entities are discussed. PMID:16918631

  10. Immunotactoid glomerulopathy associated with mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Torrelo, A.; Rivera, M. T.; Mampaso, F.; España, A.; Marcèn, R.; Ortuño, J.; Ledo, A.

    1990-01-01

    A patient with mycosis fungoides developed a nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed deposits of a highly organized fibrillar material which did not stain with the typical amyloid stains; this picture was consistent with the diagnosis of non-amyloidotic fibrillary glomerulopathy or immunotactoid glomerulopathy. We believe this is the first case reported of immunotactoid glomerulopathy associated with mycosis fungoides. Possible pathogenetic implications are discussed with reference to previous publications. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2235815

  11. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides treated successfully with puva.

    PubMed

    Khanna, N; Dogra, D; Manchanda, Y; Singh, M K

    1999-01-01

    Hypopigmented lesions are rarely encountered in mycosis fungoides. We here report a 22-year old female patient who presented with a 5-year history of asymptomatic progressively increasing discrete and confluent hypopigmented macules and a 1-year history of a few itchy erythematous, scaly, indurated plaques. The histological features were consistent with a clinical diagnosis of mycosis fungoides. She was successfully treated with PUVA therapy. PMID:20921689

  12. Koebner Phenomenon and Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Lebas, Eve; Libon, Florence; Nikkels, Arjen F.

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most frequent type of primary cutaneous T-cell/NK-cell lymphoma. The Koebner phenomenon is defined as the appearance of cutaneous lesions on previously noninvolved skin following trauma and is observed in a series of cutaneous diseases including psoriasis, lichen planus, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, etc. In this case report, 3 patients with longstanding MF are presented, the 1st with the appearance of a circumscribed early-stage type MF lesion rapidly following a surgical excision of an infundibular cyst, the 2nd with the appearance of a unique unilateral palmar tumoral MF lesion at the pressure site of a crutch, and the 3rd presented localized MF early stage lesions at the friction site of a belt. This report suggests that some MF patients may experience Koebner phenomenon-induced MF lesions and that MF should be added to the long list of skin diseases potentially exhibiting the Koebner phenomenon. PMID:26557075

  13. ELECTRON BEAM THERAPY OF MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Malcolm A.; Schneidman, Harold M.; Farber, Eugene M.; Kaplan, Henry S.

    1961-01-01

    Ionizing radiation in the form of x-ray therapy is the best modality of treatment available at the present time for single, isolated lesions of mycosis fungoides. However, for generalized mycosis fungoides, generalized x-ray therapy is technically difficult and dangerous. It is now possible to employ electron beam therapy for generalized mycosis fungoides, using energies which confine the dose to the superficial layers of the skin and thus avoid hematopoietic injury. A technique for wide field electron beam therapy has been developed for this purpose which has been effective and well tolerated in limited trials to date. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 4.Figure 4.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 5.Figure 5.Figure 6. AFigure 6. A PMID:13863947

  14. Minimal residual disease in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pa-Fan; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Jee, Shiou-Hwa

    2006-05-01

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy with stage I hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in whom minimal residual disease was detected with T-cell receptor gamma-polymerase chain reaction after the disease was in complete clinical remission. We further cloned and sequenced the T-cell receptor gamma-polymerase chain reaction product of the lesion in remission and found that the original T-cell clone still existed in decreased amounts. The patient was followed up for 3 1/2 years without any new lesions developing. The clinical significance of this residual malignant T-cell clone in mycosis fungoides remains to be elucidated. PMID:16631939

  15. Emerging treatment options for early mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Guarino, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a candidate for skin-directed therapies in its initial stages. In recent years, therapeutic options outside of the normal treatment recommendations such as topical imiquimod, topical tazarotene, topical methotrexate, excimer light sources, and photodynamic therapy have been published with variable results. These alternatives have been useful in cases of localized mycosis fungoides that do not respond to routine treatments; nevertheless, more studies on these methods are still needed. This article summarizes the literature and data that are known so far about these treatments. PMID:23450851

  16. A case of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Choe, Y B; Park, K C; Cho, K H

    2000-08-01

    We experienced a 26-year-old woman in whom widespread hypopigmented macules and patches developed as the initial clinical feature of mycosis fungoides. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The patients was treated with PUVA, and the lesion progressively disappeared within five months. PMID:10989581

  17. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides associated with atopy in two children.

    PubMed

    Onsun, N; Kural, Y; Su, O; Demirkesen, C; Büyükbabani, N

    2006-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is very rare in children. Hypopigmented lesions of this disease are usually observed in dark-skinned individuals and often show a T supressor CD8(+) phenotype. Two Caucasian children with predominantly hypopigmented lesions of mycosis fungoides are presented here. Atopy was a concomitant feature in both. PMID:17014650

  18. Free-floating collagen fibers in interstitial mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Gerardo; Crisman, Giuliana; Zalaudek, Iris; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Stefanato, Catherine M

    2010-06-01

    We present a case of interstitial mycosis fungoides showing pseudodovascular clefts with "free-floating" collagen fibers surrounded by neoplastic T lymphocytes. Such a finding further expands the histopathologic spectrum of mycosis fungoides and could be taken into account in its differential diagnosis from granuloma annulare, inflammatory morphea, and interstitial granulomatous drug reaction. PMID:20145533

  19. Mycosis Fungoides: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Akinbami, Akinsegun A; Osikomaiya, Bodunrin I; John-Olabode, Sarah O; Adediran, Adewumi A; Osinaike, Olajumoke; Uche, Ebele I; Ismail, Ayobami K; Dosunmu, Adedoyin O; Odesanya, Mojeed; Dada, Akinola; Okunoye, Olaitan

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), also known as Alibert-Bazin syndrome or granuloma fungoides, is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Cutaneous lymphomas are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) of T- and B-cell origin where the skin is the primary organ of involvement. This is a case of a 60-year-old Nigerian woman, who was diagnosed and managed as a case of chronic dermatitis but further investigations confirmed a diagnosis of MF; she was thereafter managed with topical glucocorticoids/chemotherapy and improved on these treatments. We make a plea for better awareness of the disease among physicians and pathologists in Africa. PMID:25232282

  20. Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Mycosis Fungoides

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  1. Mycosis fungoides with unusual vitiligo-like presentation.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayanta Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Asok Kumar

    2004-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), the commonest variant of primary cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), is relatively uncommon among the Asians. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is a rare variant usually observed in dark-skinned individuals, especially children. Hypopigmented MF usually responds well to therapy, particularly to PUVA, and has a comparatively benign course. Mycosis fungoides in a 16-year-old boy, with extensive asymptomatic hypopigmented lesions developing gradually all over the body over eight years and vitiligo-like skin lesions developing for seven years, with no systemic features, is presented for its unusual clinical features and conspicuous histopathological findings of prominent epidermotropism. The case showed fairly good response to PUVASOL therapy. PMID:17642645

  2. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mycosis fungoides*

    PubMed Central

    Atalla, Angelo; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Siqueira, Denise Bittencourt; Toledo, Gabriela Cumani

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides is typically an indolent disease in early stages. However, approximately 30% of patients have advanced staged disease at presentation and 20% will develop it at some time. These patients have a poorer prognosis with a median survival of 2-4 years. The only curative option for mycosis fungoides may be hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We report the case of a patient with mycosis fungoides in an advanced stage (IIB), refractory to treatment options. She underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The patient remains in complete remission nineteen months after allo-HSCT. Allogeneic transplantation can alter the natural history of mycosis fungoides and should be considered in patients who have refractory disease or short-lived responses with standard therapies. PMID:24346924

  3. Pigmented purpuric dermatosis or mycosis fungoides: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Abdul Latheef, Ettappurath N; Davul, Hena; Ashraf, Febin

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPD), a group of vascular disorders with variable clinical picture is reported in all races and age groups with a male predilection. There are reports of mycosis fungoides manifesting as pigmented purpura as well as progression of PPD to cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The diagnostic dilemma is compounded by PPD manifesting histological similarity to mycosis fungoides. Currently, it is believed that PPD with monoclonal T-cell population is more likely to progress to malignancy. We report a 31-year-old male patient who presented with the lichenoid clinical variant of PPD lesions that mimicked mycosis fungoides on histopathology. Gene rearrangement studies identified a polyclonal T-cell population. The patient responded to photochemotherapy, which is beneficial in both PPD and mycosis fungoides. Our case signifies the limitations of current diagnostic modalities in accurately distinguishing PPD from cutaneous lymphoma. Data on disease progression in similar cases may enable us to formulate better diagnostic definitions. PMID:27294054

  4. Pigmented purpuric dermatosis or mycosis fungoides: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Abdul Latheef, Ettappurath N.; Davul, Hena; Ashraf, Febin

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPD), a group of vascular disorders with variable clinical picture is reported in all races and age groups with a male predilection. There are reports of mycosis fungoides manifesting as pigmented purpura as well as progression of PPD to cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The diagnostic dilemma is compounded by PPD manifesting histological similarity to mycosis fungoides. Currently, it is believed that PPD with monoclonal T-cell population is more likely to progress to malignancy. We report a 31-year-old male patient who presented with the lichenoid clinical variant of PPD lesions that mimicked mycosis fungoides on histopathology. Gene rearrangement studies identified a polyclonal T-cell population. The patient responded to photochemotherapy, which is beneficial in both PPD and mycosis fungoides. Our case signifies the limitations of current diagnostic modalities in accurately distinguishing PPD from cutaneous lymphoma. Data on disease progression in similar cases may enable us to formulate better diagnostic definitions. PMID:27294054

  5. Intraocular involvement with subretinal pigment epithelium infiltrates by mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, B. C.; Egbert, P. R.; Peat, I. M.; Shorrock, K.; Rosenthal, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular mycosis fungoides in a 48-year-old man. The patient presented with decreased visual acuity, white subretinal lesions, and vitritis. Post-mortem histopathology revealed malignant T cell infiltrates consistent with mycosis fungoides in the retina, vitreous, and between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane Focal atrophy of the RPE, along with the sub-RPE infiltrates, correlated with the clinically visible fundus lesions. Images PMID:1751471

  6. A Case of Mycosis Fungoides and Lymphomatoid Papulosis Occurring Simultaneously in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Bognet, Rachel A.; Kozic, Heidi; Lee, Jason B.; Sahu, Joya; Hyde, Patrice M.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between lymphomatoid papulosis and other lymphomas, such as mycosis fungoides, Hodgkin’s disease, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The association between lymphomatoid papulosis and mycosis fungoides has been reported to be between seven and 39 percent. Although a relationship is acknowledged between lymphomatoid papulosis and mycosis fungoides, our understanding is limited. The authors report a case of mycosis fungoides and lymphomatoid papulosis in a child. PMID:23198014

  7. [Interstitial mycosis fungoid: a rare variant of mycosis fungoids. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Marie-Thérèse; Comoz, François; Dompmartin-Blanchere, Anne; Bagot, Martine; Ortonne, Nicolas

    2011-02-01

    Mycosis fungoids can present with various clinical and histological features, with only a few of them being recognized as distinct entities in the current WHO and EORTC classifications. Histologically, mycosis fungoids (MF) usually show a superficial perivascular or band-like lymphocytic infiltrate with epidermotropism. We here report two cases of a rare histological variant of MF, called interstitial in the literature. Our first patient, a 71-year-old male, had a previously diagnosed MF, which clinically evolved towards nodules, showing histologically an interstitial lymphocytic infiltrate without epidermotropism and without large cell transformation. The second patient was a 64-year-old female with widespread plaques and nodules. Histologically, a dense dermal interstitial infiltrate was observed, with foci of epidermotropism, without large cell transformation. At relapse after treatment, she presented with plaques, papules and nodules, histologically showing a slight interstitial lymphocytic infiltrate that resembled granuloma annulare or inflammatory morphea. In both patients, clinical aspect suggested MF and a dominant T-cell clone was found in lesional skin. Nodules in MF are not always the hallmark of large cell transformation, but may correspond to unusual interstitial lesions. Diagnosis of such rare variant may be difficult and requires a good clinical pathological correlation together with the search for foci of epidermotropism on skin biopsy and for a dominant cutaneous T-cell clone. PMID:21349387

  8. Environmental risk factors for mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Yonit; Tur, Ethel

    2007-01-01

    The rising incidence rates of mycosis fungoides (MF) call for an explanation. Thus, environmental and lifestyle factors were speculated to play a role in the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. It is thought that continuous activation of skin T helper lymphocytes leads to malignant transformation of a specific clone. Possible risk factors that have been implicated are occupational chemical exposure, radiation, drugs and infections. The carcinogenic process is probably multifactorial and multistep, combining the genetic predisposition of the individual and his immune status with various exogenous factors. Using advanced and accurate exposure assessment tools, recent epidemiological data indicate that occupational exposure to chemicals, primarily to aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons, is a major risk factor to develop MF in men (odds ratio 4.6), while exposure to pesticides, a subgroup of the aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons, is a risk factor in both genders (odds ratio 6.8 for men and 2.4 for women). Apparently, concomitant infection with Staphylococcus aureus or with Borrelia species and chronic exposure to UVR are minor risk factors for the development of MF. Further assessment of occupational and environmental exposures is essential for the evaluation of their contribution to the etiology of MF. This will allow the application of preventive and surveillance measures along with adjustment of existing health policies. PMID:17641490

  9. Mycosis fungoides progression and chronic solvent exposure.

    PubMed

    Nikkels, Arjen F; Quatresooz, Pascale; Delvenne, Philippe; Balsat, Alain; Piérard, Gérald E

    2004-01-01

    The effect of repeated exposure to specific chemicals on the initiation or progression of mycosis fungoides (MF) remains unsettled. A patient with low-grade patch stage MF progressively developed MF plaques restricted to his arms, and a tumour on his right thigh. These areas were subject to repeated exposure to solvents. His thigh was indeed in close contact with his trousers pocket where he used to store a wiping rag drenched into white spirit and cellulosic thinner. Immunophenotyping these lesions revealed a dense LCA+, CD2+, CD3+, CD4+, CD5+, CD7+, CD45+, CD45RO+ T-cell infiltrate admixed with many factor XIIIa+ dendrocytes. T-cell receptor rearrangement analysis identified a monoclonal T-cell infiltrate. An internal work-up remained negative. Stopping further solvent exposure failed to improve his condition. Oral corticotherapy combined with low-dose interferon-alpha2a halted disease progression. This observation suggests that long-term solvent exposure may trigger MF and hasten its progression from the patch stage to the plaque and tumour stages. PMID:15057012

  10. A rare presentation of erythrodermic mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam

    2012-05-01

    Although rare, of all the cutaneous lymphoid malignancies, cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) constitute 65% of all lymphomas, of which 50% are patients with mycosis fungoides (MF). The erythrodermic variant of MF, a malignancy of mature, skin homing, clonal T lymphocytes, usually presents in mid to late adulthood. We present a man in his late 30s with intractable progressive erythroderma of 18 months' duration, patchy alopecia, palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal thickening, hyperpigmentation, and intense itching as a case of erythrodermic MF. There was no systemic involvement. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsies from multiple sites and immunohistochemistry. He was categorized with stage IIIA MF according to the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC) revised classification system. Psoralen plus UVA therapy and low-dose methotrexate resulted in clearance of lesions; regular follow-up visits were conducted to monitor progression to Sézary syndrome (SS). Progression to SS has to be monitored regularly in these patients. PMID:22768436

  11. Mycosis fungoides with a CD56+ immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Wain, E Mary; Orchard, Guy E; Mayou, Susan; Atherton, David J; Misch, Klaus J; Russell-Jones, Robin

    2005-07-01

    We report 3 cases of mycosis fungoides (MF) with a CD56+ cytotoxic immunophenotype. Each patient presented with a different clinical phenotype: one exhibited limited poikilodermatous patches (skin stage T1); one, widespread hypopigmented lesions (skin stage T2); and one, poikiloderma with a single cutaneous tumor (skin stage T3). MF was confirmed both histologically and by the presence of a T-cell receptor clone in lesional skin in all cases. CD56 and T-cell intracellular antigen-1 were expressed by the malignant lymphocytes in all patients and two expressed CD8. No sample demonstrated loss of the pan T-cell markers CD2 or CD3. None of the 3 developed systemic disease and T-cell receptor gene analysis of peripheral blood was polyclonal in all cases. Only 3 cases of CD56+ MF have been reported previously, none of which exhibited tumor-stage disease. Currently, the disease in our patients appears to be behaving in a manner similar to that predicted for MF with a normal immunophenotype but the prognosis has to be guarded in view of the rarity of this subtype. PMID:15965442

  12. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Hassab-El-Naby, Hussein M M; El-Khalawany, Mohamed A

    2013-04-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) is uncommon clinical variant that was commonly observed in dark-skinned individuals. We described the clinical characteristics, pathological features, immunohistochemical profile and prognosis of HMF in Egyptian patients. During the period from January 2004 to December 2011, we were able to diagnose and follow up 27 patients with HMF. The study included 18 males (66.7%) and 9 females (33.3%) with a mean age of 35.39 ±13.13 years. The duration ranged from 1 to 6 years with a mean of 3.26 ±1.7 years. The majority of patients were skin type IV (63%) and presented with multiple (88.9%), asymptomatic (74.1%), ill-defined (70.4%) and non-scaly (77.8%) lesions distributed on the trunk (81.5%). Histologically, epidermotropic lymphocytes were observed in 100%, basal alignment of lymphocytes in 81.5%, Pautrier's microabscesses in 29% and folliculotropism in 18.5%. Immunostaining showed predominance of epidermal CD8+ cells in 51.9% while in 29.6% CD4+ cells were predominant. Phototherapy was effective in 86.7% of patients with success rate 66.7% of narrow band (NB) ultraviolet-B and 80% of psoralen ultraviolet-A. HMF among Egyptians could be classified as non-aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic CD8+ variant. It is common among middle age males with skin type IV and mostly well respond to phototherapy. PMID:23379648

  13. Inflammatory vitiligo-like macules that simulate hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Petit, Thomas; Cribier, Bernard; Bagot, Martine; Wechsler, Janine

    2003-01-01

    Two cases of an inflammatory vitiligo-like condition that simulated mycosis fungoides are reported. Both patients presented acquired hypopigmented macules sharply limited by an erythematous and papular border. The clinical aspect was suggestive of inflammatory vitiligo. Mycosis fungoides was suspected on skin specimens showing a dense band-like lymphocytic infiltrate with discrete nuclear atypias and marked exocytosis. This infiltrate was made of CD3 positive lymphocytes. CD8 positive lymphocytes were numerous in one case, few in the other. There was a loss of melanocytes in the lesional skin and absence of dominant T-cell clones in both cases. No repigmentation was observed after PUVA or local chemotherapy. The authors emphasized that erythematous and papular borders surrounding hypopigmented macules, CD8 positive lymphocytic infiltrate, absence of T-cell clonal rearrangement are helpful to rule out mycosis fungoides. PMID:12948929

  14. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a review of its clinical features and pathophysiology*

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Fabricio Cecanho; Sanches, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Several distinct clinical forms of mycosis fungoides have been described. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides should be regarded as a subtype of mycosis fungoides, insofar as it presents some peculiar characteristics that contrast with the clinical features of the classical form. Most patients with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides are younger than patients typically diagnosed with classical mycosis fungoides. In addition to typical dark-skinned individuals impairment, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides has also been described in Asian patients. The prognosis for hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is much better than for classical mycosis fungoides: hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is diagnosed when there are only patches of affected skin, and lesions usually will not progress beyond terminal stages, although they can persist for many years. Diagnosis should involve clinicopathologic correlation: skin biopsy analysis often reveals intense epidermotropism, characterized by haloed, large, and atypical CD8+ lymphocytes with convoluted nuclei, in contrast to mild to moderate dermal lymphocytic infiltrate. These CD8+ cells, which participate in T helper 1-mediated immune responses, prevent evolution to mycosis fungoides plaques and tumors and could be considered the main cause of the inhibition of melanogenesis. Therefore, hypopigmentation could be considered a marker of good prognosis for mycosis fungoides. PMID:24474105

  15. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a review of its clinical features and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Fabricio Cecanho; Sanches, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Several distinct clinical forms of mycosis fungoides have been described. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides should be regarded as a subtype of mycosis fungoides, insofar as it presents some peculiar characteristics that contrast with the clinical features of the classical form. Most patients with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides are younger than patients typically diagnosed with classical mycosis fungoides. In addition to typical dark-skinned individuals impairment, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides has also been described in Asian patients. The prognosis for hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is much better than for classical mycosis fungoides: hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is diagnosed when there are only patches of affected skin, and lesions usually will not progress beyond terminal stages, although they can persist for many years. Diagnosis should involve clinicopathologic correlation: skin biopsy analysis often reveals intense epidermotropism, characterized by haloed, large, and atypical CD8+ lymphocytes with convoluted nuclei, in contrast to mild to moderate dermal lymphocytic infiltrate. These CD8+ cells, which participate in T helper 1-mediated immune responses, prevent evolution to mycosis fungoides plaques and tumors and could be considered the main cause of the inhibition of melanogenesis. Therefore, hypopigmentation could be considered a marker of good prognosis for mycosis fungoides. PMID:24474105

  16. Juvenile mycosis fungoides diagnosed before 18 years of age.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amitai, Dan; Michael, David; Feinmesser, Meora; Hodak, Emmilia

    2003-01-01

    The literature regarding mycosis fungoides in children is sparse. To shed further light on the characteristics of mycosis fungoides in the paediatric population we analysed the clinicopathological features of 10 patients in whom this malignancy was diagnosed before the age of 18 years. All were Jews and Arabs with histologically proven patch/early plaque stage disease: 4 in stage IA, 4 in IB and 2 with unilesional disease. Seven patients had hypopigmented lesions either constituting the sole manifestation (2 patients) or in combination with classic lesions (5 patients); of these, 3 had light skin and 4 pigmented skin. Most patients had immunohistochemical features characteristic of mycosis fungoides, with a predominance of CD4+ T cells. Some had deletion of CD7+ cells. In 3 patients, however, the epidermotropic cells were exclusively or predominantly CD8+ cells. All patients responded to conventional therapy and during an average follow-up of 3.4 years only one patient showed stage progression, but without extracutaneous involvement. It is concluded that juvenile mycosis fungoides is characterized by early stage disease, occasionally with unilesional disease, usually with hypopigmented lesions irrespective of skin colour, and a good response to therapy. On the basis of our experience and review of the literature, it appears that the CD8+ phenotype is over-represented in juvenile disease. PMID:14690342

  17. Decreased CD117 expression in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides correlates with hypomelanosis: lessons learned from vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Singh, Zeba N; Tretiakova, Maria S; Shea, Christopher R; Petronic-Rosic, Vesna M

    2006-09-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is an uncommon clinical variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. We hypothesized that hypomelanosis in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides may have a similar mechanism as in vitiligo, a condition in which it is believed that alterations in expression of CD117 (stem cell factor receptor/KIT protein) on epidermal melanocytes and abnormal interactions between melanocytes and surrounding keratinocytes may play a pathogenic role. To test the hypothesis that similar mechanisms might also explain hypopigmentation in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, skin specimens from five cases each of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides and vitiligo were studied immunohistochemically for immunophenotype of the infiltrating cells, CD117 (expressed by epidermal melanocytes), and pan melanoma cocktail of antigens (gp100, tyrosinase, and MART-1) expression; cases of conventional mycosis fungoides and normal skin were studied in parallel as controls. Our findings confirm a predominance of CD8+ neoplastic T cells in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides. Similarly, the epidermal lymphocytic infiltrate in vitiligo was also composed of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, in contrast to an epidermal infiltrate composed of CD4+ T cells in conventional mycosis fungoides. The average number of epidermal CD117 expressing cells followed the same pattern of decreased expression in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides as in vitiligo, whereas the levels in conventional mycosis fungoides were higher, and similar to that observed in normal skin. Furthermore, a decreased number of melanocytes per high-power field of the length of the biopsy was present in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides and vitiligo, as compared with either conventional mycosis fungoides or normal skin, suggesting a correlation between decreased expression of CD117 and decreased number of melanocytes. We propose that decreased expression of CD117 and its downstream events in melanocytes may be initiated by cytotoxic effects of melanosomal

  18. Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical review and update*

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Thamy; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the diagnostic and classificatory concepts of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome in light of the latest normative publications. It describes the great variability of the clinical expression of mycosis fungoides in its early stages as well as the histopathological and immunohistochemical aspects that help with diagnosis. The diagnostic criteria required for characterizing Sézary syndrome and the staging system used for both mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are described. PMID:23197199

  19. Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides in an Adolescent: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Meeta Dipak; Khadke, Mona P; Ameet, Dandale L; Rachita, Dhurat S

    2016-01-01

    Folliculotropic mycosis fungoides (FMF) is an uncommon and aggressive form of mycoses fungoides with preferential involvement of head and neck region. Lesions of FMF present as erythematous plaques or papules with follicular prominences, acneiform lesions, cysts, nodules, patches of scarring alopecia, and prurigo-like lesions. The mean age of diagnosis is at 60 years and it is extremely rare in childhood and adolescence. We report a case of a 16-year-old male patient who presented with a 2-month history of an asymptomatic erythematous infiltrated plaque over the forehead. Histological examination was consistent with diagnosis of FMF. He was successfully treated with local electron beam therapy. PMID:27512205

  20. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a 10-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Manzur, A; Zaidi, S T H

    2006-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) presenting with hypopigmented lesions is an uncommon clinical variant of the disease, usually described in dark-skinned patients. We report a case of hypopigmented CTCL in a 10-year-old boy. The disease has responded favorably to narrowband UVB therapy. This case illustrates the importance of clinical suspicion for mycosis fungoides in patients with widespread hypopigmentation. PMID:17083901

  1. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a clinical mimicker of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Tolkachjov, Stanislav N; Comfere, Nneka I

    2015-02-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) that often manifests in younger patients with darker skin types in a centripetal distribution.(1) Average age of diagnosis is often 14 years.(2) The diagnosis is often missed due to its low incidence and lack of clinical suspicion. Misdiagnosis and failure to obtain biopsies lead to a long latency period from onset of hypopigmented patches to diagnosis and treatment. HMF has a clinically benign course and responds well to therapy; however, relapse is common.(3) We report a case of HMF misdiagnosed as vitiligo in order to illuminate diagnostic, histopathological, and treatment modalities. PMID:25689815

  2. Co-existence of various clinical and histopathological features of mycosis fungoides in a young female.

    PubMed

    Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Soghrati, Mehrnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Najafian, Jamshid; Rajabi, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and a rare disorder that typically affects older adults with erythematous scaling patches and plaques. Hypopigmented patches are a rare clinical variant of the disease. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is also a rare type of CTCL. No particular clinical criteria are available for the diagnosis of GMF, because of its variable presentations, and so the detection of GMF is primarily considered as a histopathological diagnosis. Rarely, a co-existence of more than one clinical or histopathological feature of mycosis fungoides may be present. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of MF that shows the simultaneous co-existence of more than one clinical and histopathological variant of MF. We present a 29-year-old female with clinical presentations of both classic and hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF), and also the histopathological features of the classic and granulomatous types of the disease. PMID:25814741

  3. Co-Existence of Various Clinical and Histopathological Features of Mycosis Fungoides in a Young Female

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Soghrati, Mehrnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Najafian, Jamshid; Rajabi, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and a rare disorder that typically affects older adults with erythematous scaling patches and plaques. Hypopigmented patches are a rare clinical variant of the disease. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is also a rare type of CTCL. No particular clinical criteria are available for the diagnosis of GMF, because of its variable presentations, and so the detection of GMF is primarily considered as a histopathological diagnosis. Rarely, a co-existence of more than one clinical or histopathological feature of mycosis fungoides may be present. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of MF that shows the simultaneous co-existence of more than one clinical and histopathological variant of MF. We present a 29-year-old female with clinical presentations of both classic and hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF), and also the histopathological features of the classic and granulomatous types of the disease. PMID:25814741

  4. Granulomatous Mycosis Fungoides in an Adolescent-A Rare Encounter and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Iris; Wohlmuth, Christoph; Duvic, Madeleine

    2016-09-01

    Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is a rare form of mycosis fungoides (MF) characterized by an infiltrate of atypical lymphocytes, histiocytes, and multinucleated giant cells. Clinically, GMF has a slowly progressing course with a worse prognosis than other forms of MF. With its peak incidence being in the fifth to sixth decade, GMF is rare in children and adolescents. Herein we describe a 14-year-old boy with GMF. PMID:27595880

  5. Delay in the histopathologic diagnosis of mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Skov, Anne G; Gniadecki, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of mycosis fungoides (MF) is difficult in early stages and is based on a combination of clinical findings and histopathologic criteria. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic delay in MF and to investigate the rationale for multiple biopsies in a single-centre, retrospective study of 157 patients with MF. The first biopsy was diagnostic for MF in 25% of cases. The median diagnostic delay was 2.3 years and depended on whether the diagnosis was established after one or multiple biopsies. The chance of a biopsy resulting in a diagnosis of MF was 25% irrespective of the number of the biopsy in the sequence. There was a significant diagnostic delay, especially in patients in whom the initial biopsy was not specific. Sampling error and unnecessary postponement of subsequent biopsies are likely factors and therefore multiple biopsies should be considered in patients with skin lesions suggesting MF. PMID:25228392

  6. The Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hyperkeratotic Plantar Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Cho, Yong-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Hwa; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2011-01-01

    The localized early-stage of Mycosis fungoides (MF) (stage IA-IIA) is usually treated with topical agents, such as nitrogen mustard, steroids, and phototherapy (UVB/PUVA) as first line therapy; response to these initial treatments is usually good. However, hyperkeratotic plantar lesions are clinically rare and have decreased responsiveness to topical agents. For such cases, physicians may consider local radiotherapy. Here, a case of an 18-year-old Korean woman who was treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for hyperkeratotic plantar lesions that were refractory to UVA-1, methotrexate, and topical steroids is reported. Complete remission was attained after radiotherapy. During the one-year follow-up period, there has been no evidence of disease recurrence and no chronic complications have been observed. PMID:22028574

  7. Early-stage mycosis fungoides variants: case-based review.

    PubMed

    Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee; Tschen, Jaime A; Duvic, Madeleine; Vega, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The diagnosis of classic MF is based on a combination of clinical presentation, histopathology, and T-cell monoclonality detected by molecular studies. However, the diagnosis can be difficult in cases of early MF because of the subtle nature of histologic findings and, in cases of variants of MF, because of the unusual clinical and/or pathologic features. In this review, we presented the most frequent variants of MF at early stage including hypopigmented, folliculotropic, pagetoid reticulosis, unilesional, granulomatous, and ichthyosis forms. This case-based clinicopathologic review provides the notion that a comprehensive clinicopathologic correlation is of substantial importance to render the diagnosis of MF. In addition, we discuss the role of molecular studies, which are highly sensitive and recently more applicable to routinely processed skin biopsy specimens in the diagnosis of MF. PMID:20850703

  8. Childhood hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a commonly delayed diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, Ana; Gouveia, Miguel; Tellechea, Óscar; Moreno, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs) are exceedingly rare in children and adolescents, with mycosis fungoides (MF) being the most frequent PCL diagnosed in childhood. There are numerous unusual clinical variants of MF, including the hypopigmented type form (HMF). HMF is exceptional overall, but comparatively common among children. We present an 8-year-old boy with a 3-year history of progressive, generalised, scaly, hypopigmented round patches and few erythematous papules. He was first diagnosed with pityriasis alba (PA), and moisturisers were prescribed with no improvement. Skin biopsy showed typical features of MF, and the patient was successfully treated with narrowband ultraviolet B. HMF may simulate atopic dermatitis, PA, pityriasis lichenoides, tinea versicolour, vitiligo, postinflammatory hypopigmentation or leprosy. Therefore, persistent and unusual hypopigmented lesions should be biopsied to rule out this rare variant of MF. PMID:25538219

  9. Annular hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a novel ringed variant.

    PubMed

    Uhlenhake, Elizabeth E; Mehregan, Darius M

    2012-05-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) is a relatively uncommon variant of cutaneous lymphoma that is mostly seen in darker skin types. We present a novel and unique clinical presentation in an African-American female patient, consisting of regular hypopigmented annular rings in areas of normal skin and in more typical hypopigmented patches of MF. The lesions appeared diffusely on all extremities, anterior chest and back. Histopathologic examination showed an atypical lymphocytic infiltrate at the dermal-epidermal junction with epidermotropism and few Pautrier's collections. The patient was otherwise healthy and improved with narrowband ultraviolet (UV)-B. This case represents a presentation of a most unusual variant of hypopigmented MF, for which we propose the name 'annular hypopigmented MF'. PMID:22515225

  10. SGN-35 in CD30-positive Lymphoproliferative Disorders (ALCL), Mycosis Fungoides (MF), and Extensive Lymphomatoid Papulosis (LyP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    CD-30 Positive Anaplastic Large T-cell Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell; Lymphomatoid Papulosis; Mycosis Fungoides; Skin Lymphoma; Cutaneous Lymphomas; Lymphoma; Hematologic Disorder

  11. Evaluation of cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with mycosis fungoides*

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mycosis fungoides, the most common subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, is more common in patients aged 45-55. OBJECTIVE Cardiovascular risk factors have been investigated in several skin diseases. However, the relation between cardiovascular diseases and mycosis fungoides remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess cardiovascular risk factors in patients with mycosis fungoides. METHODS 32 patients with mycosis fungoides and 26 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, homocystein, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein – cholesterol, were measured in the sera of patients. RESULTS Patients had significantly higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, low-density lipoprotein - cholesterol, total cholesterol (p= 0.032) (p< 0.001) (p= 0.001) (p< 0.001). There was a positive correlation between the levels of homo-cysteine and total cholesterol (p= 0.001, r = +0.431). Additionally, a significantly positive correlation was found between the levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and low-density lipoprotein - cholesterol (p= 0.014, r = +0.320) in patient group. CONCLUSIONS Patients with mycosis fungoides had significantly higher levels of total-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein -cholesterol, homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein than healthy subjects. The present study has demonstrated an increased rate of cardiovascular risk in patients with mycosis fungoides. Even though the etiology of these associations is elusive, dermatologists should be sensitized to investigate metabolic derangements in patients with mycosis fungoides, in order to lessen mortality and comorbidity with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:25672297

  12. Indications of a considerable decrease in the death rate in mycosis fungoides by PUVA treatment.

    PubMed

    Swanbeck, G; Roupe, G; Sandström, M H

    1994-11-01

    PUVA therapy has its roots in ancient India and Egypt and began to come into general use in the highly developed countries in the middle of the 1970's (1). The first reports of PUVA treatment of mycosis fungoides were published in 1976 (2); these were followed by several other studies in the two following years (3-7). Some of the early work on PUVA therapy was carried out in Sweden (8,9), and the modality was in general use in most major clinics by 1977. The dramatic effect on mycosis fungoides of PUVA therapy is well known, but whether the death rate is influenced is not known. For ethical reasons no controlled clinical studies have been performed. Sweden is a highly organized country with reliable death statistics at least for diseases as conspicuous as mycosis fungoides. The purpose of the present study was to provide data on the death rate in mycosis fungoides in Sweden from 1961 to 1990, which we think is relevant to the question whether PUVA treatment decreases the death rate in mycosis fungoides. PMID:7701883

  13. Folliculotropic mycosis fungoides with large-cell transformation presenting as dissecting cellulitis of the scalp.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, A C; Lessin, S R; Wilson, D M; Salhany, K E

    1997-03-01

    Follicular mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in which malignant lymphocytes preferentially infiltrate hair follicles. This report describes a patient with follicular mycosis fungoides presenting in a manner similar to dissecting cellulitis of the scalp with nonhealing, draining nodular lesions. Follicular mucinosis associated with folliculotropic mycosis fungoides resulted in follicular disruption and deep dissecting cellulitis. Large-cell transformation of CTCL was present in the initial diagnostic scalp and axillary lymph node specimens. The patient died from progressive CTCL 9 months following initial diagnosis despite electron beam radiation, topical mechlorethamine, interferon-alpha, and systemic chemotherapy. This case indicates that large-cell transformation of folliculotropic mycosis fungoides is an aggressive form of CTCL, and that folliculotropic mycosis fungoides can give rise to lesions which resemble dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on follicular epithelium adjacent to lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-positive folliculotropic lymphoma cells in this report provides insight into lymphocyte homing mechanisms in folliculotropic MF. PMID:9085153

  14. ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES AND SEZARY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Carreras, Jeanette; Laport, Ginna G.; Cutler, Corey S.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hale, Gregory A.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Gale, Robert Peter; Rowlings, Phillip A.; Freytes, César O; Miller, Alan M.; Vose, Julie M.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Montoto, Silvia; Maloney, David G.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2014-01-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant (CIBMTR) from 2000–2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4–206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/refractory disease. Majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared to myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs. 44 y p= 0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95 % CI 12–27%) and 22% (95 % CI 15–31%) respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41–60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50–71%) at 5 years. Progression free survival (PFS) at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22–40%) and 17% (95% CI 9–26%) respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45–63%) and 32% (95% CI 22–44%) respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5 year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half of them remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  15. Hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia in mycosis fungoides: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Matt; Maloney, Denise; Duvic, Madeleine

    2002-06-01

    The most common variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) is mycosis fungoides (MF), a malignant proliferation of atypical CD4+ CD45Ro+ T-cells that initially proliferate in the skin and later invades lymph nodes and other organs including the blood (Sezary syndrome). The pathogenesis of CTCL is largely unknown. We present definitive data showing a correlation between degree and prevalence of hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia and clinical stage of MF. Hypomagnesemia was present in 22.2% of MF patients with early stage (n = 27), 38.5% of intermediate stage (n = 13), and 67.5% of advanced stage disease (n = 40). Hypocalcemia was present in 8.3% of MF patients with early stage (n = 24), 54.5% with intermediate stage (n = 11), and 61.0% with advanced stage disease (n = 41). The odds ratios for having hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia in patients with stage II or higher MF compared with stage I patients were 5.33 and 16.24, respectively. Hypomagnesemia has been associated with immune function abnormalities including the development of T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in rats. We hypothesize that the hypomagnesemia may play a role in the progression or pathogenesis of MF or the Sezary syndrome (SS). This retrospective case series is the first study ever to report a relationship between serum cations and CTCL in humans. PMID:12152999

  16. Mycosis fungoides in Iranian population: an epidemiological and clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Fatemi Naeini, Farahnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Sadeghiyan, Hamidreza; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Najafian, Jamshid; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Extensive studies on Iranian MF patients are absent. The present study aimed to produce updated clinical information on Iranian MF patients. Methods. This was a retrospective, descriptive, single-center study, including all cases of MF seen in the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Isfahan, Iran, between 2003 and 2013. Data systematically recorded for each patient included clinical, biological, histological, and molecular findings. Results. Eighty-six patients with clinical and histologic diagnosis of MF were included in the study. Thirty-nine patients (45.3%) were male. Female predominance was observed in patients (male : female ratio is 1 : 1.2). Patients were between 7 and 84 years of age (median: 41). The interval from disease onset to diagnosis ranged from 0 to 55 years (median: 1 year). Eighteen cases (20.9%) had unusual variants of MF. The most common types included hypopigmented and poikilodermatous MF. Childhood cases of MF constituted 5.8% (5/86) of all patients. The early stages were seen in 82 cases (95.34%). Conclusion. The major differences in epidemiologic characteristics of MF in Iran are the lack of male predominance and the lower age of patients at the time of diagnosis. PMID:25694829

  17. Profile and outcome of childhood mycosis fungoides in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, E; Tay, Y K; Giam, Y C

    2000-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. It usually occurs in middle-aged and elderly persons, although several reports have described its occurrence in young children. The aim of this study was to review the profile and outcome of childhood MF in Singapore from 1989 to 1998. A total of nine patients (six males and three females) were diagnosed with MF before the age of 21 years. There were four Chinese, four Malay, and one Indian. The age at the time of histologic diagnosis ranged from 6 to 20 years (mean 14.3 years). Eight of the nine patients presented with hypopigmented patches and plaques. According to TNM staging, three were in stage 1A and six in stage 1B. The treatment modalities included psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) (n = 5), UVB (n = 2), and potent topical steroids (n = 2). We found that PUVA induced a faster clinical remission, but maintenance PUVA was required to prolong the relapse-free interval. This study also highlighted the need to consider MF in the differential diagnosis of hypopigmented dermatoses in dark-skinned individuals, especially if they occur on the buttocks. PMID:11085660

  18. Mycosis Fungoides in Iranian Population: An Epidemiological and Clinicopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi Naeini, Farahnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Sadeghiyan, Hamidreza; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Najafian, Jamshid; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Extensive studies on Iranian MF patients are absent. The present study aimed to produce updated clinical information on Iranian MF patients. Methods. This was a retrospective, descriptive, single-center study, including all cases of MF seen in the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Isfahan, Iran, between 2003 and 2013. Data systematically recorded for each patient included clinical, biological, histological, and molecular findings. Results. Eighty-six patients with clinical and histologic diagnosis of MF were included in the study. Thirty-nine patients (45.3%) were male. Female predominance was observed in patients (male : female ratio is 1 : 1.2). Patients were between 7 and 84 years of age (median: 41). The interval from disease onset to diagnosis ranged from 0 to 55 years (median: 1 year). Eighteen cases (20.9%) had unusual variants of MF. The most common types included hypopigmented and poikilodermatous MF. Childhood cases of MF constituted 5.8% (5/86) of all patients. The early stages were seen in 82 cases (95.34%). Conclusion. The major differences in epidemiologic characteristics of MF in Iran are the lack of male predominance and the lower age of patients at the time of diagnosis. PMID:25694829

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, M J; Lazarus, H M; Carreras, J; Laport, G G; Cutler, C S; Wiernik, P H; Hale, G A; Maharaj, D; Gale, R P; Rowlings, P A; Freytes, C O; Miller, A M; Vose, J M; Maziarz, R T; Montoto, S; Maloney, D G; Hari, P N

    2014-11-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant from 2000-2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4-206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/ refractory disease. The majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared with myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs 44 years, P=0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12-27%) and 22% (95% CI 15-31%), respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41-60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50-71%) at 5 years. PFS at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22-40%) and 17% (95% CI 9-26%), respectively. OS at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45-63%) and 32% (95% CI 22-44%), respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5-year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  20. Whole-genome sequencing reveals oncogenic mutations in mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    McGirt, Laura Y.; Jia, Peilin; Baerenwald, Devin A.; Duszynski, Robert J.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Zic, John A.; Zwerner, Jeffrey P.; Hucks, Donald; Dave, Utpal; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), is unknown. Although genetic alterations have been identified, none are considered consistently causative in MF. To identify potential drivers of MF, we performed whole-genome sequencing of MF tumors and matched normal skin. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing of MF samples and exome sequencing of CTCL cell lines were also performed. Multiple mutations were identified that affected the same pathways, including epigenetic, cell-fate regulation, and cytokine signaling, in MF tumors and CTCL cell lines. Specifically, interleukin-2 signaling pathway mutations, including activating Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) mutations, were detected. Treatment with a JAK3 inhibitor significantly reduced CTCL cell survival. Additionally, the mutation data identified 2 other potential contributing factors to MF, ultraviolet light, and a polymorphism in the tumor suppressor p53 (TP53). Therefore, genetic alterations in specific pathways in MF were identified that may be viable, effective new targets for treatment. PMID:26082451

  1. How I treat mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Sean; Hoppe, Richard; Prince, H Miles

    2016-06-23

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma variant and is closely related to a rare leukemic variant, Sézary syndrome (SS). MF patients at risk of disease progression can now be identified and an international consortium has been established to address the prognostic relevance of specific biologic factors and define a prognostic index. There are a lack of randomized clinical trial data in MF/SS and evidence is based on a traditional "stage-based" approach; treatment of early-stage disease (IA-IIA) involves skin directed therapies which include topical corticosteroids, phototherapy (psoralen with UVA or UVB), topical chemotherapy, topical bexarotene, and radiotherapy including total skin electron beam therapy. Systemic approaches are used for refractory early-stage and advanced-stage disease (IIB-IV) and include bexarotene, interferon α, extracorporeal photopheresis, histone deacetylase inhibitors, and antibody therapies such as alemtuzumab, systemic chemotherapy, and allogeneic transplantation. However, despite the number of biologic agents available, the treatment of advanced-stage disease still represents an unmet medical need with short duration of responses. Encouragingly, randomized phase 3 trials are assessing novel agents, including brentuximab vedotin and the anti-CCR4 antibody, mogamulizumab. A broader understanding of the biology of MF/SS will hopefully identify more effective targeted therapies. PMID:27151889

  2. TOX Acts an Oncological Role in Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Luo, Yixin; Liu, Jie; Liu, Yuehua; Sun, Qiuning

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a low-grade lymphoma characterized by clonal expansion of atypical CD4+ skin-homing T lymphocytes. Herein, we examined the role of thymocytes selection associated HMG-box (TOX), a gene previously found to be unregulated in MF skin biopsies, in MF pathogenesis. TOX encodes a high-mobility group family (HMG) domain DNA binding nuclear protein, which regulates the differentiation of developing T-cells. First, we confirmed that TOX expression levels in MF were increased compared with those in benign inflammatory dermatitis (BID) and normal skin. In addition, TOX level increased with the progression MF from patch stage to tumor stage. Overexpression of TOX accelerated the proliferation and migration of MF cell lines in vitro, which were blocked by AKT inhibitors. In conclusion, our study confirmed that TOX was highly expressed in MF lesions and accelerates the proliferation and migration of MF. TOX is a diagnostic marker for MF and may play a pathogenic role in disease progression. PMID:25811617

  3. Bullous pemphigoid. Occurrence in a patient with mycosis fungoides receiving PUVA and topical nitrogen mustard therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.W.; Ali, M.; Murray, J.C.; Hazra, T.A.

    1985-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman with mycosis fungoides developed blisters within cutaneous plaques while receiving PUVA therapy and topical nitrogen mustard. Direct and indirect immunofluorescence studies showed the findings of bullous pemphigoid. Her bullous disease was controlled after cessation of these therapies and institution of prednisone and methotrexate. During the 5 months following completion of a course of electron-beam therapy, she has been free of the cutaneous manifestations of both diseases. Previous instances of PUVA-related pemphigoid have occurred in psoriatics. The role of ultraviolet light in the induction of pemphigoid is discussed, particularly with regard to its possible interaction with the altered skin of psoriasis or mycosis fungoides. Some of the rare cases of bullous mycosis fungoides might actually have represented ultraviolet-unmasked bullous pemphigoid.

  4. Pediatric mycosis fungoides in Singapore: a series of 46 children.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yee Kiat; Koh, Mark Jean Aan; Giam, Yoke Chin; Tang, Mark Boon Yang; Chong, Wei Sheng; Tan, Suat Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated Asian children with mycosis fungoides (MF). We report a series of patients from a tertiary dermatologic institution in Singapore. A retrospective review was performed of patients younger than 16 years old diagnosed with MF between 2000 and 2008 at the National Skin Centre, Singapore. Forty-six patients were identified. At initial presentation, a provisional diagnosis of MF was made in 19 patients (41.3%), pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC) in 11 (23.9%) and postinflammatory hypopigmentation due to eczema or other causes in 11 (23.9%). After skin biopsy, the hypopigmented variant of MF was diagnosed in 42 patients (91.3%). There was one case each of PLC-like MF, pigmented purpuric dermatosis-like MF, classic MF, and solitary MF. Pityriasis lichenoides coexisted in three cases (6.5%). All except one patient presented with the early patch-plaque stage of disease (stage IA/B). The disease did not progress in any of our patients after a mean follow-up of 71.0 ± 52.5 months. Twenty-seven patients (58.7%) had complete disease clearance after a mean duration of 27.1 ± 28.1 months; 15 (49.7%) of 32 patients who received narrowband ultraviolet B treatment had complete clearance within an average of 8.9 ± 5.3 months, but 7 patients relapsed within 14.9 ± 14.8 months. One patient with solitary MF failed multiple treatment modalities before eventually achieving disease clearance with photodynamic therapy. Hypopigmented MF is the most common MF variant in Asian children. The diagnostic difficulty is in differentiating this from PLC, which may coexist with MF. Long-term prognosis is generally favorable. PMID:24890628

  5. Follicular mycosis fungoides – A report of four Indian cases

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, T.; Inchara, Y. K.; Antony, Meryl

    2009-01-01

    Background: Follicular Mycosis Fungoides (FMF) is an under-recognized disease in India. Its clinical mimics include Hansen’s disease and Sarcoidosis. Aims: To describe the clinical and pathological features of FMF. Materials and Methods: All cases of FMF between January and December 2007 were retrieved. Cases of conventional epidermotropic MF with a minor follicular component were excluded. Slides were reviewed by two observers. The following criteria were assessed: degree and density of folliculotropism of lymphocytes, location of folliculotropism (infundibular / isthmic / bulbar), follicular mucin, eosinophils, granulomas, and conventional epidermotropism. Each feature was assigned a semi-quantitative grade. Results: There were four cases of FMF, with an equal gender distribution and a mean age of 17.5 years. All lesions were on the face. They presented as: hypopigmented patches (2) and erythematous plaques (2). Alopecia was seen in two cases. The clinical diagnosis was Hansen’s disease in all four, with a differential of Alopecia mucinosa / Sarcoidosis in two cases.The histological features seen were: disproportionate folliculotropism, lymphocyte tagging with haloes, follicular mucin, and nucleomegaly / convolution in all four cases, prominent eosinophils (2), epithelioid granulomas (1), eccrine infiltration (4), parakeratosis at the follicular ostia (2), and sebaceotropism (1). The infiltrate was bulbar (4) and isthmic (2). The rest of the epidermis showed no hint of conventional MF. Conclusion: The preferential features for FMF were involvement of face, dominant folliculotropism, nuclear atypia and convolution, and follicular mucin. Presence of granulomas and eosinophils necessitated exclusion of infectious causes. The absence of findings of MF in the rest of the epidermis should not deter pathologists from rendering this diagnosis. PMID:20838548

  6. Selected inflammatory imitators of mycosis fungoides: histologic features and utility of ancillary studies.

    PubMed

    Arps, David P; Chen, Stephanie; Fullen, Douglas R; Hristov, Alexandra C

    2014-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common primary cutaneous lymphoma; however, it remains a significant diagnostic challenge, in part because of the overlap with several inflammatory dermatoses. Despite advances in immunohistochemistry and molecular diagnostics, false-positive, false-negative, and indeterminate diagnoses are not uncommon. In most cases, the overall balance of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features must be considered carefully because there are few sensitive and specific clues to the diagnosis. Moreover, an appropriate clinical presentation is essential to the diagnosis and helps to favor or exclude inflammatory/reactive processes. Herein, we discuss 3 important inflammatory dermatoses that may closely simulate mycosis fungoides, and we review the use of ancillary studies in these challenging cases. PMID:25268195

  7. Case-control study of possible causative factors in mycosis fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Tuyp, E.; Burgoyne, A.; Aitchison, T.; MacKie, R.

    1987-02-01

    A detailed case control study was carried out on 53 patients (33 males and 20 females) with histologically proven mycosis fungoides and on an age- and sex-matched control population. Possible causative factors investigated included occupation, recreation, and exposure to petrochemicals, pesticides, insecticides, and potential carcinogens. Exposure to plants of the Compositae family, tanning history, and chronic sun exposure were also investigated, as were smoking history, drug ingestion history, and other skin disease. Personal and family histories of other malignancies were also investigated. The only statistically significant difference to emerge was that the patients with mycosis fungoides had significantly more family history of atopic dermatitis. In view of the absence of any significant difference between patients and controls with regard to personal history of atopic dermatitis, this difference may be the result of multiple statistical testing rather than a phenomenon of true biological significance.

  8. [Treatment of mycosis fungoides with Zovirax (acyclovir). Study of 2 patients].

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Thiele, B; Steigleder, G K

    1985-04-01

    We report on two female patients suffering from mycosis fungoides, tumorous type but without systemic involvement, who have been treated with 400 mg Zovirax (Acyclovir) 3 times daily (about 15 mg/kg/day) for 12 days. The follow-up period amounted to 11 and 14 days, respectively. This therapy did not result in regression of the disease; one patient even showed progression of her skin tumors. PMID:4002770

  9. Calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia in a patient with granulomatous mycosis fungoides and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Takamasa; Ohashi, Naro; Tsuji, Naoko; Naito, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Shinsuke; Ono, Masafumi; Fujikura, Tomoyuki; Tsuji, Takayuki; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Yasuda, Hideo; Kato, Akihiko; Fujiyama, Toshiharu; Tokura, Yoshiki; Fujigaki, Yoshihide

    2013-05-01

    An 86-year-old man, diagnosed as having mycosis fungoides in May 2008 and treated with repeated radiation therapy, was admitted to our hospital for initiation of hemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in April 2012. On admission, his corrected serum calcium level was 9.3 mg/dL, and his intact parathyroid hormone level was 121.9 pg/mL (normal range 13.9-78.5 pg/mL), indicating secondary hyperparathyroidism due to ESRD. After starting hemodialysis, urinary volume diminished rapidly. The serum calcium level increased (12.7 mg/dL), and the intact parathyroid hormone level was suppressed (< 5 pg/mL), while the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) level increased (114 pg/mL, normal range: 20.0-60.0 pg/mL) in June 2012. The possibilities of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis were ruled out. Skin biopsies from tumorous lesions revealed a diagnosis of granulomatous mycosis fungoides. The serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels and the degrees of skin lesions went in parallel with the increased serum calcium and calcitriol levels. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed as having calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia possibly associated with granulomatous mycosis fungoides. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides is rare, and its association with calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia has not been reported. Careful attention to calcium metabolism is needed in patients with granulomatous mycosis fungoides, especially in patients with ESRD. PMID:24175265

  10. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in type v skin: a report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Ranawaka, Ranthilaka R; Abeygunasekara, Priyanka H; de Silva, M V Chandu

    2011-01-01

    Five patients with type V skin were studied to describe the clinical manifestations, pathological features, and treatment response in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF). The mean age of patients was 22.4 years at diagnosis, with a mean of 36 months of diagnostic delay. Two were children aged 11 and 13 years. Skin patches were limited to sunlight-covered body areas. In tropical climate, exposure to natural sunlight possibly cured the lesions on sun-exposed areas at early stage of onset. HMF may frequently be misinterpreted as eczema, vitiligo, or progressive macular hypomelanosis clinically and histopathologically as seen in our case series. PMID:23198169

  11. Inflammatory vitiligo versus hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a 58-year-old Indian female.

    PubMed

    Soro, Luis A; Gust, Anthony J; Purcell, Stephen M

    2013-10-01

    Vitiligo, particularly the rarer inflammatory variant, may be difficult to distinguish from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) clinically. Complicating the distinction is that when biopsies are taken from the periphery of early vitiliginous lesions or from lesions with an inflammatory border (inflammatory vitiligo), a dermal lymphocytic infiltrate, exocytosis, interface dermatitis, and mild spongiosis may be seen, all resembling the findings seen in hypopigmented MF. We present a case demonstrating the difficulty in differentiating between these two diseases and examine some characteristic clinical and histopathological features of each. Often, a conclusive diagnosis cannot be made, necessitating close follow-up of the patient and monitoring for progression of their disease over time. PMID:24350017

  12. Hypopigmented Mycosis Fungoides in Type V Skin: A Report of 5 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ranawaka, Ranthilaka R.; Abeygunasekara, Priyanka H.; de Silva, M. V. Chandu

    2011-01-01

    Five patients with type V skin were studied to describe the clinical manifestations, pathological features, and treatment response in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF). The mean age of patients was 22.4 years at diagnosis, with a mean of 36 months of diagnostic delay. Two were children aged 11 and 13 years. Skin patches were limited to sunlight-covered body areas. In tropical climate, exposure to natural sunlight possibly cured the lesions on sun-exposed areas at early stage of onset. HMF may frequently be misinterpreted as eczema, vitiligo, or progressive macular hypomelanosis clinically and histopathologically as seen in our case series. PMID:23198169

  13. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a report of 7 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stone, M L; Styles, A R; Cockerell, C J; Pandya, A G

    2001-02-01

    Over the last 2 decades, hypopigmented macules have been reported with increasing frequency as an initial presentation of mycosis fungoides (MF). We retrospectively reviewed 7 patients with hypopigmented MF. The mean age was 35 years at disease onset, with a mean of 5.5 years' duration of illness before presentation. All of our patients were Fitzpatrick skin type IV or V, and most reported pruritus. Histologic findings in all cases were consistent with MF. Treatment with topical nitrogen mustard produced repigmentation in 4 of 6 patients. PMID:11236223

  14. Inflammatory vitiligo versus hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a 58-year-old Indian female

    PubMed Central

    Soro, Luis A.; Gust, Anthony J.; Purcell, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo, particularly the rarer inflammatory variant, may be difficult to distinguish from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) clinically. Complicating the distinction is that when biopsies are taken from the periphery of early vitiliginous lesions or from lesions with an inflammatory border (inflammatory vitiligo), a dermal lymphocytic infiltrate, exocytosis, interface dermatitis, and mild spongiosis may be seen, all resembling the findings seen in hypopigmented MF. We present a case demonstrating the difficulty in differentiating between these two diseases and examine some characteristic clinical and histopathological features of each. Often, a conclusive diagnosis cannot be made, necessitating close follow-up of the patient and monitoring for progression of their disease over time. PMID:24350017

  15. Managing Patients with Cutaneous B-Cell and T-Cell Lymphomas Other Than Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Kheterpal, Meenal; Mehta-Shah, Neha; Virmani, Pooja; Myskowski, Patricia L; Moskowitz, Alison; Horwitz, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas (CL) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms characterized with clinical and histopathological variation, as well as overlap with benign dermatoses. Diagnosis and treatment of CLs is challenging and often requires a multidisciplinary approach. However, prognostic knowledge of these conditions and awareness of treatment options can help optimize appropriate use of available regimens, thereby improving care for patients. Here, we review the most recent literature and outline treatment themes for managing patients with cutaneous B-cell and T-cell lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides. PMID:27101016

  16. Extracorporeal Photopheresis in the Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zic, John A

    2015-10-01

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an immunomodulating procedure that leads to an expansion of peripheral blood dendritic cell populations and an enhanced TH1 immune response in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Because of its excellent side effect profile and moderate efficacy, ECP is considered first-line therapy for erythrodermic mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome. Patients with a measurable but low blood tumor burden are most likely to respond to ECP, and the addition of adjunctive immunostimulatory agents may also increase response rates. There may be a role for ECP in the treatment of refractory early stage MF, but data are limited. PMID:26433848

  17. Follow-up of patients with mycosis fungoides after interferon α2b treatment failure

    PubMed Central

    Studziński, Maciej; Giebel, Sebastian; Krause, Anna; Olejniczak, Monika; Grzanka, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of T cell cutaneous lymphoma( CTCL) is a controversial subject and the effectiveness of treatment is still low. Aim Report of single center experience of management CTCL after progression after first line treatment. Material and methods We present 41 patients with CTCL, 29 received interferon α2b in first line, and 12 of them received second line therapy. Results Overall response rate for second line therapy was 60%. Conclusions Results of the follow-up of patients with mycosis fungoides after interferon α2b treatment failure with the literature review and discussion. PMID:26015774

  18. Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: Current challenges in assessment, management and prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Charlotte Fm; Newland, Kate; McCormack, Christopher; Lade, Stephen; Prince, H Miles

    2016-08-01

    Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are the most common variants of the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Assessment of a patient with a suspected diagnosis requires thorough history taking and physical examination, in combination with skin biopsy. In some cases flow cytometry, molecular studies and imaging are also required in order to diagnose and stage the disease. Staging is derived from the tumour-node-metastasis-blood classification and is currently our best attempt to stratify prognosis and hence guide management in this complex disease. Many other clinical, biological and pathological factors may help to distinguish groups at risk and predict prognosis more accurately. Management remains heavily guided by staging, such that patients with early-stage disease generally begin treatment with skin-directed or local therapies and those with advanced-stage disease have many treatment options, including chemotherapy, the use of biological agents, local and total body radiotherapy, as well as haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Besides staging, many other patient-related factors influence the treatment strategy, particularly where symptom relief is paramount. There are many challenges remaining in the study of Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome and, given the rarity of the disease, concerted worldwide efforts are required to conduct efficient and effective research. PMID:25988337

  19. Frequency of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in Egyptian patients presenting with hypopigmented lesions of the trunk.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, Mona; El-Nabarawy, Eman; El Nemr, Reham; Hassan, Abeer M

    2015-11-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) is an uncommon variant of mycosis fungoides with an unknown exact frequency. We aimed to study the frequency of HMF in a cohort of Egyptian patients presenting to a tertiary care center in Cairo, Egypt, with hypopigmented lesions of the trunk. Hundred patients with hypopigmented lesions involving the trunk (with or without other sites involvement) were subjected to thorough clinical and histopathological examination. Immunohistochemical studies (S100, CD4, and CD8) were performed when indicated. Constellation of findings was used to reach a final diagnosis. Sixteen cases had HMF (16%). Other than HMF, our cohort included hypopigmented parapsoriasis en plaque (42 cases), postinflammatory hypopigmentation (28 cases), progressive macular hypomelanosis (12 cases), and pityriasis alba (2 cases). In comparison with other hypopigmented disorders, HMF was significantly associated with progressive disease course (P = 0.004), affection of distal upper limbs (P = 0.005), proximal lower limbs (P = 0.003), large-sized lesions (>5 cm) (P < 0.0001), well-defined margin (P < 0.0001), scaliness (P = 0.002), erythema (P < 0.0001), atrophy (P = 0.012), and mottled pigmentation (P < 0.0001). Awareness of HMF and its characteristic clinical features is mandatory to avoid underdiagnosis or overdiagnosis with subsequent morbidity or unnecessary aggressive therapy, respectively. PMID:26262921

  20. A Prospective, Open-Label Study of Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Kamstrup, Maria R.; Specht, Lena; Skovgaard, Gunhild L.; Gniadecki, Robert

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low-dose (4 Gy) total skin electron beam therapy as a second-line treatment of Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides in a prospective, open-label study. Methods and Materials: Ten patients (6 men, 4 women, average age 68.7 years [range, 55-82 years]) with histopathologically confirmed mycosis fungoides T2-T4 N0-N1 M0 who did not achieve complete remission or relapsed within 4 months after treatment with psoralen plus ultraviolet-A were included. Treatment consisted of low-dose total skin electron beam therapy administered at a total skin dose of 4 Gy given in 4 fractions over 4 successive days. Results: Two patients had a complete clinical response but relapsed after 3.5 months. Six patients had partial clinical responses, with a mean duration of 2.0 months. One patient had no clinical response. Median time to relapse was 2.7 months. One patient died of unrelated causes and did not complete treatment. Acute side effects included desquamation, xerosis, and erythema of the skin. No severe side effects were observed. Conclusion: Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy can induce complete and partial responses in Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides; however, the duration of remission is short. Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy may find application in palliative treatment of mycosis fungoides because of limited toxicity and the possibility of repeating treatments for long-term disease control.

  1. Coexistence of patch stage mycosis fungoides and interstitial granuloma annulare in the same patient: a pitfall in the clinicopathologic diagnosis of mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Koochek, Arash; Fink-Puches, Regina; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2012-04-01

    Several clinical and histopathologic variants of mycosis fungoides (MF) have been well described, including the often elusive interstitial MF. Differentiation from other inflammatory disorders, such as interstitial granuloma annulare (GA) and inflammatory morphea, may be extremely difficult. We report a case of MF and GA coexisting in a 54-year-old woman who initially presented to clinic in 2000 with slightly scaly patches on the trunk and extremities, histopathologically diagnostic of MF. A second biopsy taken a few months later revealed an interstitial infiltrate that was initially interpreted as interstitial MF. Over the following 10 years, additional biopsies revealed features of conventional MF. In 2009, a new biopsy showed unequivocal features of interstitial GA. Reevaluation of the original biopsy, diagnostic of "interstitial MF," revealed that this, too, could be better classified as interstitial GA than interstitial MF. Our case illustrates that MF and interstitial GA may coexist simultaneously, thus representing a pitfall in the histopathologic diagnosis of MF. Given the similarities in clinicopathologic presentation, dermatologists and dermatopathologists should be cautious not to inadvertently misinterpret GA as interstitial MF. PMID:22240773

  2. [Gemcitabine Monotherapy for Advanced Mycosis Fungoides--Two Case Reports and a Literature Review].

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Mamiko; Takasu, Hiroshi; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Gemcitabine, a pyrimidine nucleoside analogue, is gaining recognition as a potential therapeutic agent for advanced-stage and refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). We report of 2 patients whose advanced-stage mycosis fungoides was not sufficiently controlled by prior CHOP therapy. Both patients showed great improvement in the skin lesions with weekly gemcitabine therapy (1,000-1,200 mg/m2). The patients received four and 8 cycles of gemcitabine monotherapy, respectively, and no grade 3-4 hematological or hepatic adverse events occurred. This is the first report of the efficacy of gemcitabine for CTCL in Japan. Gemcitabine is well tolerated and is an effective monotherapy for CTCL. PMID:26809303

  3. [Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by oral bexarotene in a patient with advanced mycosis fungoides].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Barrio, S; Izu, R; García-Ruiz, J C; Acebo, E; Martínez de Lagrán, Z; Díaz-Pérez, J L

    2008-09-01

    We describe the case of a 17-year-old patient with rapidly progressing and aggressive mycosis fungoides, with multiple cutaneous tumors and large cell transformation. She was initially treated with 3 cycles of high-dose chemotherapy with mega-CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) without response, leading to the decision to undertake autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Partial remission of the disease was achieved with this treatment and subsequent introduction of oral bexarotene led to complete remission, which has been maintained for more than 3 years with good tolerance of oral therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the use of oral bexarotene. PMID:18682170

  4. Treatment of pruritus in early-stage hypopigmented mycosis fungoides with aprepitant.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Gallo, David; Albarrán Planelles, Cristina; Linares Barrios, Mario; Fernández Anguita, María José; Márquez Enríquez, Juan; Rodríguez Mateos, María Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Pruritus is a symptom that significantly affects the patient's quality of life in cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). The most effective treatments are those that address the condition itself; however, it is often not possible to control this symptom. Lymphoma-related pruritus normally becomes more severe as CTCL progresses, constituting an important factor for quality of life in these patients. Substance P is a neuromodulator which appears to play a key role in pruritus. Aprepitant is a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist affecting the substance P receptor. So far, several cases have been documented with an antipruritic response to the drug aprepitant in advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF). In this paper, we describe an excellent response to aprepitant in a female patient with severe pruritus secondary to hypopigmented stage I MF. We would also like to stress the absence of nausea and vomiting of this combined therapy of interferon and aprepitant. Aprepitant could improve tolerance to interferon. PMID:24517320

  5. Efficacy of narrowband ultraviolet B twice weekly for hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in Asians.

    PubMed

    Kanokrungsee, S; Rajatanavin, N; Rutnin, S; Vachiramon, V

    2012-03-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. To date, there have been no data published about the efficacy of a twice-weekly regimen of narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) for the treatment of hypopigmented MF. We retrospectively reviewed 11 patients with hypopigmented MF who were treated with NB-UVB twice weekly between 2001 and 2010. Of the 11 patients, 7 achieved a complete response with a mean of 40 treatments; the remaining 4 patients had a partial response. Upon discontinuation of treatment, three patients had clinical relapse after complete remission. Median time to relapse was 10 months. A twice-weekly regimen of NB-UVB is an effective treatment for hypopigmented MF with minimal side-effects. However, the relapse rate is high, and unfortunately, no clinical or histological features can predict the relapse of the disease. PMID:22276982

  6. Interstitial Mycosis Fungoides With Lichen Sclerosus-Like Clinical and Histopathological Features.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Burak; Kempf, Werner; Seckin, Dilek; Ergun, Tulin; Yucelten, Deniz; Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2016-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) simulates a variety of dermatologic disorders histopathologically and clinically, well deserving the designation of a great mimicker. Interstitial MF is a rare, but well-recognized histopathological variant resembling the interstitial form of granuloma annulare or the inflammatory phase of morphea. From a clinical standpoint, MF can have a wide array of manifestations, including an anecdotal presentation with lesions clinically suggestive of lichen sclerosus (LS). We herein report a 25-year-old man with a history of patch-stage MF who later developed widespread LS-like lesions histopathologically consistent with interstitial MF. In some biopsies, additional features resembling LS were discerned. We think that our case might represent a unique variant of interstitial MF presenting with LS-like lesions. The diagnostic challenge arising from this uncommon presentation is discussed together with review of the literature. PMID:26630682

  7. The utility of bexarotene in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Manisha R; Scarisbrick, Julia J

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is an umbrella term that encompasses a group of neoplasms that have atypical T-lymphocytes in the skin. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common type of CTCL and Sézary syndrome (SS) is the leukemic form. Treatment for CTCL is dependent on the stage of disease and response to previous therapy. Therapy is divided into skin-directed treatment, which tends to be first line for early-stage disease, and systemic therapy, which is reserved for refractory CTCL. Bexarotene is a rexinoid and was licensed in Europe in 2002 for use in patients with advanced disease that have been refractory to a previous systemic treatment. We review the use of bexarotene as monotherapy and in combination with other treatments. PMID:25678803

  8. Flow Cytometric Analysis of T, B, and NK Cells Antigens in Patients with Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Yazıcı, Serkan; Bülbül Başkan, Emel; Budak, Ferah; Oral, Barbaros; Adim, Şaduman Balaban; Ceylan Kalin, Zübeyde; Özkaya, Güven; Aydoğan, Kenan; Saricaoğlu, Hayriye; Tunali, Şükran

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological correlation and prognostic value of cell surface antigens expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF). 121 consecutive MF patients were included in this study. All patients had peripheral blood flow cytometry as part of their first visit. TNMB and histopathological staging of the cases were retrospectively performed in accordance with International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC) criteria at the time of flow cytometry sampling. To determine prognostic value of cell surface antigens, cases were divided into two groups as stable and progressive disease. 17 flow cytometric analyses of 17 parapsoriasis (PP) and 11 analyses of 11 benign erythrodermic patients were included as control groups. Fluorescent labeled monoclonal antibodies were used to detect cell surface antigens: T cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, TCRαβ+, TCRγδ+, CD7+, CD4+CD7+, CD4+CD7−, and CD71+), B cells (HLA-DR+, CD19+, and HLA-DR+CD19+), NKT cells (CD3+CD16+CD56+), and NK cells (CD3−CD16+CD56+). The mean value of all cell surface antigens was not statistically significant between parapsoriasis and MF groups. Along with an increase in cases of MF stage statistically significant difference was found between the mean values of cell surface antigens. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cell surface antigens in patients with mycosis fungoides may contribute to predicting disease stage and progression. PMID:26788525

  9. Clinicopathological features of mycosis fungoides in patients exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Soo; Jang, Jun Gyu; Han, Sang Hwa; Park, Jong Bin; Kang, Dong Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2013-08-01

    There are no reports on the clinicopathological features of mycosis fungoides (MF) among veterans exposed to Agent Orange, one of the herbicides used during the Vietnam War. To evaluate the clinical, histopathological and genotypic findings of Vietnam War veterans with MF and a positive history of exposure to Agent Orange, we performed a comparative clinicopathological study between MF patients with a history of Agent Orange exposure and those without a history of Agent Orange exposure. Twelve Vietnam War veterans with MF were identified. The mean interval from Agent Orange exposure to diagnosis was 24.5 years (range, 9-35). Skin lesions were significantly present on exposed and unexposed areas. Most patients (75%) experienced pruritus (mean visual analog scale score of 6.7). MF was manifested by plaques in 10 patients and by lichenification in five. Histopathological features of most cases were consistent with MF. Biopsy specimens also demonstrated irregular acanthosis (66.7%). In the comparative study, MF patients with a history of Agent Orange exposure differed significantly from those without exposure to Agent Orange in demographic and clinical characteristics. In addition, patients with exposure had an increased tendency for lesions in the exposed area. Notably, our patients showed a higher frequency (33.3%) of mycosis fungoides palmaris et plantaris than in previous studies. Histologically, irregular acanthosis was more frequently observed than ordinary MF. Our results indicate that dermatologists should pay close attention to these clinicopathological differences. Careful assessment of history of exposure to defoliants is warranted in some cases suspicious for MF. PMID:23724870

  10. STAT3/5-Dependent IL9 Overexpression Contributes to Neoplastic Cell Survival in Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Vieyra-Garcia, Pablo A.; Wei, Tianling; Naym, David Gram; Fredholm, Simon; Fink-Puches, Regina; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Odum, Niels; O'Malley, John T.; Gniadecki, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Sustained inflammation is a key feature of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Resident IL9–producing T cells have been found in skin infections and certain inflammatory skin diseases, but their role in MF is currently unknown. Experimental Design We analyzed lesional skin from patients with MF for the expression of IL9 and its regulators. To determine which cells were producing IL9, high-throughput sequencing was used to identify malignant clones and Vb-specific antibodies were employed to visualize malignant cells in histologic preparations. To explore the mechanism of IL9 secretion, we knocked down STAT3/5 and IRF4 by siRNA transfection in CTCL cell lines receiving psoralen+UVA (PUVA) ± anti-IL9 antibody. To further examine the role of IL9 in tumor development, the EL-4 T-cell lymphoma model was used in C57BL/6 mice. Results Malignant and reactive T cells produce IL9 in lesional skin. Expression of the Th9 transcription factor IRF4 in malignant cells was heterogeneous, whereas reactive T cells expressed it uniformly. PUVA or UVB phototherapy diminished the frequencies of IL9- and IL9r-positive cells, as well as STAT3/5a and IRF4 expression in lesional skin. IL9 production was regulated by STAT3/5 and silencing of STAT5 or blockade of IL9 with neutralizing antibodies potentiated cell death after PUVA treatment in vitro. IL9-depleted mice exhibited a reduction of tumor growth, higher frequencies of regulatory T cells, and activated CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Conclusion Our results suggest that IL9 and its regulators are promising new targets for therapy development in mycosis fungoides. PMID:26851186

  11. A new protoparvovirus in human fecal samples and cutaneous T cell lymphomas (mycosis fungoides).

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung G; Dreno, Brigitte; da Costa, Antonio Charlys; Li, Linlin; Orlandi, Patricia; Deng, Xutao; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Siqueira, Juliana; Knol, Anne-Chantal; Halary, Franck; Dantal, Jacques; Alexander, Kathleen A; Pesavento, Patricia A; Delwart, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We genetically characterized seven nearly complete genomes in the protoparvovirus genus from the feces of children with diarrhea. The viruses, provisionally named cutaviruses (CutaV), varied by 1-6% nucleotides and shared ~76% and ~82% amino acid identity with the NS1 and VP1 of human bufaviruses, their closest relatives. Using PCR, cutavirus DNA was found in 1.6% (4/245) and 1% (1/100) of diarrhea samples from Brazil and Botswana respectively. In silico analysis of pre-existing metagenomics datasets then revealed closely related parvovirus genomes in skin biopsies from patients with epidermotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL or mycosis fungoides). PCR of skin biopsies yielded cutavirus DNA in 4/17 CTCL, 0/10 skin carcinoma, and 0/21 normal or noncancerous skin biopsies. In situ hybridization of CTCL skin biopsies detected viral genome within rare individual cells in regions of neoplastic infiltrations. The influence of cutavirus infection on human enteric functions and possible oncolytic role in CTCL progression remain to be determined. PMID:27393975

  12. Mycosis fungoides: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography in staging and monitoring the effect of therapy

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Maria Mathew; D’Souza, Paschal; Sharma, Rajnish; Jaimini, Abhinav; Mondal, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman, diagnosed as a case of mycosis fungoides (MF), underwent [18F]-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) examination. The study revealed intense FDG uptake in a large ulceroproliferative right thigh lesion, indurated plaques in the chest wall and left thigh, along with multiple sites of cutaneous involvement, axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. The patient underwent chemotherapy with CHOP regimen, radiotherapy for the right thigh lesion, along with topical corticosteroids and emollients for the disseminated cutaneous involvement. Repeat [18F]-FDG PET/CT study performed a year later, showed near complete disease regression specifically of the ulceroproliferative lesion and indurated cutaneous plaques, no change in lymphadenopathy, and a subtle diffuse progression of the remaining cutaneous lesions. A multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, staging and treatment of MF has long been suggested for optimizing outcomes from management of patients with this disease. This case highlights the potential role of incorporating PET/CT as a single modality imaging technique in the staging and assessment of response to therapy. PMID:25829740

  13. Syringotropic mycosis fungoides responding well to VELP chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LUO, YANG; ZHANG, LI; SUN, YU-JIAO; DU, HUA; YANG, GUI-LAN

    2016-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), a low-malignant lymphoproliferative disorder, is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The current study reported a case of syringotropic MF, a rare variant of MF, which presented with reactive B cell proliferation, lymphoid follicle formation, hair loss and lymphadenopathy. The clinical manifestations of the patient were MF-like lumps. Immunohistochemical staining of AE1/AE3 showed that there were abundant infiltrated lymphocytes surrounding the syringocystadenoma. In addition, the direction of the lymphocyte arrangement was consistent with the meandering direction of syringocystadenoma. The patient did not respond to 1-month narrowband (311-nm) ultraviolet therapy; however, a good response was obtained subsequent to one cycle of chemotherapy with vincristine sulfate, etoposide, L-asparaginase and prednisone acetate (know as the VELP regimen). After 7 days of VELP chemotherapy, the skin lesions were ameliorated, hair loss was improved and lymphadenopathy disappeared. No lymphadenopathy or new skin lesions were observed during 6 months of follow-up. PMID:27313668

  14. Decreased interleukin-21 expression in skin and blood in advanced mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Kabasawa, Miyoko; Sugaya, Makoto; Oka, Tomonori; Takahashi, Naomi; Kawaguchi, Makiko; Suga, Hiraku; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Takahashi, Takehiro; Shibata, Sayaka; Fujita, Hideki; Asano, Yoshihide; Tada, Yayoi; Kadono, Takafumi; Okochi, Hitoshi; Sato, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 is regarded as a potent antitumor agent, which increases the cytotoxicity of both natural killer (NK) and CD8(+) T cells. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-21 in mycosis fungoides (MF). IL-21 mRNA expression levels in patch and plaque MF were significantly higher than those in normal skin. IL-21 mRNA expression levels in tumor MF were significantly decreased compared with those in patch and plaque MF. Interestingly, mRNA expression levels of IL-21 in MF lesional skin significantly correlated with those of T-helper type-1 cytokines/chemokines such as CXCL10, CXCL11 and γ-interferon. Immunohistochemistry showed that IL-21 was expressed by keratinocytes in patch and plaque MF. Furthermore, serum IL-21 levels in patients with tumor MF were significantly lower than those of healthy controls and plaque MF. Thus, IL-21 expression was significantly downregulated in skin and blood of patients with tumor MF, which may contribute to progression of MF. Our study suggests that recombinant IL-21 would be a promising therapy for MF. PMID:26825047

  15. Conjunctival Involvement of T-Cell Lymphoma in a Patient with Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Aldrees, Sultan S.; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Alghamdi, Sarah A.; Logan, Patrick T.; Callejo, Sonia; Burnier, Miguel N.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ocular involvement in mycosis fungoides (MF) cases occurs in one-third of patients with the eyelid being the most frequent site affected; however, conjunctival involvement is rarely reported. Herein, we report a rare case of conjunctival involvement of MF. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old man who was previously diagnosed with MF in 2010 and was treated presented in 2014 complaining of foreign body sensation and redness in both eyes. Slit lamp examination of both eyes showed erythematous conjunctival growth that extended circumferentially. Physical examination revealed erythematous skin lesions on different body parts. Conjunctival biopsy was performed and revealed a dense, highly polymorphic lymphocytic population. The immunophenotype demonstrated a neoplastic T-cell origin consistent with MF. A diagnosis of conjunctival involvement by MF was made. The conjunctiva was treated with radiotherapy resulting in tumor regression. There were no recurrences at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusion. T-cell lymphoma should be considered in patients with a history of MF presenting with conjunctival and skin lesions. PMID:26989539

  16. Mycosis fungoides--an underwriting prospective with emphasis on staging and risk selection.

    PubMed

    Iacovino, J R

    1994-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides is a T-cell lymphoma having a broad clinical spectrum ranging from localized cutaneous to rapidly fatal systemic disease. Early clinical presentation is non specific, delaying correct diagnosis. Compared to clinical, the insurable spectrum is narrow. Staging for skin, lymph node and other organ manifestations is presented. Factors which influence mortality within each stage are elucidated. The survival curves of stages and stage groupings are illustrated and discussed to facilitate risk classification. Cutaneous (T) and lymph node (LN) stages are the most important prognosticators. Substages T1/T2, LN1/LN2 without associated palpable adenopathy, eosinophilia, visceral and blood positive findings are insurable. It would be most appropriate to place them in a tumor class of mild/moderate risk after the initial excessive mortality period ends. Higher T and LN substages, adenopathy and visceral disease have highly adverse mortality. These ultimately reveal a flattening of survival curves at 8-10 years. Although numerous treatment modalities have been used, none appear to consistently prolong life expectancy except in the earliest stage skin disease. PMID:10147101

  17. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in childhood and adolescence: a long-term retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Castano, Ekaterina; Glick, Sharon; Wolgast, Lucia; Naeem, Rizwan; Sunkara, Jaya; Elston, Dirk; Jacobson, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Patients with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) present at a younger age than those with classic MF. Our goal was to describe the clinical presentation, histopathologic features and long-term outcome in patients who developed HMF before the age of 21. It was observed that among 69 pediatric patients diagnosed with MF between 1992 and 2010, 50 had HMF. Thirty-five patients had clinical follow-up. There were 37 males and 32 females with a mean age of 13.6 years. Most patients were African American or Hispanic and presented with multiple hypopigmented patches. All biopsies showed epidermotropism of T-lymphocytes, whereas fibroplasia and lichenoid infiltrate were variable. All specimens tested were CD8+. Treatment modalities included topical steroids, narrow band ultraviolet B and psoralen and ultraviolet A. HMF patients were followed for <1-12 years. Most children responded to treatment, but recurrence rates were high. One patient progressed to plaque/tumor stage. Others did not progress; however, many were lost to follow-up. We present a large cohort of children with HMF and report on the features of disease and progression. A major difference in histology of HMF was lack of fibroplasia and lichenoid infiltrate, probably because of presentation in the early patch stage. Most patients have a waxing-and-waning course and relapse after discontinuation of therapy, requiring repetitive treatment. PMID:24320808

  18. Mycosis fungoides in Arab children and adolescents: a report of 36 patients from Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti; AlSaleh, Qasem A; Al-Ajmi, Hejab; Al-Sabah, Homoud; Elkashlan, Muhammad; Al-Shemmari, Salem; Demierre, Marie-France

    2010-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is rare in children and adolescents. This study was aimed to determine the clinicoepidemiologic features of juvenile onset (≤18 yrs) MF in Kuwait. Thirty-six children and adolescents (≤18 yrs) with MF registered in a referral photobiology unit for cutaneous lymphomas between July 1991 and June 2009 were included in this study. Children and adolescents were observed to constitute 16.6% of the total number of patients with MF, with 97% of patients of Arab ethnicity. The age-adjusted incidence rate of MF in children and adolescents among the total population was 0.29/100,000 persons/year. Among 36 Arab children and adolescents, boys outnumbered girls by 1.25:1. Mean and median age at onset of disease was 9 years, and age at diagnosis was 13 years. Patch stage disease was the most common clinical variant (75%) with 56% with pure hypopigmented MF-variant. The majority of patients (75%) had stage IB (TNM and B staging) disease. The study highlights a high prevalence and incidence of juvenile MF in Kuwait with a predominantly hypopigmented presentation. PMID:21138468

  19. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: frequent expression of a CD8+ T-cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; McCalmont, Timothy H

    2002-04-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) is a form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in which hypopigmentation occurs in the absence of classic lesions of MF. Hypopigmented MF predominantly affects people with dark complexions. The natural history of this variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is similar to that of conventional MF, although the disease onset is usually in childhood or adolescence. In a retrospective study we evaluated the clinical, histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular characteristics of hypopigmented MF in 15 patients. Similar to other reports, the disease onset occurred in childhood and adolescence in most of the cases. The survival rate was comparable with that of classic MF. We did not observe progression to systemic disease or lymph node involvement. Histopathologically hypopigmented lesions were indistinguishable from hyperpigmented or erythematous patches. On immunohistochemical analysis a predominantly CD8+ infiltrate was detected in the majority of cases (nine of 15 patients). To determine whether epidermotropic CD8+ T cells represent the malignant T-cell clone or whether these cells are innocent, tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes, we performed microdissection of epidermotropic CD8+ T cells and analyzed T-cell receptor-gamma chain gene for rearrangements. The epidermotropic CD8+ T lymphocytes showed clonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangement and therefore represented the malignant T-cell clone. We conclude that hypopigmented MF tends to occur in young people and that it belongs to the group of CD8+ cutaneous T-cell lymphomas in the majority of cases. PMID:11914622

  20. Interferon and low dose methotrexate improve outcome in refractory mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Nambo, M Jesús; Neri, Natividad; Castañeda, Claudia; Cleto, Sergio; Gonzalez, Martha; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith

    2007-12-01

    Treatment of refractory mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome remain unsatisfactory. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and toxicity of low-dose methotrexate (10 mg/m(2), biweekly) and interferon (9.0 MU, three times a week) as induction therapy by 6 or 12 months, followed, if patients achieved a complete remission, by interferon maintenance until toxicity or relapse. In an intent-to-treat analysis, 158 patients were considered evaluable. Complete response (biopsy proven) was observed in 112 patients (49 [31%] at 6 months and 63 [49%] at 12 months); thus, the complete response rate was 74%. With a median follow-up of 155 months (range, 62-181), progression-free disease was 71% and overall survival was 69%. Acute toxicity was mild, treatment was well tolerated, and to date no late toxicity has been observed. We conclude that this regimen is a benefit to this setting of patients, with excellent outcome and mild toxicity. PMID:18158775

  1. Granuloma annulare with a mycosis fungoides-like distribution and palisaded granulomas of CD68-positive histiocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Barusevicius, Alan; Lessin, Stuart R

    2004-07-01

    We describe 3 unusual cases of granuloma annulare with multiple macular lesions in a distribution that simulated mycosis fungoides in patients with no associated underlying diseases. Repeated biopsies showed typical well-formed palisading granulomas and no evidence of an atypical lymphocytic infiltrate. There was no vasculitis, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, or interstitial infiltrate. The patients had no associated underlying diseases. Most of the histiocytes in the palisading granulomas were strongly positive for CD68. The lymphocytes were a minor component of the granulomatous inflammation and were predominantly CD8(+) T-cells. The findings in these cases add to the spectrum of previously defined granulomatous eruptions of the skin. PMID:15243522

  2. Canine cutaneous epitheliotropic lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) is a proliferative disorder of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P. F.; Olivry, T.; Naydan, D.

    1994-01-01

    Canine epitheliotropic lymphoma (mycosis fungoides [MF]) is a spontaneous neoplasm of skin and mucous membranes that occurs in old dogs (mean age 11 years) and has no breed predilection. The lesions evolve from a patch-plaque stage with prominent epitheliotropism into a tumor stage in which distant metastasis is observed. Unlike human MF, epitheliotropism of the lymphoid infiltrate is still prominent in tumor stage lesions. Tropism of the lymphoid infiltrate for adnexal structures, especially hair follicles and apocrine sweat glands, was marked in all clinical stages of canine MF. Twenty-three cases of MF were subjected to extensive immunophenotypic analysis in which reagents specific for canine leukocyte antigens and fresh frozen tissue sections of the canine lesions were used. Canine MF proved to be a T cell lymphoma in which the epitheliotropic lymphocytes consistently expressed CD3 (22 cases) and CD8 (19 cases); CD3+CD4-CD8- lymphocytes predominated in the remaining 4 cases. In this regard, canine MF clearly differed from human MF in which a CD4 immunophenotype predominates in the T cell infiltrate. Lack of expression of CD45RA by epitheliotropic T cells and intense expression of a beta 1 integrin (VLA-4-like) suggested that T cells in canine MF belonged to the memory subpopulation, as has been suggested for T cells in human MF. Pan-T cell antigen loss or discordant expression also proved useful as phenotypic indicators of neoplasia in canine MF. Loss of CD5 was observed in epitheliotropic T cells in 63% of cases. Discordance of neoplastic T cell Thy-1 expression was frequently observed between epithelial and dermal or submucosal compartments. We conclude that canine MF still represents a useful spontaneous animal disease model of human cutaneous T cell lymphoma, despite the immunophenotypic differences, which may reflect operational differences between human and canine skin-associated lymphoid tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure

  3. Revisiting Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Cameron; Young, James; Navi, Daniel; Riaz, Nadeem; Lingala, Bharathi; Kim, Youn; Hoppe, Richard

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a highly effective treatment for mycosis fungoides (MF). The standard course consists of 30 to 36 Gy delivered over an 8- to 10-week period. This regimen is time intensive and associated with significant treatment-related toxicities including erythema, desquamation, anhydrosis, alopecia, and xerosis. The aim of this study was to identify a lower dose alternative while retaining a favorable efficacy profile. Methods and Materials: One hundred two MF patients were identified who had been treated with an initial course of low-dose TSEBT (5-<30 Gy) between 1958 and 1995. Patients had a T stage classification of T2 (generalized patch/plaque, n = 51), T3 (tumor, n = 29), and T4 (erythrodermic, n = 22). Those with extracutaneous disease were excluded. Results: Overall response (OR) rates (>50% improvement) were 90% among patients with T2 to T4 disease receiving 5 to <10 Gy (n = 19). In comparison, OR rates between the 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy subgroups were 98% and 97%, respectively. There was no significant difference in median progression free survival (PFS) in T2 and T3 patients when stratified by dose group, and PFS in each was comparable to that of the standard dose. Conclusions: OR rates associated with low-dose TSEBT in the ranges of 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy are comparable to that of the standard dose ({>=} 30 Gy). Efficacy measures including OS, PFS, and RFS are also favorable. Given that the efficacy profile is similar between 10 and <20 Gy and 20 and <30 Gy, the utility of TSEBT within the lower dose range of 10 to <20 Gy merits further investigation, especially in the context of combined modality treatment.

  4. Vitiligo vs. hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (histopathological and immunohistochemical study, univariate analysis).

    PubMed

    El-Darouti, Mohammad A; Marzouk, Salonaz A; Azzam, Omar; Fawzi, Marwa Mohsen; Abdel-Halim, Mona R E; Zayed, Amira A; Leheta, Tahra M

    2006-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common skin disease characterized by the presence of well circumscribed, depigmented milky white macules devoid of identifiable melanocytes. On the other hand, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare variant of MF which presents clinically as persistent hypopigmented macules and patches. Both disorders show a predominance of CD8+ T cells in tissue samples and hence the differentiation between the two diseases on clinical, histopathological and even immunohistochemical grounds may offer great difficulty. The aim of this work is to identity certain histopathological clues which might help to differentiate between the two diseases. The study included 54 patients (26 vitiligo patients and 28 patients with Hypopigmented MF). Skin biopsies were taken and examined by hematoxylin and eosin and CD3, CD4 and CD8 markers were performed for ten vitiligo and nine MF patients. We have found that epidermotropism, hydropic degeneration of basal cells, partial loss of pigment, preservation of some melanocytes, presence of lymphocytes within the papillary dermis, increased density of the dermal infiltrate and wiry fibrosis of the papillary dermal collagen were detected with a significantly higher incidence in hypopigmented MF rather than vitiligo (P-values < 0.0001, < 0.00011, < 0.00011, = 0.001, = 0.008 and = 0.001 respectively). On the other hand, focal thickening of the basement membrane, complete loss of pigmentation, total absence of melanocytes, as well as absence or sparsness of lymphocytes in the dermal papillae were seen much more frequently in vitiligo. Statistical analysis of these differences was significant with P-values < 0.00011, < 0.00011, < 0.00011, = 0.008 respectively, regarding these pathological criteria. We conclude that differentiation of hypopigmented MF from vitiligo is possible by relying on the histopathological clues described in this study. This is particularly useful in areas of the world where cost benefit is crucial. PMID:16436337

  5. Childhood mycosis fungoides: experience of 28 patients and response to phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Laws, Philip M; Shear, Neil H; Pope, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), is rare in childhood. The prognosis and response to treatment are poorly described in children. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the response to phototherapy in a pediatric cohort. A retrospective cohort study of all patients diagnosed with MF before the age of 18 years and referred to the regional CTCL phototherapy service was performed between January 1990 and April 2012. Twenty-eight patients were identified (13 boys, 15 girls). The mean age at presentation was 11.6 ± 3.9 years. The hypopigmented variant was noted in 79% of patients. All patients had stage I disease (IA = 10, IB = 17, unknown = 1). The median follow-up after diagnosis was 43 months (range 6-274 mos). Narrowband ultraviolet B (NbUVB; 311 nm) was used as first-line phototherapy in 18 patients and psoralen (bath) plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) was used in 8 patients. Complete or partial response was observed in 19 of 22 patients (86%). A further course of phototherapy was required in 7 of 12 patients (58%) treated with NbUVB after a median of 4 months (range 4-29 mos). A further course of phototherapy was required in four of eight patients (50%) successfully treated with PUVA after a median of 45.5 months (range 30-87 mos). No disease progression was noted over the follow-up (median 43 mos). The majority of patients in our cohort had hypopigmented MF. Phototherapy offers an effective option for treatment of childhood MF, although the period of remission may be greater in patients treated with PUVA. PMID:24916067

  6. Retrospective 5-year review of 131 patients with mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome seen at the National Skin Centre, Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eugene Sern Ting; Tang, Mark Boon Yang; Tan, Suat Hoon

    2006-11-01

    A total of 131 new cases of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome were diagnosed clinically and histopathologically at our centre over a 5-year period. There were 87 males and 44 females with a mean age of 36.3 years (range 3-87 years) and no racial predilection. Of the 62 patients (47.3%) with classical mycosis fungoides, the majority were male (male : female = 4.2:1). There was one patient with Sézary syndrome. Patients aged older than 50 years were more likely to present with a longer duration of symptoms and advanced disease. In contrast to classical mycosis fungoides, the 47 patients diagnosed with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides had early stage disease, were younger, and no gender predilection was noted. The mean duration of follow up was 19.7 months (range 0.2-54.8 months). Complete remission was achieved in 24.7% and 53.8% of patients followed up at 1 and 3 years, respectively, using skin-directed and systemic treatment modalities appropriate for the stage of disease. There were five patients with progressive disease and three patients with advanced disease who died from disease-related complications. The most significant prognostic factors for 1-year and 3-year outcomes were the patient's duration of symptoms and stage of disease at presentation. PMID:17034466

  7. Full clinical recovery after topical acyclovir treatment of Epstein-Barr virus associated cutaneous B-cell lymphoma in patient with mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Copur, M Sitki; Deshpande, Anita; Mleczko, Kris; Norvell, Max; Hrnicek, Gordon J; Woodward, Suzette; Frankforter, Scott; Mandolfo, Natalie; Fu, Kai; Chan, Wing C

    2005-06-01

    Primary cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases with varied clinical presentations and prognosis. The use of new molecular, histological, and clinical criteria has improved their recognition. Cutaneous B-cell and T-cell lymphomas are seldom found together in the same patient. Here we report a rare case of mycosis fungoides variant of a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) which later developed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. The patient initially presented with generalized erythroderma, extensive plaques, and axillary lymphadenopathy. Histopathology and immunophenotyping of her tumor from the right breast nodule revealed a T-cell lymphoma consistent with mycosis fungoides. She was initially treated with pentostatin, followed by topical mechlorethamine and topical steroids. After progression of her mycosis fungoides with worsening diffuse skin lesions on this regimen, her treatments were changed to oral bexarotene with an initial partial response followed by stable disease. Three years from her initial presentation, she developed ulcerated cauliflower-like nodules on her forehead. Biopsy of these lesions revealed EBV-positive large- and medium-sized pleomorphic B-cells consistent with EBV-driven B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. She was treated with topical acyclovir cream on the involved skin areas while continuing with oral bexarotene for mycosis fungoides. Skin lesions gradually diminished and totally disappeared after four weeks of topical acyclovir treatment. Bexarotene treatment was continued for another year until the mycosis fungoides progressed and became wide spread causing her death four and a half years after the initial diagnosis. The coexistence of two cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphomas of different lineage in the same patient and the complete clinical response of EBV-related B-cell cutaneous component to topical acyclovir makes this rare case particularly interesting. PMID

  8. Cell Surface Differentiation Antigens of the Malignant T Cell in Sezary Syndrome and Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Barton F.; Bunn, Paul; Mann, Dean; Thomas, Charles; Eisenbarth, George S.; Minna, John; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1981-01-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and rabbit heteroantisera, we have studied the cell surface markers of peripheral blood (PB) Sezary cells from six patients with mycosis fungoides or Sezary syndrome, disease grouped within the spectrum of cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). Furthermore, we have studied two cell lines (Hut 78 and Hut 102) derived from malignant Sezary T cells from CTCL patients. The monoclonal antibody 3A1 defines a major human PB T cell subset (85% of PB T cells) while the antigen defined by the monoclonal antibody 4F2 is present on a subset (70%) of activated PB T cells and on circulating PB monocytes. In contrast to normal subjects in whom 60-70% of circulating PB mononuclear cells were 3A1+ T cells, PB mononuclear cells from six CTCL patients studied had an average of only 10.6±3.2% 3A1+ T cells. Whereas 85% of E-rosette positive cells from normal individuals were 3A1+, virtually all E-rosette positive T cells from the Sezary patients were 3A1-. Two patients with high numbers of circulating Sezary T cells had both aneuploid and diploid PB T cell populations present; after separation of PB T cells into 3A1+ and 3A1- cell suspensions, all 3A1- cells were found to be aneuploid. In contrast to normal resting PB T cells which were 4F2-, all PB Sezary cells were 4F2+, suggesting a state of activation. The 3A1 antigen was on a variety of acute lymphoblastic leukemia T cell lines (HSB-2, RPMI-8402, MOLT4, CEM) but was absent on the Hut 78 and Hut 102 Sezary T cell lines. Using rabbit anti-human T and anti-human Ia (p23, 30) antisera, we found that all malignant Sezary PB cells tested were killed by anti-T cell antiserum plus complement but not by anti-Ia plus complement. In contrast, Sezary cell lines Hut 78 and 102, were killed by both anti-T cell antiserum and anti-Ia plus complement. Similar to 3A1- normal PB T cells, 3A1- Sezary PB T cells proliferated poorly to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A. However, 3A1- Sezary T cells were able to

  9. A randomized trial comparing combination electron-beam radiation and chemotherapy with topical therapy in the initial treatment of mycosis fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.J.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.; Steinberg, S.M.; Stocker, J.L.; Ihde, D.C.; Fischmann, A.B.; Glatstein, E.J.; Schechter, G.P.; Phelps, R.M.; Foss, F.M.; )

    1989-12-28

    Mycosis fungoides is a T-cell lymphoma that arises in the skin and progresses at highly variable rates. Nonradomized studies have suggested that early aggressive therapy may improve the prognosis in this usually fatal disease. We studied 103 patients with mycosis fungoides, who, after complete staging, were randomly assigned to receive either combination therapy, consisting of 3000 cGy of electron-beam radiation to the skin combined with parenteral chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, etoposide, and vincristine (n = 52) or sequential topical treatment (n = 51). The prognostic factors were well balanced in the two groups. Combined therapy produced considerable toxicity: 12 patients required hospitalization for fever and transient neutropenia, 5 had congestive heart failure, and 2 were later found to have acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Patients receiving combined therapy had a significantly higher rate of complete response, documented by biopsy, than patients receiving conservative therapy (38 percent vs. 18 percent; P = 0.032). After a median follow-up of 75 months, however, there was no significant difference between the treatment groups in disease-free or overall survival. We conclude that early aggressive therapy with radiation and chemotherapy does not improve the prognosis for patients with mycosis fungoides as compared with conservative treatment beginning with sequential topical therapies.

  10. Evolving Insights in the Pathogenesis and Therapy of Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Henry K.; Mishra, Anjali; Hake, Timothy; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies derived from skin-homing T cells. The most common forms of CTCL are Mycosis Fungoides (MF) and Sezary Syndrome (SS). Accurate diagnosis remains a challenge due to the heterogeneity of presentation and the lack of highly characteristic immunophenotypical and genetic markers. Over the past decade molecular studies have improved our understanding of the biology of CTCL. The identification of gene expression differences between normal and malignant T-cells has led to promising new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers that now need validation to be incorporated into clinical practice. These biomarkers may also provide insight into the mechanism of development of CTCL. Additionally, treatment options have expanded with the approval of new agents, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors. A better understanding of the cell biology, immunology and genetics underlying the development and progression of CTCL will allow the design of more rational treatment strategies for these malignancies. This review summarizes the clinical epidemiology, staging and natural history of MF and SS; discusses the immunopathogenesis of MF and the functional role of the malignant T-cells; and reviews the latest advances in MF and SS treatment. PMID:21883142

  11. New insights into associated co-morbidities in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides).

    PubMed

    Hodak, Emmilia; Lessin, Stuart; Friedland, Rivka; Freud, Tamar; David, Michael; Pavlovsky, Lev; Shapiro, Jonathan; Cohen, Arnon D

    2013-07-01

    Studies of associated cancer in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) have focused primarily on secondary cancers in North American and European populations. This study investigated the association between MF and malignancies, anxiety and depression in the Israeli population. Data on Israeli patients with MF and age- and gender-matched controls were collected from a database of population- based cohort (683 patients; 1,700 controls) and an institution- based cohort (343 patients; 846 controls) and analysed by univariate and multivariate methods. MF was significantly associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma in both cohorts (multivariate odds ratio (OR) 7.83, univariate OR ∞, respectively); acute leukaemia (multivariate OR 10.1, first cohort) and lung cancer (multivariate OR 10.15, second cohort). MF was significantly associated with anxiety and depression (multivariate OR 1.59, OR 1.51, respectively in first cohort). The current study provides support to the associations between MF and other cancers: Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute leukaemia and lung cancer. The study also emphasizes the association between MF and anxiety and depression. PMID:23303582

  12. Phenotypic Variation in Different Lesions of Mycosis Fungoides Biopsied Within a Short Period of Time From the Same Patient.

    PubMed

    Kash, Natalie; Massone, Cesare; Fink-Puches, Regina; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Phenotypic variants of mycosis fungoides (MF) include mainly the expression of cytotoxic markers by neoplastic cells (either α/β or γ/δ cytotoxic). To manage the patient properly, distinction from other cutaneous cytotoxic natural killer/T-cell lymphomas is paramount. Particularly for cutaneous γ/δ T-cell lymphoma, distinction is often based on clinicopathologic correlation (presence of tumors at first diagnosis as opposed to patches only in MF). The authors report a case of cytotoxic MF characterized by expression of TCRγ in two of three biopsies performed within a time frame of 1 week. The patient presented with patches, plaques, and 1 tumor at the time of first diagnosis; thus, distinction from cutaneous γ/δ T-cell lymphoma was not possible on clinical grounds alone. The diagnosis of MF was established, thanks to the phenotypic variations revealed by the three biopsies, with 1 lacking expression of cytotoxic proteins (TIA-1 and granzyme B) and of TCRγ. This case shows the importance to perform several biopsies in cases of cutaneous lymphoma, as morphologic and phenotypic features are variable and information gathered from a single biopsy may result in a wrong diagnosis. PMID:26885605

  13. Hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia: a form of cutaneous T-cell dyscrasia distinct from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia M; Hagen, Joshua W; Crowson, Arthur N; Liu, Yen Chen; Mihm, Martin; Drucker, Natalie M; Yassin, Aminah H

    2014-07-01

    Hypopigmentation in cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disease should not always be equated with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF). A form of hypopigmented pre-lymphomatous T-cell dyscrasia falling under the designation of the so-called hypopigmented interface variant of T-cell dyscrasia has recently been proposed. The aim of the present study was to establish hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia as its own entity apart from other T-cell dyscrasias and MF using a patient case series. Twenty four cases of hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia were identified in the dermatopathology database of Weill Medical College of Cornell University. There were 17 females and seven males (mean age, 36 years). In children and adolescents, the patients were most commonly of African American extraction. Truncal photo-protected areas manifesting as large solitary patches or multiple smaller macules were characteristic; disease progression to MF occurred in only one patient. The lesions responded to topical steroids and light therapy. The pathology was defined by a cell poor interface associated with degeneration of keratinocytes and melanocytes, and by lymphocytes whose nuclei showed low-grade cerebriform atypia, and which expressed a significant reduction in CD7 and CD62L expression. In 50% of the cases, the implicated cell type was of the CD8 subset. Clonality was not identified. Hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia is a distinct entity separate from and rarely progressive to MF. PMID:24806661

  14. Review of the treatment of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A stage-based approach

    PubMed Central

    AL Hothali, Ghadah I.

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome (SS) are the most common subtypes of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Most of patients have indolent and incurable course of disease. Therefore, treatment should be reaching the optimal benefit with minimizing the toxicity as much as possible. To achieve this aim, the management should follow a -stage-based-approach. Treatment of early-stage MF (IA–IIA) involves skin-directed therapy (SDT) including topical corticosteroids, phototherapy, topical chemotherapy, topical retinoids and radiotherapy. For aggressive/recalcitrant early-stage MF or advanced-stage MF, systemic therapy should be considered including interferone-alpha, oral retinoids including bexarotine and more recently acitretin, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), fusion toxin denileukin diftitox and chemotherapy drugs. Combined drug regimens can be considered in some situations to get the synergistic effect while lowering the individual drug’s doses on the other hand. By exception of aggressive stages, chemotherapy should always come after other systemic drugs have been tried or contraindicated. Novel drugs should be considered in situations when all systemic drugs have failed. PMID:24421750

  15. Characterization of unconventional electron fields for the treatment of mycosis fungoides using the total skin irradiation technique

    SciTech Connect

    González, M. A. Pagnan Mitsoura, E.; Oviedo, J.O. Hernández; Vázquez, D. R. Ruesga

    2014-11-07

    Mycosis fungoides is a cutaneous lymphoma that accounts for 2–3% of all lymphomas. Several clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of TSEBT (Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy) in patients with mycosis fungoides. It is important to develop this technique and make it available to a larger number of patients in Mexico. Because large fields for electron TSEBT are required in order to cover the entire body of the patient, beam characterization at conventional treatment distances is not sufficient and a calibration distance of 500cm or higher is required. Materials and methods: Calibration of radiochromic Gafchromic® EBT2 film (RCF) for electrons was performed in a solid water phantom (Scanditronix Wellhöfer) at a depth of 1.4cm and a Source Axis Distance (SAD) of 100cm. A polynomial fit was applied to the calibration curve, in order to obtain the equation relating dose response with optical density. The spatial distribution is obtained in terms of percentage of the dose, placing 3×3cm samples of RCF on the acrylic screen, which is placed in front of the patient in order to obtain maximum absorbed dose on the skin, covering an area of 200×100cm{sup 2}. The Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curve was obtained placing RCF samples at depths of 0, 1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9cm in the solid water phantom, irradiated with an ELEKTA SINERGY Linear Accelerator electron beam, with an energy of 6 MeV, at a Source Skin Distance (SSD) of 500cm, with 1000MU = 100Gy, with a cone of 40×40cm and gantry angle of 90°. The RCFs were scanned on a flatbed scanner (EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL) and the images were processed with the ImageJ program using a region of interest (ROI) of 1×1cm{sup 2}. Results: The relative spatial dose distribution and the percentage depth dose for a SSD of 500±0.5cm, over an area of 200×100cm{sup 2} was obtained, resulting to an effective maximum dose depth (Z{sub ref}) for electrons of 1.4±0.05cm. Using the same experimental data

  16. Characterization of unconventional electron fields for the treatment of mycosis fungoides using the total skin irradiation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnan González, M. A.; Hernández Oviedo, J. O.; Mitsoura, E.; Ruesga Vázquez, D. R.

    2014-11-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a cutaneous lymphoma that accounts for 2-3% of all lymphomas. Several clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of TSEBT (Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy) in patients with mycosis fungoides. It is important to develop this technique and make it available to a larger number of patients in Mexico. Because large fields for electron TSEBT are required in order to cover the entire body of the patient, beam characterization at conventional treatment distances is not sufficient and a calibration distance of 500cm or higher is required. Materials and methods: Calibration of radiochromic Gafchromic® EBT2 film (RCF) for electrons was performed in a solid water phantom (Scanditronix Wellhöfer) at a depth of 1.4cm and a Source Axis Distance (SAD) of 100cm. A polynomial fit was applied to the calibration curve, in order to obtain the equation relating dose response with optical density. The spatial distribution is obtained in terms of percentage of the dose, placing 3×3cm samples of RCF on the acrylic screen, which is placed in front of the patient in order to obtain maximum absorbed dose on the skin, covering an area of 200×100cm2. The Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curve was obtained placing RCF samples at depths of 0, 1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9cm in the solid water phantom, irradiated with an ELEKTA SINERGY Linear Accelerator electron beam, with an energy of 6 MeV, at a Source Skin Distance (SSD) of 500cm, with 1000MU = 100Gy, with a cone of 40×40cm and gantry angle of 90°. The RCFs were scanned on a flatbed scanner (EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL) and the images were processed with the ImageJ program using a region of interest (ROI) of 1×1cm2. Results: The relative spatial dose distribution and the percentage depth dose for a SSD of 500±0.5cm, over an area of 200×100cm2 was obtained, resulting to an effective maximum dose depth (Zref) for electrons of 1.4±0.05cm. Using the same experimental data, horizontal and vertical

  17. Serum Vitamin D and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphism in Mycosis Fungoides Patients: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Hoda; Hegazy, Rehab A.; Gawdat, Heba I.; Mehaney, Dina A.; Kamel, Marwa M.; Fawzy, Marwa M.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Darwish, Hebatallah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D has been considered a key player in various malignancies including cutaneous cancers. To date, mycosis fungoides (MF) has been the least studied in relation to vitamin D. Furthermore, the vitamin D receptor (VDR) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have not been tackled before in the context of MF, despite their incrimination in numerous diseases. Aim of study To assess the role of vitamin D in MF by measuring its serum level, and studying VDR SNPs (TaqI, BsmI, FokI) in different stages of MF. Patients and Methods 48 patients with various stages of MF, and 45 healthy controls were included. Complete history, full clinical examination and a five mm punch skin biopsy were performed to all recruited patients. Venous blood samples were withdrawn from both patients and controls to determine the serum vitamin D level and VDR gene polymorphisms. Results Serum vitamin D level was significantly lower in patients (5.3–33.7 nmol/L)] compared to controls (8.3–90.1 nmol/L)] (P<0.001). A significant difference was observed between patients and controls regarding the FokI polymorphism only, being higher in patients (P = 0.039). Also Vitamin D serum levels differed significantly in patients with FokI genotypes (P = 0.014). No significant correlations were detected between any of the studied parameters and the demographic and clinical data of the included subjects. Conclusion Depressed vitamin D and FokI polymorphism are potentially involved in the context of MF. VDR gene polymorphisms warrant further larger scale investigations to detect the exact genes involved in the pathogenesis of such an enigmatic disease. PMID:27336155

  18. Long term outcomes of 1263 patients with Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome from 1982 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Talpur, Rakhshandra; Singh, Lotika; Daulat, Seema; Liu, Ping; Seyfer, Sarah; Trynosky, Tanya; Wei, Wei; Duvic, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this prospectively collected single center study cohort of MF/SS 1263 patients is to evaluate the significance of stage and risk of disease progression from initial presentation, and to examine other prognostic factors. Patients and Methods The prognostic variables effecting overall survival (OS) were examined in a unique prospective cohort of 1263 mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome (SS) patients seen by one investigator at MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1982–2009. Kaplan and Meier estimates were used to determine median overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and disease specific survival (DSS). Cox’s proportional hazards regression model assessed prognostic factors. Results Mean age at diagnosis was 55.33 years. Early MF (Stage IA-IIA) represented 71.5% (903 of 1263) and advanced (Stage IIB–IVB), 28.5% (360 of 1263) patients. Progression to a higher stage occurred in 147 patients (11.6 %) of whom 112 (12%) were early and 35 (9.7%) advanced. Death from disease occurred in 102/1263 (8.1%) patients. Median OS was 24.44 years, PFS was 16 years, and median DSS was not reached. OS and PFS were significantly better for early stage patients with patches (T1a/T2a) than with patches/plaques (T1b/T2b). PFS analyzed in 1241 patients found only 337 (27.2%) had disease progression or had died from disease. Risk factors associated with progression or deaths were advanced age, plaque stage, LDH level, and tumor area. Conclusions Improved outcome of MF/SS, reflected by overall survival and PFS for all stages, may result from earlier diagnosis, new therapies, and aggressive treatment of infections. PMID:22850569

  19. The current management of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome and the role of radiotherapy: Principles and indications

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Ercole; Rubino, Laura; Buglione, Michela; Antognoni, Paolo; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Bertoni, Francesco; Parmiggiani, Manuela; Barbieri, Paola; Bertoni, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the current treatment of mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) focusing on the role of radiotherapy (RT), its principles and indications, and the perspectives of the novel irradiation technologies. Background MF and SS are rare lymphoproliferative diseases whose incidence is increasing. For a long time RT has been used as a single modality or in integrated treatment programs for these diseases. Materials and methods The latest systematic reviews, primary studies and new diagnostic and treatment guidelines on MF and SS were analyzed. Clinical outcomes together with the technical aspects and the role of RT were also evaluated. Results New data are available on pathogenesis, diagnostic criteria, classification and staging procedures for MF and SS and several local and systemic therapies are proposed. Localized RT can cure “minimal stage” MF while total skin electron beam irradiation (TSEI) may cure initial-stage disease and may offer important symptom relief (itch, erythroderma) in a more advanced setting. Despite its efficacy, RT is not largely used, mainly because of some technical difficulties but new RT technologies may be proposed to treat large skin surfaces. Conclusions New treatment programs offer good results, with median survival of more than 12 years in early-stage MF, but the median survival of 2.5 years or less in advanced stages is still a challenge. RT remains an option for all stages with a good cost/effectiveness ratio in a curative or palliative setting. New RT technologies can overcome some technical problems of treating large skin surfaces. PMID:24936325

  20. Consequences of p16 tumor suppressor gene inactivation in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome and role of the bmi-1 and ras oncogenes in disease progression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlei; Toulev, Albena; Kamarashev, Jivko; Qin, Jian-Zhong; Dummer, Reinhard; Döbbeling, Udo

    2007-07-01

    In examining the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome, we found the cell cycle-regulating protein p16 to be absent in T cells. Immunohistochemical staining with p16-specific antibodies showed that the number of p16-expressing cells in cutaneous lesions decreases in late stages. The repression of p16 was not attributable to deletion or methylation of this gene; however, the Bmi-1 oncogene, a known suppressor of p16, was present in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome cell lines and skin lesions. The absence of p16 correlated with the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein on cyclin D/CDK4- or cyclin D/CDK6-specific sites. Ki-ras, which stimulates phosphorylation of retinoblastoma via cyclin-dependent kinases, was found in all tested cutaneous T-cell lymphoma samples; and its expression generally was stronger in advanced stages. Thus, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cells show changes in oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression that increase proliferation. PMID:17442375

  1. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization in early-stage mycosis fungoides: recurrent deletion of tumor suppressor genes BCL7A, SMAC/DIABLO, and RHOF.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Angelo; Bernardini, Laura; Valenzano, Francesco; Bottillo, Irene; De Simone, Clara; Capizzi, Rodolfo; Capalbo, Anna; Romano, Francesca; Novelli, Antonio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Amerio, Pierluigi

    2008-12-01

    The etiology of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most frequent form of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), is poorly understood. No specific genetic aberration has been detected, especially in early-stage disease, possibly due to the clinical and histological heterogeneity of patient series and to the different sources of malignant cells (skin, blood, or lymph node) included in most studies. Frozen skin biopsies from 16 patients with early-stage MF were studied using array-based comparative genomic hybridization. A DNA pool from healthy donors was used as the reference. Results demonstrated recurrent loss of 19, 7p22.1-p22.3, 7q11.1-q11.23, 9q34.12, 12q24.31, and 16q22.3-q23.1, and gain of 8q22.3-q23.1 and 21q22.12. The 12q24.31 region was recurrently deleted in 7/16 patients. Real-time PCR investigation for deletion of genes BCL7A, SMAC/DIABLO, and RHOF-three tumor suppressor genes with a putative role in hematological malignancies-demonstrated that they were deleted in 9, 10, and 13 cases, respectively. The identified genomic alterations and individual genes could yield important insights into the early steps of MF pathogenesis. PMID:18663754

  2. Prognostic factors in primary cutaneous lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides and the Sézary syndrome. The French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Grange, F; Hedelin, G; Joly, P; Beylot-Barry, M; D'Incan, M; Delaunay, M; Vaillant, L; Avril, M F; Bosq, J; Wechsler, J; Dalac, S; Grosieux, C; Franck, N; Esteve, E; Michel, C; Bodemer, C; Vergier, B; Laroche, L; Bagot, M

    1999-06-01

    Prognostic studies of primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCL) other than mycosis fungoides (MF) and the Sézary syndrome (SS; non-MF/SS PCL) have been mainly performed on subgroups or on small numbers of patients by using univariate analyses. Our aim was to identify independent prognostic factors in a large series of patients with non-MF/SS PCL. We evaluated 158 patients who were registered in the French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas database from January 1, 1986 to March 1, 1997. Variables analyzed for prognostic value were: age; sex; type of clinical lesions; maximum diameter, location, and number of skin lesions; cutaneous distribution (ie, local, regional, or generalized); prognostic group according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification for PCL; B- or T-cell phenotype; serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level; and B symptoms. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a model of relative survival. Forty-nine patients (31%) died. The median relative survival time was 81 months. In univariate analysis, EORTC prognostic group, serum LDH level, B symptoms, and variables related to tumor extension (ie, distribution, maximum diameter, and number of skin lesions) were significantly associated with survival. When these variables were considered together in a multivariate analysis, EORTC prognostic group and distribution of skin lesions remained statistically significant, independent prognostic factors. This study confirms the good predictive value of the EORTC classification for PCL and shows that the distribution of skin lesions at initial evaluation is an important prognostic indicator. PMID:10339469

  3. Phase II Intergroup Trial of Alisertib in Relapsed and Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma and Transformed Mycosis Fungoides: SWOG 1108

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Paul M.; Li, Hongli; Spier, Catherine; Mahadevan, Daruka; LeBlanc, Michael; Ul Haq, Mansoor; Huber, Bryan D.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D.; Horwitz, Steven M.; Fisher, Richard I.; Cheson, Bruce D.; Smith, Sonali M.; Kahl, Brad S.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A kinase (AAK) is upregulated in highly proliferative lymphomas, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Alisertib is a novel oral AAK inhibitor without adverse safety signals in early-phase studies that demonstrated preliminary activity in T-cell lymphoma. This phase II study was conducted to further investigate the efficacy of alisertib in relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTCL). Patients and Methods Eligible patients with histologically confirmed relapsed/refractory PTCL or transformed Mycosis fungoides (tMF) received alisertib 50 mg twice a day for 7 days on 21-day cycles. Results Of 37 eligible patients, the histologic subtypes enrolled included PTCL not otherwise specified (n = 13), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (n = 9), tMF (n = 7), adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (n = 4), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (n = 2), and extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (n = 2). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events in ≥ 5% of patients included neutropenia (32%), anemia (30%), thrombocytopenia (24%), febrile neutropenia (14%), mucositis (11%), and rash (5%). Treatment was discontinued most commonly for disease progression. Among the PTCL subtypes, the overall response rate was 30%, whereas no responses were observed in tMF. Aurora B kinase was more commonly overexpressed than AAK in tumor specimens. Analysis of AAK, Aurora B kinase, MYC, BCL-2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ, and Notch1 expression revealed no association with response. Conclusion Alisertib has antitumor activity in PTCL, including heavily pretreated patients. These promising results are being further investigated in an ongoing international, randomized phase III trial comparing alisertib with investigator's choice in PTCL. PMID:26077240

  4. The Therapeutic Potential of AN-7, a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, for Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome Alone or with Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeiz, Neta; Rephaeli, Ada; Nudelman, Abraham; Weitman, Michal; Tarasenko, Nataly; Gorovitz, Batia; Maron, Leah; Yehezkel, Shiran; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Lubin, Ido; Hodak, Emmilia

    2016-01-01

    The 2 histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides/sezary syndrome (MF/SS), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and romidepsin, are associated with low rates of overall response and high rates of adverse effects. Data regarding combination treatments with HDACIs is sparse. Butyroyloxymethyl diethylphosphate (AN-7) is a novel HDACI, which was found to have selective anticancer activity in several cell lines and animal models. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer effects of AN-7 and SAHA, either alone or combined with doxorubicin, on MF/SS cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with Sezary syndrome (SPBL). MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, SPBL, and PBL from healthy normal individuals (NPBL) were exposed to the test drugs, and the findings were analyzed by a viability assay, an apoptosis assay, and Western blot. AN-7 was more selectively toxic to MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, and SPBL (relative to NPBL) than SAHA and also acted more rapidly. Both drugs induced apoptosis in MF/SS cell lines, SAHA had a greater effect on MyLa cell line, while AN-7 induced greater apoptosis in SPBL; both caused an accumulation of acetylated histone H3, but AN-7 was associated with earlier kinetics; and both caused a downregulation of the HDAC1 protein in MF/SS cell lines. AN-7 acted synergistically with doxorubicin in both MF/SS cell lines and SPBL, and antagonistically with doxorubicin in NPBL. By contrast, SAHA acted antagonistically with doxorubicin on MF/SS cell lines, SPBL, and NPBL, leaving <50% viable cells. In conclusion, AN-7 holds promise as a therapeutic agent in MF/SS and has several advantages over SAHA. Our data provide a rationale for combining AN-7, but not SAHA, with doxorubicin to induce the cell death in MF/SS. PMID:26752418

  5. Origin Use of CD4, CD8, and CD1a Immunostains in Distinguishing Mycosis Fungoides from its Inflammatory Mimics: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tirumalae, Rajalakshmi; Panjwani, Poonam K

    2012-01-01

    Patch-stage/early mycosis fungoides (MF) is difficult to differentiate from benign dermatoses, despite several robust histologic criteria. Most studies include advanced lesions and data about early disease is limited. Objectives: (1) To compare the CD4:CD8 ratio in patch-stage MF versus inflammatory mimics. (2) To study patterns of CD1a expression in the epidermis and dermis in the two groups. Materials and Methods: Twenty cases each of early MF and inflammatory dermatoses were selected. The diagnoses were established after clinicopathologic correlation, repeat biopsies, and follow-up. The inflammatory group included pityriasis lichenoides chronica, actinic reticuloid, lichenoid purpura, and various psoriasiform dermatoses. Immunohistochemistry was done for CD4, CD8, and CD1a. Epidermal CD4, CD8 cells were quantified and CD1a was graded semi-quantitatively in the epidermis and dermis. Results: The average CD4:CD8 ratio was 4.2 in MF (range: 1-16.8), and 0.9 in inflammatory diseases (range: 0.43-5), which was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). None of the MF cases had a ratio <1. Four cases of pityriasis lichenoides chronica had a ratio >1. CD1a cells had a continuous or confluent epidermal pattern in almost all cases of MF, while they occurred as small or large groups in the dermis. In inflammatory dermatoses, there were either isolated or scattered CD1a+ cells in both epidermis and dermis. Conclusions: Elevated CD4:CD8 ratio favors MF. But there is an overlap in the lower range with pityriasis lichenoides chronica. These cases require good clinicopathologic correlation and follow-up. Patterns of CD1a expression are more reliable. Immunostains buttress morphology and are a valuable addition. PMID:23248358

  6. Interleukin-32 is progressively expressed in Mycosis Fungoides independent of helper T-cell 2 and helper T-cell 9 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ohmatsu, Hanako; Humme, Daniel; Gulati, Nicholas; Gonzalez, Juana; Möbs, Markus; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Cardinale, Irma; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Sterry, Wolfram; Krueger, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides (MF), the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is characterized by a helper T cell 2 (Th2)-skewing with a mature CD4+ memory T-cell phenotype. Using skin samples from MF patients (n=21), healthy volunteers (n=17), individuals with atopic dermatitis (n=17) and psoriasis (n=9), we found interleukin (IL)-32 mRNA expression significantly higher in MF samples than in samples from benign inflammatory skin diseases, and its expression increases with disease progression. By immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, we confirmed IL-32 protein expression in many CD3+CD4+ T cells and some epidermotropic T cells in MF lesions. MyLa cells (a MF cell line) express IL-32, which in turn could promote cellular proliferation and viability in a dose-dependent fashion. IL-32-treated MyLa and CTCL HH cells up-regulated cell proliferation and survival genes. Of the major “polarizing” T-cell cytokines, only IFNγ mRNA increases with MF progression and positively correlates with IL-32 mRNA expression. Th2 cytokines do not positively correlate with IL-32 mRNA expression or MF progression. Furthermore, by flow cytometry, IL-32 production by circulating activated T-cells in healthy individuals was found in both IFNγ+ and IFNγ− cells but not in IL-4+ or IL-13+ cells. In conclusion, we have identified IL-32+ cells as the likely tumor cells in MF, and demonstrated that IL-32 mRNA expression increases with MF progression and is significantly higher than those in other skin diseases, and that some IL-32+ T cells are independent from the defined Th subsets. Thus IL-32 may play a unique role in MF progression as an autocrine cytokine. PMID:24938282

  7. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Cocco, Pierluigi; La Vecchia, Carlo; Chang, Ellen T.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Kadin, Marshall E.; Spinelli, John J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Kasten, Carol; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wang, Sophia S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) are rare cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Their etiology is poorly understood. Methods A pooled analysis of 324 MF/SS cases and 17217 controls from 14 case–control studies from Europe, North America, and Australia, as part of the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Subtypes Project, was carried out to investigate associations with lifestyle, medical history, family history, and occupational risk factors. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results We found an increased risk of MF/SS associated with body mass index equal to or larger than 30kg/m2 (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.40), cigarette smoking for 40 years or more (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.31), eczema (OR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.73 to 3.29), family history of multiple myeloma (OR = 8.49, 95% CI = 3.31 to 21.80), and occupation as crop and vegetable farmers (OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.14 to 4.92), painters (OR = 3.71, 95% CI = 1.94 to 7.07), woodworkers (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.18 to 4.08), and general carpenters (OR = 4.07, 95% CI = 1.54 to 10.75). We also found a reduced risk of MF/SS associated with moderate leisure time physical activity (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.97). Conclusions Our study provided the first detailed analysis of risk factors for MF/SS and further investigation is needed to confirm these findings in prospective data and in other populations. PMID:25174030

  8. [Bone marrow biopsy in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, chronic lymphoid leukemia and mycosis fungoides. 1. Incidence and infiltration patterns].

    PubMed

    Silva, M R; Mieza, M A; Saad, F A; Kerbauy, J; Burnier Júnior, M N

    1990-01-01

    Seventy bone marrow biopsies belonging to 53 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and micosis fungoides were studied. Bone marrow involvement was analyzed in correlation to staging before and after treatment. Bone marrow involvement was most frequently seen in CLL and IL followed by WDLL and PDLL/N and PDLL/D. Highest incidences after treatment were in CLL, WDLL, and PDLL/N and PDLL/D. With respect to staging, WDLL disseminated to bone marrow only in the late stages (III or IV), whereas the nodular and diffuse forms of PDLL presented similar infiltration in all stages. HLL and IL presented a slight trend to infiltrate only in the later stages. The pattern of bone marrow infiltration was also analyzed considering staging before and after treatment. No clear correlation was observed between staging and a specific pattern of bone marrow involvement in most cases, and disease evolution and treatment do not seem to change infiltration pattern. PMID:2287861

  9. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characterization of a new formulation containing synergistic proportions of interferons alpha-2b and gamma (HeberPAG®) in patients with mycosis fungoides: an open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The synergistic combination of interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and IFN gamma results in more potent in vitro biological effects mediated by both IFNs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate by first time the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this combination in patients with mycosis fungoides. Methods An exploratory, prospective, open-label clinical trial was conducted. Twelve patients, both genders, 18 to 75 years-old, with mycosis fungoides at stages IB to III, were eligible for the study. All of them received intramuscularly a single high dose (23 × 106 IU) of a novel synergistic IFN mixture (HeberPAG®) for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma concentrations were measured during 96 hours by commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA) specific for each IFN. Other blood IFN-inducible markers and laboratory variables were used as pharmacodynamics and safety criteria. Results The pharmacokinetic evaluation by EIA yielded a similar pattern for both IFNs that are also in agreement with the well-known described profiles for these molecules when these are administered separately. The average values for main parameters were: Cmax: 263 and 9.3 pg/mL; Tmax: 9.5 and 6.9 h; AUC: 4483 and 87.5 pg.h/mL, half-life (t1/2): 4.9 and 13.4 h; mean residence time (MRT): 13.9 and 13.5 h, for serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma, respectively. The pharmacodynamic variables were strongly stimulated by simultaneous administration of both IFNs: serum neopterin and beta-2 microglobulin levels (β2M), and stimulation of 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS1) mRNA expression. The most encouraging data was the high increment of serum neopterin, 8.0 ng/mL at 48 h, not been described before for any unmodified or pegylated IFN. Additionally, β2M concentration doubled the pre-dose value at 24–48 hours. For both variables the values remained clearly upper baseline levels at 96 hours. Conclusions HeberPAG®possesses improved

  10. Acquisition of CD30 and CD15 accompanied with simultaneous loss of all pan-T-cell antigens in a case of histological transformation of mycosis fungoides with involvement of regional lymph node: an immunophenotypic alteration resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Deepti M; Sebastian, Siby; Wang, Endi

    2015-03-01

    : Acquired expression of CD30 is frequently noted in histological transformation of mycosis fungoides (MF), but simultaneous gain of CD15 accompanied with loss of pan-T-cell antigens are extremely rare. We report an unusual case of transformed MF with such an immunophenotypic alteration resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient was an 81-year-old male with MF, who was initially treated with topical steroids and phototherapy. Despite the initial response, the patient developed a tumor-like skin lesion that was confirmed to be CD30-positive large T-cell lymphoma and was subsequently found to have a regional lymph node involvement by pleomorphic large cell lymphoma. Besides CD30, pleomorphic large cells were positive for CD15 but negative for all B cell- and T cell-specific antigens. Epstein-Barr virus was negative. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays demonstrated a clonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor gamma gene but detected no B-cell clone. The mechanism and clinical significance of this phenotypic conversion remains to be elucidated. PMID:23612034

  11. Cutaneous Lymphoma International Consortium Study of Outcome in Advanced Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: Effect of Specific Prognostic Markers on Survival and Development of a Prognostic Model

    PubMed Central

    Scarisbrick, Julia J.; Prince, H. Miles; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Quaglino, Pietro; Horwitz, Steven; Porcu, Pierluigi; Stadler, Rudolf; Wood, Gary S.; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Pham-Ledard, Anne; Foss, Francine; Girardi, Michael; Bagot, Martine; Michel, Laurence; Battistella, Maxime; Guitart, Joan; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Martinez-Escala, Maria Estela; Estrach, Teresa; Papadavid, Evangelia; Antoniou, Christina; Rigopoulos, Dimitis; Nikolaou, Vassilki; Sugaya, Makoto; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Gniadecki, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Cury-Martins, Jade; Miyashiro, Denis; Servitje, Octavio; Muniesa, Cristina; Berti, Emilio; Onida, Francesco; Corti, Laura; Hodak, Emilia; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Rodríguez-Peralto, Jose L.; Knobler, Robert; Porkert, Stefanie; Bauer, Wolfgang; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Grandi, Vieri; Cowan, Richard; Rook, Alain; Kim, Ellen; Pileri, Alessandro; Patrizi, Annalisa; Pujol, Ramon M.; Wong, Henry; Tyler, Kelly; Stranzenbach, Rene; Querfeld, Christiane; Fava, Paolo; Maule, Milena; Willemze, Rein; Evison, Felicity; Morris, Stephen; Twigger, Robert; Talpur, Rakhshandra; Kim, Jinah; Ognibene, Grant; Li, Shufeng; Tavallaee, Mahkam; Hoppe, Richard T.; Duvic, Madeleine; Whittaker, Sean J.; Kim, Youn H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF; stage IIB to IV) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are aggressive lymphomas with a median survival of 1 to 5 years. Clinical management is stage based; however, there is wide range of outcome within stages. Published prognostic studies in MF/SS have been single-center trials. Because of the rarity of MF/SS, only a large collaboration would power a study to identify independent prognostic markers. Patients and Methods Literature review identified the following 10 candidate markers: stage, age, sex, cutaneous histologic features of folliculotropism, CD30 positivity, proliferation index, large-cell transformation, WBC/lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and identical T-cell clone in blood and skin. Data were collected at specialist centers on patients diagnosed with advanced-stage MF/SS from 2007. Each parameter recorded at diagnosis was tested against overall survival (OS). Results Staging data on 1,275 patients with advanced MF/SS from 29 international sites were included for survival analysis. The median OS was 63 months, with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 77% and 52%, respectively. The median OS for patients with stage IIB disease was 68 months, but patients diagnosed with stage III disease had slightly improved survival compared with patients with stage IIB, although patients diagnosed with stage IV disease had significantly worse survival (48 months for stage IVA and 33 months for stage IVB). Of the 10 variables tested, four (stage IV, age > 60 years, large-cell transformation, and increased lactate dehydrogenase) were independent prognostic markers for a worse survival. Combining these four factors in a prognostic index model identified the following three risk groups across stages with significantly different 5-year survival rates: low risk (68%), intermediate risk (44%), and high risk (28%). Conclusion To our knowledge, this study includes the largest cohort of patients with advanced-stage MF/SS and

  12. Clinical End Points and Response Criteria in Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: A Consensus Statement of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium, and the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Elise A.; Whittaker, Sean; Kim, Youn H.; Duvic, Madeleine; Prince, H. Miles; Lessin, Stuart R.; Wood, Gary S.; Willemze, Rein; Demierre, Marie-France; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Bernengo, Maria Grazia; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Bagot, Martine; Estrach, Teresa; Guitart, Joan; Knobler, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Sugaya, Makoto; Dummer, Reinhard; Pittelkow, Mark; Hoppe, Richard; Parker, Sareeta; Geskin, Larisa; Pinter-Brown, Lauren; Girardi, Michael; Burg, Günter; Ranki, Annamari; Vermeer, Maartan; Horwitz, Steven; Heald, Peter; Rosen, Steve; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Dreno, Brigette; Vonderheid, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), the major forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, have unique characteristics that distinguish them from other types of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Clinical trials in MF/SS have suffered from a lack of standardization in evaluation, staging, assessment, end points, and response criteria. Recently defined criteria for the diagnosis of early MF, guidelines for initial evaluation, and revised staging and classification criteria for MF and SS now offer the potential for uniform staging of patients enrolled in clinical trials for MF/SS. This article presents consensus recommendations for the general conduct of clinical trials of patients with MF/SS as well as methods for standardized assessment of potential disease manifestations in skin, lymph nodes, blood, and visceral organs, and definition of end points and response criteria. These guidelines should facilitate collaboration among investigators and collation of data from sponsor-generated or investigator-initiated clinical trials involving patients with MF or SS. PMID:21576639

  13. Epidermolysis bullosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... is recommended for prospective parents who have a family history of any form of epidermolysis bullosa. During pregnancy, chorionic villus sampling to test the fetus is available. For couples at high risk of having a child with ...

  14. Epidermolysis bullosa, dystrophic (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows skin lesions (epidermolysis bullosa) over the joints on the hands and feet (interphalangeal joints). Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited condition that causes red, blisters ( ...

  15. Epidermolysis bullosa, dystrophic (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows skin lesions (epidermolysis bullosa) over the joints on the hands and feet (interphalangeal joints). Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited condition that causes red, blisters (bullae) that break open, ...

  16. Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  19. Treatment Options for Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  20. General Information about Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... topical (put on the skin in a cream, lotion, or ointment ). The way the chemotherapy is given ... steroid . Topical corticosteroids may be in a cream, lotion, or ointment. Retinoids , such as bexarotene , are drugs ...

  1. Epidermolysis bullosa, dominant dystrophic (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows skin lesions (epidermolysis bullosa) over the joints on the hands and feet (interphalangeal joints). Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited condition that causes red blisters ( ...

  2. Concha bullosa: CT evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zinreich, S J; Mattox, D E; Kennedy, D W; Chisholm, H L; Diffley, D M; Rosenbaum, A E

    1988-01-01

    Aeration of the middle turbinate, termed "concha bullosa," is a common anatomical variant of intranasal anatomy. Of 320 patients evaluated for sinus disease with coronal CT, 34% had concha bullosa on at least one side. The overall incidence of inflammatory disease in the ostiomeatal complex in these symptomatic patients was not different between those with and without concha bullosa. However, there were many cases in which an abnormally large middle turbinate appeared to obstruct the ostiomeatal complex causing secondary infection of the ethmoid, frontal, and maxillary sinuses. Obstruction of drainage of the concha bullosa itself can lead to mucocele formation. Furthermore, the presence of a concha bullosa has important implications for the technique of endoscopic surgery used in the management of the sinus disease. The anatomy, pathophysiology, and CT findings in patients with concha bullosa are reviewed. PMID:3170840

  3. Epidermolysis bullosa, dominant dystrophic (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows skin lesions (epidermolysis bullosa) over the joints on the hands and feet (interphalangeal joints). Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited condition that causes red blisters (bullae) that break open, ...

  4. Myocosis fungoides--an update on a non-mycotic disease.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, Joy; Friedman, Adam

    2013-07-01

    Mycosis fungoides was first described in 1806 by the French physician Jean Louis Alibert in a patient whose skin lesions developed into mushroom-like tumors. Though it is not an infectious disease, it was termed mycosis fungoides (MF) due to its fungating appearance. In 1870, Bazin further described MF, proposing the three classical stages of the cutaneous disease: patch, plaque, and tumor. The term cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) was first utilized in 1975 by Lutzner et al to describe a group of malignant infiltrative disorders of the skin including MF and Sézary syndrome. CTCLs comprise a spectrum of extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas that are characterized by primary cutaneous involvement of a dominant clonal T-cell. As molecular biology and immunohistochemistry techniques have become more developed, CTCL has become understood to be a heterogeneous assembly of disorders that vary with regards to clinical course, histopathology, therapeutic considerations, and prognosis. MF, a low-grade lymphoproliferative disorder, is the most common type of CTCL, comprising 54% of CTCLs. It is a rare, extranodal, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and is an epidermotropic neoplasm composed of CD4+ (helper) lymphocytes Sézary syndrome is a related leukemic subtype of CTCL that presents with diffuse skin involvement as well as circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood. PMID:23884501

  5. What Is Epidermolysis Bullosa?

    MedlinePlus

    ... publication. To order the Epidermolysis Bullosa Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information above. To view the complete text or to order online, visit www.niams.nih.gov . Many of ... NIAMS Site NIH… Turning Discovery Into Health ® Home | ...

  6. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Kim, S-C

    2013-10-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a chronic autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease with clinical features similar to the genetic form of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. EBA is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against type VII collagen which is a major component of the anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. EBA can be divided into two main clinical types; mechanobullous and inflammatory EBA. Mechanobullous EBA, referred to as classic EBA, presents with skin fragility, blisters and dystrophic changes on trauma-prone areas. Inflammatory EBA resembles other autoimmune subepidermal bullous diseases. Compelling evidence from mouse models supports a pathogenic role of autoantibodies against type VII collagen in EBA. Treatment of EBA is often unsatisfactory. The most widely used systemic treatment is corticosteroids. Colchicine and dapsone have been reported to be good treatment modalities when combined with corticosteroids. Some intractable cases of EBA have successfully been treated with intravenous immunoglobulin or rituximab. PMID:23368767

  7. Anesthesia and epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Reema; Howard, Richard

    2010-04-01

    Patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) may present for anesthesia with an unrelated surgical condition or, more commonly, for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Children in particular may require frequent anesthetics. Safe and effective management of anesthesia presents a significant challenge and although there is little rigorous evidence available to aid decision-making, in this article the elements of current good anesthesia care in EB are summarized. PMID:20447497

  8. Reduced Intensity Conditioning Before Partially Matched Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome

  9. Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Laimer, Martin; Lanschuetzer, Christoph M; Diem, Anja; Bauer, Johann W

    2010-01-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa type Herlitz (JEB-H) is the autosomal recessively inherited, more severe variant of "lucidolytic" JEB. Characterized by generalized, extensive mucocutaneous blistering at birth and early lethality, this devastating condition is most often caused by homozygous null mutations in the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2, each encoding for 1 of the 3 chains of the heterotrimer laminin-332. The JEB-H subtype usually presents as a severe and clinically diverse variant of the EB group of mechanobullous genodermatoses. This article outlines the epidemiology, presentation, and diagnosis of JEB-H. Morbidity and mortality are high, necessitating optimized protocols for early (including prenatal) diagnosis and palliative care. Gene therapy remains the most promising perspective. PMID:19945616

  10. Predictors of response to extracorporeal photopheresis in advanced mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McGirt, Laura Y.; Thoburn, Christopher; Hess, Allan; Vonderheid, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) has been utilized for more than 20 years to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), but a clinical response can take up to 9 months to manifest. This study was undertaken to determine whether clinical features, laboratory values, cytokine levels, or gene expression levels of tumor markers are useful to predict the subsequent response to ECP in CTCL patients with blood involvement. Methods Twenty-one patients with CTCL treated with ECP as monotherapy for at least 6 months were retrospectively identified. Laboratory and clinical data and blood obtained at baseline, 3, and 6 months of treatment were used for analysis. Results In pretreatment blood specimens, a lower percentage of Sézary cells and a higher absolute eosinophil count were associated with a favorable clinical response. Clinical evidence of an early response after 3 months of ECP did not reliably predict a favorable response at 6 months or beyond. Comparison of cytokines, gene transcripts, and other laboratory measures of disease did not correlate with the subsequent clinical response, although lactate dehydrogenase levels tended to decrease progressively in ECP-responsive cases and increase progressively in ECP-non-responsive cases. Additionally, serum levels of TNF-α significantly increased from baseline to 6 months of ECP, but was not found to correlate with the clinical response. Conclusions Although we found that increased eosinophils and decreased percentage of Sézary cells were associated with a favorable clinical response to ECP, we were not able to identify the predictors of ECP response within the first 3 months of treatment. PMID:20626820

  11. Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquitsita

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rishu; Woodley, David T.; Chen, Mei

    2011-01-01

    EBA is a rare, acquired, chronic subepidermal bullous disease of the skin and mucosa characterized by autoantibodies to type VII collagen structures, a major component of anchoring fibrils, that attach the epidermis onto the dermis. EBA patients have tissue-bound as well as circulating anti-type VII collagen autoantibodies that attack type VII collagen and result in a reduction or perturbation of normally functioning anchoring fibrils. Patients with EBA have skin fragility, blisters, erosions, scars, milia, and nail loss: all features reminiscent of genetic dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. These anti-type VII collagen antibodies are “pathogenic” because when injected into mice, the mice develop an EBA-like blistering disease. In addition to the classical mechanobullous presentation, EBA also has several other distinct clinical syndromes similar to bullous pemphigoid, Brunsting-Perry pemphigoid, or cicatricial pemphigoid. Although treatment for EBA is often unsatisfactory, some therapeutic success has been achieved with colchicine, dapsone, plasmaphoresis, photopheresis, infliximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin. PMID:22137228

  12. Dose-Escalation Trial of Carfilzomib With and Without Romidepsin in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-10

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  13. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shinkuma, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare inherited blistering disorder caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. The deficiency and/or dysfunction of type VII collagen leads to subepidermal blistering immediately below the lamina densa, resulting in mucocutaneous fragility and disease complications such as intractable ulcers, extensive scarring, malnutrition, and malignancy. The disease is usually diagnosed by immunofluorescence mapping and/or transmission electron microscopy and subsequently subclassified into one of 14 subtypes. This review provides practical knowledge on the disease, including new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26064063

  14. Anesthetic consideration in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Narejo, AS; Khan, MU; Alotaibi, WM; Khan, MM

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of inherited rare skin disease, characterized by bullae formation in the skin or mucous membranes. The fundamental abnormality is collagen degeneration leads to splitting of various epidermal layers. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is one of the major forms of epidermolysis bullosa. These patients often admitted to the hospital for corrective surgeries, change of dressing, contracture release, and skin grafting. Anesthetic management of these cases is always a challenge. We are reporting a case of 5-year-old boy diagnosed as a case of DEB scheduled for upper lip contracture release, skin grafting and debridement of nonhealing scars under anesthesia. In this case, we have focused mainly on the anesthetic management, preparation of the monitoring, transportation, difficulties in establishing the venous accesses, and airway management. PMID:26955322

  15. Guttural pouch mycosis in a 6-month-old filly

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract A 6-month-old filly was presented with unilateral epistaxis. Based on clinical signs, endoscopic examination, and postmortem examination, guttural pouch mycosis was diagnosed. The young age of the filly and the fact that this was the 2nd diagnosis of guttural pouch mycosis on this farm was unusual. PMID:16604984

  16. Life, epidermolysis bullosa and chasing tornadoes.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sam

    2004-11-01

    Sam Hall was diagnosed with epidermolysis bullosa as a baby. Here she describes growing up with the condition and the continual dressing changes it brings, and how she has not let it prevent her from leading an active and exciting life. PMID:15575565

  17. Metaplastic Conditions in The Bladder in Patient With Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Kenan; Demirci, Deniz; Baydilli, Numan; Nazlim, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare inherited muco-cutaneous disorder that sometimes presents with genitourinary involvement. Herein we report the case of an 11-year-old girl with a history of junctional epidermolysis bullosa who was admitted with urological symptoms. On cystoscopy, suspected bullous bladder lesions were observed. Mesonephroid, intestinal and squamous metaplasia is reported here for the first time. PMID:27564298

  18. Metaplastic Conditions in The Bladder in Patient with Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Kenan; Demirci, Deniz; Baydilli, Numan; Nazlim, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a rare inherited muco-cutaneous disorder that sometimes presentes with genitourinary involvement. Herein we report the case of an 11-year-old girl with a history of junctional epidermolysis bullosa who was admitted with urological symptoms. On cystoscopy, suspected bullous bladder lesions were observed. Mesonephroid, intestinal and squamous metaplasia is reported here for the first time. PMID:27564298

  19. Silicon Phthalocyanine 4 and Photodynamic Therapy in Stage IA-IIA Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  20. Nutrition for children with epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Lesley

    2010-04-01

    Optimization of resistance to infection, growth, sexual maturation, wound healing, and provision of the best possible overall quality of life are important management goals in children with epidermolysis bullosa. However, all these goals rely on the maintenance of optimal nutritional status, and achieving this is extremely challenging in the severe types of the disease. Strategies to improve nutritional status have the best chance of success when the dietitian or nutritionist works as an integral member of the multidisciplinary team and is well informed of patients' situations, family dynamics, and prognoses. Even the best-coordinated dietetic interventions may exert only limited impact. PMID:20447494

  1. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Boeira, Vanessa Lys Simas Yamakawa; Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rêgo, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida; Follador, Ivonise

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that present with skin and, in some cases, mucosal fragility, predisposing patients to the development of blisters and/or erosions after minimal trauma or friction. Children with a recurrent history of these kinds of lesions or neonates that present them in the absence of another reasonable explanation should be investigated. Diagnosis must be based on clinical and histopathological findings. To date, management of inherited EB basically consists in avoiding traumas that trigger lesions, as well as preventing infection and facilitating healing of the wounds with the systematic use of bandages. PMID:23739692

  2. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn. PMID:26500857

  3. Genetics Home Reference: epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... science of epidermolysis bullosa and diagnostic and molecular characterization: Proceedings of the IInd International Symposium on Epidermolysis ... Published : August 2, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for ...

  4. Dermal eosinophilic infiltrate in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Saraiya, Ami; Yang, Catherine S; Kim, Jinah; Bercovitch, Lionel; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Telang, Gladys

    2015-08-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by a split in the lamina lucida usually because of mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 resulting in absence or reduction of laminin-332. Rare subtypes of JEB have mutations in COL17A1, ITGB4, ITGA6 and ITGA3 leading to reduction or dysfunction of collagen XVII, integrin α6β4 and integrin α3. The classic finding under light microscopy is a paucicellular, subepidermal split. We describe the unusual presence of an eosinophilic infiltrate in the bullae and subjacent dermis in a neonate with JEB, generalized intermediate (formerly known as non-Herlitz-type JEB), discuss the histologic differential diagnosis for a subepidermal blister in a neonate, review the literature regarding cases of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) presenting with inflammatory infiltrates, and discuss mechanisms to explain these findings. This case highlights that eosinophils can rarely be seen in EB and should not mislead the dermatopathologist into diagnosing an autoimmune blistering disorder. PMID:25950805

  5. Fungus Ball in Concha Bullosa: A Rare Case with Anosmia

    PubMed Central

    Özkırıs, Mahmut; Kapusuz, Zeliha; Seçkın, Selda; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Concha bullosa is the pneumatization of the concha and is one of the most common variations of the sinonasal anatomy. The histopathological changes caused by the infections which arise from the impaired aeration of conchal cavity are frequently found. Fungus ball of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare, fungal infection with only three cases reported previously. In this paper, we present the fourth fungus ball case which developed within a concha bullosa and presented with anosmia. PMID:23936708

  6. [Dementia in Patients with Central Nervous System Mycosis].

    PubMed

    Morita, Akihiko; Ishihara, Masaki; Konno, Michiko

    2016-04-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) mycosis is a potentially life-threatening but treatable neurological emergency. CNS mycoses progress slowly and are sometimes difficult to distinguish from dementia. Though most patients with CNS mycosis have an underlying disease, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and/or use of immunosuppressants, cryptococcosis can occur in non-immunosuppressed persons. One of the major difficulties in accurate diagnosis is to detect the pathogen in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures. Thus, the clinical diagnosis is often made by combining circumstantial evidence, including mononuclear cell-dominant pleocytosis with low glucose and protein elevation in the CSF, as well as positive results from an antigen-based assay and a (1-3)-beta-D-glucan assay using plasma and/or CSF. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostics, which are not performed as routine examinations and are mostly performed as part of academic research in Japan, are sensitive tools for the early diagnosis of CNS mycosis. Mognetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to assess the complications of fungal meningitis, such as abscess, infarction, and hydrocephalus. Clinicians should realize the advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic tools. Early and accurate diagnosis, including identification of the particular fungal species, enables optimal antifungal treatment that produces good outcomes in patients with CNS mycosis. PMID:27056851

  7. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  8. Molecular therapies for inherited epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises rare genetic disorders characterized by formation of blisters and erosions of skin and mucous membranes after minor mechanical trauma. The molecular basis and the pathomechanisms of the main EB types have been largely deciphered in the past decades. The burden of the disease is high and quality of life strongly affected. The treatment is still symptomatic aiming to support wound healing and resolve complications. Numerous experimental therapeutic approaches for EB have been explored in the last years, most of them dedicated to dystrophic EB. Although gene and cell therapies have been already applied in patients, molecular therapies including gene editing and repurposing of small molecules are currently very attractive. Recent data on the effect of small molecules, like aminoglycosides and angiotensin receptor blockers in preclinical models for dystrophic EB are encouraging. The efficacy in patients remains to be proven in clinical trials. Therapeutic efficacy, as well as unexpected outcomes must be carefully monitored. PMID:27149615

  9. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  10. Erythrodermia Congenitalis Ichthyosiformis Bullosa of Brocq

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Dorothea; Schröder, Josef; Schönbuchner, Ines; Schreml, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Berneburg, Mark; Schreml, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with congenital scaling and hyperkeratosis on his palms, the soles of his feet and the extensor areas of his joints. The flexural areas were unaffected. His maternal grandmother, questionably his maternal uncle, his mother, all three brothers, one of his two sisters as well as two nephews and three nieces have or had similar skin changes. A punch biopsy was taken from the left palm. Clinical and histological signs led to the diagnosis of erythrodermia congenitalis ichthyosiformis bullosa of Brocq. We confirmed this genetically and found a heterozygous duplication (c.1752dupT) in the keratin 1 gene (KRT-1). To our knowledge, this is the first case of this skin condition reported in the literature with a heterozygous duplication (c.1752dupT) in KRT-1. PMID:26933410

  11. Diagnosis, treatment and management of epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Jean

    Epidermis bullosa is a genetically inherited disease in which painful blistering of the skin or mucous membranes occurs after minor trauma. It is a lifelong problem. The diagnosis should be confirmed by a specialist, preferably at a specialist unit where a treatment plan and follow-up arrangements for professionals and families can be put in place. Nurses will be involved in frequent dressings of wounds, after extra analgesia, and may need to be alert to any need for further specialist referral, especially in the case of complications such as infection, deformities, gastrointestinal strictures and possible skin cancers. Genetic counselling should also be offered to families, especially when considering the possible risks to future pregnancies. PMID:27126750

  12. Epidermolysis bullosa and congenital pyloric atresia

    PubMed Central

    Mithwani, Anwar Adil; Hashmi, Asif; Adil, Salman

    2013-01-01

    The association between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and pyloric atresia (PA) is rare but well documented. Herein, we report a case of EB associated with congenital PA. A female baby, weighing 1480 g, was born vaginally to a 31-year-old gravida 7 lady at 33 weeks of gestation. Polyhydramnios was detected on antenatal assessment. The parents were non-consanguineous Saudis with no family history of significant illness. At birth, well-demarcated areas of peeled skin were present over knees, left leg and periumbilical region. Systemic examination revealed no other abnormality. On second day, the patient developed recurrent vomiting and abdominal distension. An abdominal X-ray revealed a single gastric gas bubble suggesting pyloric obstruction. Following gastroduodenostomy, the baby developed severe sepsis with multiorgan dysfunction and expired on 25th day of life. Skin biopsy showed cleavage within lamina lucida. PMID:24068383

  13. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT FOR EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA DYSTROPHICA

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Thais M.; Sakai, Vivien T.; Candido, Liliani A.; Silva, Salete M. B.; Machado, Maria Aparecida A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) consists of a group of genetic hereditary disorders in which patients frequently present fragile skin and mucosa that form blisters following minor trauma. More than 20 subtypes of EB have been recognized in the literature. Specific genetic mutations are well characterized for most the different EB subtypes and variants. The most common oral manifestations of EB are painful blisters affecting all the oral surfaces. Dental treatment for patients with EB consists of palliative therapy for its oral manifestations along with typical restorative and periodontal procedures. The aim of this article is to describe two dental clinical treatments of recessive dystrophic EB cases and their specific clinical manifestations. The psychological intervention required during the dental treatment of these patients is also presented. PMID:19089295

  14. Dental management of patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Dağ, Canan; Bezgin, Tuğba; Özalp, Nurhan

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of rare, genetic skin disorders characterized by fragility and blistering to minimal trauma. All oral surfaces may be involved, including the tongue, buccal mucosa, palate, floor of the mouth and gingiva. Common oral findings of the disease include microstomia, intraoral ulcerations and bullae formation, ankyloglossia, tongue atrophy, elimination of buccal and vestibular sulci, lingual depapillation and atrophy of the palatal folds. In these case reports; systemic findings, oral manifestations and preventive measures are described for 3 patients with EB, all of whom required extensive oral management. Early dental management and preventive care to minimize caries development and improve oral health is very important for patients with EB. Pediatric dentists play an especially important role in early intervention. In describing the dental management of three EB cases, this article stresses the importance of an aggressive dental preventive programme with strict oral hygiene instructions for patients and parents along with frequent professional cleaning and fluoride therapy. PMID:25284524

  15. Clinical management for epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Thais M; Sakai, Vivien T; Candido, Liliani A; Silva, Salete M B; Machado, Maria Aparecida A M

    2008-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) consists of a group of genetic hereditary disorders in which patients frequently present fragile skin and mucosa that form blisters following minor trauma. More than 20 subtypes of EB have been recognized in the literature. Specific genetic mutations are well characterized for most the different EB subtypes and variants. The most common oral manifestations of EB are painful blisters affecting all the oral surfaces. Dental treatment for patients with EB consists of palliative therapy for its oral manifestations along with typical restorative and periodontal procedures. The aim of this article is to describe two dental clinical treatments of recessive dystrophic EB cases and their specific clinical manifestations. The psychological intervention required during the dental treatment of these patients is also presented. PMID:19089295

  16. Research Techniques Made Simple: Immunofluorescence Antigen Mapping in Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina; He, Yinghong

    2016-07-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa is a group of genetic blistering diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical severity and molecular defects. Epidermolysis bullosa results from mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion in the epidermis. Immunofluorescence antigen mapping makes use of monoclonal antibodies against proteins of the dermal-epidermal junction zone to determine the layer of skin where cleavage occurs and the relative protein abundance. It allows the diagnosis of the type and subtype of inherited epidermolysis bullosa and sheds light on molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Immunofluorescence mapping steps include obtaining a skin biopsy sample, processing the biopsy material, antigen-antibody interaction on tissue, washing, incubation with fluorescently conjugated secondary antibodies, mounting, observation under a fluorescence microscope, and interpretation. A minimal antibody panel allows discrimination of the main epidermolysis bullosa subtypes. Extended panels can be used depending on the diagnostic or scientific question to be addressed. Immunofluorescence mapping contributed to significant progress in understanding epidermolysis bullosa, including identification of new underlying genetic mutations, mutation mechanisms, and the presence of revertant mosaicism. It is also an important tool in the assessment of the efficacy of experimental therapeutic approaches. PMID:27342035

  17. Exophiala pisciphila: a novel cause of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis.

    PubMed

    Kebbe, Jad; Mador, M Jeffery

    2016-07-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) is a hypersensitivity reaction to fungal antigens, which may particularly plague uncontrolled asthmatics. Non-aspergillus fungal organisms may be implicated and may elicit a more severe immunologic response. Exophiala pisciphila, a marine organism, has not been reported as a culprit yet. However, this report indicates it may be implicated in unrelenting symptoms in a severe asthmatic patient who had become dependent on corticosteroids. Proper identification and adequate therapy of this organism led to complete resolution of respiratory symptoms, with adequate subsequent control of the asthma. ABPM may complicate asthma and lead to a lack of its control. Proper awareness, testing and treatment of non-aspergillus pulmonary mycosis is essential to proper asthma care and beneficial for its control. PMID:27499992

  18. Exophiala pisciphila: a novel cause of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis

    PubMed Central

    Mador, M. Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) is a hypersensitivity reaction to fungal antigens, which may particularly plague uncontrolled asthmatics. Non-aspergillus fungal organisms may be implicated and may elicit a more severe immunologic response. Exophiala pisciphila, a marine organism, has not been reported as a culprit yet. However, this report indicates it may be implicated in unrelenting symptoms in a severe asthmatic patient who had become dependent on corticosteroids. Proper identification and adequate therapy of this organism led to complete resolution of respiratory symptoms, with adequate subsequent control of the asthma. ABPM may complicate asthma and lead to a lack of its control. Proper awareness, testing and treatment of non-aspergillus pulmonary mycosis is essential to proper asthma care and beneficial for its control. PMID:27499992

  19. Oral Manifestations and Dental Management of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Lisa; Sanabe, Mariane Emi; Diniz, Michele Baffi

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of hereditary chronic disorders, characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes in response to minor mechanical trauma. The objective of this study was to report the case of a young girl diagnosed with epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), transmitted by an autosomal dominant gene. Cutaneous findings included blisters and dystrophy following minimal friction. Recurrent blisters and vesicle formation on the hard palate were the main oral findings. In conclusion, publications concerning the oral and clinical manifestations of EBS are important for providing knowledge and an early multidisciplinary approach that prevents blister formation and improves these patients' quality of life, with the dentist playing an important role in oral health management. How to cite this article: Scheidt L, Sanabe ME, Diniz MB. Oral Manifestations and Dental Management of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):239-241. PMID:26604545

  20. Oral Manifestations and Dental Management of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Lisa; Sanabe, Mariane Emi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of hereditary chronic disorders, characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes in response to minor mechanical trauma. The objective of this study was to report the case of a young girl diagnosed with epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), transmitted by an autosomal dominant gene. Cutaneous findings included blisters and dystrophy following minimal friction. Recurrent blisters and vesicle formation on the hard palate were the main oral findings. In conclusion, publications concerning the oral and clinical manifestations of EBS are important for providing knowledge and an early multidisciplinary approach that prevents blister formation and improves these patients’ quality of life, with the dentist playing an important role in oral health management. How to cite this article: Scheidt L, Sanabe ME, Diniz MB. Oral Manifestations and Dental Management of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):239-241. PMID:26604545

  1. Recently Identified Forms of Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    McGrath, John A

    2015-12-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a collection of clinically diverse inherited blistering diseases that affect the skin and, in some subtypes, mucous membranes and other organs. Currently classified into four main subtypes (EB simplex, junctional EB, dystrophic EB, and Kindler syndrome, mainly based on the level of skin cleavage), the spectrum of EB extends to more than 30 clinical subtypes with pathogenic mutations in at least 18 distinct genes. This review focuses on three recent additions to variants of EB: all are autosomal recessive, and result from mutations in either DST-e (coding for epidermal dystonin, also known as the 230 kDa bullous pemphigoid antigen, BP230), EXPH5 (coding for exophilin-5, also known as Slac2-b), or ITGA3 (coding for the integrin alpha-3 subunit). Each of these new forms of EB is reviewed with respect to the initial gene discovery, clinical features, the current mutation database, and skin pathology. Awareness of these recently described forms of EB is helpful in the clinical evaluation of patients with EB and in defining genotype-phenotype correlation for inherited blistering skin diseases. PMID:26719633

  2. A Drosophila Model of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex.

    PubMed

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Paululat, Achim; Baccam, Gabriel C; Wallrath, Lori L; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-08-01

    The blistering skin disorder epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) results from dominant mutations in keratin 5 (K5) or keratin 14 (K14) genes, encoding the intermediate filament (IF) network of basal epidermal keratinocytes. The mechanisms governing keratin network formation and collapse due to EBS mutations remain incompletely understood. Drosophila lacks cytoplasmic IFs, providing a 'null' environment to examine the formation of keratin networks and determine mechanisms by which mutant keratins cause pathology. Here, we report that ubiquitous co-expression of transgenes encoding wild-type human K14 and K5 resulted in the formation of extensive keratin networks in Drosophila epithelial and non-epithelial tissues, causing no overt phenotype. Similar to mammalian cells, treatment of transgenic fly tissues with phosphatase inhibitors caused keratin network collapse, validating Drosophila as a genetic model system to investigate keratin dynamics. Co-expression of K5 and a K14(R125C) mutant that causes the most severe form of EBS resulted in widespread formation of EBS-like cytoplasmic keratin aggregates in epithelial and non-epithelial fly tissues. Expression of K14(R125C)/K5 caused semi-lethality; adult survivors developed wing blisters and were flightless due to a lack of intercellular adhesion during wing heart development. This Drosophila model of EBS is valuable for the identification of pathways altered by mutant keratins and for the development of EBS therapies. PMID:25830653

  3. Recently Identified Forms of Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a collection of clinically diverse inherited blistering diseases that affect the skin and, in some subtypes, mucous membranes and other organs. Currently classified into four main subtypes (EB simplex, junctional EB, dystrophic EB, and Kindler syndrome, mainly based on the level of skin cleavage), the spectrum of EB extends to more than 30 clinical subtypes with pathogenic mutations in at least 18 distinct genes. This review focuses on three recent additions to variants of EB: all are autosomal recessive, and result from mutations in either DST-e (coding for epidermal dystonin, also known as the 230 kDa bullous pemphigoid antigen, BP230), EXPH5 (coding for exophilin-5, also known as Slac2-b), or ITGA3 (coding for the integrin alpha-3 subunit). Each of these new forms of EB is reviewed with respect to the initial gene discovery, clinical features, the current mutation database, and skin pathology. Awareness of these recently described forms of EB is helpful in the clinical evaluation of patients with EB and in defining genotype-phenotype correlation for inherited blistering skin diseases. PMID:26719633

  4. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  5. Epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Varadraj Vasant; Sori, Tukaram; Naveen, Kikkeri Narayanshetty; Athanikar, Sharatchandra Bhimrao; Rai, Vijetha; Shastry, Dinesh Udupi

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) pruriginosa is a very rare pattern of dystrophic EB caused by type VII collagen gene mutation, with distinctive clinico-pathological features. It is characterized by nodular prurigo-like lichenified lesions, nail dystrophy, and variable presence of albopapuloid lesions. We report two such cases. PMID:24616855

  6. A concha bullosa mucopyocele manifesting as migraine headaches: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shihada, Rabia; Luntz, Michal

    2012-05-01

    A concha bullosa is a common anatomic variant that represents an aerated turbinate, usually the middle turbinate. It is usually asymptomatic. When extensively pneumatized, a large concha bullosa may cause significant problems, including headache, nasal obstruction, and blockage of sinus drainage. We report a case of a large concha bullosa mucopyocele that manifested as recurring migraine headaches. It was successfully treated with surgical excision. We also review the available literature. PMID:22614562

  7. Computed tomographic spectrum of intracranial mycosis: correlation with histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, M.A.; Stern, J.; deNapoli, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    Four cases of intracerebral fungal infection are reviewed. The clinical course is outlined, and the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics are analyzed in light of known pathological data. The CT appearance of intracranial mycosis is dependent on the type of fungus as well as the dominant infecting form, i.e., yeast or hyphae. The hyphal form leads predominantly to a CT pattern consistent with vascular occlusion and secondary abscess formation; the yeast form generally results in noncaseating granulomas, which appear on CT scan as nodular enhancing lesions. If the patient survives the acute infective process, these fungal lesions undergo a prolonged subacute phase, and may eventually calcify.

  8. Analysis of differential β variable region of T cell receptor expression and NAV3/TNFRSF1B gene mutation in mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Ren, Jingyu; Guo, Shuping; Bai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze the predominant expression of the variable region of T cell receptor (TRBV) and determine whether NAV3 or TNFRSF1B gene mutation involved in the pathogenesis of MF. Results TRBV5-7 expression increased from the normal, early-stage to advanced-stage lesion in MF patient. By contrast, TRBV2 decreased with the lesion developed. We found no mutations of NAV3 or TNFRSF1B in the lesions from this study. Materials and Methods Real-time PCR were used to screen differential expression of TRBV in different lesions. Mutational analyses were used to validate genetic alterations in the skin lesions. Conclusions The identification of TRBV gene expression differences between normal and different stages of MF lesions provide insight into promising new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. None of the reported genetic abnormalities suggests complexity of progress from a primary cytogenetic event to an advanced stage with poor prognosis in MF. PMID:26918607

  9. Advances in understanding and treating dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Oever, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of inherited disorders that can be both systemic and life-threatening. Standard treatments for the most severe forms of this disorder, typically limited to palliative care, are ineffective in reducing the morbidity and mortality due to complications of the disease. Emerging therapies—such as the use of allogeneic cellular therapy, gene therapy, and protein therapy—have all shown promise, but it is likely that several approaches will need to be combined to realize a cure. For recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, each particular therapeutic approach has added to our understanding of type VII collagen (C7) function and the basic biology surrounding the disease. The efficacy of these therapies and the mechanisms by which they function also give us insight into developing future strategies for treating this and other extracellular matrix disorders. PMID:24860657

  10. Romidepsin and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  11. Restorative and periodontal challenges in adults with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Puliyel, Divya; Chiu, Ching Hsiu Ketty; Habibian, Mina

    2014-05-01

    Oral manifestations of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) include blistering of the oral mucosa, scarring, limited mouth opening, decreased mobility of the tongue, restrictions in oral functions and a high incidence of caries. Adult oral health management is challenging and requires unique strategies, which have not been well described in the published literature. We present a case of DEB focusing on the obstacles encountered during restorative and periodontal care and recommendations for appropriate treatment. PMID:25087349

  12. Periodontal manifestation of epidermolysis bullosa: Looking through the lens

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Praveen; Jain, Rajsi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a genetic disease associated with fragility and bullous lesions of the skin and mucous membranes. There are various patterns of inheritance and histopathology. The disease is associated with systemic and oral manifestations. Treatment of this disease is multidisciplinary and remains only palliative till today. The present case report describes periodontal manifestations of EB and the treatment plan for the same. PMID:27041842

  13. Periodontal manifestation of epidermolysis bullosa: Looking through the lens.

    PubMed

    Kudva, Praveen; Jain, Rajsi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a genetic disease associated with fragility and bullous lesions of the skin and mucous membranes. There are various patterns of inheritance and histopathology. The disease is associated with systemic and oral manifestations. Treatment of this disease is multidisciplinary and remains only palliative till today. The present case report describes periodontal manifestations of EB and the treatment plan for the same. PMID:27041842

  14. [Congenital epidermolysis bullosa--a case report].

    PubMed

    Konefał, Halina; Gawrych, Elzbieta; Czeszyńska, Maria Beata

    2012-10-01

    Bullous dermatitis in infants is a clinical term used for a number of disorders associated with primary neonatal pemphigus. The disease requires differentiation of autoimmune disorders such as pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus, and bullous pemphigoid. These diseases are the result of pemphigus IgG antibodies that pass from the mother to the fetus through the placenta. The level of antibody titers in the pregnant woman and her clinical condition are not the markers of the severity of the disease in children, but, in case of a high level, a miscarriage premature birth, or even stillbirth, may occur. Staphylococcal syndrome exfoliative dermatitis (staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome - SSSS), the etiological agents of which are type A or B exfoliative toxins of Staphylococcus aureus, is most frequently observed. These toxins can activate as superantigens and cause T-cell activation. They induce proteolysis and separation of the granular layer of epidermis through direct binding of these antigens. Symptoms of the disorder regardless of the etiologic factors, are common: redness of the skin and formation of bubbles of various sizes filed with serous or serous-bloody content. Bursting bubbles patches peel off, leaving bare, sometimes oozing surface. Extensive damage to the skin is a gateway to infection and disturbs the function of regulating warmth and water-electrolyte balance. Early detection of the cause and appropriate general and local treatment effectively prevent the development of sepsis. The authors present a case of a full-term neonate (male, birthweight 3230 g, good overall condition, 5-min Apgar score: 10) born with dermatitis bullosa of unknown etiology Physical examination immediately after birth revealed multiple blisters filled with serous and serous-bloody content on the skin all over the neonatal body mostly in the area of both armpits, elbows, wrists, knees, ankles and fingers of both hands and feet. The course of pregnancy was uncomplicated

  15. Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis due to Alternaria: Case report and review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhagteshwar; Denning, David W

    2012-01-01

    While allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and mycosis are well recognised, no cases have been described related to Alternaria spp. Alternaria is a common sensitising fungus in asthmatics and related to thunderstorm asthma. We report a case of an asthmatic who presented with worsening asthma control, mild eosinophilia on high dose inhaled corticosteroids (800 μg/day), a total IgE of 3800 KIU/L, an Alternaria-specific IgE of 21.3 KUa/L and positive skin prick test, negative specific IgE and skin prick test to Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium spp., Cladosporium spp., Trichophyton spp. and a normal CT scan of the thorax. He responded well to a short course of oral prednisolone and then oral itraconazole, given over 17 months but relapsed 1 month after stopping it. PMID:24371728

  16. Management of oesophageal stenosis in epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, I B; Eisenberg, M; Willis, S

    1989-01-01

    Seven patients with epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica and chronic and recurrent oesophageal lesions such as spasm, strictures, and complete occlusion were studied. Dysphagia could be cured with drugs if it was caused by bullae formation or spasm. If oesophageal strictures were present, endoscopy and bouginage with corticosteroid prophylaxis during the quiescent phase of the disease was a safe and useful procedure. We have also given corticosteroids, which reduced the oedema caused by bullae formation and oral phenytoin, which reduced epithelial detachment by inhibiting collagenase activity. Verapamil counteracted oesophageal spasm and pureed food during periods of dysphagia reduced blistering of the upper oesophagus. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:2751329

  17. Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica treated with vitamin E and oral corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Unger, W. P.; Nethercott, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy with histologically proved epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica was treated daily with 10,000 IU of DL-alphatocopheryl acetate and prednisone 120 mg. Comparison of a control study period of seven weeks with the period during which vitamin E was given revealed no significant improvement. The same negative results were noted with the use of prednisone although the levels believed necessary to produce improvement were never attained owing to supervening infection. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4704893

  18. Innovative therapeutic strategies for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Larcher, F; Del Río, M

    2015-06-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is among the most serious rare skin diseases. It is also the rare skin disease for which most effort has been expended in developing advanced therapeutic interventions. RDEB is caused by collagen VII deficiency resulting from COL7A1 mutations. Therapeutic approaches seek to replenish collagen VII and thus restore dermal-epidermal adhesion. Therapeutic options under development include protein therapy and different cell-based and gene-based therapies. In addition to treating skin defects, some of these therapies may also target internal mucosa. In the coming years, these novel therapeutic approaches should substantially improve the quality of life of patients with RDEB. PMID:25796272

  19. Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: From Pathophysiology to Novel Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Michael; Sadik, Christian D; Bieber, Katja; Ibrahim, Saleh M; Manz, Rudolf A; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease induced by autoantibodies to type VII collagen causing mucocutaneous blisters. In the inflammatory (bullous pemphigoid-like) EBA variant, autoantibody binding is followed by a lesional inflammatory cell infiltration, and the overall clinical picture may be indistinguishable from that of bullous pemphigoid, the latter being the most common autoimmune bullous disease. The last decade witnessed the development of several mouse models of inflammatory EBA that facilitated the elucidation of the pathogenesis of autoantibody-induced, cell-mediated subepidermal blistering diseases and identified new therapeutic targets for these and possibly other autoantibody-driven disorders. PMID:26763420

  20. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in a 17-year-old boy with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, Irene; Ferrazzi, Anna; Zanetti, Irene; Alaibac, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a rare, acquired, autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of the skin, characterised by blisters and erosions, especially in trauma-prone sites and extensor skin surface, scarring with formation of milia, skin fragility and nail dystrophy. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is extremely rare in childhood and it has been reported to be frequently associated with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autoantibodies against type VII collagen have been found in a large number of patients with Crohn's disease without epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy affected by Crohn's disease who presented with milia on infiltrated erythematous plaques over the back of the hands. The diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita was confirmed by histopathology, direct and indirect immunofluorescence analysis and ELISA. PMID:26163555

  1. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  2. Reduced Toxicity Conditioning and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplantation for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Mark B; Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Giller, Roger; Umegaki, Noriko; Harel, Sivan; Kiuru, Maija; Morel, Kimberly D; LeBoeuf, Nicole; Kandel, Jessica; Bruckner, Anna; Fabricatore, Sandra; Chen, Mei; Woodley, David; McGrath, John; Baxter-Lowe, LeeAnn; Uitto, Jouni; Christiano, Angela M; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2015-09-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a severe, incurable, inherited blistering disease caused by COL7A1 mutations. Emerging evidence suggests hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) can be reprogrammed into skin; HPC-derived cells can restore COL7 expression in COL7-deficient mice. We report two children with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa treated with reduced-toxicity conditioning and HLA-matched HPC transplantation. PMID:26148662

  3. Oral manifestations of epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica: a rare genetic disease

    PubMed Central

    Parushetti, Anita Dundappa; Agrawal, Jiwanasha Manish; Nanjannawar, Lalita Girish; Agrawal, Manish Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) constitutes a group of phenotypically diverse genodermatoses, which manifests with blistering and erosions of the skin and mucous membranes as the unifying diagnostic feature. It is an acquired disease or inherited as either autosomal-dominant or recessive with an incidence of 1/50 000. The prominent clinical characteristic of the disease is the development of bullae or vesicles in mucosa or skin in response to minor trauma. It is a chronic mechanobullous disease characterised by auto antibodies against Type VII collagen. This paper documents a case of a man diagnosed with dominant dystrophic EB; describing the measures that dentists and healthcare providers should adopt in order to provide a safe and effective dental treatment. Early prevention protocols for these patients have also been discussed. PMID:23349175

  4. Epidermolysis bullosa, dental and anesthetic management: a case report.

    PubMed

    Esfahanizade, Katayoun; Mahdavi, Ali Reza; Ansari, Ghassem; Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Esfahanizadeh, Abdolreza

    2014-09-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of rare inherited skin and mucous membrane disorders in which blister formation may arise spontaneously or following a minor friction. Various patterns of inheritance are explicated for the disease. The disease has a profound effect on oral mucosa and may result in high prevalence of dental caries. General anesthesia is sometimes the only choice for dental treatments in patients with EB. The following case report describes the dental and anesthetic management of an 12.5 -year-old girl with dystrophic type of EB. The patient was followed up every 6 months. New carious lesions were detected one year after the treatment, on the last visit. Presenting a perfect dental care to children with this disorder can be challenging for the in charge specialist, both pediatric dentist and anesthesiologist. PMID:25191665

  5. Epidermolysis Bullosa, Dental and Anesthetic Management: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanizade, Katayoun; Mahdavi, Ali Reza; Ansari, Ghassem; Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Esfahanizadeh, Abdolreza

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of rare inherited skin and mucous membrane disorders in which blister formation may arise spontaneously or following a minor friction. Various patterns of inheritance are explicated for the disease. The disease has a profound effect on oral mucosa and may result in high prevalence of dental caries. General anesthesia is sometimes the only choice for dental treatments in patients with EB. The following case report describes the dental and anesthetic management of an 12.5 -year-old girl with dystrophic type of EB. The patient was followed up every 6 months. New carious lesions were detected one year after the treatment, on the last visit. Presenting a perfect dental care to children with this disorder can be challenging for the in charge specialist, both pediatric dentist and anesthesiologist. PMID:25191665

  6. Placenta-based therapies for the treatment of epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Nevala-Plagemann, Christopher; Lee, Catherine; Tolar, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a severe blistering skin disease caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene. These mutations lead to decreased or absent levels of collagen VII at the dermal-epidermal junction. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in the treatment of RDEB, including the use of hematopoietic cell transplantation, but a cure has proven elusive. Patients still experience life-limiting and life-threatening complications as a result of painful and debilitating wounds. The continued suffering of these patients drives the need to improve existing therapies and develop new ones. In this review, we will discuss how recent advances in placenta-, umbilical cord blood- and amniotic membrane-based therapies may play a role in the both the current and future treatment of RDEB. PMID:25795271

  7. Dental treatment in a patient with epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Maria Alice; de Souza Silva, Juliana; Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia de Paula E; Díaz-Serrano, Kranya Victória; Freitas, Aldevina Campos de; Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino de

    2008-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare inherited group of genodermatoses characterized by mucocutaneous fragility and blister formation, either spontaneously or as a result of minimal mechanical trauma. The repetition of these episodes in the oral cavity leads to atrophy of the mucosa, causing microstomia, ankyloglossia, tongue denudation, and vestibule obliteration, characteristics that make dental treatment difficult. Patients with EB are at high risk for caries due to the presence of dental anomalies; they also tend to have a soft diet and difficulties with mechanical removal of the dental biofilm. This case report presents a patient diagnosed with EB and describes the difficulties faced by the clinician during dental treatment as well as the measures adopted to safely manage the patient's dental care. PMID:18489655

  8. Placenta-based therapies for the treatment of epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Nevala-Plagemann, Christopher; Lee, Catherine; Tolar, Jakub

    2015-06-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a severe blistering skin disease caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene. These mutations lead to decreased or absent levels of collagen VII at the dermal-epidermal junction. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in the treatment of RDEB, including the use of hematopoietic cell transplantation, but a cure has been elusive. Patients still experience life-limiting and life-threatening complications as a result of painful and debilitating wounds. The continued suffering of these patients drives the need to improve existing therapies and develop new ones. In this Review, we will discuss how recent advances in placenta-based, umbilical cord blood-based and amniotic membrane-based therapies may play a role in the both the current and future treatment of RDEB. PMID:25795271

  9. Use of fibre dressings in children with severe epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Denyer, Jacqueline; Gibson, Elaine

    This non-comparative study explored the benefits of a natural gelling fibre dressing in 10 children with epidermolysis bullosa (EB). The clinical challenge in managing these children is that they often present with recalcitrant wounds that are perpetuated by critical colonisation, presence of biofilms and infection. KytoCel® (Aspen Medical) is a highly absorbent dressing composed of natural, biodegradable acylated chitosan. These fibres bond with wound exudate to form a clear gel that locks in fluid absorbs pathogens and is conformable to the wound bed. It also has haemostatic properties. ( Dutta PK et al, 2004 ; Lee et al, 2009 ; Stephen Haynes et al, 2014 ). Factors considered were whether the dressing could aid healing, reduce bleeding, reduce bioburden, be atraumatic and comfortable during wear time and removal. PMID:25816002

  10. Management of digestive lesions associated to congenital epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Chahed, Jamila; Mekki, Mongi; Ksia, Amine; Kechiche, Nehla; Hidouri, Saida; Youssef, Trimech Monia; Sahnoun, Lassaad; Krichene, Imed; Belghith, Mohsen; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital epidermolysis bullosa (CEB) is a rare genodermatosis. The digestive system is very frequently associated with skin manifestations. Pyloric atresia (PA) and oesophageal stenosis (OS) are considered the most serious digestive lesions to occur. The aim of this work is to study the management and the outcome of digestive lesions associated to CEB in four children and to compare our results to the literature. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study of four observations: Two cases of PA and two cases of OS associated to CEB managed in the Paediatric Surgery Department of Fattouma Bourguiba Teaching Hospital in Monastir, Tunisia. Results: Four patients, two of them are 11 and 8 years old, diagnosed as having a dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa since the neonatal period. They were admitted for the investigation of progressive dysphagia. Oesophageal stenosis was confirmed by an upper contrast study. Pneumatic dilation was the advocated therapeutic method for both patients with afavourable outcome. The two other patients are newborns, diagnosed to have a CEB because of association of PA with bullous skin lesions with erosive scars. Both patients had a complete diaphragm excision with pyloroplasty. They died at the age of 4 and 3 months of severe diarrhoea resistant to medical treatment. Conclusion: Digestive lesions associated to CEB represent an aggravating factor of a serious disease. OS complicating CEB is severe with difficult management. Pneumatic dilatation is the gold standard treatment method. However, the mortality rate in PA with CEB is high. Prenatal diagnosis of PA is possible, and it can help avoiding lethal forms. PMID:26712284

  11. Invasive Mycosis Due to Species of Blastobotrys in Immunocompromised Patients with Reduced Susceptibility to Antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Babu, Rachana; Bijulal, Swapna; Abraham, Mohan; Sasidharan, P.; Kathuria, Shallu; Sharma, Cheshta; Meis, Jacques F.

    2014-01-01

    Cases of invasive mycosis due to Blastobotrys serpentis and B. proliferans identified by sequencing in a preterm patient and a rhabdomyosarcoma patient, respectively, are reported. Both species revealed elevated fluconazole and echinocandin MICs by the CLSI broth microdilution method. Additionally, B. serpentis exhibited high amphotericin B MICs, thus posing serious therapeutic challenges. PMID:25165080

  12. The use of Biochip immunofluorescence microscopy for the serological diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo Valerio; Cozzani, Emanuele; Biasin, Matteo; Russo, Irene; Alaibac, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a rare autoimmune bullous disease characterized by the presence of circulating antibodies directed against the collagen type VII. Diagnosis is generally based on clinical history, clinical features, histology, direct and indirect immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and ELISA. Our study aims to determine the validity of the Biochip immunofluorescence microscopy for the serological diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Six patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and presence of antibodies against type VII collagen confirmed by ELISA were included in the study. Subsequently, all sera of patients were analyzed using Biochip. Antibodies anti-collagen type VII were detected in all sera by means of the Biochip technology. Thus, Biochip shows a good correlation with ELISA and seems to be an appropriate method for the diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. It is an easy, fast and standardized method which could facilitate the diagnosis of this autoimmune bullous disease. We suggest that it could be used as an initial screening test to identify patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. PMID:26895535

  13. Nutritional aspects of children and adolescents with epidermolysis bullosa: literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Zidorio, Ana Paula Caio; Dutra, Eliane Said; Leão, Dryelle Oliveira Dias; Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa is a genetic disorder that affects mainly the skin, however, all others systems are influenced. The nutritional care of children and adolescents with Epidermolysis Bullosa is a key treatment strategy, since the energy needs are increased due to the disease's metabolism, burdening the immune system and cicatrization process, symptoms caused by the disease hinder the intake and adequate absorption of nutrients, which may result in inadequate growth and development. Because this is a rare disease, there are few professionals who know the characteristics of both the clinical evolution and nutritional and dietary treatments. This literature review discusses the latest knowledge on energy and specific nutrient requirements to the dietary treatment and monitoring of children and adolescents with Epidermolysis Bullosa. PMID:25830992

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of a blister roof in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Monteiro, Luciane; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; Rocha, Nara Moreira; Scheffer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa the genetic defect of anchoring fibrils leads to cleavage beneath the basement membrane, with its consequent loss. We performed scanning electron microscopy of an inverted blister roof of a case of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, confirmed by immunomapping and gene sequencing. With a magnification of 2000 times a net attached to the blister roof could be easily identified. This net was composed of intertwined flat fibers. With higher magnifications, different fiber sizes could be observed, some thin fibers measuring around 80 nm and thicker ones measuring between 200 and 300 nm. PMID:24474107

  15. A patient with allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2012-10-01

    Allergic Bronchopulmonary Mycosis (ABPM) is an exagregated immunologic response to fungal colonization in the lower airways. It may cause by many kinds of fungal, but Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause of ABPM, although other Aspergillus and other fungal organisms, like Candida albicans, have been implicated. Aspergllus fumigatus and Candida albicans may be found as outdoor and indoor fungi, and cause the sensitization, elicitation of the disease pathology, and its clinical manifestations. Several diagnostic procedurs may be impicated to support the diagnosis of ABPM caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. A case of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans in a 48 year old man was discussed. The patient was treated with antifungal, corticosteroids, and antibiotic for the secondary bacterial infection. The patient's condition is improved without any significant side effects. PMID:23314973

  16. A consensus approach to wound care in epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Elena; Lara-Corrales, Irene; Mellerio, Jemima; Martinez, Anna; Schultz, Gregory; Burrell, Robert; Goodman, Laurie; Coutts, Patricia; Wagner, John; Allen, Upton; Sibbald, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Background Wound care is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB); however, there are currently no guidelines to help practitioners care for these patients. Objectives The objective of this study was to generate a list of recommendations that will enable practitioners to better care for patients with EB. Methods An expert panel generated a list of recommendations based on the best evidence available. The recommendations were translated into a survey, and sent to other EB experts to generate consensus using an online-based modified Delphi method. The list was refined and grouped into themes and specific recommendations. Results There were15 respondents (45% response rate), with significant experience in the EB field (>10 years [67%]). Respondents included physicians (67%), nurses (17%), and allied health professionals (7%). There was more than 85% agreement for all the proposed items. These were further refined and grouped into 5 main themes (assessment and management of factors that impair healing, patient-centered concerns, local wound care, development of an individualized care plan, and organizational support) and 17 specific recommendations. Limitations There is a paucity of scientific evidence with most recommendations based on expert opinion. Conclusions These recommendations will provide practitioners with a framework for caring for these patients. Additional scientific research including effectiveness studies for everyday practice and expert consensus, may further refine these recommendations. PMID:22387035

  17. Prevalence and Characterization of Pruritus in Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Danial, Christina; Adeduntan, Rasidat; Gorell, Emily S.; Lucky, Anne W.; Paller, Amy S.; Bruckner, Anna; Pope, Elena; Morel, Kimberly D.; Levy, Moise L.; Li, Shufeng; Gilmore, Elaine S.; Lane, Alfred T

    2014-01-01

    Background Qualitative data suggest that pruritus is a burdensome symptom in patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB), but the prevalence of pruritus in children and adults with EB, as well as factors that contribute to pruritus are unknown. Objective To quantitatively identify and to characterize pruritus experienced by EB patients using a comprehensive online questionnaire. Methods A questionnaire was developed to evaluate pruritus in all ages and types of EB. Questions that characterize pruritus were included, and factors that aggravate symptoms were investigated. Patients from seven North American EB centers were invited to participate. Results A total of 146 out of 216 questionnaires were completed (response rate=68%) (73 males, 73 females; median age, 20.0). Using a 5-point Likert scale (1=never, 2=rarely, 3=sometimes, 4=often, 5=always), itchiness was the most bothersome EB complication (mean=3.3). The average daily frequency of pruritus increased with self-reported EB severity. Pruritus was most frequent at bedtime (mean=3.8) and interfered with sleep. Factors that aggravated pruritus included healing wounds, dry skin, infected wounds, stress, heat, dryness, and humidity. Conclusions Pruritus is common in EB patients and can be very bothersome. Future studies will need to investigate the most effective treatments given to EB patients for pruritus. PMID:25236506

  18. Losartan ameliorates dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and uncovers new disease mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Alexander; Thriene, Kerstin; Mittapalli, Venugopal; Kern, Johannes S; Kiritsi, Dimitra; Dengjel, Jörn; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Genetic loss of collagen VII causes recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB)—a severe skin fragility disorder associated with lifelong blistering and disabling progressive soft tissue fibrosis. Causative therapies for this complex disorder face major hurdles, and clinical implementation remains elusive. Here, we report an alternative evidence-based approach to ameliorate fibrosis and relieve symptoms in RDEB. Based on the findings that TGF-β activity is elevated in injured RDEB skin, we targeted TGF-β activity with losartan in a preclinical setting. Long-term treatment of RDEB mice efficiently reduced TGF-β signaling in chronically injured forepaws and halted fibrosis and subsequent fusion of the digits. In addition, proteomics analysis of losartan- vs. vehicle-treated RDEB skin uncovered changes in multiple proteins related to tissue inflammation. In line with this, losartan reduced inflammation and diminished TNF-α and IL-6 expression in injured forepaws. Collectively, the data argue that RDEB fibrosis is a consequence of a cascade encompassing tissue damage, TGF-β-mediated inflammation, and matrix remodeling. Inhibition of TGF-β activity limits these unwanted outcomes and thereby substantially ameliorates long-term symptoms. PMID:26194911

  19. [Dental treatment in children with dystrophic form of epidermolysis bullosa].

    PubMed

    Korolenkova, M V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to summarize the experience for providing oral health care in children with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) treated in Central Research Institute of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery in 2013-2014. Seven EB patients (5 female and 2 male aged 5-17) with dystrophic form of EB were included in the study. Oral status was recorded (oral hygiene, presence of enamel hypoplasia and intraoral soft tissue lesions). Dental treatment provided included teeth extractions under conscious sedation (6 cases), teeth treatment (both conventional and ART methods) (5 cases) and preventive program (5 cases). All 7 dystrophic EB patients presented with generalized enamel hypoplasia in both primary and permanent dentition. In these patients one should consider using non-adhesive face dressings and careful suction pipe positioning as well as applying liniments on cotton rolls not to cause both intraoral and extraoral soft tissue lesions. Sixteen milk teeth were extracted under conscious sedation, in 3 cases the procedure caused significant vestibular scarring. Twelve teeth were treated mostly by ART method (n=1 0) as limited mouth opening made conventional treatment impossible. Dental treatment in dystrophic EB is a real challenge for pediatric dentist. This group of patients requires a special dental rehabilitation plan as they present with generalized enamel hypoplasia and have significant risk of intraoral lesions. PMID:26145475

  20. Epidermolysis bullosa in calves in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Foster, A P; Skuse, A M; Higgins, R J; Barrett, D C; Philbey, A W; Thomson, J R; Thompson, H; Fraser, M A; Bowden, P E; Day, M J

    2010-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) was diagnosed in eight calves from four farms in the United Kingdom on the basis of clinical, histological and ultrastructural findings. In three affected herds, pedigree Simmental bulls had been mated with Simmental-cross cows. In a fourth herd two Holstein-Friesian calves were affected. Lesions included multifocal erosion and ulceration of the hard and soft palates, tongue, nares and gingiva, with onychomadesis (dysungulation). There was alopecia, erosion and crusting of the coronets, pasterns, fetlocks, carpi, hocks, flanks and axillae. Histopathological findings included segmental separation of full thickness epidermis from the dermis, with formation of large clefts containing eosinophilic fluid, extravasated red blood cells and small numbers of neutrophils. Follicular and interfollicular areas of skin were affected, with clefts extending around hair follicles and sometimes involving whole follicles. Ultrastructurally, there was evidence of vacuolar change within basal keratinocytes, corresponding to areas of histological clefting. Preliminary genetic screening of the candidate keratin genes (bKRT5 and bKRT14) has excluded mutations of these as the cause of this condition. PMID:19909967

  1. Loss of desmoplakin tail causes lethal acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Jonkman, Marcel F; Pasmooij, Anna M G; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A; van den Berg, Maarten P; Ter Horst, Henk J; Timmer, Albertus; Pas, Hendri H

    2005-10-01

    The cytoplasmic plaque protein desmoplakin (DP), which is located in desmosomes, plays a major role in epithelial and muscle cell adhesion by linking the transmembrane cadherins to the cytoplasmic intermediate filament network. Mutations of DP may cause striate palmoplantar keratoderma, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, skin fragility/woolly hair syndrome, Naxos-like disease, and Carvajal syndrome. DP must be indispensable, because DP-/- mice are early abortive. Here, we report a patient with severe fragility of skin and mucous membranes caused by genetic truncation of the DP tail. The new phenotype is lethal in the neonatal period because of immense transcutaneous fluid loss. The phenotype also comprised universal alopecia, neonatal teeth, and nail loss. Histology showed suprabasal clefting and acantholysis throughout the spinous layer, mimicking pemphigus. Electron microscopy revealed disconnection of keratin intermediate filaments from desmosomes. Immunofluorescence staining of DP showed a distinct punctate intercellular pattern in the patient's skin. Protein analysis revealed expression of truncated DP polypeptides. Mutational analysis of the patient demonstrated compound heterozygosity for two DP mutations, 6079C-->T (R1934X) and 6370delTT, respectively. Aberrant mRNA transcripts that predict premature termination of translation with loss of the three intermediate filament-binding subdomains in the DP tail were detected by RT-PCR. The new dramatic phenotype, which we named "lethal acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa," underscores the paramount role of DP in epidermal integrity. PMID:16175511

  2. Clinical Presentation, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ralf J.

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a chronic mucocutaneous autoimmune skin blistering disease. The pathogenic relevance of autoantibodies targeting type VII collagen (COL7) has been well-documented. Therefore, EBA is a prototypical autoimmune disease with a well-characterized pathogenic relevance of autoantibody binding to the target antigen. EBA is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.2 new cases per million and per year. The current treatment of EBA relies on general immunosuppressive therapy, which does not lead to remission in all cases. Therefore, there is a high, so far unmet medical need for the development of novel therapeutic options. During the last 10 years, several novel in vitro and in vivo models of EBA have been established. These models demonstrated a critical role of the genetic background, T cells, and cytokines for mediating the loss of tolerance towards COL7. Neutrophils, complement activation, Fc gamma receptor engagement, cytokines, several molecules involved in cell signaling, release of reactive oxygen species, and matrix metalloproteinases are crucial for autoantibody-induced tissue injury in EBA. Based on this growing understanding of the diseases' pathogenesis, several potential novel therapeutic targets have emerged. In this review, the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment options for EBA are discussed in detail. PMID:23956869

  3. Losartan ameliorates dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and uncovers new disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Alexander; Thriene, Kerstin; Mittapalli, Venugopal; Kern, Johannes S; Kiritsi, Dimitra; Dengjel, Jörn; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2015-09-01

    Genetic loss of collagen VII causes recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB)-a severe skin fragility disorder associated with lifelong blistering and disabling progressive soft tissue fibrosis. Causative therapies for this complex disorder face major hurdles, and clinical implementation remains elusive. Here, we report an alternative evidence-based approach to ameliorate fibrosis and relieve symptoms in RDEB. Based on the findings that TGF-β activity is elevated in injured RDEB skin, we targeted TGF-β activity with losartan in a preclinical setting. Long-term treatment of RDEB mice efficiently reduced TGF-β signaling in chronically injured forepaws and halted fibrosis and subsequent fusion of the digits. In addition, proteomics analysis of losartan- vs. vehicle-treated RDEB skin uncovered changes in multiple proteins related to tissue inflammation. In line with this, losartan reduced inflammation and diminished TNF-α and IL-6 expression in injured forepaws. Collectively, the data argue that RDEB fibrosis is a consequence of a cascade encompassing tissue damage, TGF-β-mediated inflammation, and matrix remodeling. Inhibition of TGF-β activity limits these unwanted outcomes and thereby substantially ameliorates long-term symptoms. PMID:26194911

  4. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides sensu lato causing deep soft tissue mycosis following a penetrating injury

    PubMed Central

    Figtree, Melanie; Weeks, Kerry; Chan, Leonie; Leyton, Arda; Bowes, Andrew; Giuffre, Bruno; Sullivan, Martin; Hudson, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    Colletotrichum species have been rarely implicated in human disease. We describe a case of deep soft tissue mycosis following a penetrating injury with a lemon tree thorn. Direct Blankophor BA (Bayer) stain from intraoperative tissue showed fungal elements. Pure growth fungus was apparent at 2–4 days. Morphological features provisionally identified the isolate as a coelomycetous fungus, likely Colletotrichum species. This was confirmed with molecular analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) region. PMID:24432213

  5. Management of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in patients with epidermolysis bullosa: best clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mellerio, J E; Robertson, S J; Bernardis, C; Diem, A; Fine, J D; George, R; Goldberg, D; Halmos, G B; Harries, M; Jonkman, M F; Lucky, A; Martinez, A E; Maubec, E; Morris, S; Murrell, D F; Palisson, F; Pillay, E I; Robson, A; Salas-Alanis, J C; McGrath, J A

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes recommendations reached following a systematic literature review and expert consensus on the diagnosis and management of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in people with epidermolysis bullosa. The guidelines are intended to help inform decision making by clinicians dealing with this complex complication of a devastating disease. PMID:26302137

  6. Vesicostomy as a Treatment Option for Epidermolisis Bullosa Case With Urethral and Meatal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Rezaee, Haress; Kaseb, Kaveh; Ebrahimi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Epidermolisis Bullosa (EB) is a rare hereditary disorder that its junctional type is very rare one that involves epithelium, however, genitourinary epithelium involvement occurs so rarely. The present case is 5-year old boy; a known case of junctional EB whom had recurrent urinary retention due to meatal and urethral stenosis that was deteriorated by therapeutically interventions. PMID:27335789

  7. Clinical and molecular dilemmas in the diagnosis of familial epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa.

    PubMed

    Ee, Hock Leong; Liu, Lu; Goh, Chee Leok; McGrath, John A

    2007-05-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare and clinically heterogeneous mechanobullous disorder. One unusual clinical variant is epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (EBP), in which the combination of pruritus and skin fragility can lead to hypertrophic, lichenified nodules and plaques. This form of inherited epidermolysis bullosa may not develop clinically until adult life, leading to diagnostic confusion with acquired disorders, such as nodular prurigo, lichen simplex, lichen planus, hypertrophic scarring, or dermatitis artefacta. As in all other forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, the molecular pathology involves mutations in the gene encoding the anchoring fibril protein, type VII collagen (COL7A1), but there is no clear genotype-phenotype correlation in EBP. In this report, we describe a Chinese-Singaporean family with EBP in whom an autosomal dominant glycine substitution mutation, p.G2251E, was identified in exon 86 of the COL7A1 gene. This heterozygous mutation was identified in the genomic DNA of all 4 affected adults tested, as well as 2 clinically unaffected offspring (aged 9-29 years). Based on DNA sequencing, we predict that these individuals may develop EBP later in life, although additional factors leading to disease expression may determine phenotypic expression. Nevertheless, we plan to closely monitor these potentially presymptomatic individuals for symptoms of pruritus and early signs of the genetic disorder. PMID:17434045

  8. [Interdisciplinary care of newborns with epidermolysis bullosa and severe congenital ichthyoses].

    PubMed

    Ott, H; Guthmann, F; Ludwikowski, B

    2015-04-01

    Severe genodermatoses such as hereditary blistering diseases or Mendelian disorders of cornification may present as neonatal emergencies requiring interdisciplinary care. In particular, epidermolysis bullosa hereditaria, the collodion baby phenotype and harlequin ichthyosis represent serious clinical challenges with neonatal onset. This review summarizes dermatologically relevant aspects regarding pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and therapy of these illnesses. PMID:25791506

  9. An Incompletely Penetrant Novel Mutation in COL7A1 Causes Epidermolysis Bullosa Pruriginosa and Dominant Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Phenotypes in an Extended Kindred

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Catherine S; Lu, Yin; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Kashgarian, Michael; Glusac, Earl J; Lifton, Richard P; Antaya, Richard J; Choate, Keith A

    2012-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (EBP) is a rare subtype of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) characterized by intense pruritus, nodular or lichenoid lesions, and violaceous linear scarring, most prominently on the extensor extremities. Remarkably, identical mutations in COL7A1, which encodes an anchoring fibril protein present at the dermal–epidermal junction, can cause both DEB and EBP with either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. We present one family with both dystrophic and pruriginosa phenotypes of epidermolysis bullosa. The proband is a 19-year-old Caucasian woman who initially presented in childhood with lichenoid papules affecting her extensor limbs and intense pruritus consistent with EBP. Her maternal grandmother saw a dermatologist for similar skin lesions that developed without any known triggers at age 47 and mostly resolved spontaneously after approximately 10 years. The proband’s younger brother developed a small crop of pruritic papules on his elbows, dorsal hands, knees, and ankles at age 13. Her second cousin once removed, however, reported a mild blistering disease without pruritus consistent with DEB. Genetic sequencing of the kindred revealed a single dominant novel intron 47 splice site donor G>A mutation, c.4668 + 1 G>A, which we predict leads to exon skipping. Incomplete penetrance is confirmed in her clinically unaffected mother, who carries the same dominant mutation. The wide diversity of clinical phenotypes with one underlying genotype demonstrates that COL7A1 mutations are incompletely penetrant and strongly suggests that other genetic and environmental factors influence clinical presentation. PMID:22515571

  10. Mutation-based prenatal diagnosis of Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Christiano, A M; Pulkkinen, L; McGrath, J A; Uitto, J

    1997-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable diseases which manifest with blistering and erosions of the skin and mucous membranes. Due of life-threatening complications and significant long-term morbidity associated with the severe, neonatal lethal (Herlitz) form of junctional EB (H-JEB), there has been a demand for prenatal diagnosis from families at risk for recurrence. Previously, the only reliable method of prenatal diagnosis of EB was a fetal skin biopsy performed at 16-20 weeks' gestation and analysed by electron microscopy. Recently, the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, encoding the polypeptide subunits of laminin 5, an anchoring filament protein, have been shown to contain mutations in H-JEB. In this study, direct detection of pathogenetic mutations in the laminin 5 genes was used to perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based prenatal testing. DNA was obtained by chorionic villus sampling (CVS) at 10-15 weeks or amniocentesis at 12-19 weeks' gestation in 15 families at risk for recurrence of JEB. In 13 cases, the fetus was predicted to be either genetically normal or a clinically unaffected carrier of a mutation in one allele. These predictions have been validated in all cases by the birth of a healthy child. In two cases, an affected fetus was predicted, and the diagnosis was confirmed by subsequent fetal skin biopsy. These results demonstrate that DNA-based prenatal testing offers an early, expedient, and accurate method of prenatal diagnosis or an exclusion of Herlitz JEB. PMID:9160387

  11. [Cytoskeletal disorders in human keratinocytes--epidermolysis bullosa simplex].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Y; Jokura, Y; Yaoita, H

    1991-06-01

    The cytoskeletons possibly related to pathogenesis in skin disease may be limited to keratin intermediate filaments (KIF) in epidermal keratinocytes. Keratins are divided into two subclasses; 11 acidic (type I) keratins and 8 basic (type II) keratins. Combination of equimolar amounts of type I and type II can form KIF. KIFs in human epidermal basal cells consist of a pair of type I and type II keratins specifically synthesized in the basal cells, and those in spinous cells contain two pairs of keratin; a pair of basal cell keratin and another pair of keratin specific for suprabasal cells. In the first section, molecular biology and differentiation of keratins are reviewed. In the second section, epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was introduced from the view point of abnormal organization of KIFs. In the epidermis of EBS, clefts are induced in the basal cells by minor trauma or frictions consequently to produce bullae. Electron microscopy reveals small spherical aggregations of tonofilaments (KIFs) in the basal cells. In biopsies, these KIF aggregations might be caused by artifacts during procedures for biopsies, so that, in order to avoid these artifacts, we studied the KIF organization in cultured keratinocytes from a patient by immunofluorescence using anti-keratin antibodies and electron microscopy. Anti-keratin antibodies revealed a formation of small droplet-like aggregations of KIFs in many cultured cells adhering to the culture bottles, which were also suggested by electron microscopy. From these observations, it is suggested that the abnormal organization (droplets) of KIFs might be one of intrinsic factors for the pathogenesis of EBS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1720328

  12. The successful use of extracorporeal photopheresis in a 12-year-old patient with refractory epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, Walter; Omland, Silje Haukali; Gniadecki, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a rare autoimmune bullous disease of the mucosa and skin characterized by the presence of anti-collagen VII antibodies at the dermoepidermal junction. Most patients respond to immunosuppressive or antiinflammatory agents, although patients whose condition is refractory to these therapies will require more aggressive treatment. We present a 12-year-old girl with refractory epidermolysis bullosa acquisita who responded to extracorporeal photopheresis. PMID:25639865

  13. Mutation analysis and molecular genetics of epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, L; Uitto, J

    1999-02-01

    Cutaneous basement membrane zone (BMZ) consists of a number of attachment structures that are critical for stable association of the epidermis to the underlying dermis. These include hemidesmosomes, anchoring filaments and anchoring fibrils which form an interconnecting network extending from the intracellular milieu of basal keratinocytes across the dermal-epidermal basement membrane to the underlying dermis. Aberrations in this network structure, e.g. due to genetic lesions in the corresponding genes, can result in fragility of the skin at the level of the cutaneous BMZ. The prototype of such diseases is epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses characterized by fragility and blistering of the skin, often associated with extracutaneous manifestations, and inherited either in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. Based on constellations of the phenotypic manifestations, severity of the disease, and the level of tissue separation within the cutaneous BMZ, EB has been divided into clinically distinct subcategories, including the simplex, hemidesmosomal, junctional and dystrophic variants. Elucidation of BMZ gene/protein systems and development of mutation detection strategies have allowed identification of mutations in 10 different BMZ genes which can explain the clinical heterogeneity of EB. These include mutations in the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) in the dystrophic (severely scarring) forms of EB; mutations in the laminin 5 genes (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) in a lethal (Herlitz) variant of junctional EB; aberrations in the type XVII collagen gene (COL17A1) in non-lethal forms of junctional EB; mutations in the alpha6 and beta4 integrin genes in a distinct hemidesmosomal variant of EB with congenital pyloric atresia; and mutations in the plectin gene (PLEC1) in a form of EB associated with late-onset muscular dystrophy. Identification of mutations in these gene/protein systems attests to their critical importance in the

  14. Multicentre consensus recommendations for skin care in inherited epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a highly heterogeneous group of rare diseases characterized by fragility and blistering of skin and mucous membranes. Clinical features combined with immunofluorescence antigen mapping and/or electron microscopy examination of a skin biopsy allow to define the EB type and subtype. Molecular diagnosis is nowadays feasible in all EB subtypes and required for prenatal diagnosis. The extent of skin and mucosal lesions varies greatly depending on EB subtype and patient age. In the more severe EB subtypes lifelong generalized blistering, chronic ulcerations and scarring sequelae lead to multiorgan involvement, major morbidity and life-threatening complications. In the absence of a cure, patient management remains based on preventive measures, together with symptomatic treatment of cutaneous and extracutaneous manifestations and complications. The rarity and complexity of EB challenge its appropriate care. Thus, the aim of the present study has been to generate multicentre, multidisciplinary recommendations on global skin care addressed to physicians, nurses and other health professionals dealing with EB, both in centres of expertise and primary care setting. Methods Almost no controlled trials for EB treatment have been performed to date. For this reason, recommendations were prepared by a multidisciplinary team of experts from different European EB centres based on available literature and expert opinion. They have been subsequently revised by a panel of external experts, using an online-modified Delphi method to generate consensus. Results Recommendations are reported according to the age of the patients. The major topics treated comprise the multidisciplinary approach to EB patients, global skin care including wound care, management of itching and pain, and early diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. Aspects of therapeutic patient education, care of disease burden and continuity of care are also developed

  15. Access to wound dressings for patients living with epidermolysis bullosa - an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Louise J

    2014-10-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a rare genetic skin disorder characterised by fragility and blistering of skin and mucous membranes. Skin can blister and shear away from minimal friction, trauma and every day activities. The disease causes a wide range of complications but wound care is the major challenge to severe EB, and good wound care is an essential part of wound management. The goal of wound care was to choose a product that protects the fragile skin, limits friction, decreases pain and promotes healing. However, access to wound dressings for those people living with EB is challenging. This article discusses the availability of EB dressings in a number of countries around the world and also describes an innovative National Epidermolysis Bullosa Dressings Scheme (NEBDS) in Australia, which aims to improve the quality of life of people with EB, by reducing the financial burden associated with the provision of dressings accordingly. PMID:23174001

  16. Alternative Use of an Oral Endotracheal Tube Fastener in a Patient with Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Lauren; Jones, James; Christopher, John

    2015-10-01

    This case report describes the alternative use of an oral endotracheal tube fastener in a pediatric patient with junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The patient underwent dental treatment in the operating room under general anesthesia and had a medical history of junctional epidermolysis bullosa, prior secondary anemia, clubbed feet, and past methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection secondary to blistering. The oral endotracheal tube fastener was used in a nontraditional manner to avoid contact of the oral tube and tape with the epidermis and thus prevent blistering. Lubricated gauze was applied to the patient's eyes for protection, and lubricant was applied to the lips and perioral skin before intubation and during dental treatment. Postoperatively the patient exhibited minimal blistering secondary to intubation and dental treatment. PMID:26638453

  17. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina L; Hylwa, Sara A; Sajic, Dusan; Wagner, John E; Tolar, Jakub; Hook, Kristen P

    2016-06-01

    A 3-year-old child with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa treated with bone marrow transplantation subsequently developed body-wide epidermal detachment distinct from his epidermolysis bullosa. Toxic epidermal necrolysis was diagnosed by examination and skin biopsy. Although graft-vs-host disease was considered, he had no features of this diagnosis by laboratory studies or skin biopsy, and he improved without addition of further immune suppressants. Throughout the episode, the patient was maintained on cyclosporine A, a component of his transplant regimen, and also a reported therapy for toxic epidermal necrolysis. He had full recovery. Re-epithelialization occurred in a unique folliculocentric pattern, which we postulate was related to the patient's mesenchymal stem cell infusion, received as an adjunct to his marrow transplantation. PMID:26976809

  18. Urological surgery in epidermolysis bullosa: tactical planning for surgery and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Lisieux Eyer de; Rangel, Maira; Moura-Filho, Ronaldo S; Novaes, Glória; Quattrino, Ada; Aguas, Angelica F

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is characterized by extreme fragility of the skin and mucosae. Anesthetic and surgical techniques have to be adapted to those children and routine practice may not be adequate. Urological problems are relatively common, but surgical techniques adapted to those children have not been well debated and only low evidence is available to this moment. Herein we discuss the specifics of anesthetic and surgical techniques chosen to treat a six year old EB male presenting with symptomatic phimosis. PMID:25498283

  19. Occurrence of epidermolysis bullosa along with Amelogenesis imperfecta in female patient of India

    PubMed Central

    Javed, A. P.; Shenai, Prashanth; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Veena, K. M.; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Prabhu, Rachana

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited disorder, which is characteristically presented as skin blisters developing in response to minor injury. Junctional variety of EB is also associated with enamel hypoplasia. Amelogenesis imperfecta presents with abnormal formation of the enamel both in deciduous and permanent dentition. This article describes a previously unreported case of Amelogenesis imperfecta with complete loss of enamel in a young female patient with EB. PMID:24379873

  20. Diffuse Partial Woolly Hair in a Patient with Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex with Mottled Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Gerkowicz, Agnieszka; Trüeb, Ralph M

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse partial woolly hair (DPWH) is an uncommon pilar dysplasia defined by the presence of two hair shaft populations with wooly hairs distributed diffusely among normal hairs throughout the scalp. So far the condition has been reported as an isolated disorder with familial occurrence. We report a case of DPWH in 35-year-old female patient with epidermolysis bullosa with mottled pigmentation. PMID:25191045

  1. Primary amenorrhoea due to a rare cause: epidermolysis bullosa causing haematometra

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chanchal; Tripathi, Reva; Sardana, Kabir; Mala, Yedla Manikya

    2013-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman with junctional epidermolysis bullosa (EB) presented with primary amenorrhoea and massive haematometra. Considering her severe physical handicap and anticipated problems in optimising menstrual hygiene, the patient and her parents opted for hysterectomy which was performed uneventfully. The patient was recovering well postoperatively until the eighth postoperative day when she developed acute dilation of stomach and unfortunately died on day 17. PMID:23283611

  2. [Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa in school children and adolescents : Clinical picture and interdisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Ott, H; Eich, C; Schriek, K; Ludwikowski, B

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa (EB) represents a clinically heterogeneous group of congenital blistering disorders requiring multiprofessional care. EB is associated with a broad spectrum of potentially severe complications often reaching their full extent during school age and adolescence. This review aims at summarizing cutaneous manifestations of EB as well as extracutaneous complications of this complex disease and their interdisciplinary management. PMID:26943360

  3. Inflammatory epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in a 4-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Lazić-Mosler, Elvira; Jukić, Ines Lakoš; Murat-Sušić, Slobodna; Husar, Karmela; Skerlev, Mihael; Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Marinović, Branka

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a case of linear immunoglobulin A dermatosis-like epidermolysis bullosa acquisita in a 4-year-old girl showing rapid, widespread and inflammatory skin lesions. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology, direct and indirect immunofluorescence, various immunoblotting analyses and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Despite the severe clinical manifestations, the disease was successfully controlled by combination therapy of oral prednisolone and dapsone. PMID:26046385

  4. Geosmithia argillacea: An Emerging Cause of Invasive Mycosis in Human Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Challipalli, Malliswari; Anderson, Victoria; Shea, Yvonne R.; Marciano, Beatriz; Hilligoss, Dianne; Marquesen, Martha; DeCastro, Rosamma; Liu, Yen-chun; Sutton, Deanna A.; Wickes, Brian L.; Kammeyer, Patricia L.; Sigler, Lynne; Sullivan, Kathleen; Kang, Elizabeth M.; Malech, Harry L.; Holland, Steven M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase that leads to defective production of microbicidal superoxide and other oxidative radicals, resulting in increased susceptibility to invasive infections, especially those due to fungi. Methods. Geosmithia argillacea was identified from cultured isolates by genomic sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region. Isolates previously identified as Paecilomyces variotii, a filamentous fungus closely resembling G. argillacea, were also examined. Results. We identified G. argillacea as the cause of invasive mycosis in 7 CGD patients. In 5 cases, the fungus had been previously identified morphologically as P. variotii. All patients had pulmonary lesions; 1 had disseminated lesions following inhalational pneumonia. Infections involved the chest wall and contiguous ribs in 2 patients and disseminated to the brain in 1 patient. Four patients with pneumonia underwent surgical intervention. All patients responded poorly to medical treatment, and 3 died. Conclusions. We report the first cases of invasive mycosis caused by G. argillacea in CGD patients. G. argillacea infections in CGD are often refractory and severe with a high fatality rate. Surgical intervention has been effective in some cases. G. argillacea is a previously underappreciated and frequently misidentified pathogen in CGD that should be excluded when P. variotii is identified morphologically. PMID:21367720

  5. Comparison of superficial mycosis treatment using Butenafine and Bifonazole nitrate clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Abdul Bari, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections are commonly encountered by the physician. And the continuously changing epidemiology of invasive fungal infections results in the need for an expanded armamentarium of antifungal therapies. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Butenafine (BTF) versus Bifonazole (BFZ) in the treatment of superficial mycosis in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial. Of 96 patients, 48 applied (BTF) cream and 48 applied (BFZ) cream for 2 weeks to tinea versicolor, corporis and cruris treat, while tinea of feet & hands was treated for 4 weeks duration. Efficacy was assessed after the end of treatment and 2 weeks later. At the end of therapy, we find somewhat more patients using (BTF) than using (BFZ) had a mycologic cure ((BTF), 87.5%; (BFZ) 83.3%) and effective clinical response ((BTF), 91.7%; (BFZ), 83.3%). (BTF) provides rapid and persistent antifungal activity and symptom relief in patients with superficial mycosis during treatment. And patients continued to improve for at least 2 weeks after treatment. The Rates of mycologic cure and effective treatment with (BTF) were higher than with (BFZ) at cessation of treatment and 2 weeks later. However, no significant difference found between the two drugs (p> 0.05). PMID:23283047

  6. Comparison of Superficial Mycosis Treatment using Butenafine and Bifonazole nitrate Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Mohammed A. Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections are commonly encountered by the physician. And the continuously changing epidemiology of invasive fungal infections results in the need for an expanded armamentarium of antifungal therapies. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Butenafine (BTF) versus Bifonazole (BFZ) in the treatment of superficial mycosis in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial. Of 96 patients, 48 applied (BTF) cream and 48 applied (BFZ) cream for 2 weeks to tinea versicolor, corporis and cruris treat, while tinea of feet & hands was treated for 4 weeks duration. Efficacy was assessed after the end of treatment and 2 weeks later. At the end of therapy, we find somewhat more patients using (BTF) than using (BFZ) had a mycologic cure ((BTF), 87.5%; (BFZ) 83.3%) and effective clinical response ((BTF), 91.7%; (BFZ), 83.3%). (BTF) provides rapid and persistent antifungal activity and symptom relief in patients with superficial mycosis during treatment. And patients continued to improve for at least 2 weeks after treatment. The Rates of mycologic cure and effective treatment with (BTF) were higher than with (BFZ) at cessation of treatment and 2 weeks later. However, no significant difference found between the two drugs (p> 0.05). PMID:23283047

  7. Systemic mycosis in a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with detection of cystofilobasidiales DNA.

    PubMed

    Field, Cara L; Tuttle, Allison D; Sidor, Inga F; Nyaoke, Akinyi; Deering, Kathleen M; Gilbert-Marcheterre, Kelly; Risatti, Guillermo; Spoon, Tracey; Meegan, Jenny; Romano, Tracy A; Frasca, Salvatore; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2012-03-01

    A 6-yr-old, intact male California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with a systemic mycosis died after 5 wk of antifungal drug therapy. Antemortem clinical findings included hind flipper swelling, ring-lesions on skin of the flippers, and dermal nodules that increased in size and number spreading from the hind flippers and ventral abdomen to the foreflippers and muzzle. Lesions were accompanied by severe lymphadenopathy and development of systemic clinical signs despite therapy using itraconazole and later voriconazole. Histopathologic evaluation of biopsies revealed granulomatous dermatitis due to infection by fungus-producing yeast cells in tissue. Isolation attempts, using biopsied skin and tissue samples collected at necropsy, failed to yield growth of a fungus producing yeast cells like those in histologic section. Consensus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests of biopsied skin for fungal DNA produced an amplicon having significant sequence identity with a Cystofilobasidiales, a fungus belonging to a subclade that includes several Cryptococcus spp. Histopathologic evaluation of necropsy tissues revealed a systemic mycosis with yeast cells disseminated throughout subcutis, lymph nodes, and viscera. Hepatic necrosis was identified associated with acute liver failure, possibly from the voriconazole administration. This is the first report documenting the clinical presentation, treatment, and pathologic findings of infection associated with Cystofilobasidiales in a marine mammal and serves to expand the understanding of mycoses in pinnipeds. PMID:22448522

  8. MMP-9 and CXCL8/IL-8 Are Potential Therapeutic Targets in Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

    PubMed Central

    Lettner, Thomas; Lang, Roland; Klausegger, Alfred; Hainzl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa refers to a group of genodermatoses that affects the integrity of epithelial layers, phenotypically resulting in severe skin blistering. Dowling-Meara, the major subtype of epidermolysis bullosa simplex, is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and can be caused by mutations in either the keratin-5 (K5) or the keratin-14 (K14) gene. Currently, no therapeutic approach is known, and the main objective of this study was to identify novel therapeutic targets. We used microarray analysis, semi-quantitative real-time PCR, western blot and ELISA to identify differentially regulated genes in two K14 mutant cell lines carrying the mutations K14 R125P and K14 R125H, respectively. We found kallikrein-related peptidases and matrix metalloproteinases to be upregulated. We also found elevated expression of chemokines, and we observed deregulation of the Cdc42 pathway as well as aberrant expression of cytokeratins and junction proteins. We further demonstrated, that expression of these genes is dependent on interleukin-1 β signaling. To evaluate these data in vivo we analysed the blister fluids of epidermolysis bullosa simplex patients vs. healthy controls and identified matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the chemokine CXCL8/IL-8 as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23894602

  9. Compound heterozygosity for nonsense ans missense mutations in the LAMB3 gene in nonlethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    McGarth, J A; Christiano, A M; Pulkkinen, L; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1996-05-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been delineated in the autosomal recessive blistering skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, particularly in the lethal (Herlitz) variant. In this study, we searched for mutations in these genes in two patients with nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa using polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DA, followed by heteroduplex analysis and direct automated nucleotide sequencing. Both patients were found to be compound heterozygotes for the same nonsense mutation on one LAMB3 allele, and different missense mutations on the other LAMB3 allele. The combination of a nonsense and a missense mutation in the LAMB3 gene appears to be important in determining the milder clinical phenotype in some cases of the nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa involving abnormalities in laminin 5. PMID:8618058

  10. Compound heterozygosity for nonsense and missense mutations in the LAMB3 gene in nonlethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Christiano, A M; Pulkkinen, L; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1996-04-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been delineated in the autosomal recessive blistering skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, particularly in the lethal (Herlitz) variant. In this study, we searched for mutations in these genes in two patients with nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa using polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA, followed by heteroduplex analysis and direct automated nucleotide sequencing. Both patients were found to be compound heterozygotes for the same nonsense mutation on one LAMB3 allele, and different missense mutations on the other LAMB3 allele. The combination of nonsense and a missense mutation in the LAMB3 gene appears to be important in determining the milder clinical phenotype in some cases of the nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa involving abnormalities in laminin 5. PMID:8618020