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Sample records for myelinated nerve fiber

  1. Evaluating dermal myelinated nerve fibers in skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M. Iliza; Peltier, Amanda C.; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on small, unmyelinated fibers in the skin, little research has investigated dermal myelinated fibers in comparison. Glabrous, non-hairy skin contains mechanoreceptors that afford a vantage point for observation of myelinated fibers that have previously been seen only with invasively obtained nerve biopsies. This review discusses current morphometric and molecular expression data of normative and pathogenic glabrous skin obtained by various processing and analysis methods for cutaneous myelinated fibers. Recent publications have shed light on the role of glabrous skin biopsy in identifying signs of peripheral neuropathy and as a potential biomarker of distal myelin and mechanoreceptor integrity. The clinical relevance of a better understanding of the role of dermal myelinated nerve terminations in peripheral neuropathy will be addressed in light of recent publications in the growing field of skin biopsy. PMID:23192899

  2. Organization of Ion Channels in the Myelinated Nerve Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Stephen G.; Murdoch Ritchie, J.

    1985-06-01

    The functional organization of the mammalian myelinated nerve fiber is complex and elegant. In contrast to nonmyelinated axons, whose membranes have a relatively uniform structure, the mammalian myelinated axon exhibits a high degree of regional specialization that extends to the location of voltage-dependent ion channels within the axon membrane. Sodium and potassium channels are segregated into complementary membrane domains, with a distribution reflecting that of the overlying Schwann or glial cells. This complexity of organization has important implications for physiology and pathophysiology, particularly with respect to the development of myelinated fibers.

  3. A role for nociceptive, myelinated nerve fibers in itch sensation

    PubMed Central

    Ringkamp, M.; Schepers, R. J.; Shimada, S.G.; Johanek, L.M.; Hartke, T.V.; Borzan, J.; Shim, B.; LaMotte, R.H.; Meyer, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its clinical importance, the underlying neural mechanisms of itch sensation are poorly understood. In many diseases, pruritus is not effectively treated with antihistamines, indicating the involvement of non-histaminergic mechanisms. To investigate the role of small myelinated afferents in non-histaminergic itch, we tested, in psychophysical studies in humans, the effect of a differential nerve block on itch produced by intradermal insertion of spicules from the pods of a cowhage plant (Mucuna pruriens). Electrophysiological experiments in anesthetized monkey were used to investigate the responsiveness of cutaneous, nociceptive, myelinated afferents to different chemical stimuli (cowhage spicules, histamine, capsaicin). Our results provide several lines of evidence for an important role of myelinated fibers in cowhage-induced itch: 1) a selective conduction block in myelinated fibers substantially reduces itch in a sub-group of subjects with A-fiber dominated itch, 2) the time course of itch sensation differs between subjects with A-fiber versus C-fiber dominated itch, 3) cowhage activates a subpopulation of myelinated and unmyelinated afferents in monkey, 4) the time course of the response to cowhage is different in myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, 5) the time of peak itch sensation for subjects with A-fiber dominated itch matches the time for peak response in myelinated fibers, and 6) the time for peak itch sensation for subjects with C-fiber dominated itch matches the time for the peak response in unmyelinated fibers. These findings demonstrate that activity in nociceptive, myelinated afferents contributes to cowhage-induced sensations, and that non-histaminergic itch is mediated through activity in both unmyelinated and myelinated afferents. PMID:22016517

  4. Transmission-line model for myelinated nerve fiber.

    PubMed

    Einziger, P; Livshitz, L; Mizrahi, J

    2005-01-01

    Herein, the well-known cable equation for non-myelinated axon model is extended analytically for myelinated axon formulation. The classical cable equation is thereby modified into a linear second order ordinary differential equation with periodic coefficient, known as Hill's equation. Hill's equation exhibits periodic solutions, known as Floquet's modes. The Floquet's modes are recognized as the nerve fiber activation modes, which are conventionally associated with the nonlinear Hodgkin-Huxley formulation. They can also be incorporated in our linear model. PMID:17281168

  5. Saltatory conduction and a novel type of excitable fenestra in shrimp myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Xu, K; Terakawa, S

    1993-01-01

    The findings of saltatory conduction in the invertebrate giant nerve fibers were mentioned, and the experiments for analyzing the mechanism of impulse conduction in the giant myelinated nerve fibers of Penaeus orientalis and Penaeus japonicus were reviewed. Saltatory conduction was also found in many middle- and small-sized myelinated nerve fibers of, at least, 6 species of Penaeus shrimps. Saltatory conduction with its morphological basis in myelinated nerve fibers of vertebrates and invertebrates were compared, and it was concluded that the myelination of the nerve fibers in vertebrates and invertebrates has occurred independently. PMID:8271510

  6. Generalized cable equation model for myelinated nerve fiber.

    PubMed

    Einziger, Pinchas D; Livshitz, Leonid M; Mizrahi, Joseph

    2005-10-01

    Herein, the well-known cable equation for nonmyelinated axon model is extended analytically for myelinated axon formulation. The myelinated membrane conductivity is represented via the Fourier series expansion. The classical cable equation is thereby modified into a linear second order ordinary differential equation with periodic coefficients, known as Hill's equation. The general internal source response, expressed via repeated convolutions, uniformly converges provided that the entire periodic membrane is passive. The solution can be interpreted as an extended source response in an equivalent nonmyelinated axon (i.e., the response is governed by the classical cable equation). The extended source consists of the original source and a novel activation function, replacing the periodic membrane in the myelinated axon model. Hill's equation is explicitly integrated for the specific choice of piecewise constant membrane conductivity profile, thereby resulting in an explicit closed form expression for the transmembrane potential in terms of trigonometric functions. The Floquet's modes are recognized as the nerve fiber activation modes, which are conventionally associated with the nonlinear Hodgkin-Huxley formulation. They can also be incorporated in our linear model, provided that the periodic membrane point-wise passivity constraint is properly modified. Indeed, the modified condition, enforcing the periodic membrane passivity constraint on the average conductivity only leads, for the first time, to the inclusion of the nerve fiber activation modes in our novel model. The validity of the generalized transmission-line and cable equation models for a myelinated nerve fiber, is verified herein through a rigorous Green's function formulation and numerical simulations for transmembrane potential induced in three-dimensional myelinated cylindrical cell. It is shown that the dominant pole contribution of the exact modal expansion is the transmembrane potential solution of our

  7. Statistical physics approach to quantifying differences in myelinated nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Comin, César H.; Santos, João R.; Corradini, Dario; Morrison, Will; Curme, Chester; Rosene, Douglas L.; Gabrielli, Andrea; da F. Costa, Luciano; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method to quantify differences in myelinated nerve fibers. These differences range from morphologic characteristics of individual fibers to differences in macroscopic properties of collections of fibers. Our method uses statistical physics tools to improve on traditional measures, such as fiber size and packing density. As a case study, we analyze cross–sectional electron micrographs from the fornix of young and old rhesus monkeys using a semi-automatic detection algorithm to identify and characterize myelinated axons. We then apply a feature selection approach to identify the features that best distinguish between the young and old age groups, achieving a maximum accuracy of 94% when assigning samples to their age groups. This analysis shows that the best discrimination is obtained using the combination of two features: the fraction of occupied axon area and the effective local density. The latter is a modified calculation of axon density, which reflects how closely axons are packed. Our feature analysis approach can be applied to characterize differences that result from biological processes such as aging, damage from trauma or disease or developmental differences, as well as differences between anatomical regions such as the fornix and the cingulum bundle or corpus callosum. PMID:24676146

  8. Statistical physics approach to quantifying differences in myelinated nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin, César H.; Santos, João R.; Corradini, Dario; Morrison, Will; Curme, Chester; Rosene, Douglas L.; Gabrielli, Andrea; da F. Costa, Luciano; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-03-01

    We present a new method to quantify differences in myelinated nerve fibers. These differences range from morphologic characteristics of individual fibers to differences in macroscopic properties of collections of fibers. Our method uses statistical physics tools to improve on traditional measures, such as fiber size and packing density. As a case study, we analyze cross-sectional electron micrographs from the fornix of young and old rhesus monkeys using a semi-automatic detection algorithm to identify and characterize myelinated axons. We then apply a feature selection approach to identify the features that best distinguish between the young and old age groups, achieving a maximum accuracy of 94% when assigning samples to their age groups. This analysis shows that the best discrimination is obtained using the combination of two features: the fraction of occupied axon area and the effective local density. The latter is a modified calculation of axon density, which reflects how closely axons are packed. Our feature analysis approach can be applied to characterize differences that result from biological processes such as aging, damage from trauma or disease or developmental differences, as well as differences between anatomical regions such as the fornix and the cingulum bundle or corpus callosum.

  9. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Verdiyan, Ekaterina E.; Allakhverdiev, Elvin S.; Maksimov, Georgy V.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC) acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs)). Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the “axon-SC” interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+—influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization. PMID:27455410

  10. Multiple functions of the paranodal junction of myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack

    2009-11-15

    Myelin sheaths include an extraordinary structure, the "paranodal axoglial junction" (PNJ), which attaches the sheath to the axon at each end of each myelin segment. Its size is enormous and its structure unique. Here we review past and current studies showing that this junction can serve multiple functions in maintaining reliable saltatory conduction. The present evidence points to three functions in particular. 1) It seals the myelin sheath to the axon to prevent major shunting of nodal action currents beneath the myelin sheath while still leaving a narrow channel interconnecting the internodal periaxonal space with the perinodal space. This pathway represents a potential route through which juxtaparanodal and internodal channels can influence nodal activity and through which nutrients, such as glucose, and other metabolites can diffuse to and from the internodal periaxonal space. 2) It serves as a mechanism for maintaining discrete, differentiated axolemmal domains at and around the node of Ranvier by acting as a barrier to the lateral movement of ion channel complexes within the axolemma, thus concentrating voltage-gated sodium channels at the node and segregating fast voltage-gated potassium channels to the juxtaparanode under the myelin sheath. 3) It attaches the myelin sheath to the axon on either side of the node and can thus maintain nodal dimensions in the face of mechanical stresses associated with stretch or other local factors that might cause disjunction. It is therefore the likely means for maintaining constancy of nodal surface area and electrical parameters essential for consistency in conduction. PMID:19224642

  11. ATP-induced lipid membrane reordering in the myelinated nerve fiber identified using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutuzov, N. P.; Brazhe, A. R.; Yusipovich, A. I.; Maksimov, G. V.; Dracheva, O. E.; Lyaskovskiy, V. L.; Bulygin, F. V.; Rubin, A. B.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate a successful application of Raman spectroscopy to the problem of lipid ordering with microscopic resolution in different regions of the myelinated nerve fiber. Simultaneous collection of Raman spectra of lipids and carotenoids has enabled us to characterize membrane fluidity and the degree of lipid ordering based on intensity ratios for the 1527/1160 and 2940/2885 cm-1 bands. We show that the intensity profiles of the major Raman bands vary significantly between the three major regions of myelinated nerve fiber: internode, paranode and the node of Ranvier. Mapping Raman peak intensities over these areas suggested that the carotenoid molecules are localized in the myelin membranes of nerve cells. Paranodal membranes were sensitive to extracellular ATP. ATP solutions (7 mM) influenced the 1527/1160 and 2940/2885 cm-1 intensity ratios. Changes in both carotenoid and lipid Raman spectra were in accord and indicated an increase in lipid ordering degree and decrease in membrane fluidity under ATP administration. The collected data provide evidence for the existence of a regulatory purinergic signaling pathway in the peripheral nervous system.

  12. The Effect of the External Tissue Resistivity to the Threshold Level of a Myelinated Nerve Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji; Chen, Xian

    The rise of the threshold of electric current stimulation to generate compound action potential of nerve conduction study is considered to have a relationship to malfunctions of the nerve. The effect of the decrease of the resistivity of the external tissue and the thickness of myelin sheaths was investigated by computer simulation. A myelinated human nerve fiber dipped in the homogeneous conductor was stimulated with a monopolar cathode located outside the axon. As a result, the rise of the threshold by demyelination was comparable to the effect of the decrease of the resistivity of the external tissue by a few Ωm when the external resistivity is about 10 Ωm. Actually the reduction of the thickness of the myelin sheaths also reduces the resistivity of the external tissue. Therefore the contribution of both effects in case of demyelination was estimated. As a result, the contributions of each effect were antagonized. As one of the causes of the rise of the threshold of nerve activation, the decrease of the resistivity of the external tissue is considerable.

  13. Electrical neurostimulation for chronic pain: On selective relay of sensory neural activities in myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Sacré, Pierre; Sarma, Sridevi V; Guan, Yun; Anderson, William S

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pain affects about 100 million adults in the US. Despite their great need, neuropharmacology and neurostimulation therapies for chronic pain have been associated with suboptimal efficacy and limited long-term success, as their mechanisms of action are unclear. Yet current computational models of pain transmission suffer from several limitations. In particular, dorsal column models do not include the fundamental underlying sensory activity traveling in these nerve fibers. We developed a (simple) simulation test bed of electrical neurostimulation of myelinated nerve fibers with underlying sensory activity. This paper reports our findings so far. Interactions between stimulation-evoked and underlying activities are mainly due to collisions of action potentials and losses of excitability due to the refractory period following an action potential. In addition, intuitively, the reliability of sensory activity decreases as the stimulation frequency increases. This first step opens the door to a better understanding of pain transmission and its modulation by neurostimulation therapies. PMID:26737344

  14. The extracellular potential of a myelinated nerve fiber in an unbounded medium and in nerve cuff models.

    PubMed Central

    Struijk, J J

    1997-01-01

    A model is presented for the calculation of single myelinated fiber action potentials in an unbounded homogeneous medium and in nerve cuff electrodes. The model consists of a fiber model, used to calculate the action currents at the nodes of Ranvier, and a cylindrically symmetrical volume conductor model in which the fiber's nodes are represented as point current sources. The extracellular action potentials were shown to remain unchanged if the fiber diameter and the volume conductor geometry are scaled by the same factor (principle of corresponding states), both in an unbounded homogeneous medium and in an inhomogeneous volume conductor. The influence of several cuff electrode parameters, among others, cuff length and cuff diameter, were studied, and the results were compared, where possible, with theoretical and experimental results as reported in the literature. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9168022

  15. Morphometric analysis of the diameter and g-ratio of the myelinated nerve fibers of the human sciatic nerve during the aging process.

    PubMed

    Ugrenović, Sladjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Vasović, Ljiljana; Kundalić, Braca; Čukuranović, Rade; Stefanović, Vladisav

    2016-06-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers suffer from different degrees of atrophy with age. The success of subsequent regeneration varies. The aim of this research was to analyze myelinated fibers of the human sciatic nerve during the aging process. Morphometric analysis was performed on 17 cases with an age range from 9 to 93 years. The outer and inner diameter of 100 randomly selected nerve fibers was measured in each of the cases evaluated, and the g-ratio (axonal diameter/outer diameter of the whole nerve fiber) of each was calculated. Scatter plots of the diameters and g-ratios of the analyzed fibers were then analyzed. Nerve fibers of each case were classified into three groups according to the g-ratio values: group I (g-ratio lower than 0.6), group II (g-ratio from 0.6 to 0.7) and group III (g-ratio higher than 0.7). Afterwards, nerve fibers of group II were further classified into small and large subgroups. The percentages of each group of nerve fibers were computed for each case and these values were used for correlational and bivariate linear regression analysis. The percentage of myelinated nerve fibers with large diameter and optimal g-ratio of the sciatic nerve declines significantly with age. This is accompanied by a simultaneous significant increase in the percentage of small myelinated fibers with g-ratio values close to 1 that occupy the upper left quadrant of the scatter plot. It can be concluded that aging of the sciatic nerve is associated with significant atrophy of large myelinated fibers. Additionally, a significant increase in regenerated nerve fibers with thinner myelin sheath is observed with age, which, together with the large myelinated fiber atrophy, might be the cause of the age-related decline in conduction velocity. A better understanding of the changes in aging peripheral nerves might improve interpretation of their pathological changes, as well as comprehension of their regeneration in individuals of different age. PMID:25976073

  16. Differential myelinated and unmyelinated sensory and autonomic skin nerve fiber involvement in patients with ophthalmic postherpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Truini, Andrea; Haanpaa, Maija; Provitera, Vincenzo; Biasiotta, Antonella; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Santoro, Lucio; Cruccu, Giorgio; Nolano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a common and exceptionally drug-resistant neuropathic pain condition. In this cross-sectional skin biopsy study, seeking information on the responsible pathophysiological mechanisms we assessed how ophthalmic PHN affects sensory and autonomic skin innervation. We took 2-mm supraorbital punch skin biopsies from the affected and unaffected sides in 10 patients with ophthalmic PHN. Using indirect immunofluorescence and a large panel of antibodies including protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 we quantified epidermal unmyelinated, dermal myelinated and autonomic nerve fibers. Although skin biopsy showed reduced epidermal and dermal myelinated fiber density in specimens from the affected side, the epidermal/dermal myelinated nerve fiber ratio was lower in the affected than in the unaffected side (p < 0.001), thus suggesting a predominant epidermal unmyelinated nerve fiber loss. Conversely, autonomic skin innervation was spared. Our study showing that ophthalmic PHN predominantly affects unmyelinated nerve fiber and spares autonomic nerve fiber might help to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this difficult-to-treat condition. PMID:26300742

  17. Enriched environment increases the myelinated nerve fibers of aged rat corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yu; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Xuan; Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Li, Chen; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Cheng, Guo-Hua; Tang, Yong

    2012-06-01

    In this study, the effect of enriched environment (EE) on the spatial learning of aged rats was examined, and then the effects of EE on the aged corpus callosum (CC) were investigated by means of the modern stereological methods. We found that EE significantly improved the spatial learning of aged rats. The CC volume, the total volume of the myelinated fibers and total volume of the myelin sheaths in the CC, the total length of the myelinated fibers in the CC of enriched rats were significantly increased when compared to standard rats. The increase of the myelinated fibers in enriched rat CC might provide one of the structural bases for the enrichment-related improvement of the spatial learning. This study provided, to the best of our knowledge, the first evidence of environmental enrichment-induced increases of the CC and the myelinated fibers in the CC of aged rats. PMID:22431229

  18. Modeling the action-potential-sensitive nonlinear-optical response of myelinated nerve fibers and short-term memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-11-01

    The Goldman-Albus treatment of the action-potential dynamics is combined with a phenomenological description of molecular hyperpolarizabilities into a closed-form model of the action-potential-sensitive second-harmonic response of myelinated nerve fibers with nodes of Ranvier. This response is shown to be sensitive to nerve demyelination, thus enabling an optical diagnosis of various demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis. The model is applied to examine the nonlinear-optical response of a three-neuron reverberating circuit—the basic element of short-term memory.

  19. THE MAJORITY OF MYELINATED AND UNMYELINATED SENSORY NERVE FIBERS THAT INNERVATE BONE EXPRESS THE TROPOMYOSIN RECEPTOR KINASE A

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Taylor, Reid N.; Mantyh, William G.; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Although skeletal pain is a leading cause of chronic pain and disability, relatively little is known about the specific populations of nerve fibers that innervate the skeleton. Recent studies have reported that therapies blocking nerve growth factor (NGF) or its cognate receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) are efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. A potential factor to consider when assessing the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling in a pain state is the fraction of NGF-responsive TrkA+ nociceptors that innervate the tissue from which the pain is arising, as this innervation and the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling may vary considerably from tissue to tissue. To explore this in the skeleton, tissue slices and whole mount preparations of the normal, adult mouse femur were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Analysis of these preparations revealed that 80% of the unmyelinated/thinly myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also express TrkA. Similarly, the majority of myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) which innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also co-express TrkA. In the normal femur, the relative density of CGRP+, NF200+ and TrkA+ sensory nerve fibers per unit volume is: periosteum > bone marrow > mineralized bone > cartilage with the respective relative densities being 100: 2: 0.1: 0. The observation that the majority of sensory nerve fibers innervating the skeleton express TrkA+, may in part explain why therapies that block NGF/TrkA pathway are highly efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. PMID:21277945

  20. Fenestration in the myelin sheath of nerve fibers of the shrimp: a novel node of excitation for saltatory conduction.

    PubMed

    Hsu, K; Terakawa, S

    1996-07-01

    Giant nerve fibers of the shrimp family Penaeidae conduct impulses at the velocity highest among all animal species (approximately 210 m/s; highest in mammals = 120 m/s). We examined these giant and other small nerve fibers morphologically using a differential interference contrast microscope as well as an electron microscope, and found a very specialized form of excitable membrane that functions as a node for saltatory conduction of the impulse. This node appeared under the light microscope as a characteristic pattern of concentrically aligned rings in a very small spot of the myelin sheath. The diameter of the innermost ring of the node was about 5 microns, and the distance between these nodes was as long as 12 mm. Via an electron microscope, these nodes were characterized by a complete lack of the myelin sheath, forming a fenestration that has a tight junction with an axonal membrane. Voltage clamp measurements by a sucrose gap technique demonstrated that the axonal membrane at these fenestration nodes is exclusively excitable and that the large submyelinic space is a unique conductive pathway for loop currents for saltatory conduction through such fenestration nodes. PMID:8807532

  1. Effect of acclimation temperature on the axon and fiber diameter spectra and thickness of myelin of fibers of the optic nerve of goldfish.

    PubMed

    Matheson, D F; Roots, B I

    1988-07-01

    The optic nerves of common goldfish acclimated to 5 and 25 degrees C were fixed with glutaraldehyde in either phosphate buffer or PIPES with EGTA, post-fixed with osmium tetroxide, and examined by electron microscopy. The axon diameter spectra, from axons measured in electron micrographs and those measured on the electron microscope screen, differ noticeably with acclimation temperature. At the lower temperature, there is a definite shift toward the occurrence of larger fibers compared with the spectrum of the 25 degrees C fish. Although the number of fibers assessed is small compared with the total number in the goldfish nerve, these results confirm our previous study. These findings could be attributed to an increase in the number of new fibers during the acclimation to the higher temperature. We discuss this possibility and on the available evidence find it unlikely. Other changes in the axon and fiber are also seen with acclimation temperature. The axon to fiber diameter ratio, made directly from the electron micrographs, shows that axons from the nerves of the higher acclimation temperature fish possess consistently thicker myelin sheaths than are found for axons in nerves of the lower temperature fish. This finding is also in agreement with results obtained by us from measurements independent of each other. PMID:3391258

  2. Propagation Speed in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (H.H.) equations modified by Dodge for Rana pipiens myelinated nerve have been solved to determine how well the theory predicts the effects of changes of temperature and [Na+]0 on propagation. Conduction speed θ was found to have an approximately exponential dependence on temperature as was found experimentally, but the theoretical temperature coefficient (Q10) was low; 1.5 compared with the experimental finding of 2.95. θ was found to be a linear function of log ([Na+]0) in contrast to the experimental finding of a square root dependence on [Na+]0. θ is 50% greater at one-fourth normal [Na+]0 than the theory predicts. The difference between the theoretical θ([Na+]0) and the experimental θ([Na+]0) is probably due to an imprecisely known variation of parameters and not to a fundamental inadequacy of the theory. PMID:4542941

  3. Extracellular potentials of human motor myelinated nerve fibers in normal case and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Daskalova, M

    2002-01-01

    The extracellular potentials of human motor myelinated fibres in an unbounded volume conductor, in normal case and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are studied. Using our previous double-cable models of the fibres, the spatial and temporal distributions of the intracellular potentials are obtained. The intracellular potentials are then used as input to a line source model that allows to calculate the corresponding spatial and temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials at various radial distances in the surrounding volume conductor. For the normal and ALS cases, the radial decline of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the extracellular potential depends on the radial distance of the field point and increases with the increase of the distance. For given radial distances, two cases of spatial distributions of the extracellular potentials are investigated: the first case, based on the intracellular potentials at the times of nodal potential maxima and the second case, based on the intracellular potentials at the time interval from 0.2 ms to 1.0 ms at increments of 0.1 ms. For the same radial distances, the temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials are also explored. It is shown that in the case of adaptation, the temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials in the normal and ALS cases correspond well with electromyograms (EMG) from healthy subjects and ALS patients as reported in the literature. Simulation results indicate that the used models are rather promising tools in studying the main properties of compound action potentials in ALS patients which up till now have not been sufficiently well understood. PMID:12395619

  4. Ionic currents of the nodal membrane underlying the fastest saltatory conduction in myelinated giant nerve fibers of the shrimp Penaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, S; Hsu, K

    1991-06-01

    The myelinated giant nerve fiber of the shrimp, Penaeus japonicus, is known to have the fastest velocity of saltatory impulse conduction among all nerve fibers so far studied, owing to its long distances between nodal regions and large diameter. For a better understanding of the basis of this fast conduction, a medial giant fiber of the ventral nerve cord of the shrimp was isolated, and ionic currents of its presynaptic membrane (a functional node) were examined using the sucrose-gap voltage-clamp method. Inward currents induced by depolarizing voltage pulses had a maximum value of 0.5 microA and a reversal potential of 120 mV. These currents were completely suppressed by tetrodotoxin and greatly prolonged by scorpion toxin, suggesting that they are the Na current. Both activation and inactivation kinetics of the Na current were unusually rapid in comparison with those of vertebrate nodes. According to a rough estimation of the excitable area, the density of Na current reached 500 mA/cm2. In many cases, the late outward currents were induced only by depolarizing pulses larger than 50 mV in amplitude. The slope conductance measured from late currents were mostly smaller than that measured from the Na current, suggesting a low density of K channels in the synaptic membrane. These characteristics are in good harmony with the fact that the presynaptic membrane plays a role as functional node in the fastest impulse conduction of this nerve fiber. PMID:1716299

  5. Schwann cell spectrins modulate peripheral nerve myelination

    PubMed Central

    Susuki, Keiichiro; Raphael, Alya R.; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Stankewich, Michael C.; Peles, Elior; Talbot, William S.; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2011-01-01

    During peripheral nerve development, Schwann cells ensheathe axons and form myelin to enable rapid and efficient action potential propagation. Although myelination requires profound changes in Schwann cell shape, how neuron–glia interactions converge on the Schwann cell cytoskeleton to induce these changes is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the submembranous cytoskeletal proteins αII and βII spectrin are polarized in Schwann cells and colocalize with signaling molecules known to modulate myelination in vitro. Silencing expression of these spectrins inhibited myelination in vitro, and remyelination in vivo. Furthermore, myelination was disrupted in motor nerves of zebrafish lacking αII spectrin. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of spectrin significantly reduces both F-actin in the Schwann cell cytoskeleton and the Nectin-like protein, Necl4, at the contact site between Schwann cells and axons. Therefore, we propose αII and βII spectrin in Schwann cells integrate the neuron–glia interactions mediated by membrane proteins into the actin-dependent cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for myelination. PMID:21518878

  6. Sensitivity of a frequency-selective electrode based on spatial spectral properties of the extracellular AP of myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Cathébras, Guy

    2011-01-01

    In the context of functional electrical stimulation, neural recording is one of the main issues. For instance, the control of the limbs in people with motor deficiencies needs information about the muscle lengths and speeds that can be extracted from electroneurograms (ENG) carried on afferent peripheral nerves. The aim of this study is to propose an non-invasive and spatial-selective electrode (because specific informations are carried into different fascicles). To do so, we investigate the spatial properties of an extracellular action potential (AP). This properties are described qualitatively and quantitatively using analytical study on an inhomogeneous an anisotropic nerve model. Then, a spectral analysis on this spatial signal discriminates the different frequency components. Low spatial frequencies represent the global shape of the signal, whereas high frequencies are related to the type of fibers. We show that the latter is rapidly attenuated with the distance and thus, being a local phenomenon, can be used as a selective measurement. Finally, we propose a spatial filtering based on electrode design and an electronic architecture to extract this high frequencies. PMID:22255668

  7. Purinergic signaling mediated by P2X7 receptors controls myelination in sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Faroni, A; Smith, R J P; Procacci, P; Castelnovo, L F; Puccianti, E; Reid, A J; Magnaghi, V; Verkhratsky, A

    2014-10-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate, the physiological ligand of P2X receptors, is an important factor in peripheral nerve development. P2X7 receptor is expressed in Schwann cells (SCs), but the specific effects of P2X7 purinergic signaling on peripheral nerve development, myelination, and function are largely unknown. In this study, sciatic nerves from P2X7 knockout mice were analyzed for altered expression of myelin-associated proteins and for alterations in nerve morphology. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that, in the wild-type peripheral nerves, the P2X7 receptor was localized mainly in myelinating SCs, with only a few immunopositive nonmyelinating SCs. Complete absence of P2X7 receptor protein was confirmed in the sciatic nerves of the knockout mice by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis revealed that expression levels of the myelin proteins protein zero and myelin-associated glycoprotein are reduced in P2X7 knockout nerves. In accordance with the molecular results, transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that P2X7 knockout nerves possess significantly more unmyelinated axons, contained in a higher number of Remak bundles. The myelinating/nonmyelinating SC ratio was also decreased in knockout mice, and we found a significantly increased number of irregular fibers compared with control nerves. Nevertheless, the myelin thickness in the knockout was unaltered, suggesting a stronger role for P2X7 in determining SC maturation than in myelin formation. In conclusion, we present morphological and molecular evidence of the importance of P2X7 signaling in peripheral nerve maturation and in determining SC commitment to a myelinating phenotype. PMID:24903685

  8. Schwann cell autophagy, myelinophagy, initiates myelin clearance from injured nerves

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A.; Carty, Lucy; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; Palomo-Irigoyen, Marta; Varela-Rey, Marta; Griffith, Megan; Hantke, Janina; Macias-Camara, Nuria; Azkargorta, Mikel; Aurrekoetxea, Igor; De Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez; Jefferies, Harold B.J.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Elortza, Félix; Aransay, Ana M.; Martínez-Chantar, María L.; Baas, Frank; Mato, José M.; Mirsky, Rhona

    2015-01-01

    Although Schwann cell myelin breakdown is the universal outcome of a remarkably wide range of conditions that cause disease or injury to peripheral nerves, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that make Schwann cell–mediated myelin digestion possible have not been established. We report that Schwann cells degrade myelin after injury by a novel form of selective autophagy, myelinophagy. Autophagy was up-regulated by myelinating Schwann cells after nerve injury, myelin debris was present in autophagosomes, and pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy impaired myelin clearance. Myelinophagy was positively regulated by the Schwann cell JNK/c-Jun pathway, a central regulator of the Schwann cell reprogramming induced by nerve injury. We also present evidence that myelinophagy is defective in the injured central nervous system. These results reveal an important role for inductive autophagy during Wallerian degeneration, and point to potential mechanistic targets for accelerating myelin clearance and improving demyelinating disease. PMID:26150392

  9. Proton hopping: a proposed mechanism for myelinated axon nerve impulses.

    PubMed

    Kier, Lemont B; Tombes, Robert M

    2013-04-01

    Myelinated axon nerve impulses travel 100 times more rapidly than impulses in non-myelinated axons. Increased speed is currently believed to be due to 'hopping' or 'saltatory propagation' along the axon, but the mechanism by which impulses flow has never been adequately explained. We have used modeling approaches to simulate a role for proton hopping in the space between the plasma membrane and myelin sheath as the mechanism of nerve action-potential flow. PMID:23576345

  10. Collagen VI regulates peripheral nerve myelination and function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiwen; Cescon, Matilde; Megighian, Aram; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix protein with broad distribution in several tissues. Although Col6a1 is expressed by Schwann cells, the role of collagen VI in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is yet unknown. Here we show that Schwann cells, but not axons, contribute to collagen VI deposition in peripheral nerves. By using Col6a1-null mice, in which collagen VI deposition is compromised, we demonstrate that lack of collagen VI leads to increased myelin thickness (P<0.001) along with 60-130% up-regulation in myelin-associated proteins and disorganized C fibers in the PNS. The hypermyelination of PNS in Col6a1(-/-) mice is supported by alterations of signaling pathways involved in myelination, including increase of P-FAK, P-AKT, P-ERK1, P-ERK2, and P-p38 (4.15, 1.67, 2.47, 3.34, and 2.60-fold, respectively) and reduction of vimentin (0.49-fold), P-JNK (0.74-fold), and P-c-Jun (0.50-fold). Pathologically, Col6a1(-/-) mice display an impairment of nerve conduction velocity and motor coordination (P<0.05), as well as a delayed response to acute pain stimuli (P<0.001), indicating that lack of collagen VI causes functional defects of peripheral nerves. Altogether, these results indicate that collagen VI is a critical component of PNS contributing to the structural integrity and proper function of peripheral nerves. PMID:24277578

  11. Discrete impulses in ephaptically coupled nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Maïna, I; Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P; Mohamadou, A; Kofané, T C

    2015-04-01

    We exclusively analyze the condition for modulated waves to emerge in two ephaptically coupled nerve fibers. Through the multiple scale expansion, it is shown that a set of coupled cable-like Hodgkin-Huxley equations can be reduced to a single differential-difference nonlinear equation. The standard approach of linear stability analysis of a plane wave is used to predict regions of parameters where nonlinear structures can be observed. Instability features are shown to be importantly controlled not only by the ephaptic coupling parameter, but also by the discreteness parameter. Numerical simulations, to verify our analytical predictions, are performed, and we explore the longtime dynamics of slightly perturbed plane waves in the coupled nerve fibers. On initially exciting only one fiber, quasi-perfect interneuronal communication is discussed along with the possibility of recruiting damaged or non-myelinated nerve fibers, by myelinated ones, into conduction. PMID:25933666

  12. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Claude Boccara, A.; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  13. A phenomenological model of myelinated nerve with a dynamic threshold.

    PubMed

    Morse, R P; Allingham, D; Stocks, N G

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate coding strategies for cochlear implants a model of the human cochlear nerve is required. Nerve models based on voltage-clamp experiments, such as the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley model of myelinated nerve, can have over forty parameters and are not amenable for fitting to physiological data from a different animal or type of nerve. Phenomenological nerve models, such as leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) models, have fewer parameters but have not been validated with a wide range of stimuli. In the absence of substantial cochlear nerve data, we have used data from a toad sciatic nerve for validation (50 Hz to 2 kHz with levels up to 20 dB above threshold). We show that the standard LIF model with fixed refractory properties and a single set of parameters cannot adequately predict the toad rate-level functions. Given the deficiency of this standard model, we have abstracted the dynamics of the sodium inactivation variable in the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley model to develop a phenomenological LIF model with a dynamic threshold. This nine-parameter model predicts the physiological rate-level functions much more accurately than the standard LIF model. Because of the low number of parameters, we expect to be able to optimize the model parameters so that the model is more appropriate for cochlear implant simulations. PMID:26141642

  14. Central changes in primary afferent fibers following peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Lekan, H A; Doubell, T P; Allchorne, A; Woolf, C J

    1997-04-01

    Cutting or crushing rat sciatic nerve does not significantly reduce the number of central myelinated sensory axons in the dorsal roots entering the fourth and fifth lumbar segments even over very extended periods of time. Unmyelinated axons were reduced by approximately 50%, but only long after sciatic nerve lesions (four to eight months), and reinnervation of the peripheral target did not rescue these axons. This indicates that a peripheral nerve lesion sets up a slowly developing but major shift towards large afferent fiber domination of primary afferent input into the spinal cord. In addition, since myelinated axons are never lost, this is good evidence that the cells that give rise to these fibers are also not lost. If this is the case, this would indicate that adult primary sensory neurons with myelinated axons do not depend on peripheral target innervation for survival. PMID:9130791

  15. The onset and rate of myelination in six peripheral and autonomic nerves of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, K; Friede, R L

    1988-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study was carried out of the numbers of myelinated fibres in 6 nerves of the rat for 7 age groups from birth to 73 weeks. The hypoglossal nerve and the mandibular branch of the facial nerve had short and early myelination periods, essentially complete by the second week. The glossopharyngeal nerve and the sympathetic rami communicantes myelinated late and over a protracted period. Myelination of the rami communicantes continued up to 20 weeks, followed by a marked loss of fibres in the 73 week animals. Intercostal and saphenous nerves had intermediary patterns. There was evidence of subpopulations myelinating at different times. Measurements of myelin sheath thickness showed variations of relative sheath thickness with age, between nerves and for subpopulations of nerves. Late myelination corresponded to relatively thin myelin sheaths. Statistical two-stage-density cluster analysis by computer was used for analysing complex fibre populations. The developmental changes of three subpopulations of the intercostal nerve are documented. Nerves also differed in their rates of axon growth. The increment in axon calibre was small and late for sympathetic fibres. Intercostal and facial nerve fibres had rapid axon growth with different growth rates for subpopulations. PMID:3248966

  16. Histochemical discrimination of fibers in regenerating rat infraorbital nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Sanger, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    In rat dorsal root ganglia, histochemical staining of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) yields a reciprocal pattern of activity: Sensory processes are CA positive and CE negative, whereas motor processes are CA negative and CE positive. In rat infraorbital nerve (a sensory peripheral nerve), we saw extensive CA staining of nearly 100% of the myelinated axons. Although CE reactivity in myelinated axons was extremely rare, we did observe CE staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers. Four weeks after transection of infraorbital nerves, CA-stained longitudinal sections of the proximal stump demonstrated 3 distinct morphological zones. A fraction of the viable axons retained CA activity to within 2 mm of the distal extent of the stump, and the stain is capable of resolving growth sprouts being regenerated from these fibers. Staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers in serial sections shows that CE activity was not retained as far distally as is the CA sensory staining.

  17. Running Exercise Reduces Myelinated Fiber Loss in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Chao, Fenglei; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Yanmin; Xiao, Qian; Lv, Fulin; He, Qi; Zhou, Chunni; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Lin; Jiang, Rong; Gu, Hengwei; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of running exercise on myelinated fibers in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus during Alzheimer's disease (AD), 6-month-old male APP/PS1 transgenic mice were randomly assigned to control or running groups. The running group mice were subjected to a running protocol for four months. The behaviors of the mice from both group mice were then assessed using the Morris water maze, and the total volume of the DG and the related quantitative parameters with characteristics of the myelinated nerve fiber and the myelin sheath in the DG were investigated using unbiased stereological techniques and electron microscopy. Learning and spatial memory performances were both significantly increased in the running group compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in the gratio of the myelinated axons between the two groups. However, the DG volume, the myelinated fiber length and volume in the DG, and the myelin sheath volume and thickness in the DG were all significantly increased in the running group mice compared with the control group mice. These results indicated that running exercise was able to prevent DG atrophy and delay the progression of the myelinated fiber loss and the demyelination of the myelin sheaths in the DG in an AD mouse model, which may underlie the running-induced improvement in learning and spatial memory. Taken together, these results demonstrated that running exercise could delay the progression of AD. PMID:25817255

  18. Leukemia inhibitory factor regulates the timing of oligodendrocyte development and myelination in the postnatal optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Tomoko; Lee, Philip R.; Baba, Hiroko; Fields, R. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) promotes the survival of oligodendrocytes both in vitro and in an animal model of multiple sclerosis, but the possible role of LIF signaling in myelination during normal development has not been investigated. We find that LIF-/- mice have a pronounced myelination defect in optic nerve at postnatal day 10. Myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-positive myelin was evident throughout the optic nerve in the wild-type mice, but staining was present only at the chiasmal region in LIF-/- mice of the same age. Further experiments suggest that the myelination defect was a consequence of a delay in maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) population. The number of Olig2-positive cells was dramatically decreased in optic nerve of LIF-/- mice, and the distribution of Olig2-positive cells was restricted to the chiasmal region of the nerve in a steep gradient toward the retina. Gene expression profiling and cell culture experiments revealed that OPCs from P10 optic nerve of LIF-/- mice remained in a highly proliferative immature stage compared with littermate controls. Interestingly, by postnatal day 14, MBP immunostaining in the LIF-/- optic nerve was comparable to that of LIF+/+ mice. These results suggest that, during normal development of mouse optic nerve, there is a defined developmental time window when LIF is required for correct myelination. Myelination seems to recover by postnatal day 14, so LIF is not necessary for the completion of myelination during postnatal development. PMID:19598242

  19. Septin/anillin filaments scaffold central nervous system myelin to accelerate nerve conduction.

    PubMed

    Patzig, Julia; Erwig, Michelle S; Tenzer, Stefan; Kusch, Kathrin; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Goebbels, Sandra; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Werner, Hauke B

    2016-01-01

    Myelination of axons facilitates rapid impulse propagation in the nervous system. The axon/myelin-unit becomes impaired in myelin-related disorders and upon normal aging. However, the molecular cause of many pathological features, including the frequently observed myelin outfoldings, remained unknown. Using label-free quantitative proteomics, we find that the presence of myelin outfoldings correlates with a loss of cytoskeletal septins in myelin. Regulated by phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2)-levels, myelin septins (SEPT2/SEPT4/SEPT7/SEPT8) and the PI(4,5)P2-adaptor anillin form previously unrecognized filaments that extend longitudinally along myelinated axons. By confocal microscopy and immunogold-electron microscopy, these filaments are localized to the non-compacted adaxonal myelin compartment. Genetic disruption of these filaments in Sept8-mutant mice causes myelin outfoldings as a very specific neuropathology. Septin filaments thus serve an important function in scaffolding the axon/myelin-unit, evidently a late stage of myelin maturation. We propose that pathological or aging-associated diminishment of the septin/anillin-scaffold causes myelin outfoldings that impair the normal nerve conduction velocity. PMID:27504968

  20. Septin/anillin filaments scaffold central nervous system myelin to accelerate nerve conduction

    PubMed Central

    Patzig, Julia; Erwig, Michelle S; Tenzer, Stefan; Kusch, Kathrin; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Goebbels, Sandra; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Werner, Hauke B

    2016-01-01

    Myelination of axons facilitates rapid impulse propagation in the nervous system. The axon/myelin-unit becomes impaired in myelin-related disorders and upon normal aging. However, the molecular cause of many pathological features, including the frequently observed myelin outfoldings, remained unknown. Using label-free quantitative proteomics, we find that the presence of myelin outfoldings correlates with a loss of cytoskeletal septins in myelin. Regulated by phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2)-levels, myelin septins (SEPT2/SEPT4/SEPT7/SEPT8) and the PI(4,5)P2-adaptor anillin form previously unrecognized filaments that extend longitudinally along myelinated axons. By confocal microscopy and immunogold-electron microscopy, these filaments are localized to the non-compacted adaxonal myelin compartment. Genetic disruption of these filaments in Sept8-mutant mice causes myelin outfoldings as a very specific neuropathology. Septin filaments thus serve an important function in scaffolding the axon/myelin-unit, evidently a late stage of myelin maturation. We propose that pathological or aging-associated diminishment of the septin/anillin-scaffold causes myelin outfoldings that impair the normal nerve conduction velocity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17119.001 PMID:27504968

  1. Mechano- and thermosensitivity of regenerating cutaneous afferent nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid; Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia

    2009-06-01

    Crush lesion of a skin nerve is followed by sprouting of myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) afferent fibers into the distal nerve stump. Here, we investigate quantitatively both ongoing activity and activity evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the nerve in 43 A- and 135 C-fibers after crush lesion of the sural nerve using neurophysiological recordings in anesthetized rats. The discharge patterns in the injured afferent nerve fibers and in intact (control) afferent nerve fibers were compared. (1) Almost all (98%) A-fibers were mechanosensitive, some of them exhibited additionally weak cold/heat sensitivity; 7% had ongoing activity. (2) Three patterns of physiologically evoked activity were present in the lesioned C-fibers: (a) C-fibers with type 1 cold sensitivity (low cold threshold, inhibition on heating, high level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%): almost all of them were mechanoinsensitive and 40% of them were additionally heat-sensitive; (b) C-fibers with type 2 cold sensitivity (high cold threshold, low level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%). All of them were excited by mechanical and/or heat stimuli; (c) cold-insensitive C-fibers (54%), which were heat- and/or mechanosensitive. (3) The proportions of C-fibers exhibiting these three patterns of discharge to physiological stimuli were almost identical in the population of injured C-fibers and in a population of 91 intact cutaneous C-fibers. 4. Ongoing activity was present in 56% of the lesioned C-fibers. Incidence and rate of ongoing activity were the same in the populations of lesioned and intact type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers. The incidence (but not rate) of ongoing activity was significantly higher in lesioned type 2 cold-sensitive and cold insensitive C-fibers than in the corresponding populations of intact C-fibers (42/93 fibers vs. 11/72 fibers). PMID:19139872

  2. Topohistology of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers in branches of the pelvic plexus: an immunohistochemical study using donated elderly cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Hieda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Hiromasa; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi; Matsubara, Akio; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Although the pelvic autonomic plexus may be considered a mixture of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves, little information on its composite fibers is available. Using 10 donated elderly cadavers, we investigated in detail the topohistology of nerve fibers in the posterior part of the periprostatic region in males and the infero-anterior part of the paracolpium in females. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were used as parasympathetic nerve markers, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was used as a marker of sympathetic nerves. In the region examined, nNOS-positive nerves (containing nNOS-positive fibers) were consistently predominant numerically. All fibers positive for these markers appeared to be thin, unmyelinated fibers. Accordingly, the pelvic plexus branches were classified into 5 types: triple-positive mixed nerves (nNOS+, VIP+, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); double-positive mixed nerves (nNOS+, VIP-, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); nerves in arterial walls (nNOS-, VIP+, TH+, thick myelinated fibers-); non-parasympathetic nerves (nNOS-, VIP-, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); (although rare) pure sensory nerve candidates (nNOS-, VIP-, TH-, thick myelinated fibers+). Triple-positive nerves were 5-6 times more numerous in the paracolpium than in the periprostatic region. Usually, the parasympathetic nerve fibers did not occupy a specific site in a nerve, and were intermingled with sympathetic fibers. This morphology might be the result of an "incidentally" adopted nerve fiber route, rather than a target-specific pathway. PMID:24693483

  3. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  4. Myelinated mouse nerves studied by X-ray phase contrast zoom tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Krenkel, M; Cloetens, P; Möbius, W; Salditt, T

    2015-12-01

    We have used X-ray phase contrast tomography to resolve the structure of uncut, entire myelinated optic, saphenous and sciatic mouse nerves. Intrinsic electron density contrast suffices to identify axonal structures. Specific myelin labeling by an osmium tetroxide stain enables distinction between axon and surrounding myelin sheath. Utilization of spherical wave illumination enables zooming capabilities which enable imaging of entire sciatic internodes as well as identification of sub-structures such as nodes of Ranvier and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. PMID:26546551

  5. Fiber components of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gacek, R R; Lyon, M J

    1976-01-01

    Experimental neuroanatomical methods were employed in 21 adult cats to determine 1) the number and size of myelinated motor and sensory fibers in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and 2) the fiber components originating in the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and retrofacial nucleus (RFN) of the brain stem. Intracranial transection of the X and XI cranial nerves and selective destruction of the NA or RFN were the experimental lesions inflicted in order to obtain the following results. About 55% (312) of the right RLN (565 fibers) is composed of myelinated motor nerve fibers which measure 4 mu - 9 mu in diameter. Nine percent come from the RFN and are smaller (4-6 mu) than the 46% which emanate from the NA and measure 6-9 mu in diameter. The remaining 45% of the RLN is made up of sensory neurons which can be divided into three groups. 1) The largest numerical group (32%) is very small in caliber (1-3 mu) and supplies extralaryngeal regions (trachea, esophagus). 2) The intermediate size fiber group (4-9 mu) comprises 11% of the RLN and probably supplies the subglottic mucosa. 3) The smallest group (2%) of sensory fibers is the largest in diameter (10-15 mu) and may represent either the innervation of muscle spindles or afferents from the superior laryngeal nerve coursing down into the chest. PMID:949153

  6. Intact sciatic myelinated primary afferent terminals collaterally sprout in the adult rat dorsal horn following section of a neighbouring peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Doubell, T P; Mannion, R J; Woolf, C J

    1997-03-31

    Peripheral nerve section induces sprouting of the central terminals of axotomized myelinated primary afferents outside their normal dorsoventral termination zones in lamina I, III, and IV of the dorsal horn into lamina II, an area that normally only receives unmyelinated C-fiber input. This axotomy-induced regenerative sprouting is confined to the somatotopic boundaries of the injured nerve in the spinal cord. We examined whether intact myelinated sciatic afferents are able to sprout novel terminals into neighbouring areas of the dorsal horn in the adult rat following axotomy of two test nerves, either the posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh or the saphenous nerve. These peripheral nerves have somatotopically organized terminal areas in the dorsal horn that overlap in some areas and are contiguous in others, with that of the sciatic central terminal field. Two weeks after cutting either the posterior cutaneous or the saphenous nerve, intact sciatic myelinated fibers labelled with the B fragment of cholera toxin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP) sprouted into an area of lamina II normally only innervated by the adjacent injured test nerve. This collateral sprouting was strictly limited, however, to those particular areas of the dorsal horn where the A-fiber terminal field of the control sciatic and the C-fiber terminal field of the injured test nerve overlapped in the dorsoventral plane. No mediolateral sprouting was seen into those areas of neuropil solely innervated by the test nerve. We conclude that intact myelinated primary afferents do have the capacity to collaterally sprout, but that any resultant somatotopic reorganization of central projections is limited to the dorsoventral plane. These changes may contribute to sensory hypersensitivity at the edges of denervated skin. PMID:9073085

  7. Support of Nerve Conduction by Respiring Myelin Sheath: Role of Connexons.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Silvia; Bartolucci, Martina; Adriano, Enrico; Garbati, Patrizia; Ferrando, Sara; Ramoino, Paola; Calzia, Daniela; Morelli, Alessandro; Balestrino, Maurizio; Panfoli, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that myelin conducts an extramitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, hypothesizing a novel supportive role for myelin in favor of the axon. We have also hypothesized that the ATP produced in myelin could be transferred thought gap junctions. In this work, by biochemical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological techniques, the existence of a connection among myelin to the axon was evaluated, to understand how ATP could be transferred from sheath to the axoplasm. Data confirm a functional expression of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated myelin. Moreover, WB and immunohistochemistry on optic nerve slices show that connexins 32 and 43 are present in myelin and colocalize with myelin basic protein. Interestingly, addition of carbenoxolone or oleamide, two gap junction blockers, causes a decrease in oxidative metabolism in purified myelin, but not in mitochondria. Similar effects were observed on conduction speed in hippocampal Schaffer collateral, in the presence of oleamide. Confocal analysis of optic nerve slices showed that lucifer yellow (that only passes through aqueous pores) signal was found in both the sheath layers and the axoplasma. In the presence of oleamide, but not with oleic acid, signal significantly decreased in the sheath and was lost inside the axon. This suggests the existence of a link among myelin and axons. These results, while supporting the idea that ATP aerobically synthesized in myelin sheath could be transferred to the axoplasm through gap junctions, shed new light on the function of the sheath. PMID:26033217

  8. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    PubMed

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome. PMID:27595822

  9. Myelin Abnormalities in the Optic and Sciatic Nerves in Mice With GM1-Gangliosidosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinecke, Karie A.; Luoma, Adrienne; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    GM1-gangliosidosis is a glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage disease involving accumulation of GM1 and its asialo form (GA1) primarily in the brain. Thin-layer chromatography and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the lipid content/composition and the myelin structure of the optic and sciatic nerves from 7- and 10-month old β-galactosidase (β-gal) +/? and β-gal −/− mice, a model of GM1gangliosidosis. Optic nerve weight was lower in the β-gal −/− mice than in unaffected β-gal +/? mice, but no difference was seen in sciatic nerve weight. The levels of GM1 and GA1 were significantly increased in both the optic nerve and sciatic nerve of the β-gal −/− mice. The content of myelin-enriched cerebrosides, sulfatides, and plasmalogen ethanolamines was significantly lower in optic nerve of β-gal −/− mice than in β-gal +/? mice; however, cholesteryl esters were enriched in the β-gal −/− mice. No major abnormalities in these lipids were detected in the sciatic nerve of the β-gal −/− mice. The abnormalities in GM1 and myelin lipids in optic nerve of β-gal −/− mice correlated with a reduction in the relative amount of myelin and periodicity in fresh nerve. By contrast, the relative amount of myelin and periodicity in the sciatic nerves from control and β-gal −/− mice were indistinguishable, suggesting minimal pathological involvement in sciatic nerve. Our results indicate that the greater neurochemical pathology observed in the optic nerve than in the sciatic nerve of β-gal −/− mice is likely due to the greater glycolipid storage in optic nerve. PMID:25694553

  10. The myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein directly binds nerve growth factor to modulate central axon circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Feng; Greenfield, Ariele; Jahn, Sarah; Shen, Yun-An A.; Reid, Hugh H.; McKemy, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a central nervous system myelin-specific molecule expressed on the outer lamellae of myelin. To date, the exact function of MOG has remained unknown, with MOG knockout mice displaying normal myelin ultrastructure and no apparent specific phenotype. In this paper, we identify nerve growth factor (NGF) as a binding partner for MOG and demonstrate that this interaction is capable of sequestering NGF from TrkA-expressing neurons to modulate axon growth and survival. Deletion of MOG results in aberrant sprouting of nociceptive neurons in the spinal cord. Binding of NGF to MOG may offer widespread implications into mechanisms that underlie pain pathways. PMID:26347141

  11. Extracellular potentials of myelinated and demyelinated human motor nerve fibres.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Daskalova, M

    2003-12-01

    The extracellular potentials of myelinated and demyelinated human motor nerve fibres in an unbounded volume conductor are studied. Using our previous double-cable models of normal and demyelinated human fibres, the spatial and temporal intracellular potentials are calculated in the cases of point polarization and adaptation of the fibres. The intracellular potentials are then used as input to a line source model that allows to calculate the corresponding spatial and temporal extracellular potentials at various radial distances in the surrounding volume conductor. Four fibre demyelinations (termed as internodal focal\\systematic and paranodal focal\\systematic demyelinations, respectively) are studied. In all investigated cases, the radial decline of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the extracellular potential depends on the radial distance of the field point and increases with the increase of the distance. The results are consistent with the interpretation that the considerably different spatial and temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials depend not only on the cable properties of the fibres, but on the methods of fibre stimulation. In the case of fibre adaptation, the temporal extracellular potentials in the normal and demyelinated cases correspond well with electromyograms (EMGs) from healthy subjects and patients with demyelinated disorders as reported in the literature. Simulation results indicate that the models used are rather promising tools in studying the main properties of compound action potentials in patients with demyelinated disorders which up till now have not been sufficiently well understood. PMID:14717030

  12. Arf6 guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-2 regulates myelination in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kawahara, Kazuko; Saitoh, Yurika; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Takashima, Shou; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-05-01

    In postnatal development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths, increasing the nerve conduction velocity. To produce the mature myelin sheath with its multiple layers, Schwann cells undergo dynamic morphological changes. While extracellular molecules such as growth factors and cell adhesion ligands are known to regulate the myelination process, the intracellular molecular mechanism underlying myelination remains unclear. In this study, we have produced Schwann cell-specific conditional knockout mice for cytohesin-2, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) specifically activating Arf6. Arf6, a member of the Ras-like protein family, participates in various cellular functions including cell morphological changes. Cytohesin-2 knockout mice exhibit decreased Arf6 activity and reduced myelin thickness in the sciatic nerves, with decreased expression levels of myelin protein zero (MPZ), the major myelin marker protein. These results are consistent with those of experiments in which Schwann cell-neuronal cultures were treated with pan-cytohesin inhibitor SecinH3. On the other hand, the numbers of Ki67-positive cells in knockout mice and controls are comparable, indicating that cytohesin-2 does not have a positive effect on cell numbers. Thus, signaling through cytohesin-2 is required for myelination by Schwann cells, and cytohesin-2 is added to the list of molecules known to underlie PNS myelination. PMID:25824033

  13. Action potentials induce uniform calcium influx in mammalian myelinated optic nerves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Li; Wilson, J Adam; Williams, Justin; Chiu, Shing Yan

    2006-08-01

    The myelin sheath enables saltatory conduction by demarcating the axon into a narrow nodal region for excitation and an extended, insulated internodal region for efficient spread of passive current. This anatomical demarcation produces a dramatic heterogeneity in ionic fluxes during excitation, a classical example being the restriction of Na influx at the node. Recent studies have revealed that action potentials also induce calcium influx into myelinated axons of mammalian optic nerves. Does calcium influx in myelinated axons show spatial heterogeneity during nerve excitation? To address this, we analyzed spatial profiles of axonal calcium transients during action potentials by selectively staining axons with calcium indicators and subjected the data to theoretical analysis with parameters for axial calcium diffusion empirically determined using photolysis of caged compounds. The results show surprisingly that during action potentials, calcium influx occurs uniformly along an axon of a fully myelinated mouse optic nerve. PMID:16835363

  14. Abnormal Junctions and Permeability of Myelin in PMP22-Deficient Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiasong; Wang, Leiming; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jiawen; Arpag, Sezgi; Hu, Bo; Imhof, Beat A.; Tian, Xinxia; Carter, Bruce D.; Suter, Ueli; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene is associated with the most common types of inherited neuropathies, including hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) caused by PMP22 deficiency. However, the function of PMP22 has yet to be defined. Our previous study has shown that PMP22 deficiency causes an impaired propagation of nerve action potentials in the absence of demyelination. In the present study, we tested an alternative mechanism relating to myelin permeability. Methods Utilizing Pmp22+/− mice as a model of HNPP, we evaluated myelin junctions and their permeability using morphological, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches. Results We show disruption of multiple types of cell junction complexes in peripheral nerve, resulting in increased permeability of myelin and impaired action potential propagation. We further demonstrate that PMP22 interacts with immunoglobulin domain–containing proteins known to regulate tight/adherens junctions and/or transmembrane adhesions, including junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Deletion of Jam-c or Mag in mice recapitulates pathology in HNPP. Interpretation Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which PMP22 deficiency affects nerve conduction not through removal of myelin, but through disruption of myelin junctions. PMID:24339129

  15. Genome-wide analysis of EGR2/SOX10 binding in myelinating peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Rajini; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Jones, Erin A; Jang, Sung-Wook; Krueger, Courtney; Moran, John J; Svaren, John

    2012-08-01

    Myelin is essential for the rapidity of saltatory nerve conduction, and also provides trophic support for axons to prevent axonal degeneration. Two critical determinants of myelination are SOX10 and EGR2/KROX20. SOX10 is required for specification of Schwann cells from neural crest, and is required at every stage of Schwann cell development. Egr2/Krox20 expression is activated by axonal signals in myelinating Schwann cells, and is required for cell cycle arrest and myelin formation. To elucidate the integrated function of these two transcription factors during peripheral nerve myelination, we performed in vivo ChIP-Seq analysis of myelinating peripheral nerve. Integration of these binding data with loss-of-function array data identified a range of genes regulated by these factors. In addition, although SOX10 itself regulates Egr2/Krox20 expression, leading to coordinate activation of several major myelin genes by the two factors, there is a large subset of genes that are activated independent of EGR2. Finally, the results identify a set of SOX10-dependent genes that are expressed in early Schwann cell development, but become subsequently repressed by EGR2/KROX20. PMID:22492709

  16. Astrocytes phagocytose focal dystrophies from shortening myelin segments in the optic nerve of Xenopus laevis at metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Elizabeth A.; Davis, Chung-ha O.; Bushong, Eric A.; Boassa, Daniela; Kim, Keun-Young; Ellisman, Mark H.; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes can adapt to increases in axon diameter through the addition of membrane wraps to myelin segments. Here, we report that myelin segments can also decrease their length in response to optic nerve (ON) shortening during Xenopus laevis metamorphic remodeling. EM-based analyses revealed that myelin segment shortening is accomplished by focal myelin-axon detachments and protrusions from otherwise intact myelin segments. Astrocyte processes remove these focal myelin dystrophies using known phagocytic machinery, including the opsonin milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (Mfge8) and the downstream effector ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). By the end of metamorphic nerve shortening, one-quarter of all myelin in the ON is enwrapped or internalized by astrocytes. As opposed to the removal of degenerating myelin by macrophages, which is usually associated with axonal pathologies, astrocytes selectively remove large amounts of myelin without damaging axons during this developmental remodeling event. PMID:26240339

  17. Astrocytes phagocytose focal dystrophies from shortening myelin segments in the optic nerve of Xenopus laevis at metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Mills, Elizabeth A; Davis, Chung-ha O; Bushong, Eric A; Boassa, Daniela; Kim, Keun-Young; Ellisman, Mark H; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2015-08-18

    Oligodendrocytes can adapt to increases in axon diameter through the addition of membrane wraps to myelin segments. Here, we report that myelin segments can also decrease their length in response to optic nerve (ON) shortening during Xenopus laevis metamorphic remodeling. EM-based analyses revealed that myelin segment shortening is accomplished by focal myelin-axon detachments and protrusions from otherwise intact myelin segments. Astrocyte processes remove these focal myelin dystrophies using known phagocytic machinery, including the opsonin milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (Mfge8) and the downstream effector ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). By the end of metamorphic nerve shortening, one-quarter of all myelin in the ON is enwrapped or internalized by astrocytes. As opposed to the removal of degenerating myelin by macrophages, which is usually associated with axonal pathologies, astrocytes selectively remove large amounts of myelin without damaging axons during this developmental remodeling event. PMID:26240339

  18. Regulation of Peripheral Nerve Myelin Maintenance by Gene Repression through Polycomb Repressive Complex 2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ki H; Hung, Holly A; Srinivasan, Rajini; Xie, Huafeng; Orkin, Stuart H; Svaren, John

    2015-06-01

    Myelination of peripheral nerves by Schwann cells requires coordinate regulation of gene repression as well as gene activation. Several chromatin remodeling pathways critical for peripheral nerve myelination have been identified, but the functions of histone methylation in the peripheral nerve have not been elucidated. To determine the role of histone H3 Lys27 methylation, we have generated mice with a Schwann cell-specific knock-out of Eed, which is an essential subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) that catalyzes methylation of histone H3 Lys27. Analysis of this mutant revealed no significant effects on early postnatal development of myelin. However, its loss eventually causes progressive hypermyelination of small-diameter axons and apparent fragmentation of Remak bundles. These data identify the PRC2 complex as an epigenomic modulator of mature myelin thickness, which is associated with changes in Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, we found that Eed inactivation causes derepression of several genes, e.g., Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (Igfbp2), that become activated after nerve injury, but without activation of a primary regulator of the injury program, c-Jun. Analysis of the activated genes in cultured Schwann cells showed that Igfbp2 regulates Akt activation. Our results identify an epigenomic pathway required for establishing thickness of mature myelin and repressing genes that respond to nerve injury. PMID:26041929

  19. Calibration of the stereological estimation of the number of myelinated axons in the rat sciatic nerve: A multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, S.; Geuna, S.; Ronchi, G.; Ulkay, M.B.; von Bartheld, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    Several sources of variability can affect stereological estimates. Here we measured the impact of potential sources of variability on numerical stereological estimates of myelinated axons in the adult rat sciatic nerve. Besides biological variation, parameters tested included two variations of stereological methods (unbiased counting frame versus 2D-disector), two sampling schemes (few large versus frequent small sampling boxes), and workstations with varying degrees of sophistication. All estimates were validated against exhaustive counts of the same nerve cross sections to obtain calibrated true numbers of myelinated axons (gold standard). In addition, we quantified errors in particle identification by comparing light microscopic and electron microscopic images of selected consecutive sections. Biological variation was 15.6%. There was no significant difference between the two stereological approaches or workstations used, but sampling schemes with few large samples yielded larger differences (20.7%±3.7% SEM) of estimates from true values, while frequent small samples showed significantly smaller differences (12.7%±1.9% SEM). Particle identification was accurate in 94% of cases (range: 89–98%). The most common identification error was due to profiles of Schwann cell nuclei mimicking profiles of small myelinated nerve fibers. We recommend sampling frequent small rather than few large areas, and conclude that workstations with basic stereological equipment are sufficient to obtain accurate estimates. Electron microscopic verification showed that particle misidentification had a surprisingly variable and large impact of up to 11%, corresponding to 2/3 of the biological variation (15.6%). Thus, errors in particle identification require further attention, and we provide a simple nerve fiber recognition test to assist investigators with self-testing and training. PMID:20064555

  20. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Diabetic Neuropathy by Direct Modulation of Both Angiogenesis and Myelination in Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Woong; Choi, Dabin; Lee, Min Young; Huh, Yang Hoon; Yoon, Young-sup

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that diabetic neuropathy (DN) is pathophysiologically related to both impaired angiogenesis and a deficiency of neurotrophic factors in the nerves. It is widely known that vascular and neural growths are intimately associated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote angiogenesis in ischemic diseases and have neuroprotective effects, particularly on Schwann cells. Accordingly, we investigated whether DN could be improved by local transplantation of MSCs by augmenting angiogenesis and neural regeneration such as remyelination. In sciatic nerves of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities (NCVs) and capillary density were reduced, and axonal atrophy and demyelination were observed. After injection of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) into hindlimb muscles, NCVs were restored to near-normal levels. Histological examination demonstrated that injected MSCs were preferentially and durably engrafted in the sciatic nerves, and a portion of the engrafted MSCs were distinctively localized close to vasa nervora of sciatic nerves. Furthermore, vasa nervora increased in density, and the ultrastructure of myelinated fibers in nerves was observed to be restored. Real-time RT-PCR experiments showed that gene expression of multiple factors involved in angiogenesis, neural function, and myelination were increased in the MSC-injected nerves. These findings suggest that MSC transplantation improved DN through direct peripheral nerve angiogenesis, neurotrophic effects, and restoration of myelination. PMID:25975801

  1. Incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin proteins in nerves undergoing early Wallerian degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.G.; Baughman, S.; Scheidler, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    The simultaneous incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose and (1-/sup 14/C)leucine into normal rat sciatic nerve was examined using an in vitro incubation model. A linear rate of protein precursor uptake was found in purified myelin protein over 1/2-6 hr of incubation utilizing a supplemented medium containing amino acids. This model was then used to examine myelin protein synthesis in nerves undergoing degeneration at 1-4 days following a crush injury. Data showed a statistically significant decrease in the ratio of fucose to leucine at 2, 3, and 4 days of degeneration, which was the consequence of a significant increase in leucine uptake. These results, plus substantial protein recovery in axotomized nerves, are indicative of active synthesis of proteins that purify with myelin during early Wallerian degeneration.

  2. Myelinated Axons in the Auricular Branch of the Human Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Safi, Sami; Ellrich, Jens; Neuhuber, Winfried

    2016-09-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) resulted in deactivation of temporal lobe structures, similar to invasive cervical vagus nerve (CVN) stimulation. Presumably, both methods stimulated myelinated afferent beta axons mediating anti-convulsive effects. How numbers of A beta axons in the human ABVN compare to those of the CVN is unknown. The ABVN, CVN, recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and thoracic vagus nerve (TVN) were dissected from embalmed bodies. Numbers and calibers of myelinated axons were analyzed in semithin sections. Myelinated axons in the left and right ABVN averaged to 385 and 363, respectively. Numbers of A beta axons measuring ≥7 µm averaged to 64 and 78 on the left and right, respectively. Numbers of A beta axons in CVN were estimated by subtracting myelinated presumed motor axons in RLN from the total count of CVN. This resulted in 280 and 504 A beta axons on the left and right, respectively, concurring well with the thick myelinated axon count of the ipsilateral TVN (255 and 466, respectively). Thus, the ratio of A beta axons in the ABVN and CVN was ∼1:5 and 1:6 on the left and right side, respectively. These results indicate that transcutaneous ABVN stimulation might be a promising alternative to invasive CVN stimulation. Anat Rec, 299:1184-1191, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27342906

  3. Schwann cell myelination.

    PubMed

    Salzer, James L

    2015-08-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are essential for the rapid propagation of action potentials by saltatory conduction. They form as the result of reciprocal interactions between axons and Schwann cells. Extrinsic signals from the axon, and the extracellular matrix, drive Schwann cells to adopt a myelinating fate, whereas myelination reorganizes the axon for its role in conduction and is essential for its integrity. Here, we review our current understanding of the development, molecular organization, and function of myelinating Schwann cells. Recent findings into the extrinsic signals that drive Schwann cell myelination, their cognate receptors, and the downstream intracellular signaling pathways they activate will be described. Together, these studies provide important new insights into how these pathways converge to activate the transcriptional cascade of myelination and remodel the actin cytoskeleton that is critical for morphogenesis of the myelin sheath. PMID:26054742

  4. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2016-02-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and the vestibulocochlear nerve of adult guinea pigs were used herein. The proposed pipeline for fiber segmentation is based on the techniques of competitive clustering and concavity analysis. The evaluation of the proposed method for segmentation of images was done by comparing the automatic segmentation with the manual segmentation. To further evaluate the proposed method considering morphometric features extracted from the segmented images, the distributions of these features were tested for statistical significant difference. The method achieved a high overall sensitivity and very low false-positive rates per image. We detect no statistical difference between the distribution of the features extracted from the manual and the pipeline segmentations. The method presented a good overall performance, showing widespread potential in experimental and clinical settings allowing large-scale image analysis and, thus, leading to more reliable results. PMID:25986589

  5. Functional Expression of Electron Transport Chain and FoF1-ATP Synthase in Optic Nerve Myelin Sheath.

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Martina; Ravera, Silvia; Garbarino, Greta; Ramoino, Paola; Ferrando, Sara; Calzia, Daniela; Candiani, Simona; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies reported evidence for aerobic ATP synthesis by myelin from both bovine brainstem and rat sciatic nerve. Considering that the optic nerve displays a high oxygen demand, here we evaluated the expression and activity of the five Respiratory Complexes in myelin purified from either bovine or murine optic nerves. Western blot analyses on isolated myelin confirmed the expression of ND4L (subunit of Complex I), COX IV (subunit of Complex IV) and β subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthase. Moreover, spectrophotometric and in-gel activity assays on isolated myelin, as well as histochemical activity assays on both bovine and murine transversal optic nerve sections showed that the respiratory Complexes are functional in myelin and are organized in a supercomplex. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation proteins was also evaluated on bovine optic nerve sections by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Having excluded a mitochondrial contamination of isolated myelin and considering the results form in situ analyses, it is proposed that the oxidative phosphorylation machinery is truly resident in optic myelin sheath. Data may shed a new light on the unknown trophic role of myelin sheath. It may be energy supplier for the axon, explaining why in demyelinating diseases and neuropathies, myelin sheath loss is associated with axonal degeneration. PMID:26334391

  6. Axonal Transport and Morphology: How Myelination gets Nerves into Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Peter; Zhao, Peng; Monsma, Paula; Brown, Tony

    2011-03-01

    The local caliber of mature axons is largely determined by neurofilament (NF) content. The axoskeleton, mainly consisting of NFs, however, is dynamic. NFs are assembled in the cell body and are transported by molecular motors on microtubule tracks along the axon at a slow rate of fractions of mm per day. We combine live cell fluorescent imaging techniques to access NF transport in myelinated and non-myelinated segments of axons with computational modeling of the active NF flow to show that a), myelination locally slows NF transport rates by regulating duty ratios and b), that the predicted increase in axon caliber agrees well with experiments. This study, for the first time, links NF kinetics directly to axonal morphology, providing a novel conceptual framework for the physical understanding of processes leading to the formation of axonal structures such as the ``Nodes of Ranvier'' as well as abnormal axonal swellings associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). NSF grants # IOS-0818412(PJ) and IOS-0818653 (AB).

  7. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heckel, A.; Weiler, M.; Xia, A.; Ruetters, M.; Pham, M.; Bendszus, M.; Heiland, S.; Baeumer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. Methods MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD) was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV) as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Results DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr.) and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. Conclusion AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA) reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26114630

  8. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tuday, Eric C; Olree, Kenneth S; Horch, Kenneth W

    2006-01-01

    Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG) and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation. PMID:16863593

  9. In vivo optical microscopy of peripheral nerve myelination with polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Henry, Francis P; Wang, Yan; Rodriguez, Carissa L R; Randolph, Mark A; Rust, Esther A Z; Winograd, Jonathan M; de Boer, Johannes F; Park, B Hyle

    2015-04-01

    Assessing nerve integrity and myelination after injury is necessary to provide insight for treatment strategies aimed at restoring neuromuscular function. Currently, this is largely done with electrical analysis, which lacks direct quantitative information. In vivo optical imaging with sufficient imaging depth and resolution could be used to assess the nerve microarchitecture. In this study, we examine the use of polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) to quantitatively assess the sciatic nerve microenvironment through measurements of birefringence after applying a nerve crush injury in a rat model. Initial loss of function and subsequent recovery were demonstrated by calculating the sciatic function index (SFI). We found that the PS-OCT phase retardation slope, which is proportional to birefringence, increased monotonically with the SFI. Additionally, histomorphometric analysis of the myelin thickness and g-ratio shows that the PS-OCT slope is a good indicator of myelin health and recovery after injury. These results demonstrate that PS-OCT is capable of providing nondestructive and quantitative assessment of nerve health after injury and shows promise for continued use both clinically and experimentally in neuroscience. PMID:25858593

  10. In vivo optical microscopy of peripheral nerve myelination with polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Francis P.; Wang, Yan; Rodriguez, Carissa L. R.; Randolph, Mark A.; Rust, Esther A. Z.; Winograd, Jonathan M.; de Boer, Johannes F.; Park, B. Hyle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Assessing nerve integrity and myelination after injury is necessary to provide insight for treatment strategies aimed at restoring neuromuscular function. Currently, this is largely done with electrical analysis, which lacks direct quantitative information. In vivo optical imaging with sufficient imaging depth and resolution could be used to assess the nerve microarchitecture. In this study, we examine the use of polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) to quantitatively assess the sciatic nerve microenvironment through measurements of birefringence after applying a nerve crush injury in a rat model. Initial loss of function and subsequent recovery were demonstrated by calculating the sciatic function index (SFI). We found that the PS-OCT phase retardation slope, which is proportional to birefringence, increased monotonically with the SFI. Additionally, histomorphometric analysis of the myelin thickness and g-ratio shows that the PS-OCT slope is a good indicator of myelin health and recovery after injury. These results demonstrate that PS-OCT is capable of providing nondestructive and quantitative assessment of nerve health after injury and shows promise for continued use both clinically and experimentally in neuroscience. PMID:25858593

  11. Zeb2 is essential for Schwann cell differentiation, myelination and nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Quintes, Susanne; Brinkmann, Bastian G; Ebert, Madlen; Fröb, Franziska; Kungl, Theresa; Arlt, Friederike A; Tarabykin, Victor; Huylebroeck, Danny; Meijer, Dies; Suter, Ueli; Wegner, Michael; Sereda, Michael W; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-08-01

    Schwann cell development and peripheral nerve myelination require the serial expression of transcriptional activators, such as Sox10, Oct6 (also called Scip or Pou3f1) and Krox20 (also called Egr2). Here we show that transcriptional repression, mediated by the zinc-finger protein Zeb2 (also known as Sip1), is essential for differentiation and myelination. Mice lacking Zeb2 in Schwann cells develop a severe peripheral neuropathy, caused by failure of axonal sorting and virtual absence of myelin membranes. Zeb2-deficient Schwann cells continuously express repressors of lineage progression. Moreover, genes for negative regulators of maturation such as Sox2 and Ednrb emerge as Zeb2 target genes, supporting its function as an 'inhibitor of inhibitors' in myelination control. When Zeb2 is deleted in adult mice, Schwann cells readily dedifferentiate following peripheral nerve injury and become repair cells. However, nerve regeneration and remyelination are both perturbed, demonstrating that Zeb2, although undetectable in adult Schwann cells, has a latent function throughout life. PMID:27294512

  12. Laser interference microscopy: a novel approach to the visualization of structural changes in myelin during the propagation of nerve impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusipovich, A. I.; Cherkashin, A. A.; Verdiyan, E. E.; Sogomonyan, I. A.; Maksimov, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    We used 3D phase images obtained by laser interference microscopy (LIM) for ex vivo evaluation of changes in the structure of myelin during repetitive stimulation. In this work we propose a simple model of myelinated nerve fiber (mNF), which describes phase images as a result of different geometry and membrane-to-cytoplasm ratio in various regions, particularly, the internode and paranodal–nodal–paranodal region, including the node of Ranvier. Application of this model provides clear interpretation of the phase images and also demonstrates that repetitive action potentials are accompanied by structural changes in myelin in the internode and cytoplasmic modification in the node of Ranvier. The first 20 min of stimulation did not induce significant changes in the measured parameters, but then the optical path difference at the periphery of mNF and at the node of Ranvier declined reversibly. We believe that our model is also applicable to other modifications of interference and non-interference imaging.

  13. Retardation of peripheral nerve myelination in mice treated with inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. A quantitative electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, F A; Uzman, B G

    1970-09-01

    The effect of two inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis, triparanol and AY 9944, on peripheral nerve myelination, was studied. Suckling mice were intraperitoneally injected with both drugs on 3 consecutive days and were sacrificed 6 hr after the last injection; others were suckled by an injected mother and sacrificed at 2(1/2) days of age. A single mouse which had been injected with both drugs at 1, 2, and 3 days of age was sacrificed 2 wk after the last injection. Membranous and crystalline intracytoplasmic inclusions were observed in the Schwann cells of the sciatic nerves of all the experimental animals. Both the number of unmyelinated single axons and the number of myelin lamellae around each myelinating axon in the sciatic nerves were recorded for treated mice and of mice suckled by treated mothers. The sciatic nerve of the experimental mice contained a larger proportion of unmyelinated single axons and smaller numbers of myelin lamellae around the myelinating axons, when compared with age-matched controls. The results suggest that a decrease of endogenous cholesterol in suckling mice may affect peripheral nerve myelination in two ways: by retarding the "triggering" of myelination in unmyelinated axons and by decreasing the rate of myelination already in progress. PMID:4349129

  14. Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3) Improves Myelination and Recovery after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chabas, Jean-Francois; Stephan, Delphine; Marqueste, Tanguy; Garcia, Stephane; Lavaut, Marie-Noelle; Nguyen, Catherine; Legre, Regis; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated i) that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) increases axon diameter and potentiates nerve regeneration in a rat model of transected peripheral nerve and ii) that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) improves breathing and hyper-reflexia in a rat model of paraplegia. However, before bringing this molecule to the clinic, it was of prime importance i) to assess which form – ergocalciferol versus cholecalciferol – and which dose were the most efficient and ii) to identify the molecular pathways activated by this pleiotropic molecule. The rat left peroneal nerve was cut out on a length of 10 mm and autografted in an inverted position. Animals were treated with either cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol, at the dose of 100 or 500 IU/kg/day, or excipient (Vehicle), and compared to unlesioned rats (Control). Functional recovery of hindlimb was measured weekly, during 12 weeks, using the peroneal functional index. Ventilatory, motor and sensitive responses of the regenerated axons were recorded and histological analysis was performed. In parallel, to identify the genes regulated by vitamin D in dorsal root ganglia and/or Schwann cells, we performed an in vitro transcriptome study. We observed that cholecalciferol is more efficient than ergocalciferol and, when delivered at a high dose (500 IU/kg/day), cholecalciferol induces a significant locomotor and electrophysiological recovery. We also demonstrated that cholecalciferol increases i) the number of preserved or newly formed axons in the proximal end, ii) the mean axon diameter in the distal end, and iii) neurite myelination in both distal and proximal ends. Finally, we found a modified expression of several genes involved in axogenesis and myelination, after 24 hours of vitamin supplementation. Our study is the first to demonstrate that vitamin D acts on myelination via the activation of several myelin-associated genes. It paves the way for future randomised controlled clinical trials for peripheral nerve or

  15. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate produces copper accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and myelin injury in rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Elizabeth G; Valentine, Holly L; Milatovic, Dejan M; Valentine, William M

    2004-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of the dithiocarbamate, disulfiram, to produce a peripheral neuropathy in humans and experimental animals and have also provided evidence that N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDC) is a proximate toxic species of disulfiram. The ability of DEDC to elevate copper levels in the brain suggests that it may also elevate levels of copper in peripheral nerve, possibly leading to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation from redox cycling of copper. The study presented here investigates the potential of DEDC to promote copper accumulation and lipid peroxidation in peripheral nerve. Rats were administered either DEDC or deionized water by ip osmotic pumps and fed a normal diet or diet containing elevated copper, and the levels of metals, isoprostanes, and the severity of lesions in peripheral nerve and brain were assessed by ICP-AES/AAS, GC/MS, and light microscopy, respectively. Copper was the only metal that demonstrated any significant compound-related elevations relative to controls, and total copper was increased in both brain and peripheral nerve in animals administered DEDC on both diets. In contrast, lesions and elevated F2-isoprostanes were significantly increased only in peripheral nerve for the rats administered DEDC on both diets. Autometallography staining of peripheral nerve was consistent with increased metal content along the myelin sheath, but in brain, focal densities were observed, and a periportal distribution occurred in liver. These data are consistent with the peripheral nervous system being more sensitive to DEDC-mediated demyelination and demonstrate the ability of DEDC to elevate copper levels in peripheral nerve. Additionally lipid peroxidation appears to either be a contributing event in the development of demyelination, possibly through an increase of redox active copper, or a consequence of the myelin injury. PMID:15187237

  16. Thermally drawn fibers as nerve guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Ryan A; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Abdolrahim Poorheravi, Negin; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth. PMID:26717246

  17. Gangliosides are functional nerve cell ligands for myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an inhibitor of nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Alka A.; Patel, Himatkumar V.; Fromholt, Susan E.; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Vyas, Kavita A.; Dang, Jiyoung; Schachner, Melitta; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) binds to the nerve cell surface and inhibits nerve regeneration. The nerve cell surface ligand(s) for MAG are not established, although sialic acid-bearing glycans have been implicated. We identify the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as specific functional ligands for MAG-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth from primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. MAG-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition is attenuated by (i) neuraminidase treatment of the neurons; (ii) blocking neuronal ganglioside biosynthesis; (iii) genetically modifying the terminal structures of nerve cell surface gangliosides; and (iv) adding highly specific IgG-class antiganglioside mAbs. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth inhibition is mimicked by highly multivalent clustering of GD1a or GT1b by using precomplexed antiganglioside Abs. These data implicate the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as functional MAG ligands and suggest that the first step in MAG inhibition is multivalent ganglioside clustering. PMID:12060784

  18. N-WASp is required for Schwann cell cytoskeletal dynamics, normal myelin gene expression and peripheral nerve myelination

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Fuzi; Dong, Baoxia; Georgiou, John; Jiang, Qiuhong; Zhang, Jinyi; Bharioke, Arjun; Qiu, Frank; Lommel, Silvia; Feltri, M. Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Roder, John C.; Eyer, Joel; Chen, Xiequn; Peterson, Alan C.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Schwann cells elaborate myelin sheaths around axons by spirally wrapping and compacting their plasma membranes. Although actin remodeling plays a crucial role in this process, the effectors that modulate the Schwann cell cytoskeleton are poorly defined. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulator, neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASp), is upregulated in myelinating Schwann cells coincident with myelin elaboration. When N-WASp is conditionally deleted in Schwann cells at the onset of myelination, the cells continue to ensheath axons but fail to extend processes circumferentially to elaborate myelin. Myelin-related gene expression is also severely reduced in the N-WASp-deficient cells and in vitro process and lamellipodia formation are disrupted. Although affected mice demonstrate obvious motor deficits these do not appear to progress, the mutant animals achieving normal body weights and living to advanced age. Our observations demonstrate that N-WASp plays an essential role in Schwann cell maturation and myelin formation. PMID:21385763

  19. Comparison of regenerative and reinnervating capabilities of different functional types of nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Navarro, X; Verdú, E; Butí, M

    1994-10-01

    Functional reinnervation of sweat glands (SGs), skin, and muscle in the mouse paw after sciatic nerve lesions was evaluated to allow comparisons of the regeneration efficiency of different functional types of nerve fibers. In four groups of mice the sciatic nerve was crushed, sectioned, and left unrepaired or repaired by suture or tubulization. Reappearance of SG secretion and pinprick responses occurred slightly earlier than recordings of compound muscle and nerve action potentials in all groups. The degree of reinnervation, with respect to preoperative control values, of SGs and skin nociceptors was higher than the amplitude of the action potentials, mainly when the nerve injury was severe. The chances for recovery progressively decreased with the severity of the lesion, affecting the larger nerve fibers most. These results indicate that, after injuries of peripheral nerves, all types of nerve fibers are able to regenerate in the mouse, although small size fibers (sudomotor and nociceptive) allow for a higher degree of functional recovery than large myelinated fibers (skeletomotor and sensory). PMID:7957736

  20. Changes in myelin sheath thickness and internode geometry in the rabbit phrenic nerve during growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friede, R L; Brzoska, J; Hartmann, U

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit phrenic nerve was studied at seven phases of growth from the newborn to the adult to determine the length of the nerve fibres, the length of the internodes, the fibre calibre, the geometric proportions of the internodes and the thickness of the myelin sheaths. The elongation of the internodes corresponded precisely to the elongation of the nerve, indicating a constant number of approximately 140 internodes per fibre, each internode elongating commensurate with body growth. Internode elongation was accompanied by increases in fibre calibre, but these parameters did not change in precise proportion. The internodes of thick fibres were relatively short for calibre, as defined by the length/diameter quotient. This trend of foreshortening changed during growth. Sheath thickness, defined by the quotient axon diameter/fibre diameter, was determined with a computer-assisted method. Fibres of young rabbits had relatively thin sheaths for axon calibre, compared with adult rabbits. The changes in sheath thickness corresponded to the changes in internode geometry. This was consistent with previous studies showing that elongation or foreshortening of an internode of a given calibre has a slight, but definite effect on the thickness of its myelin sheath. PMID:3870716

  1. The impact of internodal segmentation in biophysical nerve fiber models.

    PubMed

    Dekker, David M T; Briaire, Jeroen J; Frijns, Johan H M

    2014-10-01

    Implementation of double cable models to simulate the behavior of myelinated peripheral nerve fibers requires defining a segmentation of the internode between successive nodes of Ranvier. The number of internodal segments is a model parameter that is not well agreed on, with values in the literature ranging from 1 to more than 500. Moreover, a lot of studies also lack a sensitivity study or a rationale behind the implementation used. In a model of a myelinated nerve fiber developed in our group, the segmentation scheme (i.e., the number of segments and their individual morphology) strongly influenced model outcomes such as action potential shape and velocity, stimulation threshold and absolute refractory period. In the present study these influences were investigated systematically in homogeneous neurons with different diameters. Uniformly segmented internodes were found to require several hundreds of segments (and associated computational power) to reach model outcomes differing by less than 1 % from the asymptotic value. In fact, in the majority of segmentation schemes the main determinant is not the number of segments, but the length λ of the internodal segments directly adjacent to the nodes of Ranvier. If λ is larger than approximately 10 μm, model outcomes for the tested fibers are almost independent of the total number of segments. Furthermore, λ can be optimized to enable models using just three segments per internode, to reach physiologically relevant model outcomes with limited computational resources. However, to study anatomical or physiological details of the internode itself, an appropriately detailed segmentation scheme is crucial. PMID:24827400

  2. Myocilin is involved in NgR1/Lingo-1-mediated oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heung Sun; Nakaya, Naoki; Abu-Asab, Mones; Kim, Hong Sug; Tomarev, Stanislav I

    2014-04-16

    Myocilin is a secreted glycoprotein that belongs to a family of olfactomedin domain-containing proteins. Although myocilin is detected in several ocular and nonocular tissues, the only reported human pathology related to mutations in the MYOCILIN gene is primary open-angle glaucoma. Functions of myocilin are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that myocilin is a mediator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and is involved in the myelination of the optic nerve in mice. Myocilin is expressed and secreted by optic nerve astrocytes. Differentiation of optic nerve oligodendrocytes is delayed in Myocilin-null mice. Optic nerves of Myocilin-null mice contain reduced levels of several myelin-associated proteins including myelin basic protein, myelin proteolipid protein, and 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase compared with those of wild-type littermates. This leads to reduced myelin sheath thickness of optic nerve axons in Myocilin-null mice compared with wild-type littermates, and this difference is more pronounced at early postnatal stages compared with adult mice. Myocilin also affects differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursors in vitro. Its addition to primary cultures of differentiating oligodendrocyte precursors increases levels of tested markers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and stimulates elongation of oligodendrocyte processes. Myocilin stimulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation occurs through the NgR1/Lingo-1 receptor complex. Myocilin physically interacts with Lingo-1 and may be considered as a Lingo-1 ligand. Myocilin-induced elongation of oligodendrocyte processes may be mediated by activation of FYN and suppression of RhoA GTPase. PMID:24741044

  3. Nitrogen Substituent Polarity Influences Dithiocarbamate-Mediated Lipid Oxidation, Nerve Copper Accumulation, and Myelin Injury

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Holly L.; Viquez, Olga M.; Amarnath, Kalyani; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Zyskowski, Justin; Kassa, Endalkachew N.; Valentine, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, with new applications being investigated. Past studies have suggested that the neurotoxicity of some dithiocarbamates may result from copper accumulation, protein oxidative damage, and lipid oxidation. The polarity of a dithiocarbamate’s nitrogen substituents influences the lipophilicity of the copper complexes it generates and thus potentially determines its ability to promote copper accumulation within nerve and induce myelin injury. In the current study, a series of dithiocarbamate-copper complexes differing in their lipophilicity were evaluated for their relative abilities to promote lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde levels generated in an ethyl arachidonate oil-in-water emulsion. In a second component of this study, rats were exposed to either N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate or sarcosine dithiocarbamate; both generate dithiocarbamate-copper complexes that are lipid and water soluble, respectively. Following the exposures, brain, tibial nerve, spinal cord and liver tissue copper levels were measured by inductively coupled mass spectroscopy to assess the relative abilities of these two dithiocarbamates to promote copper accumulation. Peripheral nerve injury was evaluated using grip strengths, nerve conduction velocities and morphologic changes at the light microscope level. Additionally, the protein expression levels of glutathione transferase alpha and heme-oxygenase-1 in nerve were determined and the quantity of protein carbonyls measured to assess levels of oxidative stress and injury. The data provide evidence that dithiocarbamate-copper complexes are redox active; and that the ability of dithiocarbamate complexes to promote lipid peroxidation is correlated to the lipophilicity of the complex. Consistent with neurotoxicity requiring the formation of a lipid soluble copper complex, significant increases in copper accumulation, oxidative stress and myelin

  4. Rapid conduction and the evolution of giant axons and myelinated fibers.

    PubMed

    Hartline, D K; Colman, D R

    2007-01-01

    Nervous systems have evolved two basic mechanisms for increasing the conduction speed of the electrical impulse. The first is through axon gigantism: using axons several times larger in diameter than the norm for other large axons, as for example in the well-known case of the squid giant axon. The second is through encasing axons in helical or concentrically wrapped multilamellar sheets of insulating plasma membrane--the myelin sheath. Each mechanism, alone or in combination, is employed in nervous systems of many taxa, both vertebrate and invertebrate. Myelin is a unique way to increase conduction speeds along axons of relatively small caliber. It seems to have arisen independently in evolution several times in vertebrates, annelids and crustacea. Myelinated nerves, regardless of their source, have in common a multilamellar membrane wrapping, and long myelinated segments interspersed with 'nodal' loci where the myelin terminates and the nerve impulse propagates along the axon by 'saltatory' conduction. For all of the differences in detail among the morphologies and biochemistries of the sheath in the different myelinated animal classes, the function is remarkably universal. PMID:17208176

  5. The cytoskeletal adapter protein 4.1G organizes the internodes in peripheral myelinated nerves

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovic, Aleksandra; Horresh, Ido; Golan, Neev; Spiegel, Ivo; Sabanay, Helena; Frechter, Shahar; Ohno, Shinichi; Terada, Nobuo; Möbius, Wiebke; Rosenbluth, Jack; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Myelinating Schwann cells regulate the localization of ion channels on the surface of the axons they ensheath. This function depends on adhesion complexes that are positioned at specific membrane domains along the myelin unit. Here we show that the precise localization of internodal proteins depends on the expression of the cytoskeletal adapter protein 4.1G in Schwann cells. Deletion of 4.1G in mice resulted in aberrant distribution of both glial adhesion molecules and axonal proteins that were present along the internodes. In wild-type nerves, juxtaparanodal proteins (i.e., Kv1 channels, Caspr2, and TAG-1) were concentrated throughout the internodes in a double strand that flanked paranodal junction components (i.e., Caspr, contactin, and NF155), and apposes the inner mesaxon of the myelin sheath. In contrast, in 4.1G−/− mice, these proteins “piled up” at the juxtaparanodal region or aggregated along the internodes. These findings suggest that protein 4.1G contributes to the organization of the internodal axolemma by targeting and/or maintaining glial transmembrane proteins along the axoglial interface. PMID:22291039

  6. PMP22 expression in dermal nerve myelin from patients with CMT1A.

    PubMed

    Katona, Istvan; Wu, Xingyao; Feely, Shawna M E; Sottile, Stephanie; Siskind, Carly E; Miller, Lindsey J; Shy, Michael E; Li, Jun

    2009-07-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by a 1.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 17p11.2, which contains the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. Increased levels of PMP22 in compact myelin of peripheral nerves have been demonstrated and presumed to cause the phenotype of CMT1A. The objective of the present study was to determine whether an extra copy of the PMP22 gene in CMT1A disrupts the normally coordinated expression of PMP22 protein in peripheral nerve myelin and to evaluate PMP22 over-expression in patients with CMT1A and determine whether levels of PMP22 are molecular markers of disease severity. PMP22 expression was measured by taking skin biopsies from patients with CMT1A (n = 20) and both healthy controls (n = 7) and patients with Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP) (n = 6), in which patients have only a single copy of PMP22. Immunological electron microscopy was performed on the skin biopsies to quantify PMP22 expression in compact myelin. Similar biopsies were analysed by real time PCR to measure PMP22 mRNA levels. Results were also correlated with impairment in CMT1A, as measured by the validated CMT Neuropathy Score. Most, but not all patients with CMT1A, had elevated PMP22 levels in myelin compared with the controls. The levels of PMP22 in CMT1A were highly variable, but not in HNPP or the controls. However, there was no correlation between neurological disabilities and the level of over-expression of PMP22 protein or mRNA in patients with CMT1A. The extra copy of PMP22 in CMT1A results in disruption of the tightly regulated expression of PMP22. Thus, variability of PMP22 levels, rather than absolute level of PMP22, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of CMT1A. PMID:19447823

  7. PMP22 expression in dermal nerve myelin from patients with CMT1A

    PubMed Central

    Katona, Istvan; Wu, Xingyao; Feely, Shawna M. E.; Sottile, Stephanie; Siskind, Carly E.; Miller, Lindsey J.; Shy, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by a 1.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 17p11.2, which contains the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. Increased levels of PMP22 in compact myelin of peripheral nerves have been demonstrated and presumed to cause the phenotype of CMT1A. The objective of the present study was to determine whether an extra copy of the PMP22 gene in CMT1A disrupts the normally coordinated expression of PMP22 protein in peripheral nerve myelin and to evaluate PMP22 over-expression in patients with CMT1A and determine whether levels of PMP22 are molecular markers of disease severity. PMP22 expression was measured by taking skin biopsies from patients with CMT1A (n = 20) and both healthy controls (n = 7) and patients with Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP) (n = 6), in which patients have only a single copy of PMP22. Immunological electron microscopy was performed on the skin biopsies to quantify PMP22 expression in compact myelin. Similar biopsies were analysed by real time PCR to measure PMP22 mRNA levels. Results were also correlated with impairment in CMT1A, as measured by the validated CMT Neuropathy Score. Most, but not all patients with CMT1A, had elevated PMP22 levels in myelin compared with the controls. The levels of PMP22 in CMT1A were highly variable, but not in HNPP or the controls. However, there was no correlation between neurological disabilities and the level of over-expression of PMP22 protein or mRNA in patients with CMT1A. The extra copy of PMP22 in CMT1A results in disruption of the tightly regulated expression of PMP22. Thus, variability of PMP22 levels, rather than absolute level of PMP22, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of CMT1A. PMID:19447823

  8. Association and release of the major intrinsic membrane glycoprotein from peripheral nerve myelin.

    PubMed Central

    Poduslo, J F; Yao, J K

    1985-01-01

    Hypo-osmotic homogenization of the endoneurium from the adult-rat sciatic nerve and subsequent evaluation of the 197 000 g aqueous supernatant by sodium dodecyl sulphate pore-gradient electrophoresis (SDS-p.g.e.) revealed a release of the major glycoprotein (P0) (29 000 Mr) from peripheral nerve myelin. Immunological verification of the presence of this asparagine-linked glycoprotein in the aqueous supernatant was obtained by immune overlay after SDS-p.g.e. and electrophoretic transfer to nitrocellulose using anti-P0 gamma-globulin followed by autoradiographic detection with 125I-protein A. A comparison of successive hypo- and iso-osmotic extractions of the endoneurium revealed that the hypo-osmotic extraction released increasing amounts of P0 into the supernatant fraction, whereas the iso-osmotic treatment revealed lower levels of P0 extracted from the myelin and lesser amounts with each successive extraction. Three successive hypo-osmotic extractions resulted in a 2.0-, 2.9-, and 9.5-fold increase in the amount of P0 released compared with the successive iso-osmotic extractions. Although these results suggest that this major myelin glycoprotein has properties similar to those of extrinsic membrane proteins, temperature-dependent phase-partitioning experiments with Triton X-114 revealed that this glycoprotein is recovered in the detergent-enriched lower phase. These results indicate that this major myelin glycoprotein is an amphipathic integral membrane protein with a distinct hydrophobic domain and yet has solubility characteristics typical of an extrinsic membrane protein. P0 labelled in vitro with [3H]mannose could be immunoprecipitated from the aqueous supernatant with anti-P0 gamma-globulin by centrifugation at 197000g without the addition of second antibody or protein A. Analysis of such an immune precipitate after incorporation in vitro with [14C]acetate to label endoneurial lipids revealed that all major endoneurial lipid classes contained radioactive

  9. Electroactive biodegradable polyurethane significantly enhanced Schwann cells myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaobin; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Shao, Yongpin; Ma, Peter X

    2016-05-01

    Myelination of Schwann cells (SCs) is critical for the success of peripheral nerve regeneration, and biomaterials that can promote SCs' neurotrophin secretion as scaffolds are beneficial for nerve repair. Here we present a biomaterials-approach, specifically, a highly tunable conductive biodegradable flexible polyurethane by polycondensation of poly(glycerol sebacate) and aniline pentamer, to significantly enhance SCs' myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering. SCs are cultured on these conductive polymer films, and the biocompatibility of these films and their ability to enhance myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion are successfully demonstrated. The mechanism of SCs' neurotrophin secretion on conductive films is demonstrated by investigating the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) level and SCs' myelination. Furthermore, the neurite growth and elongation of PC12 cells are induced by adding the neurotrophin medium suspension produced from SCs-laden conductive films. These data suggest that these conductive degradable polyurethanes that enhance SCs' myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion perform great potential for nerve regeneration applications. PMID:26897537

  10. Clinical implications of peripheral myelin protein 22 for nerve compression and neural regeneration: a review.

    PubMed

    Hui-Chou, Helen G; Hashemi, Sharyhar S; Hoke, Ahmet; Dellon, A Lee

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a major component of the peripheral myelin sheath. The PMP22 gene is located on chromosome 17p11.2, and defects in PMP22 gene have been implicated in several common inherited peripheral neuropathies. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), Dejerine-Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy are all associated with defects in PMP22 gene. The disease phenotypes mirror the range of expression of PMP22 due to the corresponding genetic defect. HNPP, characterized by a milder recurrent episodic focal demyelinating neuropathy, is attributed to a deletion leading to PMP22 underexpression. On the other end of the spectrum, CMT1A leads to a more uniform demyelination and axonal loss, resulting in severe progressive distal weakness and paresthesias; it is due to a duplication at 17p11.2 leading to PMP22 overexpression. Additional point mutations result in varying phenotypes due to dysfunction of the resultant PMP22 protein. All inherited neuropathies are diagnosed with a combination of physical findings on examination, electromyography, sural nerve biopsies, and genetic testing. Treatment and management of these disorders differ depending on the underlying genetic defect, nerves involved, and resulting functional impairments. A review of current literature elucidates clinical, microsurgical implications, and management of patients with PMP22-related neuropathy. PMID:20976668

  11. The Use of Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cocultured with Schwann Cells and Vascular Endothelial Cells to Repair Rabbit Sciatic Nerve Defect with Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongyang; You, Yang; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Feng; Sha, Ziyi; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function. PMID:24490158

  12. The use of fiber-reinforced scaffolds cocultured with Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells to repair rabbit sciatic nerve defect with vascularization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongyang; You, Yang; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Feng; Sha, Ziyi; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function. PMID:24490158

  13. Unravelling crucial biomechanical resilience of myelinated peripheral nerve fibres provided by the Schwann cell basal lamina and PMP22

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Gonzalo; Liashkovich, Ivan; Gess, Burkhard; Young, Peter; Kun, Alejandra; Shahin, Victor

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the research of the close and enigmatic relationship between nerve biomechanics and the development of neuropathies. Here we present a research strategy based on the application atomic force and confocal microscopy for simultaneous nerve biomechanics and integrity investigations. Using wild-type and hereditary neuropathy mouse models, we reveal surprising mechanical protection of peripheral nerves. Myelinated peripheral wild-type fibres promptly and fully recover from acute enormous local mechanical compression while maintaining functional and structural integrity. The basal lamina which enwraps each myelinated fibre separately is identified as the major contributor to the striking fibre's resilience and integrity. In contrast, neuropathic fibres lacking the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), which is closely connected with several hereditary human neuropathies, fail to recover from light compression. Interestingly, the structural arrangement of the basal lamina of Pmp22−/− fibres is significantly altered compared to wild-type fibres. In conclusion, the basal lamina and PMP22 act in concert to contribute to a resilience and integrity of peripheral nerves at the single fibre level. Our findings and the presented technology set the stage for a comprehensive research of the links between nerve biomechanics and neuropathies. PMID:25446378

  14. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Gradients of GDNF in the Injured Peripheral Nerve: Effects on Nerve Coil Formation, Schwann Cell Maturation and Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Ruben; de Winter, Fred; Hoyng, Stefan A.; Roet, Kasper C. D.; Ehlert, Erich M.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Verhaagen, Joost; Tannemaat, Martijn R.

    2013-01-01

    Although the peripheral nerve is capable of regeneration, only a small minority of patients regain normal function after surgical reconstruction of a major peripheral nerve lesion, resulting in a severe and lasting negative impact on the quality of life. Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent survival- and outgrowth-promoting effects on motoneurons, but locally elevated levels of GDNF cause trapping of regenerating axons and the formation of nerve coils. This phenomenon has been called the “candy store” effect. In this study we created gradients of GDNF in the sciatic nerve after a ventral root avulsion. This approach also allowed us to study the effect of increasing concentrations of GDNF on Schwann cell proliferation and morphology in the injured peripheral nerve. We demonstrate that lentiviral vectors can be used to create a 4 cm long GDNF gradient in the intact and lesioned rat sciatic nerve. Nerve coils were formed throughout the gradient and the number and size of the nerve coils increased with increasing GDNF levels in the nerve. In the nerve coils, Schwann cell density is increased, their morphology is disrupted and myelination of axons is severely impaired. The total number of regenerated and surviving motoneurons is not enhanced after the distal application of a GDNF gradient, but increased sprouting does result in higher number of motor axon in the distal segment of the sciatic nerve. These results show that lentiviral vector mediated overexpression of GDNF exerts multiple effects on both Schwann cells and axons and that nerve coil formation already occurs at relatively low concentrations of exogenous GDNF. Controlled expression of GDNF, by using a viral vector with regulatable GDNF expression, may be required to avoid motor axon trapping and to prevent the effects on Schwann cell proliferation and myelination. PMID:23951085

  15. A novel Caspr mutation causes the shambling mouse phenotype by disrupting axoglial interactions of myelinated nerves.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-yang; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Okabe, Erina; Chishima, Yûko; Kanou, Yasuhiko; Murase, Shiori; Mizumura, Kazue; Inaba, Mie; Komatsu, Yukio; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Peles, Elior; Oda, Sen-ichi; Murata, Yoshiharu

    2009-11-01

    The neurological mouse mutation shambling (shm) exhibits ataxia and hindlimb paresis. Positional cloning of shm showed that it encodes contactin-associated protein (Caspr), which is required for formation of the paranodal junction in myelinated nerves. The shm mutation is a TT insertion in the Caspr gene that results in a frame shift and a premature stop codon at the COOH-terminus. The truncated Caspr protein that is generated lacks the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Here, we found that the nodal/paranodal axoplasm of shm mice lack paranodal junctions and contain large mitochondria and abnormal accumulations of cytoplasmic organelles that indicate altered axonal transport. Immunohistochemical analysis of mutant mice showed reduced expression of Caspr, contactin, and neurofascin 155, which are thought to form a protein complex in the paranodal region; protein 4.1B, however, was normally distributed. The mutant mice had aberrant localization of voltage-gated ion channels on the axolemma of nodal/paranodal regions. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated that the velocity of saltatory conduction was reduced in sciatic nerves and that the visual response was attenuated in the primary visual cortex. These abnormalities likely contribute to the neurological phenotype of the mutant mice. PMID:19816196

  16. Human intraretinal myelination: Axon diameters and axon/myelin thickness ratios

    PubMed Central

    FitzGibbon, Thomas; Nestorovski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human intraretinal myelination of ganglion cell axons occurs in about 1% of the population. We examined myelin thickness and axon diameter in human retinal specimens containing myelinated retinal ganglion cell axons. Materials and Methods: Two eyes containing myelinated patches were prepared for electron microscopy. Two areas were examined in one retina and five in the second retina. Measurements were compared to normal retinal and optic nerve samples and the rabbit retina, which normally contains myelinated axons. Measurements were made using a graphics tablet. Results: Mean axon diameter of myelinated axons at all locations were significantly larger than unmyelinated axons (P ≤ 0.01). Myelinated axons within the patches were significantly larger than axons within the optic nerve (P < 0.01). The relationship between axon diameter/fiber diameter (the G-ratio) seen in the retinal sites differed from that in the nerve. G-ratios were higher and myelin thickness was positively correlated to axon diameter (P < 0.01) in the retina but negatively correlated to axon diameter in the nerve (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Intraretinally myelinated axons are larger than non-myelinated axons from the same population and suggests that glial cells can induce diameter changes in retinal axons that are not normally myelinated. This effect is more dramatic on intraretinal axons compared with the normal transition zone as axons enter the optic nerve and these changes are abnormal. Whether intraretinal myelin alters axonal conduction velocity or blocks axonal conduction remains to be clarified and these issues may have different clinical outcomes. PMID:24212308

  17. Activity-dependent Regulation of Mitochondrial Motility by Calcium and Na/K-ATPase at Nodes of Ranvier of Myelinated Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuan Li; Ho, Po Lai; Kintner, Douglas B.; Sun, Dandan; Chiu, Shing Yan

    2012-01-01

    The node of Ranvier is a tiny segment of a myelinated fiber with various types of specializations adapted for generation of high speed nerve impulses. It is ionically specialized with respect to ion channel segregation and ionic fluxes, and metabolically specialized in ionic pump expression and mitochondrial density augmentation. This report examines the interplay of three important parameters (calcium fluxes, Na pumps, mitochondrial motility) at nodes of Ranvier in frog during normal nerve activity. First, we used calcium dyes to resolve a highly localized elevation in axonal calcium at a node of Ranvier during action potentials, and showed that this calcium elevation retards mitochondrial motility during nerve impulses. Second, we found, surprisingly, that physiologic activation of the Na pumps retards mitochondrial motility. Blocking Na pumps alone greatly prevents action potentials from retarding mitochondrial motility, which reveals that mitochondrial motility is coupled to Na/K-ATPase. In conclusion, we suggest that during normal nerve activity, Ca elevation and activation of Na/K-ATPase act, possibly in a synergistic fashion, to recruit mitochondria to a node of Ranvier to match metabolic needs. PMID:20219989

  18. The history of myelin.

    PubMed

    Boullerne, Anne Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Andreas Vesalius is attributed the discovery of white matter in the 16th century but van Leeuwenhoek is arguably the first to have observed myelinated fibers in 1717. A globular myelin theory followed, claiming all elements of the nervous system except for Fontana's primitive cylinder with outer sheath in 1781. Remak's axon revolution in 1836 relegated myelin to the unknown. Ehrenberg described nerve tubes with double borders in 1833, and Schwann with nuclei in 1839, but the medullary sheath acquired its name of myelin, coined by Virchow, only in 1854. Thanks to Schultze's osmium specific staining in 1865, myelin designates the structure known today. The origin of myelin though was baffling. Only after Ranvier discovered a periodic segmentation, which came to us as nodes of Ranvier, did he venture suggesting in 1872 that the nerve internode was a fatty cell secreting myelin in cytoplasm. Ranvier's hypothesis was met with high skepticism, because nobody could see the cytoplasm, and the term Schwann cell very slowly emerged into the vocabulary with von Lenhossék in 1895. When Cajal finally admitted the concept of Schwann cell internode in 1912, he still firmly believed myelin was secreted by the axon. Del Río-Hortega re-discovered oligodendrocytes in 1919 (after Robertson in 1899) and named them oligodendroglia in 1921, thereby antagonizing Cajal for discovering a second cell type in his invisible third element. Penfield had to come to del Río-Hortega's rescue in 1924 for oligodendrocytes to be accepted. They jointly hypothesized myelin could be made by oligodendrocytes, considered the central equivalent of Schwann cells. Meanwhile myelin birefringence properties observed by Klebs in 1865 then Schmidt in 1924 confirmed its high fatty content, ascertained by biochemistry by Thudichum in 1884. The 20th century saw X-ray diffraction developed by Schmitt, who discovered in 1935 the crystal-like organization of this most peculiar structure, and devised the g

  19. Sodium currents and sodium-current fluctuations in rat myelinated nerve fibres

    PubMed Central

    Neumcke, B.; Stämpfli, R.

    1982-01-01

    1. Sodium currents and fluctuations of sodium currents were measured in myelinated fibres of rat sciatic nerve under voltage clamp at 20 °C. 2. Relaxations of sodium currents during various test potentials were recorded in the presence of 6 nM-TTX in the extracellular solution. The activation of sodium currents at low depolarizations could be described with the m2 formulation. At increasing potentials higher powers of m up to 4 were required. The mid-point of the PNa (E) curve was located near E = -32 mV. Sodium inactivation during various depolarizations developed in two phases. 3. The resistance in series with the nodal membrane was calculated from peak sodium currents without and with 6 nM-TTX in the extracellular solution. The resistance varied between different fibres and ranged between 190 and 620 kΩ. 4. From peak sodium currents at the same mambrane potential without and in the presence of TTX an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 1·6 nM was calculated for TTX binding to sodium channels. 5. The conductance γ and the number N0 (corrected for series-resistance effects) of sodium channels were evaluated from ensemble average values of the mean sodium current and the variance of sodium-current fluctuations at the beginning of a test pulse. The mean values were γ = 14·5 pS, N0 = 21,000 per node. 6. The spectral density of stationary sodium-current fluctuations exhibited two relaxation components whose time constants were comparable to those of sodium activation and inactivation. At low depolarizations the variance produced by inactivation fluctuations was larger than predicted by the m3. h formulation. 7. It is concluded that individual sodium channels of rat and frog nerve have similar gating properties. In mammalian nodes the number of sodium channels is lower and the single-channel conductance higher than in amphibian nodes. PMID:6292404

  20. Distribution of neurofilaments in myelinated axons of the optic nerve of goldfish (Carassius auratus L.).

    PubMed

    Matheson, D F; Diocee, M S; Roots, B I

    1980-11-01

    Neurofilaments were counted in myelinated axons of the optic nerve of goldfish which were acclimated to 5 degrees and 25 degrees C. The number of neurofilaments increases markedly with increasing axonal size; axons of less than 0.1 micrometer 2 in area contain between 25 and 60 neurofilaments, while in the larger axons of area greater than 1.0 micrometer 2 there are approximately 190. The densities of the neurofilaments in the small axons are noticeably higher than in the larger ones (507 and 160, respectively). A variety of fixation procedures i.e. osmium tetroxide (OsO4) in phosphate buffer, glutaraldehyde (4%) in phosphate buffer or in ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and piperazine-N-N'-bis-(2-ethanesulphonic acid) (PIPES) and post-fixed with OsO4 had no effect on the numbers of neurofilaments relative to the size of axon. The anaesthetic MS-222 (tricaine methanesulphonate) likewise had no effect on the numbers of neurofilaments. It is proposed that temperature acclimation alters the axon diameter concomitant with an alteration in the number of neurofilaments to fit the new diameter of the axons. PMID:6253602

  1. Interfacial models of nerve fiber cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Malev, V V; Gromov, D B; Komissarchik YaYu; Brudnaya, M S

    1992-01-01

    A new approach, basing on a resemblance between cytoskeleton structures associated with plasma membranes and interfacial layers of coexisting phases, is proposed. In particular, a lattice model, similar to those of the theory of surface properties of pure liquids and nonelectrolyte solutions (Ono, S., and S. Kondo. 1960. Handbuch der Physik.), has been developed to describe nerve fiber cytoskeleton. The preliminary consideration of the model shows the existence of submembrane cytoskeleton having increased peripheral densities of microtubules (compared with the bulk density) which is in qualitative agreement with the data in literature. Some additional possibilities of the approach proposed are briefly discussed. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420929

  2. Quantitative studies of the regeneration of rat myelinated nerve fibres: variations in the number and size of regenerating fibres after repeated localized freezings.

    PubMed Central

    Mira, J C

    1979-01-01

    The number and size of myelinated nerve fibres were determined in the nerve to the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscles of rats whose left sciatic nerve was repeatedly frozen (one to five times at three weekly intervals). The contralateral nerve was used as a control. Results varied according to the number of freezings performed and, for a given number of freezings, according to the period of regeneration. When measurements were completed 1 month after the last of several localized freezings, the number of regenerating myelinated nerve fibres increased regularly up to the third freezing, reaching to about 220% of the control value, but no higher values were recorded after four or five freezings. The nerve fibre distribution was unimodal in all the nerves studied. The mean diameter of all myelinated fibres decreased with the number of freezings from 50% of the control value after the first to 36% after the fifth. When measurements were made 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after the third and final freezing, the number of regenerating myelinated nerve fibres decreased by about 30% between the first and third month and then stabilized at 190% of the control value. Nerve fibre distribution became bimodal from the third month onwards, and the mean diameter of all myelinated fibres increased regularly. However, by the eighteenth month, the size of regenerated myelinated nerve fibres had only reached 70% of the normal contralateral value. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 PMID:511774

  3. Improved Intraoperative Visualization of Nerves through a Myelin-Binding Fluorophore and Dual-Mode Laparoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cotero, Victoria E.; Kimm, Simon Y.; Siclovan, Tiberiu M.; Zhang, Rong; Kim, Evgenia M.; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Gondo, Tatsuo; Scardino, Peter T.; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Laudone, Vincent P.; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to visualize and spare nerves during surgery is critical for avoiding chronic morbidity, pain, and loss of function. Visualization of such critical anatomic structures is even more challenging during minimal access procedures because the small incisions limit visibility. In this study, we focus on improving imaging of nerves through the use of a new small molecule fluorophore, GE3126, used in conjunction with our dual-mode (color and fluorescence) laparoscopic imaging instrument. GE3126 has higher aqueous solubility, improved pharmacokinetics, and reduced non-specific adipose tissue fluorescence compared to previous myelin-binding fluorophores. Dosing and kinetics were initially optimized in mice. A non-clinical modified Irwin study in rats, performed to assess the potential of GE3126 to induce nervous system injuries, showed the absence of major adverse reactions. Real-time intraoperative imaging was performed in a porcine model. Compared to white light imaging, nerve visibility was enhanced under fluorescence guidance, especially for small diameter nerves obscured by fascia, blood vessels, or adipose tissue. In the porcine model, nerve visualization was observed rapidly, within 5 to 10 minutes post-intravenous injection and the nerve fluorescence signal was maintained for up to 80 minutes. The use of GE3126, coupled with practical implementation of an imaging instrument may be an important step forward in preventing nerve damage in the operating room. PMID:26076448

  4. Evolution of myelin ultrastructure and the major structural myelin proteins.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Hideyo; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2016-06-15

    Myelin sheaths, as the specialized tissue wrapping the nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS), are responsible for rapid conduction of electrical signals in these fibers. We compare the nerve myelin sheaths of different phylogenetic origins-including mammal, rodent, bird, reptile, amphibian, lungfish, teleost, and elasmobranch-with respect to periodicities and inter-membrane separations at their cytoplasmic and extracellular appositions, and correlate these structural parameters with biochemical composition. P0 glycoprotein and P0-like proteins are present in PNS of terrestrial species or land vertebrates (Tetrapod) and in CNS and PNS of aquatic species. Proteolipid protein (PLP) is a major component only in the CNS myelin of terrestrial species and is involved in compaction of the extracellular apposition. The myelin structures of aquatic garfish and lungfish, which contain P0-like protein both in CNS and PNS, are similar to those of terrestrial species, indicating that they may be transitional organisms between water and land species. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26519753

  5. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  6. In vivo expression of the Arf6 Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1 in mice exhibits enhanced myelin thickness in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Onami, Naoko; Tsumura, Hideki; Nemoto, Noriko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Kato, Minoru; Kotera, Jun; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2013-10-01

    The myelin sheath consists of a unique multiple layer structure that acts as an insulator between neuronal axons to enhance the propagation of the action potential. In neuropathies such as demyelinating or dismyelinating diseases, chronic demyelination and defective remyelination occur repeatedly, leading to more severe neuropathy. As yet, little is known about the possibility of drug target-specific medicine for such diseases. In the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS), myelin sheaths form as Schwann cells wrap individual axons. It is thought that the development of a drug promoting myelination by Schwann cells would provide effective therapy against peripheral nerve disorders: to test such treatment, genetically modified mice overexpressing the drug target molecules are needed. We previously identified an Arf6 activator, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1, as the signaling molecule controlling myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells; yet, the important issue of whether cytohesin-1 itself promotes myelin thickness in vivo has remained unclear. Herein, we show that, in mouse PNS nerves, Schwann cell-specific expression of wild-type cytohesin-1 exhibits enhanced myelin thickness. Downstream activation of Arf6 is also seen in these transgenic mice, revealing the involvement of the cytohesin-1 and Arf6 signaling unit in promoting myelination. These results suggest that cytohesin-1 may be a candidate for the basis of a therapy for peripheral neuropathies through its enhancement of myelin thickness. PMID:23636892

  7. Conduction block of mammalian myelinated nerve by local cooling to 15-30°C after a brief heating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaocun; Lyon, Timothy D; Kadow, Brian T; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Kang, Audry; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed at understanding thermal effects on nerve conduction and developing new methods to produce a reversible thermal block of axonal conduction in mammalian myelinated nerves. In 13 cats under α-chloralose anesthesia, conduction block of pudendal nerves (n = 20) by cooling (5-30°C) or heating (42-54°C) a small segment (9 mm) of the nerve was monitored by the urethral striated muscle contractions and increases in intraurethral pressure induced by intermittent (5 s on and 20 s off) electrical stimulation (50 Hz, 0.2 ms) of the nerve. Cold block was observed at 5-15°C while heat block occurred at 50-54°C. A complete cold block up to 10 min was fully reversible, but a complete heat block was only reversible when the heating duration was less than 1.3 ± 0.1 min. A brief (<1 min) reversible complete heat block at 50-54°C or 15 min of nonblock mild heating at 46-48°C significantly increased the cold block temperature to 15-30°C. The effect of heating on cold block fully reversed within ∼40 min. This study discovered a novel method to block mammalian myelinated nerves at 15-30°C, providing the possibility to develop an implantable device to block axonal conduction and treat many chronic disorders. The effect of heating on cold block is of considerable interest because it raises many basic scientific questions that may help reveal the mechanisms underlying cold or heat block of axonal conduction. PMID:26740534

  8. Visualization of nerve fibers and their relationship to peripheral nerve tumors by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Cage, Tene A; Yuh, Esther L; Hou, Stephanie W; Birk, Harjus; Simon, Neil G; Noss, Roger; Rao, Anuradha; Chin, Cynthia T; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The majority of growing and/or symptomatic peripheral nerve tumors are schwannomas and neurofibromas. They are almost always benign and can usually be resected while minimizing motor and sensory deficits if approached with the proper expertise and techniques. Intraoperative electrophysiological stimulation and recording techniques allow the surgeon to map the surface of the tumor in an effort to identify and thus avoid damaging functioning nerve fibers. Recently, MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have permitted the visualization of axons, because of their anisotropic properties, in peripheral nerves. The object of this study was to compare the distribution of nerve fibers as revealed by direct electrical stimulation with that seen on preoperative MR DTI. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with a peripheral nerve or nerve root tumor between March 2012 and January 2014. Diffusion tensor imaging and intraoperative data had been prospectively collected for patients with peripheral nerve tumors that were resected. Preoperative identification of the nerve fiber location in relation to the nerve tumor surface as seen on DTI studies was compared with the nerve fiber's intraoperative localization using electrophysiological stimulation and recordings. RESULTS In 23 patients eligible for study there was good correlation between nerve fiber location on DTI and its anatomical location seen intraoperatively. Diffusion tensor imaging demonstrated the relationship of nerve fibers relative to the tumor with 95.7% sensitivity, 66.7% specificity, 75% positive predictive value, and 93.8% negative predictive value. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative DTI techniques are useful in helping the peripheral nerve surgeon to both determine the risks involved in resecting a nerve tumor and plan the safest surgical approach. PMID:26323818

  9. Ex vivo and in vivo imaging of myelin fibers in mouse brain by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Huff, T. Brandon; Wang, Han-Wei; Wang, Haifeng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy was applied to image myelinated fibers in different regions of a mouse brain. The CARS signal from the CH2 symmetric stretching vibration allows label-free imaging of myelin sheath with 3D sub-micron resolution. Compared with two-photon excited fluorescence imaging with lipophilic dye labeling, CARS microscopy provides sharper contrast and avoids photobleaching. The CARS signal exhibits excitation polarization dependence which can be eliminated by reconstruction of two complementary images with perpendicular excitation polarizations. The capability of imaging myelinated fibers without exogenous labeling was used to map the whole brain white matter in brain slices and to analyze the microstructural anatomy of brain axons. Quantitative information about fiber volume%, myelin density, and fiber orientations was derived. Combining CARS with two-photon excited fluorescence allowed multimodal imaging of myelinated axons and other cells. Furthermore, in vivo CARS imaging on an upright microscope clearly identified fiber bundles in brain subcortex white matter. These advances open up new opportunities for the study of brain connectivity and neurological disorders. PMID:19030027

  10. Metanx alleviates multiple manifestations of peripheral neuropathy and increases intraepidermal nerve fiber density in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Shevalye, Hanna; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Dyukova, Elena; Lupachyk, Sergey; Obrosova, Irina G

    2012-08-01

    Metanx is a product containing L-methylfolate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, and methylcobalamin for management of endothelial dysfunction. Metanx ingredients counteract endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium and peripheral nerve. This study evaluates Metanx on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in ZDF rats, a model of type 2 diabetes. Metanx was administered to 15-week-old ZDF and ZDF lean rats at either 4.87 mg ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ day(-1) (a body weight-based equivalent of human dose) or 24.35 mg ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ day(-1) by oral gavage two times a day for 4 weeks. Both doses alleviated hind limb digital sensory, but not sciatic motor, nerve conduction slowing and thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia in the absence of any reduction of hyperglycemia. Low-dose Metanx increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density but did not prevent morphometric changes in distal tibial nerve myelinated fibers. Metanx treatment counteracted endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation, and methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end product, nitrotyrosine, and nitrite/nitrate accumulation in the peripheral nerve. In conclusion, Metanx, at a body weight-based equivalent of human dose, increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density and improved multiple parameters of peripheral nerve function in ZDF rats. Clinical studies are needed to determine if Metanx finds use in management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22751692

  11. Modulation of C-nociceptive Activities by Inputs from Myelinated Fibers.

    PubMed

    Wan-Ru, Duan; Yi-Kuan, Xie

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms of neuropathic pain caused by demyelination, a rapid-onset, completed but reversible demyelination of peripheral A-fibers and neuropathic pain behaviors in adult rats by single injection of cobra venom into the sciatic nerve, was created. Microfilament recording revealed that cobra venom selectively blocked A-fibers, but not C-fibers. Selective blockade of A-fibers may result from A-fiber demyelination at the site of venom injection as demonstrated by microscope examination. Neuropathic pain behaviors including inflammatory response appeared almost immediately after venom injection and lasted about 3 weeks. Electrophysiological studies indicated that venom injection induced loss of conduction in A-fibers, increased sensitivity of C-polymodal nociceptors to innocuous stimuli, and triggered spontaneous activity from peripheral and central terminals of C-fiber nociceptors. Neurogenic inflammatory responses were also observed in the affected skin via Evans blue extravasation experiments. Both antidromic C-fiber spontaneous activity and neurogenic inflammation were substantially decreased by continuous A-fiber threshold electric stimuli applied proximally to the venom injection site. The data suggest that normal activity of peripheral A-fibers may produce inhibitory modulation of C-polymodal nociceptors. Removal of inhibition to C-fiber polymodal nociceptors following demyelination of A-fibers may result in pain and neurogenic inflammation in the affected receptive field. PMID:26900061

  12. SPECIES SPECIFICITY OF GIANT NERVE FIBER CONDUCTION VELOCITY IN OLIGOCHAETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Giant nerve fiber conduction velocities were studied using noninvasive electrophysiological recording techniques in adults from 12 species of oligochaetes, representing five different families. Two separate and stereotyped all-or-none response patterns to tactile stimulation (cor...

  13. [Automated imaging of the optic nerve and optic nerve fibers is essential to daily clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2004-06-01

    Chronic open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optical neuropathy. Automated imaging of the optic disc and optic nerve fibers provides reliable analysis of the optic nerve as well as long-term follow-up of neuropathy patients. HRT, GDX-VCC, and OCT, which analyze the optic disc and optical fibers, provide indisputable assistance in improving screening techniques and the follow-up of progressive glaucoma. PMID:15319758

  14. Immunohistochemical Localization of Nerve Fibers in the Pseudocapsule of Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.; Zhu, L.; Huang, X.; Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    The pseudocapsule surrounding fibroids consists of compressed myometrium containing nerves and blood vessels that continue into adjacent myometrium. Oxytocin (OXT) is thought to affect wound healing after myomectomy. We determined the presence of OXT and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) immunoreactive nerve fibers in pseudocapsule compared to adjacent myometrium. Samples (N=106) of pseudocapsule and adjacent myometrium were collected from 57 women with uterine fibroids undergoing myomectomy, and stained with anti-OXT and PGP 9.5 antibodies to demonstrate the presence of nerve fibers. Nerve fibers in the pseudocapsule stained positively with OXT (89/106, 84.0%) and PGP 9.5 (94/106, 88.7%). The densities of nerve fibers staining with PGP 9.5 and OXT in the pseudocapsule were highest in the isthmus (23.68±22.45/mm2 and 43.35±40.74/mm2, respectively). There were no significant differences in the density of nerve fibers, stained with either OXT or PGP 9.5, between the pseudocapsule, and adjacent normal myometrium regardless of the fibroid location in the uterus (P>0.05). These results suggest that the pseudocapsule should avoid to be damaged during the myomectomy procedure. PMID:24998917

  15. Decreased Myelinated Fibers in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lin; Chao, Feng-Lei; Luo, Yan-min; Xiao, Qian; Gu, Heng-Wei; Jiang, Rong; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, is characterized by deficits in cognition and memory. Although amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is known to be the earliest pathological event that triggers subsequent neurodegeneration, how Aβ accumulation causes behavioral deficits remains incompletely understood. In this study, using the Morris water maze test, ELISA and stereological methods, we examined spatial learning and memory performance, the soluble Aβ concentration and the myelination of fibers in the hippocampus of 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-month-old Tg2576 AD model mice. Our results showed that spatial learning and memory performance was significantly impaired in the Tg2576 mice compared to the wild type (WT) controls and that the myelinated fiber length in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was markedly decreased from 0.33 ± 0.03 km in the WT controls to 0.17 ± 0.02 km in the Tg2576 mice at 10 months of age. However, the concentrations of soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 were significantly increased as early as 4-6 months of age. The decreased myelinated fiber length in the DG may contribute to the spatial learning and memory deficits of Tg2576 mice. Therefore, we suggest that the significant accumulation of soluble Aβ may serve as a preclinical biomarker for AD diagnosis and that protecting myelinated fibers may represent a novel strategy for delaying the progression of early-stage AD. PMID:26971933

  16. Four-month enriched environment prevents myelinated fiber loss in the white matter during normal aging of male rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu; Lu, Wei; Zhou, De-shan; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    White matter degenerates with normal aging and accordingly results in declines in multiple brain functions. Previous neuroimaging studies have implied that the white matter is plastic by experiences and contributory to the experience-dependent recovery of brain functions. However, it is not clear how and how far enriched environment (EE) plays a role in the white matter remodeling. Male rats exhibit earlier and severer age-related damages in the white matter and its myelinated fibers than female rats; therefore, in this current study, 24 middle-aged (14-month-old) and 24 old-aged (24-month-old) male SD rats were randomly assigned to an EE or standard environment (SE) for 4 months prior to Morris water maze tests. Five rats from each group were then randomly sampled for stereological assessment of the white matter. Results revealed that EE could somewhat induce improvement of spatial learning and significantly increase the white matter volume, the myelinated fiber volume and the myelinated fiber length during normal aging. The EE-induced improvement of spatial learning ability was significantly correlated with the EE-induced increase of the white matter and its myelinated fibers. We suggested that exposure to an EE could delay the progress of age-related changes in the white matter and the effect could extend to old age. PMID:24553809

  17. Bilirubin induces auditory neuropathy in neonatal guinea pigs via auditory nerve fiber damage.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hai-Bo; Shi, Hai-Bo; Wang, Jian; Ding, Da-Lian; Yu, Dong-Zhen; Chen, Zheng-Nong; Li, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Wei-Tian; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2012-11-01

    Bilirubin can cause temporary or permanent sensorineural deafness in newborn babies with hyperbilirubinemia. However, the underlying targets and physiological effects of bilirubin-induced damage in the peripheral auditory system are unclear. Using cochlear functional assays and electron microscopy imaging of the inner ear in neonatal guinea pigs, we show here that bilirubin exposure resulted in threshold elevation in both compound action potential (CAP) and auditory brainstem response (ABR), which was apparent at 1 hr and peaked 8 hr after drug administration. The threshold elevation was associated with delayed wave latencies and elongated interwave intervals in ABR and CAP. At 72 hr postinjection, these measures returned to control levels, except for the CAP amplitude. Cochlear microphonics remained unchanged during the experiment. Morphological abnormalities were consistent with the electrophysiological dysfunction, revealing fewer auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in the basal turn, myelin sheath lesions of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) and ANFs, and loss of type 1 afferent endings beneath inner hair cells (IHCs) without loss of hair cells at 8 hr posttreatment. Similar to the electrophysiological findings, morphological changes were mostly reversed 10 days after treatment, except for the ANF reduction in the basal turn. These results suggest that hyperbilirubinemia in neonatal guinea pigs impaired auditory peripheral neuromechanisms that targeted mainly the IHC synapses and the myelin sheath of SGNs and their fibers. Our observations indicate a potential connection between hyperbilirubinemia and auditory neuropathy. PMID:22847875

  18. Prolonged myelination in human neocortical evolution

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel J.; Duka, Tetyana; Stimpson, Cheryl D.; Schapiro, Steven J.; Baze, Wallace B.; McArthur, Mark J.; Fobbs, Archibald J.; Sousa, André M. M.; Šestan, Nenad; Wildman, Derek E.; Lipovich, Leonard; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2012-01-01

    Nerve myelination facilitates saltatory action potential conduction and exhibits spatiotemporal variation during development associated with the acquisition of behavioral and cognitive maturity. Although human cognitive development is unique, it is not known whether the ontogenetic progression of myelination in the human neocortex is evolutionarily exceptional. In this study, we quantified myelinated axon fiber length density and the expression of myelin-related proteins throughout postnatal life in the somatosensory (areas 3b/3a/1/2), motor (area 4), frontopolar (prefrontal area 10), and visual (areas 17/18) neocortex of chimpanzees (N = 20) and humans (N = 33). Our examination revealed that neocortical myelination is developmentally protracted in humans compared with chimpanzees. In chimpanzees, the density of myelinated axons increased steadily until adult-like levels were achieved at approximately the time of sexual maturity. In contrast, humans displayed slower myelination during childhood, characterized by a delayed period of maturation that extended beyond late adolescence. This comparative research contributes evidence crucial to understanding the evolution of human cognition and behavior, which arises from the unfolding of nervous system development within the context of an enriched cultural environment. Perturbations of normal developmental processes and the decreased expression of myelin-related molecules have been related to psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Thus, these species differences suggest that the human-specific shift in the timing of cortical maturation during adolescence may have implications for vulnerability to certain psychiatric disorders. PMID:23012402

  19. Prolonged myelination in human neocortical evolution.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel J; Duka, Tetyana; Stimpson, Cheryl D; Schapiro, Steven J; Baze, Wallace B; McArthur, Mark J; Fobbs, Archibald J; Sousa, André M M; Sestan, Nenad; Wildman, Derek E; Lipovich, Leonard; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2012-10-01

    Nerve myelination facilitates saltatory action potential conduction and exhibits spatiotemporal variation during development associated with the acquisition of behavioral and cognitive maturity. Although human cognitive development is unique, it is not known whether the ontogenetic progression of myelination in the human neocortex is evolutionarily exceptional. In this study, we quantified myelinated axon fiber length density and the expression of myelin-related proteins throughout postnatal life in the somatosensory (areas 3b/3a/1/2), motor (area 4), frontopolar (prefrontal area 10), and visual (areas 17/18) neocortex of chimpanzees (N = 20) and humans (N = 33). Our examination revealed that neocortical myelination is developmentally protracted in humans compared with chimpanzees. In chimpanzees, the density of myelinated axons increased steadily until adult-like levels were achieved at approximately the time of sexual maturity. In contrast, humans displayed slower myelination during childhood, characterized by a delayed period of maturation that extended beyond late adolescence. This comparative research contributes evidence crucial to understanding the evolution of human cognition and behavior, which arises from the unfolding of nervous system development within the context of an enriched cultural environment. Perturbations of normal developmental processes and the decreased expression of myelin-related molecules have been related to psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Thus, these species differences suggest that the human-specific shift in the timing of cortical maturation during adolescence may have implications for vulnerability to certain psychiatric disorders. PMID:23012402

  20. Microsphere embolization of nerve capillaries and fiber degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Nukada, H.; Dyck, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Polystyrene microspheres, the size chosen to plug capillaries and precapillaries, were injected into the arterial supply of rat sciatic nerves. They produced widespread segmental occlusion of capillaries in lower limb nerves. The clinical and pathologic effect was dose-related. One million microspheres produced selective capillary occlusion but no nerve fiber degeneration; approximately 6 million microspheres also produced selective capillary occlusion and associated foot and leg weakness, sensory loss, and fiber degeneration, beginning in a central core of the distal sciatic nerve; 30 million microspheres caused both capillary and arterial occlusion and a greater neuropathologic deficit. From these observations it is inferred that 1) occlusion of isolated precapillaries and capillaries does not produce ischemic fiber degeneration; 2) occlusion of many microvessels results in central fascicular fiber degeneration, indicating that these cores are watershed regions of poor perfusion; and 3) stereotyped pathologic alterations of nerve fibers and Schwann cells are related to dose, anatomic site, and time elapsed since injection. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:6326580

  1. What Is the Optimal Value of the g-Ratio for Myelinated Fibers in the Rat CNS? A Theoretical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Background The biological process underlying axonal myelination is complex and often prone to injury and disease. The ratio of the inner axonal diameter to the total outer diameter or g-ratio is widely utilized as a functional and structural index of optimal axonal myelination. Based on the speed of fiber conduction, Rushton was the first to derive a theoretical estimate of the optimal g-ratio of 0.6 [1]. This theoretical limit nicely explains the experimental data for myelinated axons obtained for some peripheral fibers but appears significantly lower than that found for CNS fibers. This is, however, hardly surprising given that in the CNS, axonal myelination must achieve multiple goals including reducing conduction delays, promoting conduction fidelity, lowering energy costs, and saving space. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we explore the notion that a balanced set-point can be achieved at a functional level as the micro-structure of individual axons becomes optimized, particularly for the central system where axons tend to be smaller and their myelin sheath thinner. We used an intuitive yet novel theoretical approach based on the fundamental biophysical properties describing axonal structure and function to show that an optimal g-ratio can be defined for the central nervous system (≈0.77). Furthermore, by reducing the influence of volume constraints on structural design by about 40%, this approach can also predict the g-ratio observed in some peripheral fibers (≈0.6). Conclusions/Significance These results support the notion of optimization theory in nervous system design and construction and may also help explain why the central and peripheral systems have evolved different g-ratios as a result of volume constraints. PMID:19915661

  2. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF. PMID:26928128

  3. Epidermal Nerve Fiber Quantification in the Assessment of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beiswenger, Kristina K.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Assessment of cutaneous innervation in skin biopsies is emerging as a valuable means of both diagnosing and staging diabetic neuropathy. Immunolabeling, using antibodies to neuronal proteins such as protein gene product 9.5, allows for the visualization and quantification of intraepidermal nerve fibers. Multiple studies have shown reductions in intraepidermal nerve fiber density in skin biopsies from patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. More recent studies have focused on correlating these changes with other measures of diabetic neuropathy. A loss of epidermal innervation similar to that observed in diabetic patients has been observed in rodent models of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and several therapeutics have been reported to prevent reductions in intraepidermal nerve fiber density in these models. This review discusses the current literature describing diabetes-induced changes in cutaneous innervation in both human and animal models of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18384843

  4. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  5. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  6. Molecular characterization of myelin protein zero in Xenopus laevis peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bo; Luo, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Cheng; Priest, Christina Marie; Chan, Shiu-Yung; O'Connor, Peter B.; Kirschner, Daniel A.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2007-12-01

    Myelin protein zero (P0), a glycosylated single-pass transmembrane protein, is essential in the formation and maintenance of peripheral nervous system (PNS) compact myelin. P0 in Xenopus (xP0) exists primarily as a dimeric form that remains stable after various physical and chemical treatments. In exploring the nature of the interactions underlying the dimer stability, we found that xP0 dimer dissociated into monomer during continuous elution gel electrophoresis and conventional SDS-PAGE, indicating that the dimer is stabilized by non-covalent interactions. Furthermore, as some of the gel-purified monomer re-associated into dimer on SDS-PAGE gels, there is likely a dynamic equilibrium between xP0 dimer and monomer in vivo. Because the carbohydrate and fatty acyl moieties may be crucial for the adhesion role of P0, we used sensitive mass spectrometry approaches to elucidate the detailed N-glycosylation and S-acylation profiles of xP0. Asn92 was determined to be the single, fully-occupied glycosylation site of xP0, and a total of 12 glycans was detected that exhibited new structural features compared with those observed from P0 in other species: (1) the neutral glycans were composed mainly of high mannose and hybrid types; (2) 5 of 12 were acidic glycans, among which three were sialylated and the other two were sulfated; (3) none of the glycans had core fucosylation; and (4) no glucuronic acid, hence no HNK-1 epitope, was detected. The drastically different carbohydrate structures observed here support the concept of the species-specific variation in N-glycosylation of P0. Cys152 was found to be acylated with stearoyl (C18:0), whereas palmitoyl (C16:0) is the corresponding predominant fatty acyl group on P0 from higher vertebrates. We propose that the unique glycosylation and acylation patterns of Xenopus P0 may underlie its unusual dimerization behavior. Our results should shed light on the understanding of the phylogenetic development of P0's adhesion role in PNS

  7. Extracting the inclination angle of nerve fibers within the human brain with 3D-PLI independent of system properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckfort, Julia; Wiese, Hendrik; Dohmen, Melanie; Grässel, David; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2013-09-01

    The neuroimaging technique 3D-polarized light imaging (3D-PLI) has opened up new avenues to study the complex nerve fiber architecture of the human brain at sub-millimeter spatial resolution. This polarimetry technique is applicable to histological sections of postmortem brains utilizing the birefringence of nerve fibers caused by the regular arrangement of lipids and proteins in the myelin sheaths surrounding axons. 3D-PLI provides a three-dimensional description of the anatomical wiring scheme defined by the in-section direction angle and the out-of-section inclination angle. To date, 3D-PLI is the only available method that allows bridging the microscopic and the macroscopic description of the fiber architecture of the human brain. Here we introduce a new approach to retrieve the inclination angle of the fibers independently of the properties of the used polarimeters. This is relevant because the image resolution and the signal transmission inuence the measured birefringent signal (retardation) significantly. The image resolution was determined using the USAF- 1951 testchart applying the Rayleigh criterion. The signal transmission was measured by elliptical polarizers applying the Michelson contrast and histological slices of the optic tract of a postmortem brain. Based on these results, a modified retardation-inclination transfer function was proposed to extract the fiber inclination. The comparison of the actual and the inclination angles calculated with the theoretically proposed and the modified transfer function revealed a significant improvement in the extraction of the fiber inclinations.

  8. Parallel Changes in Structural and Functional Measures of Optic Nerve Myelination after Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Walt, Anneke; Kolbe, Scott; Mitchell, Peter; Wang, Yejun; Butzkueven, Helmut; Egan, Gary; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Klistorner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Visual evoked potential (VEP) latency prolongation and optic nerve lesion length after acute optic neuritis (ON) corresponds to the degree of demyelination, while subsequent recovery of latency may represent optic nerve remyelination. We aimed to investigate the relationship between multifocal VEP (mfVEP) latency and optic nerve lesion length after acute ON. Methods Thirty acute ON patients were studied at 1,3,6 and 12 months using mfVEP and at 1 and 12 months with optic nerve MRI. LogMAR and low contrast visual acuity were documented. By one month, the mfVEP amplitude had recovered sufficiently for latency to be measured in 23 (76.7%) patients with seven patients having no recordable mfVEP in more than 66% of segments in at least one test. Only data from these 23 patients was analysed further. Results Both latency and lesion length showed significant recovery during the follow-up period. Lesion length and mfVEP latency were highly correlated at 1 (r = 0.94, p = <0.0001) and 12 months (r = 0.75, p < 0.001). Both measures demonstrated a similar trend of recovery. Speed of latency recovery was faster in the early follow-up period while lesion length shortening remained relatively constant. At 1 month, latency delay was worse by 1.76ms for additional 1mm of lesion length while at 12 months, 1mm of lesion length accounted for 1.94ms of latency delay. Conclusion A strong association between two putative measures of demyelination in early and chronic ON was found. Parallel recovery of both measures could reflect optic nerve remyelination. PMID:26020925

  9. Recent advances toward a fiber optic sensor for nerve agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.; Mukamal, Harold; Ruiz, David; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2008-04-01

    We report advances made on the development of a fiber optic nerve agent sensor having its entire length as the sensing element. Upon exposure to sarin gas or its simulant, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, the cladding changes color resulting in an alteration of the light intensity throughput. The optical fiber is multimode and consists of a fused-silica core and a nerve agent sensitive cladding. The absorption characteristics of the cladding affect the fiber's spectral attenuation and limit the length of light guiding fiber that can be deployed continuously. The absorption of the cladding is also dependent on the sensor formulation, which in turn influences the sensitivity of the fiber. In this paper, data related to the trade-off of sensitivity, spectral attenuation, and length of fiber challenged will be reported. The fiber is mass produced using a conventional fiber optic draw tower. This technology could be used to protect human resources and buildings from dangerous chemical attacks, particularly when large areas or perimeters must be covered. It may also be used passively to determine how well such areas have been decontaminated.

  10. The evolution of vertebrate and invertebrate myelin: a theoretical computational study.

    PubMed

    Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2015-06-01

    Multilayered, lipid-rich myelin increases nerve impulse conduction velocity, contributes to compact nervous systems, and reduces metabolic costs of neural activity. Based on the hypothesis that increased impulse conduction velocity provides a selective advantage that drives the evolution of myelin, we simulated a sequence of plausible intermediate stages of myelin evolution, each of which providing an enhancement of conduction speed. We started with the expansion of insulating glial coverage, which led first to a single layer of myelin surrounding the axon and then to multiple myelin wraps with well-organized nodes. The myelinated fiber was modeled at three levels of complexity as the hypothesized evolutionary progression became more quantitatively exacting: 1) representing the fiber as a mathematically-tractable uniform active cylinder with the effect of myelination approximated by changing its specific capacitance (C(m)); 2) representing it as a chain of simple, cable-model compartments having alternating nodal and internodal parameters subject to optimization, and 3) representing it in a double cable model with the axon and myelin sheath treated separately. Conduction velocity was optimized at each stage. To maintain optimal conduction velocities, increased myelin coverage of axonal surface must be accompanied by an increase in channel density at the evolving nodes, but along with increases in myelin thickness, a reduction in overall average channel density must occur. Leakage under the myelin sheath becomes more of a problem with smaller fiber diameters, which may help explain the tendency for myelin to occur preferentially in larger nerve fibers in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25832903

  11. Virtual Instrumentation for a Fiber-Optics-Based Artificial Nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Kyaw, Thet Mon; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A LabView-based computer interface for fiber-optic artificial nerves has been devised as a Masters thesis project. This project involves the use of outputs from wavelength multiplexed optical fiber sensors (artificial nerves), which are capable of producing dense optical data outputs for physical measurements. The potential advantages of using optical fiber sensors for sensory function restoration is the fact that well defined WDM-modulated signals can be transmitted to and from the sensing region allowing networked units to replace low-level nerve functions for persons desirous of "intelligent artificial limbs." Various FO sensors can be designed with high sensitivity and the ability to be interfaced with a wide range of devices including miniature shielded electrical conversion units. Our Virtual Instrument (VI) interface software package was developed using LabView's "Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench" package. The virtual instrument has been configured to arrange and encode the data to develop an intelligent response in the form of encoded digitized signal outputs. The architectural layout of our nervous system is such that different touch stimuli from different artificial fiber-optic nerve points correspond to gratings of a distinct resonant wavelength and physical location along the optical fiber. Thus, when an automated, tunable diode laser sends scans, the wavelength spectrum of the artificial nerve, it triggers responses that are encoded with different touch stimuli by way wavelength shifts in the reflected Bragg resonances. The reflected light is detected and a resulting analog signal is fed into ADC1 board and DAQ card. Finally, the software has been written such that the experimenter is able to set the response range during data acquisition.

  12. Disrupted axon-glia interactions at the paranode in myelinated nerves cause axonal degeneration and neuronal cell death in the aged Caspr mutant mouse shambling.

    PubMed

    Takagishi, Yoshiko; Katanosaka, Kimiaki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Murata, Yoshiharu

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that axonal degeneration is a disease mechanism in various neurodegenerative diseases and that the paranodes at the nodes of Ranvier may be the initial site of pathogenesis. We investigated the pathophysiology of the disease process in the central and peripheral nervous systems of a Caspr mutant mouse, shambling (shm), which is affected by disrupted paranodal structures and impaired nerve conduction of myelinated nerves. The shm mice manifest a progressive neurological phenotype as mice age. We found extensive axonal degeneration and a loss of neurons in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system in aged shm mice. Axonal alteration of myelinated nerves was defined by abnormal distribution and expression of neurofilaments and derangements in the status of phosphorylated and non/de-phosphorylated neurofilaments. Autophagy-related structures were also accumulated in degenerated axons and neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that disrupted axon-glia interactions at the paranode cause the cytoskeletal alteration in myelinated axons leading to neuronal cell death, and the process involves detrimental autophagy and aging as factors that promote the pathogenesis. PMID:27255813

  13. Comparative analysis of numerical estimation methods of epithelial nerve fibers using tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Hilliges, M; Johansson, O

    1999-01-01

    The proper assessment of neuron numbers in the nervous system during physiological and pathological conditions, as well as following various treatments, has always been an important part of neuroscience. The present paper evaluates three methods for numerical estimates of nerves in epithelium: I) unbiased nerve fiber profile and nerve fiber fragment estimation methods, II) the traditional method of counting whole nerve fibers, and III) the nerve fiber estimation method. In addition, an unbiased nerve length estimation method was evaluated. Of these four methods, the nerve length per volume method was theoretically optimal, but more time-consuming than the others. The numbers obtained with the methods of nerve fiber profile, nerve fragment and nerve fiber estimation are dependent on the thickness of the epithelium and the sections as well as certain shape factors of the counted fiber. However for those, the actual counting can readily be performed in the microscope and is consequently quick and relatively inexpensive. The statistical analysis showed a very good correlation (R > 0.96) between the three numerical methods, meaning that basically any method could be used. However, dependent on theoretical and practical considerations and the correlation statistics, it may be concluded that the nerve fiber profile or fragment estimation methods should be employed if differences in epithelial and section thickness and the nerve fibers shape factors can be controlled. Such drawbacks are not inherent in the nerve length estimation method and, thus, it can generally be applied. PMID:10197065

  14. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

    PubMed

    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve. PMID:2719524

  15. Significant Differences in Sympathetic Nerve Fiber Density Among the Facial Skin Nerves: A Histologic Study Using Human Cadaveric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Tadatoshi; Cho, Kwang Ho; Jang, Hyung Suk; Murakami, Gen; Yamamoto, Masahito; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Sympathetic nerve fibers in the skin nerves are connected with vasomotor, thermoregulatory, sensory input modulatory, and immunologic events; however, to our knowledge, no histological information is available for skin nerves in the human face. Using specimens from 17 donated cadavers (mean age, 86 years), we measured a sectional area of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive fibers in (1) the frontal nerve (V1), (2) the infraorbital nerve (V2), (3) the mental nerve (V3), (4) the greater auricular nerve (C2), (5) the auriculotemporal nerve (ATN), and (6) the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve (VII). The V1, V2, and V3 were obtained at their entrances to the subcutaneous tissue from the bony canal or notch. The V1, C2, ATN, and/or VII usually contained abundant TH-positive fibers (almost 3%-8% of the nerve sectional area), whereas the V2 and V3 consistently carried few TH-positive fibers (<1%). The difference between these two groups was quite significant (P < 0.001). Thus, from the superior cervical ganglion, the sympathetic nerve fibers reached the forehead through the frontal nerve trunk, whereas artery-bounded fibers came to the cheek, nose, and mouth. The sympathetic palsy caused by trigeminal nerve involvement is mainly characterized by the symptoms seen in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, such as in Horner's syndrome. It suggests that the forehead and the other facial areas are representative parts of those different sympathetic innervations that could be useful for evaluating the sympathetic function of the face in various diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1054-1059, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072367

  16. Collateral sprouting of uninjured primary afferent A-fibers into the superficial dorsal horn of the adult rat spinal cord after topical capsaicin treatment to the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Doubell, T P; Coggeshall, R E; Woolf, C J

    1996-08-15

    That terminals of uninjured primary sensory neurons terminating in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord can collaterally sprout was first suggested by Liu and Chambers (1958), but this has since been disputed. Recently, horseradish peroxidase conjugated to the B subunit of cholera toxin (B-HRP) and intracellular HRP injections have shown that sciatic nerve section or crush produces a long-lasting rearrangement in the organization of primary afferent central terminals, with A-fibers sprouting into lamina II, a region that normally receives only C-fiber input (Woolf et al., 1992). The mechanism of this A-fiber sprouting has been thought to involve injury-induced C-fiber transganglionic degeneration combined with myelinated A-fibers being conditioned into a regenerative growth state. In this study, we ask whether C-fiber degeneration and A-fiber conditioning are both necessary for the sprouting of A-fibers into lamina II. Local application of the C-fiber-specific neurotoxin capsaicin to the sciatic nerve has previously been shown to result in C-fiber damage and degenerative atrophy in lamina II. We have used B-HRP to transganglionically label A-fiber central terminals and have shown that 2 weeks after topical capsaicin treatment to the sciatic nerve, the pattern of B-HRP staining in the dorsal horn is indistinguishable from that seen after axotomy, with lamina II displaying novel staining in the identical region containing capsaicin-treated C-fiber central terminals. These results suggest that after C-fiber injury, uninjured A-fiber central terminals can collaterally sprout into lamina II of the dorsal horn. This phenomenon may help to explain the pain associated with C-fiber neuropathy. PMID:8756447

  17. Electrochemical Skin Conductance Correlates with Skin Nerve Fiber Density

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) using reverse iontophoresis and chronoamperometry has been used to evaluate abnormal function of small fibers. How ESC correlates with loss of small fibers in skin is unclear. Methods: This was a prospective, blinded study. The primary outcome measure was the correlation between ESC at the feet and results of skin biopsies including epidermal nerve fiber density (ENFD) and sweat gland nerve fiber density (SGNFD) at the distal leg. ESC, ENFD, and SGNFD data were normalized by adjusting for weight. The secondary outcome measures were the correlation between ESC and the following variables: quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) and symptom scales (neuropathy, pain and autonomic). Results: Eighty-one patients (mean ± sd): age = 53.3 ± 17.3, men/women = 25/56 were enrolled in the study. ESC was reduced in subjects with abnormally low ENFD (ENFD normal/abnormal, ESC = 1.17 ± 0.27/0.87 ± 0.34 μSiemens/kg, p < 0.0008) and abnormally low SGNFD (SGNFD normal/abnormal ESC = 1.09 ± 0.34/0.78 ± 0.3 μSiemens/kg, p < 0.0003). ESC correlated with ENFD (ρ = 0.73, p = 0.0001) and SGNFD (ρ = 0.64, p = 0.0001). ESC did not correlate with symptom scales. Conclusion: ESC is diminished in subjects who have a reduced number of small fibers in the skin and the ESC reduction is proportional to ENFD and SGNFD. ESC can be useful in detecting loss of small nerve fibers. PMID:27605912

  18. Synthesis of myelin, particulate, and soluble protein subfractions of rat sciatic nerve during the early stage of Wallerian degeneration: a comparison of metabolic studies using double and single isotope methods and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.E.; Peterson, R.G.; Wiggins, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    The recovery, electrophoretic composition and synthesis of the myelin, particulate protein and soluble protein subfractions of rat sciatic nerve were compared in normal, sham-operated, and degenerating rat sciatic nerve at one, three and five days after neurotomy. Both single and double isotope methods were used to measure changes in synthesis in vitro and double isotope methods were used in vivo. The wet weights of nerves undergoing Wallerian degeneration for 5 days increased by 40 percent compared to normal and sham-operated nerves. The recovery, specific radioactivity, and synthesis of the myelin was reduced. The effect on myelin protein synthesis was similar in vitro and in vivo. The myelin loss was relatively constant in amount (30-40 microgram) regardless of differences in nerve sizes of young and old rats, consequently the percentage of myelin loss was inversely proportional to nerve size. The recovery of particulate protein increased, its rate of synthesis remained unchanged, and accordingly the specific radioactivity was decreased. The recovery, specific radioactivity, and the rate of synthesis of the soluble protein fraction were all elevated. The protein composition of the three fractions, as analyzed qualitatively by polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis, remained essentially unchanged through five days of degeneration. With regard to comparisons of the single and double isotope methods, results shows that the latter are more ideally suited to measuring changes in synthesis during the non-steady state conditions that are characteristics of rapid degeneration.

  19. Cortical Responses to Aδ-Fiber Stimulation: Magnetoencephalographic Recordings in a Subject Lacking Large Myelinated Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Håkan; Cole, Jonathan; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    Controversy persists over the role of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in processing small-fiber peripheral afferent input. We therefore examined subject I.W, who, due to sensory neuronopathy syndrome, has no large-fiber afferents below C3 level. Cortical evoked responses were recorded with a whole-scalp neuromagnetometer to high-intensity electrical stimulation of the distal right radial, median, and tibial nerves and skin over the forearm and mechanical stimulation of (neurologically intact) lip. The responses to electrical stimulation in the Aβ-denervated limbs peaked at 110–140 ms in contralateral SI and at 140–220 ms in contralateral secondary somatosensory cortex (SII), consistent with Aδ-mediated input. I.W. was able to localize pin-prick stimuli with 4 cm accuracy. Responses to laser stimuli on the radial dorsum of the hand peaked in contralateral SII cortex at 215 ms, also compatible with Aδ-mediated input. These results support the role of the SI cortex in processing the sensory discriminative aspects of Aδ-mediated input. PMID:19959562

  20. Tissue engineering the retinal ganglion cell nerve fiber layer.

    PubMed

    Kador, Karl E; Montero, Ramon B; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Hertz, Jonathan; Zindell, Allison N; Valenzuela, Daniel A; Uddin, Mohammed S; Lavik, Erin B; Muller, Kenneth J; Andreopoulos, Fotios M; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2013-06-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, affect millions of people worldwide and ultimately lead to retinal cell death and blindness. Cell transplantation therapies for photoreceptors demonstrate integration and restoration of function, but transplantation into the ganglion cell layer is more complex, requiring guidance of axons from transplanted cells to the optic nerve head in order to reach targets in the brain. Here we create a biodegradable electrospun (ES) scaffold designed to direct the growth of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons radially, mimicking axon orientation in the retina. Using this scaffold we observed an increase in RGC survival and no significant change in their electrophysiological properties. When analyzed for alignment, 81% of RGCs were observed to project axons radially along the scaffold fibers, with no difference in alignment compared to the nerve fiber layer of retinal explants. When transplanted onto retinal explants, RGCs on ES scaffolds followed the radial pattern of the host retinal nerve fibers, whereas RGCs transplanted directly grew axons in a random pattern. Thus, the use of this scaffold as a cell delivery device represents a significant step towards the use of cell transplant therapies for the treatment of glaucoma and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23489919

  1. Tissue Engineering the Retinal Ganglion Cell Nerve Fiber Layer

    PubMed Central

    Kador, Karl E.; Montero, Ramon B.; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Hertz, Jonathan; Zindell, Allison N.; Valenzuela, Daniel A.; Uddin, Mohammed S.; Lavik, Erin B.; Muller, Kenneth J.; Andreopoulos, Fotios M.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, affect millions of people worldwide and ultimately lead to retinal cell death and blindness. Cell transplantation therapies for photoreceptors demonstrate integration and restoration of function, but transplantation into the ganglion cell layer is more complex, requiring guidance of axons from transplanted cells to the optic nerve head in order to reach targets in the brain. Here we create a biodegradable electrospun (ES) scaffold designed to direct the growth of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons radially, mimicking axon orientation in the retina. Using this scaffold we observed an increase in RGC survival and no significant change in their electrophysiological properties. When analyzed for alignment, 81% of RGCs were observed to project axons radially along the scaffold fibers, with no difference in alignment compared to the nerve fiber layer of retinal explants. When transplanted onto retinal explants, RGCs on ES scaffolds followed the radial pattern of the host retinal nerve fibers, whereas RGCs transplanted directly grew axons in a random pattern. Thus, the use of this scaffold as a cell delivery device represents a significant step towards the use of cell transplant therapies for the treatment of glaucoma and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23489919

  2. Fbxw7 Limits Myelination by Inhibiting mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Christina A.; Ravanelli, Andrew M.; Cooper, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    An important characteristic of vertebrate CNS development is the formation of specific amounts of insulating myelin membrane on axons. CNS myelin is produced by oligodendrocytes, glial cells that extend multiple membrane processes to wrap multiple axons. Recent data have shown that signaling mediated by the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) serine/threonine kinase promotes myelination, but factors that regulate mTOR activity for myelination remain poorly defined. Through a forward genetic screen in zebrafish, we discovered that mutation of fbxw7, which encodes the substrate recognition subunit of a SCF ubiquitin ligase that targets proteins for degradation, causes hypermyelination. Among known Fbxw7 targets is mTOR. Here, we provide evidence that mTOR signaling activity is elevated in oligodendrocyte lineage cells of fbxw7 mutant zebrafish larvae. Both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of mTOR function suppressed the excess myelin gene expression resulting from loss of Fbxw7 function, indicating that mTOR is a functionally relevant target of Fbxw7 in oligodendrocytes. fbxw7 mutant larvae wrapped axons with more myelin membrane than wild-type larvae and oligodendrocyte-specific expression of dominant-negative Fbxw7 produced longer myelin sheaths. Our data indicate that Fbxw7 limits the myelin-promoting activity of mTOR, thereby serving as an important brake on developmental myelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelin, a specialized, proteolipid-rich membrane that ensheaths and insulates nerve fibers, facilitates the rapid conduction of electrical impulses over long distances. Abnormalities in myelin formation or maintenance result in intellectual and motor disabilities, raising a need for therapeutic strategies designed to promote myelination. The mTOR kinase is a powerful driver of myelination, but the mechanisms that regulate mTOR function in myelination are not well understood. Our studies reveal that Fbxw7, a subunit of a ubiquitin ligase that targets

  3. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yogi A.

    2015-01-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5–70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1–3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function. PMID:25878155

  4. The diameters and number of nerve fibers in spinal nerve roots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, YongTao; Zhou, XiaoJi; Ma, Jun; Ge, YingBin; Cao, Xiaojian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anatomical and histological features of spinal nerve roots and provide base data for neuroanastomosis therapy for paraplegia. Methods Spinal nerve roots from C1 to S5 were exposed on six adult cadavers. The diameter and the number of nerve fibers of each nerve root were measured, respectively, with a caliper and image analysis software. Results As for ventral roots, the diameter of C5 (2.50 ± 0.55 mm) was the largest in cervical segments. In thoracic and lumbosacral segments, the diameter gradually increased from T11 to S1 and then decreased from S1 to S5 except L3. S1 (1.43 ± 0.16 mm) was the thickest root and S5 (0.14 ± 0.02 mm) was the thinnest one. As for dorsal roots, the diameter of C7 (4.61 ± 0.87 mm) was the largest in cervical segments. From T11 to S1, the diameter increased and then decreased gradually from S1 to S5. The diameter of dorsal roots from T1 to S5 was largest at S1 (2.95 ± 0.57 mm) and smallest at S5 (0.27 ± 0.13 mm), respectively. C7 (8467 ± 1019), T12 (6538 ± 892), L3 (9169 ± 1160), and S1 (8253 ± 1419) ventral roots contained the most nerve fibers in cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral segments, respectively. Similarly, C7 (39 653 ± 8458), T1 (26 507 ± 7617), L5 (34 455 ± 2740), and S1 (41 543 ± 3036) dorsal roots, respectively, contained the most nerve fibers in their corresponding segments. Conclusion The findings in the current study provided the imperative data and may be valuable for spinal nerve root microanastomosis surgery in the paraplegic patients. PMID:24605949

  5. Galactosphingolipids and axono-glial interaction in myelin of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bosio, A; Büssow, H; Adam, J; Stoffel, W

    1998-05-01

    The myelin of central and peripheral nervous system of UDP-galactose-ceramide galactosyltransferase deficient mice (cgt-/-) is completely depleted of its major lipid constituents, galactocerebrosides and sulfatides. The deficiency of these glycolipids affects the biophysical properties of the myelin sheath and causes the loss of the rapid saltatory conduction velocity of myelinated axons. With the onset of myelination, null mutant cgt-/- mice develop fatal neurological defects. CNS and PNS analysis of cgt-/- mice revealed (1) hypomyelination of axons of the spinal cord and optic nerves, but no apoptosis of oligodendrocytes, (2) redundant myelin in younger mice leading to vacuolated nerve fibers in cgt-/- mice, (3) the occurrence of multiple myelinated CNS axons, and (4) severely distorted lateral loops in CNS paranodes. The loss of saltatory conduction is not associated with a randomization of voltage-gated sodium channels in the axolemma of PNS fibers. We conclude that cerebrosides (GalC) and sulfatides (sGalC) play a major role in CNS axono-glial interaction. A close axono-glial contact is not a prerequisite for the spiraling and compaction process of myelin. Axonal sodium channels remain clustered at the nodes of Ranvier independent of the change in the physical properties of myelin membrane devoid of galactosphingolipids. Increased intracellular concentrations of free ceramides do not trigger apoptosis of oligodendrocytes. PMID:9560463

  6. Membrane interactions in nerve myelin. I. Determination of surface charge from effects of pH and ionic strength on period.

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, H.; Kirschner, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    We have used x-ray diffraction to study the interactions between myelin membranes in the sciatic nerve (PNS) and optic nerve (CNS) as a function of pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-0.18). The period of myelin was found to change in a systematic manner with pH and ionic strength. PNS periods ranged from 165 to 250 A or more, while CNS periods ranged from 150 to 230 A. The native periods were observed only near physiological ionic strength at neutral or alkaline pH. The smallest periods were observed in the pH range 2.5-4 for PNS myelin and pH 2.5-5 for CNS myelin. The minimum period was also observed for PNS myelin after prolonged incubation in distilled water. At pH 4, within these acidic pH ranges, myelin period increased slightly with ionic strength; however, above these ranges, the period increased with pH and decreased with ionic strength. Electron density profiles calculated at different pH and ionic strength showed that the major structural alteration underlying the changes in period was in the width of the aqueous space at the extracellular apposition of membranes; the width of the cytoplasmic space was virtually constant. Assuming that the equilibrium myelin periods are determined by a balance of nonspecific forces/i.e., the electrostatic repulsion force and the van der Walls attractive force, as well as the short-range repulsion force (hydration force, or steric stabilization), then values in the period-dependency curve can be used to define the isoelectric pH and exclusion length of the membrane. The exclusion length, which is related to the minimum period at isoelectric pH, was used to calculate the electrostatic repulsion force given the other forces. The electrostatic repulsion was then used to calculate the surface potential, which in turn was used to calculate the surface charge density (at different pH and ionic strength). We found the negative surface charge increases with pH at constant ionic strength and with ionic strength at constant pH. We

  7. Sex differences in morphometric aspects of the peripheral nerves and related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Shogo; Inoue, Yuriko; Itoh, Masahiro; Otsuka, Naruhito

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The elucidation of the relationship between the morphology of the peripheral nerves and the diseases would be valuable in developing new medical treatments on the assumption that characteristics of the peripheral nerves in females are different from those in males. METHODS: We used 13 kinds of the peripheral nerve. The materials were obtained from 10 Japanese female and male cadavers. We performed a morphometric analysis of nerve fibers. We estimated the total number of myelinated axons, and calculated the average transverse area and average circularity ratio of myelinated axons in the peripheral nerves. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in the total number, average transverse area, or average circularity ratio of myelinated axons between the female and male specimens except for the total number of myelinated axons in the vestibular nerve and the average circularity ratio of myelinated axons in the vagus nerve. CONCLUSIONS: The lower number of myelinated axons in the female vestibular nerve may be one of the reasons why vestibular disorders have a female preponderance. Moreover, the higher average circularity ratio of myelinated axons in the male vagus nerve may be one reason why vagus nerve activity to modulate pain has a male preponderance. PMID:27589511

  8. Contribution of auditory nerve fibers to compound action potential of the auditory nerve.

    PubMed

    Bourien, Jérôme; Tang, Yong; Batrel, Charlène; Huet, Antoine; Lenoir, Marc; Ladrech, Sabine; Desmadryl, Gilles; Nouvian, Régis; Puel, Jean-Luc; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Sound-evoked compound action potential (CAP), which captures the synchronous activation of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs), is commonly used to probe deafness in experimental and clinical settings. All ANFs are believed to contribute to CAP threshold and amplitude: low sound pressure levels activate the high-spontaneous rate (SR) fibers, and increasing levels gradually recruit medium- and then low-SR fibers. In this study, we quantitatively analyze the contribution of the ANFs to CAP 6 days after 30-min infusion of ouabain into the round window niche. Anatomic examination showed a progressive ablation of ANFs following increasing concentration of ouabain. CAP amplitude and threshold plotted against loss of ANFs revealed three ANF pools: 1) a highly ouabain-sensitive pool, which does not participate in either CAP threshold or amplitude, 2) a less sensitive pool, which only encoded CAP amplitude, and 3) a ouabain-resistant pool, required for CAP threshold and amplitude. Remarkably, distribution of the three pools was similar to the SR-based ANF distribution (low-, medium-, and high-SR fibers), suggesting that the low-SR fiber loss leaves the CAP unaffected. Single-unit recordings from the auditory nerve confirmed this hypothesis and further showed that it is due to the delayed and broad first spike latency distribution of low-SR fibers. In addition to unraveling the neural mechanisms that encode CAP, our computational simulation of an assembly of guinea pig ANFs generalizes and extends our experimental findings to different species of mammals. Altogether, our data demonstrate that substantial ANF loss can coexist with normal hearing threshold and even unchanged CAP amplitude. PMID:24848461

  9. Nerve growth factor induces sensitization of nociceptors without evidence for increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Michael; Rukwied, Roman; Gromann, Alois; Turnquist, Brian; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Francke, Klaus; Albrecht, Philip; Rice, Frank; Hägglöf, Björn; Ringkamp, Matthias; Engelhardt, Maren; Schultz, Christian; Schmelz, Martin; Obreja, Otilia

    2013-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is involved in the long-term sensitization of nociceptive processing linked to chronic pain. Functional and structural ("sprouting") changes can contribute. Thus, humans report long-lasting hyperalgesia to mechanical and electrical stimulation after intradermal NGF injection and NGF-induced sprouting has been reported to underlie cancer bone pain and visceral pain. Using a human-like animal model we investigated the relationship between the structure and function of unmyelinated porcine nociceptors 3 weeks after intradermal NGF treatment. Axonal and sensory characteristics were studied by in vivo single-fiber electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry. C fibers recorded extracellularly were classified based on mechanical response and activity-dependent slowing (ADS) of conduction velocity. Intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) densities were assessed by immunohistochemistry in pigs and in human volunteers using the same NGF model. NGF increased conduction velocity and reduced ADS and propagation failure in mechano-insensitive nociceptors. The proportion of mechano-sensitive C nociceptors within NGF-treated skin areas increased from 45.1% (control) to 71% and their median mechanical thresholds decreased from 40 to 20 mN. After NGF application, the mechanical receptive fields of nociceptors increased from 25 to 43 mm(2). At the structural level, however, IENF density was not increased by NGF. In conclusion, intradermal NGF induces long-lasting axonal and mechanical sensitization in porcine C nociceptors that corresponds to hyperalgesia observed in humans. Sensitization is not accompanied by increased IENF density, suggesting that NGF-induced hyperalgesia might not depend on changes in nerve fiber density but could be linked to the recruitment of previously silent nociceptors. PMID:23891896

  10. Multi-scale and Multimodal Fusion of Tract-tracing, Myelin Stain and DTI-derived Fibers in Macaque Brains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tuo; Kong, Jun; Jing, Ke; Chen, Hanbo; Jiang, Xi; Li, Longchuan; Guo, Lei; Lu, Jianfeng; Hu, Xiaoping; Liu, Tianming

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of structural connectivity patterns of brains can be an important avenue for better understanding mechanisms of structural and functional brain architectures. Therefore, many efforts have been made to estimate and validate axonal pathways via a number of techniques, such as myelin stain, tract-tracing and diffusion MRI (dMRI). The three modalities have their own advantages and are complimentary to each other. From myelin stain data, we can infer rich in-plane information of axonal orientation at micro-scale. Tract-tracing data is considered as ‘gold standard’ to estimate trustworthy meso-scale pathways. dMRI currently is the only way to estimate global macro-scale pathways given further validation. We propose a framework to take advantage of these three modalities. Information of the three modalities is integrated to determine the optimal tractography parameters for dMRI fibers and identify cross-validated fiber bundles that are finally used to construct atlas. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the framework by a collection of experimental results. PMID:26501133

  11. Myelin changes in leprous neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J M; Shetty, V P; Antia, N H

    1987-01-01

    Myelin changes were observed in fibres of nerves from cases of leprosy. The myelin had a 'loosened' appearance caused by increased and irregular separation of the intraperiod line. 'Loosening' might affect all, or only some, of the lamellae forming a myelin sheath. There was a patchy distribution of fibres with abnormal myelin, and they were seen only in nerves showing other marked pathological changes including the presence of oedema. The appearances are suggestive of intramyelinic oedema which may be related to the presence of endoneurial oedema. PMID:2821728

  12. The effect of the rotational angle on MR diffusion indices in nerves: Is the rms displacement of the slow-diffusing component a good measure of fiber orientation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, much effort has been made to increase our ability to infer nerve fiber direction through the use of diffusion MR. The present study examines the effect of the rotational angle ( α), i.e. the angle between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and the main axis of the fibers in the nerves, on different NMR indices. The indices examined were the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), extracted from low b-values ( bmax ≈ 1200 s/mm 2), and the root mean square (rms) displacement of the fast and the slow-diffusing components extracted from high b-value q-space diffusion MR data. In addition, the effect of both the diffusion time and myelination was evaluated. We found that the most sensitive index to the rotational angle is the rms displacement of the slow-diffusing component extracted from the high b-value q-space diffusion MR experiment. For this component the rms displacement was nearly constant for α values ranging from -10° to +80° (where α = 0° is the z direction), but it changed dramatically when diffusion was measured nearly perpendicular to the nerve fiber direction, i.e., for α = 90 ± 10°. The ADC and the rms displacement of the fast-diffusing component exhibited only gradual changes, with a maximal change at α = 45 ± 15°. The sensitivity of the rms displacement of the slow-diffusing component to the rotational angle was found to be higher at longer diffusion times and in mature fully myelinated nerves. The relevance of these observations for determining the fiber direction is briefly discussed.

  13. Reproducibility in Nerve Morphometry: Comparison between Methods and among Observers

    PubMed Central

    Bilego Neto, Antônio Paulo da Costa; Silveira, Fernando Braga Cassiano; Rodrigues da Silva, Greice Anne; Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the reproducibility of a semiautomated method (computerized with manual intervention) for nerve morphometry (counting and measuring myelinated fibers) between three observers with different levels of expertise and experience with the method. Comparisons between automatic (fully computerized) and semiautomated morphometric methods performed by the same computer software using the same nerve images were also performed. Sural nerves of normal adult rats were used. Automatic and semiautomated morphometry of the myelinated fibers were made through the computer software KS-400. Semiautomated morphometry was conducted by three independent observers on the same images, using the semiautomated method. Automatic morphometry overestimated the myelin sheath area, thus overestimating the myelinated fiber size and underestimating the axon size. Fiber distributions overestimation was of 0.5 μm. For the semiautomated morphometry, no differences were found between observers for myelinated fiber and axon size distributions. Overestimation of the myelin sheath size of normal fibers by the fully automatic method might have an impact when morphometry is used for diagnostic purposes. We suggest that not only semiautomated morphometry results can be compared between different centers in clinical trials but it can also be performed by more than one investigator in one single experiment, being a reliable and reproducible method. PMID:23841086

  14. Ultrastructural changes in the vagal nerve of mice after exposure to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, S.; Kita, S.; Ito, M.; Onishi, R.; Kim, H.; Shiozawa, T.; Iwasaki, K.

    We investigated the ultrastructural changes in the vagal nerve induced after lifelong exposure to a 2G environment. Method: 8-week-old ICR mice bred in a 2G environment (2G) were operated to observe the cervical vagal nerves, and compared with control mice bred in a 1G environment (1G). The vagal nerve was observed on transverse section with electron microscopy to count the number of myelinated nerve fibers. Small-sized, large-sized and all (large and small) myelinated nerve fibers were counted. Result: The number of all myelinated fibers in the 2G (795+/-103.2) was more than those in the 1G (644+/-59.6) significantly. The number of small-sized myelinated fibers in the 2G (657+/-95.2) was more than those in the 1G (522+/-66.1) significantly. The number of large-sized myelinated fibers in the 2G (138+/-14.5) was more than those in the 1G (122+/-16.3), but not significantly. The ratios of small-sized to all and large sized to all myelinated fibers in the 2G were 82.5+/-1.8% and 17.5+/-1.8% respectively. The ratios of small-sized to all and large-sized to all myelinated fibers in the 1G were 80.9+/-3.5% and 19.0+/-3.8% respectively. There was no difference on the ratios between 2G and 1G. Conclusion: The results suggest that an increase in the number of myelinated nerve fibers is induced in a 2G environment.

  15. Changes in the Distribution of Periodontal Nerve Fibers during Dentition Transition in the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Koji; Honma, Shiho; Ebara, Satomi; Kumamoto, Kenzo; Murakami, Shinya; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal ligament has a rich sensory nerve supply which originates from the trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. Although various types of mechanoreceptors have been reported in the periodontal ligament, the Ruffini ending is an essential one. It is unknown whether the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous teeth is identical to that in permanent teeth or not. Moreover, morphological changes in the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers during resorption of deciduous teeth and eruption of successional permanent teeth in diphyodont animals have not been reported in detail. Therefore, in this study, we examined changes in the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in the cat during changes in dentition (i.e., deciduous, mixed and permanent dentition) by immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5. During deciduous dentition, periodontal nerve fibers were concentrated at the apical portion, and sparsely distributed in the periodontal ligament of deciduous molars. During mixed dentition, the periodontal nerve fibers of deciduous molars showed degenerative profiles during resorption. In permanent dentition, the periodontal nerve fibers of permanent premolars, the successors of deciduous molars, increased in number. Similar to permanent premolars, the periodontal nerve fibers of permanent molars, having no predecessors, increased in number, and were densely present in the apical portion. The present results indicate that the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition is almost identical to that in permanent dentition although the number of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition was low. The sparse distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition agrees with clinical evidence that children are less sensitive to tooth stimulation than adults. PMID:26083023

  16. Phylogenetic development of myelin glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Y

    1986-12-15

    Myelin is a highly specialized membrane, which enwraps axons and facilitates saltatory nerve conduction in vertebrates. Galactocerebroside and its sulfate ester, sulfatide, are highly localized in myelin. To understand the role played by these galactosphingolipids we investigated the changes of these myelin-specific compounds during the course of the evolution of myelin. We found that urodele nerve myelin lacks alpha-hydroxy fatty acid-containing galactosphingolipids. Our morphological and physiological studies of urodele nerves indicated that these hydroxy fatty acid-containing galactosphingolipids probably contribute to fast nerve conduction. Also it is suspected that they are involved in the regulation of the thickness of myelin in relation to the size of the axon. In another study, we discovered that glucocerebroside, which has glucose instead of galactose as its carbohydrate component, is abundantly present in the myelin-like sheath membrane of crustacean nerves. Subsequently, the phylogenetic study indicated that galactocerebrosides were limited to the nervous system of deuterostomes, while all protostome nerves contain glucocerebrosides. The role of glucocerebrosides in multilayered membranes and in the conduction velocity of the protostome nervous system is discussed. PMID:3549016

  17. [The retinal nerve fiber layer in normal and glaucoma eyes].

    PubMed

    Jonas, J B; Schiro, D; Naumann, G O

    1993-12-01

    Glaucoma leads to changes of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). This study was performed to evaluate glaucomatous alterations of the RNFL and to correlate them with other parameters of glaucomatous optic nerve damage. The study included red-free wide-angle fundus photographs of the RNFL of 453 normal eyes and 609 eyes with glaucoma. We evaluated the visibility of the RNFL in different fundus regions and the occurrence of localized RNFL defects. In the glaucoma eyes, including those with "early" glaucomatous optic nerve damage, the visibility of RNFL was significantly lower than in the normal eyes. The degree of RNFL visibility correlated with other morphological and perimetric parameters. Localized RNFL defects were detected in 20% of the glaucoma eyes. Their frequency increased significantly (P < 0.01) from an "early" glaucoma stage to a subgroup with medium advanced glaucomatous damage and decreased again to a stage with marked glaucomatous changes. They were significantly more common in eyes with normal pressure glaucoma, followed by eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma and finally eyes with secondary open-angle glaucoma. They were significantly associated with optic disk hemorrhages and notches of the neuroretinal rim. The results indicate that the glaucomatous changes of the RNFL are correlated with the optic disk alterations. This holds true also for eyes with "early" glaucomatous damage. It suggests that during every routine ophthalmoscopy the RNFL should be examined. Localized RNFL defects indicate optic nerve damage with a specificity of more than 90%. The contrast between localized and diffuse RNFL loss, the varying frequency of localized RNFL defects in different types of glaucoma and the association between localized RNFL defects and optic disk hemorrhages are diagnostically and pathogenetically important. PMID:8124022

  18. Peptide Mimetic of the S100A4 Protein Modulates Peripheral Nerve Regeneration and Attenuates the Progression of Neuropathy in Myelin Protein P0 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Mihai; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Dmytriyeva, Oksana; Pankratova, Stanislava; Fugleholm, Kåre; Klingelhofer, Jorg; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir; Krarup, Christian; Kiryushko, Darya

    2013-01-01

    We recently found that S100A4, a member of the multifunctional S100 protein family, protects neurons in the injured brain and identified two sequence motifs in S100A4 mediating its neurotrophic effect. Synthetic peptides encompassing these motifs stimulated neuritogenesis and survival in vitro and mimicked the S100A4-induced neuroprotection in brain trauma. Here, we investigated a possible function of S100A4 and its mimetics in the pathologies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We found that S100A4 was expressed in the injured PNS and that its peptide mimetic (H3) affected the regeneration and survival of myelinated axons. H3 accelerated electrophysiological, behavioral and morphological recovery after sciatic nerve crush while transiently delaying regeneration after sciatic nerve transection and repair. On the basis of the finding that both S100A4 and H3 increased neurite branching in vitro, these effects were attributed to the modulatory effect of H3 on initial axonal sprouting. In contrast to the modest effect of H3 on the time course of regeneration, H3 had a long-term neuroprotective effect in the myelin protein P0 null mice, a model of dysmyelinating neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease), where the peptide attenuated the deterioration of nerve conduction, demyelination and axonal loss. From these results, S100A4 mimetics emerge as a possible means to enhance axonal sprouting and survival, especially in the context of demyelinating neuropathies with secondary axonal loss, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease. Moreover, our data suggest that S100A4 is a neuroprotectant in PNS and that other S100 proteins, sharing high homology in the H3 motif, may have important functions in PNS pathologies. PMID:23508572

  19. [Polychromatic method of simultaneously demonstrating all the structural components of a peripheral nerve].

    PubMed

    Dolishniĭ, N V; Mel'man, E P

    1978-02-01

    To study neuro-vessel relations in the nerve conductive system, a combined method revealing myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers and blood vessels was suggested. The method includes the following stages of material treatment: injection of the nerve blood vessels with chloroform emulsion of Paris blue (5--10 g of the dye in 100 g of the solvant); the straightened nerves about 5 mm long are fixed in 12% neutral formalin; etching in the solution of chromium solts; embedding in paraffin and preparation of thin sections (3--5 mcm); staining after Masson's method applied for collagen fiber staining) in the author's modification and mounting in balsam. In the preparations, the axons of the nerve fibers are seen blue--purple, myelin sheaths--light red, connective tissue elements--violet and blood vessels are seen as dark blue rings. PMID:77154

  20. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves, plexus, or root lesions). Furthermore pathological processes may result in either demyelination, axonal degeneration or both. In order to reach an exact diagnosis of any neuropathy electrophysiological studies are crucial to obtain information about these variables. Conventional electrophysiological methods including nerve conduction studies and electromyography used in the study of patients suspected of having a neuropathy and the significance of the findings are discussed in detail and more novel and experimental methods are mentioned. Diagnostic considerations are based on a flow chart classifying neuropathies into eight categories based on mode of onset, distribution, and electrophysiological findings, and the electrophysiological characteristics in each type of neuropathy are discussed. PMID:23931776

  1. Ultrastructural and cytochemical evidence for single impulse initiation zones in vestibular macular nerve fibers of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Chee, Oliver; Black, Samuel; Cutler, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    Cupric ion-ferricyanide labeling methods and related ferrocyanide-stained tissues were used to locate the characterize, at the ultrastructural level, presumptive impulse initiation zones in the three types of vestibular macular nerve fibers. Large-diameter, M-type vestibular nerve fibers terminate in a calyx at the heminode, and labeling is coextensive with the base of the calyx. Intermediate, M/U-type nerve fibers have short, unmyelinated preterminal segments that sometimes bifurcate intamacularly, and small-diameter, U-type nerve fibers have long, unmyelinated preterminal axons and up to three branches. Preterminals of these nerve fibers display ultrastructural heterogeneity that is correlated with labeling patterns for sodium channels and/or associated polyanionic sites. They have a nodelike ultrastructure and label heavily from near the heminode to the base of the macula. Their intramacular branches, less organized ultrastructurally, label only slightly. Results indicate that vestibular nerve fibers have one impulse initiation zone, located near the heminode, that varies in length according to nerve fiber type. Structural heterogeneity may favor impulse conduction in the central direction, and length of the impulse initiation zone could influence nerve discharge patterns.

  2. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  3. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  4. Peptide therapy with pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gjurasin, Miroslav; Miklic, Pavle; Zupancic, Bozidar; Perovic, Darko; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Brcic, Luka; Kolenc, Danijela; Radic, Bozo; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    We focused on the healing of rat transected sciatic nerve and improvement made by stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg, 10ng/kg) applied shortly after injury (i) intraperitoneally/intragastrically/locally, at the site of anastomosis, or after (ii) non-anastomozed nerve tubing (7 mm nerve segment resected) directly into the tube. Improvement was shown clinically (autotomy), microscopically/morphometrically and functionally (EMG, one or two months post-injury, walking recovery (sciatic functional index (SFI)) at weekly intervals). BPC 157-rats exhibited faster axonal regeneration: histomorphometrically (improved presentation of neural fascicles, homogeneous regeneration pattern, increased density and size of regenerative fibers, existence of epineural and perineural regeneration, uniform target orientation of regenerative fibers, and higher proportion of neural vs. connective tissue, all fascicles in each nerve showed increased diameter of myelinated fibers, thickness of myelin sheet, number of myelinated fibers per area and myelinated fibers as a percentage of the nerve transected area and the increased blood vessels presentation), electrophysiologically (increased motor action potentials), functionally (improved SFI), the autotomy absent. Thus, BPC 157 markedly improved rat sciatic nerve healing. PMID:19903499

  5. Retinal nerve fiber layer reflectometry must consider directional reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiang-Run; Knighton, Robert W.; Feuer, William J.; Qiao, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies reveal that measurements of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) reflectance provide more sensitive detection of glaucomatous damage than RNFL thickness, but most do not consider directional reflectance of the RNFL, an important source of variability. This study quantitatively compared RNFL directional reflectance, represented by an angular spread function (ASF), measured at different scattering angles, different wavelengths and different distances from the optic nerve head (ONH) and for bundles with different thicknesses (T). An ASF was characterized by its amplitude (A) and width (W). Internal reflectance of a bundle was expressed as A/T. The study found that A varied significantly with scattering angle and wavelength and that A/T was different among bundles but constant along the same bundle, indicating that the internal structure of axons may vary among bundles but does not change with distance. This study also found that W was larger near the ONH and at longer wavelengths, but did not depend on scattering angle or T. Because a 4.3° change in incident angle can change reflected intensity by a factor of 2.7, accounting for directional reflectance should improve the accuracy and reproducibility of RNFL reflectance measurements. PMID:26819814

  6. Transgenic BDNF induces nerve fiber regrowth into the auditory epithelium in deaf cochleae.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Seiji B; Cortez, Sarah R; Beyer, Lisa A; Wiler, James A; Di Polo, Adriana; Pfingst, Bryan E; Raphael, Yehoash

    2010-06-01

    Sensory organs typically use receptor cells and afferent neurons to transduce environmental signals and transmit them to the CNS. When sensory cells are lost, nerves often regress from the sensory area. Therapeutic and regenerative approaches would benefit from the presence of nerve fibers in the tissue. In the hearing system, retraction of afferent innervation may accompany the degeneration of auditory hair cells that is associated with permanent hearing loss. The only therapy currently available for cases with severe or complete loss of hair cells is the cochlear implant auditory prosthesis. To enhance the therapeutic benefits of a cochlear implant, it is necessary to attract nerve fibers back into the cochlear epithelium. Here we show that forced expression of the neurotrophin gene BDNF in epithelial or mesothelial cells that remain in the deaf ear induces robust regrowth of nerve fibers towards the cells that secrete the neurotrophin, and results in re-innervation of the sensory area. The process of neurotrophin-induced neuronal regeneration is accompanied by significant preservation of the spiral ganglion cells. The ability to regrow nerve fibers into the basilar membrane area and protect the auditory nerve will enhance performance of cochlear implants and augment future cell replacement therapies such as stem cell implantation or induced transdifferentiation. This model also provides a general experimental stage for drawing nerve fibers into a tissue devoid of neurons, and studying the interaction between the nerve fibers and the tissue. PMID:20109446

  7. Transgenic BDNF induces nerve fiber regrowth into the auditory epithelium in deaf cochleae

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Seiji B.; Cortez, Sarah R.; Beyer, Lisa A.; Wiler, Jim A.; Di Polo, Adriana; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2010-01-01

    Sensory organs typically use receptor cells and afferent neurons to transduce environmental signals and transmit them to the CNS. When sensory cells are lost, nerves often regress from the sensory area. Therapeutic and regenerative approaches would benefit from the presence of nerve fibers in the tissue. In the hearing system, retraction of afferent innervation may accompany the degeneration of auditory hair cells that is associated with permanent hearing loss. The only therapy currently available for cases with severe or complete loss of hair cells is the cochlear implant auditory prosthesis. To enhance the therapeutic benefits of a cochlear implant, it is necessary to attract nerve fibers back into the cochlear epithelium. Here we show that forced expression of the neurotrophin gene BDNF in epithelial or mesothelial cells that remain in the deaf ear, induces robust regrowth of nerve fibers towards the cells that secrete the neurotrophin, and results in re-innervation of the sensory area. The process of neurotrophin-induced neuronal regeneration is accompanied by significant preservation of the spiral ganglion cells. The ability to regrow nerve fibers into the basilar membrane area and protect the auditory nerve will enhance performance of cochlear implants and augment future cell replacement therapies such as stem cell implantation or induced transdifferentiation. This model also provides a general experimental stage for drawing nerve fibers into a tissue devoid of neurons, and studying the interaction between the nerve fibers and the tissue. PMID:20109446

  8. [Research advances of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and its association with myopia].

    PubMed

    Kang, M T; Ran, A R; Wang, N L; Li, S M

    2016-05-11

    Recently, the distribution characteristics of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in myopic population have raised scholars' attention. The retinal nerve fiber layer thickness is varied with different refractive statuses, and is correlated to many factors like age, eye elongation, and fundus changes. Further exploration of the relationship between myopia and retinal structure and function will promote our understanding and knowledge of the pathogenesis of myopia. The article reviews the structure characteristics of the retinal nerve fiber layer, its associations with demographic characteristics, its characteristics in myopia, and the structural-functional relationship.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 396-400). PMID:27220715

  9. Paranodal dysmyelination in peripheral nerves of Trembler mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Bobrowski-Khoury, Natasha

    2014-04-01

    Subtle defects in paranodes of myelinated nerve fibers can cause significant physiological malfunction. We have investigated myelinated fibers in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the Trembler mouse, a model of CMT-1A neuropathy, for evidence of such defects. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the "transverse bands," which attach the myelin sheath to the axon at the paranodal axoglial junction, are grossly diminished in number in Trembler nerve fibers. Although paranodes often appear to be greatly elongated, it is only a short region immediately adjacent to the node of Ranvier that displays transverse bands. Where transverse bands are missing, the junctional gap widens, thus reducing resistance to short circuiting of nodal action currents during saltatory conduction and increasing the likelihood that axonal K(+) channels under the myelin sheath will be activated. In addition, we find evidence that structural domains in Trembler axons are incompletely differentiated, consistent with diminution in nodal Na channel density, which could further compromise conduction. Deficiency of transverse bands may also increase susceptibility to disruption of the paranodal junction and retraction of the myelin sheath. We conclude that Trembler PNS myelinated fibers display subtle defects in paranodal and nodal regions that could contribute significantly to conduction defects and increased risk of myelin detachment. PMID:24446165

  10. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  11. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-07-15

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  12. Altered metabolic incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin of 25-week-old diabetic (C57BL/Ks (db/db)) mice: effects of untreated diabetes on nerve metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chez, M.G.; Peterson, R.G.

    1983-04-01

    Sciatic nerves of 25-week-old genetically diabetic (C57BL/Ks (db/db)) mice and their litter-mate controls were removed, and their metabolic incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose and (/sup 14/C)leucine into myelin was studied in vitro. Untreated diabetic animals showed significant increases (p less than 0.05) in the fucose/leucine incorporation into myelin when compared to values found for their litter-mates. These results correlated well with previous experiments performed on alloxan or streptozotocin-diabetic rats and thus show the in vitro incubation procedure to be a good indicator of altered metabolic conditions in peripheral nerves due to diabetes mellitus. The resulting ratio increases seen in diabetic animals is at variance with the decrease in ratios found in animals undergoing typical Wallerian degeneration. These results suggest that different metabolic processes operate in untreated diabetics than in normals or in those undergoing other degenerative nerve processes.

  13. Effect of loading on the development of nerve fibers around oral implants in the dog mandible.

    PubMed

    Wada, S; Kojo, T; Wang, Y H; Ando, H; Nakanishi, E; Zhang, M; Fukuyama, H; Uchida, Y

    2001-06-01

    Occlusal forces cause stress which morphologically affects the supporting tissues of implants. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of occlusal forces on the distribution of neurofilament protein (NFP)-positive nerve fibers in the tissue of peri-implant bone. The bilateral 2nd, 3rd and 4th mandibular premolars and the 1st molars were extracted from three mongrel dogs. After 4 months of healing, 4 screw-type implants were inserted in the oral cavity. Three months after insertion, the implants on the molar site were loaded by occlusal forces, while those on the premolar site were unloaded. After a further 3 months, the dogs were sacrificed, and specimens were prepared for immunohistochemical NFP-positive staining by the labeled-streptavidin-biotin method. Many NFP-positive nerve fibers were found in the tissues of the loaded site when compared with the unloaded site. These fibers were localized in both the bone marrow space and in the peri-implant fibrous tissue. They had two types of nerve endings: simple free nerve endings, and nerve endings with tree-like ramifications. The present results suggest that loading by occlusal force causes an increase in the number of NFP-positive nerve fibers, many of which have free nerve endings in the peri-implant tissue. The possible role of these NFP-positive nerve fibers is discussed. PMID:11359478

  14. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çitlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-12-25

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thickness, Schwann cell morphology, and the mechanical property of nerve fibers did not differ obviously. These results indicate that delayed neurorrhaphy do not produce any deleterious effect on sciatic nerve repair. PMID:25206663

  15. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  16. Binary Imaging Analysis for Comprehensive Quantitative Assessment of Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Daniel A.; Moradzadeh, Arash; Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Brenner, Michael J.; Myckatyn, Terence M.; Wei, Cindy H.; Tung, Thomas H.H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative histomorphometry is the current gold standard for objective measurement of nerve architecture and its components. Many methods still in use rely heavily upon manual techniques that are prohibitively time consuming, predisposing to operator fatigue, sampling error, and overall limited reproducibility. More recently, investigators have attempted to combine the speed of automated morphometry with the accuracy of manual and semi-automated methods. Systematic refinements in binary imaging analysis techniques combined with an algorithmic approach allow for more exhaustive characterization of nerve parameters in the surgically relevant injury paradigms of regeneration following crush, transection, and nerve gap injuries. The binary imaging method introduced here uses multiple bitplanes to achieve reproducible, high throughput quantitative assessment of peripheral nerve. Number of myelinated axons, myelinated fiber diameter, myelin thickness, fiber distributions, myelinated fiber density, and neural debris can be quantitatively evaluated with stratification of raw data by nerve component. Results of this semi-automated method are validated by comparing values against those obtained with manual techniques. The use of this approach results in more rapid, accurate, and complete assessment of myelinated axons than manual techniques. PMID:17675163

  17. Molecular mechanisms regulating myelination in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jorge A; Lebrun-Julien, Frédéric; Suter, Ueli

    2012-02-01

    Glial cells and neurons are engaged in a continuous and highly regulated bidirectional dialog. A remarkable example is the control of myelination. Oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and Schwann cells (SCs) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) wrap their plasma membranes around axons to organize myelinated nerve fibers that allow rapid saltatory conduction. The functionality of this system is critical, as revealed by numerous neurological diseases that result from deregulation of the system, including multiple sclerosis and peripheral neuropathies. In this review we focus on PNS myelination and present a conceptual framework that integrates crucial signaling mechanisms with basic SC biology. We will highlight signaling hubs and overarching molecular mechanisms, including genetic, epigenetic, and post-translational controls, which together regulate the interplay between SCs and axons, extracellular signals, and the transcriptional network. PMID:22192173

  18. Ultrastructural evidence for nerve fibers within all vital layers of the human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Hilliges, M; Wang, L; Johansson, O

    1995-01-01

    To prove the existence of human intraepidermal nerve fibers at the electron microscopic level, we used both conventional and immunohistochemical ultrastructural techniques. Specimens were obtained from skin of the back, one of the most densely innervated areas of the human epidermis. The immunohistochemical marker protein gene product 9.5 was chosen because it is highly potent in labeling nerves. Thin nerve fibers were found in the basal, spinous, and granular layers of the epidermis with both techniques used, although it was more difficult to identify the nervous structures with the conventional method. The nerves appeared in the intercellular spaces and contacted keratinocyte cell bodies or cilia by membrane-membrane apposition, but without any specialized structures. Nerve fibers in the very superficial part of the vital human epidermis have not been described before at the ultrastructural level. PMID:7798631

  19. Potassium currents and conductance. Comparison between motor and sensory myelinated fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Palti, Y; Moran, N; Stämpfli, R

    1980-01-01

    The potassium conductance system of sensory and motor fibers from the frog Rana esculenta were studied and compared by means of the voltage clamp. The potassium ion accumulation was first estimated from the currents and reversal potentials within the framework of both a three-compartment model and diffusion-in-an-unstirred-layer model. The potassium conductance parameters were then computed using the measured currents and corrected ionic driving forces. It was found that the potassium accumulation is faster and more pronounced in sensory fibers, the voltage dependency of the potassium conductance is steeper in sensory fibers, the maximal potassium conductance, corrected for accumulation, is approximately 1.1 S/cm2 in sensory and 0.55 S/cm2 in motor fibers, and that the conductance time constants, tau n, are smaller in sensory than in motor fibers. These differences, which increase progressively with depolarization, are not detectable for depolarization of 50 mV or smaller. The interpretation of these findings in terms of different types of potassium channels as well as their implications with regard to the differences between the excitability phenomena in motor and sensory fibers are discussed. PMID:6973371

  20. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and retinal vessel calibers in children with thalassemia minor

    PubMed Central

    Acer, Semra; Balcı, Yasemin I; Pekel, Gökhan; Ongun, Tuğba T; Polat, Aziz; Çetin, Ebru N; Yağcı, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements in children with thalassemia minor. Methods: In this cross-sectional and comparative study, 30 thalassemia minor patients and 36 controls were included. Heidelberg spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used for peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and retinal vessel caliber measurements. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and subfoveal choroidal thickness between the two groups (p > 0.05). There was no correlation between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and hemoglobin values. Both the arterioral and venular calibers were higher in thalassemia minor group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is increased retinal arterioral and venular calibers in children with thalassemia minor compared with controls. PMID:27540484

  1. Environmental tobacco smoke in the early postnatal period induces impairment in brain myelination.

    PubMed

    Torres, Larissa H; Annoni, Raquel; Balestrin, Natalia T; Coleto, Priscila L; Duro, Stephanie O; Garcia, Raphael C T; Pacheco-Neto, Maurílio; Mauad, Thais; Camarini, Rosana; Britto, Luiz R G; Marcourakis, Tania

    2015-11-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality, mainly in children. However, few studies focus on the brain development effects of ETS exposure. Myelination mainly occurs in the early years of life in humans and the first three postnatal weeks in rodents and is sensitive to xenobiotics exposure. This study investigated the effects of early postnatal ETS exposure on myelination. BALB/c mice were exposed to ETS generated from 3R4F reference research cigarettes from the third to the fourteenth days of life. The myelination of nerve fibers in the optic nerve by morphometric analysis and the levels of Olig1 and myelin basic protein (MBP) were evaluated in the cerebellum, diencephalon, telencephalon, and brainstem in infancy, adolescence, and adulthood. Infant mice exposed to ETS showed a decrease in the percentage of myelinated fibers in the optic nerve, compared with controls. ETS induced a decrease in Olig1 protein levels in the cerebellum and brainstem and an increase in MBP levels in the cerebellum at infant. It was also found a decrease in MBP levels in the telencephalon and brainstem at adolescence and in the cerebellum and diencephalon at adulthood. The present study demonstrates that exposure to ETS, in a critical phase of development, affects the percentage of myelinated fibers and myelin-specific proteins in infant mice. Although we did not observe differences in the morphological analysis in adolescence and adulthood, there was a decrease in MBP levels in distinctive brain regions suggesting a delayed effect in adolescence and adulthood. PMID:25182420

  2. Refractoriness enhances temporal coding by auditory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Avissar, Michael; Wittig, John H; Saunders, James C; Parsons, Thomas D

    2013-05-01

    A universal property of spiking neurons is refractoriness, a transient decrease in discharge probability immediately following an action potential (spike). The refractory period lasts only one to a few milliseconds, but has the potential to affect temporal coding of acoustic stimuli by auditory neurons, which are capable of submillisecond spike-time precision. Here this possibility was investigated systematically by recording spike times from chicken auditory nerve fibers in vivo while stimulating with repeated pure tones at characteristic frequency. Refractory periods were tightly distributed, with a mean of 1.58 ms. A statistical model was developed to recapitulate each fiber's responses and then used to predict the effect of removing the refractory period on a cell-by-cell basis for two largely independent facets of temporal coding: faithful entrainment of interspike intervals to the stimulus frequency and precise synchronization of spike times to the stimulus phase. The ratio of the refractory period to the stimulus period predicted the impact of refractoriness on entrainment and synchronization. For ratios less than ∼0.9, refractoriness enhanced entrainment and this enhancement was often accompanied by an increase in spike-time precision. At higher ratios, little or no change in entrainment or synchronization was observed. Given the tight distribution of refractory periods, the ability of refractoriness to improve temporal coding is restricted to neurons responding to low-frequency stimuli. Enhanced encoding of low frequencies likely affects sound localization and pitch perception in the auditory system, as well as perception in nonauditory sensory modalities, because all spiking neurons exhibit refractoriness. PMID:23637161

  3. Effects of metabolic syndrome on the ultrastructure of the femoral nerve in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues de Souza, Romeu; Gama, Eliane F; El-Razi Neto, Semaan; Maldonado, Diogo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the morphometry of the femoral nerve in aging rats with metabolic syndrome compared to controls. Systolic blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose were measured, and myelinated and unmyelinated fibers in the femoral nerves were quantitatively assessed under electron microscopy. Aging rats exposed to a regimen of metabolic syndrome developed elevation of plasma glucose concentration, mild hypertension and polyneuropathy characterized by a decrease in myelin fiber area, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and myelin fiber loss in the femoral nerve. The histogram of size distribution for myelinated fibers and axons from the aging rats of the control group was bimodal. For aging MS animals, the histogram turned out to be unimodal. The ultrastructure of unmyelinated fibers and of Schwann cells in 18-month-old rats was well preserved. Granules of lipofuscin were seen in unmyelinated fiber axons of 18-month-old rats with MS. The damage percentage of the large myelinated fibers has increased significantly in 18-month-old and 18-month-old (MS) rats in relation to the controls. No significant difference was observed among the groups for the g-ratio. Comparing the three groups, the number of neurotubules and neurofilaments in myelinated fibers of 18-month-old rats with MS was significantly smaller than for the groups of 18-month-old and 14-month-old rats. The overall changes seen in the femoral nerve from aging rats seem minor compared to the changes in the aging rats with MS, suggesting that long-term MS accelerates the progressive modifications in peripheral nerves that develop in old age. PMID:25866014

  4. Cholesterol: a novel regulatory role in myelin formation.

    PubMed

    Saher, Gesine; Quintes, Susanne; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2011-02-01

    Myelin consists of tightly compacted membranes that form an insulating sheath around axons. The function of myelin for rapid saltatory nerve conduction is dependent on its unique composition, highly enriched in glycosphingolipids and cholesterol. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate limiting for the development of CNS and PNS myelin. Experiments with conditional mouse mutants that lack cholesterol biosynthesis in oligodendrocytes revealed that only minimal changes of the CNS myelin lipid composition are tolerated. In Schwann cells of the PNS, protein trafficking and myelin compaction depend on cholesterol. In this review, the authors summarize the role of cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and myelin disease. PMID:21343408

  5. A polarization measurement method for the quantification of retardation in optic nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Yasufumi; Okazaki, Yoshio; Shioiri, Takashi; Iida, Yukio; Kikuta, Hisao; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    The thickness measurement of the optic nerve fiber layer is one of the most important evaluations for carrying out glaucoma diagnosis. Because the optic nerve fiber layer has birefringence, the thickness can be measured by illuminating eye optics with circular polarized light and analyzing the elliptical rate of the detected polarized light reflected from the optic nerve fiber layer. In this method, the scattering light from the background and the retardation caused by the cornea disturbs the precise measurement. If the Stokes vector expressing the whole state of polarization can be detected, we can eliminate numerically the influence of the background scattering and of the retardation caused by the cornea. Because the retardation process of the eye optics can be represented by a numerical equation using the retardation matrix of each component and also the nonpolarized background scattering light, it can be calculated by using the Stokes vector. We applied a polarization analysis system that can detect the Stokes vector onto the fundus camera. The polarization analysis system is constructed with a CCD area image sensor, a linear polarizing plate, a micro phase plate array, and a circularly polarized light illumination unit. With this simply constructed system, we can calculate the retardation caused only by the optic nerve fiber layer and it can predict the thickness of the optic nerve fiber layer. We report the method and the results graphically showing the retardation of the optic nerve fiber layer without the retardation of the cornea.

  6. Alterations of sympathetic nerve fibers in avascular necrosis of femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Li, Deqiang; Liu, Peilai; Zhang, Yuankai; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) was mainly due to alterations of bone vascularity. And noradrenaline (NA), as the neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), leads to the vasoconstriction by activating its α-Receptor. This study was to explore the nerve fiber density of the femoral head in the rabbit model of ANFH. Methods: Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. The rabbit model of ANFH was established by the injection of methylprednisolone acetate. The nerve fiber density and distribution in the femoral head was determined using an Olympus BH2 microscope. Results: Significant fewer sympathetic nerve fibers was found in the ANFH intertrochanteric bone samples (P = 0.036) with osteonecrosis. The number of sympathetic nerve fibers was compared between the two groups. And less sympathetic nerve fibers were found in later stage ANFH samples in comparison with those of early stages. Conclusions: ANFH might be preceded by an inflammatory reaction, and an inflammatory response might lead to arthritic changes in tissue samples, which in turn reduces the number of sympathetic nerve fibers. PMID:26617812

  7. Transforming growth factor-β3 promotes facial nerve injury repair in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANMEI; ZHAO, XINXIANG; HUOJIA, MUHTER; XU, HUI; ZHUANG, YOUMEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 on the regeneration of facial nerves in rabbits. A total of 20 adult rabbits were randomly divided into three equal groups: Normal control (n=10), surgical control (n=10) and TGF-β3 treatment (n=10). The total number and diameter of the regenerated nerve fibers was significantly increased in the TGF-β3 treatment group, as compared with in the surgical control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, in the TGF-β3 treatment group, the epineurial repair of the facial nerves was intact and the nerve fibers, which were arranged in neat rows, were morphologically intact with visible myelin swelling. However, in the surgical control group, the epineurial repair was incomplete, as demonstrated by: Atrophic nerve fibers, partially disappeared axons and myelin of uneven thickness with fuzzy borders. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the regenerated fibers in the TGF-β3 treatment group were predominantly myelinated, with clear-layered myelin sheath structures and axoplasms rich in organelles. Although typical layered myelin sheath structures were observed in the surgical control group, the myelin sheaths of the myelinated nerve fibers were poorly developed and few organelles were detected in the axoplasms. Neuro-electrophysiological examination demonstrated that, as compared with the surgical control group, the latency period of the action potentials in the TGF-β3 treatment group were shorter, whereas the stimulus amplitudes of the action potentials were significantly increased (P<0.01). The results of the present study suggest that TGF-β3 may improve the regeneration of facial nerves following trauma or injury. PMID:26997982

  8. Biological and Electrophysiologic Effects of Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) on Regenerating Peripheral Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Baghmanli, Ziya; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Wei, Benjamin; Shim, Bong S.; Martin, David C.; Cederna, Paul S.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Uninjured peripheral nerves in upper-limb amputees represent attractive sites for connectivity with neuroprostheses because their predictable internal topography allows for precise sorting of motor and sensory signals. The inclusion of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) reduces impedance and improves charge transfer at the biotic-abiotic interface. This study evaluates the in vivo performance of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)–coated interpositional decellularized nerve grafts across a critical nerve conduction gap, and examines the long-term effects of two different poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) formulations on regenerating peripheral nerve fibers. Methods In 48 rats, a 15-mm gap in the common peroneal nerve was repaired using a nerve graft of equivalent length, including (1) decellularized nerve chemically polymerized with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (dry); (2) decellularized nerve electrochemically polymerized with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (wet); (3) intact nerve; (4) autogenous nerve graft; (5) decellularized nerve alone; and (6) unrepaired nerve gap controls. All groups underwent electrophysiologic characterization at 3 months, and nerves were harvested for histomorphometric analysis. Results Conduction velocity was significantly faster in the dry poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) group compared with the sham, decellularized nerve, and wet poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) groups. Maximum specific force for the dry poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) group was more similar to sham than were decellularized nerve controls. Evident neural regeneration was demonstrated in both dry and wet poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) groups by the presence of normal regenerating axons on histologic cross-section. Conclusions Both poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) formulations were compatible with peripheral nerve regeneration at 3 months. This study supports poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) as a promising adjunct for peripheral nerve interfaces for

  9. Reorganization of Lipid Diffusion by Myelin Basic Protein as Revealed by STED Nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Steshenko, Olena; Andrade, Débora M; Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Schneider, Falk; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W; Simons, Mikael; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Myelin is a multilayered membrane that ensheathes axonal fibers in the vertebrate nervous system, allowing fast propagation of nerve action potentials. It contains densely packed lipids, lacks an actin-based cytocortex, and requires myelin basic protein (MBP) as its major structural component. This protein is the basic constituent of the proteinaceous meshwork that is localized between adjacent cytoplasmic membranes of the myelin sheath. Yet, it is not clear how MBP influences the organization and dynamics of the lipid constituents of myelin. Here, we used optical stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to assess the characteristics of diffusion of different fluorescent lipid analogs in myelin membrane sheets of cultured oligodendrocytes and in micrometer-sized domains that were induced by MBP in live epithelial PtK2 cells. Lipid diffusion was significantly faster and less anomalous both in oligodendrocytes and inside the MBP-rich domains of PtK2 cells compared with undisturbed live PtK2 cells. Our data show that MBP reorganizes lipid diffusion, possibly by preventing the buildup of an actin-based cytocortex and by preventing most membrane proteins from entering the myelin sheath region. Yet, in contrast to myelin sheets in oligodendrocytes, the MBP-induced domains in epithelial PtK2 cells demonstrate no change in lipid order, indicating that segregation of long-chain lipids into myelin sheets is a process specific to oligodendrocytes. PMID:27276262

  10. Molecular regulators of nerve conduction - Lessons from inherited neuropathies and rodent genetic models.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are highly compartmentalized. Helically wrapped lipoprotein membranes of myelin are integrated with subsets of proteins specifically in each compartment to shape the physiological behavior of these nerve fibers. With the advance of molecular biology and genetics, many functions of these proteins have been revealed over the past decade. In this review, we will first discuss how action potential propagation has been understood by classical electrophysiological studies. In particular, the discussion will be concentrated on how the geometric dimensions of myelinated nerve fibers (such as internodal length and myelin thickness) may affect nerve conduction velocity. This discussion will then extend into how specific myelin proteins may shape these geometric parameters, thereby regulating action potential propagation. For instance, periaxin may specifically affect the internodal length, but not other parameters. In contrast, neuregulin-1 may affect myelin thickness, but not axon diameter or internodal length. Finally, we will discuss how these basic neurobiological observations can be applied to inherited peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:25792482

  11. Molecular Regulators of Nerve Conduction - Lessons from Inherited Neuropathies and Rodent Genetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are highly compartmentalized. Helically wrapped lipoprotein membranes of myelin are integrated with subsets of proteins specifically in each compartment to shape the physiological behavior of these nerve fibers. With the advance of molecular biology and genetics, many functions of these proteins have been revealed over the past decade. In this review, we will first discuss how action potential propagation has been understood by classical electrophysiological studies. In particular, the discussion will be concentrated on how the geometric dimensions of myelinated nerve fibers (such as internodal length and myelin thickness) may affect nerve conduction velocity. This discussion will then extend into how specific myelin proteins may shape these geometric parameters, thereby regulating action potential propagation. For instance, periaxin may specifically affect the internodal length, but not other parameters. In contrast, neuregulin-1 may affect myelin thickness, but not axon diameter or internodal length. Finally, we will discuss how these basic neurobiological observations can be applied to inherited peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:25792482

  12. Neura, nerves, nerve fibers, neurofibrils, microtubules: multidimensional routes of pain, pleasure, and voluntary action in images across the ages.

    PubMed

    Frixione, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Available records indicate that the human body has always been conceived, in different periods and cultures, as spanned by multiple channels for internal communication and coherent functioning as a unit-"meridians" in treatises of Chinese medicine, metu in Egyptian papyri, srotas in Ayurvedic Indian texts, and neura in the Western scientific heritage from ancient Greece. Unfortunately, the earliest extant figurative depictions of such pathways of general control, complementary to the blood vessels, are late medieval copies of old crude sketches that attempted to show the main anatomico-physiological systems. The scarcity of adequate illustrations was more than compensated in the Renaissance, when the efforts of both artists and anatomists for the first time produced basically correct renditions of the human nervous system and many other bodily structures. As attention was next focused on microscopic structure as a requisite to understand physiological mechanisms, during the Enlightenment the nerves were revealed to consist of numerous thin tubes or fibers aligned in parallel. Improved microscopy techniques in the nineteenth century led to discovering and delineating still finer fibrils coursing along the cores of the nerve fibers themselves. Electron microscopy, developed throughout the twentieth century, recognized some of these fibrils within nerve fibers as being also tubular. All the progressive stages in understanding nerve construction, at increasingly more detailed scales, have been accompanied by technological advances and by debate about the structure and function relationship. And every step has been a source of amazing imagery. PMID:24041279

  13. Holographic Control Of Radial Distribution Of Myelinized Nervous Fiber Refractive Index In Vitality State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov I., P.; Goroshkov A., V.; Kalyunov V., N.; Markhvida I., V.; Rubanov A., S.; Tanin L., V.

    1983-12-01

    The role of investigation of peripheral vervous fibers in bitality state is of great importance when elucidating the mechanism of a stimulant low-energy laser radiation influence which is widely applicable, for example, in practice for curing lumbar osteochondros-is (1), trigeminal verve radiculitis, and in developing the processes of transmission and processing of the information required for sustaining organism homeostasis. Using both electrophysiologic and holographic methods simultaneously can increase total information and authenticity of these investigations.

  14. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  15. Bilateral tectal innervation by regenerating optic nerve fibers in goldfish: a radioautographic, electrophysiological and behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Springer, A D; Heacock, A M; Schmidt, J T; Agranoff, B W

    1977-06-17

    Following unilateral enucleation and optic nerve crush in goldfish, the remaining nerve regenerates and innervates both optic tecta. Approximately 5% of the nerve fibers reach the ipsilateral optic tectum (IOT) via the ipsilateral tract at the chiasma. Comparable debris in both tracts was not sufficient to result in an IOT projection since when both nerves were crushed simultaneously the usual pattern was seen, i.e., each nerve innervated a contralateral optic tectum (COT). When the arrival of one nerve at the chiasma was delayed by staggering the nerve crushes, the nerve that first arrived at the chiasma partially innervated the Iot. In most instances the entire IOT was innervated, however, the stratigraphic distribution of fibers in the various tectal lamina was atypical. Electrophysiological analysis indicated that fibers from each area of the retina innervated the IOT visuotopically. The COT was ablated in order to determine whether the IOT projection could mediate behavior. All fish failed to respond to changes in illumination as measured by respiration and failed to swim with or against the stripes in an optomotor drum. Thus, the IOT input, possibly because of its sparseness, could not be shown to be behaviorally functional. PMID:69466

  16. BREAST CANCER-INDUCED BONE REMODELING, SKELETAL PAIN AND SPROUTING OF SENSORY NERVE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Aaron P.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Taylor, Reid N.; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Freeman, Katie T.; Coughlin, Kathleen A.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone is frequently accompanied by pain. What remains unclear is why this pain tends to become more severe and difficult to control with disease progression. Here we test the hypothesis that with disease progression sensory nerve fibers that innervate the breast cancer bearing bone undergo a pathological sprouting and reorganization, which in other non-malignant pathologies has been shown to generate and maintain chronic pain. Injection of human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231-BO) into the femoral intramedullary space of female athymic nude mice induces sprouting of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP+) sensory nerve fibers. Nearly all CGRP+ nerve fibers that undergo sprouting also co-express tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA+) and growth associated protein-43 (GAP43+). This ectopic sprouting occurs in periosteal sensory nerve fibers that are in close proximity to breast cancer cells, tumor-associated stromal cells and remodeled cortical bone. Therapeutic treatment with an antibody that sequesters nerve growth factor (NGF), administered when the pain and bone remodeling were first observed, blocks this ectopic sprouting and attenuates cancer pain. The present data suggest that the breast cancer cells and tumor-associated stromal cells express and release NGF, which drives bone pain and the pathological reorganization of nearby CGRP+ / TrkA+ / GAP43+ sensory nerve fibers. PMID:21497141

  17. FIBER-OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fiber-optic enzyme biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate nerve
    agents was developed. The basic element of this biosensor is organophosphorus hydrolase
    immobilized on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated optical fiber
    bundle....

  18. Spike rate of multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve fibers after catheter-based renal nerve ablation.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Schmidt, Bernhard M; Menne, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Diedrich, André; Jordan, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Patients with treatment-resistant arterial hypertension exhibited profound reductions in single sympathetic vasoconstrictor fiber firing rates after renal nerve ablation. In contrast, integrated multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) changed little or not at all. We hypothesized that conventional MSNA analysis may have missed single fiber discharges, thus, obscuring sympathetic inhibition after renal denervation. We studied patients with difficult-to-control arterial hypertension (age 45-74 years) before, 6 (n = 11), and 12 months (n = 8) after renal nerve ablation. Electrocardiogram, respiration, brachial, and finger arterial blood pressure (BP), as well as the MSNA and raw MSNA signals were analyzed. We detected MSNA action-potential spikes using 2 stage kurtosis wavelet denoising techniques to assess mean, median, and maximum spike rates for each beat-to-beat interval. Supine heart rate and systolic BP did not change at 6 (ΔHR: -2 ± 3 bpm; ΔSBP: 2 ± 9 mm Hg) or at 12 months (ΔHR: -1 ± 3 mm Hg, ΔSBP: -1 ± 9 mm Hg) after renal nerve ablation. Mean burst frequency and mean spike frequency at baseline were 34 ± 3 bursts per minute and 8 ± 1 spikes per second. Both measurements did not change at 6 months (-1.4 ± 3.6 bursts/minute; -0.6 ± 1.4 spikes/second) or at 12 months (-2.5 ± 4.0 bursts/minute; -2.0 ± 1.6 spikes/second) after renal nerve ablation. After renal nerve ablation, BP decreased in 3 of 11 patients. BP and MSNA spike frequency changes were not correlated (slope = -0.06; P = .369). Spike rate analysis of multi-unit MSNA neurograms further suggests that profound sympathetic inhibition is not a consistent finding after renal nerve ablation. PMID:26324745

  19. Biomechanics of chiasmal compression: Sensitivity of the mechanical behaviors of nerve fibers to variations in material property and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Neely, Andrew J.; McIlwaine, Gawn G.; Lueck, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism of bitemporal hemianopia is still unclear. Previous research suggested that the nerve fiber packing pattern may contribute to the selective damage of nasal (crossed) nerve fibers. Numerical models were built using finite element modeling to study the biomechanics of optic nerve fibers. The sensitivity of the mechanical behaviors of the nerve fibers to variations of five parameters in the nerve fiber model were investigated using design of experiments (DOE). Results show that the crossing angle is a very significant factor that affects a wide range of responses of the model. The strain difference between the crossed and the uncrossed nerve fibers may account for the phenomenon of bitemporal hemianopia. This work also highlights the need for more accurate material properties of the tissues in the model and an improved understanding of the microstructure of the optic chiasm.

  20. Growth-associated protein 43 immunoreactivity in the superficial dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord is localized in atrophic C-fiber, and not in sprouted A-fiber, central terminals after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Doubell, T P; Woolf, C J

    1997-09-15

    Peripheral nerve injury induces the up-regulation in dorsal root ganglion cells of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) and its transport to the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, where it is located primarily in unmyelinated axons and growth-cone like structures. Peripheral nerve injury also induces the central terminals of axotomized myelinated axons to sprout and form novel synaptic contacts in lamina II of the dorsal horn. To investigate whether the sprouting of A-fiber central terminals into lamina II is the consequence of GAP-43 incorporation into their terminal membranes, we have used an ultrastructural analysis with double labelling to identify the localization of GAP-43 immunoreactivity. Transganglionic transport of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was used to identify C-fiber terminals. Transganglionic transport of the B fragment of cholera toxin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP) was used to label A-fiber sciatic nerve central terminals in combination with GAP-43 immunocytochemistry. GAP-43 was found to colocalize only with WGA-HRP- and not with B-HRP-labelled synapses or axons. In addition, many single-labelled GAP-43 synapses were observed. Many of the WGA-HRP-labelled terminals that were characterized by degenerative changes were GAP-43 immunoreactive. Our results indicate that peripheral nerve injury induces novel synapse formation of A fibers in lamina II but that up-regulated levels of GAP-43 are present mainly in other axon projections to the superficial dorsal horn. PMID:9303528

  1. Retinal nerve fiber bundle tracing and analysis in human eye by polarization sensitive OCT.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Mitsuro; Pircher, Michael; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Roberts, Philipp; Makihira, Tomoyuki; Tomatsu, Nobuhiro; Sato, Makoto; Vass, Clemens; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2015-03-01

    We present a new semi-automatic processing method for retinal nerve fiber bundle tracing based on polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) data sets. The method for tracing is based on a nerve fiber orientation map that covers the fovea and optic nerve head (ONH) regions. In order to generate the orientation map, two types of information are used: optic axis orientation based on polarization data, and complementary information obtained from nerve fiber layer (NFL) local thickness variation to reveal fiber bundle structures around the fovea. The corresponding two orientation maps are fused into a combined fiber orientation map. En face maps of NFL retardation, thickness, and unit-depth-retardation (UDR, equivalent to birefringence) are transformed into "along-trace" maps by using the obtained traces of the nerve fiber bundles. The method is demonstrated in the eyes of healthy volunteers, and as an example of further analyses utilizing this method, maps illustrating the gradients of NFL retardation, thickness, and UDR are demonstrated. PMID:25798324

  2. Nerve fibers that were not stained with the non-specific acetylcholinesterase (NsAchE) method, and TRPV1- and IB4-positive nerve fibers in the rat cornea.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hiura, Akio; Mitome, Masato; Ishimura, Kazunori

    2009-08-01

    Previously, we noticed the presence of nerve fiber-like structures in a whole mount preparation of the rat cornea that had not been stained with the non-specific acetylcholinesterase (NsAchE) method. These nerve-like fibers were projected into the central area of the cornea, forming a mesh-like pattern. The aim of this study is to examine the properties of these mesh-like fibers using the following two methods: their sensitivity to capsaicin and the detection of isolectin B4 (IB4)- and capsaicin receptor TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1)-reactivities. The mean disappeared area of non-stained fibers after NsAchE treatment was 26% of the total areas in the neonatally capsaicin-treated cornea. Bunches composed of fine IB4-positive nerve fibers were seen in a whole mount preparation. There were connections between the bunches, producing a mesh-like pattern similar to that of the fibers that were not stained with NsAchE. Fine TRPV1-immunoreactive (ir) nerve fibers were also shown to form bunches, with connections between each bunch observed in whole mount preparations. Thus, TRPV1-ir nerve fibers seem to densely innervate the rat corneal subepithelial stroma and are distinct from the NsAchE-positive nerve fibers. The TRPV1-ir fine nerve fibers overlapped with the IB4-positive nerve fibers, suggesting that the mesh-like fibers that were not stained with NsAchE are fine nociceptive sensory nerve fibers because of their sensitivity to capsaicin and similar distribution pattern to IB4- and TRPV1-positive nerve fibers. PMID:19763029

  3. Orientational Ordering of Carotenoids in Myelin Membranes Resolved by Polarized Raman Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kutuzov, Nikolay P.; Brazhe, Alexey R.; Maksimov, Georgy V.; Dracheva, Olga E.; Lyaskovskiy, Vladimir L.; Bulygin, Fedor V.; Rubin, Andrey B.

    2014-01-01

    We study orientational ordering of membrane compounds in the myelinated nerve fiber by means of polarized Raman microspectroscopy. The theory of orientational distribution functions was adapted to live-cell measurements. The obtained orientational distribution functions of carotenoids and lipid acyl chain clearly indicated a predominantly radial-like orientation in membranes of the myelin. Two-dimensional Raman images, made under optimal polarization of incident laser beam, corroborated the proposed carotenoid orientation within the bilayer. Experimental data suggested the tilted orientation of both carotenoid polyenic and lipid acyl chains. The values of maximum tilt angles were similar, with possible implication of carotenoid-induced ordering effect on lipid acyl chains, and hence change of myelin membrane properties. This study stages carotenoids of the nerve as possible mediators of excitation and leverages underlying activity-dependent membrane reordering. PMID:25140424

  4. CNS myelin sheath is stochastically built by homotypic fusion of myelin membranes within the bounds of an oligodendrocyte process.

    PubMed

    Szuchet, Sara; Nielsen, Lauren L; Domowicz, Miriam S; Austin, Jotham R; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L

    2015-04-01

    Myelin - the multilayer membrane that envelops axons - is a facilitator of rapid nerve conduction. Oligodendrocytes form CNS myelin; the prevailing hypothesis being that they do it by extending a process that circumnavigates the axon. It is pertinent to ask how myelin is built because oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and myelin are compositionally different. To this end, we examined oligodendrocyte cultures and embryonic avian optic nerves by electron microscopy, immuno-electron microscopy and three-dimensional electron tomography. The results support three novel concepts. Myelin membranes are synthesized as tubules and packaged into "myelinophore organelles" in the oligodendrocyte perikaryon. Myelin membranes are matured in and transported by myelinophore organelles within an oligodendrocyte process. The myelin sheath is generated by myelin membrane fusion inside an oligodendrocyte process. These findings abrogate the dogma of myelin resulting from a wrapping motion of an oligodendrocyte process and open up new avenues in the quest for understanding myelination in health and disease. PMID:25682762

  5. Streptozotocin induced diabetes as a model of phrenic nerve neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Filho, Omar Andrade; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2006-03-15

    Phrenic neuropathies are increasingly recognized in peripheral neuropathies but reports on experimental models of the phrenic nerves diabetic neuropathy are scanty. In the present study, we investigated the phrenic nerve neuropathy, due to experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and the evolution of this neuropathy in diabetic rats treated with insulin. Proximal and distal segments of the left and right phrenic nerves were morphologically and morphometrically evaluated, from rats rendered diabetic for 12 weeks, by injection of STZ. Control rats received vehicle. Treated rats received a single subcutaneous injection of insulin on a daily basis. The nerves were prepared for light microcopy study by means of conventional techniques. Morphometry was carried out with the aid of computer software. The phrenic nerves of diabetic rats showed smaller myelinated axon diameters compared to controls. The g ratio was significantly smaller for myelinated fibers from diabetic rats compared to controls. Insulin treatment prevented these alterations. Histograms of size distribution for myelinated fibers and axons from control rats were bimodal. For diabetic animals, the myelinated fiber histogram was bimodal while the axon distribution turned to be unimodal. Insulin treatment also prevented these alterations. Our results confirm the phrenic nerve neuropathy in this experimental model of diabetes and suggest that conventional insulin treatment was able to prevent and/or correct the myelinated axon commitment by diabetes. PMID:16125783

  6. A phenotypically restricted set of primary afferent nerve fibers innervate the bone versus skin: therapeutic opportunity for treating skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Xu, Kevin Haili; Ferng, Alice S.; Dussor, Gregory; Vanderah, Todd W.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2009-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of chronic pain and physical disability in both developed as well as developing countries, relatively little is known about the nerve fibers and mechanisms that drive skeletal pain. Small diameter sensory nerve fibers, most of which are C-fiber nociceptors, can be separated into two broad populations: the peptide-rich and peptide-poor nerve fibers. Peptide-rich nerve fibers express substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). In contrast, the peptide-poor nerve fibers bind to isolectin B4 (IB4) and express the purinergic receptor P2X3 and Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor member d (Mrgprd). In the present report, we used mice in which the Mrgprd+ nerve fibers express genetically encoded axonal tracers to determine the peptide-rich and peptide-poor sensory nerve fibers that innervate the glabrous skin of the hindpaw as compared to the bone marrow, mineralized bone and periosteum of the femur. Whereas the skin is richly innervated by CGRP+, SP+, P2X3+ and Mrgprd+ sensory nerve fibers, the bone marrow, mineralized bone and periosteum receive a significant innervation by SP+ and CGRP+, but not Mrgprd+ and P2X3+ nerve fibers. This lack of redundancy in the populations of C-fibers that innervate the bone may present a unique therapeutic opportunity for targeting skeletal pain, as the peptide-rich and peptide-poor sensory nerve fibers generally express a different repertoire of receptors and channels to detect noxious stimuli. Thus, therapies that target the specific types of C-nerve fibers that innervate the bone may be uniquely effective in attenuating skeletal pain as compared to skin pain. PMID:19766746

  7. Dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve: a light and electron microscopy histometric study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Adriana L C R D; Fazan, Valéria P S; Marques, Wilson; Barreira, Amilton A

    2011-06-01

    This study describes the normal morphology and morphometry of the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve (DCBU) in humans. Fourteen nerves of eight donors were prepared by conventional techniques for paraffin and epoxy resin embedding. Semiautomatic morphometric analysis was performed by means of specific computer software. Histograms of the myelinated and unmyelinated fiber population and the G-ratio distribution of fibers were plotted. Myelinated fiber density per nerve varied from 5,910 to 10,166 fibers/mm(2) , with an average of 8,170 ± 393 fibers/mm(2) . The distribution was bimodal with peaks at 4.0 and 9.5 µm. Unmyelinated fiber density per nerve varied from 50,985 to 127,108, with an average of 78,474 ± 6,610 fibers/mm(2) , with a unimodal distribution displaying a peak at 0.8 µm. This study thus adds information about the fascicles and myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of DCBU nerves in normal people, which may be useful in further studies concerning ulnar nerve neuropathies, mainly leprosy neuropathy. PMID:21692907

  8. Cornea nerve fiber quantification and construction of phenotypes in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Oudejans, Linda; He, Xuan; Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert; Brines, Michael; van Velzen, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Cornea confocal microscopy (CCM) is a novel non-invasive method to detect small nerve fiber pathology. CCM generally correlates with outcomes of skin biopsies in patients with small fiber pathology. The aim of this study was to quantify the morphology of small nerve fibers of the cornea of patients with fibromyalgia in terms of density, length and branching and further phenotype these patients using standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST). Small fiber pathology was detected in the cornea of 51% of patients: nerve fiber length was significantly decreased in 44% of patients compared to age- and sex-matched reference values; nerve fiber density and branching were significantly decreased in 10% and 28% of patients. The combination of the CCM parameters and sensory tests for central sensitization, (cold pain threshold, mechanical pain threshold, mechanical pain sensitivity, allodynia and/or windup), yielded four phenotypes of fibromyalgia patients in a subgroup analysis: one group with normal cornea morphology without and with signs of central sensitization, and a group with abnormal cornea morphology parameters without and with signs of central sensitization. In conclusion, half of the tested fibromyalgia population demonstrates signs of small fiber pathology as measured by CCM. The four distinct phenotypes suggest possible differences in disease mechanisms and may require different treatment approaches. PMID:27006259

  9. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies.

  10. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies. PMID:24395587

  11. A method for the staining of intraosseous nerve fibers using Sihler's staining technique.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, K; Miida, K; Tanaka, R; Shimoda, S

    2013-08-01

    Understanding nerve fiber distribution in the jaw bone is important when performing invasive surgical treatments. Both microscopic and macroscopic anatomical techniques have been developed to study innervation. Conventional methods of removing and staining these structures, however, often alter structure and lack reproducibility of the resulting specimens. We sought to optimize Sihler's staining technique to stain intraosseous nerves in mandibles. Four cadaver specimens were used. The best staining of intraosseous nerve fibers was achieved by using the Plank-Rychlo solution. When the Styrene monomer was used, the resulting transparency was better than that obtained with glycerin under the same conditions. No significant differences were found between Sihler's staining procedure performed according to the conventional method and the procedure in which the second decalcification step was omitted. Our results demonstrate that applying Sihler's staining technique to bones makes them transparent and allows observation of nerves while preserving the external shape of the bone and maintaining the position of intraosseous nerve fibers. Our findings suggest our Sihler staining method for intraosseous nerve fibers can provide an intermediate resolution between macroscopic and microscopic techniques. PMID:23472877

  12. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  13. A comparative study of acellular nerve xenografts and allografts in repairing rat facial nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haitao; Xiao, Hongxi; Liu, Huawei; Niu, Yu; Yan, Rongzeng; Hu, Min

    2015-10-01

    Acellular nerves are composed of a basal lamina tube, which retains sufficient bioactivity to promote axon regeneration, thereby repairing peripheral nerve gaps. However, the clinical application of acellular allografts has been restricted due to its limited availability. To investigate whether xenografts, a substitute to allograft acellular nerves in abundant supply, could efficiently promote nerve regeneration, rabbit and rat acellular nerve grafts were used to reconstruct 1 cm defects in Wistar rat facial nerves. Autologous peroneal nerve grafts served as a positive control group. A total of 12 weeks following the surgical procedure, the axon number, myelinated axon number, myelin sheath thickness, and nerve conduction velocity of the rabbit and rat‑derived acellular nerve grafts were similar, whereas the fiber diameter of the rabbit‑derived acellular xenografts decreased, as compared with those of rat‑derived acellular allografts. Autografts exerted superior effects on nerve regeneration; however, no significant difference was observed between the axon number in the autograft group, as compared with the two acellular groups. These results suggested that autografts perform better than acellular nerve grafts, and chemically extracted acellular allografts and xenografts have similar effects on the regeneration of short facial nerve defects. PMID:26239906

  14. The transcriptome of mouse central nervous system myelin

    PubMed Central

    Thakurela, Sudhir; Garding, Angela; Jung, Ramona B.; Müller, Christina; Goebbels, Sandra; White, Robin; Werner, Hauke B.; Tiwari, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in the CNS is facilitated by insulation of axons with myelin, a specialized oligodendroglial compartment distant from the cell body. Myelin is turned over and adapted throughout life; however, the molecular and cellular basis of myelin dynamics remains elusive. Here we performed a comprehensive transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq) of myelin biochemically purified from mouse brains at various ages and find a surprisingly large pool of transcripts enriched in myelin. Further computational analysis showed that the myelin transcriptome is closely related to the myelin proteome but clearly distinct from the transcriptomes of oligodendrocytes and brain tissues, suggesting a highly selective incorporation of mRNAs into the myelin compartment. The mRNA-pool in myelin displays maturation-dependent dynamic changes of composition, abundance, and functional associations; however ageing-dependent changes after 6 months were minor. We suggest that this transcript pool enables myelin turnover and the local adaptation of individual pre-existing myelin sheaths. PMID:27173133

  15. The transcriptome of mouse central nervous system myelin.

    PubMed

    Thakurela, Sudhir; Garding, Angela; Jung, Ramona B; Müller, Christina; Goebbels, Sandra; White, Robin; Werner, Hauke B; Tiwari, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in the CNS is facilitated by insulation of axons with myelin, a specialized oligodendroglial compartment distant from the cell body. Myelin is turned over and adapted throughout life; however, the molecular and cellular basis of myelin dynamics remains elusive. Here we performed a comprehensive transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq) of myelin biochemically purified from mouse brains at various ages and find a surprisingly large pool of transcripts enriched in myelin. Further computational analysis showed that the myelin transcriptome is closely related to the myelin proteome but clearly distinct from the transcriptomes of oligodendrocytes and brain tissues, suggesting a highly selective incorporation of mRNAs into the myelin compartment. The mRNA-pool in myelin displays maturation-dependent dynamic changes of composition, abundance, and functional associations; however ageing-dependent changes after 6 months were minor. We suggest that this transcript pool enables myelin turnover and the local adaptation of individual pre-existing myelin sheaths. PMID:27173133

  16. Uncompacted Myelin Lamellae and Nodal Ion Channel Disruption in POEMS Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Rina; Koike, Haruki; Takahashi, Mie; Ohyama, Ken; Kawagashira, Yuichi; Iijima, Masahiro; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-01

    To elucidate the significance of uncompacted myelin lamellae (UML) and ion channel disruption at the nodes of Ranvier in the polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome, we evaluated sural nerve biopsy specimens from 33 patients with POEMS syndrome and from 7 control patients. Uncompacted myelin lamellae distribution was assessed by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy. In the POEMS patient biopsies, UML were seen more frequently in small versus large myelinated fibers. Paranodes and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, where normal physiologic UM is located, were frequently associated with UM. Widening of the nodes of Ranvier (i.e. segmental demyelination) was not associated with UML. There was axonal hollowing with neurofilament condensation at Schmidt-Lanterman incisures with abnormal UML, suggesting axonal damage at those sites in the POEMS patient biopsies. Myelin sheath irregularity was conspicuous in large myelinated fibers and was associated with abnormally widened bizarrely shaped Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. Indirect immunofluorescent studies revealed abnormalities of sodium (pan sodium) and potassium (KCNQ2) channels, even at nonwidened nodes of Ranvier. Thus, UML was not apparently associated with segmental demyelination but seemed to be associated with axonal damage. These observations suggest that nodal ion channel disruption may be associated with functional deficits in POEMS syndrome patient nerves. PMID:26574667

  17. Brain imaging signatures of the relationship between epidermal nerve fibers and heat pain perception.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-11-15

    Although the small-diameter primary afferent fibers in the skin promptly respond to nociceptive stimuli and convey sensory inputs to the central nervous system, the neural signatures that underpin the relationship between cutaneous afferent fibers and pain perception remain elusive. We combined skin biopsy at the lateral aspect of the distal leg, which is used to quantify cutaneous afferent fibers, with fMRI, which is used to assess brain responses and functional connectivity, to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensory nerves and the corresponding pain perception in the brain after applying heat pain stimulation to the dorsum of the right foot in healthy subjects. During painful stimulation, the degree of cutaneous innervation, as measured by epidermal nerve fiber density, was correlated with individual blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the posterior insular cortex and of the thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and rostral ventromedial medulla. Pain perception was associated with the activation of the anterior insular cortex and with the functional connectivity from the anterior insular cortex to the primary somatosensory cortex during painful stimulation. Most importantly, both epidermal nerve fiber density and activity in the posterior insular cortex showed a positive correlation with the strength of coupling under pain between the anterior insular cortex and the primary somatosensory cortex. Thus, our findings support the notion that the neural circuitry subserving pain perception interacts with the cerebral correlates of peripheral nociceptive fibers, which implicates an indirect role for skin nerves in human pain perception. PMID:26279210

  18. Morphologic Characterization of Nerves in Whole-Mount Airway Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J.; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Woodcock, Ashley A.; Smith, Jaclyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Neuroplasticity of bronchopulmonary afferent neurons that respond to mechanical and chemical stimuli may sensitize the cough reflex. Afferent drive in cough is carried by the vagus nerve, and vagal afferent nerve terminals have been well defined in animals. Yet, both unmyelinated C fibers and particularly the morphologically distinct, myelinated, nodose-derived mechanoreceptors described in animals are poorly characterized in humans. To date there are no distinctive molecular markers or detailed morphologies available for human bronchopulmonary afferent nerves. Objectives: Morphologic and neuromolecular characterization of the afferent nerves that are potentially involved in cough in humans. Methods: A whole-mount immunofluorescence approach, rarely used in human lung tissue, was used with antibodies specific to protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) and, for the first time in human lung tissue, 200-kD neurofilament subunit. Measurements and Main Results: We have developed a robust technique to visualize fibers consistent with autonomic and C fibers and pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. A group of morphologically distinct, 200-kD neurofilament-immunopositive myelinated afferent fibers, a subpopulation of which did not express PGP9.5, was also identified. Conclusions: PGP9.5-immunonegative nerves are strikingly similar to myelinated airway afferents, the cough receptor, and smooth muscle–associated airway receptors described in rodents. These have never been described in humans. Full description of human airway nerves is critical to the translation of animal studies to the clinical setting. PMID:25906337

  19. Endometrial nerve fibers in women with endometriosis, adenomyosis, and uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinmei; Lu, Bangchun; Huang, Xiufeng; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Caiyun; Lin, Jun

    2009-11-01

    To determine whether nerve fibers in the functional layer endometrium are caused by an endometriosis itself or a common symptom of pain, endometrial tissues from 30 women with endometriosis, 40 women with adenomyosis, 41 women with uterine fibroids, and 47 endometriosis women with adenomyosis were stained immunohistochemically using the highly specific polyclonal rabbit antiprotein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) and monoclonal mouse antineurofilament protein. We demonstrated PGP9.5-immunoactive nerve fibers in the functional layer of endometrium in women with pain symptoms, but not in women without pain symptoms, whether the women had endometriosis, adenomyosis, uterine fibroids, or endometriosis with adenomyosis, suggesting a role of PGP9.5-immunoactive nerve fibers in the functional layer of the endometrium playing in pain generation in these disorders. PMID:19535047

  20. Fiber-optic-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors for the detection of toxic nerve agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Anna M. C.; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Banerji, Soame; Masson, Jean-Francois; Booksh, Karl S.

    2004-03-01

    Analytical instruments capable of detecting nerve agents in battlefield conditions where speed, accuracy and ease of operation are a must in today's military. Fast detection and decontamination of nerve agents in very low concentrations is the primary focus of our research. The method presented here focuses on optimizing polymer stabilized sensing elements on the surface of SPR fiber-optic probes. A number of polymers & polymer supported metal complexes capable of reversibly binding to the species of interest & which have robust operation in hostile environments are incorporated with the fiber optic sensing elements. An optical technique, such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), better suited to rapid data collection without sample pretreatment is employed. The approach using polymer-based optical fibers with off-the-shelf SPR system components has been tested for the detection of Pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP), a simulant for nerve agent Soman. Surface initiated polymeric sensors have higher sensitivity toward detecting PMP than bulk-polymerized sensors.

  1. Gamma Knife Irradiation of Injured Sciatic Nerve Induces Histological and Behavioral Improvement in the Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Yagasaki, Yuki; Hayashi, Motohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Kawakami, Yoriko

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of gamma knife (GK) irradiation on injured nerves using a rat partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) model. GK irradiation was performed at one week after ligation and nerve preparations were made three weeks after ligation. GK irradiation is known to induce immune responses such as glial cell activation in the central nervous system. Thus, we determined the effects of GK irradiation on macrophages using immunoblot and histochemical analyses. Expression of Iba-1 protein, a macrophage marker, was further increased in GK-treated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. Immunohistochemical study of Iba-1 in GK-irradiated injured sciatic nerves demonstrated Iba-1 positive macrophage accumulation to be enhanced in areas distal to the ligation point. In the same area, myelin debris was also more efficiently removed by GK-irradiation. Myelin debris clearance by macrophages is thought to contribute to a permissive environment for axon growth. In the immunoblot study, GK irradiation significantly increased expressions of βIII-tubulin protein and myelin protein zero, which are markers of axon regeneration and re-myelination, respectively. Toluidine blue staining revealed the re-myelinated fiber diameter to be larger at proximal sites and that the re-myelinated fiber number was increased at distal sites in GK-irradiated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. These results suggest that GK irradiation of injured nerves facilitates regeneration and re-myelination. In a behavior study, early alleviation of allodynia was observed with GK irradiation in PSL rats. When GK-induced alleviation of allodynia was initially detected, the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a potent analgesic factor, was significantly increased by GK irradiation. These results suggested that GK irradiation alleviates allodynia via increased GDNF. This study provides novel evidence that GK irradiation of

  2. Molecular mimicry between Mycobacterium leprae proteins (50S ribosomal protein L2 and Lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and myelin basic protein: a possible mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Mishra, Bishal; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, U D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    Autoantibodies against various components of host are known to occur in leprosy. Nerve damage is the primary cause of disability associated with leprosy. The aim of this study was to detect the level of autoantibodies and lympho-proliferative response against myelin basic protein (MBP) in leprosy patients (LPs) and their correlation with clinical phenotypes of LPs. Further, probable role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage of LPs was investigated. We observed significantly high level of anti-MBP antibodies in LPs across the spectrum and a positive significant correlation between the level of anti-MBP antibodies and the number of nerves involved in LPs. We report here that 4 B cell epitopes of myelin A1 and Mycobacterium leprae proteins, 50S ribosomal L2 and lysyl tRNA synthetase are cross-reactive. Further, M. leprae sonicated antigen hyperimmunization was responsible for induction of autoantibody response in mice which could be adoptively transferred to naive mice. For the first time our findings suggest the role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage in leprosy. PMID:25576930

  3. Localization of NADPH Oxidase in Sympathetic and Sensory Ganglion Neurons and Perivascular Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xian; Demel, Stacie L.; Quinn, Mark T.; Galligan, James J.; Kreulen, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide anion (O2−•) production was previously reported to be increased in celiac ganglia (CG) during DOCA-salt hypertension, possibly via activation of the reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. This suggested a role for neuronal NADPH oxidase in autonomic neurovascular control. However, the expression and localization of NADPH oxidase in the peripheral neurons is not fully known. The purpose of this study was to examine the subcellular localization of NADPH oxidase in sympathetic and sensory ganglion neurons and perivascular nerve fibers. In rat CG, p22phox and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were colocalized in all neurons. P22phox was also localized to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that contain calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). In mesenteric arteries, p22phox and p47phox were colocalized with NPY or CGRP in perivascular nerve terminals. A similar pattern of nerve terminal staining of p22phox and p47phox was also found in cultured CG neurons and nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized localization of NADPH oxidase in perivascular nerve fibers. The presence of a O2−• – generating enzyme in close vicinity to the sites of neurotransmitter handling in the nerve fibers suggests the possibility of novel redox-mediated mechanisms in peripheral neurovascular control. PMID:19716351

  4. Stochastic information transfer from cochlear implant electrodes to auditory nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiao; Grayden, David B.; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2014-08-01

    Cochlear implants, also called bionic ears, are implanted neural prostheses that can restore lost human hearing function by direct electrical stimulation of auditory nerve fibers. Previously, an information-theoretic framework for numerically estimating the optimal number of electrodes in cochlear implants has been devised. This approach relies on a model of stochastic action potential generation and a discrete memoryless channel model of the interface between the array of electrodes and the auditory nerve fibers. Using these models, the stochastic information transfer from cochlear implant electrodes to auditory nerve fibers is estimated from the mutual information between channel inputs (the locations of electrodes) and channel outputs (the set of electrode-activated nerve fibers). Here we describe a revised model of the channel output in the framework that avoids the side effects caused by an "ambiguity state" in the original model and also makes fewer assumptions about perceptual processing in the brain. A detailed comparison of how different assumptions on fibers and current spread modes impact on the information transfer in the original model and in the revised model is presented. We also mathematically derive an upper bound on the mutual information in the revised model, which becomes tighter as the number of electrodes increases. We found that the revised model leads to a significantly larger maximum mutual information and corresponding number of electrodes compared with the original model and conclude that the assumptions made in this part of the modeling framework are crucial to the model's overall utility.

  5. Dithranol abolishes UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the nerve fibers of the rat orofacial skin.

    PubMed

    Orojan, Ivan; Szigeti, Csaba; Varszegi, Szilvia; Dobo, Endre; Gulya, Karoly

    2006-11-22

    Dithranol has been used to treat psoriasis for decades. Although its beneficial effect may involve the induction of cutaneous inflammation, and inflammation often leads to damages in nerve fibers, these alterations are not well documented. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dithranol on the immunohistochemical characteristics of the cutaneous nerve fibers in the rat skin. Epidermal nerve fiber staining was achieved with ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) immunohistochemistry in the orofacial skin of control rats, rats treated with (a) dithranol for 5 days, (b) corticosteroid for 5 days following dithranol treatment for 5 days, and (c) corticosteroid for 5 days. The results revealed a complete loss of UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the dithranol-treated animals. Topical application of corticosteroid onto the inflamed skin for 5 days reversed this effect: the UCH-L1 immunoreactivity was almost completely restored. Steroid treatment for 5 days did not change the appearance of the UCH-L1-immunoreactive nerve fibers. These findings were supported by Western blot analyses. We conclude that dithranol, incidentally similarly to psoriasis, causes inflammation and abolishes UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the rat orofacial skin in a corticosteroid-reversible manner. This phenomenon may be due to the ability of dithranol to cause oxidative damage to the UCH-L1 protein, and to the antioxidant activity of the corticosteroids countering this effect. PMID:17011532

  6. Reduction in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo; Pardini, Matteo; Benassi, Francesca; Marciano, Sara; Amore, Mario; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Porfirio, Maria Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the use of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) evaluation as an easy-to-use, reproducible, proxy-measure of brain structural abnormalities. Here, we evaluated RNFL thickness in a group of subjects with high functioning autism (HFA) or with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to its potential as a tool to study autism…

  7. Speckle reduction during all-fiber common-path optical coherence tomography of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Fiddy, Michael; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-02-01

    Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery, which are responsible for erectile function, may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. In this study, we use a rat prostate, ex vivo, to evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a diagnostic tool for real-time imaging and identification of the cavernous nerves. A novel OCT system based on an all single-mode fiber common-path interferometer-based scanning system is used for this purpose. A wavelet shrinkage denoising technique using Stein's unbiased risk estimator (SURE) algorithm to calculate a data-adaptive threshold is implemented for speckle noise reduction in the OCT image. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was improved by 9 dB and the image quality metrics of the cavernous nerves also improved significantly.

  8. Blood-nerve barrier in IgM paraproteinemic neuropathy: a clinicopathologic assessment.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Usui, S; Beppu, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamawaki, M; Oda, M

    1998-02-01

    We report the pathologic findings in a patient with sensorimotor neuropathy associated with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, particularly in relation to blood-nerve barrier defects. The monoclonal IgM was of kappa type and possessed anti-HNK-1 activity. A sural nerve biopsy specimen revealed severe loss of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers and gaps between adjacent endothelial cells of small endoneurial vessels. Postmortem findings 3 years later included severe loss of myelinated nerve fibers and diffuse infiltration by lymphoplasmacytic B cells throughout the peripheral nervous system, sparing the central nervous system. Findings in this case suggest an immune attack against endoneurial endothelial cells with permeation of IgM into peripheral nerve tissue. PMID:9498055

  9. Registration of adaptive optics corrected retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) images

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Gomathy; Lombardo, Marco; Devaney, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the western world. Investigation of high-resolution retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) images in patients may lead to new indicators of its onset. Adaptive optics (AO) can provide diffraction-limited images of the retina, providing new opportunities for earlier detection of neuroretinal pathologies. However, precise processing is required to correct for three effects in sequences of AO-assisted, flood-illumination images: uneven illumination, residual image motion and image rotation. This processing can be challenging for images of the RNFL due to their low contrast and lack of clearly noticeable features. Here we develop specific processing techniques and show that their application leads to improved image quality on the nerve fiber bundles. This in turn improves the reliability of measures of fiber texture such as the correlation of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). PMID:24940551

  10. Degradation in the degree of polarization in human retinal nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Biwei; Wang, Bingqing; Rylander, Henry G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Using a fiber-based swept-source (SS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system, we investigate the degree of polarization (DOP) of light backscattered from the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in normal human subjects. Algorithms for processing data were developed to analyze the deviation in phase retardation and intensity of backscattered light in directions parallel and perpendicular to the nerve fiber axis (fast and slow axes of RNFL). Considering superior, inferior, and nasal quadrants, we observe the strongest degradation in the DOP with increasing RNFL depth in the temporal quadrant. Retinal ganglion cell axons in normal human subjects are known to have the smallest diameter in the temporal quadrant, and the greater degradation observed in the DOP suggests that higher polarimetric noise may be associated with neural structure in the temporal RNFL. The association between depth degradation in the DOP and RNFL structural properties may broaden the utility of PS-OCT as a functional imaging technique.

  11. [Biophysics of nerve excitation].

    PubMed

    Kol'e, O R; Maksimov, G V

    2010-01-01

    The studies testifying to the presence of the interrelation between the physiological functions of the organism and physical and chemical processes in nerves are discussed. Changes in some physical and chemical parameters observed both upon elicited rhythmic exaltation of nerves and during the spontaneous rhythmic activity of neurons are analyzed. Upon rhythmic exaltation, a complex of physical and chemical processes is triggered, and reversible structural and metabolic rearrangements at the subcellular and molecular levels occur that do not take place during the generation of a single action potential. Thus, only in conditions of rhythmic exaltation of a nerve, it is possible to reveal those processes that provide exaltation of nerves in the organism. The future possibilities of the investigations combining the biophysical and physiological approaches are substantiated. Characteristic changes in physicochemical parameters are observed in nerves during the generation of a series of action potentials of different frequency and duration ("frequency dependence") under normal physiological conditions, as well as in extreme situations and in nerve pathology. The structural and metabolic rearrangements are directly related to the mode of rhythmic exaltation and proceed both in the course of rhythmic exaltation and after its termination. Participation and the basic components of the nervous fulcrum (an axon, Shwan cell, myelin, subcellular organelles) in the realization of rhythmic exaltation is shown. In the coordination of all processes involved in rhythmic exaltation, the main role is played by the systems of redistribution and transport of intercellular and endocellular calcium. The idea is put forward that myelin of nerve fibers is not only an isolator, but also an "intercellular depot" of calcium and participates in the redistribution of different ions. Thus, the rhythmic excitation is of great importance in the realization of some physiological functions, the

  12. High-resolution measurement of electrically-evoked vagus nerve activity in the anesthetized dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Paul B.; Lubock, Nathan B.; Hincapie, Juan G.; Ruble, Stephen B.; Hamann, Jason J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Not fully understanding the type of axons activated during vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is one of several factors that limit the clinical efficacy of VNS therapies. The main goal of this study was to characterize the electrical recruitment of both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers within the cervical vagus nerve. Approach. In anesthetized dogs, recording nerve cuff electrodes were implanted on the vagus nerve following surgical excision of the epineurium. Both the vagal electroneurogram (ENG) and laryngeal muscle activity were recorded in response to stimulation of the right vagus nerve. Main results. Desheathing the nerve significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio of the ENG by 1.2 to 9.9 dB, depending on the nerve fiber type. Repeated VNS following nerve transection or neuromuscular block (1) enabled the characterization of A-fibers, two sub-types of B-fibers, and unmyelinated C-fibers, (2) confirmed the absence of stimulation-evoked reflex compound nerve action potentials in both the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves, and (3) provided evidence of stimulus spillover into muscle tissue surrounding the stimulating electrode. Significance. Given the anatomical similarities between the canine and human vagus nerves, the results of this study provide a template for better understanding the nerve fiber recruitment patterns associated with VNS therapies.

  13. Transient Alterations of Cutaneous Sensory Nerve Function by Noninvasive Cryolipolysis.

    PubMed

    Garibyan, Lilit; Cornelissen, Laura; Sipprell, William; Pruessner, Joachim; Elmariah, Sarina; Luo, Tuan; Lerner, Ethan A; Jung, Yookyung; Evans, Conor; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B; Rox Anderson, R

    2015-11-01

    Cryolipolysis is a noninvasive, skin cooling treatment for local fat reduction that causes prolonged hypoesthesia over the treated area. We tested the hypothesis that cryolipolysis can attenuate nociception of a range of sensory stimuli, including stimuli that evoke itch. The effects of cryolipolysis on sensory phenomena were evaluated by quantitative sensory testing (QST) in 11 healthy subjects over a period of 56 days. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were measured on treated and contralateral untreated (control) flanks. Itch duration was evaluated following histamine iontophoresis. Unmyelinated epidermal nerve fiber and myelinated dermal nerve fiber densities were quantified in skin biopsies from six subjects. Cryolipolysis produced a marked decrease in mechanical and thermal pain sensitivity. Hyposensitivity started between two to seven days after cryolipolysis and persisted for at least thirty-five days post treatment. Skin biopsies revealed that cryolipolysis decreased epidermal nerve fiber density, as well as dermal myelinated nerve fiber density, which persisted throughout the study. In conclusion, cryolipolysis causes significant and prolonged decreases in cutaneous sensitivity. Our data suggest that controlled skin cooling to specifically target cutaneous nerve fibers has the potential to be useful for prolonged relief of cutaneous pain and might have a use as a research tool to isolate and study cutaneous itch-sensing nerves in human skin. PMID:26099028

  14. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust

  15. Biophysical and functional consequences of receptor-mediated nerve fiber transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Tanelian, D L; Markin, V S

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of the nervous system by substance P, a G protein-coupled receptor, and subsequent receptor internalization causes dendrites to change their shape from homogeneous cylinders to a heterogeneous string of swollen varicosities (beads) connected by thin segments. In this paper we have analyzed this phenomenon and propose quantitative mechanisms to explain this type of physical shape transformation. We developed a mathematical solution to describe the relationship between the initial radius of a cylindrical nerve fiber and the average radii of the subsequently created varicosities and connecting segments, as well as the periodicity of the varicosities along the nerve fiber. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with our own and published experimental data from dorsal root ganglion neurons, spinal cord, and brain. Modeling the electrical properties of these beaded fibers has led to an understanding of the functional biophysical consequences of nerve fiber transformation. Several hypotheses for how this shape transformation can be used to process information within the nervous system have been put forth. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:9138558

  16. Disruption of myelin leads to ectopic expression of K(V)1.1 channels with abnormal conductivity of optic nerve axons in a cuprizone-induced model of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Bandita; Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Kaza, Seshu; Scholz, Dimitri; O'Leary, Valerie B; Dolly, J Oliver; Ovsepian, Saak V

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants of abnormal propagation of action potentials along axons and ectopic conductance in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system, like multiple sclerosis (MS), are poorly defined. Widespread interruption of myelin occurs in several mouse models of demyelination, rendering them useful for research. Herein, considerable myelin loss is shown in the optic nerves of cuprizone-treated demyelinating mice. Immuno-fluorescence confocal analysis of the expression and distribution of voltage-activated K⁺ channels (K(V)1.1 and 1.2 α subunits) revealed their spread from typical juxta-paranodal (JXP) sites to nodes in demyelinated axons, albeit with a disproportionate increase in the level of K(V)1.1 subunit. Functionally, in contrast to monophasic compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded in controls, responses derived from optic nerves of cuprizone-treated mice displayed initial synchronous waveform followed by a dispersed component. Partial restoration of CAPs by broad spectrum (4-aminopyridine) or K(V)1.1-subunit selective (dendrotoxin K) blockers of K⁺ currents suggest enhanced K(V)1.1-mediated conductance in the demyelinated optic nerve. Biophysical profiling of K⁺ currents mediated by recombinant channels comprised of different K(V)1.1 and 1.2 stoichiometries revealed that the enrichment of K(V)1 channels K(V)1.1 subunit endows a decrease in the voltage threshold and accelerates the activation kinetics. Together with the morphometric data, these findings provide important clues to a molecular basis for temporal dispersion of CAPs and reduced excitability of demyelinated optic nerves, which could be of potential relevance to the patho-physiology of MS and related disorders. PMID:24498366

  17. [Effects of local corticoids on the nerve fiber. Experimental study (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Magalon, G; Roffe, J L; Pellissier, J F; Chrestian, M; Benaim, L; Bureau, H

    1982-05-13

    The intra-operative establishment of some impairments of the median nerve, in patients who are operated for carpal tunnel syndrome and who previously received several local injections of corticoids, led the authors to try to see the respective responsibility of the compression and of the injection in the degenerative process. In 60- dog cubital nerves, it has been possible, to study different parameters by intra and perineural (recurrent or not injections: the puncture, the dilatation, the solvents, the benzylic alcool and two long action corticoids very often used (triamcinolone acetonide, cortivazol). In the first of our series, the injections were done around the nerve and inside the nerve under visual or blind control (as for an infiltration). The nerves are then cut off after 1, 2, or 3 months. In the second of our series, the injections were done in the same way, but recurrently on the first, second and third month, and the nerve was cut off within the fourth month. An electrophysiological study was performed before taking the samples; they were then prepared for reading on the optical and electron microscope. The results show lesions characterized by an epineural spumous sediment, a localized decrease in the large fibers under the perineurium in the first and second series. These impairments seem to be diminishing with time. However when the injections are done recurrently, the lesions are more important, showing a wallerian degeneration and regeneration. PMID:6285499

  18. The cutaneous nerve biopsy: technical aspects, indications, and contribution.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Nolano, Maria; Sommer, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Skin biopsy with a 3mm disposable circular punch is easy to perform and allows, after proper processing, the visualization of epidermal, dermal, and sweat gland nerve fibers. A technique of sampling the epidermis alone by applying a suction capsule, the "blister" technique, has also been developed. It is most common to stain immunohistochemically for the pan-axonal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), an ubiquitin C-terminal hydroxylase. The sections are then observed and analyzed with bright-field microscopy or with indirect immunofluorescence with or without confocal microscopy. Most studies report quantification of intraepidermal nerve fiber density displayed in bright-field microscopy. Normative values have been established, particularly from the distal part of the leg, 10cm above the external malleolus. In diabetes mellitus early degeneration of intraepidermal nerve fibers is induced and there is slower regeneration even when there is no evidence of neuropathy. Skin biopsy is of particular value in the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy when nerve conduction studies are normal. It may also be repeated in order to study the progressive nature of the disease and also has the potential of studying regeneration of nerve fibers and thus the effects of treatment. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies may also involve loss of small-diameter nerve fibers and IgM deposits in dermal myelinated nerve fibers in anti-MAG neuropathy. In some cases the presence of vasculitis in skin may indicate a nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy and in HIV neuropathy intraepidermal nerve fiber density is reduced in a length-dependent manner. In several hereditary neuropathies intraepidermal nerve fiber density may be reduced but other abnormalities can also be demonstrated in dermal myelinated fibers. Some small swellings and varicosities may be present in the distal leg skin biopsy of healthy individuals but large axonal swellings are considered as evidence of a pathological

  19. Identification of the origin of adrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibers within the superior hypogastric plexus of the human fetus

    PubMed Central

    Zaitouna, Mazen; Alsaid, Bayan; Diallo, Djibril; Benoit, Gérard; Bessede, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Nerve fibers contributing to the superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) and the hypogastric nerves (HN) are currently considered to comprise an adrenergic part of the autonomic nervous system located between vertebrae (T1 and L2), with cholinergic aspects originating from the second to fourth sacral spinal segments (S2, S3 and S4). The aim of this study was to identify the origin and the nature of the nerve fibers within the SHP and the HN, especially the cholinergic fibers, using computer-assisted anatomic dissection (CAAD). Serial histological sections were performed at the level of the lumbar spine and pelvis in five human fetuses between 14 and 30 weeks of gestation. Sections were treated with histological staining [hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson's trichrome (TriM)] and with immunohistochemical methods to detect nerve fibers (anti-S100), adrenergic fibers (anti-TH), cholinergic fibers (anti-VAChT) and nitrergic fibers (anti-nNOS). The sections were then digitalized using a high-resolution scanner and the 3D images were reconstructed using winsurf software. These experiments revealed the coexistence of adrenergic and cholinergic fibers within the SHP and the HNs. One-third of these cholinergic fibers were nitrergic fibers [anti-VACHT (+)/anti-NOS (+)] and potentially pro-erectile, while the others were non-nitrergic [anti-VACHT (+)/anti-NOS (−)]. We found these cholinergic fibers arose from the lumbar nerve roots. This study described the nature of the SHP nerve fibers which gives a better understanding of the urinary and sexual dysfunctions after surgical injuries. PMID:23668336

  20. The acquisition of myelin: a success story.

    PubMed

    Zalc, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    The myelin sheath, and hence the myelin-forming cells (i.e. Schwann cells in the PNS and oligodendrocytes in the CNS), have been a crucial acquisition of vertebrates. The major function of myelin is to increase the velocity of propagation of nerve impulses. Invertebrate axons are ensheathed by glial cells, but do not have a compact myelin. As a consequence, action potentials along invertebrate axons propagate at about 1 m/s, or less. This is sufficient, however, for the survival of small animals (between 0.1 and 30cm). Among invertebrates, only the cephalopods are larger. By increasing their axonal diameter to 1 mm or more, cephalopods have been able to increase the speed of propagation of action potentials and therefore adapt nerve conduction to their larger body size. However, due to the physical constraint imposed by the skull and vertebrae, vertebrates had to find an alternative solution. This was achieved by introducing the myelin sheath, which leads action potentials to propagate at speeds of 50-100m/s without increasing the diameter of their axons. Not all vertebrate axons, however, are myelinated. In the protovertebrates (lancelets, hagfishes, lampreys), which belong to the agnathes (jawless fishes), axons are not ensheathed by myelin. Among living vertebrates, the most ancient myelinated species are the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays), suggesting that acquisition of myelin is concomitant with the acquisition of a hinged-jaw, i.e. the gnathostoma. The close association between the apparition of a hinged-jaw and the myelin sheath has led to speculation that among the devonian fishes that have disappeared today, the jawless conodonts and ostracoderms were not myelinated, and that myelin was first acquired by the oldest gnathostomes: the placoderms. I also question where myelin first appeared: the PNS, the CNS or both? I provide evidence that, in fact, it is not the type of myelin-forming cell that is crucial, but the appearance of axonal signals

  1. Atrophic nerve fibers in regions of reduced MIBG uptake in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Hajime; Ozawa Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Isao

    1995-11-01

    A myocardial MIBG-SPECT examination was conducted 2 wk after doxorubicin chemotherapy on a 52-yr-old woman without cardiac symptoms. Despite normal {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy, reduced MIBG uptake was detected in the apical anterior, inferior and lateral segments of the left ventricle. The patient died of congestive heart failure due to doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy 10 mo later. At necropsy, the left ventricle was markedly dilated and the apical anterior, inferior and lateral walls were thin, stiff and whitish. Nerve fibers in the apical inferior wall were atrophic and markedly fibrotic where MIBG uptake was most reduced. Nerve fibers in the septum were normal where MIBG uptake had remained normal. The histologic findings correspond with the findings on the MIBG image. MIBG imaging may detect cardiac sympathetic denervation in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy before cardiac symptoms are manifest and cardiac function deteriorates. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Scanning laser polarimetry of the peripapillar retinal nerve fiber layer in glaucoma cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiec, Slawomir; Rzendkowski, Marek; Gierek-Ciaciura, Stanislawa; Szymkowiak, Monika; Momot-Kawalska, Barbara

    1998-10-01

    Scanning laser polarimetry is the method of evaluating the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Different pathologies damage retinal fibers, but in glaucoma the damage is present very often before other symptoms reveal. As the earliest possible diagnosis of glaucoma is essential for treatment results, scanning laser polarimetry offers a very useful diagnostic tool for ophthalmology. This paper describes the principles of the method and discusses the results obtained in 50 glaucomatous eyes in conjunction with 2- and 3-D topographical parameters of the optic disc.

  3. Nanofibrous nerve conduits for repair of 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Pouya, Majid; Rad, Hadi; Nava, Melody Omrani; Azarbakhsh, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    It has been confirmed that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit can promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. However, its efficiency in repair of over 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects needs to be assessed. In this study, we used a nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit to bridge a 30-mm-long gap in the rat sciatic nerve. At 4 months after nerve conduit implantation, regenerated nerves were cally observed and histologically assessed. In the nanofibrous graft, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed by restoration of nerve continuity and formation of myelinated nerve fiber. There were Schwann cells and glial cells in the regenerated nerves. Masson's trichrome staining showed that there were no pathological changes in the size and structure of gastrocnemius muscle cells on the operated side of rats. These findings suggest that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit is suitable for repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25206536

  4. Changes of the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the diabetic rat's alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Erzsébet; Batbayar, Bayarchimeg; Vér, Agota; Zelles, Tivadar

    2006-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, where neuropeptides and immunocells might play important roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this article we have quantified the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat's alimentary tract (tongue, duodenum, colon) using immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical methods. The immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were found in all layers of the alimentary tract and their distribution pattern was similar in both control and diabetic groups. Mast cell-nerve fiber contacts were rarely found in the controls. However, after 4 weeks duration of diabetes the number of IR nerve fibers and the immunocompetent cells increased significantly (P < 0.05), and the number of mast cell-nerve fiber contacts was even more significantly increased (P < 0.001). The distance between nerve fibers and immunocells was about 1 mum or even less. Some of the mast cells were degranulated in the vicinity of nerve fibers. No immunocompetent cells were IR for any antisera in the control. However, after the streptozotocin treatment, a large number of the immunocompetent cells showed immunoreactivity for SP and NPY. Counting all immunocompetent cells in whole sections showed that 12.3% of them were IR for SP and 25.4% were IR for NPY. Increased number of SP-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in diabetes mellitus might be the reason for painful neuropathy and might amplify the inflammatory reaction in an axon reflex manner; the released histamine and leukotrienes, cytokines, and chemokines might cause inflammations and lesions of the mucosa. PMID:17151308

  5. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  6. Nerve growth factor/p38 signaling increases intraepidermal nerve fiber densities in painful neuropathy of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsinlin T.; Dauch, Jacqueline R.; Hayes, John M.; Yanik, Brandon M.; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a common, yet devastating complication of type 2 diabetes. At this time, there is no objective test for diagnosing PDN. In the current study, we measured the peptidergic intraepidermal nerve fiber densities (IENFD) from hind paws of the db/db mouse, an animal model for type 2 diabetes, during the period of mechanical allodynia from 6–12 wk of age. Intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENF) of the hind footpads were identified by protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 immunohistochemistry. The peptidergic IENF were determined by double immunofluorescence using anti-PGP9.5 and antibodies against tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (Trk) A. We observed a significant increase in PGP9.5-positive IENFD at 8 and 10 wk of age. Similarly, Trk A-positive peptidergic IENF, which also express substance P and calcitonin gene related peptide in db/db mice, were observed to be elevated from 1.5 to 2 fold over controls. This upregulation ended at 16 wk of age, in accordance with the reduction of mechanical allodynia. Anti-NGF treatment significantly inhibited the upregulation of peptidergic IENFD during the period of mechanical allodynia, suggesting increased neurotrophism may mediate this phenomenon. In addition, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38, blocked the increase in peptidergic IENFD in db/db mice. The current results suggest peptidergic IENFD could be a potential diagnostic indicator for PDN in type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the inhibition of NGF-p38 signaling could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating this painful condition. PMID:21872660

  7. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes. PMID:23313191

  8. The Mouse Median Nerve Experimental Model in Regenerative Research

    PubMed Central

    Buskbjerg Jager, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Sciatic nerve crush injury in rat animal model is one of the most common experimental models used in regenerative research. However, the availability of transgenic mouse for nerve regeneration studies is constantly increasing and, therefore, the shift from rat model to mouse model is, in some cases, necessary. Moreover, since most of the human nerve lesions occur in the upper limb, it is also advantageous to shift from sciatic nerve to median nerve. In this study we described an experimental model which involves lesions of the median nerve in the mouse. Data showed that the finger flexor muscle contraction strength, assessed to evaluate the motor function recovery, and reached values not different from the control already 20 days after injury. The degree of nerve regeneration evaluated with stereological methods in light microscopy showed that, 25 days after injury, the number of regenerated myelinated fibers was comparable to the control, but they were smaller with a thinner myelin thickness. Stereological analysis made in electron microscopy confirmed these results, although the total number of fibers quantified was significantly higher compared to light microscopy analysis, due to the very small size of some fibers that can be detected only in electron microscopy. PMID:25180190

  9. Effects of IDPN-induced axonal swellings on conduction in motor nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Stanley, E F; Griffin, J W; Fahnestock, K E

    1985-07-01

    Paranodal demyelination produces a reduction of conduction velocity and conduction block. The relative proportions of these changes appear to vary among different demyelinating disorders. In this study we have examined the effects on conduction of paranodal demyelination produced by giant axonal swellings. The axonal swellings were induced in rats by administration of beta, beta'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN). In this experimental model synchronous axonal swellings occur in the proximal region of virtually every alpha-motorneuron without evidence of segmental demyelination or fiber loss. Conduction across the motor neuron was evaluated by two methods: a monosynaptic reflex pathway and intracellular recording from single motor neurons. Increases in the delay across the central region of the monosynaptic reflex pathway began between 2 and 4 days after toxin administration. Intracellular studies confirmed that the slowing occurred across the proximal regions of the motor axons; more distal regions of the motor axons were unaffected. The substantial reduction in conduction velocity over the swollen segment occurs with only moderate evidence of conduction block, as assayed by a reduction in the H-reflex/M-response amplitude ratio. Parallel morphological studies showed that in the enlarged fibers the myelin terminal loops maintained contact with the axon but were displaced from the paranodal region into the internode. The appearance of this "passive" paranodal demyelination correlated closely with the increase in conduction delay. We suggest that the contact maintained by the displaced myelin terminal loops with the axolemma allows saltatory conduction to continue, and explains the paucity of conduction block in this model despite the prominent conduction slowing. PMID:2993531

  10. Chronic Migraine Is Associated With Reduced Corneal Nerve Fiber Density and Symptoms of Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Kinard, Krista I.; Smith, A. Gordon; Singleton, J. Robinson; Lessard, Margaret K.; Katz, Bradley J.; Warner, Judith E.A.; Crum, Alison V.; Mifflin, Mark D.; Brennan, Kevin C.; Digre, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background We used in vivo corneal confocal microscopy to investigate structural differences in the sub-basal corneal nerve plexus in chronic migraine patients and a normal population. We used a validated questionnaire and tests of lacrimal function to determine the prevalence of dry eye in the same group of chronic migraine patients. Activation of the trigeminal system is involved in migraine. Corneal nociceptive sensation is mediated by trigeminal axons that synapse in the gasserian ganglion and the brainstem, and serve nociceptive, protective, and trophic functions. Noninvasive imaging of the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus is possible with in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. Methods For this case–control study, we recruited chronic migraine patients and compared them with a sex- and age-similar group of control subjects. Patients with peripheral neuropathy, a disease known to be associated with a peripheral neuropathy, or prior corneal or intraocular surgery were excluded. Participants underwent in vivo corneal confocal microscopy using a Heidelberg Retinal Tomography III confocal microscope with a Rostock Cornea Module. Nerve fiber length, nerve branch density, nerve fiber density, and tortuosity coefficient were measured using established methodologies. Migraine participants underwent testing of basal tear production with proparacaine, corneal sensitivity assessment with a cotton-tip applicator, measurement of tear break-up time, and completion of a validated dry eye questionnaire. Results A total of 19 chronic migraine patients and 30 control participants completed the study. There were no significant differences in age or sex. Nerve fiber density was significantly lower in migraine patients compared with controls (48.4 ± 23.5 vs 71.0 ± 15.0 fibers/mm2, P < .001). Nerve fiber length was decreased in the chronic migraine group compared with the control group, but this difference was not statistically significant (21.5 ± 11.8 vs 26.8 ± 5.9 mm/mm2, P

  11. Optical imaging of the optic nerve: beyond demonstration of retinal nerve fiber layer loss.

    PubMed

    Kupersmith, Mark J

    2015-06-01

    Although we are still early in the evolution of optical imaging of the optic nerve, the available techniques already play an important role in clinical decision making. I would summarize our findings to date as follows: For acute ON: Presentation: OCT shows RNFL swelling, normal GCL + IPL by OCT; 1 month: OCT and SLP show RNFL thinning and swelling, GCL + IPL thinning by OCT; 3 months or later: OCT and SLP show RNFL thinning, further mild GCL thinning by OCT; 6 months: RNFL and GCL + IPL thinning finished. For acute NAION: Presentation: OCT shows RNFL swelling and SLP shows loss of birefringence, normal GCL + IPL by OCT; 1 month: RNFL swelling and thinning by OCT and thinning by SLP, GCL + IPL thinning by OCT; 3 months or later: RNFL and further mild GCL + IPL thinning; 6 months: RNFL and GCL + IPL thinning finished. For IIH Papilledema with mild vision loss: Presentation: OCT shows swelling of RNFL, TRT, and ONH volume; Presentation: OCT shows normal GCL + IPL; Presentation: OCT shows neural canal border inward deflection; 6 months: OCT shows structural shape changes reflecting the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:25893873

  12. Adaptive myelination from fish to man.

    PubMed

    Baraban, Marion; Mensch, Sigrid; Lyons, David A

    2016-06-15

    Myelinated axons with nodes of Ranvier are an evolutionary elaboration common to essentially all jawed vertebrates. Myelin made by Schwann cells in our peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in our central nervous system has been long known to facilitate rapid energy efficient nerve impulse propagation. However, it is now also clear, particularly in the central nervous system, that myelin is not a simple static insulator but that it is dynamically regulated throughout development and life. New myelin sheaths can be made by newly differentiating oligodendrocytes, and mature myelin sheaths can be stimulated to grow again in the adult. Furthermore, numerous studies in models from fish to man indicate that neuronal activity can affect distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and the process of myelination itself. This begs questions as to how these effects of activity are mediated at a cellular and molecular level and whether activity-driven adaptive myelination is a feature common to all myelinated axons, or indeed all oligodendrocytes, or is specific to cells or circuits with particular functions. Here we review the recent literature on this topic, elaborate on the key outstanding questions in the field, and look forward to future studies that incorporate investigations in systems from fish to man that will provide further insight into this fundamental aspect of nervous system plasticity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26498877

  13. Oxytocin nerve fibers innervate beta-endorphin neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Csiffáry, A; Ruttner, Z; Tóth, Z; Palkovits, M

    1992-09-01

    Fine, varicose oxytocin-containing nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in rats. Using Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinin as an anterograde tracer, fine neuronal fibers of paraventricular nucleus origin could be seen throughout the arcuate nucleus. Using double immunostaining, oxytocin-immunoreactive varicose fibers were observed around or in the close vicinity of beta-endorphin-immunoreactive neurons. Silver-gold-labeled oxytocin-immunoreactive presynaptic boutons were shown to make synaptic contacts with diaminobenzidine-labeled beta-endorphin-immunoreactive neurons by electron microscopy. These findings provide morphological evidence for a possible influence of oxytocin on the activity of the brain beta-endorphin system at the hypothalamic level. PMID:1279446

  14. A simple model of radial nerve injury in the rhesus monkey to evaluate peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Huang, Xijun; Fu, Guo; Gu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Honggang; Hu, Jun; Yi, Jianhua; Niu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Qingtang

    2014-05-15

    Current research on bone marrow stem cell transplantation and autologous or xenogenic nerve transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration has mainly focused on the repair of peripheral nerve defects in rodents. In this study, we established a standardized experimental model of radial nerve defects in primates and evaluated the effect of repair on peripheral nerve injury. We repaired 2.5-cm lesions in the radial nerve of rhesus monkeys by transplantation of autografts, acellular allografts, or acellular allografts seeded with autologous bone marrow stem cells. Five months after surgery, regenerated nerve tissue was assessed for function, electrophysiology, and histomorphometry. Postoperative functional recovery was evaluated by the wrist-extension test. Compared with the simple autografts, the acellular allografts and allografts seeded with bone marrow stem cells facilitated remarkable recovery of the wrist-extension functions in the rhesus monkeys. This functional improvement was coupled with radial nerve distal axon growth, a higher percentage of neuron survival, increased nerve fiber density and diameter, increased myelin sheath thickness, and increased nerve conduction velocities and peak amplitudes of compound motor action potentials. Furthermore, the quality of nerve regeneration in the bone marrow stem cells-laden allografts group was comparable to that achieved with autografts. The wrist-extension test is a simple behavioral method for objective quantification of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25206757

  15. Bridging peripheral nerves using a deacetyl chitin conduit combined with short-term electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongli; Li, Xin; Zuo, Songjie; Xin, Jie; Zhang, Peixun

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that deacetyl chitin conduit nerve bridging or electrical stimulation can effectively promote the regeneration of the injured peripheral nerve. We hypothesized that the combination of these two approaches could result in enhanced regeneration. Rats with right sciatic nerve injury were subjected to deacetyl chitin conduit bridging combined with electrical stimulation (0.1 ms, 3 V, 20 Hz, for 1 hour). At 6 and 12 weeks after treatment, nerve conduction velocity, myelinated axon number, fiber diameter, axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin sheath in the stimulation group were better than in the non-stimulation group. The results indicate that deacetyl chitin conduit bridging combined with temporary electrical stimulation can promote peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25206762

  16. Association of TAG-1 with Caspr2 is essential for the molecular organization of juxtaparanodal regions of myelinated fibers.

    PubMed

    Traka, Maria; Goutebroze, Laurence; Denisenko, Natalia; Bessa, Maria; Nifli, Artemisia; Havaki, Sophia; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Fukamauchi, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Kazutada; Soliven, Betty; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Karagogeos, Domna

    2003-09-15

    Myelination results in a highly segregated distribution of axonal membrane proteins at nodes of Ranvier. Here, we show the role in this process of TAG-1, a glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored cell adhesion molecule. In the absence of TAG-1, axonal Caspr2 did not accumulate at juxtaparanodes, and the normal enrichment of shaker-type K+ channels in these regions was severely disrupted, in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In contrast, the localization of protein 4.1B, an axoplasmic partner of Caspr2, was only moderately altered. TAG-1, which is expressed in both neurons and glia, was able to associate in cis with Caspr2 and in trans with itself. Thus, a tripartite intercellular protein complex, comprised of these two proteins, appears critical for axo-glial contacts at juxtaparanodes. This complex is analogous to that described previously at paranodes, suggesting that similar molecules are crucial for different types of axo-glial interactions. PMID:12975355

  17. Association of TAG-1 with Caspr2 is essential for the molecular organization of juxtaparanodal regions of myelinated fibers

    PubMed Central

    Traka, Maria; Goutebroze, Laurence; Denisenko, Natalia; Bessa, Maria; Nifli, Artemisia; Havaki, Sophia; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Fukamauchi, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Kazutada; Soliven, Betty; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Karagogeos, Domna

    2003-01-01

    Myelination results in a highly segregated distribution of axonal membrane proteins at nodes of Ranvier. Here, we show the role in this process of TAG-1, a glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol–anchored cell adhesion molecule. In the absence of TAG-1, axonal Caspr2 did not accumulate at juxtaparanodes, and the normal enrichment of shaker-type K+ channels in these regions was severely disrupted, in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In contrast, the localization of protein 4.1B, an axoplasmic partner of Caspr2, was only moderately altered. TAG-1, which is expressed in both neurons and glia, was able to associate in cis with Caspr2 and in trans with itself. Thus, a tripartite intercellular protein complex, comprised of these two proteins, appears critical for axo–glial contacts at juxtaparanodes. This complex is analogous to that described previously at paranodes, suggesting that similar molecules are crucial for different types of axo–glial interactions. PMID:12975355

  18. A simple method for fabrication of electrospun fibers with controlled degree of alignment having potential for nerve regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Vimal, Sunil Kumar; Ahamad, Nadim; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2016-06-01

    In peripheral nerve injuries where direct suturing of nerve endings is not feasible, nerve regeneration has been facilitated through the use of artificially aligned fibrous scaffolds that provide directional growth of neurons to bridge the gap. The degree of fiber alignment is crucial and can impact the directionality of cells in a fibrous scaffold. While there have been multiple approaches that have been used for controlling fiber alignment, however, they have been associated with a compromised control on other properties, such as diameter, morphology, curvature, and topology of fibers. Therefore, the present study demonstrates a modified electrospinning set-up, that enabled fabrication of electrospun fibers with controlled degree of alignment from non-aligned (NA), moderately aligned (MA, 75%) to highly aligned (HA, 95%) sub-micron fibers while keeping other physical properties unchanged. The results demonstrate that the aligned fibers (MA and HA) facilitated directional growth of human astrocytoma cells (U373), wherein the aspect ratio of cells was found to increase with an increase in degree of fibers alignment. In contrast to NA and MA fibers, the HA fibers showed improved contact guidance to U373 cells that was demonstrated by a significantly higher cell aspect ratio and nuclear aspect ratio. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated a modified electrospinning setup to fabricate differentially aligned fibrous scaffolds with the HA fibers showing potential for use in neural tissue engineering. PMID:27040257

  19. Extracellular Recording of Light Responses from Optic Nerve Fibers and the Caudal Photoreceptor in the Crayfish

    PubMed Central

    Nesbit, Steven C.; Van Hoof, Alexander G.; Le, Chi C.; Dearworth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Few laboratory exercises have been developed using the crayfish as a model for teaching how neural processing is done by sensory organs that detect light stimuli. This article describes the dissection procedures and methods for conducting extracellular recording from light responses of both the optic nerve fibers found in the animal’s eyestalk and from the caudal photoreceptor located in the ventral nerve cord. Instruction for ADInstruments’ data acquisition system is also featured for the data collection and analysis of responses. The comparison provides students a unique view on how spike activities measured from neurons code image-forming and non-image-forming processes. Results from the exercise show longer latency and lower frequency of firing by the caudal photoreceptor compared to optic nerve fibers to demonstrate evidence of different functions. After students learn the dissection, recording procedure, and the functional anatomy, they can develop their own experiments to learn more about the photoreceptive mechanisms and the sensory integration of modalities by these light-responsive interneurons. PMID:26557793

  20. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali; Gouws, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was subject to full ophthalmic examination as well as Goldmann visual field testing, optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of both her optic discs and maculae. ODD although rare, can be visually devastating. No treatment is currently available however patients should be counseled about progressive nature of ODD and the potential for visual loss. OCT imaging of the maculae as well as optic discs may serve a role in monitoring the damage disc drusen cause to the eye. PMID:25136235

  1. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ali; Gouws, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was subject to full ophthalmic examination as well as Goldmann visual field testing, optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of both her optic discs and maculae. ODD although rare, can be visually devastating. No treatment is currently available however patients should be counseled about progressive nature of ODD and the potential for visual loss. OCT imaging of the maculae as well as optic discs may serve a role in monitoring the damage disc drusen cause to the eye. PMID:25136235

  2. The "Lillie transition": models of the onset of saltatory conduction in myelinating axons.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert G; Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2013-06-01

    Almost 90 years ago, Lillie reported that rapid saltatory conduction arose in an iron wire model of nerve impulse propagation when he covered the wire with insulating sections of glass tubing equivalent to myelinated internodes. This led to his suggestion of a similar mechanism explaining rapid conduction in myelinated nerve. In both their evolution and their development, myelinating axons must make a similar transition between continuous and saltatory conduction. Achieving a smooth transition is a potential challenge that we examined in computer models simulating a segmented insulating sheath surrounding an axon having Hodgkin-Huxley squid parameters. With a wide gap under the sheath, conduction was continuous. As the gap was reduced, conduction initially slowed, owing to the increased extra-axonal resistance, then increased (the "rise") up to several times that of the unmyelinated fiber, as saltatory conduction set in. The conduction velocity slowdown was little affected by the number of myelin layers or modest changes in the size of the "node," but strongly affected by the size of the "internode" and axon diameter. The steepness of the rise of rapid conduction was greatly affected by the number of myelin layers and axon diameter, variably affected by internode length and little affected by node length. The transition to saltatory conduction occurred at surprisingly wide gaps and the improvement in conduction speed persisted to surprisingly small gaps. The study demonstrates that the specialized paranodal seals between myelin and axon, and indeed even the clustering of sodium channels at the nodes, are not necessary for saltatory conduction. PMID:23306554

  3. FK506-loaded chitosan conduit promotes the regeneration of injured sciatic nerves in the rat through the upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and TrkB.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zheng, Xifu; Fu, Chongyang; Qu, Wei; Wei, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-09-15

    FK506 has been shown to exert neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects, but its long-term application for nerve regeneration is limited. This study evaluated the potential application of a novel FK506-loaded chitosan conduit for peripheral nerve repair, and explored the underlying mechanism. A sciatic nerve injury model was created in male Wistar rats, which were then randomly divided into three treatment groups (n=40, each): chitosan-only, chitosan+FK506 injection, and FK506-loaded chitosan. We found significant recovery of normal morphology of sciatic nerves and higher density of myelinated nerve fibers in rats treated with FK506-loaded chitosan. Similarly, the total number of myelinated nerve fibers, myelin sheath thickness, and axon diameters were significantly higher in this group compared with the others, and the compound muscle action potentials and motor nerve conduction velocity values of sciatic nerves were significantly higher. BDNF and TrkB levels in motor neurons were highest in rats treated with FK506-loaded chitosan. In conclusion, FK506-loaded chitosan promoted peripheral nerve repair and regeneration in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury. These effects are correlated with increased BDNF and TrkB expression in motor neurons. PMID:24954089

  4. Needle stylet with integrated optical fibers for spectroscopic contrast during peripheral nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Adrien E.; van der Voort, Marjolein; Roggeveen, Stefan; Lucassen, Gerald; Bierhoff, Walter; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; Brynolf, Marcus; Holmström, Björn

    2011-07-01

    The effectiveness of peripheral nerve blocks is highly dependent on the accuracy at which the needle tip is navigated to the target injection site. Even when electrical stimulation is utilized in combination with ultrasound guidance, determining the proximity of the needle tip to the target region close to the nerve can be challenging. Optical reflectance spectroscopy could provide additional information about tissues that is complementary to these navigation methods. We demonstrate a novel needle stylet for acquiring spectra from tissue at the tip of a commercial 20-gauge needle. The stylet has integrated optical fibers that deliver broadband light to tissue and receive scattered light. Two spectrometers resolve the light that is received from tissue across the wavelength range of 500-1600 nm. In our pilot study, measurements are acquired from a postmortem dissection of the brachial plexus of a swine. Clear differences are observed between spectra acquired from nerves and those acquired from adjacent tissue structures. We conclude that spectra acquired with the stylet have the potential to increase the accuracy with which peripheral nerve blocks are performed.

  5. Neuronal fiber tracts connecting the brain and ventral nerve cord of the early Drosophila larva.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Albert; Larsen, Camilla; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-08-01

    By using a combination of dye injections, clonal labeling, and molecular markers, we have reconstructed the axonal connections between brain and ventral nerve cord of the first-instar Drosophila larva. Out of the approximately 1,400 neurons that form the early larval brain hemisphere, less than 50 cells have axons descending into the ventral nerve cord. Descending neurons fall into four topologically defined clusters located in the anteromedial, anterolateral, dorsal, and basoposterior brain, respectively. The anterolateral cluster represents a lineage derived from a single neuroblast. Terminations of descending neurons are almost exclusively found in the anterior part of the ventral nerve cord, represented by the gnathal and thoracic neuromeres. This region also contains small numbers of neurons with axons ascending into the brain. Terminals of the ascending axons are found in the same basal brain regions that also contain descending neurons. We have mapped ascending and descending axons to the previously described scaffold of longitudinal fiber tracts that interconnect different neuromeres of the ventral nerve cord and the brain. This work provides a structural framework for functional and genetic studies addressing the control of Drosophila larval behavior by brain circuits. PMID:19459219

  6. Neuronal fiber tracts connecting the brain and ventral nerve cord of the early Drosophila larva

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Albert; Larsen, Camilla; Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of dye injections, clonal labeling, and molecular markers we have reconstructed the axonal connections between brain and ventral nerve cord of the first instar Drosophila larva. Out of the approximately 1400 neurons that form the early larval brain hemisphere, less than 50 cells have axons descending into the ventral nerve cord. Descending neurons fall into four topologically defined clusters located in the antero-medial, antero-lateral, dorsal, and baso-posterior brain, respectively. The antero-lateral cluster represents a lineage derived from a single neuroblast. Terminations of descending neurons are almost exclusively found in the anterior part of the ventral nerve cord, represented by the gnathal and thoracic neuromeres. This region also contains small numbers of neurons with axons ascending into the brain. Terminals of the ascending axons are found in the same basal brain regions that also contain descending neurons. We have mapped ascending and descending axons to the previously described scaffold of longitudinal fiber tracts that interconnect different neuromeres of the ventral nerve cord and the brain. This work provides a structural framework for functional and genetic studies addressing the control of Drosophila larval behavior by brain circuits. PMID:19459219

  7. Plasmalogen phospholipids protect internodal myelin from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Luoma, Adrienne M; Kuo, Fonghsu; Cakici, Ozgur; Crowther, Michelle N; Denninger, Andrew R; Avila, Robin L; Brites, Pedro; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in a range of degenerative conditions, including aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and neurological disorders. Myelin is a lipid-rich multilamellar sheath that facilitates rapid nerve conduction in vertebrates. Given the high energetic demands and low antioxidant capacity of the cells that elaborate the sheaths, myelin is considered intrinsically vulnerable to oxidative damage, raising the question whether additional mechanisms prevent structural damage. We characterized the structural and biochemical basis of ROS-mediated myelin damage in murine tissues from both central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). To determine whether ROS can cause structural damage to the internodal myelin, whole sciatic and optic nerves were incubated ex vivo with a hydroxyl radical-generating system consisting of copper (Cu), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and ortho-phenanthroline (OP). Quantitative assessment of unfixed tissue by X-ray diffraction revealed irreversible compaction of myelin membrane stacking in both sciatic and optic nerves. Incubation in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger sodium formate prevented this damage, implicating hydroxyl radical species. Myelin membranes are particularly enriched in plasmalogens, a class of ether-linked phospholipids proposed to have antioxidant properties. Myelin in sciatic nerve from plasmalogen-deficient (Pex7 knockout) mice was significantly more vulnerable to Cu/OP/HP-mediated ROS-induced compaction than myelin from WT mice. Our results directly support the role of plasmalogens as endogenous antioxidants providing a defense that protects ROS-vulnerable myelin. PMID:25801291

  8. Collateral sprouting of sensory axons after end-to-side nerve coaptation--a longitudinal study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Uros; Tomsic, Martin; Sketelj, Janez; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2007-02-01

    The end-to-side nerve coaptation is able to induce collateral sprouting of axons from the donor nerve and to provide functional reinnervation of the target tissue. Sensory axon sprouting and its effects on the donor nerve up to 9 months after the end-to-side nerve coaptation were studied in the rat. Peroneal, tibial and saphenous nerves were transected and ligated, and the distal stump of the transected peroneal nerve was sutured to the side of the uninjured sural nerve. The average skin area of the residual sensitivity to pinch due to the axons sprouting through the recipient peroneal nerve did not change statistically significantly between 4 and 9 months after surgery. Axon counting, measurements of compound action potentials and retrograde neuron labeling indicate that the sprouting of the myelinated sensory axons and unmyelinated axons through the recipient nerve was largely completed by 2 months and 4 months after the end-to-side nerve coaptation, respectively, and remained stable thereafter for at least 9 months. A decrease in the amplitude and area of the CAP of myelinated fibers, observed in the donor nerve up to 4 months after surgery, was probably due to mild degeneration of nerve fibers and a tendency of the diameter of myelinated axons to decline. However, no significant changes in functional, electrophysiological or morphological properties of the donor nerve could be observed at the end of the observational period, indicating that end-to-side nerve coaptation has no detrimental effect on the donor nerve on a long-term scale. PMID:17045263

  9. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness in children with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Selim; Özer, Samet; Alim, Sait; Güneş, Alper; Ortak, Hüseyin; Yılmaz, Resul

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness analysis of peripapillary optic nerve head (PONH) and macula as well as ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness in obese children. METHODS Eighty-five children with obesity and 30 controls were included in the study. The thicknesses of the PONH and macula of each subject's right eye were measured by high-resolution spectral-domain optic coherence tomography (OCT). RESULTS The RNFL thicknesses of central macular and PONH were similar between the groups (all P>0.05). The GCIPL thickness was also similar between the groups. However, the RNFL thickness of temporal outer macula were 261.7±13.7 and 268.9±14.3 µm for the obesity and the control group, respectively (P=0.034). CONCLUSION Obesity may cause a reduction in temporal outer macular RNFL thickness. PMID:27158616

  10. Early axonal damage and progressive myelin pathology define the kinetics of CNS histopathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Recks, Mascha S; Stormanns, Eva R; Bader, Jonas; Arnhold, Stefan; Addicks, Klaus; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2013-10-01

    Studies of MS histopathology are largely dependent on suitable animal models. While light microscopic analysis gives an overview of tissue pathology, it falls short in evaluating detailed changes in nerve fiber morphology. The ultrastructural data presented here and obtained from studies of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG):35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice delineate that axonal damage and myelin pathology follow different kinetics in the disease course. While myelin pathology accumulated with disease progression, axonal damage coincided with the initial clinical disease symptoms and remained stable over time. This pattern applied both to irreversible axolysis and early axonal pathology. Notably, these histopathological patterns were reflected by the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM), suggesting that the NAWM is also in an active neurodegenerative state. The data underline the need for neuroprotection in MS and suggest the MOG model as a highly valuable tool for the assessment of different therapeutic strategies. PMID:23899992

  11. Effect of axonal micro-tubules on the morphology of retinal nerve fibers studied by second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyungsik; Danias, John

    2012-11-01

    Many studies suggest that the degradation of microtubules in the retinal ganglion cells may be an early event in the progression of glaucoma. Because reflectance and birefringence of the retinal nerve fibers arise primarily from microtubules, the optical properties have been intensively studied for early detection of the disease. We previously reported a novel nonlinear optical signal from axonal microtubules for visualizing the retinal nerve fibers, namely second-harmonic generation (SHG). We demonstrate the use of axonal SHG to investigate the effect of microtubules on the morphology of the retinal nerve fiber bundles. Time-lapse SHG imaging of ex vivo rat retinal flat mounts was performed during pharmacological treatment of nocodazole, and the intensity of axonal SHG and the changes in nerve fiber bundle morphology were monitored. We found that the microtubule disruption does not lead to immediate modification in the morphology of the nerve fibers. Our results indicate that microtubular SHG may provide a useful means for sensitive detection of axonal injuries. Since the intrinsic radiation depends on the regular architecture of the cytoskeleton element as maintained by active cellular regulations, the intensity of signal reflects the health of the retinal ganglion cell axons.

  12. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  13. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  14. Long-term in vivo regeneration of peripheral nerves through bioengineered nerve grafts.

    PubMed

    di Summa, P G; Kalbermatten, D F; Pralong, E; Raffoul, W; Kingham, P J; Terenghi, G

    2011-05-01

    Although autologous nerve graft is still the first choice strategy in nerve reconstruction, it has the severe disadvantage of the sacrifice of a functional nerve. Cell transplantation in a bioartificial conduit is an alternative strategy to improve nerve regeneration. Nerve fibrin conduits were seeded with various cell types: primary Schwann cells (SC), SC-like differentiated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dMSC), SC-like differentiated adipose-derived stem cells (dASC). Two further control groups were fibrin conduits without cells and autografts. Conduits were used to bridge a 1 cm rat sciatic nerve gap in a long term experiment (16 weeks). Functional and morphological properties of regenerated nerves were investigated. A reduction in muscle atrophy was observed in the autograft and in all cell-seeded groups, when compared with the empty fibrin conduits. SC showed significant improvement in axon myelination and average fiber diameter of the regenerated nerves. dASC were the most effective cell population in terms of improvement of axonal and fiber diameter, evoked potentials at the level of the gastrocnemius muscle and regeneration of motoneurons, similar to the autografts. Given these results and other advantages of adipose derived stem cells such as ease of harvest and relative abundance, dASC could be a clinically translatable route towards new methods to enhance peripheral nerve repair. PMID:21371534

  15. Loudness function derives from data on electrical discharge rates in auditory nerve fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Judgements of the loudness of pure-tone sound stimuli yield a loudness function which relates perceived loudness to stimulus amplitude. A loudness function is derived from physical evidence alone without regard to human judgments. The resultant loudness function is L=K(q-q0), where L is loudness, q is effective sound pressure (specifically q0 at the loudness threshold), and K is generally a weak function of the number of stimulated auditory nerve fibers. The predicted function is in agreement with loudness judgment data reported by Warren, which imply that, in the suprathreshold loudness regime, decreasing the sound-pressure level by 6 db results in halving the loudness.

  16. Changes of nitric oxide synthase-containing nerve fibers and parameters for oxidative stress after unilateral cavernous nerve resection or manuplation in rat penis.

    PubMed

    Ozkara, Hamdi; Alan, Cabir; Atukeren, Pinar; Uyaner, Ilhan; Demirci, Cihan; Gümüştaş, M Koray; Alici, Bulent

    2006-06-30

    After pelvic surgeries such as radical prostatectomy, two major complications--urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction (ED) may occur. Etiologies for ED are multiple pathologic mediators/systems. Oxidative stress, which is known to be induced after surgical trauma, could be a cause of ED. The purposes of in this study are to investigate the effect of unilateral manipulation/ dissection and resection of the cavernous nerve (neurotomy) to NOS (nitric oxide synthase)-containing nerve fibers and pressure after electro stimulation in rat corpus cavernosum, and to determine whether these procedures would produce oxidative stress within rat cavernous tissue 3 weeks and 6 months after the operation. Male rats were divided into 5 groups. Rats in groups 1 and 2 underwent unilateral cavernous nerve manipulation and sacrificed 3 weeks and 6 months after the operation, respectively. Rats in groups 3 and 4 underwent unilateral neurotomy of a 5-mm. segment of the cavernous nerve, and they were sacrificed 3 weeks and 6 months after nerve ablation, respectively. Group 5 rats were control animals for biochemical analysis. Intracavernous pressure following electro stimulation reduced is significantly 3 weeks after unilateral resection, as compared to that of the manipulated nerve (P < 0.05), and it recovered 6 months after neurotomy. The recovery was also confirmed by NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) diaphorase staining in neurotomy groups. Lipid peroxidation, which is an indicater of oxidative stress, was determined by measuring thiobarbituric acid reacting substance (TBARS) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. These markers indicated that unilateral cavernous nerve manipulation or resection produced oxidative stress within rat corpus cavernosum. Oxidative stress was more prominent 3 weeks after unilateral neurotomy (P < 0.05). Also, compared to the control animal group, oxidative stress was observed three weeks after manipulation of unilateral

  17. Nodes of Ranvier and myelin sheath dimensions along exceptionally thin myelinated vertebrate PNS axons.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, F; Hildebrand, C

    1992-11-01

    The trigeminal alveolar branch in the lower jaw of the cichlid Tilapia mariae was examined by light and electron microscopy on single and serial sections, and by light microscopy on teased fibre preparations. The principal purpose was to find out if the exceptionally thin myelinated axons (d < 1 micron) present in this nerve possess true nodes of Ranvier, and to determine the dimensions of their myelin sheaths. This necessitated analysis of the whole size range of myelinated fibres, with respect to nodal and internodal morphology. The results show that the exceptionally thin myelinated fibres exhibit primitive nodal regions, with patches of axolemmal undercoating, and few Schwann cell processes in the node gap. This contrasts with the more complex nodal organization seen in larger trigeminal alveolar branch fibres. For the whole population of myelinated fibres the number of myelin lamellae increases rectilinearly with axon diameter, and sheath length increases with fibre diameter according to a logarithmic expression. The myelin sheaths of the exceptionally thin trigeminal alveolar branch fibres are composed of 10-20 lamellae, and extend 35-50 microns along the axon. These results show that the structural complexity of nodal regions in the trigeminal alveolar branch decreases with decreasing fibre size, that the exceptionally thin myelinated trigeminal alveolar branch fibres possess primitive nodes and that they have very short myelin sheaths. Our crude theoretical calculations suggest that these fibres might be capable of saltatory conduction. PMID:1279131

  18. Intrinsic optical fiber sensor for sensing organophosphate nerve agent using the modified cladding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Lalitkumar; El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    2004-03-01

    The concept of modified cladding based sensors represents the largest class of intrinsic fiber optic chemical sensors. In this design, the passive cladding of the optical fiber is replaced by an active coating, called modified cladding. The analyte in this case diffuses into the coating and induces changes in the absorbance, fluorescence, or some other spectroscopic property of the modified cladding, the coating acts as a chemo-chromic transducer and sensing takes place by intensity modulation. This design i.e. of the coating based sensors, has found enormous applicability in the realm of chemical and biochemical sensing which also includes environmental monitoring and detection of chemical warfare agents. In this paper, the development of an intrinsic fiber optic sensor for detection of organophosphate dimethyl-methyl phoshopnate (DMMP) is presented. DMMP is a chemical precursor to the nerve agent sarin. The chemo-chromic transducer material used as a modified coating on the fiber core is NDSA (Naphthalene disulphonic acid) doped polypyrrole. This coating material shows conductivity and absorbance change when exposed to DMMP. The fabrication of the sensor device is a three step process which involves (a) etching a small section of the optical fiber to expose the core, (b) coating the etched section of the optical fiber with the polymer, (c) integration of sensor components and testing. Thin film characterization is done using the UV-Vis spectrophotometer on in-situ coated films of polypyrrole on a glass substrate to check for absorbance change upon exposure to DMMP. The development procedure is presented next and encouraging results are discussed.

  19. Electrical Excitation of the Acoustically Sensitive Auditory Nerve: Single-Fiber Responses to Electric Pulse Trains

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Paul J.; Robinson, Barbara K.; Nourski, Kirill V.; Zhang, Fawen; Jeng, Fuh-Cherng

    2006-01-01

    Nearly all studies on auditory-nerve responses to electric stimuli have been conducted using chemically deafened animals so as to more realistically model the implanted human ear that has typically been profoundly deaf. However, clinical criteria for implantation have recently been relaxed. Ears with “residual” acoustic sensitivity are now being implanted, calling for the systematic evaluation of auditory-nerve responses to electric stimuli as well as combined electric and acoustic stimuli in acoustically sensitive ears. This article presents a systematic investigation of single-fiber responses to electric stimuli in acoustically sensitive ears. Responses to 250 pulse/s electric pulse trains were collected from 18 cats. Properties such as threshold, dynamic range, and jitter were found to differ from those of deaf ears. Other types of fiber activity observed in acoustically sensitive ears (i.e., spontaneous activity and electrophonic responses) were found to alter the temporal coding of electric stimuli. The electrophonic response, which was shown to greatly change the information encoded by spike intervals, also exhibited fast adaptation relative to that observed in the “direct” response to electric stimuli. More complex responses, such as “buildup” (increased responsiveness to successive pulses) and “bursting” (alternating periods of responsiveness and unresponsiveness) were observed. Our findings suggest that bursting is a response unique to sustained electric stimulation in ears with functional hair cells. PMID:16708257

  20. Tracking Epidermal Nerve Fiber Changes in Asian Macaques: Tools and Techniques for Quantitative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mangus, Lisa M; Dorsey, Jamie L; Weinberg, Rachel L; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Hauer, Peter; Laast, Victoria A; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative assessment of epidermal nerve fibers (ENFs) has become a widely used clinical tool for the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathies such as diabetic neuropathy and human immunodeficiency virus-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN). To model and investigate the pathogenesis of HIV-SN using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected Asian macaques, we adapted the skin biopsy and immunostaining techniques currently employed in human patients and then developed two unbiased image analysis techniques for quantifying ENF in macaque footpad skin. This report provides detailed descriptions of these tools and techniques for ENF assessment in macaques and outlines important experimental considerations that we have identified in the course of our long-term studies. Although initially developed for studies of HIV-SN in the SIV-infected macaque model, these methods could be readily translated to a range of studies involving peripheral nerve degeneration and neurotoxicity in nonhuman primates as well as preclinical investigations of agents aimed at neuroprotection and regeneration. PMID:27235324

  1. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Segmentation on FD-OCT Scans of Normal Subjects and Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Markus A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Mardin, Christian Y.; Tornow, Ralf P.

    2010-01-01

    Automated measurements of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness on circular OCT B-Scans provide physicians additional parameters for glaucoma diagnosis. We propose a novel retinal nerve fiber layer segmentation algorithm for frequency domain data that can be applied on scans from both normal healthy subjects, as well as glaucoma patients, using the same set of parameters. In addition, the algorithm remains almost unaffected by image quality. The main part of the segmentation process is based on the minimization of an energy function consisting of gradient and local smoothing terms. A quantitative evaluation comparing the automated segmentation results to manually corrected segmentations from three reviewers is performed. A total of 72 scans from glaucoma patients and 132 scans from normal subjects, all from different persons, composed the database for the evaluation of the segmentation algorithm. A mean absolute error per A-Scan of 2.9 µm was achieved on glaucomatous eyes, and 3.6 µm on healthy eyes. The mean absolute segmentation error over all A-Scans lies below 10 µm on 95.1% of the images. Thus our approach provides a reliable tool for extracting diagnostic relevant parameters from OCT B-Scans for glaucoma diagnosis. PMID:21258556

  2. Easy method to examine single nerve fiber excitability and conduction parameters using intact nonanesthetized earthworms

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christiane K.

    2014-01-01

    The generation and conduction of neuronal action potentials (APs) were the subjects of a cell physiology exercise for first-year medical students. In this activity, students demonstrated the all-or-none nature of AP generation, measured conduction velocity, and examined the dependence of the threshold stimulus amplitude on stimulus duration. For this purpose, they used the median giant nerve fiber (MGF) in the ventral nerve cord of the common earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris). Here, we introduce a specialized stimulation and recording chamber that the nonanesthetized earthworm enters completely unforced. The worm resides in a narrow round duct with silver electrodes on the bottom such that individual APs of the MGF can be elicited and recorded superficially. Our experimental setup combines several advantages: it allows noninvasive single fiber AP measurements taken from a nonanesthetized animal that is yet restrained. Students performed the experiments with a high success rate. According to the data acquired by the students, the mean conduction velocity of the MGF was 30.2 m/s. From the amplitude-duration relationship for threshold stimulation, rheobase and chronaxie were graphically determined by the students according to Lapicque's method. The mean rheobase was 1.01 V, and the mean chronaxie was 0.06 ms. The acquired data and analysis results are of high quality, as deduced from critical examination based on the law of Weiss. In addition, we provide video material, which was also used in the practical course. PMID:25179616

  3. Easy method to examine single nerve fiber excitability and conduction parameters using intact nonanesthetized earthworms.

    PubMed

    Bähring, Robert; Bauer, Christiane K

    2014-09-01

    The generation and conduction of neuronal action potentials (APs) were the subjects of a cell physiology exercise for first-year medical students. In this activity, students demonstrated the all-or-none nature of AP generation, measured conduction velocity, and examined the dependence of the threshold stimulus amplitude on stimulus duration. For this purpose, they used the median giant nerve fiber (MGF) in the ventral nerve cord of the common earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris). Here, we introduce a specialized stimulation and recording chamber that the nonanesthetized earthworm enters completely unforced. The worm resides in a narrow round duct with silver electrodes on the bottom such that individual APs of the MGF can be elicited and recorded superficially. Our experimental setup combines several advantages: it allows noninvasive single fiber AP measurements taken from a nonanesthetized animal that is yet restrained. Students performed the experiments with a high success rate. According to the data acquired by the students, the mean conduction velocity of the MGF was 30.2 m/s. From the amplitude-duration relationship for threshold stimulation, rheobase and chronaxie were graphically determined by the students according to Lapicque's method. The mean rheobase was 1.01 V, and the mean chronaxie was 0.06 ms. The acquired data and analysis results are of high quality, as deduced from critical examination based on the law of Weiss. In addition, we provide video material, which was also used in the practical course. PMID:25179616

  4. The origin of the myelination program in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Zalc, B; Goujet, D; Colman, D

    2008-06-24

    The myelin sheath was a transformative vertebrate acquisition, enabling great increases in impulse propagation velocity along axons. Not all vertebrates possess myelinated axons, however, and when myelin first appeared in the vertebrate lineage is an important open question. It has been suggested that the dual, apparently unrelated acquisitions of myelin and the hinged jaw were actually coupled in evolution [1,2]. If so, it would be expected that myelin was first acquired during the Devonian period by the oldest jawed fish, the placoderms [3]. Although myelin itself is not retained in the fossil record, within the skulls of fossilized Paleozoic vertebrate fish are exquisitely preserved imprints of cranial nerves and the foramina they traversed. Examination of these structures now suggests how the nerves functioned in vivo. In placoderms, the first hinge-jawed fish, oculomotor nerve diameters remained constant, but nerve lengths were ten times longer than in the jawless osteostraci. We infer that to accommodate this ten-fold increase in length, while maintaining a constant diameter, the oculomotor system in placoderms must have been myelinated to function as a rapidly conducting motor pathway. Placoderms were the first fish with hinged jaws and some can grow to formidable lengths, requiring a rapid conduction system, so it is highly likely that they were the first organisms with myelinated axons in the craniate lineage. PMID:18579089

  5. Challenges for nerve repair using chitosan-siloxane hybrid porous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Shirosaki, Yuki; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Osaka, Akiyoshi; Lopes, Maria A; Santos, José D; Geuna, Stefano; Mauricio, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains one of the greatest challenges of neurosurgery, as functional recover is rarely satisfactory in these patients. Recently, biodegradable nerve guides have shown great potential for enhancing nerve regeneration. A major advantage of these nerve guides is that no foreign material remains after the device has fulfilled its task, which spares a second surgical intervention. Recently, we studied peripheral nerve regeneration using chitosan-γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (chitosan-GPTMS) porous hybrid membranes. In our studies, these porous membranes significantly improved nerve fiber regeneration and functional recovery in rat models of axonotmetic and neurotmetic sciatic nerve injuries. In particular, the number of regenerated myelinated nerve fibers and myelin thickness were significantly higher in rat treated with chitosan porous hybrid membranes, whether or not they were used in combination with mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord. In this review, we describe our findings on the use of chitosan-GPTMS hybrids for nerve regeneration. PMID:25054129

  6. Mast Cell-Derived Tumor Necrosis Factor Can Promote Nerve Fiber Elongation in the Skin during Contact Hypersensitivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kakurai, Maki; Monteforte, Rossella; Suto, Hajime; Tsai, Mindy; Nakae, Susumu; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    In humans, lesions of contact eczema or atopic dermatitis can exhibit increases in epidermal nerves, but the mechanism resulting in such nerve elongation are not fully understood. We found that contact hypersensitivity reactions to oxazolone in mice were associated with significant increases in the length of nerves in the epidermis and dermis. Using genetically mast cell-deficient c-kit mutant mice selectively repaired of their dermal mast cell deficiency with either wild-type or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-deficient mast cells, we found that mast cells, and mast cell-derived TNF, significantly contributed to the elongation of epidermal and dermal PGP 9.5+ nerves and dermal CGRP+ nerves, as well as to the inflammation observed at sites of contact hypersensitivity in response to oxazolone. Moreover, the percentage of mast cells in close proximity to dermal PGP 9.5+ nerve fibers was significantly higher in wild-type mice and in c-kit mutant mice repaired of their dermal mast cell deficiency by the adoptive transfer of wild-type mast cells than in TNF-deficient mice or in TNF−/− mast cell-engrafted c-kit mutant mice. These observations show that mast cells, and mast cell-derived TNF, can promote the elongation of cutaneous nerve fibers during contact hypersensitivity in the mouse. PMID:17071594

  7. Saltatory conduction of peripheral nerve impulse in clioquinol-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Homma, S; Kotaki, H; Mizote, M; Nakajima, Y; Tamura, Z

    1984-04-01

    By using a new method, unidimensional latency-topography, which shows the saltatory conduction pattern of an impulse along peripheral nerve fibers, the internodal length, internodal conduction time and conduction velocity were determined from the L5 ventral and/or dorsal root filaments of clioquinol-treated rats (CTR). The saltatory conduction pattern was preserved in most of the CTR fibers tested, but was not seen in some fibers. A positive correlation was seen between the conduction velocity and the internodal length in the nerve fibers of both the normal rats and CTR. Although there was no difference in the internodal length between normal rats and CTR, conduction velocities determined in CTR fibers were lower than those in normal rat fibers. Myelin length was calculated from the saltatory conduction pattern in the topography to represent the functional length of the saltatory conduction. The functional myelin length of the CTR fiber was shorter than that of normal rats. Shortening of the functional myelin length in CTR is due to the widening of the Ranvier node, which corresponds to the exposure of the Ranvier node, i.e. demyelination. It was concluded that the decrease in conduction velocity in CTR fibers was due to exposure which caused delayed excitation at the Ranvier nodes. PMID:6233507

  8. In vivo Imaging of Optic Nerve Fiber Integrity by Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.; Witte, Otto W.; Weih, Falk; Kretz, Alexandra; Haenold, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    The rodent visual system encompasses retinal ganglion cells and their axons that form the optic nerve to enter thalamic and midbrain centers, and postsynaptic projections to the visual cortex. Based on its distinct anatomical structure and convenient accessibility, it has become the favored structure for studies on neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. Recent advancements in MR imaging have enabled the in vivo visualization of the retino-tectal part of this projection using manganese mediated contrast enhancement (MEMRI). Here, we present a MEMRI protocol for illustration of the visual projection in mice, by which resolutions of (200 µm)3 can be achieved using common 3 Tesla scanners. We demonstrate how intravitreal injection of a single dosage of 15 nmol MnCl2 leads to a saturated enhancement of the intact projection within 24 hr. With exception of the retina, changes in signal intensity are independent of coincided visual stimulation or physiological aging. We further apply this technique to longitudinally monitor axonal degeneration in response to acute optic nerve injury, a paradigm by which Mn2+ transport completely arrests at the lesion site. Conversely, active Mn2+ transport is quantitatively proportionate to the viability, number, and electrical activity of axon fibers. For such an analysis, we exemplify Mn2+ transport kinetics along the visual path in a transgenic mouse model (NF-κB p50KO) displaying spontaneous atrophy of sensory, including visual, projections. In these mice, MEMRI indicates reduced but not delayed Mn2+ transport as compared to wild type mice, thus revealing signs of structural and/or functional impairments by NF-κB mutations. In summary, MEMRI conveniently bridges in vivo assays and post mortem histology for the characterization of nerve fiber integrity and activity. It is highly useful for longitudinal studies on axonal degeneration and regeneration, and investigations of mutant mice for genuine or

  9. Wavelength-Dependent Change of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Reflectance in Glaucomatous Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiang-Run; Zhou, Ye; Knighton, Robert W.; Kong, Wei; Feuer, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) reflectance is often used in optical methods for RNFL assessment in clinical diagnosis of glaucoma, yet little is known about the reflectance property of the RNFL under the development of glaucoma. This study measured the changes in RNFL reflectance spectra that occurred in retinal nerve fiber bundles with different degrees of glaucomatous damage. Methods. A rat model of glaucoma with laser photocoagulation of trabecular meshwork was used. Reflectance of the RNFL in an isolated retina was measured at wavelengths of 400–830 nm. Cytostructural distribution of the bundles measured optically was evaluated by confocal imaging of immunohistochemistry staining of cytoskeletal components, F-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments. RNFL reflectance spectra were studied in bundles with normal-looking appearance, early F-actin distortion, and apparent damage of all cytoskeletal components. Changes of RNFL reflectance spectra were studied at different radii (0.22, 0.33, and 0.44 mm) from the optic nerve head (ONH). Results. Bundles in 30 control retinas and 41 glaucomatous retinas were examined. In normal retinas, reflectance spectra were similar along the same bundles. In glaucomatous retinas, reflectance spectra changed along bundles with the spectra becoming flatter as bundle areas approached the ONH. Conclusions. Elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) causes nonuniform changes in RNFL reflectance across wavelengths. Changes of reflectance spectra occur early in bundles near the ONH and prior to apparent cytoskeletal distortion. Using the ratio of RNFL reflectance measured at different wavelengths can provide early and sensitive detection of glaucomatous damage. PMID:22836775

  10. Hypoxia Activates Calpains in the Nerve Fiber Layer of Monkey Retinal Explants

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Masayuki; Shearer, Thomas R.; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The vascular ischemic hypothesis attributes nerve damage in the retina to decreased blood flow in the ophthalmic artery, reduced oxygenation, and impaired axonal transport. Activation of calpain enzymes contributes to retinal cell death during hypoxia. However, we still do not know in which specific retinal layers calpains are activated. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate where and when calpains are activated in an improved culture model of hypoxic monkey retina. Methods Monkey retinal explants were cultured on microporous membranes with the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) side facing up. Explants were incubated under hypoxic conditions, with or without additional reoxygenation. When it was used, the calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 was maintained throughout the culture period. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting assays for α-spectrin, calpains 1 and 2, calpastatin, β-III tubulin, and γ-synuclein were performed with specific antibodies. Cell death was assessed by TUNEL staining. Results Under normoxic conditions, TUNEL-positive cells were minimal in our improved culture conditions. As early as 8 hours after hypoxia, the 150-kDa calpain-specific α-spectrin breakdown product appeared in the nerve fiber layer (NFL), where calpains 1 and 2 were localized. TUNEL-positive RGCs then increased at later time periods. The calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 ameliorated changes induced by hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation. Conclusions During hypoxia/reoxygenation in an improved, relevant monkey model, calpains were first activated in the NFL, followed by death of the parent RGCs. This observation suggest that calpain-induced degeneration of retinal nerve fibers may be an underlying mechanism for RGC death in hypoxic retinal neuropathies. PMID:26393472

  11. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure on the elbow An elbow fracture or dislocation Temporary pain and tingling of this nerve can ... Saunders; 2011:chap 428. Read More Broken bone Dislocation Mononeuritis multiplex Mononeuropathy Myelin Peripheral neuropathy Systemic Update ...

  12. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow. The damage destroys the nerve covering ( myelin sheath) ... be caused by: Long-term pressure on the elbow An elbow fracture or dislocation Temporary pain and ...

  13. The Relationship Between Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Optic Nerve Head Neuroretinal Rim Tissue in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nimesh B.; Sullivan-Mee, Michael; Harwerth, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between optical coherence tomography (OCT) measures of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and neuroretinal rim (NRR) in a nonhuman primate experimental glaucoma model, and in a population of clinical patients. Methods. For nonhuman primates, normative data were collected from 44 healthy monkeys, and nine animals with unilateral experimental glaucoma that were followed longitudinally. Cross-sectional human subjects data were collected from 89 healthy, 74 glaucoma suspects, and 104 glaucoma patients. Individualized transverse scaling for OCT scans was calculated using a schematic eye that incorporated optical ocular biometry. Custom algorithms were used to quantify RNFL thickness with and without vessels removed, scaled minimum rim width (sMRW), and neural rim volume (NRV). Results. For the experimental glaucoma group, NRR parameters showed the first changes with increased cumulative IOP. The data for both NRR and RNFL measures were best fit by an exponential rise model (NRV, R2 = 0.79, P < 0.01, sMRW, R2 = 0.74, P < 0.01). The major retinal vascular thickness contribution to the RNFL decreased (0.03 μm/μm, P < 0.01) with RNFL loss, but the percent vascular contribution increased (−0.1%/μm, P < 0.01) with disease progression. Overall, the findings for the cross-sectional human data were similar to those of the experimental model. Conclusions. The findings illustrate a nonlinear relationship between NRR and RNFL measures and provide support for the use of multiple OCT scaled morphological measures for the diagnosis and management of primary open angle glaucoma in humans. PMID:25249610

  14. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  15. Neuroanatomical evidence for segregation of nerve fibers conveying light touch and pain sensation in Eimer's organ of the mole.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Paul D; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Bautista, Diana M; Julius, David; Catania, Kenneth C

    2006-06-13

    Talpid moles are small insectivores that live in dark underground tunnels. They depend heavily on touch to navigate and find food. Most species have an array of complex epidermal sensory structures called Eimer's organs that cover the tip of the nose. In this study, the anatomy of Eimer's organ was examined in the coast mole and star-nosed mole by using the fluorescent styryl pyridinium dye AM1-43 and immunocytochemical staining for neurofilament 200 and substance P. In addition, DiI was used to label neural components of Eimer's organ. AM1-43 labeled all of the Eimer's organ receptors after systemic injection, suggesting a role in mechanotransduction. Immunostaining with neurofilament 200 and substance P labeled distinct subtypes of sensory fibers. Substance P labeled a group of free nerve endings along the outer edge of Eimer's organ, indicating a nociceptive role for these fibers. In contrast, neurofilament 200 labeled a more central set of nerve endings, suggesting that these fibers function as low-threshold mechanoreceptors. By labeling subsets of trigeminal afferents distant from the receptor array with DiI, we revealed innervation patterns indicating that one afferent supplies the outer, substance P-positive set of free nerve endings, whereas several afferents differentially innervate the central free nerve endings. Our results suggest that the free nerve endings innervating Eimer's organ are largely mechanosensitive and may play an important role in the rapid sensory discrimination observed in these species. PMID:16751268

  16. The effect of aging on the density of the sensory nerve fiber innervation of bone and acute skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Freeman, Katie T.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    As humans age there is a decline in most sensory systems including vision, hearing, taste, smell, and tactile acuity. In contrast, the frequency and severity of musculoskeletal pain generally increases with age. To determine whether the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce skeletal pain changes with age, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) sensory nerve fibers that innervate the femur were examined in the femurs of young (4 month old), middle-aged (13 month) and old (36 month) male F344/BNF1 rats. Whereas the bone quality showed a significant age-related decline, the density of CGRP+ and NF200+ nerve fibers that innervate the bone remained remarkably unchanged as well as the severity of acute skeletal fracture pain. Thus, while bone mass, quality and strength undergo a significant decline with age, the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce noxious stimuli remain largely intact. These data may in part explain why musculoskeletal pain increases with age. PMID:20947214

  17. Dexamethasone enhanced functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  18. Dexamethasone Enhanced Functional Recovery after Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects. PMID:25839037

  19. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model

    PubMed Central

    Machado, J.A.; Ghizoni, M.F.; Bertelli, J.; Teske, Gabriel C.; Teske, Guilherme C.; Martins, D.F.; Mazzardo-Martins, L.; Cargnin-Ferreira, E.; Santos, A.R.S.; Piovezan, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP) on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36) underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001), compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05). Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001), in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05) and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01). Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration. PMID:24270909

  20. Characterization of nerve and microvessel damage and recovery in type 1 diabetic mice after permanent femoral artery ligation.

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Mantsounga, Chris S; Broqueres-You, Dong; Dohan, Anthony; Polivka, Marc; Deroide, Nicolas; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Kubis, Nathalie; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathy is the most common complication of the peripheral nervous system during the progression of diabetes. The pathophysiology is unclear but may involve microangiopathy, reduced endoneurial blood flow, and tissue ischemia. We used a mouse model of type 1 diabetes to study parallel alterations of nerves and microvessels following tissue ischemia. We designed an easily reproducible model of ischemic neuropathy induced by irreversible ligation of the femoral artery. We studied the evolution of behavioral function, epineurial and endoneurial vessel impairment, and large nerve myelinated fiber as well as small cutaneous unmyelinated fiber impairment for 1 month following the onset of ischemia. We observed a more severe hindlimb dysfunction and delayed recovery in diabetic animals. This was associated with reduced density of large arteries in the hindlimb and reduced sciatic nerve epineurial blood flow. A reduction in sciatic nerve endoneurial capillary density was also observed, associated with a reduction in small unmyelinated epidermal fiber number and large myelinated sciatic nerve fiber dysfunction. Moreover, vascular recovery was delayed, and nerve dysfunction was still present in diabetic animals at day 28. This easily reproducible model provides clear insight into the evolution over time of the impact of ischemia on nerve and microvessel homeostasis in the setting of diabetes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25944265

  1. Incorporation of fiber optic beam shaping into a laparoscopic probe for laser stimulation of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Mayeh, Mona; Burnett, Arthur L.; Farahi, Faramarz; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The cavernous nerves (CN) course along the prostate surface and are responsible for erectile function. Improved identification and preservation of the CN's is critical to maintaining sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery. Noncontact optical nerve stimulation (ONS) of the CN's was recently demonstrated in a rat model, in vivo, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for identification of the CN's during prostate surgery. However, the therapeutic window for ONS is narrow, so optimal design of the fiber optic delivery system is critical for safe, reproducible stimulation. This study describes modeling, assembly, and testing of an ONS probe for delivering a small, collimated, flat-top laser beam for uniform CN stimulation. A direct comparison of the magnitude and response time of the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) for both Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles was performed. Thulium fiber laser radiation (λ=1870 nm) was delivered through a 200-μm fiber, with distal fiber tip chemically etched to convert a Gaussian to flat-top beam profile. The laser beam was collimated to a 1-mm-diameter spot using an aspheric lens. Computer simulations of light propagation were used to optimize the probe design. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) laparoscopic probe provided a constant radiant exposure at the nerve surface. The probe was tested in four rats, in vivo. ONS of the CN's was performed with a 1-mm-diameter spot, 5- ms pulse duration, and pulse rate of 20 Hz for a duration of 15-30 s. The flat-top laser beam profile consistently produced a faster and higher ICP response at a lower radiant exposure than the Gaussian beam profile due, in part, to easier alignment of the more uniform beam with nerve. With further development, ONS may be used as a diagnostic tool for identification of the CN's during laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  2. Reduction in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in young adults with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo; Pardini, Matteo; Benassi, Francesca; Marciano, Sara; Amore, Mario; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Porfirio, Maria Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-04-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the use of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) evaluation as an easy-to-use, reproducible, proxy-measure of brain structural abnormalities. Here, we evaluated RNFL thickness in a group of subjects with high functioning autism (HFA) or with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to its potential as a tool to study autism pathophysiology. All subjects underwent high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography to evaluate RNFL thickness. HFA subjects presented with reduced global RNFL thickness compared both to AS subjects and controls. AS subjects showed a reduced nasal quadrant RNFL thickness compared to controls. Verbal-IQ/performance-IQ discrepancy correlated with RNFL thickness. Our data suggest that RNFL evaluation could help in the development of biological markers of autism pathophysiology. PMID:24014196

  3. Waveform efficiency analysis of auditory nerve fiber stimulation for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Lotfi Navaii, Mehdi; Sadjedi, Hamed; Jalali, Mohsen

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of the electrical stimulation efficiency of various stimulating waveforms is an important issue for efficient neural stimulator design. Concerning the implantable micro devices design, it is also necessary to consider the feasibility of hardware implementation of the desired waveforms. In this paper, the charge, power and energy efficiency of four waveforms (i.e. square, rising ramp, triangular and rising ramp-decaying exponential) in various durations have been simulated and evaluated based on the computational model of the auditory nerve fibers. Moreover, for a fair comparison of their feasibility, a fully integrated current generator circuit has been developed so that the desired stimulating waveforms can be generated. The simulation results show that stimulation with the square waveforms is a proper choice in short and intermediate durations while the rising ramp-decaying exponential or triangular waveforms can be employed for long durations. PMID:23918258

  4. Repair of peripheral nerve defects with chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with neurotrophic factors-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Ru; Ka, Ka; Zhang, Ge-Chen; Zhang, Hui; Shang, Yan; Zhao, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Wen-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with brain-derived neurotrophic factor-transfected or ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to repair sciatic nerve injury better than chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts alone, or chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We hypothesized that these allografts compounded with both brain-derived neurotrophic factor- and ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells may demonstrate even better effects in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. We cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and/or ciliary neurotrophic factor and used them to treat sciatic nerve injury in rats. We observed an increase in sciatic functional index, triceps wet weight recovery rate, myelin thickness, number of myelinated nerve fibers, amplitude of motor-evoked potentials and nerve conduction velocity, and a shortened latency of motor-evoked potentials when allografts loaded with both neurotrophic factors were used, compared with allografts loaded with just one factor. Thus, the combination of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can greatly improve nerve injury. PMID:26604913

  5. Repair of peripheral nerve defects with chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with neurotrophic factors-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-ru; Ka, Ka; Zhang, Ge-chen; Zhang, Hui; Shang, Yan; Zhao, Guo-qiang; Huang, Wen-hua

    2015-01-01

    Chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with brain-derived neurotrophic factor-transfected or ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to repair sciatic nerve injury better than chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts alone, or chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts loaded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We hypothesized that these allografts compounded with both brain-derived neurotrophic factor- and ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells may demonstrate even better effects in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. We cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and/or ciliary neurotrophic factor and used them to treat sciatic nerve injury in rats. We observed an increase in sciatic functional index, triceps wet weight recovery rate, myelin thickness, number of myelinated nerve fibers, amplitude of motor-evoked potentials and nerve conduction velocity, and a shortened latency of motor-evoked potentials when allografts loaded with both neurotrophic factors were used, compared with allografts loaded with just one factor. Thus, the combination of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can greatly improve nerve injury. PMID:26604913

  6. Whole Mount Preparation of the Adult Drosophila Ventral Nerve Cord for Giant Fiber Dye Injection

    PubMed Central

    Boerner, Jana; Godenschwege, Tanja A.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the axonal and dendritic morphology of neurons, it is essential to obtain accurate labeling of neuronal structures. Preparing well labeled samples with little to no tissue damage enables us to analyze cell morphology and to compare individual samples to each other, hence allowing the identification of mutant anomalies. In the demonstrated dissection method the nervous system remains mostly inside the adult fly. Through a dorsal incision, the abdomen and thorax are opened and most of the internal organs are removed. Only the dorsal side of the ventral nerve cord (VNC) and the cervical connective (CvC) containing the big axons of the giant fibers (GFs)1 are exposed, while the brain containing the GF cell body and dendrites remains2 in the intact head. In this preparation most nerves of the VNC should remain attached to their muscles. Following the dissection, the intracellular filling of the giant fiber (GF) with a fluorescent dye is demonstrated. In the CvC the GF axons are located at the dorsal surface and thus can be easily visualized under a microscope with differential interference contrast (DIC) optics. This allows the injection of the GF axons with dye at this site to label the entire GF including the axons and their terminals in the VNC. This method results in reliable and strong staining of the GFs allowing the neurons to be imaged immediately after filling with an epifluorescent microscope. Alternatively, the fluorescent signal can be enhanced using standard immunohistochemistry procedures3 suitable for high resolution confocal microscopy. PMID:21673644

  7. Characteristics of intermittent mitochondrial transport in guinea pig enteric nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Hennig, Grant W; Smith, Terence K

    2004-04-01

    Enteric neurons controlling various gut functions are prone to oxidative insults that might damage mitochondria (e.g., intestinal inflammation). To resume local energy supply, mitochondria need to be transported. We used MitoTracker dyes and confocal microscopy to investigate basic characteristics of mitochondrial transport in guinea pig myenteric neurites. During a 10-s observation of 1 mm nerve fiber, on average, three mitochondria were transported at an average speed of 0.41 +/- 0.02 microm/s. Movement patterns were clearly erratic, and velocities were independent of mitochondrial size. The velocity oscillated periodically ( approximately 6 s) but was not consistently affected by structures such as en route boutons, bifurcations, or stationary mitochondria. Also, mitochondria transported in opposite directions did not necessarily affect each others' mobility. Transport was blocked by microtubule disruption (100 microM colchicine), and destabilization (1 microM cytochalasin-D) or stabilization (10 microM phalloidin) of actin filaments, respectively, decreased (0.22 +/- 0.02 microm/s, P < 0.05) or increased (0.53 +/- 0.02 microm/s, P < 0.05) transport speed. Transport was inhibited by TTX (1 microM), and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) (plus 2 mM EGTA) had no effect. However, depletion of intracellular stores (thapsigargin) reduced (to 33%) and slowed the transport significantly (0.18 +/- 0.02 microm/s, P < 0.05), suggesting an important role for stored Ca(2+) in mitochondrial transport. Transport was also reduced (to 21%) by the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP (1 microM) in a time-dependent fashion and slowed by oligomycin (10 microM). We conclude that mitochondrial transport is remarkably independent of structural nerve fiber properties. We also show that mitochondrial transport is TTX sensitive and speeds up by stabilizing actin and that functional Ca(2+) stores are required for efficient transport. PMID:14592946

  8. In-vivo imaging of retinal nerve fiber layer vasculature: imaging - histology comparison

    PubMed Central

    Scoles, Drew; Gray, Daniel C; Hunter, Jennifer J; Wolfe, Robert; Gee, Bernard P; Geng, Ying; Masella, Benjamin D; Libby, Richard T; Russell, Stephen; Williams, David R; Merigan, William H

    2009-01-01

    Background Although it has been suggested that alterations of nerve fiber layer vasculature may be involved in the etiology of eye diseases, including glaucoma, it has not been possible to examine this vasculature in-vivo. This report describes a novel imaging method, fluorescence adaptive optics (FAO) scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), that makes possible for the first time in-vivo imaging of this vasculature in the living macaque, comparing in-vivo and ex-vivo imaging of this vascular bed. Methods We injected sodium fluorescein intravenously in two macaque monkeys while imaging the retina with an FAO-SLO. An argon laser provided the 488 nm excitation source for fluorescence imaging. Reflectance images, obtained simultaneously with near infrared light, permitted precise surface registration of individual frames of the fluorescence imaging. In-vivo imaging was then compared to ex-vivo confocal microscopy of the same tissue. Results Superficial focus (innermost retina) at all depths within the NFL revealed a vasculature with extremely long capillaries, thin walls, little variation in caliber and parallel-linked structure oriented parallel to the NFL axons, typical of the radial peripapillary capillaries (RPCs). However, at a deeper focus beneath the NFL, (toward outer retina) the polygonal pattern typical of the ganglion cell layer (inner) and outer retinal vasculature was seen. These distinguishing patterns were also seen on histological examination of the same retinas. Furthermore, the thickness of the RPC beds and the caliber of individual RPCs determined by imaging closely matched that measured in histological sections. Conclusion This robust method demonstrates in-vivo, high-resolution, confocal imaging of the vasculature through the full thickness of the NFL in the living macaque, in precise agreement with histology. FAO provides a new tool to examine possible primary or secondary role of the nerve fiber layer vasculature in retinal vascular disorders and

  9. Directionality of phase locking in auditory nerve fibers of the leopard frog Rana pipiens pipiens.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, B; White, T D; Narins, P M

    1992-06-01

    A dorsal approach to the eighth nerve and free-field stimulation were used to investigate the effect of sound direction and intensity on phase locking in auditory nerve fibers of the leopard frog Rana pipiens pipiens. Tuning curves of 75 auditory neurons were analyzed (Fig. 2). Amphibian papillar neurons, but not basilar papillar neurons, exhibit significant phase locking to short tone bursts at the characteristic frequency (CF), the degree of phase locking (vector strength) decreasing with the neuron's CF (Figs. 3, 4 and 10E). Vector strength increases with sound pressure level to saturate about 20 dB above threshold, while the preferred firing phase is only slightly affected (Figs. 5 and 6). In contrast, sound direction hardly affects vector strength (Figs. 7, 8, 9A and 10A and C), but has a strong influence on the preferred firing phase (Figs. 7, 8, 9B and C, 10B and D): With respect to anterior tone presentation there are phase lags for ipsilateral and phase leads for posterior and contralateral presentation. Phase differences between both ears show a sinusoidal or cardioid/ovoidal directional characteristic; maximum differences are found with antero-lateral tone presentation (Fig. 11). The directionality of phase locking decreases with the neuron's CF (Fig. 10F) and only slightly changes with sound pressure level (Fig. 12). Thus, phase locking of amphibian papilla neurons can potentially provide intensity-independent information for sound localization. PMID:1507157

  10. Detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects on retinal fundus images for early diagnosis of glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Sawada, Akira; Hatanaka, Yuji; Hara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD) is a major sign of glaucoma, which is the second leading cause of blindness in the world. Early detection of NFLDs is critical for improved prognosis of this progressive, blinding disease. We have investigated a computerized scheme for detection of NFLDs on retinal fundus images. In this study, 162 images, including 81 images with 99 NFLDs, were used. After major blood vessels were removed, the images were transformed so that the curved paths of retinal nerves become approximately straight on the basis of ellipses, and the Gabor filters were applied for enhancement of NFLDs. Bandlike regions darker than the surrounding pixels were detected as candidates of NFLDs. For each candidate, image features were determined and the likelihood of a true NFLD was determined by using the linear discriminant analysis and an artificial neural network (ANN). The sensitivity for detecting the NFLDs was 91% at 1.0 false positive per image by using the ANN. The proposed computerized system for the detection of NFLDs can be useful to physicians in the diagnosis of glaucoma in a mass screening.

  11. Axolemmal abnormalities in myelin mutants.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, J

    1990-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that the paranodal axoglial junction plays important roles in the differentiation and function of myelinated axons. In myelin-deficient axons, ion flux across the axolemma is greater than that in myelinated fibers because a larger proportion of the axolemma is active during continuous, as opposed to saltatory, conduction. In addition, older myelin-deficient rats that have developed spontaneous seizures display small foci of node-like E-face particle accumulations in CNS axons as well as more diffuse regions of increased particle density and number. Assuming that the E-face particles represent sodium channels, such regions could underlie high sodium current density during activity, low threshold for excitation, and increased extracellular potassium accumulation. Depending on the degree of spontaneous channel opening, they could also represent sites of spontaneous generation of activity. The appearance of seizures and their gradual increase in frequency and severity could represent an increase in the number of such regions. In addition, diminution in the dimensions of the extracellular space during maturation would result in increased extracellular resistance, which, together with increasing axonal diameter, would tend to increase the likelihood of ephaptic interaction among neighboring axons as well as the likelihood of extracellular potassium rises to levels that could cause spontaneous activity. PMID:2268117

  12. A schwannoma of the S1 dural sleeve was resected while the intact nerve fibers were preserved using a microscope. Report of a case with early MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Uchida, K; Kokubo, Y; Yayama, T; Nakajima, H; Inukai, T; Nomura, E; Baba, H

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we describe a small schwannoma of the dural sleeve and mention that it is often difficult to differentiate this tumor from lumbar disc herniation, especially a sequestered hernia, or a discal cyst. Gadolinium-enhanced MR images were a useful preoperative examination modality for differentiating this lesion from other diseases. Microscopically, the intradural tumor was successfully removed. The dura mater of the S1 nerve root was opened microsurgically, allowing the nerve fibers involved in the tumor to be identified. The involved fibers were cut around the tumor, and the lesion was resected while the intact nerve fibers were preserved. Based on histological examination of the resected specimen, the tumor was diagnosed as a schwannoma with multilocular cystic degeneration. Microsurgery allowed the tumor to be removed with minimal impairment from cutting of nerve fibers in the nerve root. PMID:17674301

  13. NKCC1 Activation Is Required for Myelinated Sensory Neurons Regeneration through JNK-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mòdol, Laura; Santos, Daniel; Cobianchi, Stefano; González-Pérez, Francisco; López-Alvarez, Víctor; Navarro, Xavier

    2015-05-13

    After peripheral nerve injury, axons are able to regenerate, although specific sensory reinnervation and functional recovery are usually worse for large myelinated than for small sensory axons. The mechanisms that mediate the regeneration of different sensory neuron subpopulations are poorly known. The Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) is particularly relevant in setting the intracellular chloride concentration. After axotomy, increased NKCC1 phosphorylation has been reported to be important for neurite outgrowth of sensory neurons; however, the mechanisms underlying its effects are still unknown. In the present study we used in vitro and in vivo models to assess the differential effects of blocking NKCC1 activity on the regeneration of different types of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) neurons after sciatic nerve injury in the rat. We observed that blocking NKCC1 activity by bumetanide administration induces a selective effect on neurite outgrowth and regeneration of myelinated fibers without affecting unmyelinated DRG neurons. To further study the mechanism underlying NKCC1 effects, we also assessed the changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling under NKCC1 modulation. The inhibition of NKCC1 activity in vitro and in vivo modified pJNK1/2/3 expression in DRG neurons. Together, our study identifies a mechanism selectively contributing to myelinated axon regeneration, and point out the role of Cl(-) modulation in DRG neuron regeneration and in the activation of MAPKs, particularly those belonging to the JNK family. PMID:25972170

  14. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes. PMID:27149509

  15. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes. PMID:27149509

  16. CSF myelin basic protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF myelin basic protein is a test to measure the level of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The CSF ... less than 4 ng/mL of myelin basic protein in the CSF. Normal value ranges may vary ...

  17. Structural and dynamical properties of reconstituted myelin sheaths in the presence of myelin proteins MBP and P2 studied by neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Wiebke; Peters, Judith; Kursula, Petri; Gerelli, Yuri; Ollivier, Jacques; Demé, Bruno; Telling, Mark; Kemner, Ewout; Natali, Francesca

    2014-01-21

    The myelin sheath is a tightly packed, multilayered membrane structure wrapped around selected nerve axons in the central and the peripheral nervous system. Because of its electrical insulation of the axons, which allows fast, saltatory nerve impulse conduction, myelin is crucial for the proper functioning of the vertebrate nervous system. A subset of myelin-specific proteins is well-defined, but their influence on membrane dynamics, i.e. myelin stability, has not yet been explored in detail. We investigated the structure and the dynamics of reconstituted myelin membranes on a pico- to nanosecond timescale, influenced by myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin protein 2 (P2), using neutron diffraction and quasi-elastic neutron scattering. A model for the scattering function describing molecular lipid motions is suggested. Although dynamical properties are not affected significantly by MBP and P2 proteins, they act in a highly synergistic manner influencing the membrane structure. PMID:24651633

  18. Reorganization of central terminals of myelinated primary afferents in the rat dorsal horn following peripheral axotomy.

    PubMed

    Woolf, C J; Shortland, P; Reynolds, M; Ridings, J; Doubell, T; Coggeshall, R E

    1995-09-11

    We have investigated the time course and extent to which peripheral nerve lesions cause a morphological reorganization of the central terminals of choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP)-labelled primary afferent fibers in the mammalian dorsal horn. Choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase is retrogradely transported by myelinated (A) sensory axons to laminae I, III, IV and V of the normal dorsal horn of the spinal cord, leaving lamina II unlabelled. We previously showed that peripheral axotomy results in the sprouting of numerous B-HRP-labelled large myelinated sensory axons into lamina II. We show here that this spread of B-HRP-labelled axons into lamina II is detectable at 1 week, maximal by 2 weeks and persists for over 6 months postlesion. By 9 months, however, B-HRP fibers no longer appear in lamina II. The sprouting into lamina II occurs whether regeneration is allowed (crush) or prevented (section with ligation), and does not reverse at times when peripheral fibers reinnervate the periphery. We also show that 15 times more synaptic terminals in lamina II are labelled by B-HRP 2 weeks after axotomy than in the normal. We interpret this as indicating that the sprouting fibers are making synaptic contacts with postsynaptic targets. This implies that A-fiber terminal reorganization is a prominent and long-lasting but not permanent feature of peripheral axotomy. We also provide evidence that this sprouting is the consequence of a combination of an atrophic loss of central synaptic terminals and the conditioning of the sensory neurons by peripheral axotomy. The sprouting of large sensory fibers into the spinal territory where postsynaptic targets usually receive only small afferent fiber input may bear on the intractable touch-evoked pain that can follow nerve injury. PMID:7499558

  19. Affinity-based release of glial-derived neurotrophic factor from fibrin matrices enhances sciatic nerve regeneration†

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Matthew D.; Moore, Amy M.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Tuffaha, Sami; Borschel, Gregory H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2008-01-01

    Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes both sensory and motor neuron survival. The delivery of GDNF to the peripheral nervous system has been shown to enhance regeneration following injury. In this study we evaluated the effect of affinity-based delivery of GDNF from a fibrin matrix in a nerve guidance conduit on nerve regeneration in a 13 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Seven experimental groups were evaluated which received GDNF or nerve growth factor (NGF) with the delivery system within the conduit, control groups excluding one or more components of the delivery system, and nerve isografts. Nerves were harvested 6 weeks after treatment for analysis by histomorphometry and electron microscopy. The use of the delivery system (DS) with either GDNF or NGF resulted in a higher frequency of nerve regeneration vs. control groups, as evidenced by a neural structure spanning the 13 mm gap. The GDNF DS and NGF DS groups were also similar to the nerve isograft group in measures of nerve fiber density, percent neural tissue and myelinated area measurements, but not in terms of total fiber counts. In addition, both groups contained a significantly greater percentage of larger diameter fibers, with GDNF DS having the largest in comparison to all groups, suggesting more mature neural content. The delivery of GDNF via the affinity-based delivery system can enhance peripheral nerve regeneration through a silicone conduit across a critical nerve gap and offers insight into potential future alternatives to the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:19103514

  20. Tuning PAK Activity to Rescue Abnormal Myelin Permeability in HNPP.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Zhang, Xuebao; Möbius, Wiebke; Werner, Hauke; Sosinsky, Gina; Ellisman, Mark; Zhang, Yang; Hamilton, Audra; Chernoff, Jonathan; Li, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous systems extend their membranes to wrap axons concentrically and form the insulating sheath, called myelin. The spaces between layers of myelin are sealed by myelin junctions. This tight insulation enables rapid conduction of electric impulses (action potentials) through axons. Demyelination (stripping off the insulating sheath) has been widely regarded as one of the most important mechanisms altering the action potential propagation in many neurological diseases. However, the effective nerve conduction is also thought to require a proper myelin seal through myelin junctions such as tight junctions and adherens junctions. In the present study, we have demonstrated the disruption of myelin junctions in a mouse model (Pmp22+/-) of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of Pmp22 gene. We observed a robust increase of F-actin in Pmp22+/- nerve regions where myelin junctions were disrupted, leading to increased myelin permeability. These abnormalities were present long before segmental demyelination at the late phase of Pmp22+/- mice. Moreover, the increase of F-actin levels correlated with an enhanced activity of p21-activated kinase (PAK1), a molecule known to regulate actin polymerization. Pharmacological inhibition of PAK normalized levels of F-actin, and completely prevented the progression of the myelin junction disruption and nerve conduction failure in Pmp22+/- mice. Our findings explain how abnormal myelin permeability is caused in HNPP, leading to impaired action potential propagation in the absence of demyelination. We call it "functional demyelination", a novel mechanism upstream to the actual stripping of myelin that is relevant to many demyelinating diseases. This observation also provides a potential therapeutic approach for HNPP. PMID:27583434

  1. Dexamethasone prevents vascular damage in early-stage non-freezing cold injury of the sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury is a prevalent cause of peripheral nerve damage, but its pathogenic mechanism is poorly understood, and treatment remains inadequate. Glucocorticoids have anti-inflammatory and lipid peroxidation-inhibiting properties. We therefore examined whether dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid compound, would alleviate early-stage non-freezing cold injury of the sciatic nerve. We established Wistar rat models of non-freezing cold injury by exposing the left sciatic nerve to cold (3–5°C) for 2 hours, then administered dexamethasone (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to half of the models. One day after injury, the concentration of Evans blue tracer in the injured sciatic nerve of rats that received dexamethasone was notably lower than that in the injured sciatic nerve of rats that did not receive dexamethasone; neither Evans blue dye nor capillary stenosis was observed in the endoneurium, but myelinated nerve fibers were markedly degenerated in the injured sciatic nerve of animals that received dexamethasone. After dexamethasone administration, however, endoneurial vasculopathy was markedly improved, although damage to the myelinated nerve fiber was not alleviated. These findings suggest that dexamethasone protects the blood-nerve barrier, but its benefit in non-freezing cold injury is limited to the vascular system. PMID:26981107

  2. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Ruani N; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry-diameter and length-is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy(2j/2j) mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  3. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Ruani N.; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A.; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry—diameter and length—is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy2j/2j mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  4. Estimating nerve excitation thresholds to cutaneous electrical stimulation by finite element modeling combined with a stochastic branching nerve fiber model.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Hennings, Kristian; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2011-04-01

    Electrical stimulation of cutaneous tissue through surface electrodes is an often used method for evoking experimental pain. However, at painful intensities both non-nociceptive Aβ-fibers and nociceptive Aδ- and C-fibers may be activated by the electrical stimulation. This study proposes a finite element (FE) model of the extracellular potential and stochastic branching fiber model of the afferent fiber excitation thresholds. The FE model described four horizontal layers; stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and hypodermal used to estimate the excitation threshold of Aβ-fibers terminating in dermis and Aδ-fibers terminating in epidermis. The perception thresholds of 11 electrodes with diameters ranging from 0.2 to 20 mm were modeled and assessed on the volar forearm of healthy human volunteers by an adaptive two-alternative forced choice algorithm. The model showed that the magnitude of the current density was highest for smaller electrodes and decreased through the skin. The excitation thresholds of the Aδ-fibers were lower than the excitation thresholds of Aβ-fibers when current was applied through small, but not large electrodes. The experimentally assessed perception threshold followed the lowest excitation threshold of the modeled fibers. The model confirms that preferential excitation of Aδ-fibers may be achieved by small electrode stimulation due to higher current density in the dermoepidermal junction. PMID:21207174

  5. The molecular physiology of the axo-myelinic synapse.

    PubMed

    Micu, Ileana; Plemel, Jason R; Lachance, Celia; Proft, Juliane; Jansen, Andrew J; Cummins, Karen; van Minnen, Jan; Stys, Peter K

    2016-02-01

    Myelinated axons efficiently transmit information over long distances. The apposed myelin sheath confers favorable electrical properties, but restricts access of the axon to its extracellular milieu. Therefore, axonal metabolic support may require specific axo-myelinic communication. Here we explored activity-dependent glutamate-mediated signaling from axon to myelin. 2-Photon microscopy was used to image Ca(2+) changes in myelin in response to electrical stimulation of optic nerve axons ex vivo. We show that optic nerve myelin responds to axonal action potentials by a rise in Ca(2+) levels mediated by GluN2D and GluN3A-containing NMDA receptors. Glutamate is released from axons in a vesicular manner that is tetanus toxin-sensitive. The Ca(2+) source for vesicular fusion is provided by ryanodine receptors on axonal Ca(2+) stores, controlled by L-type Ca(2+) channels that sense depolarization of the internodal axolemma. Genetic ablation of GluN2D and GluN3A subunits results in greater lability of the compact myelin. Our results support the existence of a novel synapse between the axon and its myelin, suggesting a means by which traversing action potentials can signal the overlying myelin sheath. This may be an important physiological mechanism by which an axon can signal companion glia for metabolic support or adjust properties of its myelin in a dynamic manner. The axo-myelinic synapse may contribute to learning, while its disturbances may play a role in the pathophysiology of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia, where subtle abnormalities of myelinated white matter tracts have been shown in the human, or to frank demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26515690

  6. Origin and endpoint of the olfactory nerve fibers: as described by Santiago Ramón y Cajal.

    PubMed

    Levine, Catherine; Marcillo, Alexander

    2008-07-01

    In the late Nineteenth Century, Santiago Ramón y Cajal was able to reproduce an exceptional illustration of the Olfactory Nerve pathway and its myriad of cells, by using the Golgi Method. Dr. Cajal focused intense study on the histology of the nervous system and published a treatise on the olfactory nerve fibers and the distinct peripheral origin and central nervous system endpoint of this unique pathway. The original title of this work is "Origen y terminación de las fibras nerviosas olfatorias" published in 1890. As the original publication is in Spanish, here we provide an English translation allowing present-day English speakers to read these writings. Cajal followed the trajectory of the olfactory nerve fibers as they transitioned between the peripheral and central nervous system and was able to assert that these fibers were not continuous from the olfactory bulb to the bipolar cells that relinquish into the olfactory epithelium, but that the olfactory system was made up of various cell types each having distinct morphologies and functions. This may very well be the first definitive description of the olfactory receptor neurons and the first illustrations of the continuity of these cells throughout the olfactory pathway. These meticulous histological preparations were created by first using Camillo Golgi's potassium dichromate and silver nitrate impregnation method known as "reazione nera" or "black reaction," where nerve cells, nerve fibers, and neuroglia could be visualized. This study exhibits the structural and functional organization of the mammalian fila olfactoria as it was investigated in centuries past. PMID:18383279

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: a novel Tyr145Ser mutation in the myelin protein zero (MPZ, P0) gene causes different phenotypes in homozygous and heterozygous carriers within one family.

    PubMed

    Leal, Alejandro; Berghoff, Corinna; Berghoff, Martin; Del Valle, Gerardo; Contreras, Carlos; Montoya, Olga; Hernández, Erick; Barrantes, Ramiro; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Neundörfer, Bernhard; Reis, André; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Heuss, Dieter

    2003-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B (CMT 1B) is caused by mutations in the gene coding for peripheral myelin protein zero (MPZ, P0) that plays a fundamental role in adhesion and compaction of peripheral myelin. Here we report a Costa Rican family with a hereditary peripheral neuropathy due to a novel Tyr145Ser MPZ mutation. Four family members were heterozygously affected; two siblings of two heterozygous carriers were homozygous for this mutation. On neurological examination the heterozygous parents and their homozygous children both showed distal sensory deficits. The mother and the siblings displayed impaired deep tendon reflexes and mild sensory ataxia. The homozygous individuals were more severely affected with an earlier age of onset, distal motor weakness, and pupillary abnormalities. Electrophysiological studies revealed both signs of demyelination and axonal nerve degeneration. The sural nerve biopsy of one sibling showed thinly myelinated nerve fibers, onion bulb formation, and clusters of regenerating fibers. On electron microscopy axonal degeneration and decompaction of inner myelin layers were found. This Costa Rican family shows phenotypic variability depending on the homozygous or heterozygous state of the Tyr145Ser mutation carriers. PMID:12845552

  8. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  9. Experimental Research on Differentiation-Inducing Growth of Nerve Lateral Bud by HUC-MSCs Chitosan Composite Conduit.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Xuepu; Wu, Yuexin

    2015-11-01

    This study is intended to explore the role of human umbilical-cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs) in nerve end-to-side anastomosis, as well as in the induction and promotion of growth of nerve lateral bud. The chitosan nerve conduit was prepared based on the biological characteristics of chitosan, and the nerve conduit was filled with HUC-MSCs, and was used to bridge the nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma. The experimental animals were randomly assigned into three groups (10 in each group), and the nerve end-to-side anastomosis was conducted: (1) group A (control group): traditional tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomosis; (2) group B (experimental group 1): tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma bridged with chitosan nerve conduit; (3) group C (experimental group 2): tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma bridged by chitosan nerve conduit filled with HUC-MSCs. General morphological observation, nerve electrophysiology, and anti-S-100 immunohistochemistry were performed. All experimental animals survived, and no infections were found at operative incisions. The nerve continuity was in good condition through visual observation when sampling, which is mild adhesion to the surrounding tissue and easy to be separated. 12 W HUC-MSCs chitosan composite nerve conduits were degraded completely after operation. Electrophysiological test showed that the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in group C was significantly higher than that in group A or group B (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences between NCVs of group A and group B. Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscope showed that the number of the medullated fibers and the myelin sheath thickness in group C were larger than those in group A or B. There were no significant differences between the numbers of the medullated fibers and between the myelin sheath thicknesses of groups A and B. By means of anti-S-100

  10. Raman spectroscopy of non-penetrating peripheral nerve damage in swine: a tool for spectral pathology of nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilwa, Katherine E.; Slaughter, Tiffani; Elster, Eric A.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Crane, Nicole J.

    2015-03-01

    Over 30% of combat injuries involve peripheral nerve injury compared to only 3% in civilian trauma. In fact, nerve dysfunction is the second leading cause of long-term disability in injured service members and is present in 37% of upper limb injuries with disability. Identification and assessment of non-penetrating nerve injury in trauma patients could improve outcome and aid in therapeutic monitoring. We report the use of Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive, non-destructive method for detection of nerve degeneration in intact nerves due to non-penetrating trauma. Nerve trauma was induced via compression and ischemia/reperfusion injury using a combat relevant swine tourniquet model (>3 hours ischemia). Control animals did not undergo compression/ischemia. Seven days post-operatively, sciatic and femoral nerves were harvested and fixed in formalin. Raman spectra of intact, peripheral nerves were collected using a fiber-optic probe with 3 mm diameter spot size and 785 nm excitation. Data was preprocessed, including fluorescence background subtraction, and Raman spectroscopic metrics were determined using custom peak fitting MATLAB scripts. The abilities of bivariate and multivariate analysis methods to predict tissue state based on Raman spectroscopic metrics are compared. Injured nerves exhibited changes in Raman metrics indicative of 45% decreased myelin content and structural damage (p<<0.01). Axonal and myelin degeneration, cell death and digestion, and inflammation of nerve tissue samples were confirmed via histology. This study demonstrates the non-invasive ability of Raman spectroscopy to detect nerve degeneration associated with non-penetrating injury, relevant to neurapraxic and axonotmetic injuries; future experiments will further explore the clinical utility of Raman spectroscopy to recognize neural injury.

  11. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  12. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Pawel; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. MATERIAL AND METHODS After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. CONCLUSIONS The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  13. A new method for labelling saxitoxin and its binding to non-myelinated fibres of the rabbit vagus, lobster walking leg, and garfish olfactory nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, J M; Rogart, R B; Strichartz, G R

    1976-01-01

    1. A new method of labelling saxitoxin (STX) is described, based on transfer of tritium from tritiated water to the toxin. 2. The radiochemical purity of the labelled toxin has been directly determined, rather than being based on indirect biochemical means, as in previous experiments with Wilzbach-labelled STX and TTX. 3. The specific activity of the labelled toxin, 66 d..m.f-mole-1, corresponds with one tritium atom per molecule STX, an improvement of about 300-fold over other means of labelling TTX and STX. 4. The binding of this toxin to rabbit, lobster and garfish olfactory nerve fibres has been re-examined. 5. The density of sodium channels calculated on the basis of the binding of the toxin is about four to six-times the values previously reported. PMID:978583

  14. Detection of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects in Alzheimer’s Disease Using SD-OCT

    PubMed Central

    Kromer, Robert; Serbecic, Nermin; Hausner, Lucrezia; Froelich, Lutz; Aboul-Enein, Fahmy; Beutelspacher, Sven C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim is to examine the clinical value of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (Spectralis OCT) to detect retinal nerve fibre layer defects in patients with clinically defined Alzheimer‘s disease (AD). Material and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 22 patients with AD (mean age: 75.9 ± 6.1 years) and 22 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and a series of high-resolution OCT examinations of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness using the Spectralis 3.5-mm circle scan protocol with ART-Modus and eye tracking were obtained, and compared to age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Results: Patients with AD showed a significant decrease in RNFL thickness in the nasal superior sector compared to the control group (101.0 ± 18.18 μm versus 122.8 ± 28.08 μm; P < 0.0001). In all other sectors, independently of disease duration, no significant difference in RNFL thickness compared to controls was detected. Using the advanced age- and gender-matched measurement model, 32 out of 42 eyes (76.19%) as pathologic with 67 abnormal sectors were detected. Discussion: As examined by spectral-domain OCT, patients with mild to moderate stages of AD showed a significant reduction of RNFL thickness in the nasal superior sector. Nevertheless, successive studies are needed. PMID:24616709

  15. Localization of TRPV1 and P2X3 in unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Sam M; Andresen, Michael C; Aicher, Sue A

    2016-03-01

    The vagus nerve is dominated by afferent fibers that convey sensory information from the viscera to the brain. Most vagal afferents are unmyelinated, slow-conducting C-fibers, while a smaller portion are myelinated, fast-conducting A-fibers. Vagal afferents terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem and regulate autonomic and respiratory reflexes, as well as ascending pathways throughout the brain. Vagal afferents form glutamatergic excitatory synapses with postsynaptic NTS neurons that are modulated by a variety of channels. The organization of vagal afferents with regard to fiber type and channels is not well understood. In the present study, we used tract tracing methods to identify distinct populations of vagal afferents to determine if key channels are selectively localized to specific groups of afferent fibers. Vagal afferents were labeled with isolectin B4 (IB4) or cholera toxin B (CTb) to detect unmyelinated and myelinated afferents, respectively. We find that TRPV1 channels are preferentially found in unmyelinated vagal afferents identified with IB4, with almost half of all IB4 fibers showing co-localization with TRPV1. These results agree with prior electrophysiological findings. In contrast, we found that the ATP-sensitive channel P2X3 is found in a subset of both myelinated and unmyelinated vagal afferent fibers. Specifically, 18% of IB4 and 23% of CTb afferents contained P2X3. The majority of CTb-ir vagal afferents contained neither channel. Since neither channel was found in all vagal afferents, there are likely further degrees of heterogeneity in the modulation of vagal afferent sensory input to the NTS beyond fiber type. PMID:26706222

  16. Erythropoietin promotes peripheral nerve regeneration in rats by upregulating expression of insulin-like growth factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Qing; Wang, Lei; Bai, Guang; Yang, Tao; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Zhitu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to have beneficial effects on peripheral nerve damage, but its mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. In this study we hypothesized that EPO promotes peripheral nerve repair via neurotrophic factor upregulation. Material and methods Thirty adult male Wistar rats were employed to establish a sciatic nerve injury model. They were then randomly divided into two groups to be subjected to different treatment: 0.9% saline (group A) and 5000 U/kg EPO (group B). The walking behavior of rats was evaluated by footprint analysis, and the nerve regeneration was assessed by electron microscopy. The expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in the injured sciatic nerves was detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Results Compared to saline treatment, EPO treatment led to the growth of myelin sheath, the recovery of normal morphology of axons and Schwann cells, and higher density of myelinated nerve fibers. Erythropoietin treatment promoted the recovery of SFI in the injured sciatic nerves. In addition, EPO treatment led to increased IGF-1 expression in the injured sciatic nerves. Conclusions Erythropoietin may promote peripheral nerve repair in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through the upregulation of IGF-1 expression. These findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the neurotrophic effects of EPO. PMID:25995763

  17. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy. PMID:27373589

  18. Can Automated Imaging for Optic Disc and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Analysis Aid Glaucoma Detection?

    PubMed Central

    Banister, Katie; Boachie, Charles; Bourne, Rupert; Cook, Jonathan; Burr, Jennifer M.; Ramsay, Craig; Garway-Heath, David; Gray, Joanne; McMeekin, Peter; Hernández, Rodolfo; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of automated imaging for glaucoma. Design Prospective, direct comparison study. Participants Adults with suspected glaucoma or ocular hypertension referred to hospital eye services in the United Kingdom. Methods We evaluated 4 automated imaging test algorithms: the Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) glaucoma probability score (GPS), the HRT Moorfields regression analysis (MRA), scanning laser polarimetry (GDx enhanced corneal compensation; Glaucoma Diagnostics (GDx), Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) nerve fiber indicator (NFI), and Spectralis optical coherence tomography (OCT; Heidelberg Engineering) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) classification. We defined abnormal tests as an automated classification of outside normal limits for HRT and OCT or NFI ≥ 56 (GDx). We conducted a sensitivity analysis, using borderline abnormal image classifications. The reference standard was clinical diagnosis by a masked glaucoma expert including standardized clinical assessment and automated perimetry. We analyzed 1 eye per patient (the one with more advanced disease). We also evaluated the performance according to severity and using a combination of 2 technologies. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity and specificity, likelihood ratios, diagnostic, odds ratio, and proportion of indeterminate tests. Results We recruited 955 participants, and 943 were included in the analysis. The average age was 60.5 years (standard deviation, 13.8 years); 51.1% were women. Glaucoma was diagnosed in at least 1 eye in 16.8%; 32% of participants had no glaucoma-related findings. The HRT MRA had the highest sensitivity (87.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 80.2%–92.1%), but lowest specificity (63.9%; 95% CI, 60.2%–67.4%); GDx had the lowest sensitivity (35.1%; 95% CI, 27.0%–43.8%), but the highest specificity (97.2%; 95% CI, 95.6%–98.3%). The HRT GPS sensitivity was 81.5% (95% CI, 73.9%–87.6%), and

  19. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  20. Central distribution of the efferent cells and the primary afferent fibers of the trigeminal nerve in Pleurodeles waltlii (Amphibia, Urodela).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, A; Muñoz, M

    1988-04-22

    As part of a study on the organization of the brainstem in a primitive group of vertebrates, the efferent cells and primary afferent fibers of the urodele amphibian Pleurodeles waltlii were examined by means of retrograde and anterograde axonal transport and anterograde degeneration. The trigeminal motor nucleus is located in the periventricular gray just medial to the sulcus limitans. Its rostral part is a band of pear-shaped cells lying parallel to the wall of the ventricle, whereas its caudal part is a round mass consisting of polygonal cells. In addition, a small group of scattered neurons is situated ventral to the rostral part of the nucleus. The primary afferent fibers enter the brainstem in the dorsal two-thirds of the trigeminal root. They diverge into a short ascending and a long descending tract. The former distributes its axons to the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus, which is an ill-defined cell group located at the ventrolateral edge of the periventricular gray. In the descending tract, the fibers of the ophthalmic nerve are predominantly located ventromedially, and those of the maxillomandibular nerve dorsolaterally. A fascicle of the ophthalmic nerve leaves the descending tract and, apparently, makes contact with the accessory abducens nucleus. The descending tract extends caudally into the three upper cervical segments of the spinal cord. The mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus consists of conspicuous large cells, which are scattered through the tectum of the mesencephalon. The cells with peripheral branches in the ophthalmic nerve are mainly located in the caudal half of the tectum, and those with peripheral branches in the maxillomandibular nerve in the rostral half. Collaterals of the central branches of the mesencephalic trigeminal system were traced to an area of the periventricular gray situated between the motor nucleus and the principal sensory nucleus of the trigeminus. PMID:2836480

  1. Rat sciatic nerve reconstruction across a 30 mm defect bridged by an oriented porous PHBV tube with Schwann cell as artificial nerve graft.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mina; Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz; Doostmohamadpour, Jafar; Janfada, Alireza; Montazeri, Arash

    2014-01-01

    An oriented poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit has been used to evaluate its efficiency based on the promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. The oriented porous micropatterned artificial nerve conduit was designed onto the micropatterned silicon wafers, and then their surfaces were modified with oxygen plasma to increase cell adhesion. The designed conduits were investigated by cell culture analyses with Schwann cells (SCs). The conduits were implanted into a 30 mm gap in sciatic nerves of rats. Four months after surgery, the regenerated nerves were monitored and evaluated by macroscopic assessments and histology and behavioral analyses. Results of cellular analyses showed suitable properties of designed conduit for nerve regeneration. The results demonstrated that in the polymeric graft with SCs, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed with restoration of nerve continuity and formatted nerve fibers with myelination. Histological results demonstrated the presence of Schwann and glial cells in regenerated nerves. Functional recovery such as walking, swimming, and recovery of nociceptive function was illustrated for all the grafts especially conduits with SCs. This study proves the feasibility of the artificial nerve graft filled with SCs for peripheral nerve regeneration by bridging a longer defect in an animal model. PMID:24399063

  2. Rat Sciatic Nerve Reconstruction Across a 30 mm Defect Bridged by an Oriented Porous PHBV Tube With Schwann Cell as Artificial Nerve Graft

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An oriented poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit has been used to evaluate its efficiency based on the promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. The oriented porous micropatterned artificial nerve conduit was designed onto the micropatterned silicon wafers, and then their surfaces were modified with oxygen plasma to increase cell adhesion. The designed conduits were investigated by cell culture analyses with Schwann cells (SCs). The conduits were implanted into a 30 mm gap in sciatic nerves of rats. Four months after surgery, the regenerated nerves were monitored and evaluated by macroscopic assessments and histology and behavioral analyses. Results of cellular analyses showed suitable properties of designed conduit for nerve regeneration. The results demonstrated that in the polymeric graft with SCs, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed with restoration of nerve continuity and formatted nerve fibers with myelination. Histological results demonstrated the presence of Schwann and glial cells in regenerated nerves. Functional recovery such as walking, swimming, and recovery of nociceptive function was illustrated for all the grafts especially conduits with SCs. This study proves the feasibility of the artificial nerve graft filled with SCs for peripheral nerve regeneration by bridging a longer defect in an animal model. PMID:24399063

  3. Morphological changes of the peripheral nerves evaluated by high-resolution ultrasonography are associated with the severity of diabetic neuropathy, but not corneal nerve fiber pathology in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Fukashi; Taniguchi, Miki; Kojima, Rie; Kawasaki, Asami; Kosaka, Aiko; Uetake, Harumi

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction To evaluate the morphological changes of the median and posterior tibial nerve using high-resolution ultrasonography, and the corneal C fiber pathology by corneal confocal microscopy in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional area, hypoechoic area and maximum thickness of the nerve fascicle of both nerves were measured by high-resolution ultrasonography in 200 type 2 diabetic patients, stratified by the severity of diabetic neuropathy, and in 40 age- and sex-matched controls. These parameters were associated with corneal C fiber pathology visualized by corneal confocal microscopy, neurophysiological tests and severity of diabetic neuropathy. Results The cross-sectional area, hypoechoic area and maximum thickness of the nerve fascicle of both nerves in patients without diabetic neuropathy were larger than those in control subjects (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), and further increased relative to the severity of neuropathy (P < 0.0001). All morphological changes of both nerves were negatively associated with motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity (P = 0.01 to P < 0.0001), and directly associated with 2,000-Hz current perception threshold (P = 0.009 to P < 0.001). The significant corneal C fiber pathology occurred before developing the neuropathy, and deteriorated only in patients with the most severe neuropathy. The association between the morphological changes of both nerves and corneal C fiber pathology was poor. Conclusions The morphological changes in peripheral nerves of type 2 diabetic patients were found before the onset of neuropathy, and were closely correlated with the severity of diabetic neuropathy, but not with corneal C fiber pathology. PMID:25969719

  4. Effects of motor and sensory nerve transplants on amount and specificity of sciatic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lago, Natalia; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Guzmán, Mónica S; Jaramillo, Jéssica; Navarro, Xavier

    2007-09-01

    Nerve regeneration after complete transection does not allow for adequate functional recovery mainly because of lack of selectivity of target reinnervation. We assessed if transplanting a nerve segment from either motor or sensory origin may improve specifically the accuracy of sensory and motor reinnervation. For this purpose, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone guide containing a predegenerated segment of ventral root (VR) or dorsal root (DR), compared to a silicone guide filled with saline. Nerve regeneration and reinnervation was assessed during 3 months by electrophysiologic and functional tests, and by nerve morphology and immunohistochemistry against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) for labeling motor axons. Functional tests showed that reinnervation was successful in all the rats. However, the two groups with a root allotransplant reached higher degrees of reinnervation in comparison with the control group. Group VR showed the highest reinnervation of muscle targets, whereas Group DR had higher levels of sensory reinnervation than VR and saline groups. The total number of regenerated myelinated fibers was similar in the three groups, but the number of ChAT+ fibers was slightly lower in the VR group in comparison with DR and saline groups. These results indicate that a predegenerated root nerve allotransplant enhances axonal regeneration, leading to faster and higher levels of functional recovery. Although there is not clear preferential reinnervation, regeneration of motor axons is promoted at early times by a motor graft, whereas reinnervation of sensory pathways is increased by a sensory graft. PMID:17455293

  5. [The impairment of A-delta fibers in median nerve compression at the wrist, using the cutaneous silent period].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Juan M; D'Onofrio, Héctor M; Rolón, Juan Ignacio; Bertotti, Alicia C

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel síndrome (CTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, that leads to pain, paresthesia and painful dysesthesia. The electrophysiological diagnosis is based upon nerve conduction studies which evaluate thick nerve fibers. Our hypothesis is that there is an additional dysfunction of small fibers in CTS, which correlates with the degree of severity of the neuropathy. A retrospective study of 69 hands that belonged to 47 patients of both sexes (mean age 53.8, years, range 22-87) was performed, and, as a control group, 21 hands which corresponded to the asymptomatic side of those patients were evaluated. Motor and sensory conduction studies, as well as F-waves were performed to classify the neuropathy according to the degree of severity. Cutaneous silent period (CSP) was elicited in all hands. Mean onset latencies and durations of CSP were evaluated. Mean onset latencies were significantly prolonged in neuropathic hands (84.3 ± 16.3 msec) compared to asymptomatic hands (74.8 ± 11.6 msec) (p < 0.05). Mean latencies of the CSP were even prolonged (p < 0.05) in hands affected by a more severe neuropathy. In the 3 hands with most severe neuropathy, a CSP could not be elicited. In CTS an impairment of A-delta fibers was recorded through the CSP. The more severe the neuropathy is, the more impairment of A-delta fibers can be found. CSP may be assessed as a complement of motor and sensory nerve conduction studies in this neuropathy. PMID:27576280

  6. Axon-Schwann cell interaction in degenerating and regenerating peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrino, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Severance of a peripheral nerve stimulates a characteristic sequence of events in the distal stump, including the dissolution of axons and myelin and the proliferation of Schwann cells within their basal lamina. The first part of this thesis employs the cat tibial nerve to examine the relationship between the spatio-temporal pattern of Schwann cell mitosis, loss of the structural and functional properties of axolemma, synthesis of P/sub 0/, the major myelin glycoprotein, and the clearance of morphological myelin. Induction of S phase was measured by determining the uptake of /sup 3/H thymidine into trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitates following a 3 hour in vitro incubation in Krebs-Ringers buffer containing /sup 3/H thymidine. Nerve transection stimulated a monophasic increase in /sup 3/H thymidine uptake that peaked at 4 days post-transection throughout an 80 mm length of distal stump. Light microscope autoradiography revealed prominent incorporation into Schwann cells of myelinated fibers. Nerve transection also produced dramatic changes in the intrafascicular binding of /sup 3/H STX which binds to voltage-sensitive sodium channels STX binding fell precipitously to 20% of normal at 4 days post-transection, concurrent with the peak of /sup 3/H thymidine uptake. In conclusion, these studies suggest: (a) Schwann cells divide more or less contemporaneously throughout the distal stump; (b) changes in axons rather than myelin are likely to stimulate the Schwann cell to divide; (c) mitosis regulates other events during Wallerian degeneration, including myelin degeneration and the clearance of sodium channels from nodal axolemma.

  7. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  8. The Multiple Silicone Tube Device, “Tubes within a Tube,” for Multiplication in Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Lars B.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple nerve branches were created during the regeneration procedure after a nerve injury and such multiple branches are suggested to be used to control, for example, prosthesis with many degrees of freedom. Transected rat sciatic nerve stumps were inserted into a nine mm long silicone tube, which contained four, five mm long, smaller tubes, thus leaving a five mm gap for regenerating nerve fibers. Six weeks later, several new nerve structures were formed not only in the four smaller tubes, but also in the spaces in-between. The 7–9 new continuous nerve structures, which were isolated as individual free nerves after removal of the tubes, were delineated by a perineurium and contained both myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers as well as blood vessels. Stimulation of the proximal nerve elicited contractions in distal muscles. Thin metal electrodes, inserted initially into the smaller tubes in some experiments, became embedded in the new nerve structures and when stimulated contractions of the distal muscles were observed. The “tubes within a tube” technique, creating multiple new nerves from a single “mother” nerve, can be used to record multiple signals for prosthetic device control or as sources for supply of multiple denervated targets. PMID:24864255

  9. Evaluation of inner hair cell and nerve fiber loss as sufficient pathologies underlying auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    El-Badry, Mohamed M; McFadden, Sandra L

    2009-09-01

    Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder characterized by normal function of outer hair cells, evidenced by intact cochlear microphonic (CM) potentials and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), with absent or severely dys-synchronized auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). To determine if selective lesions of inner hair cells (IHCs) and auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) can account for these primary clinical features of auditory neuropathy, we measured physiological responses from chinchillas with large lesions of ANFs (about 85%) and IHCs (45% loss in the apical half of the cochlea; 73% in the basal half). Distortion product OAEs and CM potentials were significantly enhanced, whereas summating potentials and compound action potentials (CAPs) were significantly reduced. CAP threshold was elevated by 7.5dB, but response synchrony was well preserved down to threshold levels of stimulation. Similarly, ABR threshold was elevated by 5.6dB, but all waves were present and well synchronized down to threshold levels in all animals. Thus, large lesions of IHCs and ANFs reduced response amplitudes but did not abolish or severely dys-synchronize CAPs or ABRs. Pathologies other than or in addition to ANF and IHC loss are likely to account for the evoked potential dys-synchrony that is a clinical hallmark of auditory neuropathy in humans. PMID:19531376

  10. Effects of electrode position on spatiotemporal auditory nerve fiber responses: a 3D computational model study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soojin; Chwodhury, Tanmoy; Moon, Il Joon; Hong, Sung Hwa; Yang, Hyejin; Won, Jong Ho; Woo, Jihwan

    2015-01-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is an auditory prosthesis that enables hearing by providing electrical stimuli through an electrode array. It has been previously established that the electrode position can influence CI performance. Thus, electrode position should be considered in order to achieve better CI results. This paper describes how the electrode position influences the auditory nerve fiber (ANF) response to either a single pulse or low- (250 pulses/s) and high-rate (5,000 pulses/s) pulse-trains using a computational model. The field potential in the cochlea was calculated using a three-dimensional finite-element model, and the ANF response was simulated using a biophysical ANF model. The effects were evaluated in terms of the dynamic range, stochasticity, and spike excitation pattern. The relative spread, threshold, jitter, and initiated node were analyzed for single-pulse response; and the dynamic range, threshold, initiated node, and interspike interval were analyzed for pulse-train stimuli responses. Electrode position was found to significantly affect the spatiotemporal pattern of the ANF response, and this effect was significantly dependent on the stimulus rate. We believe that these modeling results can provide guidance regarding perimodiolar and lateral insertion of CIs in clinical settings and help understand CI performance. PMID:25755675

  11. Effects of Electrode Position on Spatiotemporal Auditory Nerve Fiber Responses: A 3D Computational Model Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is an auditory prosthesis that enables hearing by providing electrical stimuli through an electrode array. It has been previously established that the electrode position can influence CI performance. Thus, electrode position should be considered in order to achieve better CI results. This paper describes how the electrode position influences the auditory nerve fiber (ANF) response to either a single pulse or low- (250 pulses/s) and high-rate (5,000 pulses/s) pulse-trains using a computational model. The field potential in the cochlea was calculated using a three-dimensional finite-element model, and the ANF response was simulated using a biophysical ANF model. The effects were evaluated in terms of the dynamic range, stochasticity, and spike excitation pattern. The relative spread, threshold, jitter, and initiated node were analyzed for single-pulse response; and the dynamic range, threshold, initiated node, and interspike interval were analyzed for pulse-train stimuli responses. Electrode position was found to significantly affect the spatiotemporal pattern of the ANF response, and this effect was significantly dependent on the stimulus rate. We believe that these modeling results can provide guidance regarding perimodiolar and lateral insertion of CIs in clinical settings and help understand CI performance. PMID:25755675

  12. Diurnal changes in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chirapapaisan, Niphon; Likitgorn, Techawit; Pleumchitchom, Mintra; Sakiyalak, Darin; Banhiran, Wish; Saiman, Manatsawin; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in the morning and evening in Thai patients with varying degrees of obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). METHODS In this cross-sectional study, potential OSAHS patients at Siriraj Hospital underwent polysomnography to determine the severity of OSAHS and an eye examination (including best corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, and Goldmann applanation tonometry). RNFL thickness was recorded once in the morning and once in the evening, using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Thickness was expressed as an average and given for each quadrant. Patients with ocular or systemic diseases that might affect RNFL thickness were excluded. RESULTS Forty-one eyes of 41 patients were classified into 4 OSAHS groups. The average and mean RNFL thickness in most of the four quadrants of the severe OSAHS group trended toward being less than those in the comparable quadrants of the other groups in both the morning and evening. In the moderate OSAHS group, the average RNFL thickness and temporal and superior quadrant thickness in the morning were significantly higher than in the evening (P=0.01, P=0.01, and P=0.03, respectively). In the severe OSAHS group, the inferior quadrant thickness in the morning was significantly higher than in the evening (P=0.03). CONCLUSION The RNFL thickness in the morning was higher than in the evening in moderate OSAHS. PMID:27500104

  13. Retinal nerve fiber layer retardation measurements using a polarization-sensitive fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Yasufumi; Okazaki, Yoshio; Shioiri, Takashi; Iida, Yukio; Kikuta, Hisao; Shirakashi, Motohiro; Yaoeda, Kiyoshi; Abe, Haruki; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko

    2011-07-01

    To measure the retardation distribution of the optic retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) from a single image, we have developed a new polarization analysis system that is able to detect the Stokes vector using a fundus camera. The polarization analysis system is constructed with a CCD area image sensor, a linear polarizing plate, a microphase plate array, and a circularly polarized light illumination unit. In this system, the Stokes vector expressing the whole state of polarization is detected, and the influence of the background scattering in the retina and of the retardation caused by the cornea are numerically eliminated. The measurement method is based on the hypothesis that the retardation process of the eye optics can be quantified by a numerical equation that consists of a retardation matrix of all the polarization components. We show the method and the measurement results for normal eyes. Our results indicate that the present method may provide a useful means for the evaluation of retardation distribution of the RNFL.

  14. Is Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Change Related to Headache Lateralization in Migraine?

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Seden; Tok, Levent; Tok, Ozlem; Demirci, Serpil; Kutluhan, Süleyman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in migraine patients with unilateral headache. Methods A total of 58 patients diagnosed with migraine headache consistently occurring on the same side and 58 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. RNFL thickness was measured using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and the side with the headache was com-pared with the contralateral side as well as with the results of healthy subjects. Results The mean patient age was 33.05 ± 8.83 years, and that of the healthy subjects was 31.44 ± 8.64 years (p = 0.32). The mean duration of disease was 10.29 ± 9.03 years. The average and nasal RNFL thicknesses were significantly thinner on the side of headache and on the contralateral side compared to control eyes (p < 0.05, for all). Thinning was higher on the side of the headache compared to the contralateral side; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions The RNFL thicknesses were thinner on the side of the headache compared to the contralateral side in the migraine patients with unilateral headache, but this difference was not statistically significant. PMID:27051262

  15. Diabetes-induced myelin abnormalities are associated with an altered lipid pattern: protective effects of LXR activation[S

    PubMed Central

    Cermenati, Gaia; Abbiati, Federico; Cermenati, Solei; Brioschi, Elisabetta; Volonterio, Alessandro; Cavaletti, Guido; Saez, Enrique; De Fabiani, Emma; Crestani, Maurizio; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Melcangi, Roberto C.; Caruso, Donatella; Mitro, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is characterized by myelin abnormalities; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying such deficits remain obscure. To uncover the effects of diabetes on myelin alterations, we have analyzed myelin composition. In a streptozotocin-treated rat model of diabetic neuropathy, analysis of sciatic nerve myelin lipids revealed that diabetes alters myelin's phospholipid, FA, and cholesterol content in a pattern that can modify membrane fluidity. Reduced expression of relevant genes in the FA biosynthetic pathway and decreased levels of the transcriptionally active form of the lipogenic factor sterol-regulatory element binding factor-1c (SREBF-1c) were found in diabetic sciatic nerve. Expression of myelin's major protein, myelin protein zero (P0), was also suppressed by diabetes. In addition, we confirmed that diabetes induces sciatic nerve myelin abnormalities, primarily infoldings that have previously been associated with altered membrane fluidity. In a diabetic setting, synthetic activator of the nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) increased SREBF-1c function and restored myelin lipid species and P0 expression levels to normal. These LXR-modulated improvements were associated with restored myelin structure in sciatic nerve and enhanced performance in functional tests such as thermal nociceptive threshold and nerve conduction velocity. These findings demonstrate an important role for the LXR-SREBF-1c axis in protection from diabetes-induced myelin abnormalities. PMID:22158827

  16. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-11-15

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4-6 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes. PMID:25598780

  17. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4–6 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes. PMID:25598780

  18. Differential reduction in corneal nerve fiber length in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Stem, Maxwell S.; Hussain, Munira; Lentz, Stephen I.; Raval, Nilesh; Gardner, Thomas W.; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Shtein, Roni M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To examine the relationship between corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) and diabetic neuropathy (DN) status in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) Methods In this cross-sectional study, we examined 25 diabetic patients without DN, 10 patients with mild DN, 8 patients with severe DN, and 9 controls without diabetes. DN status was assigned based on a combination of clinical symptoms, signs, and electrophysiological testing. Patients underwent corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) of the sub-basal nerve plexus. Post-hoc analysis of the CCM images was performed to quantify the average CNFL, and ANOVA was used to assess for differences in CNFL. Results All 25 subjects without DN had type 1 DM, and subjects with DN had type 2 DM. Participants with severe DN had significantly lower CNFL (12.5 ± 6.1 mm/mm2) compared to controls (20.7 ± 2.2 mm/mm2) (p=0.009). However, lower CNFL was also found in participants with type 1 DM who did not have DN (15.1 ± 4.7 mm/mm2) relative to controls (p=0.033). Conclusions CCM of the sub-basal nerve plexus may be an indicator of early peripheral nerve degeneration in type 1 DM. Type of diabetes, in addition to degree of neuropathy, may influence the extent of corneal nerve damage. PMID:25044236

  19. Distributed nerve gases sensor based on IR absorption in hollow optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, R.; Liberatore, N.; Luciani, D.; Mengali, S.; Pierno, L.

    2010-10-01

    The Nerve gases are persistent gases that appear as very challenging menace in homeland security scenarios, due to the low pressure vapor at ambient temperature, and the very low lethal concentrations. A novel approach to the detection and identification of these very hazardous volatile compounds in large areas such as airports, underground stations, big events arenas, aimed to a high selectivity (Low false alarm probability), has been explored under the SENSEFIB Corporate Project of Finmeccanica S.p.A. The technical demonstrator under development within the Project is presented. It is based on distributed line sensors performing infrared absorption measurements to reveal even trace amounts of target compounds from the retrieval of their spectral fingerprint. The line sensor is essentially constituted by a widely tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL), coupled to IR thermoelectrically cooled MCT fast detectors by means of a infrared hollow core fibers (HCF). The air is sampled through several micro-holes along the HCF, by means of a micropump, while the infrared radiation travels inside the fiber from the source to the detector, that are optically coupled with the opposite apertures of the HCF. The architecture of the sensor and its principle of operation, in order to cover large areas with a few line sensors instead of with a grid of many point sensors, are illustrated. The sensor is designed to use the HCF as an absorption cell, exploiting long path length and very small volume, (e.g fast response), at the same time. Furthermore the distributed sensor allows to cover large areas and/or not easily accessible locations, like air ducts, with a single line sensor by extending the HCF for several tens of meters. The main components implemented in the sensor are described, in particular: the EC-QCL source to span the spectral range of wavelength between 9.15um and 9.85um; and the hollow core fiber, exhibiting a suitably low optical loss in this spectral

  20. Isoflurane depresses hippocampal CA1 glutamate nerve terminals without inhibiting fiber volleys

    PubMed Central

    Winegar, Bruce D; MacIver, M Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Background Anesthetic-induced CNS depression is thought to involve reduction of glutamate release from nerve terminals. Recent studies suggest that isoflurane reduces glutamate release by block of Na channels. To further investigate this question we examined the actions of isoflurane, TTX, extracellular Ca2+, CNQX and stimulus voltage (stim) on glutamate-mediated transmission at hippocampal excitatory synapses. EPSPs were recorded from CA1 neurons in rat hippocampal brain slices in response to Schaffer-collateral fiber stimulation. Results Isoflurane (350 μM; 1 MAC) reversibly depressed EPSP amplitudes by ~60% while facilitation increased ~20%. Consistent with previous studies, these results indicate a presynaptic site of action that involves reduced excitation-release coupling. EPSPs were depressed to comparable levels by TTX (60 nM) or lowered stim, but facilitation was not changed, indicating a simple failure of axonal conduction. Similarly, partial antagonism of postsynaptic glutamate receptors with CNQX (10 μM) depressed EPSP amplitudes with no change in facilitation. However, EPSP depression by low external Ca2+ (0.8 mM) was accompanied by an increase in facilitation comparable to isoflurane. Isoflurane depression of EPSP amplitudes could also be partly reversed by high external Ca2+ (4 mM) that also decreased facilitation. Isoflurane or low Ca2+ markedly reduced the slopes of fiber volley (FV)-EPSP input-output curves, consistent with little or no effect on FVs. By contrast, TTX didn't alter the FV-EPSP curve slope, indicating that EPSP depression resulted from FV depression. FVs were remarkably resistant to isoflurane. Somatic spike currents were unaffected by 350 μM (1 MAC) isoflurane as well. The EC50 for isoflurane depression of FVs was ~2.8 mM (12 vol. %; 8 MAC). Conclusion Isoflurane appears to depress CA1 synapses at presynaptic sites downstream from Na channels, as evident by the increased facilitation that accompanies EPSP depression. Fiber

  1. Myelin Membrane Assembly Is Driven by a Phase Transition of Myelin Basic Proteins Into a Cohesive Protein Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:23762018

  2. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A T; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:23762018

  3. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Quigley, A F; Bulluss, K J; Kyratzis, I L B; Gilmore, K; Mysore, T; Schirmer, K S U; Kennedy, E L; O'Shea, M; Truong, Y B; Edwards, S L; Peeters, G; Herwig, P; Razal, J M; Campbell, T E; Lowes, K N; Higgins, M J; Moulton, S E; Murphy, M A; Cook, M J; Clark, G M; Wallace, G G; Kapsa, R M I

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  4. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  5. Identification of the Protein Target of Myelin-Binding Ligands by Immunohistochemistry and Biochemical Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Anshika; LaPlante, Nicole E.; Cotero, Victoria E.; Fish, Kenneth M.; Bjerke, Roger M.; Siclovan, Tiberiu

    2013-01-01

    The ability to visualize myelin is important in the diagnosis of demyelinating disorders and the detection of myelin-containing nerves during surgery. The development of myelin-selective imaging agents requires that a defined target for these agents be identified and that a robust assay against the target be developed to allow for assessment of structure-activity relationships. We describe an immunohistochemical analysis and a fluorescence polarization binding assay using purified myelin basic protein (MBP) that provides quantitative evidence that MBP is the molecular binding partner of previously described myelin-selective fluorescent dyes such as BMB, GE3082, and GE3111. PMID:23092790

  6. Reduced BACE1 activity enhances clearance of myelin debris and regeneration of axons in the injured peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Mohamed H.; Pan, Bao Han; Hoffman, Paul N.; Ferraris, Dana; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Nguyen, Thien; Wong, Philip C.; Price, Donald L.; Slusher, Barbara S.; Griffin, John W.

    2012-01-01

    β- site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease best known for its role in generating the amyloid β peptides that are present in plaques of Alzheimer's Disease. BACE1 has been an attractive target for drug development. In cultured embryonic neurons BACE1-cleaved N-terminal APP is further processed to generate a fragment that can trigger axonal degeneration, suggesting a vital role for BACE1 in axonal health. In addition, BACE1 cleaves neuregulin 1 type III, a protein critical for myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells during development. Here, we asked if axonal degeneration or axonal regeneration in adult nerves might be affected by inhibition or elimination of BACE1. We report that BACE1 knockout and wild-type nerves degenerated at a similar rate after axotomy and to a similar extent in the experimental neuropathies produced by administration of paclitaxel and acrylamide. These data indicate N-APP is not the sole culprit in axonal degeneration in adult nerves. Unexpectedly, however, we observed that BACE1 knockout mice had markedly enhanced clearance of axonal and myelin debris from degenerated fibers, accelerated axonal regeneration, and earlier reinnervation of neuromuscular junctions, compared to littermate controls. These observations were reproduced in part by pharmacological inhibition of BACE1. These data suggest BACE1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach to accelerate regeneration and recovery after peripheral nerve damage. PMID:21490216

  7. Hierarchical structural health monitoring system combining a fiber optic spinal cord network and distributed nerve cell devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Tsukamoto, Haruka; Takeda, Nobuo

    2009-03-01

    This study proposes novel hierarchical sensing concept for detecting damages in composite structures. In the hierarchical system, numerous three-dimensionally structured sensor devices are distributed throughout the whole structural area and connected with the optical fiber network through transducing mechanisms. The distributed "sensory nerve cell" devices detect the damage, and the fiber optic "spinal cord" network gathers damage signals and transmits the information to a measuring instrument. This study began by discussing the basic concept of the hierarchical sensing system thorough comparison with existing fiber optic based systems and nerve systems in the animal kingdom. Then, in order to validate the proposed sensing concept, impact damage detection system for the composite structure was proposed. The sensor devices were developed based on Comparative Vacuum Monitoring (CVM) system and the Brillouin based distributed strain sensing was utilized to gather the damage signals from the distributed devices. Finally a verification test was conducted using prototype devices. Occurrence of barely visible impact damage was successfully detected and it was clearly indicated that the hierarchical system has better repairability, higher robustness, and wider monitorable area compared to existing systems utilizing embedded optical fiber sensors.

  8. Analysis of Gpr126 function defines distinct mechanisms controlling the initiation and maturation of myelin

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Thomas D.; Talbot, William S.

    2013-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, Schwann cells form the myelin sheath, which allows the efficient propagation of action potentials along axons. The transcription factor Krox20 regulates the initiation of myelination in Schwann cells and is also required to maintain mature myelin. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Gpr126 is essential for Schwann cells to initiate myelination, but previous studies have not addressed the role of Gpr126 signaling in myelin maturation and maintenance. Through analysis of Gpr126 in zebrafish, we define two distinct mechanisms controlling the initiation and maturation of myelin. We show that gpr126 mutant Schwann cells elaborate mature myelin sheaths and maintain krox20 expression for months, provided that the early signaling defect is bypassed by transient elevation of cAMP. At the onset of myelination, Gpr126 and protein kinase A (PKA) function as a switch that allows Schwann cells to initiate krox20 expression and myelination. After myelination is initiated, krox20 expression is maintained and myelin maturation proceeds independently of Gpr126 signaling. Transgenic analysis indicates that the Krox20 cis-regulatory myelinating Schwann cell element (MSE) becomes active at the onset of myelination and that this activity is dependent on Gpr126 signaling. Activity of the MSE declines after initiation, suggesting that other elements are responsible for maintaining krox20 expression in mature nerves. We also show that elevated cAMP does not initiate myelination in the absence of functional Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) signaling. These results indicate that the mechanisms regulating the initiation of myelination are distinct from those mediating the maturation and maintenance of myelin. PMID:23804499

  9. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurement Comparison Using Spectral Domain and Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ahnul; Lee, Seung Hyen; Lee, Eun Ji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness concordance when measured by spectral domain (SD) and swept source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT), and to compare glaucoma-discriminating capability. Methods RNFL thicknesses were measured with the scan circle, centered on the optic nerve head, in 55 healthy, 41 glaucoma suspected, and 87 glaucomatous eyes. The RNFL thickness measured by the SD-OCT (sdRNFL thickness) and SS-OCT (ssRNFL thickness) were compared using the t-test. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to examine their agreement. We compared areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve and examined sdRNFL and ssRNFL thickness for discriminating glaucomatous eyes from healthy eyes, and from glaucoma suspect eyes. Results The average ssRNFL thickness was significantly greater than sdRNFL thickness in healthy (110.0 ± 7.9 vs. 100.1 ± 6.8 µm, p < 0.001), glaucoma suspect (96.8 ± 9.3 vs. 89.6 ± 7.9 µm, p < 0.001), and glaucomatous eyes (74.3 ± 14.2 vs. 69.1 ± 12.4 µm, p = 0.011). Bland-Altman analysis showed that there was a tendency for the difference between ssRNFL and sdRNFL to increase in eyes with thicker RNFL. The area under the curves of the average sdRNFL and ssRNFL thickness for discriminating glaucomatous eyes from healthy eyes (0.984 vs. 0.986, p = 0.491) and glaucoma suspect eyes (0.936 vs. 0.918, p = 0.132) were comparable. Conclusions There was a tendency for ssRNFL thickness to increase, compared with sdRNFL thickness, in eyes with thicker RNFL. The ssRNFL thickness had comparable diagnostic capability compared with sdRNFL thickness for discriminating glaucomatous eyes from healthy eyes and glaucoma suspect eyes. PMID:27051263

  10. Myelin Avoids the JAM.

    PubMed

    Follis, Rose M; Carter, Bruce D

    2016-08-17

    In this issue of Neuron, Redmond et al. (2016) identify junction adhesion molecule 2 (JAM2) as an inhibitor of somatodendritic myelination in spinal cord neurons, thereby elucidating how myelin forms on axons but avoids dendrites and cell bodies. PMID:27537479

  11. Schwann cell myelination of the myelin deficient rat spinal cord following X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, I.D.; Hammang, J.P.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The myelin-deficient (md) rat is an X-linked myelin mutant that has an abnormality of oligodendrocytes and a severe paucity of myelin throughout the CNS. This lack of myelin makes it an ideal model in which to study the cellular interactions that occur when foreign myelinating cells are induced in the milieu of this nonmyelinated CNS. In this study, Schwann cells were induced in the lumbosacral spinal cord by exposing it to radiation, a technique demonstrated repeatedly in other nonmutant strains of rats. Md rats and their age-matched littermates were irradiated (3,000 to 4,000 R) at 3 days of age and perfused 16-22 days later after pulse labeling with tritiated thymidine. In the md rat, Schwann cell invasion progressed from the area of the spinal cord-nerve root junction and extended into the dorsal columns and adjacent gray matter. Autoradiographic evidence revealed that many of these cells incorporated 3H-thymidine, indicating that they were undergoing proliferation. Ultrastructural observations showed that there was an integration of these intraspinal Schwann cells with the cells normally occurring in this environment, i.e., oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. The extent of migration and division of Schwann cells, as well as their interactions with glial cells, were similar to those seen in the nonmutant irradiated littermates. These studies provide conclusive evidence that md rat axons are normal with respect to their ability to provide trophic and mitogenic signals to myelinating cells.

  12. Theory of myelin coiling.

    PubMed

    Huang, J-R

    2006-04-01

    A new model is proposed to explain coiling of myelins composed of fluid bilayers. This model allows the constituent bilayer cylinders of a myelin to be non-coaxial and the bilayer lateral tension to vary from bilayer to bilayer. The calculations show that a myelin would bend or coil to lower its free energy when the bilayer lateral tension is sufficiently large. From a mechanical point of view, the proposed coiling mechanism is analogous to the classical Euler buckling of a thin elastic rod under axial compression. The analysis of a simple two-bilayer case suggests that a bilayer lateral tension of about 1 dyne/cm can easily induce coiling of myelins of typical lipid bilayers. This model signifies the importance of bilayer lateral tension in determining the morphology of myelinic structures. PMID:16465468

  13. Effect of Delayed Peripheral Nerve Repair on Nerve Regeneration, Schwann Cell Function and Target Muscle Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Samuel; Wiberg, Rebecca; McGrath, Aleksandra M.; Novikov, Lev N.; Wiberg, Mikael; Novikova, Liudmila N.; Kingham, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques for peripheral nerve repair, functional restitution remains incomplete. The timing of surgery is one factor influencing the extent of recovery but it is not yet clearly defined how long a delay may be tolerated before repair becomes futile. In this study, rats underwent sciatic nerve transection before immediate (0) or 1, 3, or 6 months delayed repair with a nerve graft. Regeneration of spinal motoneurons, 13 weeks after nerve repair, was assessed using retrograde labeling. Nerve tissue was also collected from the proximal and distal stumps and from the nerve graft, together with the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. A dramatic decline in the number of regenerating motoneurons and myelinated axons in the distal nerve stump was observed in the 3- and 6-months delayed groups. After 3 months delay, the axonal number in the proximal stump increased 2–3 folds, accompanied by a smaller axonal area. RT-PCR of distal nerve segments revealed a decline in Schwann cells (SC) markers, most notably in the 3 and 6 month delayed repair samples. There was also a progressive increase in fibrosis and proteoglycan scar markers in the distal nerve with increased delayed repair time. The yield of SC isolated from the distal nerve segments progressively fell with increased delay in repair time but cultured SC from all groups proliferated at similar rates. MG muscle at 3- and 6-months delay repair showed a significant decline in weight (61% and 27% compared with contra-lateral side). Muscle fiber atrophy and changes to neuromuscular junctions were observed with increased delayed repair time suggestive of progressively impaired reinnervation. This study demonstrates that one of the main limiting factors for nerve regeneration after delayed repair is the distal stump. The critical time point after which the outcome of regeneration becomes too poor appears to be 3-months. PMID:23409189

  14. Long-term daily vibration exposure alters current perception threshold (CPT) sensitivity and myelinated axons in a rat-tail model of vibration-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Krajnak, Kristine; Raju, Sandya G; Miller, G Roger; Johnson, Claud; Waugh, Stacey; Kashon, Michael L; Riley, Danny A

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to hand-transmitted vibration through the use of powered hand tools may result in pain and progressive reductions in tactile sensitivity. The goal of the present study was to use an established animal model of vibration-induced injury to characterize changes in sensory nerve function and cellular mechanisms associated with these alterations. Sensory nerve function was assessed weekly using the current perception threshold test and tail-flick analgesia test in male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 28 d of tail vibration. After 28 d of exposure, Aβ fiber sensitivity was reduced. This reduction in sensitivity was partly attributed to structural disruption of myelin. In addition, the decrease in sensitivity was also associated with a reduction in myelin basic protein and 2',3'- cyclic nucleotide phosphodiasterase (CNPase) staining in tail nerves, and an increase in circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations. Changes in Aβ fiber sensitivity and CGRP concentrations may serve as early markers of vibration-induced injury in peripheral nerves. It is conceivable that these markers may be utilized to monitor sensorineural alterations in workers exposed to vibration to potentially prevent additional injury. PMID:26852665

  15. Reflectance Decreases before Thickness Changes in the Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Glaucomatous Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Kong, Wei; Knighton, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Glaucoma damages the retinal never fiber layer (RNFL). RNFL thickness, measured with optical coherence tomography (OCT), is often used in clinical assessment of the damage. In this study the relation between the RNFL reflectance and thickness at early stages of glaucoma was investigated. Methods. A rat model of glaucoma was used that involved laser photocoagulation of the trabecular meshwork. The reflectance of the RNFL in an isolated retina was measured, followed by immunohistochemical staining of the axonal cytoskeleton. RNFL thickness was measured by confocal fluorescence imaging. RNFL reflectance was calculated for bundle areas located at radii of 0.22, 0.33, and 0.44 mm from the optic nerve head (ONH) center. Linear regression was used to study the relation between reflectance and thickness. For glaucomatous eyes, only those bundles with no apparent structural damage were used. Results. Bundles in 11 control retinas and 10 treated retinas were examined. Bundle thickness of both groups at each radius was similar (P = 0.89). The reflectance of the bundles at radii of 0.33 and 0.44 mm was found to be similar in both control and treated retinas (P > 0.5). However, the reflectance of the bundles at the 0.22-mm radius decreased significantly in the treated group (P = 0.005). Conclusions. Elevation of intraocular pressure causes decrease in RNFL reflectance for bundles near the ONH. Change in RNFL reflectance precedes thinning of the RNFL. The results suggest that a decrease in RNFL reflectance near the ONH is an early sign of glaucomatous damage. PMID:21730345

  16. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Alterations After Photocoagulation: A Prospective Spectral-Domain OCT Study

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Sıtkı; Ozturk, Taylan; Yaman, Aylin; Oner, Hakan; A. Osman, Saatci

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effect of panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) in treatment-naive patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Methods : Fifty eight previously untreated eyes of 30 patients with PDR who underwent PRP treatment were enrolled prospectively. All patients had at least six months of follow-up. Detailed ophthalmologic examinations including macular thickness and RNFLT assessments with spectral-domain type optic coherence tomography were performed at baseline as well as the third and sixth posttreatment months. Initial RNFLT and macular thickness of laser administered patients were compared with two separate control groups that were consisted of either nondiabetic patients or diabetics without PDR. Results : The mean age of study patients was 52.4±7.1 years (Range, 32-66 years) and 16 of them (53.3%) were female. At the sixth post-PRP month, visual stabilization or improvement was achieved in 54 eyes (93.1%). No significant difference was demonstrated in initial RNFLT measurements between the study patients and two control groups (p=0.478). Mean RNFLT was measured as 108.5±17.5µm, 115.8±17.6µm, and 103.0±16.4µm at baseline, third and sixth months of the follow-up, respectively. Although RNFLT increase noted at the third post-laser month was statistically significant compared to its baseline values (p<0.001), there was a significant reduction in RNFLT at the sixth post-laser month compared to its baseline values (p<0.001). Conclusion : RNFLT increase in the third month of follow-up may be related to ensuing axonal edema. Significant RNLFT decrease at the sixth month of follow-up may be attributed to axonal loss secondary to the laser treatment. PMID:25493103

  17. A Phenomenological Model of the Electrically Stimulated Auditory Nerve Fiber: Temporal and Biphasic Response Properties

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Colin D. F.; Sumner, Christian J.; Seeber, Bernhard U.

    2016-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model of electrically stimulated auditory nerve fibers (ANFs). The model reproduces the probabilistic and temporal properties of the ANF response to both monophasic and biphasic stimuli, in isolation. The main contribution of the model lies in its ability to reproduce statistics of the ANF response (mean latency, jitter, and firing probability) under both monophasic and cathodic-anodic biphasic stimulation, without changing the model's parameters. The response statistics of the model depend on stimulus level and duration of the stimulating pulse, reproducing trends observed in the ANF. In the case of biphasic stimulation, the model reproduces the effects of pseudomonophasic pulse shapes and also the dependence on the interphase gap (IPG) of the stimulus pulse, an effect that is quantitatively reproduced. The model is fitted to ANF data using a procedure that uniquely determines each model parameter. It is thus possible to rapidly parameterize a large population of neurons to reproduce a given set of response statistic distributions. Our work extends the stochastic leaky integrate and fire (SLIF) neuron, a well-studied phenomenological model of the electrically stimulated neuron. We extend the SLIF neuron so as to produce a realistic latency distribution by delaying the moment of spiking. During this delay, spiking may be abolished by anodic current. By this means, the probability of the model neuron responding to a stimulus is reduced when a trailing phase of opposite polarity is introduced. By introducing a minimum wait period that must elapse before a spike may be emitted, the model is able to reproduce the differences in the threshold level observed in the ANF for monophasic and biphasic stimuli. Thus, the ANF response to a large variety of pulse shapes are reproduced correctly by this model. PMID:26903850

  18. Estimated retinal ganglion cell counts in glaucomatous eyes with localized retinal nerve fiber layer defects

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Andrew J.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To estimate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) losses associated with visible glaucomatous localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects. Design Observational cross-sectional study. Methods A multicenter study of 198 normal eyes (138 subjects) and 66 glaucomatous eyes (55 subjects) recruited from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study and African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study. All eyes had standard automated perimetry (SAP), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundus stereophotographs within 6 months. Glaucomatous eyes were included if localized RNFL defects were detected by masked grading of stereophotographs. The number of RGCs in each sector of a structure-function map was estimated using a previously published model combining RGC estimates from SAP and SD-OCT. The estimated percentage loss of RGCs (combined structure function index) was calculated. Results In glaucomatous eyes there were 136 sectors with visible RNFL defects and 524 sectors without visible RNFL defects. The commonest sectors with visible RNFL defects were inferior and inferotemporal sectors, followed by superior and superotemporal sectors. Eyes with visible RNFL defects had a mean estimated RGC count of 657,172 cells versus 968,883 cells in healthy eyes (P<0.001). The average combined structure function index in sectors with a visible RNFL defect (59±21%) was significantly higher than in sectors without a visible RNFL defect in glaucomatous eyes (15±29%, P<0.001) and higher than in healthy eyes (1±13%, P<0.001). Conclusions Although visible localized RNFL defects are often considered an early sign of glaucoma this study indicates that they are likely to be associated with large neuronal losses. PMID:23746612

  19. Correlation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Visual Fields in Glaucoma: A broken stick model

    PubMed Central

    Alasil, Tarek; Wang, Kaidi; Yu, Fei; Field, Matthew G.; Lee, Hang; Baniasadi, Neda; de Boer, Johannes F.; Coleman, Anne L.; Chen, Teresa C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness at which visual field (VF) damage becomes detectable and associated with structural loss. Design Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods Eighty seven healthy and 108 glaucoma subjects (one eye per subject) were recruited from an academic institution. All patients had VF examinations (Swedish Interactive Threshold Algorithm 24-2 test of the Humphrey visual field analyzer 750i; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography RNFL scans (Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Comparison of RNFL thicknesses values with VF threshold values showed a plateau of VF threshold values at high RNFL thickness values and then a sharp decrease at lower RNFL thickness values. A broken stick statistical analysis was utilized to estimate the tipping point at which RNFL thickness values are associated with VF defects. The slope for the association between structure and function was computed for data above and below the tipping point. Results The mean RNFL thickness value that was associated with initial VF loss was 89 μm. The superior RNFL thickness value that was associated with initial corresponding inferior VF loss was 100 μm. The inferior RNFL thickness value that was associated with initial corresponding superior VF loss was 73 μm. The differences between all the slopes above and below the aforementioned tipping points were statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusions In open angle glaucoma, substantial RNFL thinning or structural loss appears to be necessary before functional visual field defects become detectable. PMID:24487047

  20. Reproducibility of retinal nerve fiber layer measurements across the glaucoma spectrum using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vazirani, Jayesh; Kaushik, Sushmita; Pandav, Surinder Singh; Gupta, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to determine intra-session and inter-session reproducibility of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements with the spectral-domain Cirrus optical coherence tomography (OCT)® (SD-OCT) in normal and glaucomatous eyes, including a subset of advanced glaucoma. Materials and Methods: RNFL measurements of 40 eyes of 40 normal subjects and 40 eyes of 40 glaucomatous patients including 14 with advanced glaucoma were obtained on the Cirrus OCT® (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA) five times on 1-day (intra-session) and on five separate days (inter-session). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (COV), and test-retest variability (TRT) values were calculated for mean and quadrant RNFL in each group separately. Reproducibility values were correlated with age and stage of glaucoma. Results: For intra-session reproducibility, the ICC, COV, and TRT values for mean RNFL thickness in normal eyes were 0.993, 1.96%, and 4.02 µm, respectively, 0.996, 2.39%, and 3.84 µm in glaucomatous eyes, and 0.996, 2.41%, and 3.70 µm in advanced glaucoma. The corresponding inter-session values in normal eyes were 0.992, 2.16%, and 4.09 µm, 0.995, 2.62%, and 3.98 µm in glaucoma and 0.990, 2.70%, and 4.16 µm in advanced glaucoma. The mean RNFL thickness measurements were the most reproducible while the temporal quadrant had the lowest reproducibility values in all groups. There was no correlation between reproducibility and age or mean deviation on visual fields. Conclusions: Peripapillary RNFL thickness measurements using Cirrus OCT® demonstrated excellent reproducibility in normal and glaucomatous eyes, including eyes with advanced glaucoma. Mean RNFL thickness measurements appear to be the most reproducible and probably represent the best parameter to use for longitudinal follow-up. PMID:26044467

  1. The Correlation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness With Blood Pressure in a Chinese Hypertensive Population

    PubMed Central

    Gangwani, Rita A.; Lee, Jacky W.Y.; Mo, H.Y.; Sum, Rita; Kwong, Alfred S.K.; Wang, Jenny H.L.; Tsui, Wendy W.S.; Chan, Jonathan C.H.; Lai, Jimmy S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the association between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and blood pressure (BP) in subjects with systemic hypertension. Subjects with systemic hypertension on anti-hypertensive medications were screened by fundus photography and referred for glaucoma work-up if there was enlarged vertical cup-to-disc (VCDR) ratio ≥0.6, VCDR asymmetry ≥0.2, or optic disc hemorrhage. Workup included a complete ophthalmological examination, Humphrey visual field test, and RNFL thickness measurement by optical coherence tomography. The intraocular pressure (IOP) and RNFL thicknesses (global and quadrant) were averaged from both eyes and the means were correlated with: the systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using Pearson correlation. Among 4000 screened hypertensive subjects, 133 were referred for glaucoma workup and 110 completed the workup. Of the 4000 screened subjects, 1.3% had glaucoma (0.9% had normal tension glaucoma [NTG], 0.2% had primary open angle glaucoma, and 0.2% had primary angle closure glaucoma), whereas 0.3% were NTG suspects. The SBP was negatively correlated with the mean superior RNFL thickness (P = 0.01). The DBP was negatively correlated with the mean global (P = 0.03), superior (P = 0.02), and nasal (P = 0.003) RNFL thickness. The MAP was negatively correlated with the mean global (P = 0.01), superior (P = 0.002), and nasal (P = 0.004) RNFL thickness while positively correlated with the mean IOP (P = 0.02). In medically treated hypertensive subjects, glaucoma was present in 1.3%, with NTG being most prevalent. MAP control may help with IOP lowering and RNFL preservation, although future prospective studies will be needed. PMID:26061324

  2. Oxaliplatin-induced hyperexcitation of rat sciatic nerve fibers: an intra-axonal study.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Kosmidis, Efstratios K; Theophilidis, George

    2013-02-01

    Oxaliplatin is an agent that is used extensively in gastrointestinal cancer chemotherapy. The agent's major dose-limiting toxicity is peripheral neuropathy that can manifest as a chronic or an acute syndrome. Oxaliplatin-induced acute neuropathy is purportedly caused by an alteration of the biophysical properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. However, sodium channel blockers have not been successful at preventing acute neuropathy in the clinical setting. We report intra-axonal recordings from the isolated rat sciatic nerve preparation under the effect of oxaliplatin. The depolarization phase of single action potentials remains intact with a duration of 0.52 ± 0.02 ms (n=68) before and 0.55 ± 0.01 ms (n=68) after 1-5 h of exposure to 150 μM oxaliplatin (unpaired t-test, P > 0.05) whereas there is a significant broadening of the repolarization phase (2.16 ± 0.10 ms, n=68, before and 5.90 ± 0.32 ms after, n=68, unpaired t-test, P < 0.05). Apart from changes in spike shape, oxaliplatin also had drastic concentration- and time-dependent effects on the firing responses of fibers to short stimuli. In the intra-axonal recordings, three groups of firing patterns were indentified. The first group shows bursting (internal frequency 90 - 130 Hz, n=88), the second shows a characteristic plateau (at -19.27�2.84 mV, n=31, with durations ranging from 45 - 140 ms depending on the exposure time), and the third combines a plateau and a bursting period. Our results implicate the voltage-gated potassium channels as additional oxaliplatin targets, opening up new perspectives for the pharmacological prevention of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22721389

  3. The Anterior Chamber Depth and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacky W. Y.; Yau, Gordon S. K.; Woo, Tiffany T. Y.; Yick, Doris W. F.; Tam, Victor T. Y.; Yuen, Can Y. F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the correlation of anterior chamber depth (ACD) with the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, age, axial length (AL), and spherical equivalent in children. Subjects. Consecutive subjects aged 4 to 18 were recruited. Visually disabling eye conditions were excluded. Only the right eye was included for analysis. The ACD was correlated with RNFL thickness, age, spherical equivalent, and AL for all subjects. Subjects were then divided into 3 groups based on their postcycloplegic spherical equivalent: myopes (<−1.0 D), emmetropes (≥−1.0 to ≤+1.0 D), and hyperopes (>+1.0 D). The ACD was compared among the 3 groups before and after age adjustment. Results. In 200 subjects (mean age 7.6 ± 3.3 years), a deeper ACD was correlated with thinner global RNFL (r = −0.2, r2 = 0.06, P = 0.0007), older age (r = 0.4, r2 = 0.1, P < 0.0001), myopic spherical equivalent (r = −0.3, r2 = 0.09, P < 0.0001), and longer AL (r = 0.5, r2 = 0.2, P < 0.0001). The ACD was deepest in myopes (3.5 ± 0.4 mm, n = 67), followed by emmetropes (3.4 ± 0.3, n = 60) and then hyperopes (3.3 ± 0.2, n = 73) (all P < 0.0001). After age adjustment, myopes had a deeper ACD than the other 2 groups (all P < 0.0001). Conclusions. In children, a deeper ACD was associated with thinner RNFL thickness, older age, more myopic spherical equivalent, and longer AL. Myopes had a deeper ACD than emmetropes and hyperopes. PMID:25431789

  4. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in normal Indian pediatric population measured with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Neelam; Maheshwari, Devendra; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Ramakrishnan, Renagappa

    2013-11-11

    Purpose: To measure the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in normal Indian pediatric population. Subjects and Methods: 120 normal Indian children ages 5-17 years presenting to the Pediatric Clinic were included in this observational cross-sectional study. RNFL thickness was measured with stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT). Children with strabismus or amblyopia, with neurological, metabolic, vascular, or other disorders and those with abnormal optic discs were excluded. One eye of each subject was randomly selected for statistical analysis. The effect of age, refraction and gender on RNFL thickness was investigated statistically. Result: OCT measurements were obtained in 120 of 130 (92.3%) subjects. Mean age was 10.8 ± 3.24 years (range 5-17). Average RNFL thickness was (± SD) 106.11 ± 9.5 μm (range 82.26-146.25). The RNFL was thickest inferiorly (134.10 ± 16.16 μm) and superiorly (133.44 ± 15.50 μm), thinner nasally (84.26 ± 16.43 μm), and thinnest temporally (70.72 ± 14.80 μm). In univariate regression analysis, age had no statistical significant effect on RNFL thickness (P = 0.7249) and refraction had a significant effect on RNFL thickness (P = 0.0008). Conclusion: OCT can be used to measure RNFL thickness in children. Refraction had an effect on RNFL thickness. In normal children, variation in RNFL thickness is large. The normative data provided by this study may assist in identifying changes in RNFL thickness in Indian children. PMID:24212231

  5. Correlation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Axial Length on Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dhasmana, Renu; Nagpal, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The assessment of the peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) thickness has been an important tool for evaluating and diagnosing glaucoma and its progression. Literature suggests that myopic eyes are at an increased risk for developing glaucoma. This study gives an insight into the relationship of RNFL thickness to the axial length in normal population. Aim To correlate the RNFL thickness and the axial length in normal individuals with Fourier domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Materials and Methods In the current study, 298 eyes of 149 normal individuals (10 years or older) with or without refractive error were recruited. The RNFL thickness was measured using Optovue (RTVue) three-dimensional Fourier domain OCT. Results We observed an inverse relationship between average RNFL thickness and increasing axial length(p=0.003). Maximum RNFL thickness was seen in the Infero-Temporal (IT) quadrant and minimum in the Supero-Nasal (SN) quadrant. RNFL thickness did not show any tendency to decline with age using the Pearsons correlation (r=0.07). Females had an increased RNFL thickness in the Supero-Temporal (ST) and Infero-Nasal (IN) quadrant (p-value 0.046 and 0.02) in comparison to males. There was a statistically significant thinning in Ganglion Cell Complex (GCC) with increasing axial length (p-value 0.000) Conclusion The current study suggests that the average RNFL thickness does not decrease with age. The RNFL and GCC thickness shows an inverse correlation with axial length of the eyeball hence observations have to be carefully interpreted in myopic eyes. Clinicians need to keep the anatomical variations in RNFL for better patient management. PMID:27190850

  6. EFFECTS OF HYPERGLYCEMIA ON RAT CAVERNOUS NERVE AXONS: A FUNCTIONAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Zotova, Elena G.; Schaumburg, Herbert H.; Raine, Cedric S.; Cannella, Barbara; Tar, Moses; Melman, Arnold; Arezzo, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study explored parallel changes in the physiology and structure of myelinated (Aδ) and unmyelinated (C) small diameter axons in the cavernous nerve of rats associated with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Damage to these axons is thought to play a key role in diabetic autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction, but their pathophysiology has been poorly studied. Velocities in slow conducting fibers were measured by applying multiple unit procedures; histopathology was evaluated with both light and electron microscopy. To our knowledge, these are the initial studies of slow nerve conduction velocities in the distal segments of the cavernous nerve. We report that hyperglycemia is associated with a substantial reduction in the amplitude of the slow conducting response, as well as a slowing of velocities within this very slow range (<2.5 m/sec). Even with prolonged hyperglycemia (> 4 months), histopathological abnormalities were mild and limited to the distal segments of the cavernous nerve. Structural findings included dystrophic changes in nerve terminals, abnormal accumulations of glycogen granules in unmyelinated and preterminal axons, and necrosis of scattered smooth muscle fibers. The onset of slowing of velocity in the distal cavernous nerve occurred subsequent to slowing in somatic nerves in the same rats. The functional changes in the cavernous nerve anticipated and exceeded the axonal degeneration detected by morphology. The physiologic techniques outlined in these studies are feasible in most electrophysiologic laboratories and could substantially enhance our sensitivity to the onset and progression of small fiber diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18687329

  7. AOTF based molecular hyperspectral imaging system and its applications on nerve morphometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Xu, Dongrong; He, Xiaofu; Wang, Yiting; Chen, Zenggan; Liu, Hongying; Xu, Qintong; Guo, Fangmin

    2013-06-10

    The neuroanatomical morphology of nerve fibers is an important description for understanding the pathological aspects of nerves. Different from the traditional automatic nerve morphometry methods, a molecular hyperspectral imaging system based on an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) was developed and used to identify unstained nerve histological sections. The hardware, software, and system performance of the imaging system are presented and discussed. The gray correction coefficient was used to calibrate the system's spectral response and to remove the effects of noises and artifacts. A spatial-spectral kernel-based approach through the support vector machine formulation was proposed to identify nerve fibers. This algorithm can jointly use both the spatial and spectral information of molecular hyperspectral images for segmentation. Then, the morphological parameters such as fiber diameter, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness, fiber area, and g-ratio were calculated and evaluated. Experimental results show that the hyperspectral-based method has the potential to recognize and measure the nerve fiber more accurately than traditional methods. PMID:23759836

  8. Myelin, myelin-related disorders, and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mighdoll, Michelle I; Tao, Ran; Kleinman, Joel E; Hyde, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The neuropathological basis of schizophrenia and related psychoses remains elusive despite intensive scientific investigation. Symptoms of psychosis have been reported in a number of conditions where normal myelin development is interrupted. The nature, location, and timing of white matter pathology seem to be key factors in the development of psychosis, especially during the critical adolescent period of association area myelination. Numerous lines of evidence implicate myelin and oligodendrocyte function as critical processes that could affect neuronal connectivity, which has been implicated as a central abnormality in schizophrenia. Phenocopies of schizophrenia with a known pathological basis involving demyelination or dysmyelination may offer insights into the biology of schizophrenia itself. This article reviews the pathological changes in white matter of patients with schizophrenia, as well as demyelinating diseases associated with psychosis. In an attempt to understand the potential role of dysmyelination in schizophrenia, we outline the evidence from a number of both clinically-based and post-mortem studies that provide evidence that OMR genes are genetically associated with increased risk for schizophrenia. To further understand the implication of white matter dysfunction and dysmyelination in schizophrenia, we examine diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which has shown volumetric and microstructural white matter differences in patients with schizophrenia. While classical clinical-neuropathological correlations have established that disruption in myelination can produce a high fidelity phenocopy of psychosis similar to schizophrenia, the role of dysmyelination in schizophrenia remains controversial. PMID:25449713

  9. Sensory nerve endings in the rat oro-facial region labeled by the anterograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase: a new method for tracing peripheral nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Marfurt, C F; Turner, D F

    1983-02-14

    The purpose of the present investigation is to introduce the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the study of the morphology and peripheral distribution of sensory nerve endings. HRP was injected into the trigeminal ganglion or trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex (TBNC) in separate adult rats. HRP injected into the trigeminal ganglion was taken up by the neuronal perikarya and transported anterogradely in massive amounts to sensory nerve endings in the cornea, vibrissal hair follicles, tooth pulps, and periodontal ligaments. HRP injected into the TBNC was taken up by trigeminal primary afferent fibers that terminated there and transported transganglionically, i.e., past or through the trigeminal ganglion, to peripheral sensory endings. The results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that: (1) anterograde HRP transport is a highly successful method of labeling with an intracellular marker trigeminal sensory endings in a variety of oro-facial tissues, and (2) trigeminal primary sensory neurons possess intra-axonal transport mechanisms by which HRP, and possibly other substances, taken up in the central nervous system may be transported to the periphery. PMID:6601506

  10. Alpha-lipoic acid loaded in chitosan conduit enhances sciatic nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Saeed; Heshmatian, Behnam; Amini, Keyvan; Raisi, Abbas; Azimzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the effect of topical administration of alpha-lipoic acid into chitosan conduit on peripheral nerve regeneration using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty five Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups randomly. A 10-mm gap of sciatic nerve was bridged with a chitosan conduit following surgical preparation and anesthesia. In treatment group, the conduit was filled with 30 µl alpha-lipoic acid (10 mg/kg/bw).It was filled with 30 µl phosphate buffered saline solution in control group. In Sham group sciatic nerve was just exposed. Results: The recovery of nerve function was faster in treatment group than in control, at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery (P-value<0.05). Conduction velocity was better in treatment group than in control group at 4 and 12 weeks (P-value<0.05). Recovery index was higher in treatment group than the control group, 8 weeks after surgery (P-value <0.05). Greater nerve fiber diameter, axon diameter, and myelin sheath thickness were observed in treatment group compared to control group at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery (P-value<0.05). The immunoreactivity of regenerated axons and myelin sheath in treatment group were far more similar to sham group. Conclusion: Alpha-lipoic acid when loaded in a chitosan conduit could improve transected sciatic nerve regeneration in rat. PMID:25945234

  11. Automated method for the segmentation and morphometry of nerve fibers in large-scale CARS images of spinal cord tissue.

    PubMed

    Bégin, Steve; Dupont-Therrien, Olivier; Bélanger, Erik; Daradich, Amy; Laffray, Sophie; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel C

    2014-12-01

    A fully automated method for large-scale segmentation of nerve fibers from coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy images is presented. The method is specifically designed for CARS images of transverse cross sections of nervous tissue but is also suitable for use with standard light microscopy images. After a detailed description of the two-part segmentation algorithm, its accuracy is quantified by comparing the resulting binary images to manually segmented images. We then demonstrate the ability of our method to retrieve morphological data from CARS images of nerve tissue. Finally, we present the segmentation of a large mosaic of CARS images covering more than half the area of a mouse spinal cord cross section and show evidence of clusters of neurons with similar g-ratios throughout the spinal cord. PMID:25574428

  12. Automated method for the segmentation and morphometry of nerve fibers in large-scale CARS images of spinal cord tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bégin, Steve; Dupont-Therrien, Olivier; Bélanger, Erik; Daradich, Amy; Laffray, Sophie; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    A fully automated method for large-scale segmentation of nerve fibers from coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy images is presented. The method is specifically designed for CARS images of transverse cross sections of nervous tissue but is also suitable for use with standard light microscopy images. After a detailed description of the two-part segmentation algorithm, its accuracy is quantified by comparing the resulting binary images to manually segmented images. We then demonstrate the ability of our method to retrieve morphological data from CARS images of nerve tissue. Finally, we present the segmentation of a large mosaic of CARS images covering more than half the area of a mouse spinal cord cross section and show evidence of clusters of neurons with similar g-ratios throughout the spinal cord. PMID:25574428

  13. [A family of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I with a new type of myelin P0 mutation].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, A; Ohnari, K; Hashimoto, T; Hayasaka, K; Yoshimura, T; Fukushima, Y

    1994-06-01

    A 26-year-old man had complaints of insidiously progressive muscle weakness of the legs, worse in the right leg than in the left. Slight to moderate degrees of asymmetrical muscular atrophy and weakness of the distal lower limb muscles, greater in the right leg than in the left, without fasciculation, were also observed. Pes equinovarus deformity of both feet was obvious. Muscle stretch reflexes were decreased in the upper limbs and absent in the lower limbs, without pathologic reflexes. Vibratory sensation was moderately decreased in the toes. The right median and tibial motor nerve conduction velocities were 19.4 and 10.5 m/sec, respectively, with a markedly prolonged distal latency. No nerve action potentials were elicited from stimulation of the right and left sural nerves. A fascicular biopsy of the right sural nerve was performed. The myelinated fibers showing segmental de- and remyelination were frequently found in teased fiber preparations. Both demyelinated and remyelinated axons and onion-bulbs were frequently observed by light and electron microscopy in the Epon-embedded sections. Based on the neurological examinations and nerve conduction studies of the family members, an elder brother, father and grandmother of the proband were found to be affected by polyneuropathy. However, the mother, an uncle, an aunt, and a cousin of the proband were normal. Therefore, we concluded that this family had HMSN type I with autosomal dominant inheritance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7525134

  14. [Development of Researches on Acupuncture Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xing; Ma, Tie-ming

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical disease. Acupuncture therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in improving nerve injury in clinical practice, but its underlying mechanisms in prompting tissue repair basically remain unknown. In the present paper, the authors reviewed some descriptions of traditional Chinese medicine on peripheral nerve injury and treatment, and recent development of researches on acupuncture treatment of it in both clinical practice and animal studies. Clinical trials demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can relieve nerve injury induced pain, ameliorate both sensory and motor functions. Experimental studies showed that acupuncture stimulation may promote nerve repair by reducing desquamation of medullary sheath of nerve fibers, inhibiting apoptosis of nerve cells, and up-regulating expression of myelin basic protein, Slit-1 protein and gene, etc. In addition, acupuncture intervention may also improve the microenvironment of neural regeneration including increase of the proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cells and release of various types of neurotrophic factors. However, its mechanisms underlying accelerating rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injury need being researched further. PMID:27141630

  15. [Neuropathic pain intensity depends on the degree of peripheral nerve injury in the rat].

    PubMed

    Abuduhadeer, Tayier

    2004-12-01

    Partial peripheral nerve injury produces a persistent neuropathic pain which is difficult to relieve. In order to determine whether different degrees of peripheral nerve injury are related with the severity of neuropathic pain, we examined pain-related behaviors, histological changes and NGF in the skin in rats treated with different types of spinal nerve injury: tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve, incomplete ligation of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves. In all model rats, the thresholds of paw withdrawal in response to mechanical and heat stimuli began to decrease on the injured side 1 day after the operation, and the decreases in the thresholds persisted for more than 1 month. Incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves caused more severe allodynia and hyperalgesia than tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve on the injured side. In rats treated with incomplete crush, the threshold of withdrawal response to mechanical or heat stimuli was improved on day 32 after the operation as compared with that on day 15. Histological analysis revealed that about 80% of the fibers in the sciatic nerve were injured after incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves on day 15, while about 50% of the fibers were damaged by tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve. In accordance with pain-relieving, the sciatic nerve fibers regenerated to about 50% of the number of the intact sciatic nerve fibers on day 32 in the crush model. Nerve growth factor (NGF) in the skin of the hindpaw on the injured side was accumulated after incomplete ligation and incomplete crush of the left L4 and L5 spinal nerves, but not tight ligation of the left L5 spinal nerve, on day 15 after the operation, possibly due to impairment of transport via unmyelinated primary afferents. Regeneration of the sciatic nerve alleviated the accumulation of NGF in the injured side hindpaw

  16. Far-Infrared Therapy Promotes Nerve Repair following End-to-End Neurorrhaphy in Rat Models of Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Chin; Sha, Ya-Na; Chou, Jiun-Rou

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a rat model of sciatic nerve injury to investigate the effects of postoperative low-power far-infrared (FIR) radiation therapy on nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The rat models were divided into the following 3 groups: (1) nerve injury without FIR biostimulation (NI/sham group); (2) nerve injury with FIR biostimulation (NI/FIR group); and (3) noninjured controls (normal group). Walking-track analysis results showed that the NI/FIR group exhibited significantly higher sciatic functional indices at 8 weeks after surgery (P < 0.05) compared with the NI/sham group. The decreased expression of CD4 and CD8 in the NI/FIR group indicated that FIR irradiation modulated the inflammatory process during recovery. Compared with the NI/sham group, the NI/FIR group exhibited a significant reduction in muscle atrophy (P < 0.05). Furthermore, histomorphometric assessment indicated that the nerves regenerated more rapidly in the NI/FIR group than in the NI/sham group; furthermore, the NI/FIR group regenerated neural tissue over a larger area, as well as nerve fibers of greater diameter and with thicker myelin sheaths. Functional recovery, inflammatory response, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessment all indicated that FIR radiation therapy can accelerate nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sciatic nerve. PMID:25722734

  17. The potential role of endometrial nerve fibers in the pathogenesis of pain during endometrial biopsy at office hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Florio, Pasquale; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Guerra, Germano; Spinelli, Marialuigia; Di Carlo, Costantino; Filippeschi, Marco; Nappi, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether nerve fibers are present in the endometrial layer of patients submitted to office hysteroscopy and their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of pain during that procedure. Through a prospective case-control study performed in tertiary centers for women's health, endometrium samples were collected during operative office hysteroscopy from 198 cycling women who previously underwent laparoscopy and/or magnetic resonance imaging investigation for infertility assessment. Samples were classified according to the degree of the pain patients experienced and scored from values ranging from 0 (absence of discomfort/pain) to 10 (intolerable pain) on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). The presence of nerve fiber markers (S100, NSE, SP, VIP, NPY, NKA, NKB, NKR1, NKR2, and NKR3) in the endometrium was also evaluated by morphologic and immunohistochemical analyses. We found that S-100, NSE, NKR1, NK-A, NK-B, VIP, and NPY, were immunolocalized in samples of endometrium, in significantly (P < .01, for all) higher levels in samples collected from patients with VAS score > 5 (group A) than ≤ 5 (group B) and significantly (P < .0001 for all) positively correlated with VAS levels. A statistically significant (P = .018) higher prevalence of endometriosis and/or adenomyosis was depicted in patients of group A than group B. Data from the present study led us to conclude that nerve fibers are expressed at the level of the functional layer of the endometrium and may contribute to pain generation during office hysteroscopy, mainly in women affected by endometriosis and adenomyosis. PMID:24807378

  18. The Potential Role of Endometrial Nerve Fibers in the Pathogenesis of Pain During Endometrial Biopsy at Office Hysteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Guerra, Germano; Spinelli, Marialuigia; Di Carlo, Costantino; Filippeschi, Marco; Nappi, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether nerve fibers are present in the endometrial layer of patients submitted to office hysteroscopy and their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of pain during that procedure. Through a prospective case–control study performed in tertiary centers for women’s health, endometrium samples were collected during operative office hysteroscopy from 198 cycling women who previously underwent laparoscopy and/or magnetic resonance imaging investigation for infertility assessment. Samples were classified according to the degree of the pain patients experienced and scored from values ranging from 0 (absence of discomfort/pain) to 10 (intolerable pain) on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). The presence of nerve fiber markers (S100, NSE, SP, VIP, NPY, NKA, NKB, NKR1, NKR2, and NKR3) in the endometrium was also evaluated by morphologic and immunohistochemical analyses. We found that S-100, NSE, NKR1, NK-A, NK-B, VIP, and NPY, were immunolocalized in samples of endometrium, in significantly (P < .01, for all) higher levels in samples collected from patients with VAS score > 5 (group A) than ≤ 5 (group B) and significantly (P < .0001 for all) positively correlated with VAS levels. A statistically significant (P = .018) higher prevalence of endometriosis and/or adenomyosis was depicted in patients of group A than group B. Data from the present study led us to conclude that nerve fibers are expressed at the level of the functional layer of the endometrium and may contribute to pain generation during office hysteroscopy, mainly in women affected by endometriosis and adenomyosis. PMID:24807378

  19. Computational Tissue Volume Reconstruction of a Peripheral Nerve Using High-Resolution Light-Microscopy and Reconstruct

    PubMed Central

    Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Freiman, Thomas M.; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten; Mueller, Alexandra; Kaminsky, Jan; Stieglitz, Thomas; Plachta, Dennis T. T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of neural cuff-electrodes requires several in vivo studies and revisions of the electrode design before the electrode is completely adapted to its target nerve. It is therefore favorable to simulate many of the steps involved in this process to reduce costs and animal testing. As the restoration of motor function is one of the most interesting applications of cuff-electrodes, the position and trajectories of myelinated fibers in the simulated nerve are important. In this paper, we investigate a method for building a precise neuroanatomical model of myelinated fibers in a peripheral nerve based on images obtained using high-resolution light microscopy. This anatomical model describes the first aim of our “Virtual workbench” project to establish a method for creating realistic neural simulation models based on image datasets. The imaging, processing, segmentation and technical limitations are described, and the steps involved in the transition into a simulation model are presented. The results showed that the position and trajectories of the myelinated axons were traced and virtualized using our technique, and small nerves could be reliably modeled based on of light microscopy images using low-cost OpenSource software and standard hardware. The anatomical model will be released to the scientific community. PMID:23785485

  20. Findings of Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Two Common Types of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yousefipour, Gholamali; Hashemzahi, Zabihollah; Yasemi, Masood; Jahani, Pegah

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most prevalent disease caused by the inflammatory demyelinating process that causes progressive nervous system degeneration over the time. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technology, which can measure the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer as well as the diameter of the macula. The purpose of the study is evaluation OCT findings in two common types of multiple sclerosis. For doing the cross-sectional study, 63 patients with two prevalent types of multiple sclerosis (35 patients with Relapse Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) and 28 patients with Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS) were evaluated for 6 months. Exclusion criteria of the study were a history of optic neuritis, suffering from diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ocular disease, and the presence of other neurologic degenerative diseases. Then, the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), as well as thickness and volume of the macula, were measured in the patients using OCT technology. The disability rate of patients was evaluated according to Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Finally, data was analyzed by means of SPSS software. Overall, 35 patients with RRMS (with mean age of 32.37+10.01, average disease period of 3.81+3.42 and mean EDSS of 1.84+0.45) and 28 patients with SPMS (with mean age of 39.21+9.33, average disease period of 11.32+5.87 and mean EDSS of 5.12+1.46) were assessed and compared in terms of retinal nerve fiber layer and size and thickness of macula. In all of these sections, the thicknesses were smaller in SPMS patients than patients with RRMS. But, there was a significant difference in total thickness (81.82µm versus 96.03µm with P=0.04) and thickness of temporal sector (54.5 µm versus 69.34 µm with P=0.04) of retinal nerve fiber layer and macular size at the superior sector of external ring (1.48 mm³ versus 1.58 mm³ with P=0.03), and nasal sector of external ring surrounding macula (1

  1. Relating Retinal Ganglion Cell Function and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) Retardance to Progressive Loss of RNFL Thickness and Optic Nerve Axons in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Cull, Grant; Reynaud, Juan; Wang, Lin; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To relate changes in retinal function and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardance to loss of RNFL thickness and optic nerve axon counts in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods. Bilateral longitudinal measurements of peripapillary RNFL thickness (spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, SDOCT; Spectralis), retardance (GDxVCC), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG; VERIS) were performed in 39 NHP at baseline (BL; median, 5 recordings; range, 3–10) and weekly after induction of unilateral EG by laser photocoagulation of the trabecular meshwork. Multifocal ERG responses were high-pass filtered (>75 Hz) to measure high- and low-frequency component (HFC and LFC) amplitudes, including LFC features N1, P1, and N2. High-frequency component amplitudes are known to specifically reflect retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function. Complete (100%) axon counts of orbital optic nerves were obtained in 31/39 NHP. Results. Postlaser follow-up was 10.4 ± 7.9 months; mean and peak IOP were 18 ± 5 and 41 ± 11 mm Hg in EG eyes, 11 ± 2 and 18 ± 6 mm Hg in control (CTL) eyes. At the final available time point, RNFL thickness had decreased from BL by 14 ± 14%, retardance by 20 ± 11%, and the mfERG HFC by 30 ± 17% (P < 0.0001 each). Longitudinal changes in retardance and HFC were linearly related to RNFL thickness change (R2 = 0.51, P < 0.0001 and R2 = 0.22, P = 0.002, respectively); LFC N2 was weakly related but N1 or P2 (N1: R2 = 0.07, P = 0.11; P1: R2 = 0.04, P = 0.24; N2: R2 = 0.13, P = 0.02). At zero change from BL for RNFL thickness (Y-intercept), retardance was reduced by 11% (95% confidence interval [CI]: −15.3% to −6.8%) and HFC by 21.5% (95% CI: −28.7% to −14.3%). Relative loss of RNFL thickness, retardance, and HFC (EG:CTL) were each related to axon loss (R2 = 0.66, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.42, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.42, P < 0.0001, respectively), but only retardance and HFC were significantly reduced at zero relative axon

  2. Creation of highly aligned electrospun poly-L-lactic acid fibers for nerve regeneration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han Bing; Mullins, Michael E.; Cregg, Jared M.; Hurtado, Andres; Oudega, Martin; Trombley, Matthew T.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2009-02-01

    Aligned, electrospun polymer fibers have shown considerable promise in directing regenerating axons in vitro and in vivo. However, in several studies, final electrospinning parameters are presented for producing aligned fiber scaffolds, and alignment where minimal fiber crossing occurs is not achieved. Highly aligned species are necessary for neural tissue engineering applications to ensure that axonal extension occurs through a regenerating environment efficiently. Axonal outgrowth on fibers that deviate from the natural axis of growth may delay axonal extension from one end of a scaffold to the other. Therefore, producing aligned fiber scaffolds with little fiber crossing is essential. In this study, the contributions of four electrospinning parameters (collection disk rotation speed, needle size, needle tip shape and syringe pump flow rate) were investigated thoroughly with the goal of finding parameters to obtain highly aligned electrospun fibers made from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA). Using an 8 wt% PLLA solution in chloroform, a collection disk rotation speed of 1000 revolutions per minute (rpm), a 22 gauge, sharp-tip needle and a syringe pump rate of 2 ml h-1 produced highly aligned fiber (1.2-1.6 µm in diameter) scaffolds verified using a fast Fourier transform and a fiber alignment quantification technique. Additionally, the application of an insulating sheath around the needle tip improved the rate of fiber deposition (electrospinning efficiency). Optimized scaffolds were then evaluated in vitro using embryonic stage nine (E9) chick dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and rat Schwann cells (SCs). To demonstrate the importance of creating highly aligned scaffolds to direct neurite outgrowth, scaffolds were created that contained crossing fibers. Neurites on these scaffolds were directed down the axis of the aligned fibers, but neurites also grew along the crossed fibers. At times, these crossed fibers even stopped further axonal extension. Highly aligned PLLA fibers

  3. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Stimulate Regeneration of Peripheral Nerves: BDNF Secreted by These Cells Promotes Nerve Healing and Axon Growth De Novo

    PubMed Central

    Lopatina, Tatiana; Kalinina, Natalia; Karagyaur, Maxim; Stambolsky, Dmitry; Rubina, Kseniya; Revischin, Alexander; Pavlova, Galina; Parfyonova, Yelena; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) induces tissue regeneration by accelerating the growth of blood vessels and nerve. However, mechanisms by which they accelerate the growth of nerve fibers are only partially understood. We used transplantation of ASCs with subcutaneous matrigel implants (well-known in vivo model of angiogenesis) and model of mice limb reinnervation to check the influence of ASC on nerve growth. Here we show that ASCs stimulate the regeneration of nerves in innervated mice's limbs and induce axon growth in subcutaneous matrigel implants. To investigate the mechanism of this action we analyzed different properties of these cells and showed that they express numerous genes of neurotrophins and extracellular matrix proteins required for the nerve growth and myelination. Induction of neural differentiation of ASCs enhances production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as ability of these cells to induce nerve fiber growth. BDNF neutralizing antibodies abrogated the stimulatory effects of ASCs on the growth of nerve sprouts. These data suggest that ASCs induce nerve repair and growth via BDNF production. This stimulatory effect can be further enhanced by culturing the cells in neural differentiation medium prior to transplantation. PMID:21423756

  4. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and nerve fibers was larger in CS1 (P < 0.01) and CS14 (P < 0.05) than in C, and myelin sheath thickness was lower in all crushed groups (P < 0.05). There was no functional difference between CS1 and CS14 (P > 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury. PMID:21876821

  5. FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIONS ARE ESTABLISHED BETWEEN GIANT NERVE FIBERS IN GRAFTED EARTHWORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Giant fiber interconnections were examined in successful grafts between two posterior portions of earthworms (Eisenia foetida). Electrophysiological and histological results indicated that cell-specific interanimal connections were formed between the medial giant fibers (MGF) in ...

  6. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. RESULTS The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (P<0.01) and significant decrease of theta power P<0.05). Corneal nerves were damaged in corneas of retinoblastoma patients. Corneal nerve injury was positively correlated with delta EEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands. PMID:27592207

  7. Polarization properties of the retinal nerve fiber layer investigated with multispectral imaging micropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiangrun

    Evaluation of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is valuable in diagnosing glaucoma and other ocular neuropathic diseases. Several optical methods have been developed to assess the RNFL quantitatively. Knowledge about the optical properties of the RNFL and the underlying mechanisms is essential to understand these techniques and improve their assessment ability. Experimental studies show that the RNFL reflectance arises from the scattering of light by cylindrical structures. The measured reflectance spectra of the RNFL suggest that both thin and thick cylinders contribute to the RNFL reflection and experiments with colchicine suggest that microtubules are a likely candidate for the thin cylinders. The RNFL was modeled mathematically as an ensemble of uniformly distributed cylinders assumed to be form birefringent. The Mueller matrix of the RNFL model was derived and decomposed to reveal its polarization properties. The diattenuation of the model was due to the cylindrical scattering properties. The retardance exhibited in the model included the phase changes due to cylindrical scattering and to the RNFL birefringence. Reflection by the RNFL model preserved polarization. A multispectral imaging micropolarimeter was designed and calibrated. It was used to investigate the reflectance and polarization properties of the RNFL of isolated rat retinas. The RNFL retardance measured in transmission was constant over visible wavelengths, which suggested that only one mechanism was involved in the RNFL birefringence and agreed with the assumption of the RNFL being form birefringent. Measurements of diattenuation spectra of the RNFL reflectance revealed that intrinsic diattenuation is small at all wavelengths. The results led to two possible conclusions (1)if the RNFL reflection arises from scattering by spatially separated cylinders, the refractive index of these cylinders is close to that of the surrounding medium and (2)cylindrical structures other than spatially

  8. Decreased retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng-Lin; Zhou, Li-Xiao; Dang, Yalong; Huo, Yin-Ping; Shi, Lei; Chang, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the changes of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Methods: Relevant studies were selected from 3 major literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE) without language restriction. Main inclusion criteria is that a case-control study in which RNFL thickness was measured by a commercial available optical coherence tomography (OCT) in OSAS patients. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Efficacy estimates were evaluated by weighted mean difference with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcome evaluations were: the average changes of RNFL thickness in total OSAS patients, subgroup analysis of RNFL thickness changes in patients of different OSAS stages, and subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant RNFL thickness changes in total OSAS patients. Results: Of the initial 327 literatures, 8 case-control studies with 763 eyes of OSA patients and 474 eyes of healthy controls were included (NOS scores ≥6). For the people of total OSAS, there had an average 2.92 μm decreased RNFL thickness compared with controls (95% CI: −4.61 to −1.24, P = 0.001). For subgroup analysis of OSAS in different stages, the average changes of RNFL thickness in mild, moderate, severe, and moderate to severe OSAS were 2.05 (95% CI: −4.40 to 0.30, P = 0.088), 2.32 (95% CI: −5.04 to 0.40, P = 0.094), 4.21 (95% CI: −8.36 to −0.06, P = 0.047), and 4.02 (95% CI: −7.65 to −0.40, P = 0.03), respectively. For subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant, the average changes of RNFL thickness in Superior, Nasal, Inferior, and Temporal quadrant were 2.43 (95% CI: −4.28 to −0.57, P = 0.01), 1.41 (95% CI: −3.33 to 0.51, P = 0.151), 3.75 (95% CI: −6.92 to −0.59, P = 0.02), and 0.98 (95% CI: −2.49 to 0.53, P = 0.203), respectively. Conclusion: Our study suggests that RNFL thickness in OSAS patients is much thinner than

  9. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cikmazkara, Ipek; Ugurlu, Seyda Karadeniz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Materials and Methods: 102 female patients who had IDA (hemoglobin <12 g/dl, serum transferrin saturation <15%, serum iron <50 μg/dl, and serum ferritin <15 μg/dl) were enrolled in the study. Optic disc and RNFL parameters obtained by Cirrus high-definition OCT 4000 were compared with those of 49 age and sex-matched nonanemic individuals. The time between blood analysis and OCT measurements was 3.14 ± 5.6 (range, 0–28) days in the anemia group, and 3.5 ± 6.7 (range, 0–27) days in the control group (P = 0.76). Results: Average ages of 102 patients and 49 control subjects were 35.76 ± 10.112 (range, 18–66) years, and 36.08 ± 8.416 (range, 19–57) years (P = 0.850), respectively. The average RNFL thickness was 94.67 ± 9.380 in the anemia group, and 100.22 ± 9.12 in the control group (P = 0.001). Temporal, nasal, and lower quadrant average RNFL thicknesses of IDA group were thinner than the control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.013, P = 0.008). Upper quadrant RNFL thicknesses in IDA and control groups were similar. Correlation analysis revealed positive correlation between mean RNFL thickness and hemoglobin (r = 0.273), iron (r = 0.177), ferritin (r = 0.163), and transferrin saturations (r = 0.185), while a negative correlation was found between total iron binding capacity (r = −0.199) and mean RNFL thickness. Conclusions: Peripapillary RNFL thickness measured by OCT is thinner in adult female patients with IDA. It may have a significant influence on the management of many disorders such as glaucoma and neuro-ophthalmological diseases. PMID:27146929

  10. Arrest of Myelination and Reduced Axon Growth when Schwann Cells Lack mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Diane L.; Krols, Michiel; Wu, Lai-Man; Grove, Matthew; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Brophy, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    In developing peripheral nerves differentiating Schwann cells sort individual axons from bundles and ensheath them to generate multiple layers of myelin. In recent years there has been an increasing understanding of the extracellular and intracellular factors that initiate and stimulate Schwann cell myelination together with a growing appreciation of some of the signalling pathways involved. However, our knowledge of how Schwann cell growth is regulated during myelination is still incomplete. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a core kinase in two major complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate cell growth and differentiation in a variety of mammalian cells. Here we show that elimination of mTOR from murine Schwann cells prevented neither radial sorting nor the initiation of myelination. However, normal post-natal growth of myelinating Schwann cells, both radially and longitudinally, was highly retarded. The myelin sheath in the mutant was much thinner than normal; nevertheless, sheath thickness relative to axon diameter (g-ratio) remained constant in both wild-type and mutant nerves from P14 to P90. Although axon diameters were normal in the mutant at the initiation of myelination, further growth as myelination proceeded was retarded, and this was associated with reduced phosphorylation of neurofilaments. Consistent with thinner axonal diameters and internodal lengths, conduction velocities in mutant quadriceps nerves were also reduced. These data establish a critical role for mTOR signalling in both the longitudinal and radial growth of the myelinating Schwann cell. PMID:22302821

  11. Arrest of myelination and reduced axon growth when Schwann cells lack mTOR.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Diane L; Krols, Michiel; Wu, Lai-Man N; Grove, Matthew; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Brophy, Peter J

    2012-02-01

    In developing peripheral nerves, differentiating Schwann cells sort individual axons from bundles and ensheath them to generate multiple layers of myelin. In recent years, there has been an increased understanding of the extracellular and intracellular factors that initiate and stimulate Schwann cell myelination, together with a growing appreciation of some of the signaling pathways involved. However, our knowledge of how Schwann cell growth is regulated during myelination is still incomplete. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a core kinase in two major complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate cell growth and differentiation in a variety of mammalian cells. Here we show that elimination of mTOR from murine Schwann cells prevented neither radial sorting nor the initiation of myelination. However, normal postnatal growth of myelinating Schwann cells, both radially and longitudinally, was highly retarded. The myelin sheath in the mutant was much thinner than normal; nevertheless, sheath thickness relative to axon diameter (g-ratio) remained constant in both wild-type and mutant nerves from P14 to P90. Although axon diameters were normal in the mutant at the initiation of myelination, further growth as myelination proceeded was retarded, and this was associated with reduced phosphorylation of neurofilaments. Consistent with thinner axonal diameters and internodal lengths, conduction velocities in mutant quadriceps nerves were also reduced. These data establish a critical role for mTOR signaling in both the longitudinal and radial growth of the myelinating Schwann cell. PMID:22302821

  12. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG-no injury), exercise group (EG-no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG-injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG-injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  13. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG—no injury), exercise group (EG—no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG—injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG—injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  14. [Traumatic nerve damage: causes, approaches and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Müller-Vahl, H

    2015-02-01

    Whereas minor injuries to peripheral nerves merely lead to a circumscribed damage of the myelin sheath which is completely healed within 3 months, penetrating injuries lead to degeneration of the distal axonal fragment (Waller degeneration) and simultaneously to time-dependent alterations in the effector organs, in the perikarya in the medulla and spinal ganglia as well as in the brain. Animal experimental studies and also findings in humans confirm that the conditions for regeneration of nerve fibers are most favorable in the first days and weeks following injury. Therefore, for optimal therapy it should be clarified as early as possible whether there is a chance for reinnervation using exclusively conservative therapy or whether an operative reconstruction is necessary due to the severity of structural damage. Imaging investigation procedures, such as neurosonography and magnetic resonance (MR) neurography can provide decisive information on this aspect. As a rule, the decision on the indications for a nerve operation should be made within the first 3 months. Even with optimal therapy the healing process of severe neural injuries is often unsatisfactory. For some years novel procedures for improvement of nerve regeneration have been tested in animal experiments which involve totally different points in the healing process. It is hoped that with these approaches procedures for improvement in the treatment of nerve injuries in humans can be developed in the near future. PMID:25627807

  15. The major pelvic ganglion is the main source of nitric oxide synthase-containing nerve fibers in penile erectile tissue of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ding, Y Q; Wang, Y Q; Qin, B Z; Li, J S

    1993-12-24

    The possible implication of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in penile erection was examined by utilizing NADPH histochemistry in the rat. NADPH histochemistry indicated that the major pelvic ganglion (MPG), a well-known origin of nerve fibers supplying the external genitalia, contained many NOS-positive neurons. On the other hand, NOS-positive nerve fibers in penile erectile tissue observed in the walls of both arteries and veins, as well as in intrinsic smooth muscles. The retrograde tracing study with Fluoro-Gold (FG) in combination with NADPH histochemistry revealed that almost all MPG neurons which were retrogradely labeled with FG injected into the penile crura were NOS-positive. Thus, the MPG was considered to be the main source of NOS-positive nerve fibers in penile erectile tissue. PMID:7512245

  16. Watery and dark axons in Wallerian degeneration of the opossum's optic nerve: different patterns of cytoskeletal breakdown?

    PubMed

    Narciso, M S; Hokoç, J N; Martinez, A M

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we report a qualitative morphological analysis of Wallerian degeneration in a marsupial. Right optic nerves of opossums Didelphis marsupialis were crushed with a fine forceps and after 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 hours the animals were anaesthetized and perfused with fixative. The optic nerves were immersed in fixative and processed for routine transmission electron microscopy. Among the early alterations typical of axonal degeneration, we observed nerve fibers with focal degeneration of the axoplasmic cytoskeleton, watery degeneration and dark degeneration, the latter being prevalent at 168 hours after crush. Our results point to a gradual disintegration of the axoplasmic cytoskeleton, opposed to the previous view of an "all-or-nothing" process (Griffin et al 1995). We also report that, due to an unknown mechanism, fibers show either a dark or watery pattern of axonal degeneration, as observed in axon profiles. We also observed fibers undergoing early myelin breakdown in the absence of axonal alterations. PMID:11404785

  17. Spider Silk Constructs Enhance Axonal Regeneration and Remyelination in Long Nerve Defects in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Radtke, Christine; Allmeling, Christina; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Reimers, Kerstin; Thies, Kerstin; Schenk, Henning C.; Hillmer, Anja; Guggenheim, Merlin; Brandes, Gudrun; Vogt, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Surgical reapposition of peripheral nerve results in some axonal regeneration and functional recovery, but the clinical outcome in long distance nerve defects is disappointing and research continues to utilize further interventional approaches to optimize functional recovery. We describe the use of nerve constructs consisting of decellularized vein grafts filled with spider silk fibers as a guiding material to bridge a 6.0 cm tibial nerve defect in adult sheep. Methodology/Principal Findings The nerve constructs were compared to autologous nerve grafts. Regeneration was evaluated for clinical, electrophysiological and histological outcome. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained at 6 months and 10 months post surgery in each group. Ten months later, the nerves were removed and prepared for immunostaining, electrophysiological and electron microscopy. Immunostaining for sodium channel (NaV 1.6) was used to define nodes of Ranvier on regenerated axons in combination with anti-S100 and neurofilament. Anti-S100 was used to identify Schwann cells. Axons regenerated through the constructs and were myelinated indicating migration of Schwann cells into the constructs. Nodes of Ranvier between myelin segments were observed and identified by intense sodium channel (NaV 1.6) staining on the regenerated axons. There was no significant difference in electrophysiological results between control autologous experimental and construct implantation indicating that our construct are an effective alternative to autologous nerve transplantation. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that spider silk enhances Schwann cell migration, axonal regrowth and remyelination including electrophysiological recovery in a long-distance peripheral nerve gap model resulting in functional recovery. This improvement in nerve regeneration could have significant clinical implications for reconstructive nerve surgery. PMID:21364921

  18. Detection of a diabetic sural nerve from the magnetic field after electric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji; Hyodo, Akira; Chen, Xian; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we proposed a new diagnostic technique for diabetic neuropathy using biomagnetic measurement. Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes. To examine the injury, the skin potential around the nerve is often measured after electric stimulation. However, measuring the magnetic field may reveal precise condition of the injury. To evaluate the effect of measuring the magnetic field, a simulation study was performed. A diabetic sural nerve was simulated as a bundle of myelinated nerve fibers. Each fiber was modeled as an electric cable of Ranvier's nodes. Anatomical data were used to determine the number of nerve fibers and distribution of nerve fiber diameters. The electric potential and the magnetic field on the skin after electric stimulation were computed to the boundary element method. Biphasic time courses were obtained as the electric potential and the magnetic flux density at measurement points. In diabetic nerves, the longer interpeak latency of the electric potential wave and the shorter interpeak latency of the magnetic flux wave were obtained. Measuring both the electric potential and the magnetic flux density seemed to provide a noninvasive and objective marker for diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  20. Comparative study of peripheral neuropathy and nerve regeneration in NOD and ICR diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Homs, Judit; Ariza, Lorena; Pagès, Gemma; Verdú, Enrique; Casals, Laura; Udina, Esther; Chillón, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse was suggested as an adequate model for diabetic autonomic neuropathy. We evaluated sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve regeneration following sciatic nerve crush in NOD males rendered diabetic by multiple low doses of streptozotocin, in comparison with similarly treated Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice, a widely used model for type I diabetes. Neurophysiological values for both strains showed a decline in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity at 7 and 8 weeks after induction of diabetes in the intact hindlimb. However, amplitudes of compound muscle and sensory action potentials (CMAPs and CNAPs) were significantly reduced in NOD but not in ICR diabetic mice. Morphometrical analysis showed myelinated fiber loss in highly hyperglycemic NOD mice, but no significant changes in fiber size. There was a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, more pronounced in NOD than in ICR diabetic mice. Interestingly, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities were increased already at 1 week of hyperglycemia, persisting until the end of the experiment in both strains. Muscle and nerve reinnervation was delayed in diabetic mice following sciatic nerve crush, being more marked in NOD mice. Thus, diabetes of mid-duration induces more severe peripheral neuropathy and slower nerve regeneration in NOD than in ICR mice. PMID:22003936

  1. Functional recoveries of sciatic nerve regeneration by combining chitosan-coated conduit and neurosphere cells induced from adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Huang, Tzu-Chieh; Fan, Shih-Chen; Wang, Duo-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, Sheng-Che

    2014-02-01

    Suboptimal repair occurs in a peripheral nerve gap, which can be partially restored by bridging the gap with various biosynthetic conduits or cell-based therapy. In this study, we developed a combination of chitosan coating approach to induce neurosphere cells from human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) on chitosan-coated plate and then applied these cells to the interior of a chitosan-coated silicone tube to bridge a 10-mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve. Myelin sheath degeneration and glial scar formation were discovered in the nerve bridged by the silicone conduit. By using a single treatment of chitosan-coated conduit or neurosphere cell therapy, the nerve gap was partially recovered after 6 weeks of surgery. Substantial improvements in nerve regeneration were achieved by combining neurosphere cells and chitosan-coated conduit based on the increase of myelinated axons density and myelin thickness, gastrocnemius muscle weight and muscle fiber diameter, and step and stride lengths from gait analysis. High expressions of interleukin-1β and leukotriene B4 receptor 1 in the intra-neural scarring caused by using silicone conduits revealed that the inflammatory mechanism can be inhibited when the conduit is coated with chitosan. This study demonstrated that the chitosan-coated surface performs multiple functions that can be used to induce neurosphere cells from ASCs and to facilitate nerve regeneration in combination with a cells-assisted coated conduit. PMID:24360575

  2. KV1 channels identified in rodent myelinated axons, linked to Cx29 in innermost myelin: support for electrically active myelin in mammalian saltatory conduction.

    PubMed

    Rash, John E; Vanderpool, Kimberly G; Yasumura, Thomas; Hickman, Jordan; Beatty, Jonathan T; Nagy, James I

    2016-04-01

    Saltatory conduction in mammalian myelinated axons was thought to be well understood before recent discoveries revealed unexpected subcellular distributions and molecular identities of the K(+)-conductance pathways that provide for rapid axonal repolarization. In this study, we visualize, identify, localize, quantify, and ultrastructurally characterize axonal KV1.1/KV1.2 channels in sciatic nerves of rodents. With the use of light microscopic immunocytochemistry and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling electron microscopy, KV1.1/KV1.2 channels are localized to three anatomically and compositionally distinct domains in the internodal axolemmas of large myelinated axons, where they form densely packed "rosettes" of 9-nm intramembrane particles. These axolemmal KV1.1/KV1.2 rosettes are precisely aligned with and ultrastructurally coupled to connexin29 (Cx29) channels, also in matching rosettes, in the surrounding juxtaparanodal myelin collars and along the inner mesaxon. As >98% of transmembrane proteins large enough to represent ion channels in these specialized domains, ∼500,000 KV1.1/KV1.2 channels define the paired juxtaparanodal regions as exclusive membrane domains for the voltage-gated K(+)conductance that underlies rapid axonal repolarization in mammals. The 1:1 molecular linkage of KV1 channels to Cx29 channels in the apposed juxtaparanodal collars, plus their linkage to an additional 250,000-400,000 Cx29 channels along each inner mesaxon in every large-diameter myelinated axon examined, supports previously proposed K(+)conductance directly from juxtaparanodal axoplasm into juxtaparanodal myeloplasm in mammalian axons. With neither Cx29 protein nor myelin rosettes detectable in frog myelinated axons, these data showing axon-to-myelin linkage by abundant KV1/Cx29 channels in rodent axons support renewed consideration of an electrically active role for myelin in increasing both saltatory conduction velocity and maximum propagation frequency in

  3. Optimized retinal nerve fiber layer segmentation based on optical reflectivity and birefringence for polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingqing; Paranjape, Amit S.; Yin, Biwei; Liu, Shuang; Markey, Mia K.; Milner, Thomas E.; Rylander, H. Grady, III

    2011-09-01

    Segmentation of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) from swept source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SS-PSOCT) images is required to determine RNFL thickness and calculate birefringence. Traditional RNFL segmentation methods based on image processing and boundary detection algorithms utilize only optical reflectivity contrast information, which is strongly affected by speckle noise. We present a novel approach to segment the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) using SS-PSOCT images including both optical reflectivity and phase retardation information. The RNFL anterior boundary is detected based on optical reflectivity change due to refractive index difference between the vitreous and inner limiting membrane. The posterior boundary of the RNFL is a transition zone composed of birefringent axons extending from retinal ganglion cells and may be detected by a change in birefringence. A posterior boundary detection method is presented that segments the RNFL by minimizing the uncertainty of RNFL birefringence determined by a Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear fitting algorithm. Clinical results from a healthy volunteer show that the proposed segmentation method estimates RNFL birefringence and phase retardation with lower uncertainty and higher continuity than traditional intensity-based approaches.

  4. Spinal activity of interleukin 6 mediates myelin basic protein-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Ko, Justin S; Eddinger, Kelly A; Angert, Mila; Chernov, Andrei V; Dolkas, Jennifer; Strongin, Alex Y; Yaksh, Tony L; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2016-08-01

    Mechanosensory fibers are enveloped by myelin, a unique multilamellar membrane permitting saltatory neuronal conduction. Damage to myelin is thought to contribute to severe pain evoked by innocuous tactile stimulation (i.e., mechanical allodynia). Our earlier (Liu et al., 2012) and present data demonstrate that a single injection of a myelin basic protein-derived peptide (MBP84-104) into an intact sciatic nerve produces a robust and long-lasting (>30days) mechanical allodynia in female rats. The MBP84-104 peptide represents the immunodominant epitope and requires T cells to maintain allodynia. Surprisingly, only systemic gabapentin (a ligand of voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ1), but not ketorolac (COX inhibitor), lidocaine (sodium channel blocker) or MK801 (NMDA antagonist) reverse allodynia induced by the intrasciatic MBP84-104. The genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the sciatic nerve followed by the bioinformatics analyses of the expression changes identified interleukin (IL)-6 as the major cytokine induced by MBP84-104 in both the control and athymic T cell-deficient nude rats. The intrasciatic MBP84-104 injection resulted in both unilateral allodynia and unilateral IL-6 increase the segmental spinal cord (neurons and astrocytes). An intrathecal delivery of a function-blocking IL-6 antibody reduced the allodynia in part by the transcriptional effects in large-diameter primary afferents in DRG. Our data suggest that MBP regulates IL-6 expression in the nervous system and that the spinal IL-6 activity mediates nociceptive processing stimulated by the MBP epitopes released after damage or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. PMID:26970355

  5. Myelination of cortical-hippocampal relays during late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Benes, F M

    1989-01-01

    The normal developmental series of brains in the Yakovlev Collection has been examined to explore the possibility that various brain regions implicated in schizophrenia may show changes in myelination during late adolescence, a period coinciding with the appearance of early symptoms of this disorder. The prefrontal, cingulate, and parahippocampal (entorhinal) cortex, as well as the perforant pathway, cingulum bundle, and hippocampus, were closely examined because these regions have recently been found to show various neuropathological differences in schizophrenia. Observation of these specimens has confirmed earlier reports by Yakovlev and Lecours (1967) that primary motor and sensory cortices show robust myelination early in the first decade of life. In contrast, associative cortical areas show increased amounts of myelin staining only by the second decade, although some cortical areas, like the cingulate and basofrontal cortex, remain poorly myelinated throughout life. The most striking finding, however, was the appearance of increased myelination of the subicular and presubicular regions during the late adolescent period. Increased myelination in the subiculum was localized to a discrete region at the surface where fibers of the perforant pathway are known to aggregate as they course toward the area dentata. The comparable region in the adjacent presubicular area that also showed increased myelin staining probably contains distal portions of the cingulum bundle. Support for this latter possibility was obtained from a single case in which a stereotaxically placed lesion causing interruption of the cingulum bundle showed less myelin in the presubicular area of the effectively lesioned side.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2623440

  6. Effect of Photorefractive Keratectomy on Optic Nerve Head Topography and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measured by Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3

    PubMed Central

    Nilforushan, Naveed; Azadi, Pejvak; Soudi, Reza; Shaheen, Yahya; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) has a significant effect on optic nerve head (ONH) parameters and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured by the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 (Heidelberg Engineering GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany) in eyes with low to moderate myopia. Methods: This prospective, interventional case series, includes 43 consecutive myopic eyes which were assessed on the day of PRK and 3 months postoperatively using the HRT3. Among the stereometric parameters, we compared disc area, linear cup disc ratio, cup shape measure, global rim area, global rim volume, RNFL height variation contour and mean RNFL thickness; out of the Glaucoma Probability Score (GPS) we assessed changes in global value, rim steepness temporal/superior, and temporal/inferior, as well as cup size and cup depth before and after PRK. Results: Mean refractive error before and after PRK were −3.24 ± 1.31 and −0.20 ± 0.42 diopters, respectively. No significant change occurred in disc area, linear cup disc ratio, cup shape measure, rim area and rim volume among the stereometric parameters; and in rim steepness temporal/superior and rim steepness temporal/inferior in the GPS before and after PRK using the default average keratometry. However, RNFL height variation contour, mean RNFL thickness, and cup size and depth were significantly altered after PRK (P < 0.05). Conclusion: PRK can affect some HRT3 parameters. Although the most important stereometric parameters for differentiating normal, suspect or glaucomatous patients such as rim and cup measurements in stereometric parameters were not changed. PMID:27413492

  7. Significant correlations between optic nerve head microcirculation and visual field defects and nerve fiber layer loss in glaucoma patients with myopic glaucomatous disk

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Yu; Aizawa, Naoko; Chiba, Naoki; Omodaka, Kazuko; Nakamura, Masahiko; Otomo, Takaaki; Yokokura, Shunji; Fuse, Nobuo; Nakazawa, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Background Eyes with glaucoma are characterized by optic neuropathy with visual field defects in the areas corresponding to the optic disk damage. The exact cause for the glaucomatous optic neuropathy has not been determined. Myopia has been shown to be a risk factor for glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a significant correlation existed between the microcirculation of the optic disk and the visual field defects and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) in glaucoma patients with myopic optic disks. Methods Sixty eyes of 60 patients with myopic disks were studied; 36 eyes with glaucoma (men:women = 19:17) and 24 eyes with no ocular diseases (men:women = 14:10). The mean deviation (MD) determined by the Humphrey field analyzer, and the peripapillary RNFLT determined by the Stratus-OCT were compared between the two groups. The ocular circulation was determined by laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), and the mean blur rate (MBR) was compared between the two groups. The correlations between the RNFLT and MBR of the corresponding areas of the optic disk and between MD and MBR of the optic disk in the glaucoma group were determined by simple regression analyses. Results The average MBR for the entire optic disk was significantly lower in the glaucoma group than that in the control group. The differences of the MBR for the tissue in the superior, inferior, and temporal quadrants of the optic disk between the two groups were significant. The MBR for the entire optic disk was significantly correlated with the MD (r = 0.58, P = 0.0002) and the average RNFLT (r = 0.53, P = 0.0008). The tissue MBR of the optic disk was significantly correlated with the RNFLT in the superior, inferior, and temporal quadrants. Conclusions Our study suggests that there is a causal relationship between the thinner RNFLT that led to the MD and reduction in the microcirculation in the optic nerve head. PMID:22205831

  8. Physiological effects of auditory nerve myelinopathy in chinchillas.

    PubMed

    El-Badry, Mohamed M; Ding, Da-lian; McFadden, Sandra L; Eddins, Ann C

    2007-03-01

    The goals were to study the physiological effects of auditory nerve myelinopathy in chinchillas and to test the hypothesis that myelin abnormalities could account for auditory neuropathy, a hearing disorder characterized by absent auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) with preserved outer hair cell function. Doxorubicin, a cytotoxic drug used as an experimental demyelinating agent, was injected into the auditory nerve bundle of 18 chinchillas; six other chinchillas were injected with vehicle alone. Cochlear microphonics, compound action potentials (CAPs), inferior colliculus evoked potentials (IC-EVPs), cubic distortion product otoacoustic emissions and ABRs were recorded before and up to 2 months after injection. Cochleograms showed no hair cell loss in any of the animals and measures of outer hair cell function were normal (cubic distortion product otoacoustic emissions) or enhanced (cochlear microphonics) after injection. ABR was present in animals with mild myelin damage (n = 10) and absent in animals with severe myelin damage that included the myelin surrounding spiral ganglion cell bodies and fibers in Rosenthal's canal (n = 8). Animals with mild damage had reduced response amplitudes at 1 day, followed by recovery of CAP and enhancement of the IC-EVP. In animals with severe damage, CAP and IC-EVP thresholds were elevated, amplitudes were reduced, and latencies were prolonged at 1 day and thereafter. CAPs deteriorated over time, whereas IC-EVPs partially recovered; latencies remained consistently prolonged despite changes in amplitudes. The results support auditory nerve myelinopathy as a possible pathomechanism of auditory neuropathy but indicate that myelinopathy must be severe before physiological measures are affected. PMID:17425569

  9. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  10. Functional and morphological assessment of a standardized crush injury of the rat median nerve.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, G; Nicolino, S; Raimondo, S; Tos, P; Battiston, B; Papalia, I; Varejão, A S P; Giacobini-Robecchi, M G; Perroteau, I; Geuna, S

    2009-04-30

    The availability of effective experimental models for investigating nerve regeneration and designing new strategies for promoting this unique repair process is important. The aim of this study was to standardize a rat median nerve crush injury model using a non-serrated clamp exerting a compression force of 17.02 MPa for a duration of 30s. Results showed that functional recovery, evaluated by grasping test, was already detectable at day-12 and progressively increased until day-28 after which animal performance plateaued until the end of testing (day-42), reaching a range of 75-80% of pre-operative values. Morphological analysis on the median nerve segments, distal to the crush lesion, which were withdrawn at the end of the experiment showed that regenerated nerve fibers are significantly more numerous and densely packed; they are also smaller and have a thinner myelin sheath compared to controls. Together, these results provide a baseline characterization of the crush median nerve injury experimental model for its employment in the investigation of nerve regeneration research, especially when a reproducible regeneration process is required, such as for the study of biological mechanisms of peripheral nerve fiber regeneration or development of new therapeutic agents for promoting posttraumatic nerve repair. PMID:19428511

  11. The tumour suppressor LKB1 regulates myelination through mitochondrial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pooya, Shabnam; Liu, Xiaona; Kumar, V.B. Sameer; Anderson, Jane; Imai, Fumiyasu; Zhang, Wujuan; Ciraolo, Georgianne; Ratner, Nancy; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Yoshida, Yutaka; Jankowski, Michael P.; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2015-01-01

    A prerequisite to myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells (SCs) is SC differentiation, and recent evidence indicates that reprogramming from a glycolytic to oxidative metabolism occurs during cellular differentiation. Whether this reprogramming is essential for SC differentiation, and the genes that regulate this critical metabolic transition are unknown. Here we show that the tumour suppressor Lkb1 is essential for this metabolic transition and myelination of peripheral axons. Hypomyelination in the Lkb1-mutant nerves and muscle atrophy lead to hindlimb dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. Lkb1-null SCs failed to optimally activate mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during differentiation. This deficit was caused by Lkb1-regulated diminished production of the mitochondrial Krebs cycle substrate citrate, a precursor to cellular lipids. Consequently, myelin lipids were reduced in Lkb1-mutant mice. Restoring citrate partially rescued Lkb1-mutant SC defects. Thus, Lkb1-mediated metabolic shift during SC differentiation increases mitochondrial metabolism and lipogenesis, necessary for normal myelination. PMID:25256100

  12. Comparison of Longitudinal In Vivo Measurements of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Retinal Ganglion Cell Density after Optic Nerve Transection in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Tiffany E.; Abbott, Carla J.; Piper, Chelsea; Wang, Lin; Fortune, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between longitudinal in vivo measurements of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density after unilateral optic nerve transection (ONT). Methods Nineteen adult Brown-Norway rats were studied; N = 10 ONT plus RGC label, N = 3 ONT plus vehicle only (sans label), N = 6 sham ONT plus RGC label. RNFLT was measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) at baseline then weekly for 1 month. RGCs were labeled by retrograde transport of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CTB) from the superior colliculus 48 hours prior to ONT or sham surgery. RGC density measurements were obtained by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO) at baseline and weekly for 1 month. RGC density and reactivity of microglia (anti-Iba1) and astrocytes (anti-GFAP) were determined from post mortem fluorescence microscopy of whole-mount retinae. Results RNFLT decreased after ONT by 17% (p<0.05), 30% (p<0.0001) and 36% (p<0.0001) at weeks 2, 3 and 4. RGC density decreased after ONT by 18%, 69%, 85% and 92% at weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 (p<0.0001 each). RGC density measured in vivo at week 4 and post mortem by microscopy were strongly correlated (R = 0.91, p<0.0001). In vivo measures of RNFLT and RGC density were strongly correlated (R = 0.81, p<0.0001). In ONT- CTB labeled fellow eyes, RNFLT increased by 18%, 52% and 36% at weeks 2, 3 and 4 (p<0.0001), but did not change in fellow ONT-eyes sans CTB. Microgliosis was evident in the RNFL of the ONT-CTB fellow eyes, exceeding that observed in other fellow eyes. Conclusions In vivo measurements of RNFLT and RGC density are strongly correlated and can be used to monitor longitudinal changes after optic nerve injury. The strong fellow eye effect observed in eyes contralateral to ONT, only in the presence of CTB label, consisted of a dramatic increase in RNFLT associated with retinal microgliosis. PMID:25393294

  13. Are human peripheral nerves sensitive to X-ray imaging?

    PubMed

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O'Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  14. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  15. Human central nervous system myelin inhibits neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Ng, W P; Cartel, N; Roder, J; Roach, A; Lozano, A

    1996-05-13

    In vitro and animal studies have identified molecules in mammalian CNS myelin which inhibit neuritic extension and which may be responsible, at least in part, for the lack of axonal regeneration after injury in the injured brain, optic nerve and spinal cord. To determine whether such inhibitory activity may be present in human CNS myelin, we used a bioassay to characterize neurite outgrowth on this substrate. Human CNS myelin strongly inhibited neuritic outgrowth from newborn rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and NG-108-15 cells, a neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cell line. Similar but less potent inhibitory activity was identified in human gray matter. The CNS myelin inhibition of neuritic outgrowth appeared to be dependent on direct contact between the myelin substrate and neurites. The inhibitory activity in human CNS myelin closely resembled that described in adult rodents. Inhibition of neurite growth by human CNS myelin in this in vitro bioassay mirrors the lack of regeneration in vivo and can be used as a model to develop strategies designed to enhance axonal regeneration and neural recovery. PMID:8782892