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  1. Laminectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Lumbar decompression; Decompressive laminectomy; Spine surgery - laminectomy ... problems Bleeding , blood clots , or infection Risks of spine surgery are: Infection in wound or vertebral bones Damage ...

  2. Laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Yu; Yang, Si-Dong; Huo, Li-Shuang; Wang, Tao; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This is a meta-analysis to compare the results between laminoplasty and laminectomy followed by fusion for the patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. An extensive search of literature was performed in MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, and WANFANG. The following outcome measures were extracted: the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, cervical curvature index (CCI), visual analog scale (VAS), cervical lordosis (C2–7), complications, blood loss, and operation time. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 and STATA 12.0. A total of 23 studies comprising 774 and 743 patients treated with laminoplasty and laminectomy followed by fusion, respectively, were included in the final analysis. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in preoperative JOA scores [P = 0.89], postoperative JOA scores [P = 0.13], JOA scores improvement rate [P = 0.27], preoperative CCI [P = 0.15], postoperative CCI [P = 0.14], preoperative VAS [P = 0.41], postoperative VAS [P = 0.52], preoperative cervical lordosis (C2–7) [P = 0.46], postoperative cervical lordosis (C2–7) [P = 0.67], total complications [P = 0.07], axial pain [P = 0.94], and blood loss [P = 0.51]. However, there were significant difference in operation time (WMD = −19.57 [−32.11, −7.02], P = 0.002) and C5 palsy (OR = 0.26 [0.15, 0.44], P < 0.001). As compared with laminectomy followed by fusion, expansive laminoplasty showed no significant differences in JOA scores, CCI, ROM, VAS, cervical lordosis (C2–7), axial pain, total complications, and blood loss, but shorter operation time and fewer C5 palsy. PMID:27281067

  3. Laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Yu; Yang, Si-Dong; Huo, Li-Shuang; Wang, Tao; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    This is a meta-analysis to compare the results between laminoplasty and laminectomy followed by fusion for the patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. An extensive search of literature was performed in MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, and WANFANG. The following outcome measures were extracted: the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, cervical curvature index (CCI), visual analog scale (VAS), cervical lordosis (C2-7), complications, blood loss, and operation time. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 and STATA 12.0. A total of 23 studies comprising 774 and 743 patients treated with laminoplasty and laminectomy followed by fusion, respectively, were included in the final analysis. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in preoperative JOA scores [P = 0.89], postoperative JOA scores [P = 0.13], JOA scores improvement rate [P = 0.27], preoperative CCI [P = 0.15], postoperative CCI [P = 0.14], preoperative VAS [P = 0.41], postoperative VAS [P = 0.52], preoperative cervical lordosis (C2-7) [P = 0.46], postoperative cervical lordosis (C2-7) [P = 0.67], total complications [P = 0.07], axial pain [P = 0.94], and blood loss [P = 0.51]. However, there were significant difference in operation time (WMD = -19.57 [-32.11, -7.02], P = 0.002) and C5 palsy (OR = 0.26 [0.15, 0.44], P < 0.001). As compared with laminectomy followed by fusion, expansive laminoplasty showed no significant differences in JOA scores, CCI, ROM, VAS, cervical lordosis (C2-7), axial pain, total complications, and blood loss, but shorter operation time and fewer C5 palsy. PMID:27281067

  4. Laminoplasty and Laminectomy Hybrid Decompression for the Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy with Hypertrophic Ligamentum Flavum: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huairong; Xue, Yuan; Tang, Yanming; He, Dong; Li, Zhiyang; Zhao, Ying; Zong, Yaqi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the outcomes of a posterior hybrid decompression protocol for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) associated with hypertrophic ligamentum flavum (HLF). Background Laminoplasty is widely used in patients with CSM; however, for CSM patients with HLF, traditional laminoplasty does not include resection of a pathological ligamentum flavum. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 116 CSM patients with HLF who underwent hybrid decompression with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up. The procedure consisted of reconstruction of the C4 and C6 laminae using CENTERPIECE plates with spinous process autografts, and resection of the C3, C5, and C7 laminae. Surgical outcomes were assessed using Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, recovery rate, cervical lordotic angle, cervical range of motion, spinal canal sagittal diameter, bone healing rates on both the hinge and open sides, dural sac expansion at the level of maximum compression, drift-back distance of the spinal cord, and postoperative neck pain assessed by visual analog scale. Results No hardware failure or restenosis was noted. Postoperative JOA score improved significantly, with a mean recovery rate of 65.3±15.5%. Mean cervical lordotic angle had decreased 4.9 degrees by 1 year after surgery (P<0.05). Preservation of cervical range of motion was satisfactory postoperatively. Bone healing rates 6 months after surgery were 100% on the hinge side and 92.2% on the open side. Satisfactory decompression was demonstrated by a significantly increased sagittal canal diameter and cross-sectional area of the dural sac together with a significant drift-back distance of the spinal cord. The dural sac was also adequately expanded at the time of the final follow-up visit. Conclusion Hybrid laminectomy and autograft laminoplasty decompression using Centerpiece plates may facilitate bone healing and produce a comparatively satisfactory prognosis for CSM patients with HLF. PMID:24740151

  5. Laminoplasty versus laminectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical myelopathy: a meta-analysis of clinical and radiological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Jaebong; Kang, James D; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Posterior cervical surgery, expansive laminoplasty (EL) or laminectomy followed by fusion (LF), is usually performed in patients with multilevel (≥ 3) cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, the superiority of either of these techniques is still open to debate. The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and postoperative kyphosis in patients undergoing EL versus LF by performing a meta-analysis. METHODS Included in the meta-analysis were all studies of EL versus LF in adults with multilevel CSM in MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane library. A random-effects model was applied to pool data using the mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, such as the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) grade, the cervical curvature index (CCI), and the visual analog scale (VAS) score for neck pain. RESULTS Seven studies comprising 302 and 290 patients treated with EL and LF, respectively, were included in the final analyses. Both treatment groups showed slight cervical lordosis and moderate neck pain in the baseline state. Both groups were similarly improved in JOA grade (MD 0.09, 95% CI -0.37 to 0.54, p = 0.07) and neck pain VAS score (MD -0.33, 95% CI -1.50 to 0.84, p = 0.58). Both groups evenly lost cervical lordosis. In the LF group lordosis seemed to be preserved in long-term follow-up studies, although the difference between the 2 treatment groups was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Both EL and LF lead to clinical improvement and loss of lordosis evenly. There is no evidence to support EL over LF in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Any superiority between EL and LF remains in question, although the LF group shows favorable long-term results. PMID:25815808

  6. Laminectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... done along with a diskectomy , foraminotomy , and spinal fusion . You will be asleep and feel no pain ( ... the spine. Your surgeon may do a spinal fusion to make sure your spinal column is stable ...

  7. Laminectomy with and without spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Tria, A J; Williams, J M; Harwood, D; Zawadsky, J P

    1987-11-01

    This retrospective study evaluates two groups of patients surgically treated for a symptomatic, myelographically proven, herniated nucleus pulposus with a follow-up period from 3.5 to 16 years. One hundred thirty-four patients were treated with laminectomy, discectomy, and fusion (LDF) between the years 1972 and 1978; 49 returned for follow-up examination. Two hundred patients had laminectomies and discectomies between the years 1968 and 1981; 40 returned for follow-up evaluation. Two of the disc patients had a repeat laminectomy for recurrent disc herniation, thus totaling 42 laminectomies. Each patient was scored on a scale from zero to 100. The LDF cases had an average score of 70 points. The disc cases had an average score of 69 points. Three of the LDF cases (6%) and eight of the disc cases (19%) had had a second operation. Laminectomy patients have a significantly higher reoperation rate than patients who have had spinal fusion along with laminectomy; however, the authors were unable to evaluate the results in the two groups by the overall score. PMID:3665232

  8. Prevention of nerve root adhesions after laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Yong-Hing, K; Reilly, J; de Korompay, V; Kirkaldy-Willis, W H

    1980-01-01

    In repeat lumbar surgery for failure of the original operation to provide lasting relief, well-organized fibrous tissue is often noted binding together the dura, nerve roots, and erector spinae muscles. Lumbar laminectomy was carried out in 46 dogs and seven groups of animals studied. Gelfoam failed to prevent fibrosis. Free fat grafts prevented fibrosis whether the graft was placed at the laminectomy site or around the nerve roots. Vascularization of the grafts was demonstrated by injection of India ink before sacrifice. Ligamentum nuchae, which is similar to ligamentum flavum in its high elastic content, was also effective in preventing scar formation. The operative biopsy findings at reexploration in four patients who had free fat grafts following laminectomy are presented. PMID:7361199

  9. The prevention of adhesions after laminectomy. Adverse results of Zenoderm implantations into laminectomy sites in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Boot, D A; Hughes, S P

    1987-02-01

    Zenoderm (Ethicon Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland) is porcine skin dermis specially treated so as to be weakly antigenic when implanted. Its use as an extradural spinal and nerve root membrane to reduce postoperative adhesions after laminectomy was tested in 22 rabbits with laminectomy in the second and fourth lumbar vertebra. The sites were reviewed histologically two to 36 weeks after operation. Histologic sections showed that Zenoderm was initially surrounded by hematoma that organized into fibrous tissue and, later, bone. When Zenoderm was placed immediately adjacent to the dura, dense adhesions formed, which were slower to resolve than those in the control sites. The rate of Zenoderm resorption was variable. In general, Zenoderm did not excite excessive fibrous tissue formation and was slowly replaced by bone. Contrary to the experience of others, it was unusual to find adhesions between the laminectomy site, and the dura began disappearing after six to nine weeks. In rabbits, Zenoderm is unlikely to prevent adhesions forming after lumbar disc surgery. The resorption rate is variable, and laminectomy sites are unsuitable for the investigation of material for the prevention of spinal dural adhesions. PMID:3542330

  10. The management of pain following laminectomy for lumbar disc lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G.

    1981-01-01

    Assessment of the results of laminectomy for lumbar disc lesions is unsatisfactory, but it seems that some degree of recurrent pain is virtually inevitable. The clinical features and incidence of the various painful syndromes seen in these patients, including one, the sacro-spinalis insertion syndrome, which has not previously been described, are outlined and the management of each is discussed with reference to two personal series, one of 98 patients consecutively undergoing laminectomy and the other of 35 patients referred because of recurrent pain following laminectomy. Finally, problems of prophylaxis are considered. PMID:6454375

  11. Trumpet Laminectomy Microdecompression for Lumbal Canal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Arifin, Muhammad Zafrullah; Takayasu, Masakazu; Faried, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Microsurgery techniques are useful innovations towards minimizing the insult of canal stenosis. Here, we describe the trumpet laminectomy microdecompression (TLM) technique, advantages and disadvantages. Sixty-two TLM patients with lumbar disc herniation, facet hypertrophy or yellow ligament or intracanal granulation tissue. The symptoms are low back pain, dysesthesia and severe pain on both legs. Spine levels operated Th11-S1; the patients who had trumpet-type fenestration, 62.9% had hypertrophy of the facet joint, 11.3% had intracanal granulation tissue, 79.1% had hypertrophy of the yellow ligament and 64.5% had disc herniation. The average of procedure duration was 68.9 min and intraoperative blood loss was 47.4 mL. Intraoperative complications were found in 3.2% of patients, with dural damage but without cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The TLM can be performed for all ages and all levels of spinal canal stenosis, without the complication of spondilolistesis. The TLM has a shorter duration, with minimal intraoperative blood loss. PMID:25346821

  12. Dynamic Compression of the Spinal Cord by Paraspinal Muscles following Cervical Laminectomy: Diagnosis Using Flexion-Extension MRI.

    PubMed

    Evans, Linton T; Lollis, S Scott

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flexion-extension, or kinematic, MRI has been used to identify dynamic spondylotic spinal cord compression not seen with traditional static MRI. The use of kinematic MRI to diagnose postoperative complications, specifically dynamic compression, is not as well documented. The authors describe a case of dynamic spinal cord compression by the paraspinal muscles causing worsening myelopathy following cervical laminectomy. This was only diagnosed with flexion-extension MRI. Methods. The patient was a 90-year-old male presenting to the neurosurgery clinic with functional decline and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Results. A multilevel laminectomy was performed. Following surgery the patient had progressive weakness and worsening myelopathy. No active cord compression was seen on multiple MRIs obtained in a neutral position, and flexion-extension X-rays did not show instability. A kinematic MRI demonstrated dynamic compression of the spinal cord only during neck extension, by the paraspinal muscles. To relieve the compression, the patient underwent an instrumented fusion, with cross-links used to buttress the paraspinal muscles away from the cord. This resulted in neurologic improvement. Conclusions. We describe a novel case of spinal cord compression by paraspinal muscles following cervical laminectomy. In individuals with persistent myelopathy or delayed neurologic decline following posterior decompression, flexion-extension MRI may prove useful in diagnosing this potential complication. PMID:25984378

  13. Dynamic Compression of the Spinal Cord by Paraspinal Muscles following Cervical Laminectomy: Diagnosis Using Flexion-Extension MRI

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Linton T.; Lollis, S. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flexion-extension, or kinematic, MRI has been used to identify dynamic spondylotic spinal cord compression not seen with traditional static MRI. The use of kinematic MRI to diagnose postoperative complications, specifically dynamic compression, is not as well documented. The authors describe a case of dynamic spinal cord compression by the paraspinal muscles causing worsening myelopathy following cervical laminectomy. This was only diagnosed with flexion-extension MRI. Methods. The patient was a 90-year-old male presenting to the neurosurgery clinic with functional decline and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Results. A multilevel laminectomy was performed. Following surgery the patient had progressive weakness and worsening myelopathy. No active cord compression was seen on multiple MRIs obtained in a neutral position, and flexion-extension X-rays did not show instability. A kinematic MRI demonstrated dynamic compression of the spinal cord only during neck extension, by the paraspinal muscles. To relieve the compression, the patient underwent an instrumented fusion, with cross-links used to buttress the paraspinal muscles away from the cord. This resulted in neurologic improvement. Conclusions. We describe a novel case of spinal cord compression by paraspinal muscles following cervical laminectomy. In individuals with persistent myelopathy or delayed neurologic decline following posterior decompression, flexion-extension MRI may prove useful in diagnosing this potential complication. PMID:25984378

  14. Obtuse-angled Laminotomy as a Modification of Multilevel Laminectomy for Spinal Cord Decompression.

    PubMed

    Jhas, Sumit; Pirouzmand, Farhad

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this note is to describe an obtuse-angled laminotomy of C7 during cervical decompression that aims to preserve cervicothoracic junction stability and potentially reduce pain. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy can result from degenerative cervical spinal disease including, herniated disk material, osteophytes, redundant ligamentum flavum, or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Surgical intervention for multilevel myelopathy aims to decompress the spinal cord and maintain stability of the cervical spine. Multilevel laminectomy is traditionally used when degenerative changes affect 3 or more levels and when there is primarily dorsal compressive disease. Traditional laminectomy can result in instability and kyphosis. The C7 lamina can be particularly vulnerable given the location at cervicothoracic junction. We describe an obtuse-angled laminotomy for the most caudal lamina in a planned decompression. This lamina is left attached to ligamentum nuchea, adjacent fascia, and paravertebral muscles. Only the base of spinous process and ventral portion of lamina's cortical and cancellous bone are removed in an obtuse angle through the opening. This variation is aimed to preserve as much of the cervical stability while still achieving the goal of decompression. PMID:26889986

  15. Myasthenia Gravis Presentation After a Cervical Laminectomy With Fusion.

    PubMed

    Deters, Darlene; Fowler, Stephanie L; Orozco, Raymundo; Smith, Patrick R; Spurlock, Shelby; Blackmon, Darlene; Thomas, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic neuromuscular disorder that causes skeletal muscle weakness. Typically, myasthenia gravis affects the ocular, bulbar, neck, proximal limbs, and respiratory muscles. Although the presentation is typically observed with complaints of vision and bulbar symptoms such as diplopia, dystonia, and dysphagia, this article presents a case study of an elderly man with a history of increasing upper extremity weakness with complaints of worsening hand dexterity and intermittent episodes of expressive aphasia. After cervical laminectomy with fusion, this gentleman was admitted to the medical intensive care unit, in a complete myasthenic crisis. PMID:27258955

  16. Clinical outcomes after decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic ossification of ligamentum flavum at the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhao-Ming; Wu, Qian; Meng, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Yong-Jian; Qu, Dong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Xing; Jiang, Jian-Ming; Lu, Kai-Wu; Zheng, Shuai; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2016-06-01

    Ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) is a rare disease that causes acquired thoracic spinal canal stenosis and thoracic myelopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes of symptomatic thoracic OLF treated using posterior decompressive laminectomy. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 22 patients who underwent posterior decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic thoracic OLF. The surgical results were evaluated using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system and Hirabayashi recovery rate. The intensity of pain was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). The mean duration of follow-up was 35.6months. The mean JOA score was significantly improved at final follow-up (9.18±standard deviation of 1.53 points [range, 6-11 points]) compared with before surgery (5.64±2.04 points [range, 3-9 points]) (P<0.001). The mean Hirabayashi recovery rate was 65.49% (range, 20-100%). Recovery outcomes were excellent in nine patients, good in eight patients, fair in four patients and unchanged in one patient. No patient was classified as deteriorated. The VAS scores were 2.82±3.08 before surgery and 0.59±1.05 at final follow-up (P=0.001). Surgical complications, which resolved after appropriate and prompt treatment, included dural tear in five patients, cerebrospinal fluid leakage in one patient, immediate postoperative neurologic deterioration in one patient, epidural hematoma in one patient, and wound infection in one patient. Our findings suggest that posterior decompressive laminectomy is an effective treatment for symptomatic thoracic OLF and provides satisfactory clinical improvement, but surgery for thoracic OLF is associated with a relatively high incidence of complications. PMID:26898582

  17. A review: Reduced reoperation rate for multilevel lumbar laminectomies with noninstrumented versus instrumented fusions

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The reoperation rate, including for adjacent segment disease (ASD), is lower following multilevel lumbar laminectomy with noninstrumented versus instrumented fusions. Methods: This study reviews selected literature focusing on the reoperation rate, including for ASD, following multilevel laminectomies with noninstrumented versus instrumented fusions. Several prior studies document a 1.3–5.6% reoperation rate following multilevel laminectomy with/without noninstrumented fusions. Results: The reoperation rates for instrumented fusions, including for ASD, are substantially higher. One study cited a 12.2–18.5% frequency for reoperation following instrumented transforaminal lumbar and posterior lumbar interbody fusions (TLIF and PLIFs) at an average of 164 postoperative months. Another study cited a 9.9% reoperation rate for ASD 1 year following PLIF; this increased to 80% at 5 postoperative years. A further study compared 380 patients variously undergoing laminectomies/noninstrumented posterolateral fusions, laminectomies with instrumented fusions (PLFs), and laminectomies with instrumented PLF plus an interbody fusions; this study documented no significant differences in outcomes for any of these operations at 4 postoperative years. Furthermore, other series showed fusion rates for 1–2 level procedures which were often similar with or without instrumentation, while instrumentation increased reoperation rates and morbidity. Conclusions: Many studies document no benefit for adding instrumentation to laminectomies performed for degenerative disease, including spondylolisthesis. Reoperation rates for laminectomy alone/laminectomy with noninstrumented fusions vary from 1.3% to 5.6% whereas reoperation rates for ASD after instrumented PLIF was 80% at 5 postoperative years. This review should prompt spinal surgeons to reexamine when, why, and whether instrumentation is really necessary, particularly for treating degenerative lumbar disease. PMID:27274408

  18. Pentoxifylline Inhibits Epidural Fibrosis in Post-Laminectomy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelten, Bilal; Erdogan, Hakan; Antar, Veysel; Sanel, Selim; Tuncdemir, Matem; Kutnu, Muge; Karaoglan, Alper; Orki, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular pentoxifylline in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Material/Methods We divided 16 adult Wistar albino rats into 2 equal groups: treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. The intramuscular treatment group received pentoxifylline. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was studied in both groups using electron microscopy, light microscopy, histology, biochemistry, and macroscopy. Results The evaluation of epidural fibrosis in the 2 groups according to macroscopic (p<0.01) assessment and light microscopy revealed that epidural scar tissue formation was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.001) and the number of fibroblasts was also decreased significantly in the pentoxifylline-treated group (p<0.05). More immature fibers were demonstrated in the treatment group by electron microscopy in comparison with the control group. In biochemical analysis, a statistically significant decrease was detected in hydroxyproline, which indicates fibrosis and myeloperoxidase activity, and shows an inflammatory response (P<0.001). Conclusions Systemic pentoxifylline application prevents postoperative epidural fibrosis and adhesions with various mechanisms. Our study is the first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with pentoxifylline. PMID:26974057

  19. [Update on prevention of epidural adhesion after lumbar laminectomy].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-xuan; Hong, Dun

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural adhesion is one of the most common causes of failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), which can lead to back and leg pain or neurological deficit. Prevention of epidural adhesion after laminectomy is critical for improving the outcomes of lumbar surgery. The main origins of epidural fibrosis are raw surface of erector muscles and rupture fibers of intervertebral disc. The main current preventive methods for epidural adhesion include the usage of implants, chemicals and low dose radiation. However, most of them are still in experiment period. There are still controversies on the clinic usage of autograft free fat, ADCON-L, and Mitomycin C (MMC). The optimal implants are characteristics of better biocompatibility, degradable absorption and capability of existing for a certain period in body. The optimal medicine should have good effect on anti-desmoplasia, less side effects and long half-life. Besides, the combination of biodegradable medical film and drug and the mixture of two or more medical films are also the research frontlines of epidural adhesion. Further researches are required to explore new materials and drugs with stable and most favorable effect in preventing epidural adhesion. PMID:26757539

  20. A carbohydrate polymer that effectively prevents epidural fibrosis at laminectomy sites in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wujek, J R; Ahmad, S; Harel, A; Maier, K H; Roufa, D; Silver, J

    1991-11-01

    We demonstrate that a carbohydrate polymer, designated GL402, effectively inhibits epidural fibrosis in a rat laminectomy model. A total laminectomy in Lewis rats was performed at lumbar vertebrae 3 and 5. GL402 or phosphate buffer solutions in gelatin sponges were applied to the laminectomy sites. Epidural fibrosis was measured, using a double-blind protocol, 2 weeks postoperatively either by gross anatomical evaluation (blunt dissection) or by histological evaluation. Local application of GL402 produced nearly complete inhibition of epidural fibrosis, whereas extensive scar formation and bone growth occurred after local application of buffer or other purported anti-fibrotics. In laminectomy sites treated with GL402 the dura mater was essentially free of adhering fibrosis and bone growth was dramatically decreased. With reduction of postlaminectomy fibrosis, the spinal nerve roots are more mobile and therefore may be less prone to recurrent nerve root compression. The dramatic reduction of epidural fibrosis by GL402 will make reoperative disc surgery safer due to greater accessibility of the laminectomy site. This compound may be useful in preventing surgical adhesions in other sites as well. PMID:1748197

  1. Low reoperation rate following 336 multilevel lumbar laminectomies with noninstrumented fusions

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few reoperations are required in older patients undergoing multilevel lumbar laminectomy with noninstrumented fusions for spinal stenosis with/without spondylolisthesis/instability, and they rarely require instrumentation. Methods: We reviewed 336 patients averaging 66.5 years of age undergoing initial average 4.7 level lumbar laminectomies with average 1.4 level noninstrumented fusions over an average 7.1-year period (range 2.0–16.5 years). Patients uniformly exhibited spinal stenosis, instability (Grade I [195 patients] or Grade II spondylolisthesis [67 patients]), disc herniations (154 patients), and/or synovial cysts (66 patients). Reoperations, including for adjacent segment disease (ASD), addressed new/recurrent pathology. Results: Nine (2.7%) of 336 patients required reoperations, including for ASD, an average of 6.3 years (range 2–15 years) following initial 4.7 level laminectomies with 1.4 level noninstrumented fusions. Second operations warranted average 4.8 level (range 3–6) laminectomies and average 1.1 level non instrumented fusions addressing stenosis with instability (Grade I [7 patients] or Grade II [1 patient] spondylolisthesis), new disc herniations (2 patients), and/or a synovial cyst (1 patient). Conclusions: Only 9 (2.7%) of 336 patients required reoperations (including for ASD) consisting of multilevel laminectomies with noninstrumented fusions for recurrent/new stenosis even with instability; these older patients were not typically unstable, or were likely already fused, and did not require instrumentation. Alternatively, reoperation rates following instrumented fusions in other series approached 80% at 5 postoperative years. Therefore, we as spinal surgeons should realize that older patients even with instability rarely require instrumentation and that the practice of performing instrumented fusions in everyone, irrespective of age, needs to stop. PMID:27274407

  2. The effect of multi-level laminoplasty and laminectomy on the biomechanics of the cervical spine: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Kode, Swathi; Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Smucker, Joseph D; Fredericks, Douglas C; Grosland, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    Laminectomy has been regarded as a standard treatment for multi-level cervical stenosis. Concern for complications such as kyphosis has limited the indication of multi-level laminectomy; hence it is often augmented with an instrumented fusion. Laminoplasty has emerged as a motion preserving alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the multidirectional flexibility of the cervical spine in response to a plate-only open door laminoplasty, double door laminoplasty, and laminectomy using a computational model. A validated three-dimensional finite element model of a specimen-specific intact cervical spine (C2-T1) was modified to simulate each surgical procedure at levels C3-C6. An additional goal of this work was to compare the instrumented computational model to our multi-specimen experimental findings to ensure similar trends in response to the surgical procedures. Model predictions indicate that mobility was retained following open and double door laminoplasty with a 5.4% and 20% increase in flexion, respectively, compared to the intact state. Laminectomy resulted in 57% increase in flexion as compared to the intact state, creating a concern for eventual kyphosis--a known risk/complication of multi-level laminectomy in the absence of fusion. Increased disc stresses were observed at the altered and adjacent segments post-laminectomy in flexion. PMID:25328475

  3. Application of the Flexible CO2 Laser in Minimally Invasive Laminectomies: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Namath S; Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive laminectomy is a very effective surgical method for treating lumbar stenosis. However, this technique can be technically difficult, especially in patients suffering from severe stenosis. The contralateral decompression from a unilateral approach can result in durotomy during removal of the hypertrophied ligamentum flavum. This complication can be difficult to treat through a small working channel. Objective To detail our group's operative experience with the CO2 laser and discuss our results and previous studies in the literature reporting results.  Methods The CO2 laser (Omniguide, Boston, MA) was investigated in the surgical ablation of the contralateral ligamentum flavum during minimally invasive laminectomies. Forty levels have been investigated thus far. The amount of voltage needed to adequately desiccate and remove the ligamentum flavum safely as well as the effectiveness of this technique were investigated. Results The contralateral ligamentum flavum could be removed effectively using the 9 to 11 watt continuous wavelength (10,600 nanometer) power setting on the CO2 laser. Shrinkage of the contralateral ligamentum flavum facilitated its removal using a number 2 Kerrison Punch. No durotomies occurred, and the use of the laser did not significantly lengthen operative times.  Conclusions The CO2 laser appears to be a useful tool in the armamentarium of instruments available to the minimally invasive spine surgeon and may help to reduce the incidence of durotomies when performing minimally invasive laminectomies. PMID:27433407

  4. Application of the Flexible CO2 Laser in Minimally Invasive Laminectomies: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive laminectomy is a very effective surgical method for treating lumbar stenosis. However, this technique can be technically difficult, especially in patients suffering from severe stenosis. The contralateral decompression from a unilateral approach can result in durotomy during removal of the hypertrophied ligamentum flavum. This complication can be difficult to treat through a small working channel. Objective To detail our group’s operative experience with the CO2 laser and discuss our results and previous studies in the literature reporting results.  Methods The CO2 laser (Omniguide, Boston, MA) was investigated in the surgical ablation of the contralateral ligamentum flavum during minimally invasive laminectomies. Forty levels have been investigated thus far. The amount of voltage needed to adequately desiccate and remove the ligamentum flavum safely as well as the effectiveness of this technique were investigated. Results The contralateral ligamentum flavum could be removed effectively using the 9 to 11 watt continuous wavelength (10,600 nanometer) power setting on the CO2 laser. Shrinkage of the contralateral ligamentum flavum facilitated its removal using a number 2 Kerrison Punch. No durotomies occurred, and the use of the laser did not significantly lengthen operative times.  Conclusions The CO2 laser appears to be a useful tool in the armamentarium of instruments available to the minimally invasive spine surgeon and may help to reduce the incidence of durotomies when performing minimally invasive laminectomies. PMID:27433407

  5. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  6. The Effect of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate on Post-Operative Analgesia During Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffaripour, Sina; Eghbal, Hossein; Rahimi, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Post-operative pain control is an important concern for both patients and physicians. Magnesium is being used as an adjuvant for anesthesia and analgesia during and after various surgeries. We aimed to investigate the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-operative analgesia after laminectomy. Methods Materials: In this randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, we enrolled 40 adult patients aged 18-60 with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)  Class I-II who were candidates for elective laminectomy. The patients were randomly assigned in two control groups and were similarly anesthetized. In the case group, after the induction of anesthesia, a loading dose of magnesium sulfate (30 mg/kg) was administered within five to 10 minutes followed by a maintenance dose of 10 mg/kg/hr up to the end of the surgery; while, the patients in the control group received the same volume of saline. After the surgery, all patients received a patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) pump containing morphine. The first time of using PCA, the amount of consumed morphine during the first 24 hours, and pain score were recorded at 6,12,18 and 24 hours in the post-operative period. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the amount of morphine consumed in 24 hours after the surgery (P value =0.23), the first time of using of PCA pump (P value =0.79) and pain intensity (P value=0.52). Conclusion: The infusion of Magnesium Sulfate during laminectomy had no effect on patients’ pain and opioid requirement during the first 24 hours after the surgery. PMID:27433405

  7. Comparison of standard laminectomy with an optimized ejection method for the removal of spinal cords from rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Heather S; Jones, Charles; Caplazi, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    For researchers seeking to collect spinal cord samples from mice and rats while avoiding acid decalcification, few options are available. Laminectomy is the standard method which yields high quality samples, yet is time consuming and technically difficult. Ejection of the cord from the vertebral column is another technique commonly used; however, the literature suggests that this method can damage the spinal tissues and is typically avoided when histology of samples is the desired endpoint. Here, we describe an optimized method for ejection of spinal cords from rats and mice, and compare histological quality of these samples with those collected via laminectomy. Our results show that ejection can yield high quality spinal cord samples and may be suitable for use as an alternative to laminectomy. PMID:24039319

  8. Effects of a Temperature-Sensitive, Anti-Adhesive Agent on the Reduction of Adhesion in a Rabbit Laminectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Woo; Cho, Tae Koo; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ryu, Je Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective A common cause of failure in laminectomy surgery is when epidural, peridural, or perineural adhesion occurs postoperatively. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a temperature-sensitive, anti-adhesive agent (TSAA agent), Guardix-SG®, as a mechanical barrier for the prevention or reduction of peridural scar adhesion in a rabbit laminectomy model. Methods Twenty-six mature rabbits were used for this study. Each rabbit underwent two separate laminectomies at lumbar vertebrae L3 and L6, left empty (the control group) and applied 2 mL of the TSAA agent (the experimental group), respectively. Invasive scar formation or inflammation after laminectomy was quantitatively evaluated by measuring the thickness of the dura, the distance from the surface of dura to the scar tissues, the number of inflammatory cells in the scar tissues at the laminectomy site, and the concentration of collagen in histological sections. Results At 6 weeks postsurgery, the dura was significantly thinner and the distance from the surface of dura to the scar tissues was greater in the experimental group than in the control group (p=0.04 and p=0.01). The number of inflammatory cells was not significantly different in the two groups (p=0.08), although the mean number of inflammatory cells was relatively lower in the experimental group than in the control group. Conclusion The current study suggests that the TSAA agent, Guardix-SG®, could be useful as an interpositional physical barrier after laminectomy for the prevention or reduction of adhesion. PMID:27226857

  9. Decompressive cervical laminectomy and lateral mass screw-rod arthrodesis. Surgical analysis and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the outcome and complications of decompressive cervical Laminectomy and lateral mass screw fixation in 110 cases treated for variable cervical spine pathologies that included; degenerative disease, trauma, neoplasms, metabolic-inflammatory disorders and congenital anomalies. Methods A retrospective review of total 785 lateral mass screws were placed in patients ages 16-68 years (40 females and 70 males). All cases were performed with a polyaxial screw-rod construct and screws were placed by using Anderson-Sekhon trajectory. Most patients had 12-14-mm length and 3.5 mm diameter screws placed for subaxial and 28-30 for C1 lateral mass. Screw location was assessed by post operative plain x-ray and computed tomography can (CT), besides that; the facet joint, nerve root foramen and foramen transversarium violation were also appraised. Results No patients experienced neural or vascular injury as a result of screw position. Only one patient needed screw repositioning. Six patients experienced superficial wound infection. Fifteen patients had pain around the shoulder of C5 distribution that subsided over the time. No patients developed screw pullouts or symptomatic adjacent segment disease within the period of follow up. Conclusion decompressive cervical spine laminectomy and Lateral mass screw stabilization is a technique that can be used for a variety of cervical spine pathologies with safety and efficiency. PMID:21595968

  10. Minimally Invasive Drainage of a Post-Laminectomy Subfascial Seroma with Cervical Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Kitshoff, Adriaan Mynhardt; Van Goethem, Bart; Cornelis, Ine; Combes, Anais; Dvm, Ingeborgh Polis; Gielen, Ingrid; Vandekerckhove, Peter; de Rooster, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    A 14 mo old female neutered Doberman pinscher was evaluated for difficulty in rising, a wide based stance, pelvic limb gait abnormalities, and cervical pain of 2 mo duration. Neurologic examination revealed pelvic limb ataxia and cervical spinal hyperesthesia. Spinal reflexes and cranial nerve examination were normal. The pathology was localized to the C1-C5 or C6-T2 spinal cord segments. Computed tomography (CT) findings indicated bony proliferation of the caudal articular processes of C6 and the cranial articular processes of C7, resulting in bilateral dorsolateral spinal cord compression that was more pronounced on the left side. A limited dorsal laminectomy was performed at C6-C7. Due to progressive neurological deterioration, follow-up CT examination was performed 4 days postoperatively. At the level of the laminectomy defect, a subfacial seroma had developed, entering the spinal canal and causing significant spinal cord compression. Under ultrasonographic guidance a closed-suction wound catheter was placed. Drainage of the seroma successfully relieved its compressive effects on the spinal cord and the patient's neurological status improved. CT was a valuable tool in assessing spinal cord compression as a result of a postoperative subfascial seroma. Minimally invasive application of a wound catheter can be successfully used to manage this condition. PMID:27008321

  11. Efficacy of topical cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogel in preventing post laminectomy/laminotomy fibrosis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Yi; Huang, Yi-Hung; Lee, Jung-Shun; Tai, Ta-Wei; Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Post-laminectomy/laminotomy epidural fibrosis (EF) has been implicated as an important cause of failed back syndrome (FBS). The various clinical approaches used to control EF yield mixed outcomes. Cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogel (cHA) was synthesized to increase mechanical stability and residence time. We evaluated the therapeutic attenuation of proliferative EF in laminectomy/laminotomy groups treated and not treated with cHA. A bilateral T11-L1 total laminectomy or unilateral T12 laminotomy was done on four groups (n = 10 each) of Sprague-Dawley rats and then histologically examined 2 months post-surgery: (I) laminectomy group treated with and (II) not treated with cHA, (III) laminotomy group treated with and (IV) not treated with cHA. The grade of EF, the diameters within the spinal canal, dura mater thickness, and the area of the epidural space, subarachnoid space, and conus medullaris space were assessed. The cHA-treated subgroups (I, III) had a significantly lower grade of EF, thinner dura mater, and larger epidural and subarachnoid spaces than did the control subgroups (II, IV) (p < 0.05). The cHA formed a solid interpositional membrane barrier that prevented invasive fibrosis, and also helped reduce pathological changes to the adjacent structures. In conclusion, topically applied cHA is effective for reducing EF. PMID:26222496

  12. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Surendra Mohan; Kapoor, Varun; Jain, Anil K; Jain, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iatrogenic instability following laminectomy occurs in patients with degenerative lumbar canal stenosis. Long segment fusions to obviate postoperative instability result in loss of motion of lumbar spine and predisposes to adjacent level degeneration. The best alternative would be an adequate decompressive laminectomy with a nonfusion technique of preserving the posterior ligament complex integrity. We report a retrospective analysis of multilevel lumbar canal stenosis that were operated for posterior decompression and underwent spinaplasty to preserve posterior ligament complex integrity for outcome of decompression and iatrogenic instability. Materials and Methods: 610 patients of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis (n=520) and development spinal canal stenosis (n=90), with a mean age 58 years (33–85 years), underwent multilevel laminectomies and spinaplasty procedure. At followup, changes in the posture while walking, increase in the walking distance, improvement in the dysesthesia in lower limb, the motor power, capability to negotiate stairs and sphincter function were assessed. Forward excursion of vertebrae more than 4 mm in flexion–extension lateral X-ray of the spine as compared to the preoperative movements was considered as the iatrogenic instability. Clinical assessment was done in standing posture regarding active flexion–extension movement, lateral bending and rotations Results: All patients were followed up from 3 to 10 years. None of the patients had neurological deterioration or pain or catch while movement. Walking distance improved by 5–10 times, with marked relief (70–90%) in neurogenic claudication and preoperative stooping posture, with improvement in sensation and motor power. There was no significant difference in the sagittal alignment as well as anterior translation. Two patients with concomitant scoliosis and one with cauda equine syndrome had incomplete recovery. Two patients who developed disc protrusion, underwent

  13. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  14. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  15. The Effect of Gabapentin Plus Celecoxib on Pain and Associated Complications After Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vasigh, Aminolah; Jaafarpour, Molouk; Khani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prevention and treatment of postoperative pain is a major challenge in postoperative care and well-being of the surgical patient. The multimodal analgesic method has been recommended as an alternative treatment for the management of postoperative pain. Aim To assess the comparative effect of gabapentin versus gabapentin plus celecoxib on pain and associated complications after laminectomy. Materials and Methods In this randomized double- blind clinical trial, 114 patients scheduled for elective laminectomy received gabapentin (n=38, 900 mg daily), gabapentin plus celecoxib (n=38, 200 mg celecoxib plus 300mg gabapentin twice a day), and placebo (n=38, capsule containing starch). Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to determine the severity of pain. Complications after surgery, anxiety scores before surgery and patient’s satisfaction 24 hour after surgery were recorded. Results The mean pain sevenity score and morphine consumption in the gabapentin plus celecoxib group were less compared to the placebo and gabapentin group respectively at various intervals (p < 0.001). The mean anxiety score, shivering, nausea, vomiting and pruritus in the gabapentin group were significantly lower compared to the placebo and gabapentin plus celecoxib groups respectively (p < 0.001, p < 0.05). The frequencies of drowsiness (42.1%) in the gabapentin group were significantly high compared to the placebo and gabapentin plus celecoxib group respectively (p <0.001, p< 0.05). In the gabapentin plus celecoxib group patient satisfaction was significantly higher compared to the placebo and gabapentin group (p< 0.05). Conclusion Combination of 300 mg gabapentin plus 200 mg celecoxib twice a day is a good alternative in multimodal analgesia, effective in pain control with lesser side effects seen with gabapentin alone. PMID:27134973

  16. Eight years of follow-up after laminectomy of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition in the cervical yellow ligament of patient with Coffin–Lowry syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Tadao; Ogata, Tadanori; Horiuchi, Hideki; Yamaoka, Shintaro; Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Miura, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We report 8 years of follow-up after decompression to treat cervical myelopathy in a patient with Coffin–Lowry syndrome (CLS). CLS is a rare X-linked semidominant syndrome associated with growth and psychomotor retardation, general hypotonia, and skeletal abnormalities. In this patient, the spinal cord was compressed by calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition in the cervical yellow ligament (YL). To date, only 1 report has described clinical features after surgery for calcified cervical YL in CLS. Methods: A 15-year-old male with tetraplegia secondary to compression of the cervical spinal cord induced by a hypoplastic posterior arch of C1 and calcification of the YL from C2 to C7 was treated surgically with laminectomy from C1 to C7. The patient's history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. The patient was incapable of speech because of mental retardation, so he could not describe his symptoms. Gait disturbance worsened over the 2 months before admission to our hospital. At admission, the patient could not move his extremities, and tendon reflexes of the upper and lower extremities were significantly increased. Computed tomography of the cervical spine showed YL calcification from C2 to C7. Magnetic resonance imaging showed consecutive compression of the cervical spinal cord. We diagnosed quadriplegia secondary to cervical cord damage and performed emergency surgery. Results: During C1–C7 laminectomy, YL calcification in C2–C7 was observed. The calcification was confirmed as calcium pyrophosphate by crystal analysis. Quadriplegia gradually resolved, and almost disappeared by 2 weeks after the operation. Cervical hyperlordosis was observed in radiographs starting from 1 month after the operation, but it has not progressed and is not associated with any symptoms. Conclusions: The efficacy of decompression continued, and no postoperative complications have occurred during at least 8 years of follow-up. PMID

  17. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alexander D.; Rolston, John D.; Gauger, Grant E.; Larson, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 87 • Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Spinal subdural abscess Symptoms: Fever • pain • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laminectomy • durotomy • drainage • debridement Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. Case Report: Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3–4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. Conclusions: These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID

  18. The cost effectiveness of dynamic and static interspinous spacer for lumbar spinal stenosis compared with laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoubi, Mohsen; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Zamani, Neda; Naghibzadeh-Tahami, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Dynamic Interspinous Spacer (Coflex®) and Static Spacer (X-STOP ®) compared to Laminectomy (LAMI) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods: A decision-analysis model was developed to estimate the cost-effectiveness. The effectiveness parameters were obtained from a systematic literature review in relevant databases including PUBMED and EMBASE. A meta-analysis was performed using the STATA statistical package and a random model was used to collect measures of mean difference of visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score before and after intervention in X-stop, Coflex and LAMI (95% confidence intervals). Cost data were obtained from provider and associated literature based on health care provider prospective. We assumed that the probability of the success rate of surgery in each intervention from associated literature and calculated Incremental cost effectiveness ratio. A one-way sensitivity analysis was also carried out. Results: Twenty-four out of 294 studies are included in the Meta-analysis. The overall pooled estimate of the mean difference of VAS pain score were 3.49 (95% CI 3.7-4.2) and 4.14 (95% CI 3.09- 5.19) for X-stop and Coflex, respectively. In addition, we assumed the overall pooled estimate of 5.3 (95% CI 2.15-7.4) on the basis of literature for LAMI. The average cost per LAMI surgery, X-stop and Coflex was US$ 3019, US$ 2022 and US$ 2566, respectively. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio of X-stop and Coflex versus LAMI was US$ 665.9 and US$ 780.7, respectively. Conclusion: Static Interspinous Spacer (X-stop) appears to be the most cost-effective treatment strategy in base case scenario with success rate of LAMI (range between (55%-70%). A sensitivity analysis shows that the increase probability of success rate of LAMI was more than 70 % and less than 55% which lead to the cost effectiveness of the Coflex intervention. PMID:27390709

  19. Spinous Process splitting Laminectomy: Clinical outcome and Radiological analysis of extent of decompression

    PubMed Central

    Srikantha, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spinous process splitting laminectomy (SPSL) is a useful technique in achieving adequate decompression for lumbar canal stenosis, has the advantage of simultaneously decompressing multiple levels and minimising injury to the paraspinal muscles. Some concern has been expressed over the efficacy of this technique in decompressing lateral recesses. This study was undertaken to assess the clinical outcome of SPSL technique and radiologically assess the extent of decompression. Patients and Methods Thirty-nine consecutive patients treated by SPSL for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis were methodically assessed for demographic data, clinical findings, Pre- and post-op VAS, JOA scores and spinal canal dimensions on imaging. Surgical technique for SPSL is described. Results The mean age of the patients was 66.9 yrs. The mean follow-up was 7.3 months. The mean pre- and post-operative VAS scores were 7.8 and 3.7, respectively. The mean pre- and post-operative JOA scores were 6.3 and 11.2, respectively. The mean JOA recovery rate was 57.3%. 77% of the patients were in the ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ McNab's grades at follow-up. Radiologic results were assessed separately at the 118 levels decompressed by the SPSL technique. The ratio increase for the spinal canal dimensions on post-operative images were as follows – Interfacet distance–116.6%; Effective AP distance–67.6%; Right lateral recess depth–165.1%; Right lateral recess angle–145.5%; Left lateral recess depth–149.3%; Left lateral recess angle–133.6%; Cross-sectional spinal canal area–163.8%. There was no worsening of pre-existing degenerative listhesis or scoliosis in any case. Conclusion SPSL achieves effective central and lateral recess decompression, at the same time minimising injury to the paraspinal muscles thus reducing post-operative pain and aiding in quicker mobilisation and recovery. It is an effective tool to treat multiple level spinal stenosis, especially in elderly

  20. Radicular Pain due to Subsidence of the Nitinol Shape Memory Loop for Stabilization after Lumbar Decompressive Laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Son, Byung-Chul; Kim, Deog-Ryeong

    2015-01-01

    A number of dynamic stabilization systems have been used to overcome the problems associated with spinal fusion with rigid fixation recently and the demand for an ideal dynamic stabilization system is greater for younger patients with multisegment disc degeneration. Nitinol, a shape memory alloy of nickel and titanium, is flexible at low temperatures and regains its original shape when heated, and the Nitinol shape memory loop (SML) implant has been used as a posterior tension band mostly in decompressive laminectomy cases because the Nitinol implant has various characteristics such as high elasticity and a tensile force, flexibility, and biological compatibility. The reported short-term outcomes of the application of SMLs as posterior column supporters in cervical and lumbar decompressive laminectomies seem to be positive, and complications are minimal except for the rare occurrence of pullout and fracture of the SML. However, there was no report of neurological complications related to neural compression in spite of the use of the loop of SML in the epidural space. The authors report a case of delayed development of radiating pain caused by subsidence of the SML resulting epidural compression. PMID:25674347

  1. Radicular Pain due to Subsidence of the Nitinol Shape Memory Loop for Stabilization after Lumbar Decompressive Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-ryeong

    2015-01-01

    A number of dynamic stabilization systems have been used to overcome the problems associated with spinal fusion with rigid fixation recently and the demand for an ideal dynamic stabilization system is greater for younger patients with multisegment disc degeneration. Nitinol, a shape memory alloy of nickel and titanium, is flexible at low temperatures and regains its original shape when heated, and the Nitinol shape memory loop (SML) implant has been used as a posterior tension band mostly in decompressive laminectomy cases because the Nitinol implant has various characteristics such as high elasticity and a tensile force, flexibility, and biological compatibility. The reported short-term outcomes of the application of SMLs as posterior column supporters in cervical and lumbar decompressive laminectomies seem to be positive, and complications are minimal except for the rare occurrence of pullout and fracture of the SML. However, there was no report of neurological complications related to neural compression in spite of the use of the loop of SML in the epidural space. The authors report a case of delayed development of radiating pain caused by subsidence of the SML resulting epidural compression. PMID:25674347

  2. Four lateral mass screw fixation techniques in lower cervical spine following laminectomy: a finite element analysis study of stress distribution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral mass screw fixation (LSF) techniques have been widely used for reconstructing and stabilizing the cervical spine; however, complications may result depending on the choice of surgeon. There are only a few reports related to LSF applications, even though fracture fixation has become a severe complication. This study establishes the three-dimensional finite element model of the lower cervical spine, and compares the stress distribution of the four LSF techniques (Magerl, Roy-Camille, Anderson, and An), following laminectomy -- to explore the risks of rupture after fixation. Method CT scans were performed on a healthy adult female volunteer, and Digital imaging and communication in medicine (Dicom) data was obtained. Mimics 10.01, Geomagic Studio 12.0, Solidworks 2012, HyperMesh 10.1 and Abaqus 6.12 software programs were used to establish the intact model of the lower cervical spines (C3-C7), a postoperative model after laminectomy, and a reconstructive model after applying the LSF techniques. A compressive preload of 74 N combined with a pure moment of 1.8 Nm was applied to the intact and reconstructive model, simulating normal flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The stress distribution of the four LSF techniques was compared by analyzing the maximum von Mises stress. Result The three-dimensional finite element model of the intact C3-C7 vertebrae was successfully established. This model consists of 503,911 elements and 93,390 nodes. During flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation modes, the intact model’s angular intersegmental range of motion was in good agreement with the results reported from the literature. The postoperative model after the three-segment laminectomy and the reconstructive model after applying the four LSF techniques were established based on the validated intact model. The stress distribution for the Magerl and Roy-Camille groups were more dispersive, and the maximum von Mises stress

  3. Comparing Gabapentin and Celecoxib in Pain Management and Complications After Laminectomy: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vasigh, Aminolah; Najafi, Fatemeh; Khajavikhan, Javaher; Jaafarpour, Molouk; Khani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Complications and postoperative pain are major care problems that can affect the quality of health care plan. Objectives According to the use of multimodal therapy the current study aimed to compare the efficacy of gabapentin and celecoxib in pain management and complications after laminectomy at Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran, in 2015. Patients and Methods In this randomized double-blind clinical trial, 114 patients scheduled for elective laminectomy with simple random sampling design received gabapentin (n = 38, 900 mg/day), celecoxib (n = 38, 600 mg/day) and placebo (n = 38, capsule contain starch). Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to determine the intensity of pain. Complications after surgery, anxiety scores before surgery and patient’s satisfaction 24 hours after the surgery were recorded. Results The mean pain intensity in the gabapentin group was lower compared to those of the placebo and celecoxib groups respectively at different time durations (P < 0.001). The means of morphine consumption were 11.9 mg, 22.8 mg and 30.1 mg in the gabapentin, celecoxib and placebo groups, respectively (P < 0.001). The prevalence of shivering, nausea, vomiting and pruritus were 10.5%, 12.8%, 10.3% and 18.4% in the gabapentin group vs 31.5%, 29.8%, 32.4% and 28.9% in the celecoxib group and 42.1%, 44.7%, 39.5% and 44.7% in the placebo group (P < 0.001). The mean anxiety score in the gabapentin group was 2.4 vs those of the celecoxib group 3 and placebo group 3.6 (P < 0.001). The frequencies of drowsiness were 42.1%, 13.2% and 5.3% in the gabapentin, celecoxib and placebo groups, respectively (P < 0.001). In the gabapentin group, patient satisfaction was significantly higher compared to those of the placebo and celecoxib groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions According to the effect of gabapentin on pain management, complications after laminectomy and increased patients satisfaction, it can be regarded as an alter native in multimodal analgesia. PMID

  4. Microsurgical excision of symptomatic sacral perineurial cyst with sacral recapping laminectomy : a case report in technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Lee, Sang Koo; Kim, Young-Jin

    2014-02-01

    Perineurial cysts (Tarlov cysts) are lesions of the nerve root that are often observed in the sacral area. There is debate about whether symptomatic perineurial cysts should be treated surgically. We presented three patients with symptomatic perineurial cyst who were treated surgically, and introduced sacral recapping laminectomy. Patients complained of low back pain and hypesthesia on lower extremities. We performed operations with sacral recapping technique for all three. The outcome measure was baseline visual analogue score and post operative follow up magnetic resonance images. All patients were completely relieved of symptoms after operation. Although not sufficient to address controversies, this small case series introduces successful use of a particular surgical technique to treat sacral perineural cyst, with resolution of most symptoms and no sequelae. PMID:24653808

  5. Microsurgical Excision of Symptomatic Sacral Perineurial Cyst with Sacral Recapping Laminectomy : A Case Report in Technical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Lee, Sang Koo

    2014-01-01

    Perineurial cysts (Tarlov cysts) are lesions of the nerve root that are often observed in the sacral area. There is debate about whether symptomatic perineurial cysts should be treated surgically. We presented three patients with symptomatic perineurial cyst who were treated surgically, and introduced sacral recapping laminectomy. Patients complained of low back pain and hypesthesia on lower extremities. We performed operations with sacral recapping technique for all three. The outcome measure was baseline visual analogue score and post operative follow up magnetic resonance images. All patients were completely relieved of symptoms after operation. Although not sufficient to address controversies, this small case series introduces successful use of a particular surgical technique to treat sacral perineural cyst, with resolution of most symptoms and no sequelae. PMID:24653808

  6. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexander D; Rolston, John D; Gauger, Grant E; Larson, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. CASE REPORT Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3-4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSIONS These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID:27402228

  7. [Ultrasound-assisted neuraxial anesthesia in a patient with previous lumbar laminectomy and fusion: a case report].

    PubMed

    Geng, J; Li, M

    2016-02-18

    A patient with previous L3-4 posterior lumbar interbody fusion, pedicle screws instrumentation and L3-4 decompression, was scheduled for left total hip arthroplasty. Two years ago, due to poor landmarks palpation, the patient experienced a failed lumbar puncture after multiple attempts before herniorrhaphy. His plain radiography showed bilateral partial laminectomy at L3-4 level, and between L3 and L4, two posterior pedicle screws connected by metal rods on both sides. This time, we used ultrasound to locate L4-5 interlaminar space in paramedian sagittal oblique view and identified the spine midline by transverse interlaminar view before puncture. According to this information, L4-5 puncture point was verified and the combined spinal-epidural anesthesia was performed in a paramedian approach. After withdrawing clear cerebral spinal fluid, 15 mg hyperbaric bupivicaine was injected into intrathecal space. An epidural catheter was then inserted into the epidural space. The sensory block level was fixed at T10 to S within 10 minutes. Intraoperatively, the patient received 10 mL 2% (mass fraction) lidocaine through the epidural catheter in total. The surgery was uneventful. No neurologic complication was observed after the surgery. This case report demonstrates that ultRASound imaging can provide useful information for neuraxial needle placement and can be a valuable tool in managing patients with anatomical change around the spine. PMID:27538165

  8. Finite Element Analysis for Comparison of Spinous Process Osteotomies Technique with Conventional Laminectomy as Lumbar Decompression Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the biomechanical behavior of the lumbar spine after posterior decompression with the spinous process osteotomy (SPiO) technique or the conventional laminectomy (CL) technique using a finite element (FE) model. Materials and Methods Three validated lumbar FE models (L2-5) which represented intact spine and two decompression models using SPiO and CL techniques at the L3-4 segment were developed. In each model, the ranges of motion, the maximal von Mises stress of the annulus fibrosus, and the intradiscal pressures at the index segment (L3-4) and adjacent segments (L2-3 and L4-5) under 7.5 Nm moments were analyzed. Facet contact forces were also compared among three models under the extension and torsion moments. Results Compared to the intact model, the CL and SPiO models had increased range of motion and annulus stress at both the index segment (L3-4) and the adjacent segments under flexion and torsion. However, the SPiO model demonstrated a reduced range of motion and annulus stress than the CL model. Both CL and SPiO models had an increase of facet contact force at the L3-4 segment under the torsion moment compared to that of the intact model. Under the extension moment, however, three models demonstrated a similar facet contact force even at the L3-4 model. Conclusion Both decompression methods lead to postoperative segmental instability compared to the intact model. However, SPiO technique leads to better segmental stability compared to the CL technique. PMID:25510758

  9. Degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, So; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Cervical myelopathy is the most common cause of acquired spinal cord compromise. The concept of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM), defined as symptomatic myelopathy associated with degenerative arthropathic changes in the spine axis, is being introduced. Given its progressive nature, treatment options have to be chosen in a timely manner. Surgical options include anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF), anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), arthroplasty (in highly select cases), posterior laminectomy with/without fusion, and laminoplasty. Indications for each should be carefully considered in individual patients. Riluzole, a sodium-glutamate antagonist, is a promising option to optimize neurologic outcomes post-surgery and is being examined in the CSM-Protect Randomized Controlled Trial. Preoperative risk assessment is mandatory for prognostication. Sagittal alignment is known to play an important role to optimize surgical outcome. Guidelines for optimal management of DCM are in process. In principle, all but the mildest cases of DCM should be offered surgery for optimal outcome. PMID:27250040

  10. Risk factors for early post-operative neurological deterioration in dogs undergoing a cervical dorsal laminectomy or hemilaminectomy: 100 cases (2002-2014).

    PubMed

    Taylor-Brown, F E; Cardy, T J A; Liebel, F X; Garosi, L; Kenny, P J; Volk, H A; De Decker, S

    2015-12-01

    Early post-operative neurological deterioration is a well-known complication following dorsal cervical laminectomies and hemilaminectomies in dogs. This study aimed to evaluate potential risk factors for early post-operative neurological deterioration following these surgical procedures. Medical records of 100 dogs that had undergone a cervical dorsal laminectomy or hemilaminectomy between 2002 and 2014 were assessed retrospectively. Assessed variables included signalment, bodyweight, duration of clinical signs, neurological status before surgery, diagnosis, surgical site, type and extent of surgery and duration of procedure. Outcome measures were neurological status immediately following surgery and duration of hospitalisation. Univariate statistical analysis was performed to identify variables to be included in a multivariate model. Diagnoses included osseous associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (OACSM; n = 41), acute intervertebral disk extrusion (IVDE; 31), meningioma (11), spinal arachnoid diverticulum (10) and vertebral arch anomalies (7). Overall 54% (95% CI 45.25-64.75) of dogs were neurologically worse 48 h post-operatively. Multivariate statistical analysis identified four factors significantly related to early post-operative neurological outcome. Diagnoses of OACSM or meningioma were considered the strongest variables to predict early post-operative neurological deterioration, followed by higher (more severely affected) neurological grade before surgery and longer surgery time. This information can aid in the management of expectations of clinical staff and owners with dogs undergoing these surgical procedures. PMID:26542365

  11. Investigation of Efficacy of Mitomycin-C, Sodium Hyaluronate and Human Amniotic Fluid in Preventing Epidural Fibrosis and Adhesion Using a Rat Laminectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Bolat, Elif; Kocamaz, Erdoğan; Kulahcilar, Zeki; Yilmaz, Ali; Topcu, Abdullah; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal

    2013-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The aim of this study was to evalute the effects of mitomycin-C, sodium hyaluronate and human amniotic fluid on preventing spinal epidural fibrosis. Overview of Literature The role of scar tissue in pain formation is not exactly known, but it is reported that scar tissue causes adhesions between anatomic structures. Intensive fibrotic tissue compresses on anatomic structures and increases the sensitivity of the nerve root for recurrent herniation and lateral spinal stenosis via limiting movements of the root. Also, neuronal atrophy and axonal degeneration occur under scar tissue. Methods The study design included 4 groups of rats: group 1 was the control group, groups 2, 3, and 4 receieved antifibrotic agents, mitomycin-C (group 2), sodium hyaluronate (group 3), and human amniotic fluid (group 4). Midline incision for all animals were done on L5 for total laminectomy. Four weeks after the surgery, the rats were sacrificed and specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and photos of the slides were taken for quantitive assesment of the scar tissue. Results There was no significant scar tissue in the experimental animals of groups 2, 3, and 4. It was found that there was no significant difference between drug groups, but there was a statistically significant difference between the drug groups and the control group. Conclusions This experimental study shows that implantation of mitomycin-C, sodium hyaluronate and human amniotic fluid reduces epidural fibrosis and adhesions after spinal laminectomy in rat models. Further studies in humans are needed to determine the complications of the agents researched. PMID:24353840

  12. A prospective randomized study comparing short- and intermediate-term perioperative outcome variables after spinal or general anesthesia for lumbar disk and laminectomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W S; Thalji, Z; Stevenson, K; Shea, J

    1996-09-01

    General or regional anesthesia may be used for lumbar laminectomy. To determine whether one method is superior, 122 patients were randomly assigned to receive either a standard general anesthetic (GA) or spinal anesthesia (SA) supplemented with intravenous (IV) propofol sedation. Data from the intraoperative period through hospital discharge were collected and compared. Demographically, both groups were similar. Total anesthesia (131.0 +/- 4.3 vs 106.6 +/- 3.2 min) and surgical times (81.5 +/- 3.6 vs 67.1 +/- 2.8 min) were longer in the GA group. Intraoperative hemodynamics were similar between groups except that the incidence of increased blood pressure was more frequent with GA (26.2% vs 3.3%). Blood loss was less during SA (133 +/- 18 mL vs 221 +/- 32 mL). Postanesthesia care unit (PACU) heart rates and mean arterial pressures were higher in the GA group. Peak pain scores in the PACU were higher after GA compared with SA (58 +/- 4 vs 22 +/- 3) as were the number of patients who required analgesics. Severe nausea was more common in the GA group both in the PACU and during the 24 h after surgery. Analgesic requirements after discharge from the PACU, urinary retention, and days in the hospital did not differ between groups. This study suggests that SA may be superior to GA both intraoperatively and postoperatively for lumbar spine procedures lasting less than 2 h. PMID:8780281

  13. Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Oyinkan Marquis, B; Capone, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Myelopathy is an inclusive term, referring to pathology leading to a neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. The clinical diagnosis of myelopathy requires a detailed history and physical examination to define the clinical syndrome. Neuroimaging is indicated in most instances of new-onset myelopathy. It is indicated also when the worsening of a myelopathy is unexplained. Advances in neuroimaging have proved to play a vital role in diagnosis. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment are dependent upon an adequate imaging evaluation to establish the presence of mechanical stability, extrinsic spinal cord compression, or an intramedullary lesion. The most frequent etiology of myelopathy is related to degenerative disease of the spine from osteophyte or extruded disc material causing compression of the spinal cord in the cervical or thoracic spine. The next common etiologies are spinal cord compression due to extradural masses caused by metastatic disease to bone or blunt trauma. In these cases, emergency imaging should be performed to assess the nature of the lesion causing the myelopathy and plan the most appropriate treatment. Also urgent imaging should be performed when an abscess in the spinal canal is suspected. Less urgent is imaging of primary neoplasms of the meninges, roots, or spinal cord, as well as noninfectious inflammatory processes, such as multiple sclerosis, and neurodegenerative, vascular, nutritional, or idiopathic disorders leading to myelopathy. Although a survey of the entire spinal cord can be performed with imaging, it is more appropriate to define from the clinical findings what levels of the spine and spinal cord should be imaged. This approach helps limit the likelihood of false-positive imaging findings that may encourage needless attempts to fix what is not broken. Similarly, the most appropriate imaging study and protocol should be selected in order to provide a timely and accurate diagnosis. To do so requires detailed knowledge

  14. Hospital charges associated with "never events": comparison of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and lumbar laminectomy to total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Contag, Alec G; Rastegar, Farbod; Waagmeester, Garrett; Anderson, Paul A; Arthur, Melanie; Hart, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Beginning in 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service (CMS) determined that certain hospital-acquired adverse events such as surgical site infection (SSI) following spine surgery should never occur. The following year, they expanded the ruling to include deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following total joint arthroplasty. Due to their ruling that "never events" are not the payers' responsibility, CMS insists that the costs of managing these complications be borne by hospitals and health care providers, rather than billings to health care payers for additional care required in their management. Data comparing the expected costs of such adverse events in patients undergoing spine and orthopedic surgery have not previously been reported. METHODS The California State Inpatient Database (CA-SID) from 2008 to 2009 was used for the analysis. All patients with primary procedure codes indicating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), lumbar laminectomy (LL), total knee replacement (TKR), and total hip replacement (THR) were analyzed. Patients with diagnostic and/or treatment codes for DVT, PE, and SSI were separated from patients without these complication codes. Patients with more than 1 primary procedure code or more than 1 complication code were excluded. Median charges for treatment from primary surgery through 3 months postoperatively were calculated. RESULTS The incidence of the examined adverse events was lowest for ACDF (0.6% DVT, 0.1% PE, and 0.03% SSI) and highest for TKA (1.3% DVT, 0.3% PE, 0.6% SSI). Median inpatient charges for uncomplicated LL was $51,817, compared with $73,432 for ACDF, $143,601 for PLIF, $74,459 for THR, and $70,116 for TKR. Charges for patients with DVT ranged from $108,387 for TKR (1.5 times greater than index) to $313,536 for ACDF (4.3 times greater than index). Charges for patients with PE ranged from $127,958 for TKR (1.8 times greater than

  15. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: Factors in Choosing the Surgical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yalamanchili, Praveen K.; Vives, Michael J.; Chaudhary, Saad B.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a progressive disease and a common cause of acquired disability in the elderly. A variety of surgical interventions are available to halt or improve progression of the disease. Surgical options include anterior or posterior approaches with and without fusion. These include anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, cervical disc replacement, laminoplasty, laminectomy with and without fusion, and combined approaches. Recent investigation into the ideal approach has not found a clearly superior choice, but individual patient characteristics can guide treatment. PMID:22312563

  16. Our technique of midsagittal splitting laminoplasty for compressive cervical myelopathy and its short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Niraj Kumar; Singh, Sunita; Chauhan, Shishu Pal Singh; Gopal, Nitya Nand

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to discuss the technique of midsagittal splitting laminoplasty and to compare its short-term follow-up results with laminectomy in cases of compressive cervical spinal cord myelopathy. Materials and Methods: Exclusion criteria were as follows: Intramedullary compressive lesions, kyphotic cervical spine, previous spinal surgeries, and defective anterior vertebral column. Twenty patients (10 each of laminoplasty and laminectomy groups) were prospectively studied from 2005 to 2008. After clinico-radiological assessment, laminoplasty or laminectomy was performed in patients aged <50 years and >50 years, respectively. The laminoplasty was performed by splitting the excised lamina in midline up to the tip of spinous process. Follow-up was done by neurosurgical cervical spine scoring, Nurick's grading, and the final outcome was determined by Odom's criteria. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss in laminoplasty and laminectomy was 100 ± 0.87 (range 90-140 min), 80 ± 0.67 (range 75-100 min) P = 0.04; and 65 ± 0.07 (range 60-90 ml) and 68 ± 0.61 (range 65-80 ml) P = 0.09, respectively. There were no intraoperative accidents, and no postoperative neurological deterioration/recurrence of symptoms. One patient who underwent laminectomy alone developed progressive kyphosis of the spine, whereas one having rheumatoid arthritis and long symptom duration didn’t improve. 85% (17/20 patients) had sustained excellent to fair outcome (improvement by at least one Nurick's grade). Conclusions: The technique used by us was simple, effective, and inexpensive. There was no minimal postoperative morbidity, although long-term results are awaited. PMID:27366246

  17. Cross-clamping of the thoracic aorta. Influence of aortic shunts, laminectomy, papaverine, calcium channel blocker, allopurinol, and superoxide dismutase on spinal cord blood flow and paraplegia in baboons.

    PubMed

    Svensson, L G; Von Ritter, C M; Groeneveld, H T; Rickards, E S; Hunter, S J; Robinson, M F; Hinder, R A

    1986-07-01

    There is a high incidence of paraplegia associated with thoracic aortic cross-clamping, even when cardiopulmonary bypass or shunts are used. In 56 adult baboons, spinal cord blood flow (SCBF), vascular anatomy, and paraplegia rates were evaluated. Tissue blood flow was measured by radioactive microspheres. Various procedures were used to increase SCBF and to prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury. It was found that the rate of paraplegia was inversely correlated with neural tissue ischemia (SCBF) and directly correlated with reperfusion hyperemia. Two methods completely prevented paraplegia. These two methods were a thoracic shunt with occlusion of the infrarenal aorta or cerebrospinal fluid drainage plus intrathecal papaverine injection, both of which were associated with an increased SCBF. Furthermore, papaverine dilated the anterior spinal artery (ASA) (p = 0.007) and increased the blood flow through the lower ASA. Whereas procedures utilizing a calcium channel blocker (flunarizine), allopurinol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), laminectomy alone, and a thoracoabdominal shunt not perfusing the arteria radicularis magna (ARM) all failed to prevent paraplegia, allopurinol (p = 0.026) and SOD (p = 0.004) did prevent gastric stress lesions, indicating that their failure to prevent paraplegia was not due to a lack of activity. Of great clinical interest is that, if a shunt is used and the ARM is perfused, infrarenal aortic cross-clamping increases SCBF, thus preventing paraplegia. Intrathecal application of papaverine proved to be even more effective in increasing SCBF and also completely prevented paraplegia. As this is a safer procedure than the insertion of shunts, this is the method of choice for the prevention of paraplegia associated with thoracic aortic cross-clamping. The preliminary trial using intrathecal papaverine in human beings has thus far shown no adverse side effects from the drug, and no paraplegia has occurred. PMID:3729582

  18. Cross-clamping of the thoracic aorta. Influence of aortic shunts, laminectomy, papaverine, calcium channel blocker, allopurinol, and superoxide dismutase on spinal cord blood flow and paraplegia in baboons.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, L G; Von Ritter, C M; Groeneveld, H T; Rickards, E S; Hunter, S J; Robinson, M F; Hinder, R A

    1986-01-01

    There is a high incidence of paraplegia associated with thoracic aortic cross-clamping, even when cardiopulmonary bypass or shunts are used. In 56 adult baboons, spinal cord blood flow (SCBF), vascular anatomy, and paraplegia rates were evaluated. Tissue blood flow was measured by radioactive microspheres. Various procedures were used to increase SCBF and to prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury. It was found that the rate of paraplegia was inversely correlated with neural tissue ischemia (SCBF) and directly correlated with reperfusion hyperemia. Two methods completely prevented paraplegia. These two methods were a thoracic shunt with occlusion of the infrarenal aorta or cerebrospinal fluid drainage plus intrathecal papaverine injection, both of which were associated with an increased SCBF. Furthermore, papaverine dilated the anterior spinal artery (ASA) (p = 0.007) and increased the blood flow through the lower ASA. Whereas procedures utilizing a calcium channel blocker (flunarizine), allopurinol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), laminectomy alone, and a thoracoabdominal shunt not perfusing the arteria radicularis magna (ARM) all failed to prevent paraplegia, allopurinol (p = 0.026) and SOD (p = 0.004) did prevent gastric stress lesions, indicating that their failure to prevent paraplegia was not due to a lack of activity. Of great clinical interest is that, if a shunt is used and the ARM is perfused, infrarenal aortic cross-clamping increases SCBF, thus preventing paraplegia. Intrathecal application of papaverine proved to be even more effective in increasing SCBF and also completely prevented paraplegia. As this is a safer procedure than the insertion of shunts, this is the method of choice for the prevention of paraplegia associated with thoracic aortic cross-clamping. The preliminary trial using intrathecal papaverine in human beings has thus far shown no adverse side effects from the drug, and no paraplegia has occurred. PMID:3729582

  19. Ossification of ligamentum flavum, a rare cause of myelopathy: First case report of a Lebanese patient.

    PubMed

    El Helou, Antonios; Alaywan, Moussa; Tarabay, Antonio; Nachanakian, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of ligamentum flavum (OLF) is a well-known pathology causing myelopathy, although it is a rare disease. The most commonly affected population is from the Far East and mainly Japanese. However, few reports and studies have shown the prevalence of the disease all over the world. We report the case of a 33-year-old man presenting with signs of progressive myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed Th2-Th11 OLF with severe narrowing and intramedullary hypersignal at the level Th2-Th3. This is the first Lebanese case reported in the literature. A decompressive laminectomy with flavectomy was done. This case adds to the previous reported cases on the occurrence of the disease in different populations. PMID:27057241

  20. Recurrence of cervical myelopathy secondary to a strut graft fracture 20 years after anterior decompression and fusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kida, Kazunobu; Takaya, Shogo; Tadokoro, Nobuaki; Kumon, Masashi; Kiyasu, Katsuhito; Kato, Tomonari; Takemasa, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tani, Toshikazu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on a 70-year-old man with recurrent cervical myelopathy 20 years after anterior decompression and fusion of C4-7 using a free vascularised strut graft. The recurrent myelopathy was secondary to a kyphotic deformity of a fractured graft and residual ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament with stenosis at C3/4. Intraoperative spinal cord-evoked potentials indicated that spinal cord traction secondary to progressive kyphosis of the cervical spine after the graft fracture was the cause. The patient underwent laminoplasty at C3 and laminectomy at C4 to decompress the stenosis at C3/4 as well as posterior cervical spinal fusion at C3-7 with pedicle screws and a lateral mass screw and a bone graft to prevent further progression of the kyphosis. At postoperative 18 months, the patient's Japanese Orthopaedic Association score had improved to 14 from 8, and he could walk without support. PMID:26321562

  1. Cervical myelopathy associated with extradural synovial cysts in 4 dogs.

    PubMed

    Levitski, R E; Chauvet, A E; Lipsitz, D

    1999-01-01

    Three Mastiffs and 1 Great Dane were presented to the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for cervical myelopathy based on history and neurologic examination. All dogs were males and had progressive ataxia and tetraparesis. Degenerative arthritis of the articular facet joints was noted on survey spinal radiographs. Myelography disclosed lateral axial compression of the cervical spinal cord medial to the articular facets. Extradural compressive cystic structures adjacent to articular facets were identified on magnetic resonance imaging (1 dog). High protein concentration was the most important finding on cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Dorsal laminectomies were performed in all dogs for spinal cord decompression and cyst removal. Findings on cytologic examination of the cystic fluid were consistent with synovial fluid, and histopathologic results supported the diagnosis of synovial cysts. All dogs are ambulatory and 3 are asymptomatic after surgery with a follow-up time ranging from 1 to 8 months. This is the 1st report of extradural synovial cysts in dogs, and synovial cysts should be a differential diagnosis for young giant breed dogs with cervical myelopathy. PMID:10357105

  2. [Laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy].

    PubMed

    Fransen, P

    2014-10-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a common condition. Uninstrumented laminectomy may be complicated by postoperative instability, whereas anterior or posterior decompression with fusion may be associated with stiffness and adjacent segment disease. Cervical laminoplasty, initially oriented towards pediatric patients and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, becomes an interesting surgical alternative to decompress and reconstruct cervical anatomy without fusion. Eighteen patients (12 men, 6 women), mean age 64.2 who presented with CSM were treated surgically using multilevel laminoplasty, and reviewed after 1 month, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the Benzel-JOA and Nurick scores. The preoperative mean Benzel-JOA score was 13.55; Preoperative mean Nurick score was 1.88. Preoperative MRI was carried-out in 16/18 patients. Intramedullary hyperintensity in T2 was observed in 6 patients. The operation was performed on 2 levels (4 patients) 3 levels (11 patients) and 4 levels (3 patients). We used the open-door hinged laminoplasty technique, using metallic implants, without bone graft. At one month FU, mean JOA score was 15.44, and Nurick dropped to 1.05. At 6 months, mean JOA was 16.28 and Nurick was 0.71. At one year, the mean JOA score was 16.16, and Nurick was 0.83. At 2 years, mean JOA was 17.5, and Nurick was 0.25. One infection, one dural tear and one transient episode of C5 paresthesia were observed. We conclude that spinal cord decompression by open-door laminoplasty for CSM allows significant clinical improvement observed progressively in the two years following surgery. PMID:25239380

  3. Anterior versus posterior approach for four-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dasheng; Zhai, Wenliang; Lian, Kejian; Kang, Liangqi; Ding, Zhenqi

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results of 2 surgical strategies for 4-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a hybrid procedure using anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with segmental corpectomy versus posterior laminectomy and fixation. Between 2002 and 2010, fifty-one patients with consecutive 4-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy were treated surgically, with 27 patients undergoing the hybrid procedure and 24 undergoing posterior laminectomy and fixation. Radiologic data were compared between the 2 groups, including cervical curvature and cervical range of motion (ROM) in the sagittal plane. Pre- and postoperative neurological status was evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system and the Nurick grading system. Mean ROM at last follow-up was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P>.05). In the hybrid group, mean JOA score and Nurick grade improved from 9.6±1.4 and 2.74±0.45 respectively, preoperatively, to 13.9±1.3 and 0.86±0.38 respectively, postoperatively. In the fixation group, mean JOA score and Nurick grade improved from 9.4±1.2 and 2.81±0.42 respectively, preoperatively, to 13.1±1.5 and 1.32±0.36 respectively, postoperatively. The JOA scores and Nurick grades at last follow-up were significantly different between the 2 groups (P<.05). In patients with preoperative cervical kyphosis, preoperative JOA score and Nurick grade were not significantly different between the 2 groups (P>.05); however, JOA scores and Nurick grades at last follow-up showed better improvement in the hybrid group than in the fixation group (P<.01). In patients with preoperative cervical lordosis, the preoperative and last follow-up JOA score and Nurick grade were not significantly different between the 2 groups (P>.05). PMID:24200449

  4. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Secondary to Dropped Head Syndrome: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soufiani, Housain F.; Rahimizadeh, Saghayegh

    2016-01-01

    The dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a disabling condition caused by severe weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing progressive reducible kyphosis of the cervical spine and the inability to hold the head up. Weakness can occur in isolation or in association with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Isolated cases are owed to the late onset of noninflammatory myopathy designated as INEM, where persistent chin to chest deformity may gradually cause or aggravate preexisting degenerative changes of the cervical spine and ultimately result in myelopathy. In review of the literature, we could find only 5 cases, with no unique guidelines to address the management of these two concomitant pathologies. Herein, a 69-year-old man who had developed cervical myelopathy 2 years after being affected by isolated dropped head syndrome is presented. Chin to chest deformity and cervical myelopathy were managed through three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with decompressive cervical laminectomy and stabilization with C2 to C7 pedicle screw-rod construct. At 4-month follow-up, despite recovery in patient's neurological status, flexion deformity reappeared with recurrence of dropped head due to C7 pedicle screws pull-out. However, this was successfully managed with extension of the construct to the upper thoracic levels. PMID:27034870

  5. Angiographically proven cervical venous engorgement: a possible concurrent cause in the pathophysiology of Hirayama's myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Elisa F; Chiapparini, Luisa; Erbetta, Alessandra; Longhi, Laura; Cicardi, Benedetta; Milani, Nicoletta; Solero, Carlo Lazzaro; Savoiardo, Mario

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to discuss the possible role of cervical posterior epidural plexus engorgement during cervical flexion in the pathogenesis of Hirayama myelopathy. In Hirayama disease, MRI during neck flexion often shows that the posterior dura detaches from the posterior arches compressing the spinal cord. Autopsies demonstrated asymmetric changes in the anterior horns consistent with chronic ischemic damage, attributed to arterial insufficiency during flexion or to microcirculatory changes due to compression by the tight dura. In a 15-year-old patient with 5-year history of distal upper limbs weakness, MRI demonstrated marked venous engorgement of the posterior epidural plexus in cervical flexion, confirmed by angiography. Laminectomy from C3 to C6 with duraplasty was performed. At one-year follow-up, the clinical condition of the patient remained stable. In Hirayama myelopathy, compression of the spinal cord by the tight dura is probably the most important pathogenetic factor. However, venous congestion in flexion might play an additional role in determining spinal cord ischemic changes. PMID:20857161

  6. Restoration of Upper Limb Function in an Individual with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy using Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Milos R.; Zivanovic, Vera; Valiante, Taufik A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-traumatic spinal cord pathology is responsible for 25–52% of all spinal cord lesions. Studies have revealed that spinal stenosis accounts for 16–21% of spinal cord injury (SCI) admissions. Impaired grips as well as slow unskilled hand and finger movements are the most common complaints in patients with spinal cord disorders, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. In the past, our team carried out couple of successful clinical trials, including two randomized control trials, showing that functional electrical stimulation therapy (FEST) can restore voluntary reaching and/or grasping function, in people with stroke and traumatic SCI. Motivated by this success, we decided to examine changes in the upper limb function following FEST in a patient who suffered loss of hand function due to myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. The participant was a 61-year-old male who had C3–C7 posterior laminectomy and instrumented fusion for cervical myelopathy. The participant presented with progressive right hand weakness that resulted in his inability to voluntarily open and close the hand and to manipulate objects unilaterally with his right hand. The participant was enrolled in the study ~22 months following initial surgical intervention. Participant was assessed using Toronto Rehabilitation Institute’s Hand Function Test (TRI-HFT), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). The pre–post differences in scores on all measures clearly demonstrated improvement in voluntary hand function following 15 1-h FEST sessions. The changes observed were meaningful and have resulted in substantial improvement in performance of activities of daily living. These results provide preliminary evidence that FEST has a potential to improve upper limb function in patients with non-traumatic SCI, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. PMID:27375547

  7. Restoration of Upper Limb Function in an Individual with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy using Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Milos R; Zivanovic, Vera; Valiante, Taufik A

    2016-01-01

    Non-traumatic spinal cord pathology is responsible for 25-52% of all spinal cord lesions. Studies have revealed that spinal stenosis accounts for 16-21% of spinal cord injury (SCI) admissions. Impaired grips as well as slow unskilled hand and finger movements are the most common complaints in patients with spinal cord disorders, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. In the past, our team carried out couple of successful clinical trials, including two randomized control trials, showing that functional electrical stimulation therapy (FEST) can restore voluntary reaching and/or grasping function, in people with stroke and traumatic SCI. Motivated by this success, we decided to examine changes in the upper limb function following FEST in a patient who suffered loss of hand function due to myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. The participant was a 61-year-old male who had C3-C7 posterior laminectomy and instrumented fusion for cervical myelopathy. The participant presented with progressive right hand weakness that resulted in his inability to voluntarily open and close the hand and to manipulate objects unilaterally with his right hand. The participant was enrolled in the study ~22 months following initial surgical intervention. Participant was assessed using Toronto Rehabilitation Institute's Hand Function Test (TRI-HFT), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). The pre-post differences in scores on all measures clearly demonstrated improvement in voluntary hand function following 15 1-h FEST sessions. The changes observed were meaningful and have resulted in substantial improvement in performance of activities of daily living. These results provide preliminary evidence that FEST has a potential to improve upper limb function in patients with non-traumatic SCI, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. PMID:27375547

  8. Autoimmune myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eoin P

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune myelopathies are a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated spinal cord disorders with a broad differential diagnosis. They encompass myelopathies with an immune attack on the spinal cord (e.g., aquaporin-4-IgG (AQP4-IgG) seropositive neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and its spectrum disorders (NMOSD)), myelopathies occurring with systemic autoimmune disorders (which may also be due to coexisting NMO/NMOSD), paraneoplastic autoimmune myelopathies, postinfectious autoimmune myelopathies (e.g., acute disseminated encephalomyelitis), and myelopathies thought to be immune-related (e.g., multiple sclerosis and spinal cord sarcoidosis). Spine magnetic resonance imaging is extremely useful in the evaluation of autoimmune myelopathies as the location of signal change, length of the lesion, gadolinium enhancement pattern, and evolution over time narrow the differential diagnosis considerably. The recent discovery of multiple novel neural-specific autoantibodies accompanying autoimmune myelopathies has improved their classification. These autoantibodies may be pathogenic (e.g., AQP4-IgG) or nonpathogenic and more reflective of a cytotoxic T-cell-mediated autoimmune response (collapsin response mediator protein-5(CRMP5)-IgG). The presence of an autoantibody may help guide cancer search, assist treatment decisions, and predict outcome/relapse. With paraneoplastic myelopathies the initial goal is detection and treatment of the underlying cancer. The aim of immunotherapy in all autoimmune myelopathies is to maximize reversibility, maintain benefits (while preventing relapse), and minimize side effects. PMID:27112686

  9. Two Cases of Klippel-Feil Syndrome with Cervical Myelopathy Successfully Treated by Simple Decompression without Fixation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Bum; Park, Seung Won; Lee, Young Seok; Nam, Taek Kyun; Park, Yong Sook; Kim, Young Baeg

    2015-09-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a congenital developmental disorder of cervical spine, showing short neck with restricted neck motion, low hairline, and high thoracic cage due to multilevel cervical fusion. Radiculopathy or myelopathy can be accompanied. There were 2 patients who were diagnosed as KFS with exhibited radiological and physical characteristics. Both patients had stenosis and cord compression at C1 level due to anterior displacement of C1 posterior arch secondary to kyphotic deformity of upper cervical spine, which has been usually indicative to craniocervical fixation. One patient was referred due to quadriparesis detected after surgery for aortic arch aneurysmal dilatation. The other patient was referred to us due to paraparesis and radiating pain in all extremities developed during gynecological examinations. Decompressive C1 laminectomy was done for one patient and additional suboccipital craniectomy for the other. No craniocervical fixation was done because there was no spinal instability. Motor power improved immediately after the operation in both patients. Motor functions and spinal stability were well preserved in both patients for 2 years. In KFS patients with myelopathy at the C1 level without C1-2 instability, a favorable outcome could be achieved by a simple decompression without spinal fixation. PMID:26512291

  10. Two Cases of Klippel-Feil Syndrome with Cervical Myelopathy Successfully Treated by Simple Decompression without Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Bum; Lee, Young Seok; Nam, Taek Kyun; Park, Yong Sook; Kim, Young Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a congenital developmental disorder of cervical spine, showing short neck with restricted neck motion, low hairline, and high thoracic cage due to multilevel cervical fusion. Radiculopathy or myelopathy can be accompanied. There were 2 patients who were diagnosed as KFS with exhibited radiological and physical characteristics. Both patients had stenosis and cord compression at C1 level due to anterior displacement of C1 posterior arch secondary to kyphotic deformity of upper cervical spine, which has been usually indicative to craniocervical fixation. One patient was referred due to quadriparesis detected after surgery for aortic arch aneurysmal dilatation. The other patient was referred to us due to paraparesis and radiating pain in all extremities developed during gynecological examinations. Decompressive C1 laminectomy was done for one patient and additional suboccipital craniectomy for the other. No craniocervical fixation was done because there was no spinal instability. Motor power improved immediately after the operation in both patients. Motor functions and spinal stability were well preserved in both patients for 2 years. In KFS patients with myelopathy at the C1 level without C1-2 instability, a favorable outcome could be achieved by a simple decompression without spinal fixation. PMID:26512291

  11. Syphilitic myelopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilitic myelopathy is a complication of untreated syphilis that involves muscle weakness and abnormal sensations . ... which is a complication of late or tertiary syphilis infection. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection. A ...

  12. Comparison of minimally invasive surgery with standard open surgery for vertebral thoracic metastases causing acute myelopathy in patients with short- or mid-term life expectancy: surgical technique and early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Miscusi, Massimo; Polli, Filippo Maria; Forcato, Stefano; Ricciardi, Luca; Frati, Alessandro; Cimatti, Marco; De Martino, Luca; Ramieri, Alessandro; Raco, Antonino

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spinal metastasis is common in patients with cancer. About 70% of symptomatic lesions are found in the thoracic region of the spine, and cord compression presents as the initial symptom in 5%-10% of patients. Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) has recently been advocated as a useful approach for spinal metastases, with the aim of decreasing the morbidity associated with more traditional open spine surgery; furthermore, the recovery time is reduced after MISS, such that postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy can begin sooner. METHODS Two series of oncological patients, who presented with acute myelopathy due to vertebral thoracic metastases, were compared in this study. Patients with complete paraplegia for more than 24 hours and with a modified Bauer score greater than 2 were excluded from the study. The first group (n = 23) comprised patients who were prospectively enrolled from May 2010 to September 2013, and who were treated with minimally invasive laminotomy/laminectomy and percutaneous stabilization. The second group (n = 19) comprised patients from whom data were retrospectively collected before May 2010, and who had been treated with laminectomy and stabilization with traditional open surgery. Patient groups were similar regarding general characteristics and neurological impairment. Results were analyzed in terms of neurological recovery (American Spinal Injury Association grade), complications, pain relief (visual analog scale), and quality of life (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-BM22 scales) at the 30-day follow-up. Operation time, postoperative duration of bed rest, duration of hospitalization, intraoperative blood loss, and the need and length of postoperative opioid administration were also evaluated. RESULTS There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of neurological recovery and complications. Nevertheless, the MISS group showed a clear and significant

  13. Hereditary and metabolic myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Hedera, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and metabolic myelopathies are a heterogeneous group of neurologic disorders characterized by clinical signs suggesting spinal cord dysfunction. Spastic weakness, limb ataxia without additional cerebellar signs, impaired vibration, and positional sensation are hallmark phenotypic features of these disorders. Hereditary, and to some extent, metabolic myelopathies are now recognized as more widespread systemic processes with axonal loss and demyelination. However, the concept of predominantly spinal cord disorders remains clinically helpful to differentiate these disorders from other neurodegenerative conditions. Furthermore, metabolic myelopathies are potentially treatable and an earlier diagnosis increases the likelihood of a good clinical recovery. This chapter reviews major types of degenerative myelopathies, hereditary spastic paraplegia, motor neuron disorders, spastic ataxias, and metabolic disorders, including leukodystrophies and nutritionally induced myelopathies, such as vitamin B12, E, and copper deficiencies. Neuroimaging studies usually detect a nonspecific spinal cord atrophy or demyelination of the corticospinal tracts and dorsal columns. Brain imaging can be also helpful in myelopathies caused by generalized neurodegeneration. Given the nonspecific nature of neuroimaging findings, we also review metabolic or genetic assays needed for the specific diagnosis of hereditary and metabolic myelopathies. PMID:27430441

  14. Toxic and Metabolic Myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio José; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    Myelopathy describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. It is most commonly caused by its compression by neoplasms, degenerative disc disease, trauma, or infection. Less common causes of myelopathy include spinal cord tumors, infection, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, vascular, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Conditions affecting the spinal cord must be recognized as early as possible to prevent progression that may lead to permanent disability. Biopsy is rarely performed, thus the diagnosis and management rely on patient׳s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings. Here we review the clinical presentations, pathophysiological mechanisms, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of myelopathies related to metabolic or toxic etiologies. PMID:27616316

  15. A case of anesthesia mumps after sacral laminectomy under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Ali; Karam, Karima; Rashid, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Acute transient parotid gland enlargement in association with general anesthesia is a rare complication and has also been called anesthesia mumps. Unilateral or bilateral parotid or submandibular swelling usually develops during surgery under anesthesia or, a few hours later and usually resolves in a few days with no sequelae. It has been reported as a complication after general anesthesia in patients undergoing spinal surgeries in prone and lateral decubitus position, even after cesarean section in the supine position and also reported in Intensive Care Unit patients. We present a case of a unilateral parotid swelling noticed in immediate postoperative course, in a patient who underwent spine surgery. PMID:26240559

  16. [Subcutaneous stimulation as additional therapy to spinal cord stimulation in a post-laminectomy syndrome patient].

    PubMed

    Akbaş, Mert; Yeğin, Mehmet Arif; Özdemir, İrem; Göksu, Ethem; Akyüz, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation as treatment of chronic low back pain via neuromodulation has been frequently performed in recent years. The dorsal column is stimulated by an electrode placed at the epidural region. In the case presently described, subcutaneous lead was implanted in a patient with failed back syndrome after spinal cord stimulation was inadequate to treat back and gluteal pain. A 65-year-old male had undergone surgery to treat lumbar disc herniation, after which he received physical therapy and multiple steroid injections due to unrelieved pain. He was admitted to the pain clinic with pain radiating to right gluteal muscle and leg. Spinal cord stimulation was performed and, as pain was not relieved, subcutaneous lead was applied to the right cluneal nerve distribution. Following treatment, the patient scored 1-2 on visual analog scale. Pain had been reduced by over 80%. Octad electrode was placed between T8 and T10 vertebrae after Tuohy needle was introduced to intervertebral area between L1 and L2. Paresthesia occurred in the right extremity. Boundaries were determined by area of right gluteal region in which paresthesia did not occur. Octad electrode was placed subcutaneously after vertical line was drawn from center point. Paresthesia occurred throughout the region. Pulse wave was 390-450 msec; frequency was 10-30 Hz. Subcutaneous electrode replacement is effective additional therapy when pain is not relieved by spinal cord stimulation. PMID:27225614

  17. Silicon prevents post laminectomy epidural root adhesions. An experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Hadani, M; Ram, Z; Horowitz, A; Shacked, I

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study was designed to test the efficacy of a silicon barrier around a nerve root in order to prevent post operative epidural root scar adhesions. In 32 Sprague-Dawley rats a lumbar nerve root was microsurgically exposed bilaterally. In 16 animals a silicon tube, prepared with a longitudinal cut along half of its wall, was placed around one nerve root, while the contralateral side served as control. In another group of 12 animals, an autologous subcutaneous fat graft was placed on the exposed root. A group of 4 animals served as the control group which had not been operated upon. No post operative neurological deficit was observed in any of the animals. All animals were sacrificed 60 days after the operation and a block of tissue including the nerve roots were resected bilaterally without removal of the silicon or fat graft. Longitudinal and transverse cuts of the roots were stained with Haematoxilin and Eosin and with Masson's trichrome collagen stain. The roots in the "unoperated" control group were clean of any scar tissue. In 13 out of 16 animals, silicon prevented scar formation around the root as opposed to scar adhesions around control root on the contralateral side and as compared to unoperated roots. In the silicon group, adhesions penetrated only through the longitudinal narrow cut edge of the tube. Fat did not prevent adhesions in 11 out of 12 animals. We conclude that a silicon barrier is an effective method preventing post operative epidural root scarring in rats. PMID:8237494

  18. Diabetes and cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Houten, John K; Lenart, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes may affect the typical physical findings associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, as coexisting diabetic neuropathy may dampen expected hyperreflexia and also produce non-dermatomal extremity numbness. Most large studies of surgically treated diabetic patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy have focused upon infection rates rather than exploring any differences in the presenting physical signs. We conducted a retrospective study of the pattern of presenting neurological signs and symptoms and of the clinical outcomes in 438 patients surgically treated for cervical spondylotic myelopathy, 79 of whom had diabetes. Compared with non-diabetic patients, those with diabetes were slightly older and had lower preoperative modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scores. Those with diabetes also had a significantly higher incidence of hyporeflexia and a higher incidence of a positive Babinski sign, but there was no difference in the appearance of the Hoffman sign. The magnitude of mJOA improvement after surgery was comparable. We conclude that diabetes may alter the typical signs and symptoms of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and suggest that knowledge of the differences may aid in securing a prompt and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26747704

  19. Do intramedullary spinal cord changes in signal intensity on MRI affect surgical opportunity and approach for cervical myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament?

    PubMed

    Sun, Qizhi; Hu, Hongwei; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yang; Chen, Linwei; Chen, Huajiang; Yuan, Wen

    2011-09-01

    Some controversy still exists over the optimal treatment time and the surgical approach for cervical myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The aim of the current study was first to analyze the effect of intramedullary spinal cord changes in signal intensity (hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging and hypointensity on T1-weighted imaging) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on surgical opportunity and approach for cervical myelopathy due to OPLL. This was a prospective randomized controlled study. Fifty-six patients with cervical myelopathy due to OPLL were enrolled and assigned to either group A (receiving anterior decompression and fusion, n = 27) or group P (receiving posterior laminectomy, n = 29). All the patients were followed up for an average 20.3 months (12-34 months). The clinical outcomes were assessed by the average operative time, blood loss, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, improvement rate (IR) and complication. To determine the relevant statistics, we made two factorial designs and regrouped the data of all patients to group H (with hyperintensity on MRI, n = 31), group L (with hypointensity on MRI, n = 19) and group N (no signal on MRI, n = 25), and then to further six subgroups as well: AH (with hyperintensity on MRI from group A, n = 15), PH (with hyperintensity on MRI from group P, n = 16), AL (with hypointensity on MRI from group A, n = 10), PL (with hypointensity on MRI from group P, n = 9), AN (no signal intensity on MRI from group A, n = 12) and PN (no signal intensity on MRI from group P, n = 13). Both hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging and hypointensity on T1-weighted imaging had a close relationship with the JOA score and IR. The pre- and postoperative JOA score and postoperative IR of either group H or group L was significantly lower than that of group N (P < 0.05), regardless of whether the patients had received anterior or posterior surgery. On the other hand, both the JOA score and

  20. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Angevine, Peter D; Aulino, Joseph M; Berger, Kevin L; Choudhri, Asim F; Fries, Ian Blair; Holly, Langston T; Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karaqulle; Kessler, Marcus M; Kirsch, Claudia F; Luttrull, Michael D; Mechtler, Laszlo L; O'Toole, John E; Sharma, Aseem; Shetty, Vilaas S; West, O Clark; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Bykowski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with myelopathic symptoms may have a number of causative intradural and extradural etiologies, including disc degenerative diseases, spinal masses, infectious or inflammatory processes, vascular compromise, and vertebral fracture. Patients may present acutely or insidiously and may progress toward long-term paralysis if not treated promptly and effectively. Noncontrast CT is the most appropriate first examination in acute trauma cases to diagnose vertebral fracture as the cause of acute myelopathy. In most nontraumatic cases, MRI is the modality of choice to evaluate the location, severity, and causative etiology of spinal cord myelopathy, and predicts which patients may benefit from surgery. Myelopathy from spinal stenosis and spinal osteoarthritis is best confirmed without MRI intravenous contrast. Many other myelopathic conditions are more easily visualized after contrast administration. Imaging performed should be limited to the appropriate spinal levels, based on history, physical examination, and clinical judgment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals, and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26653797

  1. Canine degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Coates, Joan R; Wininger, Fred A

    2010-09-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an adult-onset fatal neurodegenerative disease that occurs in many breeds. The initial upper motor neuron spastic paraparesis and general proprioceptive ataxia in the pelvic limbs progress to a flaccid lower motor neuron tetraparesis. Recently, a missense mutation in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene was found to be a risk factor for DM, suggesting that DM is similar to some forms of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). This article reviews the current knowledge of canine DM with regard to its signalment, clinical spectrum, diagnostic approach, and treatment. The implications of the SOD1 mutation on both diseases are discussed, comparing pathogenic mechanisms while conveying perspectives to translational medicine. PMID:20732599

  2. Cost-effectiveness of three treatment strategies for lumbar spinal stenosis: Conservative care, laminectomy, and the Superion interspinous spacer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise H.; Nelson, Teresa; Patel, Vikas V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is a painful and debilitating condition resulting in healthcare costs totaling tens of billions of dollars annually. Initial treatment consists of conservative care modalities such as physical therapy, NSAIDs, opioids, and steroid injections. Patients refractory to these therapies can undergo decompressive surgery, which has good long-term efficacy but is more traumatic and can be associated with high post-operative adverse event (AE) rates. Interspinous spacers have been developed to offer a less-invasive alternative. The objective of this study was to compare the costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) gained of conservative care (CC) and decompressive surgery (DS) to a new minimally-invasive interspinous spacer. Methods A Markov model was developed evaluating 3 strategies of care for lumbar spinal stenosis. If initial therapies failed, the model moved patients to more invasive therapies. Data from the Superion FDA clinical trial, a prospective spinal registry, and the literature were used to populate the model. Direct medical care costs were modeled from 2014 Medicare reimbursements for healthcare services. QALYs came from the SF-12 PCS and MCS components. The analysis used a 2-year time horizon with a 3% discount rate. Results CC had the lowest cost at $10,540, while Spacers and DS were nearly identical at about $13,950. CC also had the lowest QALY increase (0.06), while Spacers and DS were again nearly identical (.28). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) for Spacers compared to CC was $16,300 and for DS was $15,200. Conclusions Both the Spacer and DS strategies are far below the commonly cited $50,000/QALY threshold and produced several times the QALY increase versus CC, suggesting that surgical care provides superior value (cost / effectiveness) versus sustained conservative care in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26273546

  3. Nontraumatic Myelopathy Associated With Surfing

    PubMed Central

    Avilés-Hernández, Israel; García-Zozaya, Inigo; DeVillasante, Jorge M

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Ischemic nontraumatic spinal cord injury associated with surfing is a novel diagnosis believed to be related to prolonged spine hyperextension while lying prone on the surfboard. Only 9 cases have been documented. This report features possible risk factors, etiology, diagnostic imaging, and outcomes of surfer's myelopathy. Design: Case report. Results: A 37-year-old man developed T11 American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A paraplegia shortly after surfing. The clinical history and magnetic resonance imaging findings were compatible with an ischemic insult to the distal thoracic spinal cord. Our patient did not have any of the proposed risk factors associated with this condition, and, contrary to most reports, he sustained a complete spinal cord lesion without neurological recovery by 8 weeks post injury. Conclusions: Surfer's myelopathy, because of its proposed mechanism of injury, is amenable to medical intervention. Increased awareness of this condition may lead to early recognition and treatment, which should contribute to improved neurological outcomes. PMID:17684897

  4. Acute myelopathy with normal imaging.

    PubMed

    Holland, Neil R

    2013-05-01

    A 17-year-old girl presented with rapidly progressive quadriparesis and ventilatory failure. The clinical findings indicated a spinal level, but the diagnosis of myelopathy was not supported by her initial spinal imaging and cerebrospinal fluid studies. She had completed treatment for Guillain-Barré syndrome before a follow-up spinal imaging study showed interval expansion and enhancement of the cervical cord. PMID:22752484

  5. Acute transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Bucknall, R C

    1989-01-01

    A sixteen year old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus developed acute transverse myelopathy. She was treated with high dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange and regained partial neurological function. Previous descriptions of transverse myelopathy complicating systemic lupus erythematosus are reviewed, with particular reference to the efficacy of high dose steroid treatment. PMID:2662918

  6. Mechanical and cellular processes driving cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Roisin T; Butler, Joseph S; O’Byrne, John M; Poynton, Ashley R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a well-described clinical syndrome that may evolve from a combination of etiological mechanisms. It is traditionally classified by cervical spinal cord and/or nerve root compression which varies in severity and number of levels involved. The vast array of clinical manifestations of cervical myelopathy cannot fully be explained by the simple concept that a narrowed spinal canal causes compression of the cord, local tissue ischemia, injury and neurological impairment. Despite advances in surgical technology and treatment innovations, there are limited neuro-protective treatments for cervical myelopathy, which reflects an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved in this disease. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key pathophysiological processes at play in the development of cervical myelopathy. PMID:26807352

  7. Cervical myelopathy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meijers, K A; Cats, A; Kremer, H P; Luyendijk, W; Onvlee, G J; Thomeer, R T

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained in 43 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with cervical myelopathy are described; all patients showed several alarm signs together with neurological disturbances. Thirty-four cases were operable; nine patients were not operated upon for various reasons (refusal, and general condition). In the surgically treated patients, the changes were localized in the C1-C2 area (n = 20), in the area below C2 (n = 5), or in both (n = 9). The patients were put on skull traction pre- and post-operatively and nursed on a circo-electric bed. Pre-operatively, the duration of traction varied from a few days to weeks (mean 3 weeks). Post-operatively, the patients were given continuous skull traction for 2 1/2-3 months. This procedure yielded neurological improvement and a stable graft in all but two patients. On follow-up, recurrence of neurological complaints was seen in nine patients, in four due to a new slip at a lower level. Three of these cases were reoperated with good results. Twenty-three patients have died: four 'early' (one pre-operatively and three within 6 weeks post-operatively) and 19 'late'. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.5 years. In those who died 'late', the cause of death was due to the effects of an unstable graft in two cases and in the others the causes were not related to changes in the cervical spine. In the 10 patients who are still alive the mean duration of follow-up is 5 years. The nine patients who were not operated upon all died within a year, 4 of them due to consequences of cord compression. If cervical spondylodesis is feasible in an RA patient with myelopathy, the procedure is advocated. PMID:6529877

  8. Rare Thoracolumbar Facet Synovial Cyst Presenting as Paraparesis

    PubMed Central

    Dahuja, Gitanshu; Kaur, Rashmeet

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord compressing syndrome due to synovial cyst (SC) of the thoracolumbar spine is a rare clinical condition. In this report we aim to heighten awareness of the thoracolumbar facet synovial cyst as a possible cause of thoracic myelopathy. The SC was removed thoroughly by laminectomy. The patient had an excellent recovery. The etiological and therapeutic aspects are discussed. PMID:26512282

  9. Subacute myelopathy caused by spinal venous infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C. E.; Cumming, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A 44 year old female presented with a subacute myelopathy in association with pelvic venous thrombosis. It is inferred from the temporal relationship of these events that the patient suffered a subacute spinal venous infarction. This is discussed along with the aetiology, anatomical distribution and management of the condition. Images Figure 1 PMID:3422870

  10. A Case Report of Reiter's Syndrome with Progressive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Kyoung; An, Jae Young; Park, Min Soo; Kim, Byoung Joon

    2007-12-01

    Reiter's syndrome belongs to the family of spondyloarthropathies that usually present with a triad of arthritis, urethritis, and uveitis. The diagnostic criteria include clinical, radiological, and genetic findings, and the response to treatment. Nervous system involvement in Reiter's syndrome is extremely rare. We report here on a 36-year-old man who initially presented with progressive cervical myelopathy and was diagnosed as Reiter's syndrome 2 years later. The myelopathy was stable after treatment with methotrexate and sulfasalazine. This case suggests that Reiter's syndrome can present as progressive myelopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of treatable myelopathies. PMID:19513137

  11. Degenerative myelopathy in two Boxer dogs.

    PubMed

    Miller, A D; Barber, R; Porter, B F; Peters, R M; Kent, M; Platt, S R; Schatzberg, S J

    2009-07-01

    Degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a common, slowly progressive, debilitating disease reported in several dog breeds, including the German Shepherd Dog and Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Boxer dogs present occasionally for a thoracolumbar myelopathy for which no cause is identified on MRI or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Despite a lack of a histologic description of DM in the Boxer in the veterinary literature, such dogs are presumed to have DM. Here we report 2 histologically confirmed cases of DM in the Boxer breed in which histologic studies disclosed marked degenerative changes in the spinal cord that were most prominent in the thoracic and cranial lumbar segments. Lesions consisted of myelin vacuolation and degeneration, myelophagocytosis, reactive astrocytosis, and ellipsoid formation most prominent in the lateral and ventral funiculi. We present a detailed histologic description of DM in the Boxer dog and compare it to DM in other purebred dogs. PMID:19276068

  12. Operative Outcomes for Cervical Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, J. G.; Butler, J. S.; Dolan, A. M.; O'Byrne, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy are common disorders which can lead to significant clinical morbidity. Conservative management, such as physical therapy, cervical immobilisation, or anti-inflammatory medications, is the preferred and often only required intervention. Surgical intervention is reserved for those patients who have intractable pain or progressive neurological symptoms. The goals of surgical treatment are decompression of the spinal cord and nerve roots and deformity prevention by maintaining or supplementing spinal stability and alleviating pain. Numerous surgical techniques exist to alleviate symptoms, which are achieved through anterior, posterior, or circumferential approaches. Under most circumstances, one approach will produce optimal results. It is important that the surgical plan is tailored to address each individual's unique clinical circumstance. The objective of this paper is to analyse the major surgical treatment options for cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy focusing on outcomes and complications. PMID:22046575

  13. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis causing cervical myelopathy].

    PubMed

    Doléagbénou, A K; Mukengeshay Ntalaja, J; Derraz, S; El Ouahabi, A; El Khamlichi, A

    2012-08-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), a disorder of the phagocytic system, is a rare condition. Moreover, spinal involvement causing myelopathy is even rare and unusual. Here, we report a case of atypical LCH causing myelopathy, which was subsequently treated by corporectomy and fusion. An 8-year-old boy presented with 3 weeks of severe neck pain and limited neck movement accompanying upper and lower limbs motor weakness. CT scans revealed destruction of C5 body and magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumoral process at C5 with cord compression. Interbody fusion using anterior cervical plate packed by autologus iliac bone was performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of LCH. After the surgery, the boy recovered from radiating pain and motor weakness of limbs. Despite the rarity of the LCH in the cervical spine, it is necessary to maintain our awareness of this condition. When neurologic deficits are present, operative treatment should be considered. PMID:22552159

  14. Activ C cervical disc replacement for myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    McGonagle, L.; Cadman, S.; Chitgopkar, S. D.; Canavan, L.; O’Malley, M.; Shackleford, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc replacement is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for cervical myelopathy. It retains motion at the affected segment, unlike anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The aim of this study is to assess the outcomes of a series of patients who underwent Activ C disc replacement for cervical myelopathy. Materials and Methods: A series of patients at the above Trust with clinical and radiological evidence of cervical myelopathy who were suitable for cervical disc replacement from 2007 to 2009 were included. Implants were inserted by one of two consultant surgeons {IMS, MO’M}. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at six, 12 and 24 months, postoperatively, with a visual analogue score (VAS) for neck and arm pain severity and frequency, the Neck Disability Index questionnaire (NDI) and the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression questionnaire (CES-D). Results: Ten patients underwent surgery between May 2007 and July 2009, 6 women, and 4 men. Average age was 54 years (40-64). Disc levels replaced were: four at C4-5; eight at C5-6; seven at C6-7. Three patients had one disc replaced, five patients had two discs replaced, and two patients had three discs replaced. The VAS for neck pain improved from 5.9 pre-operatively to 1.4-24 months postoperatively and the VAS arm pain improved from 5.4 to 2.6. The NDI improved from 51% preoperatively to 26.8% at 24 months postoperatively. The CES-D showed a slight increase from 19.5 preoperatively to 21.7 at 24 months, postoperatively. Conclusion: Cervical decompression and disc replacement improves pain and function in patients with cervical myelopathy. This benefit is maintained at 24 months post op, with no cases requiring revision. PMID:23125494

  15. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  16. Overshunting-associated myelopathy: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jason Man-Kit; Law, Hing-Yuen; Yuen, Shing-Chau; Yam, Kwong-Yui

    2016-09-01

    The authors present 2 cases of cervical myelopathy produced by engorged vertebral veins due to overshunting. Overshunting-associated myelopathy is a rare complication of CSF shunting. Coexisting cervical degenerative disc disease may further increase the difficulty of diagnosing the condition. Neurosurgeons and others who routinely evaluate patients with intracranial shunts should be familiar with this rare but possible diagnosis. PMID:27581312

  17. MR imaging in nelarabine-induced myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Dua, Sumeet G; Jhaveri, Miral D

    2016-07-01

    Nelarabine is one of the newer and novel drugs approved by the USA Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed and resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Although there are a few accounts of the neurologic toxicity of nelarabine in the oncological literature, it has never been discussed from a radiologic stand point to our knowledge. We describe a case of nelarabine-induced myelopathy and review the existing literature in an attempt to characterize the MRI features helpful in making an early diagnosis of this elusive entity. PMID:26899359

  18. Differential Diagnosis of Acute Myelopathies: An Update.

    PubMed

    Nichtweiß, M; Weidauer, S

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate description may lead to adequate diagnostic and therapeutic measures, and therefore, a simple scheme to categorize and term the imaging findings of acute myelopathy is suggested based on current literature. Assigning imaging findings to five groups, that is (a) "segmental with rash," (b) "poliolike," (c) "granulomatous-nodular," (d) "longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis," (e) "short-segment ovoid or peripherally located," provides a rationale to lessen differential diagnoses. The key for understanding, proper description and differential diagnosis is the correlation of two time points: When did the first symptoms appear and when did imaging take place? Early infarction within the first 24 h will show neither swelling nor enhancement. PMID:26031429

  19. Acute compressive myelopathy due to vertebral haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Kaloostian, Paul; Bydon, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman with a history of anaemia presented to the emergency room with an acute onset of leg weakness. Physical examination of the bilateral lower extremities was significant for 0/5 muscle strength in all muscle groups with decreased pinprick and temperature sensation. A sensory level at the umbilicus was appreciated. Fine touch and proprioception were preserved. Bowel and bladder function were intact. CT revealed several thoracic, vertebral haemangiomatas. An MRI was suggestive of an epidural clot at the T8–T10-weighted posterior epidural space. At the level of the lesion, the cerebrospinal fluid space was completely effaced, and the flattened spinal cord exhibited signs of oedema and compressive myelopathy. The patient immediately underwent surgical decompression of the spinal cord. An epidural clot and vessel conglomeration were identified. A postoperative spinal angiogram confirmed the diagnosis of vertebral haemangioma. At 1-month follow-up, the patient regained strength and sensation. PMID:24777075

  20. Expansion Duroplasty Improves Intraspinal Pressure, Spinal Cord Perfusion Pressure, and Vascular Pressure Reactivity Index in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Isaac; Werndle, Melissa C.; Saadoun, Samira; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Marek; Zoumprouli, Argyro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We recently showed that, after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), laminectomy does not improve intraspinal pressure (ISP), spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), or the vascular pressure reactivity index (sPRx) at the injury site sufficiently because of dural compression. This is an open label, prospective trial comparing combined bony and dural decompression versus laminectomy. Twenty-one patients with acute severe TSCI had re-alignment of the fracture and surgical fixation; 11 had laminectomy alone (laminectomy group) and 10 had laminectomy and duroplasty (laminectomy+duroplasty group). Primary outcomes were magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal cord decompression (increase in intradural space, cerebrospinal fluid around the injured cord) and spinal cord physiology (ISP, SCPP, sPRx). The laminectomy and laminectomy+duroplasty groups were well matched. Compared with the laminectomy group, the laminectomy+duroplasty group had greater increase in intradural space at the injury site and more effective decompression of the injured cord. In the laminectomy+duroplasty group, ISP was lower, SCPP higher, and sPRx lower, (i.e., improved vascular pressure reactivity), compared with the laminectomy group. Laminectomy+duroplasty caused cerebrospinal fluid leak that settled with lumbar drain in one patient and pseudomeningocele that resolved completely in five patients. We conclude that, after TSCI, laminectomy+duroplasty improves spinal cord radiological and physiological parameters more effectively than laminectomy alone. PMID:25705999

  1. Cervical Synovial Cyst Causing Cervical Radiculomyelopathy: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corredor, José A; Quan, Gerald

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Synovial cysts in the subaxial cervical spine are rare and are most commonly reported at the cervicothoracic junction. Only six cases of symptomatic C5-C6 synovial cysts have been reported in the literature; the condition is usually treated with decompressive laminectomy. We present a patient with a synovial cyst arising from the C5-C6 facet joint, associated with spondylolisthesis, and causing radiculomyelopathy. The patient was treated with a posterior excision of the cyst, decompressive laminectomy, and fusion. Methods A 67-year-old man had vertebral canal stenosis at C5-C6 secondary to a synovial cyst and spondylolisthesis with symptoms and signs of radiculopathy and myelopathy. Surgical management involved C5-C6 posterior decompressive laminectomy and excision of the cyst and C4-C6 instrumented fusion with lateral mass screws and rods. A literature review of symptomatic cervical synovial cysts is presented. Results The imaging studies identified grade I spondylolisthesis and a 3.3 × 4.3-mm extradural lentiform-like mass associated with focal compression of the spinal cord and exiting the C6 nerve root. After the surgery, the patient had an immediate full recovery and was asymptomatic by the 6-month examination. No operative complications were reported. The histologic report confirmed the presence of a synovial cyst. Conclusions C5-C6 is an unusual localization for symptomatic synovial cysts. Similar cases reported in the literature achieved excellent results after cyst excision and decompressive laminectomy. Because spondylolisthesis plus laminectomy are risk factors for segmental instability in the cervical spine, we report a case of a C5-C6 facet synovial cyst successfully treated with posterior laminectomy and C4-C6 fusion. PMID:26225291

  2. Cervical Synovial Cyst Causing Cervical Radiculomyelopathy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Corredor, José A.; Quan, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Synovial cysts in the subaxial cervical spine are rare and are most commonly reported at the cervicothoracic junction. Only six cases of symptomatic C5–C6 synovial cysts have been reported in the literature; the condition is usually treated with decompressive laminectomy. We present a patient with a synovial cyst arising from the C5–C6 facet joint, associated with spondylolisthesis, and causing radiculomyelopathy. The patient was treated with a posterior excision of the cyst, decompressive laminectomy, and fusion. Methods A 67-year-old man had vertebral canal stenosis at C5–C6 secondary to a synovial cyst and spondylolisthesis with symptoms and signs of radiculopathy and myelopathy. Surgical management involved C5–C6 posterior decompressive laminectomy and excision of the cyst and C4–C6 instrumented fusion with lateral mass screws and rods. A literature review of symptomatic cervical synovial cysts is presented. Results The imaging studies identified grade I spondylolisthesis and a 3.3 × 4.3-mm extradural lentiform-like mass associated with focal compression of the spinal cord and exiting the C6 nerve root. After the surgery, the patient had an immediate full recovery and was asymptomatic by the 6-month examination. No operative complications were reported. The histologic report confirmed the presence of a synovial cyst. Conclusions C5–C6 is an unusual localization for symptomatic synovial cysts. Similar cases reported in the literature achieved excellent results after cyst excision and decompressive laminectomy. Because spondylolisthesis plus laminectomy are risk factors for segmental instability in the cervical spine, we report a case of a C5–C6 facet synovial cyst successfully treated with posterior laminectomy and C4–C6 fusion. PMID:26225291

  3. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Injections into the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Jeffrey W.; Layzer, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of longitudinally extensive cervical myelopathies temporally associated with neck injections are presented. The spinal cord injury was similar radiographically, despite a number of different needle approaches and substances injected. In recent years, there have been reports of an acute cervical myelopathy immediately following an injection procedure in the neck. Various explanations have been offered for this unfortunate complication, including (1) direct injection into the cord leading to traumatic injury, (2) injection of particulate matter into the arterial supply of the cord causing microvascular embolism and spinal cord infarction, and (3) intraneural injection of the chemical with centripetal spread of the injectant from the nerve trunk to the substance of the cord. The merits of each of these 3 mechanisms in explaining these cases are discussed. Albeit rare, acute cervical myelopathy should be considered a potential complication from any deep injection of chemicals into the neck. PMID:26425248

  4. [Acute non-traumatic myelopathy in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A

    2013-09-01

    The term 'acute myelopathies'--referred to a spinal cord dysfunction--represent a heterogeneous group of disorders with distinct etiologies, clinical and radiologic features, and prognoses. The objective of this review is to discuss the non-traumatic acute myelopathies. Acute myelopathy can be due to several causes as infective agents or inflammatory processes, such as in acute myelitis, compressive lesions, vascular lesions, etc. The clinical presentation is often dramatic with tetraparesis or paraparesis, sensory disturbances and bladder and/or bowel dysfunction. History and physical examination are used to localize the lesion to the root or specific level of the cord, which can guide imaging. Different syndromes are recognized: complete transverse lesion, central grey matter syndrome, anterior horn syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome, etc). The first priority is to rule out a compressive lesion. If a myelopathy is suspected, a gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the spinal cord should be obtained as soon as possible. If there is no structural lesion such as epidural blood or a spinal mass, then the presence or absence of spinal cord inflammation should be documented with a lumbar puncture. The absence of pleocytosis would lead to consideration of non inflammatory causes of myelopathy such as arteriovenous malformations, fibrocartilaginous embolism, or possibly early inflammatory myelopathy. In the presence of an inflammatory process (defined by gadolinium enhancement, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, or elevated cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin index), one should determine whether there is an inflammatory or an infectious cause. Different virus, bacterias, parasites and fungi have to be considered as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that involve the central nervous system. PMID:23897140

  5. Laminoplasty Techniques for the Treatment of Multilevel Cervical Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunaga, Lance K.; Klineberg, Eric O.; Gupta, Munish C.

    2012-01-01

    Laminoplasty is one surgical option for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. It was developed to avoid the significant risk of complications associated with alternative surgical options such as anterior decompression and fusion and laminectomy with or without posterior fusion. Various laminoplasty techniques have been described. All of these variations are designed to reposition the laminae and expand the spinal canal while retaining the dorsal elements to protect the dura from scar formation and to preserve postoperative cervical stability and alignment. With the right surgical indications, reliable results can be expected with laminoplasty in treating patients with multilevel cervical myelopathy. PMID:22496982

  6. Imaging features and differentials in surfer's myelopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Stephanie; Moser, Franklin; Kotton, Ryan H

    2016-02-01

    Surfer's myelopathy is a rare non-traumatic cause of myelopathy found in novice surfers. We present a case of a 23-year-old female who developed acute and rapidly progressive bilateral lower extremity paraplegia, paresthesia, and anesthesia, accompanied by lower back discomfort and bowel and bladder dysfunction after surfing for the first time. She had a past history of auto-resolved lower extremity weakness that could be related to anatomy variation of spinal cord vascular supply. This individual variation could have increased the risk for ischemic myelopathy after prolonged prone position with back hyperextension on the surf board. We discuss radiological findings of acute spinal cord infarct and longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) as possible differentials in this case. The diagnosis of surfer's myelopathy relies on a first time surfing history since the clinical and radiological presentations can be similar to other entities in some cases. Thus, we highlight the importance of a full clinical report and efficient communication between referring clinicians and radiologists for a precise and early diagnosis. PMID:26394636

  7. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  8. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  9. Dorsal column myelopathy following intrathecal chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Prathap Jacob; Reyes, Maria Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective/context To describe a distinctive clinical and radiographic pattern of myelopathy following intrathecal chemotherapy. Myelopathy is a rare complication of intrathecal chemotherapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We present a 42-year-old female with T-cell ALL who developed a myelopathy primarily involving the dorsal columns. Method Case report and literature review. Findings Within 24 hours of an injection of intrathecal methotrexate, cytarabine, and hydrocortisone, the patient developed ascending lower limb numbness and balance difficulties progressing to the inability to ambulate. Clinical examination showed profound loss of lower limb proprioception and light touch sensation below T5, mild proximal limb weakness, but preserved pinprick and temperature sensation with intact bowel and bladder function. Initial thoracic and lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 week revealed no abnormalities. However, repeat imaging at 6 weeks showed abnormal signal in the posterior cord with sparing of the anterior and lateral columns, diffusely involving the lower cervical cord through the conus medullaris. Dermatomal somatosensory-evoked potential (DSEP) conduction abnormalities were consistent with thoracic myelopathy. An empiric trial of high-dose intravenous corticosteroids during inpatient rehabilitation more than 6 weeks later produced no significant clinical improvement. Conclusion/clinical relevance Preferential and persistent dorsal column myelopathy is a distinctive clinical and radiographic presentation of a rare complication of intrathecal chemotherapy. The MRI abnormalities were initially absent, but evolved to consist of multi-level spinal cord T2 and STIR hyperintensity with regional gadolinium enhancement. DSEPs more accurately reflected the clinical level of spinal cord dysfunction. PMID:24090227

  10. Treatment of Portosystemic Shunt Myelopathy with a Stent Graft Deployed through a Transjugular Intrahepatic Route

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Deepak Arora, Ankur; Deka, Pranjal; Mukund, Amar Bhatnagar, Shorav; Jindal, Deepti Kumar, Niteen Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2013-08-01

    A case of surgically created splenorenal shunt complicated with shunt myelopathy was successfully managed by placement of a stent graft within the splenic vein to close the portosystemic shunt and alleviate myelopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of shunt myelopathy in a patient with noncirrhotic portal fibrosis without cirrhosis treated by a novel technique wherein a transjugular intrahepatic route was adopted to deploy the stent graft.

  11. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wanis H; Elalamy, Osama R; Doiphode, Sanjay H; Mobyaed, Hassan; Darweesh, Adham

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis. PMID:21483588

  12. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Wanis H.; Elalamy, Osama R.; Doiphode, Sanjay H.; Mobyaed, Hassan; Darweesh, Adham

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis. PMID:21483588

  13. Arachnoiditis Ossificans – A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O’Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology. PMID:26401174

  14. Arachnoiditis Ossificans - A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O'Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology. PMID:26401174

  15. Langerhans cell histiocytosis causing cervical myelopathy in a child.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kun Soo; Jung, Youn Young; Kim, Seok Won

    2010-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), a disorder of the phagocytic system, is a rare condition. Moreover, spinal involvement causing myelopathy is even rare and unusual. Here, we report a case of atypical LCH causing myelopathy, which was subsequently treated by corpectemy and fusion. A 5-year-old boy presented with 3 weeks of severe neck pain and limited neck movement accompanying right arm motor weakness. CT scans revealed destruction of C7 body and magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumoral process at C7 with cord compression. Interbody fusion using cervical mesh packed by autologus iliac bone was performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of LCH. After the surgery, the boy recovered from radiating pain and motor weakness of right arm. Despite the rarity of the LCH in the cervical spine, it is necessary to maintain our awareness of this condition. When neurologic deficits are present, operative treatment should be considered. PMID:20617093

  16. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Causing Cervical Myelopathy in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kun Soo; Jung, Youn Young

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), a disorder of the phagocytic system, is a rare condition. Moreover, spinal involvement causing myelopathy is even rare and unusual. Here, we report a case of atypical LCH causing myelopathy, which was subsequently treated by corpectemy and fusion. A 5-year-old boy presented with 3 weeks of severe neck pain and limited neck movement accompanying right arm motor weakness. CT scans revealed destruction of C7 body and magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumoral process at C7 with cord compression. Interbody fusion using cervical mesh packed by autologus iliac bone was performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of LCH. After the surgery, the boy recovered from radiating pain and motor weakness of right arm. Despite the rarity of the LCH in the cervical spine, it is necessary to maintain our awareness of this condition. When neurologic deficits are present, operative treatment should be considered. PMID:20617093

  17. Degenerative myelopathy in 18 Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs.

    PubMed

    March, P A; Coates, J R; Abyad, R J; Williams, D A; O'Brien, D P; Olby, N J; Keating, J H; Oglesbee, M

    2009-03-01

    Postmortem examination was performed on 18 Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs (mean age 12.7 years) with clinical signs and antemortem diagnostic tests compatible with a diagnosis of degenerative myelopathy. Tissue sections from specific spinal cord and brain regions were systematically evaluated in all dogs. Axonal degeneration and loss were graded according to severity and subsequently compared across different spinal cord segments and funiculi. White matter lesions were identified in defined regions of the dorsal, lateral, and ventral funiculi. The dorsolateral portion of the lateral funiculus was the most severely affected region in all cord segments. Spinal cord segment T12 exhibited the most severe axonal loss. Spinal nerve roots, peripheral nerves, and brain sections were within normal limits, with the exception of areas of mild astrogliosis in gray matter of the caudal medulla. Dogs with more severe lesions showed significant progression of axonal degeneration and loss at T12 and at cord segments cranial and caudal to T12. Severity of axonal loss in individual dogs positively correlated with the duration of clinical signs. The distribution of axonal degeneration resembled that reported in German Shepherd Dog degenerative myelopathy but differed with respect to the transverse and longitudinal extent of the lesions within more clearly defined funicular areas. Although these lesion differences might reflect disease longevity, they could also indicate a form of degenerative myelopathy unique to the Pembroke Welsh Corgi dog. PMID:19261635

  18. Cytokine expression of macrophages in HIV-1-associated vacuolar myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Tyor, W R; Glass, J D; Baumrind, N; McArthur, J C; Griffin, J W; Becker, P S; Griffin, D E

    1993-05-01

    Macrophages are frequently present within the periaxonal and intramyelinic vacuoles that are located primarily in the posterior and lateral funiculi of the thoracic spinal cord in HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy. But the role of these macrophages in the formation of the vacuoles is unclear. One hypothesis is that cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, are produced locally by macrophages and have toxic effects on myelin or oligodendrocytes. The resulting myelin damage eventually culminates in the removal of myelin by macrophages and vacuole formation. We studied thoracic spinal cord specimens taken at autopsy from HIV-positive (+) and HIV-negative individuals. The predominant mononuclear cells present in HIV+ spinal cords are macrophages. They are located primarily in the posterior and lateral funiculi regardless of the presence or absence of vacuolar myelopathy. Macrophages and microglia are more frequent in HIV+ than HIV-negative individuals and these cells frequently stain for class I and class II antigens, IL-1, and TNF-alpha. Activated macrophages positive for IL-1 and TNF-alpha are great increased in the posterior and lateral funiculi of HIV+ individuals with and without vacuolar myelopathy, suggesting they are present prior to the development of vacuoles. Cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, may be toxic for myelin or oligodendrocytes, leading to myelin damage and removal by macrophages and vacuole formation. PMID:8492917

  19. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy in a solid organ transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Montesdeoca Andrade, Maria Jose; Correa Diaz, Edgar Patricio; Buestán, Maria Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in Japan, the Caribbean and in South American countries such as Ecuador. This virus is the cause of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy or tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a myelopathy characterised by chronic progressive paraparesis, spasticity and urinary symptoms. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who received a kidney transplant from a living donor and developed HAM/TSP, 24 months after transplant. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of HTLV-1 in blood and cerebrospinal fluid by the ELISA and Western Blot tests. For myelopathy, the patient was treated with pulse methylprednisolone, but had poor response to treatment. We recommend that all patients receiving transplants and their donors who come from endemic countries be given a mandatory screening for HTLV-1 through an ELISA test, in an effort to inform candidates for renal transplantation of the potential risk of infection and the development of this disease. PMID:27268291

  20. Non-compressive myelopathy: clinical and radiological study.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, S; Syal, P; Singh, P; Lal, V; Khandelwal, N; Das, C P

    1999-12-01

    Fifty seven patients (42 males and 15 females) with non-compressive myelopathy were studied from 1997 to 1999. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) was the commonest (31) followed by Vit B12 deficiency myelopathy (8), primary progressive multiple sclerosis (5), hereditary spastic paraplegia (3), tropical spastic paraplegia (2), subacute necrotising myelitis (1), radiation myelitis (1), syphilitic myelitis (1) and herpes zoster myelitis (1). 4 cases remained unclassified. In the ATM group, mean age was 30.35 years, antecedent event was observed in 41.9% case, 25 cases had symmetrical involvement and most of the cases had severe deficit at onset. CSF study carried out in 23 patients of ATM revealed rise in proteins (mean 147.95mg%, range 20-1200 mg/dL) and pleocytosis (mean 20.78/cumm, range 0-200 mm3). Oligoclonal band (OCB) was present in 28% of cases of ATM. The most common abnormality detected was a multisegment hyperintense lesion on T2W images, that occupied the central area on cross section. In 6 patients hyperintense signal was eccentric in location. MRI was normal in 4 cases of ATM. Thus ATM is the leading cause of non-compressive myelopathy. Clinical features combined with MRI findings are helpful in defining the cause of ATM. PMID:10625902

  1. Copper deficiency myelopathy in the setting of advanced degenerative cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Page, Paul S; Nazar, Ryan G; Park, Michael C; James, Robert F

    2016-08-01

    When presenting conjointly, degenerative cervical spondylosis and copper deficiency myelopathy may be difficult to differentiate providing the potential for mismanagement and unnecessary surgery. We present a case of a 69-year-old female with copper deficiency myelopathy secondary to previous bowel resection in the setting of advanced degenerative cervical spondylotic disease. PMID:26337459

  2. Increased seroreactivity to HERV-K10 peptides in patients with HTLV myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously, we had shown that persons infected with human T-cell lymphoma leukemia virus 1 or 2 (HTLV-1 or 2) had an increased prevalence of antibodies to a peptide in the Pol protein of the retrovirus HERV-K10, homologous to a peptide in HTLV gp21 envelope protein. The prevalence rate was higher in those with myelopathy vs. non-myelopathy. We have now extended our observations to a cohort restricted to North America in whom the diagnosis of HTLV myelopathy was rigorously confirmed to also test for reactivity to another HERV-K10 peptide homologous to the HTLV p24 Gag protein. Methods Sera from 100 volunteer blood donors (VBD), 53 patients with large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGLL), 74 subjects with HTLV-1 or 2 infection (58 non-myelopathy and 16 myelopathy) and 83 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were evaluated in ELISA assays using the above peptides. Results The HTLV myelopathy patients had a statistically significant increased prevalence of antibodies to both HERV-K10 peptides (87.5%) vs. the VBD (0%), LGLL patients (0%), MS patients (4.8%), and the HTLV positive non-myelopathy subjects (5.2%). Conclusion The data suggest that immuno-cross-reactivity to HERV-K10 peptides and/or transactivation of HERV-K10 expression by the HTLV Tax protein may be involved in the pathogenesis of HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and spastic ataxia. PMID:24365054

  3. Analysis of five specific scores for cervical spondylogenic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dalitz, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The ability to compare various results that measure clinical deficits and outcome is a necessity for successful worldwide discussion about cervical spondylogenic myelopathy (CSM) and its treatment. There is hardly any information in literature how to value and compare outcome assessed by different scores. In a retrospective study we objectively evaluated the Nurick-score, Japanese-orthopaedic-association-score (JOA-Score), Cooper-myelopathy-scale (CMS), Prolo-score and European-myelopathy-score (EMS) using the data of 43 patients, all of whom showed clinical and morphological signs of CSM and underwent operative decompression. The scores were assessed pre- and postoperatively. The correlation between the score-results, anamnesis, clinical and diagnostic data was investigated. All the scores show a statistically significant correlation and measure postoperative improvement. With exception of the Prolo-score all scores reflect clinical deficits of CSM. The Prolo-score rates the severity of CSM on the state of the economic situation above clinical symptoms. The main differences of the scores are shown in the number of patients showing postoperative improvement, varying between 33% (Nurick-score) and 81% (JOA-score). The recovery-rates, as a measure of the cumulative improvement of all the symptoms, show less variation (23–37%). The differences of the recovery-rate were only statistically significant between JOA-score, Nurick-score and EMS (P < 0.05), whereas all the other scores showed no significant differences. To assess the postoperative successes, the evaluation of the recovery-rate is essential. There is no significant difference in the recovery-rate amongst the majority of the scores, which allows a good comparison of the results from different studies. Nevertheless, it is always important to differentiate the therapy results of CSM published worldwide. PMID:17922150

  4. Application of magnetic resonance imaging in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuan; Das, Sushant K; Yang, Dong-Jun; Yang, Han-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction and is caused by static or dynamic repeated compression of the spinal cord resulting from degenerative arthritis of the cervical spine and some biological injuries to the cervical spine. The T2 signal change on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is most commonly associated with neurological deficits. Diffusion tensor imaging and MR spectroscopy show altered microstructure and biochemistry that reflect patient-specific pathogenesis and can be used to predict neurological outcome and response to intervention. Functional MRI can help to assess the neurological functional recovery after decompression surgery for CSM. PMID:25349665

  5. Anti-venom-induced myelopathy in a semipoisonous snakebite.

    PubMed

    Biswas, R; Irodi, A; Paul, A; Ghimere, G; Joshi, K R; Alurkar, V M; Shetty, K J

    2004-06-01

    A 40-year-old woman developed myelopathy manifesting as Brown Sequard syndrome after administration of Anti-venom (polyvalent enzyme-refined equine globulin supposed to neutralise 0.6 mg of standard cobra venom, 0.45 mg of standard krait venom, 0.6 mg of standard Russel's viper venom and 0.45 mg of saw scaled viper venom, manufactured by Serum Institute of India, Pune, India). It was concluded to be an immunological inflammation of the spinal cord after ruling out hematomyelia on imaging. The necessity of antivenom in semipoisonous snake bites have been addressed further in the article. PMID:15311570

  6. [A case of HTLV-1 associated myelopathy with pulmonary involvement].

    PubMed

    Araki, J; Kaku, M; Mashimoto, H; Fukuda, Y; Asai, S

    1989-11-01

    A 70-year-old woman was admitted complaining of gait disturbance and difficulty in urination. Neurological examination showed myelopathy and both serum and CSF anti ATLA antibodies were positive. A diagnosis of HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM) was made and steroid therapy was initiated. Chest X-ray film on admission showed no abnormality, but three months later, diffuse fine nodular and reticular shadows appeared in both lung fields. The patients had no respiratory symptom. The results of pulmonary function tests were normal, aside from a mild obstructive defect as indicated by reduced V25. Arterial blood gas was also normal. Bronchoalveolar lavage studies showed increased total cell counts and an increased proportion of T-cells. The histological findings of the transbronchial lung biopsy specimen were bronchiolitis and alveolitis. Subsequently, within the next eight months the abnormal shadows on chest X-ray cleared gradually on maintenance dosage of prednisolone, 10 mg/day. Possible relationships between HAM and the pulmonary lesions were discussed. PMID:2625816

  7. Anterior approaches for cervical spondylotic myelopathy: which? When? How?

    PubMed

    Emery, Sanford E

    2015-04-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a degenerative disorder with an unfavorable natural history. Surgical treatment options have evolved substantially over time, with both anterior and posterior methods proving successful for certain patients with specific characteristics. Anterior decompression of the spinal canal plus fusion techniques for stabilization has several advantages and some disadvantages when compared to posterior options. Understanding the pros and cons of the approaches and techniques is critical for the surgeon to select the best operative treatment strategy for any given patient to achieve the best outcome. Multiple decision-making factors are involved, such as sagittal alignment, number of levels, shape of the pathoanatomy, age and comorbidities, instability, and pre-operative pain levels. Any or all of these factors may be relevant for a given patient, and to varying degrees of importance. Choice of operative approach will therefore be dependent on patient presentation, risks of that approach for a given patient, and to some degree surgeon experience. PMID:25652554

  8. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: Part I: anatomical and pathomechanical considerations *

    PubMed Central

    Burns, SH; Mior, SA; O’Connor, SM

    1991-01-01

    This two part series reviews the recent literature concerning the etiology and clinical presentation of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). CSM is the most common neurological spinal cord disorder after middle age. It is caused by the compromise of the cervical spinal cord from narrowing of the spinal canal. In Part I, a review of the anatomy and the pathomechanics of the cervical spine pertinent to CSM is discussed. Emphasis is placed upon the intricate relationship between the osseous, neurological and vascular structures. The consequences of degenerative changes upon this relationship is evidenced by the resulting neurovascular compression. In turn, compression may lead to spinal cord ischemia with characteristic clinical results. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5

  9. Solitary osteochondroma of the thoracic spine causing myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Song, K-J; Lee, K-B

    2007-06-01

    We evaluate the clinical presentation and radiographic findings of a patient with solitary osteochondroma and compressive myelopathy and review the relevant English-language medical literature. The involvement of the spine with a solitary osteochondroma is rare. The addition of the current case to those already reported makes a total of 51 published cases of solitary vertebral osteochondromas with spinal cord compression. The clinical history, computed tomogram, magnetic resonance image, and plain radiograms were reviewed. A review of the literature was also done. The patient gradually improved and symptoms stopped progressing after surgical removal of the lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are useful for evaluating the size and extent of a spinal osteochondroma causing spinal cord compression. PMID:17638163

  10. Advances in MR Imaging for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Salamon, Noriko; Holly, Langston T.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is the most common cause of nontraumatic spinal cord injury and is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in the elderly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an invaluable tool for the diagnosis and assessment of cervical spondylosis due to its sensitivity to soft tissues; however, standard MR techniques have some limitations in predicting neurological impairment and response to intervention. Therefore, there is great interest in novel MR techniques including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) as imaging biomarkers for neurological impairment and tools for understanding spinal cord physiology. This review outlines the pathogenesis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the correlative abnormalities observed on standard MRI, the biological implications and current status of DTI and MRS as clinical tools, and future directions of MR technology in the management of CSM patients. PMID:23917647

  11. Postlaminectomy synovial cyst formation: a possible consequence of ligamentum flavum excision.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2012-02-01

    Ligamentum flavum is generally resected with impunity when a laminectomy is performed; it is a strong ligament and its removal may not be inconsequential. We sought to examine the consequence of resection of ligamentum flavum as it pertains to the formation of synovial cysts. Following IRB approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of consecutive patients who underwent a laminectomy for any diagnosis during the years 2009-2010. Exclusions were made for patients undergoing resection of a synovial cyst, laminectomy done as part of a fusion, and microdiscectomy. A total of 201 laminectomies were performed. 10 instances of post-laminectomy synovial cyst occurred in only the lumbar spine. Synovial cysts occurred exclusively after surgery for stenosis (n=10). Laminectomy and resection of the ligament flavum is a risk factor for the subsequent formation of a synovial cyst. Secondary synovial cyst formation should be suspected in individuals who develop radiculopathy after laminectomy for stenosis. PMID:22051031

  12. Progressive relapse of ligamentum flavum ossification following decompressive surgery.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kei; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ukai, Junichi; Muramoto, Akio; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (T-OLF) is a relatively rare spinal disorder that generally requires surgical intervention, due to its progressive nature and the poor response to conservative therapy. The prevalence of OLF has been reported at 3.8%-26%, which is similar to that of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The progression of OPLL after cervical laminoplasty for the treatment of OPLL is often shown in long-term follow-up. However, there have been no reports on the progression of OLF following surgery. We report a case of thoracic myelopathy secondary to the progressive relapse of OLF following laminectomy. PMID:25558329

  13. Effect of posterior decompression extent on biomechanical parameters of the spinal cord in cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of the cervical myelopathy due to compression of the spinal cord. Patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament usually require the decompression surgery, and there is a need to better understand the optimal surgical extent with which sufficient decompression without excessive posterior shifting can be achieved. However, few quantitative studies have clarified this optimal extent for decompression of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. We used finite element modeling of the cervical spine and spinal cord to investigate the effect of posterior decompression extent for continuous-type cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament on changes in stress, strain, and posterior shifting that occur with three different surgical methods (laminectomy, laminoplasty, and hemilaminectomy). As posterior decompression extended, stress and strain in the spinal cord decreased and posterior shifting of the cord increased. The location of the decompression extent also influenced shifting. Laminectomy and laminoplasty were very similar in terms of decompression results, and both were superior to hemilaminectomy in all parameters tested. Decompression to the extents of C3-C6 and C3-C7 of laminectomy and laminoplasty could be considered sufficient with respect to decompression itself. Our findings provide fundamental information regarding the treatment of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and can be applied to patient-specific surgical planning. PMID:26951839

  14. Cervical Laminoplasty: The History and the Future

    PubMed Central

    KUROKAWA, Ryu; KIM, Phyo

    Cervical laminoplasty was developed as an alternative to cervical laminectomy for treatment of cervical myelopathy, in which hinges are created to lift the lamina. Various techniques of laminoplasty have since been developed after two prototype techniques: Hirabayashi’s open-door laminoplasty and Kurokawa’s spinous process splitting (double-door) laminoplasty. Several in vitro studies report superior biomechanical stability of the cervical spine after laminoplasty compared with laminectomy. In clinical situation, randomized control studies are scarce and superiority of one procedure over another is not uniformly shown. Lack of hard evidence supporting the purported advantages of laminoplasty over laminectomy, that is, reduced rate of postoperative instability and kyphosis development, while preserving range of motion (ROM), has been a weak selling point. Currently, laminoplasty is performed by majority of spine surgeons in Japan, but is rarely performed in the United States and Europe. Recent development in laminoplasty is preservation of muscle attachment, which enabled dynamic stabilization of the cervical spine by neck extensor muscles. After treatment with new laminoplasty techniques with active postoperative neck ROM exercises, postoperative instability, kyphosis, axial neck pain, and loss of ROM seems minimal. Well-designed clinical trials to show the effectiveness and long-term outcome of this surgical procedure are warranted. PMID:26119898

  15. Anterior decompression and fusion versus posterior laminoplasty for multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuzhou; Wang, Hehui; Zhou, Zhilai; Jin, Anmin

    2014-02-01

    The optimal surgical strategy for anterior or posterior approaches remains controversial for multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy caused by multisegment cervical spondylotic myelopathy (MCSM) or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted evaluating the clinical results of anterior decompression and fusion (ADF) compared with posterior laminoplasty for patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials and nonrandomized cohort studies conducted from 1990 to May 2013 comparing ADF with posterior laminoplasty for the treatment of multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy due to MCSM or OPLL. The following outcome measures were extracted: Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, recovery rate, complication rate, reoperation rate, blood loss, and operative time. Subgroup analysis was conducted according to the mean number of surgical segments. Eleven studies were included in the review, all of which were prospective or retrospective cohort studies with relatively low quality indicated by GRADE Working Group assessment. A definitive conclusion could not be reached regarding which surgical approach is more effective for the treatment of multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. Although ADF was associated with better postoperative neural function than posterior laminoplasty in the treatment of multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy due to MCSM or OPLL, there was no apparent difference in the neural function recovery rate between the 2 approaches. Higher rates of surgery-related complication and reoperation should be taken into consideration when ADF is used for patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. The surgical trauma associated with corpectomy was significantly higher than that associated with posterior laminoplasty. PMID:24679196

  16. Phosphorylated neurofilament subunit levels in the serum of cervical compressive myelopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Kato, So; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Ohya, Junichi; Hayakawa, Kentaro; Takeshita, Katsushi; Tanaka, Sakae; Ogata, Toru

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the serum levels of the phosphorylated form of the high molecular weight neurofilament subunit (pNF-H) in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy. pNF-H is becoming increasingly recognized as a biomarker for axonal injury, however, it remains unclear whether serum pNF-H is elevated in chronic spinal cord compression. We examined 26 patients who underwent surgery for cervical compressive myelopathy. Peripheral blood samples were obtained both preoperatively and 1 week after surgery to evaluate the serum pNF-H levels using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A history of recent aggravation of myelopathy was also investigated. Of the 26 myelopathy patients, the preoperative serum pNF-H level was negative in 20 patients and moderately elevated in six. Patients who were positive for pNF-H were more likely to have had a recent aggravation of myelopathy compared with the pNF-H negative patients (83 versus 25%; p=0.02). All patients who were positive for pNF-H before surgery remained positive after surgery. Two patients who became positive after surgery demonstrated a neurologic deterioration associated with the surgery. In conclusion, the serum pNF-H level was negative in the majority of patients with cervical compressive myelopathy. Our results suggest that an elevated serum level of pNF-H is associated with an acute worsening of myelopathy and that a positive conversion of pNF-H after surgery is a marker of perioperative neural damage. PMID:26195334

  17. Preliminary documentation of the comparable efficacy of vitoss versus NanOss bioactive as bone graft expanders for posterior cervical fusion

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laminectomies with posterior cervical instrumented fusions often utilize bone graft expanders to supplement cervical lamina/iliac crest autograft/bone marrow aspirate (BMA). Here we compared posterior fusion rates utilizing two graft expanders; Vitoss (Orthovita, Malvern, PA, USA) vs. NanOss Bioactive (Regeneration Technologies Corporation [RTI: Alachua, FL, USA]). Methods: Two successive prospective cohorts of patients underwent 1-3 level laminectomies with 5-9 level posterior cervical fusions to address cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and/or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The first cohort of 72 patients received Vitoss, while the second cohort or 20 patients received NanOss. Fusions were performed utilizing the Vertex/Rod/Eyelet System (Medtronic, Memphis, TN, USA) with braided titanium cables through the base of intact spinous processes (not lateral mass screws) cephalad and caudad to laminectomy defects. Fusion was documented by an independent neuroradiologist blinded to the study design, utilizing dynamic X-rays and two dimensional computed tomography (2D-CT) studies up to 6 months postoperatively, or until fusion or pseudarthrosis was confirmed at 1 year. Results: Vitoss and NanOss resulted in comparable times to fusion: 5.65 vs. 5.35 months. Dynamic X-ray and CT-documented pseudarthrosis developed in 2 of 72 Vitoss patients at one postoperative year (e.g. bone graft resorbed secondary to early deep wound infections), while none occurred in the 20 patients receiving NanOss. Conclusion: In this preliminary study combining cervical laminectomy/fusions, the time to fusion (5.65 vs. 5.35 months), pseudarthrosis (2.7% vs. 0%), and infection rates (2.7% vs. 0%) were nearly comparable sequentially utilizing Vitoss (72 patients) vs. NanOss (20 patients) as bone graft expanders. PMID:26005578

  18. Canine degenerative myelopathy: a model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra C; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-02-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (CDM) represents a unique naturally occurring animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar clinical signs, neuropathologic findings, and involvement of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. A definitive diagnosis can only be made postmortem through microscopic detection of axonal degeneration, demyelination and astroglial proliferation, which is more severe in the dorsal columns of the thoracic spinal cord and in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus. Interestingly, the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes are intact in CDM prior to functional impairment, thus suggesting that muscle atrophy in CDM does not result from physical denervation. Moreover, since sensory involvement seems to play an important role in CDM progression, a more careful investigation of the sensory pathology in ALS is also warranted. The importance of SOD1 expression remains unclear, while oxidative stress and denatured ubiquinated proteins appear to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CDM. In this updated narrative review we performed a systematic search of the published studies on CDM that may shed light on the pathophysiological mechanisms of human ALS. A better understanding of the factors that determine the disease progression in CDM may be beneficial for the development of effective treatments for ALS. PMID:26432396

  19. Reported Outcome Measures in Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Maire; Elgheriani, Ali; Kolias, Angelos G.; Tetreault, Lindsay A.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Kotter, Mark R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Degenerative cervical myelopathy [DCM] is a disabling and increasingly prevalent group of diseases. Heterogeneous reporting of trial outcomes limits effective inter-study comparison and optimisation of treatment. This is recognised in many fields of healthcare research. The present study aims to assess the heterogeneity of outcome reporting in DCM as the premise for the development of a standardised reporting set. Methods A systematic review of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases, registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015025497) was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Full text articles in English, with >50 patients (prospective) or >200 patients (retrospective), reporting outcomes of DCM were eligible. Results 108 studies, assessing 23,876 patients, conducted world-wide, were identified. Reported outcome themes included function (reported by 97, 90% of studies), complications (reported by 56, 52% of studies), quality of life (reported by 31, 29% of studies), pain (reported by 29, 27% of studies) and imaging (reported by 59, 55% of studies). Only 7 (6%) studies considered all of domains in a single publication. All domains showed variability in reporting. Conclusions Significant heterogeneity exists in the reporting of outcomes in DCM. The development of a consensus minimum dataset will facilitate future research synthesis. PMID:27482710

  20. Compression Myelopathy due to Proliferative Changes around C2 Pars Defects without Instability.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Sakai, Toshinori; Tezuka, Fumitake; Abe, Mitsunobu; Yamashita, Kazuta; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    We report a case with compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects without instability. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive clumsy hands and spastic gait. Plain radiographs showed bilateral spondylolysis (pars defects) at C2 and fusion between C2 and C3 spinous processes. Dynamic views revealed mobility through the pars defects, but there was no apparent instability. Computed tomography showed proliferative changes at the pars defects, which protruded into spinal canal. On magnetic resonance imaging, the spinal cord was compressed and intramedullary high signal change was found. A diagnosis of compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects was made. We performed posterior decompression. Postoperatively, symptoms have been alleviated and images revealed sufficient decompression and no apparent instability. In patients with the cervical spondylolysis, myelopathy caused by instability or slippage have been periodically reported. The present case involving C2 spondylolysis is extremely rare. PMID:27340539

  1. Compression Myelopathy due to Proliferative Changes around C2 Pars Defects without Instability

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Tezuka, Fumitake; Abe, Mitsunobu; Yamashita, Kazuta; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case with compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects without instability. A 69-year-old man presented with progressive clumsy hands and spastic gait. Plain radiographs showed bilateral spondylolysis (pars defects) at C2 and fusion between C2 and C3 spinous processes. Dynamic views revealed mobility through the pars defects, but there was no apparent instability. Computed tomography showed proliferative changes at the pars defects, which protruded into spinal canal. On magnetic resonance imaging, the spinal cord was compressed and intramedullary high signal change was found. A diagnosis of compression myelopathy due to proliferative changes around the C2 pars defects was made. We performed posterior decompression. Postoperatively, symptoms have been alleviated and images revealed sufficient decompression and no apparent instability. In patients with the cervical spondylolysis, myelopathy caused by instability or slippage have been periodically reported. The present case involving C2 spondylolysis is extremely rare. PMID:27340539

  2. Lateral and Dorsal Column Hyperintensity on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Patient with Myelopathy Associated with Intrathecal Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Fumine; Hatano, Taku; Hori, Masaaki; Kawamura, Miwako; Sasaki, Makoto; Aoki, Shigeki; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-related myelopathy mimicking subacute combined degeneration (SCD) has rarely been reported. We encountered a 35-year-old female with sensory ataxia after intrathecal chemotherapy. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed localized abnormal signal areas in the lateral and dorsal white matter, mimicking SCD. Diffusion imaging showed restricted water diffusion and increased microstructural complexity, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed increased levels of myelin basic proteins, indicating demyelinating myelopathy. Advanced diffusion imaging can provide more information on the microstructure of chemotherapy-related myelopathy. PMID:23874296

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of degenerative cervical myelopathy: a review of structural changes and measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Martin, Allan R; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative cervical myelopathy encompasses a spectrum of age-related structural changes of the cervical spine that result in static and dynamic injury to the spinal cord and collectively represent the most common cause of myelopathy in adults. Although cervical myelopathy is determined clinically, the diagnosis requires confirmation via imaging, and MRI is the preferred modality. Because of the heterogeneity of the condition and evolution of MRI technology, multiple techniques have been developed over the years in an attempt to quantify the degree of baseline severity and potential for neurological recovery. In this review, these techniques are categorized anatomically into those that focus on bone, ligaments, discs, and the spinal cord. In addition, measurements for the cervical spine canal size and sagittal alignment are also described briefly. These tools have resulted collectively in the identification of numerous useful parameters. However, the development of multiple techniques for assessing the same feature, such as cord compression, has also resulted in a number of challenges, including introducing ambiguity in terms of which methods to use and hindering effective comparisons of analysis in the literature. In addition, newer techniques that use advanced MRI are emerging and providing exciting new tools for assessing the spinal cord in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy. PMID:27246488

  4. A rare presentation of subacute progressive ascending myelopathy secondary to cement leakage in percutaneous vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Rohit Prakash; Barman, Apurba; Varghese, Shiela Mary; Chatterjee, Ahana; Mammen, Suraj; George, Jacob; Thomas, Raji

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty is used to manage osteoporotic vertebral body compression fractures. Although it is relatively safe, complications after vertebroplasty ranging from minor to devastatingly major ones have been described. Cement leakage into the spinal canal is one such complication. Subacute progressive ascending myelopathy is an infrequent neurologic complication after spinal cord injury, typically presenting as ascending neurologic deficit within weeks after the initial insult. The precise cause of subacute progressive ascending myelopathy still remains an enigma, considering the rarity of this disorder. The authors present the case of a 62-yr-old woman with osteoporotic vertebral fracture who underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty and developed T6 complete paraplegia because of cement leakage. A few weeks later, the neurologic level ascended to higher cervical level (C3). To date, no case of subacute progressive ascending myelopathy secondary to cement leakage after percutaneous vertebroplasty has been reported. Literature is reviewed regarding subacute progressive ascending myelopathy, and the rehabilitation challenges in the management of this patient are discussed. PMID:24322431

  5. Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula Presenting as Cervical Myelopathy: A Rapid Recovery with Balloon Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, Manish; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Lal, Anupam; Prabhakar, S.; Khandelwal, N.

    2010-12-15

    A 24-year-old male presented with progressive cervical myelopathy of 2 months' duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and angiography revealed a large arteriovenous fistula arising from the left vertebral artery. The present case highlights the clinical features and dramatic recovery following endovascular balloon occlusion of a giant cervical arteriovenous fistula.

  6. Development of a functional scoring system for rheumatoid arthritis patients with cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, A T; Bland, J M; Crockard, H A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To be able to measure disability objectively in rheumatoid arthritis complicated by cervical myelopathy. METHODS: The responses to the Stanford health assessment questionnaire disability index were recorded from 250 consecutive patients (group 1) referred to our unit for spinal surgery. Using principal components analysis the questionnaire was reduced from 20 questions to 10 questions. In the second part of the study, the results of the questionnaire for those patients undergoing surgery from the original group of 250 patients were analysed with respect to outcome. RESULTS: The reduction in the number of questions results in no significant loss of information, reliability (internal consistency Cronbach's alpha = 0.968) or sensitivity. The new scale, the myelopathy disability index, measures only one dimension (Eigen value 6.97) and may be more finely tuned to the measurement of disability in these myelopathic patients. When administered to the 194 patients undergoing cervical spine (group 2) surgery the myelopathy disability index was an accurate predictor of neurological and functional outcome, as well as survival following surgery (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The myelopathy disability index provides a much needed objective and reliable means of assessing disability in patients with rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine and also in predicting outcome following surgical intervention. It also provides information for both the patient and surgeon alike, on what to realistically expect from surgery. Its adoption should facilitate comparisons between different forms of surgical intervention. PMID:9014584

  7. Myelopathy Caused by Soft Cervical Disc Herniation : Surgical Results and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Jin; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Kim, Young-Soo; Ko, Yong; Oh, Suck Jun

    2007-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the surgical results and prognostic factors for patients with soft cervical disc herniation with myelopathy. Methods During the last 7 years, 26 patients with cervical discogenic myelopathy were undertaken anterior discectomy and fusion. Clinical and radiographic features were reviewed to evaluate the surgical results and prognostic factors. The clinical outcome was judged using two grading systems (Herkowitz's scale and Nurick's grade). Results Male were predominant (4:1), and C5-6 was the most frequently involved level. Gait disturbance, variable degree of spasticity, discomfort in chest and abdomen, hand numbness were the most obvious signs. Magnetic resonance(MR) images showed that central disc herniation was revealed in 16 cases, and accompanying cord signal changes in 4. Postoperatively, 23 patients showed favorable results (excellent, good and fair) according to Herkowitz's scale. Conclusion Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion effectively reduced myelopathic symptoms due to soft cervical disc herniation. The authors assured that the shorter duration of clinical attention, the lesser the degree of myelopathy and better outcome in discogenic myelopathy. PMID:19096586

  8. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Qizhi, Sun; Peijia, Li; Lei, Sun; Junsheng, Chen; Jianmin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: Noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a special degenerative disease because of the intermediate normal level or levels between supra and infraabnormal levels. Some controversy exists over the optimal procedure for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. The study was to evaluate the outcomes of the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with zero-profile devices for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. Materials and Methods: 17 consecutive patients with two noncontiguous levels of CSM operated between December 2009 and August 2012 were included in the study. There were 12 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60.7 years (range 45–75 years). Involved disc levels were C3/4 and C5/6 in 11 patients and C4/5 and C6/7 in six patients. Preoperative plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT) with 3-D reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine were taken in all patients. All radiographs were independently evaluated by 2 spine surgeons and 1 radiologist. The outcomes were assessed by the average operative time, blood loss, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, improvement rate, neck dysfunction index (NDI), swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL) score, the cervical lordosis and complications. Results: The mean followup was 48.59 months (range 24-56 months). The average operative time and blood loss was 105.29 min and 136.47 ml, respectively. The preoperative JOA score was 8.35, which significantly increased to 13.7 at the final followup (P < 0.01). The NDI score was significantly decreased from preoperative 13.06 to postoperative 3.35 (P < 0.01). The operation also provided a significant increase in the cervical lordosis (P < 0.01) from preoperative 10.17° to postoperative 17.06°. The fusion rate was 94.1% at 6 months postoperatively, and 100% at 12 months after surgery. The mean SWAL-QOL score decreased from preoperative 68.06 to immediate postoperatively 65.65 and then increased to 67.65 at final followup

  9. Posterior C1-C2 calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Isaac Bing-Yi; Arkun, Knarik; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2016-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease rarely occurs in the posterior aspect of the craniocervical junction (CCJ). To the best of our knowledge, there have been only 2 previously reported cases of patients with posterior CPPD lesions in this region that have led to cervical myelopathy. We report the case of a 70-year-old man presenting with neck pain and cervical myelopathy with multilevel stenosis from C1-C6. The stenosis was worst at C1-C2, secondary to compression by a CPPD lesion posterior to the spinal cord. The patient underwent a C2-C6 laminectomy and fusion with resection of the CPPD lesion. In this report, we discuss the patient and present a novel theory to explain the preponderance of CPPD lesions in the CCJ occurring anteriorly and not posteriorly to the spinal cord. PMID:26976840

  10. Subacute myelo‑optic neuropathy, beriberi, and HTLV‑I‑associated myelopathy: elucidation of some neurological diseases in Japan.

    PubMed

    Igata, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Personal experience of the discovery of the cause, pathophysiology, and treatment as well as prevention of subacute myelo‑optic neuropathy, beriberi, and HTLV‑I‑associated myelopathy were described. PMID:23222550

  11. Myelopathy among zinc-smelter workers in Upper Silesia during the late 19th century.

    PubMed

    Lanska, Douglas J; Remler, Bernd

    2014-04-01

    Zinc-induced myeloneuropathy was recently (re)discovered and its pathophysiology elaborated as resulting from secondary copper deficiency. However, myelopathy was a recognized problem among European zinc-smelter workers in the late 19th century, although these early reports have been overlooked in recent studies and reports. The purpose of this article is to translate and review German-language reports of myelopathy among zinc-smelter workers in Upper Silesia (now southern Poland) by Schlockow from the 1870s. Disease manifestations among zinc-smelter workers developed after sustained zinc exposure over many years. The earliest symptoms were sensory and included paresthesias, dysesthesias, allodynia, and formication in the lower extremities, particularly the feet. Workers ultimately developed a clinical picture resembling subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord with a spastic-ataxic gait with prominent proprioceptive impairment, sensory disequilibrium, and rombergism. PMID:24688096

  12. Negative MRI findings in a case of degenerative myelopathy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Kitagawa, M; Kanayama, K; Yamamura, H; Sakai, T

    2009-12-01

    An 11-year-old male Rough collie was submitted with paraparesis, but did not respond to medical treatment. Clinical signs worsened and the dog displayed paralysis, inability to stand and loss of voluntary bladder control, whereupon magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. No significant abnormalities were identified from MRI, blood tests, cerebrospinal fluid tests or radiography. After MRI, the dog developed dyspnoea and died. Autopsy and subsequent histopathological examination led to a diagnosis of degenerative myelopathy. PMID:20458868

  13. Prediction of surgical outcome in compressive cervical myelopathy: A novel clinicoradiological prognostic score

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rishi Anil; Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Bhosale, Sunil Krishna; Nemade, Pradip Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Context: Preoperative severity of myelopathy, age, and duration of symptoms have been shown to be highly predictive of the outcome in compressive cervical myelopathy (CCM). The role of radiological parameters is still controversial. Aims: Define the prognostic factors in CCM and formulate a prognostic score to predict the outcome following surgery in CCM. Settings and Design: Retrospective. Materials and Methods: This study included 78 consecutive patients with CCM treated surgically. The modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale was used to quantify severity of myelopathy at admission and at 12-month follow-up. The outcome was defined as good if the patient had mJOA score ≥16 and poor if the score was <16. Age, sex, duration of symptoms, comorbidities, intrinsic hand muscle wasting (IHMW), diagnosis, surgical technique, Torg ratio, instability on dynamic radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity changes were assessed. Statistics: Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) (version 20.0) was used for statistical analysis. The association was assessed amongst variables using logistic regression analysis. Parameters having a statistically significant correlation with the outcome were included in formulating a prognostic score. Results: Severity of myelopathy, IHMW, age, duration, diabetes, and instability on radiographs were predictive of the outcome with a P value <0.01. Genders, diagnosis, surgical procedure, Torg ratio, and intensity changes on MRI were not significantly related to the outcome. A 8-point scoring system was devised incorporating the significant clinicoradiological parameters, and it was found that nearly all patients (97.82%) with a score below 5 had good outcome and all patients (100%) with a score above 5 had poor outcome. The outcome is difficult to predict with a score of 5. Conclusions: Clinical parameters are better predictors of the outcome as compared to radiological findings, following

  14. Breed Distribution of SOD1 Alleles Previously Associated with Canine Degenerative Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, R; Coates, JR; Johnson, GC; Hansen, L; Awano, T; Kolicheski, A; Ivansson, E; Perloski, M; Lindblad-Toh, K; O'Brien, DP; Guo, J; Katz, ML; Johnson, GS

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous reports associated 2 mutant SOD1 alleles (SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T) with degenerative myelopathy in 6 canine breeds. The distribution of these alleles in other breeds has not been reported. Objective To describe the distribution of SOD1:c.118A and SOD1:c.52T in 222 breeds. Animals DNA from 33,747 dogs was genotyped at SOD1:c.118, SOD1:c.52, or both. Spinal cord sections from 249 of these dogs were examined. Methods Retrospective analysis of 35,359 previously determined genotypes at SOD1:c.118G>A or SOD1:c.52A>T and prospective survey to update the clinical status of a subset of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias. Results The SOD1:c.118A allele was found in cross-bred dogs and in 124 different canine breeds whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele was only found in Bernese Mountain Dogs. Most of the dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A homozygotes, but 8 dogs with histopathologically confirmed degenerative myelopathy were SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes and had no other sequence variants in their SOD1 amino acid coding regions. The updated clinical conditions of dogs from which samples were obtained with a relatively low ascertainment bias suggest that SOD1:c.118A homozygotes are at a much higher risk of developing degenerative myelopathy than are SOD1:c.118A/G heterozygotes. Conclusions and Clinical Importance We conclude that the SOD1:c.118A allele is widespread and common among privately owned dogs whereas the SOD1:c.52T allele is rare and appears to be limited to Bernese Mountain Dogs. We also conclude that breeding to avoid the production of SOD1:c.118A homozygotes is a rational strategy. PMID:24524809

  15. HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis and probable HTLV-1- associated myelopathy in an adolescent female*

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Raquel Bisacotti; Tonoli, Renata Elise; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Pinto, Giselle Martins; Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated infective dermatitis (ID) is a chronic, severe and recurrent eczema occurring during childhood in patients vertically infected with HTLV-1. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesia (HAM/ TSP) is slow and progressive. We report the case of an adolescent female from a non-endemic area for HTLV-1 who presents ID and, most likely, associated HAM/TSP. PMID:26312674

  16. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. PMID:27616315

  17. Extensive arachnoid ossification with associated syringomyelia presenting as thoracic myelopathy. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Slavin, K V; Nixon, R R; Nesbit, G M; Burchiel, K J

    1999-10-01

    The authors present the case of progressive thoracic myelopathy caused by the extensive ossification of the arachnoid membrane and associated intramedullary syrinx. Based on their findings and results of the literature search, they describe a pathological basis for this rare condition, discuss its incidence and symptomatology, and suggest a simple classification for various types of the arachnoid ossification. They also discuss the magnetic resonance imaging features of arachnoid ossification and associated spinal cord changes. The particular value of plain computerized tomography, which is highly sensitive in revealing intraspinal calcifications and ossifications, in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with a clinical picture of progressive myelopathy is emphasized. PMID:10505510

  18. Demographic Trends of Patients with Compressive Myelopathy in a Developing Asian Country

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vishal; Kumar, Avinash; Bahadur, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective case series. Purpose To analyze the demographic picture of the patients suffering from compression myelopathy due to various spinal problems. Overview of Literature: There is a lack of literature depicting demographic picture of such patients with spinal injuries as most of the articles have shown the epidemiology of spinal cord injuries either managed conservatively or operatively. None have focused on the patients with compressive myelopathy requiring surgeries. Methods Patients with spinal pathologies with a neurological deficit due to compressive myelopathy requiring surgical decompression of dorsal and thoracolumbar region were studied. The different kinds of etiologies, the demographic profiles involved, the involvement of various regions of spine in each of the etiologies, sex distribution of different etiologies, association of age and sex with the occurrence of paraplegia, and association of thoracolumbar junction (TLJ) involvement by age and sex were studied. This study addressed the dorsal and TLJ till L2 vertebrae surgically treated by anterior transthoracic transpleural approach. Results With regard to gender, 75% of the females and 67.3% of the males were paraplegic but there was no relationship between gender and the occurrence of paraplegia (p >0.05). There was also no association between TLJ involvement and the age and sex of the patients (p >0.05). Seventy percent of the patients were paraplegic with a mean age of 38.90 years and 30% were paraparetic with a mean age of 43.43 years. Male to female ratio stood at 4.43:1. Conclusions Traumatic spine in females is increasing. The occurrence of paraplegia and involvement of TLJ is not affected by the age and the sex of the patients. Deep epidemiological understanding of spinal pathologies can lead to a better appreciation of the potential impact of health care management strategies and health policies to prevent and minimize their consequences considering limited worldwide

  19. Ossified Posterior Longitudinal Ligament With Massive Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Dysphagia in a Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Patient.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinichi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Maruo, Keishi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Tsuji, Shotaro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-08-01

    Descriptive case report.To report a case of a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) patient with both massive ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) leading to severe dysphagia as well as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) causing mild cervical myelopathy, warranting not only an anterior approach but also a posterior one.Although DISH can cause massive OALL in the cervical spine, severe dysphagia resulting from DISH is a rare occurrence. OALLs are frequently associated with OPLL. Treatment for a DISH patient with OPLL in setting of OALL-caused dysphagia is largely unknown.A 70-year-old man presented with severe dysphagia with mild cervical myelopathy. Neurological examination showed mild spastic paralysis and hyper reflex in his lower extremities. Plane radiographs and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a discontinuous massive OALL at C4-5 and continuous type OPLL at C2-6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pronounced spinal cord compression due to OPLL at C4-5. Esophagram demonstrated extrinsic compression secondary to OALL at C4-5.We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. Severe dysphagia markedly improved without any complications.We considered that this patient not only required osteophytectomy and fusion by the anterior approach but also required decompression and spinal fusion by the posterior approach to prevent both deterioration of cervical myelopathy and recurrence of OALL after surgery. PMID:26266365

  20. Subacute posttraumatic ascending myelopathy in a 15-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Kovanda, Timothy J; Horn, Eric M

    2014-09-01

    Secondary injury following initial spinal cord trauma is uncommon and frequently attributed to mismanagement of an unprotected cord in the acute time period after injury. Subacute posttraumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM) is a rare occurrence in the days to weeks following an initial spinal cord injury that is unrelated to manipulation of an unprotected cord and involves 4 or more vertebral levels above the original injury. The authors present a case of SPAM occurring in a 15-year-old boy who sustained a T3-4 fracture-dislocation resulting in a complete spinal cord injury, and they highlight the imaging findings and optimum treatment for this rare event. PMID:24905393

  1. Imaging features of copper deficiency myelopathy: a study of 25 cases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Ahlskog, J Eric; Klein, Christopher J; Port, John D

    2006-02-01

    Acquired copper deficiency presents with a spastic gait and sensory ataxia. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with copper deficiency myelopathy may show increased T2 signal, most commonly in the dorsal midline cervical and thoracic cord. These imaging findings may be reversible with normalization of serum copper. The clinical and imaging picture is very similar to the subacute combined degeneration seen in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency. Neuroradiologists should consider this possibility when a long segment of symmetric dorsal spinal cord T2-hyperintensity is identified. PMID:16261334

  2. Delayed myelopathy secondary to stab wound with a retained blade tip within the laminae: case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Delayed neurologic deficit after a stab wound with a retained foreign body near the spinal canal is unusual, adequate radiological examination is fundamental in detecting retained foreign bodies, especially the CT scan, surgical extraction of the foreign body is the primary task and the surgical outcome is satisfactory. Here, we report a rare case of delayed myelopathy caused by spinal stenosis secondary to broken blade tip within thoracic laminae in an old man, who was injured in a knife attack 39 years ago. The incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis and prognosis are discussed. PMID:26629221

  3. CT myelography of the thoraco-lumbar spine in 8 dogs with degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeryl C; Inzana, Karen D; Rossmeisl, John H; Bergman, Robert L; Wells, Tana; Butler, Katherine

    2005-12-01

    CT myelography of the T11-L2 region was performed in 8 large-breed dogs with a clinical diagnosis of degenerative myelopathy (DM) and 3 large-breed dogs that were clinically normal. CT myelographic characteristics were recorded for each dog, at each disc level. Area measurements of the spinal cord, dural sac, vertebral canal, and vertebral body were recorded at 4 slice locations for each disc level. Mean area ratios were calculated and graphically compared, by slice location and group. In all dogs, CT myelography identified morphologic abnormalities that were not suspected from conventional myelograms. Characteristics observed with higher frequency in DM versus normal dogs were: spinal stenosis, disc protrusion, focal attenuation of the subarachnoid space, spinal cord deformity, small spinal cord, and paraspinal muscle atrophy. Mean spinal cord:dural sac, spinal cord:vertebral canal, dural sac: vertebral canal, and vertebral canal:vertebral body ratios were smaller in DM versus normal dogs at more than one disc level. Some CT myelographic characteristics in DM dogs were similar to those previously reported in humans, dogs and horses with stenotic myelopathy. PMID:16293999

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging features of cervical stenotic myelopathy in 21 dogs.

    PubMed

    Lipsitz, D; Levitski, R E; Chauvet, A E; Berry, W L

    2001-01-01

    The cervical spine of 21 dogs with clinical signs of cervical stenotic myelopathy was evaluated using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Spin echo T1, T2 and gradient echo T2 weighted images were obtained with a 1.5 Tesla magnet in 12 dogs and a 1.0 Tesla magnet in 9 dogs. Sagittal or parasagittal T1W and T2W images were helpful in determining the presence of spinal cord compression or degenerative disease of the articular processes. Transverse T1W and T2W images were the most useful for the identification of dorsolateral spinal cord compression secondary to soft tissue and ligament hypertrophy, as well as synovial cysts, associated with the articular processes. The MR imaging findings were consistent with the surgical findings in all 14 dogs that underwent surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging provided a safe, non-invasive method of evaluating the cervical spine in dogs suspected of having cervical stenotic myelopathy. Veterinary PMID:11245233

  5. Evaluation of a proposed therapeutic protocol in 12 dogs with tentative degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Polizopoulou, Zoe S; Koutinas, Alexander F; Patsikas, Michael N; Soubasis, Nektarios

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of a proposed therapeutic protocol in 12 dogs with a tentative diagnosis of degenerative myelopathy, followed-up for a 6-month period. Twelve dogs fulfilling the antemortem inclusion criteria (breed, age, adequate vaccination, history of progressive posterior ataxia and/or paraparesis, no radiographic and myelographic abnormalities in the spinal cord and vertebral column) were allocated. All these dogs presented signs of thoracolumbar syndrome (T3-L3), scored as grade I (mild to moderate ataxia and paraparesis) in 10 and grade II (severe ataxia and ambulatory paraparesis) in 2 cases. Treatment included the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid and N-acetylcysteine, supplemented with vitamins B, C and E. Prednisolone was given for the first two weeks and upon worsening of neurological signs. Daily exercise, performed as walking or swimming, was strongly recommended. Clinicopathological evaluation was normal in all 12 dogs, and survey radiographs and myelograms did not show spinal cord compression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed only in 4 dogs, did not disclose compressive disorders or intramedullary lesions. Neurological signs were progressively worsening in all 12 animals, eventually resulting in severe paraparesis (grade III) or paraplegia (grade IV). The applied medications do not appear to be an attractive alternative to conservative management (physiotherapy) or euthanasia in canine degenerative myelopathy, irrespective of its chronicity. PMID:18828481

  6. Surgical Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Associated Hypertension—A Retrospective Study of 309 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wen-yu; Wang, Xia; Chen, Bin; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Nie, Lin; Cheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease, and various risk factors are known to be involved in it. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common non-traumatic cause of myelopathy, which displays neurological symptoms and may induce systemic symptoms. To date, it is still unknown whether CSM is associated with hypertension, and if so, whether the decompression operations can attenuate CSM associated hypertension. Here, a total of 309 patients with CSM who received anterior or posterior decompression surgery were enrolled as subjects. Blood pressure measurements were performed before and within one week after the surgery. Among the 309 subjects, 144 (46.6%) of them exhibited hypertension before surgery, a significantly higher ratio than that of the whole population. One week after surgery, blood pressure of 106 (73.6%) patients turned back to normal. Blood pressure of another 37(25.7%) patients decreased with different degrees, although still higher than normal. Moreover, it appears that both approaches were effective in improving blood pressure, while the posterior approach was more effective in decreasing systolic blood pressure. We speculate this type of hypertension might result from hyperactivity of sympathetic nervous system as the heart rate of these patients decreased after surgery as well. Collectively, compression of spinal cord in CSM patients might be associated with hypertension, and decompression surgery largely attenuated this type of hypertension. These findings prove CSM to be a potential associated factor of high blood pressure and may shed light on therapies of hypertension in clinics. PMID:26193469

  7. Effect of Pulsed Methylprednisolone on Pain, in Patients with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Kevin G.; Puri, Aiysha; Demontis, Maria Antonietta; Short, Charlotte L.; Adonis, Adine; Haddow, Jana; Martin, Fabiola; Dhasmana, Divya

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is an immune mediated myelopathy caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The efficacy of treatments used for patients with HAM/TSP is uncertain. The aim of this study is to document the efficacy of pulsed methylprednisolone in patients with HAM/TSP. Data from an open cohort of 26 patients with HAM/TSP was retrospectively analysed. 1g IV methylprednisolone was infused on three consecutive days. The outcomes were pain, gait, urinary frequency and nocturia, a range of inflammatory markers and HTLV-1 proviral load. Treatment was well tolerated in all but one patient. Significant improvements in pain were: observed immediately, unrelated to duration of disease and maintained for three months. Improvement in gait was only seen on Day 3 of treatment. Baseline cytokine concentrations did not correlate to baseline pain or gait impairment but a decrease in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) concentration after pulsed methylprednisolone was associated with improvements in both. Until compared with placebo, treatment with pulsed methylprednisolone should be offered to patients with HAM/TSP for the treatment of pain present despite regular analgesia. PMID:27077747

  8. Methotrexate-induced myelopathy responsive to substitution of multiple folate metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, R; Semmler, A; Maurer, G D; Hattingen, E; Fornoff, F; Steinbach, J P; Linnebank, M

    2010-05-01

    Methotrexate (MTX)-associated myelopathy is a rare but serious subacute complication of MTX-based chemotherapy. We report the case of a woman with breast cancer and meningeal carcinomatosis who developed severe progressive myelopathy after four cycles of intrathecal MTX administration. We substituted high doses of the key metabolites of the methyl-transfer pathway: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), 200 mg three times daily i.v.; folinate, 20 mg four times daily i.v.; cyanocobalamin, 100 microg once daily i.v.; and methionine, 5 g daily p.o. The patient's paraparesis improved rapidly thereafter, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed resolution of the intramedullary lesions. Genetic analyses revealed homozygosity for the A allele of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) c.1298A>C (p.E429A), whereas other genetic variants of folate/methionine metabolism associated with MTX neurotoxicity were not present. Substitution with multiple folate metabolites may be a promising strategy for the treatment of MTX-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:19821069

  9. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Goldstein, Christina L; Arnold, Paul; Harrop, James; Hilibrand, Alan; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord dysfunction can result from either traumatic or nontraumatic causes, including tumors, infections, and degenerative changes. In this article, we review the range of degenerative spinal disorders resulting in progressive cervical spinal cord compression and propose the adoption of a new term, degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). DCM comprises both osteoarthritic changes to the spine, including spondylosis, disk herniation, and facet arthropathy (collectively referred to as cervical spondylotic myelopathy), and ligamentous aberrations such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies. PMID:26378358

  10. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a review of surgical indications and decision making.

    PubMed Central

    Law, M. D.; Bernhardt, M.; White, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated. The key to the initial diagnosis is a careful neurologic examination. The physical findings may be subtle, thus a high index of suspicion is helpful. Poor prognostic indicators and, therefore, absolute indications for surgery are: 1. Progression of signs and symptoms. 2. Presence of myelopathy for six months or longer. 3. Compression ratio approaching 0.4 or transverse area of the spinal cord of 40 square millimeters or less. Improvement is unusual with nonoperative treatment and almost all patients progressively worsen. Surgical intervention is the most predictable way to prevent neurologic deterioration. The recommended decompression is anterior when there is anterior compression at one or two levels and no significant developmental narrowing of the canal. For compression at more than two levels, developmental narrowing of the canal, posterior compression, and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, we recommend posterior decompression. In order for posterior decompression to be effective there must be lordosis of the cervical spine. If kyphosis is present, anterior decompression is needed. Kyphosis associated with a developmentally narrow canal or posterior compression may require combined anterior and posterior approaches. Fusion is required for instability. Images Figure 1 PMID:8209553

  11. MRI findings in Hirayama's disease: flexion-induced cervical myelopathy or intrinsic motor neuron disease?

    PubMed

    Schröder, R; Keller, E; Flacke, S; Schmidt, S; Pohl, C; Klockgether, T; Schlegel, U

    1999-11-01

    Hirayama's disease is a benign juvenile form of focal amyotrophy affecting the upper limbs. Previous studies have suggested that the disorder is a neck flexion induced cervical myelopathy. We report clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in nine patients with Hirayama's disease. Cervical imaging of seven patients revealed spinal cord changes consisting of focal atrophy and foci of signal alterations. On neck flexion a forward movement and mild reduction in the anteroposterior diameter of the lower cervical cord against the vertebral bodies was noted in affected individuals as well as in five normal controls. In contrast to earlier reports, none of our patients showed complete obliteration of the posterior subarachnoid space. Measurement of the anteroposterior spinal cord diameter in each vertebral segment (C4-C7) revealed no significant differences in the degree of spinal cord flattening between the two groups. Furthermore, two of our patients had significant degenerative changes in the cervical spine (disc herniation, retrospondylosis) contralateral to the clinically affected side. These degenerative changes resulted in a marked cord compression on neck flexion but were not associated with ipsilateral clinical abnormalities or spinal cord alterations. Our results argue against a flexion-induced cervical myelopathy and support the view that Hirayama's disease is an intrinsic motor neuron disease. PMID:10631640

  12. [Meningeal seeding of spinal cord glioblastoma multiforme without any signs of myelopathy].

    PubMed

    Chida, K; Konno, H; Sahara, M; Takase, S

    1995-11-01

    An autopsy case of meningeal spreading of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) probably originating in the cervical cord was reported. In contrast to autopsy findings, main symptoms were similar to subacute meningitis, and any signs of myelopathy could not be detected during the clinical course. The patient was a 22-year-old man who was hospitalized because of a 2-week history of progressive headache following cough and slight fever. Vomiting and somnolence, developing 5 days before admission, were improved the day after a lumbar puncture performed at another hospital. On admission, meningeal signs, mild right abducens palsy, and depressed deep tendon reflexes were detected. There was no muscle weakness, sensory loss, or Babinski sign. Lumbar puncture yielded CSF with an opening pressure of 280 mmH2O, 21 mononuclear cells/mm3, a protein level of 645 mg/dl, and a glucose level of 7 mg/dl. Cytology for malignancy and multiple cultures were negative. Brain CT scan showed mild hydrocephalus and swelling of the brainstem and cerebellum. Intravenous administration of antimicrobial drugs was started and ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery was performed. During the third hospital week, however, meningeal signs progressed and somnolence reappeared, followed by progressive multiple cranial neuropathy and polyradiculopathy characterized by flaccid tetraparesis, muscle atrophy, and sensory impairment without a level. Babinski sign could not be detected. MRI revealed an intramedullary lesion in the lower cervical cord, swelling of the brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord and nerve roots, and a diffuse or nodular thickning of leptomeninges. Repeated CSF cytology disclosed atypical cells. Examinations for extraneural malignancies were negative. During the 9th hospital week, flaccid tetraplegia progressed and stupor developed, and the patient died 2 weeks later. The pathological study was limited to the brain. The brain showed a diffuse opalescent thickening of the leptomeninges, especially

  13. Muscular weakness represents the main limiting factor of walk, functional independence and quality of life of myelopathy patients associated to HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Caiafa, Renata Costa; Orsini, Marco; Felicio, Lilian R; Puccioni-Sohler, Marzia

    2016-04-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy is a progressive disabling disease associated with gait abnormalities. Objective To identify and quantify the main muscles affected by weakness and spasticity, their impact on gait, functional capacity and on quality of life of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy patients. Method We evaluated lower limbs muscular strength according to the Medical Research Council scale, spasticity according to the modified Ashworth scale, daily activities according to the Barthel Index and quality of life according to the Short-Form Health Survey-36 of 26 HTLV-1-associated myelopathy patients. Results The muscles most affected by weakness included the dorsal flexors and knee flexors. Spasticity predominated in the hip adductor muscles and in plantar flexors. Assistance for locomotion, minimal dependence in daily activities, limitations in functional capacity and physical aspects were the most common findings. Conclusion The impairment of gait, functional dependence and quality of life were predominantly a consequence of intense muscle weakness in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy patients. PMID:27096999

  14. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our clinical with left buttock pain and paresthesia for 3 years. A large extradural cyst was found at T1-L2 level on MRI and a communication between the cyst and subarachnoid space was illustrated by CT-myelography. We performed cyst fenestration with primary repair of dural defect. Both patients' symptoms gradually subsided and follow up images taken 1-2 months postoperatively showed nearly disappeared cysts. There has been no documented recurrence in these two cases so far. Tailored laminotomy with cyst fenestration can be a safe and effective alternative choice in treating SEACs compared to traditional complete resection of cyst wall with multi-level laminectomy. PMID:24294463

  15. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary. PMID:26409007

  16. Immunohistochemical observation of canine degenerative myelopathy in two Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Mizue; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Park, Eun-Sil; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Jun; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess whether oxidative stress and/or denatured proteins play roles in the pathogenesis of canine degenerative myelopathy (DM). Two Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) dogs with a homozygous mutation (c.118G>A) in the canine superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene were examined. The pathological features of the dogs were consistent with those of previous cases of DM in PWC. In the spinal lesions, diffuse SOD1 expression was observed in the neurons while no inclusion-like aggregates had formed, which disagreed with the findings of a previous study. A unique inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) staining pattern in reactive astrocytes and a significant increase in ubiquitin immunoreactivity in the spinal lesions were also observed. These findings indicate the involvement of oxidative stress and the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in the pathogenesis of canine DM, whereas the role of SOD1 remains unclear. PMID:21628865

  17. Comparison of two reconstructive techniques in the surgical management of four-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, FengNing; Li, ZhongHai; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Fan; Shen, HongXing; Kang, YiFan; Zhang, YinQuan; Cai, Bin; Hou, TieSheng

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy and radiological outcome of treating 4-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) with either anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or "skip" corpectomy and fusion, 48 patients with 4-level CSM who had undergone ACDF or SCF at our hospital were analyzed retrospectively between January 2008 and June 2011. Twenty-seven patients received ACDF (Group A) and 21 patients received SCF. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, and Cobb's angles of the fused segments and C2-7 segments were compared in the two groups. The minimum patient follow-up was 2 years. No significant differences between the groups were found in demographic and baseline disease characteristics, duration of surgery, or follow-up time. Our study demonstrates that there was no significant difference in the clinical efficacy of ACDF and SCF, but ACDF involves less intraoperative blood loss, better cervical spine alignment, and fewer postoperative complications than SCF. PMID:25692140

  18. Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Draining into Spinal Perimedullary Veins: A Rare Cause of Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atamaz, Funda; Oran, Ismail; Durmaz, Berrin

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare case of progressive myelopathy caused by intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with venous drainage into the spinal perimedullary veins. A 45-yr-old man developed urinary and fecal incontinence and muscle weakness in the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed brainstem edema and dilated veins of the brainstem and spinal cord. Cerebral angiography showed a dural arteriovenous fistula fed by the neuromeningeal branch of the left ascending pharyngeal artery. Occlusion of the fistula could be achieved by embolization after a diagnostic and subsequent therapeutic delay. There was no improvement in clinical condition. For the neurologic outcome of these patients it is important that fistula must be treated before ischemic and gliotic changes become irreversible. PMID:17043439

  19. Compressive myelopathy of the cervical spine in Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis).

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Dawn M; Douglass, Michael; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Aguilar, Roberto; Schaftenaar, Willem; Shores, Andy

    2009-03-01

    Cervical subluxation and compressive myelopathy appears to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Four cases of cervical subluxation resulting in nerve root compression or spinal cord compression were identified. Three were presumptively induced by trauma, and one had an unknown inciting cause. Two dragons exhibited signs of chronic instability. Cervical vertebrae affected included C1-C4. Clinical signs on presentation included ataxia, ambulatory paraparesis or tetraparesis to tetraplegia, depression to stupor, cervical scoliosis, and anorexia. Antemortem diagnosis of compression was only confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography. Treatment ranged from supportive care to attempted surgical decompression. All dragons died or were euthanatized, at 4 days to 12 mo postpresentation. Studies to define normal vertebral anatomy in the species are necessary to determine whether the pathology is linked to cervical malformation, resulting in ligament laxity, subsequent instability, and subluxation. PMID:19368265

  20. A Peruvian family with a high burden of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carolina; Verdonck, Kristien; Tipismana, Martín; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is frequent in Peru; an estimated 1-2% of the Peruvian population carry this retrovirus. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a chronic disabling disease that affects about 1% of the carriers of HTLV-1. It is not yet known why some HTLV-1-infected people develop HAM/TSP while others do not. In this case report, we present a family with an unusually high burden of HAM/TSP: 5 (the 2 parents and 3 of their children) of 7 HTLV-1 carriers developed the same disease. We describe the clinical presentation and discuss the clustering of disease against the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP. Families such as this may hold the key to discovering which factors trigger the development of HAM/TSP. PMID:26392440

  1. The post-syrinx syndrome: stable central myelopathy and collapsed or absent syrinx.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, E I; Heiss, John D; Mendelevich, E G

    2006-06-01

    Among 168 cases with neurologic findings of cervicothoracic syringomyelia and MRI findings of Chiari 1 malformation and/or underdevelopment of the posterior cranial fossa, 15 patients (9.1 %) had collapsed, flat syrinxes and 14 patients (8.3 %) did not have syrinxes. Both groups of patients had clinical findings of central myelopathy that had been stable for at least 3 years. Magnetic resonance imaging detected atrophy of the cervical spinal cord in both groups and spontaneous communications between the syrinx and the subarachnoid space in 3 patients of the group with collapsed syrinxes. Analysis of these results and review of the literature suggest that patients with clinical signs of syringomyelia and Chiari 1 malformation or underdeveloped posterior fossa, but with small or absent syringomyelitic cavities, have the "postsyrinx" state as a result of spontaneous collapse of distended syrinxes. PMID:16511636

  2. Modified Open-Door Laminoplasty Using a Ceramic Spacer and Suture Fixation for Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Toyone, Tomoaki; Shiboi, Ryutaro; Inada, Kunimasa; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji; Inoue, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Shirahata, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Katsunori

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a new simple technique using suture anchors and ceramic spacers to stabilize the elevated laminae in open-door cervical laminoplasty. Although ceramic spacers were placed in the opened laminae and fixed with nylon threads in this series, it was occasionally difficult to fix the nylon threads to the lateral mass. Materials and Methods Study 1: A preliminary study was conducted using a suture anchor system. Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent surgery for cervical myelopathy were prospectively examined. Study 2: The second study was performed prospectively to evaluate the feasibility of this new technique based on the result of the preliminary study. Clinical outcomes were examined in 45 consecutive patients [cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM)] and 43 consecutive patients (OPLL). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scoring system (JOA score), axial neck pain, and radiological findings were analyzed. Results 1) In one case, re-operation was necessary due to dislodgement of the ceramic spacer following rupture of the thread. 2) In all patients, postoperative CT scans showed that the anchors were securely inserted into the bone. In the CSM group, the average JOA score improved from 9.5 points preoperatively to 13.3 at follow-up (recovery 51%). In the OPLL group, the average JOA score improved from 10.1 (5-14) points preoperatively to 14.4 (11-16) at follow-up (recovery 62%). There were no serious complications. Conclusion The use of the suture anchor system made it unnecessary to create a hole in the lateral mass and enabled reliable and faster fixation of the HA spacers in open-door laminoplasty. PMID:26446650

  3. Myelopathic signs and functional outcome following cervical decompression surgery: a proposed myelopathy scale.

    PubMed

    El-Zuway, Salem; Farrokhyar, Forough; Kachur, Edward

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in adults. In spite of this, the impact of the changes in myelopathic signs following cervical decompression surgery and their relationship to functional outcome measures remains unclear. The main goals of our study were to prospectively assess changes in myelopathic signs with a functional outcome scale (the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association [mJOA] scale) following cervical decompression surgery and to objectively test a proposed new myelopathy scale (MS). METHODS Between 2008 and 2011, 36 patients with CSM were observed following cervical decompression surgery. Patient data including mJOA and MS scores were prospectively collected and analyzed preoperatively and at 1 year after surgery. RESULTS In this cohort, reflex, Babinski, and proprioception signs showed statistically significant improvement following surgery at 1 year (p = < 0.001, p = 0.008, and p = 0.015, respectively). A lesser degree of improvement was observed with the Hoffman sign (p = 0.091). No statistically significant improvement in clonus occurred (p = 0.368). There was a significant improvement in mJOA (p ≤ 0.001) and MS (p ≤ 0.001) scores at 1 year compared with the preoperative scores. The results showed an inverse correlation between MS and mJOA scores both pre- and postoperatively (Spearman's correlation coefficient = -0.202 preoperatively and -0.361 postoperatively). CONCLUSIONS Improvement in myelopathic signs was noted following cervical decompression surgery in patients with CSM. The newly devised MS scale demonstrated these findings, and the new MS scale correlates with improvement in mJOA scores in this patient cohort. PMID:26849710

  4. Clinical Presentation of Cervical Myelopathy at C1–2 Level

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Terashima, Yoshinori; Tsuda, Hajime; Yoshimoto, Mitsunori; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective study. Purpose To clarify the clinical features of cervical myelopathy at the C1–2 level. Overview of Literature Methods for distinguishing the affected level based on myelomere symptoms or dysfunction of the conducting pathway were established. However, no symptoms have been identified as being specific to the C1–2 level segment. Methods We evaluated 24 patients with cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression at the C1–2 level. Preoperative neurological assessment were investigated and compared with the rate and site of compression of the spinal cord using computed tomography-myelography. Results Impaired temperature and pain sensation were confirmed in 18 of the 24 patients with that localized to the upper arms (n=3), forearm (n=9), both (n=2), and whole body (n=4). Muscle weakness was observed in 18 patients, muscle weakness extended from the biceps brachii to the abductor digiti minimi in 10 patients, and in the whole body in 8 patients. Deep tendon reflexes were normal in 10 patients, whereas hyperactive deep tendon reflexes were noted in 14 patients. The rate of spinal cord compression was significantly higher in patients with perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness compared with those with no dysfunction. However, no significant difference in the rate and site of compression was identified in those with dysfunction. Conclusions Perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness localized to the upper limbs was observed in 58% and 42% of patients, respectively. Neurological abnormalities, such as perceptual dysfunction and muscle weakness, were visualized in patients with marked compression. PMID:27559458

  5. Etiological, clinical, and radiological features of longitudinally extensive myelopathy in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihe; Jiao, Yujuan; Cui, Lei; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Linwei; Jiao, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Longitudinally extensive myelopathy (LEM) is a rare spinal syndrome, and was mostly assessed in western populations. In order to investigate the etiological, clinical, and radiological features of LEM in Chinese patients, we retrospectively analyzed eighty-nine (40 men and 49 women, median age 45.9±15.7years) patients with LEM hospitalized in China-Japan Friendship Hospital. LEM comprised autoimmune inflammatory myelitis (n=53), metabolic and compressive disorders (n=13), vascular diseases (n=10), neoplastic diseases (n=7), infectious diseases (n=4), and syringomyelia (n=2). Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) was the most common cause of transverse myelopathy identified in LEM (38/89 [42.7%]) characterized by intractable vomiting and hiccups and painful tonic spasms. Subacute combined degeneration and anterior spinal artery syndrome accounted for the largest non-transverse LEM, which selectively affected the spinal dorsal and/or lateral columns and the spinal anterior region, respectively. Radicular pain was common in anterior spinal artery syndrome. Postrema (n=15, 39.5%) and cervical (n=31, 81.6%) lesions were significantly increased in NMOSD versus non-NMOSD (n=7, 13.7% and n=34, 66.7%, respectively, p<0.05]. Axial T2-weighted MRI indicated that 46 (51.7%) patients exhibited complete lesions; 43 (48.3%) patients exhibited non-transverse lesions, mainly unilateral or symmetrical tract lesions. Twenty-four (51.1%) LEM patients exhibited distinct gadolinium contrast enhancement. In this Chinese cohort, LEM was primarily attributed to NMOSD. While the etiological distribution in the non-NMOSD group was different from western populations, clinical and imaging features may facilitate a differential diagnosis. PMID:27526974

  6. Degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, R M

    1992-07-01

    DM in the German Shepherd is an immune-related disorder whose clinical signs are explained by a widespread degeneration of the white matter pathways in the thoracolumbar spinal cord. Therapy includes exercise, vitamin supplementation, and EACA medication. Avoiding unnecessary surgical procedures is also important to preclude permanent deterioration that can result following surgery in DM patients. In dogs other than German Shepherds, other identifiable causes should be treated. Additional confirmation of the diagnosis of DM may be assisted by performing cell-mediated immune studies or other serodiagnostic tests as they become available. PMID:1641928

  7. Syphilitic myelopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... not reverse existing nerve damage. For neurosyphilis, aqueous penicillin G (by injection) is the drug of choice. Some patients (for example, pregnant women) with penicillin allergies may have to be desensitized to penicillin ...

  8. Interferon beta-1a treatment in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto da; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; Silva, Diego Luz Felipe da; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  9. INTERFERON BETA-1A TREATMENT IN HTLV-1-ASSOCIATED MYELOPATHY/TROPICAL SPASTIC PARAPARESIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; da Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; da Silva, Diego Luz Felipe; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  10. A Caucasian Australian presenting with human T-lymphotropic virus type I associated myelopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We report the first known case of human T-lymphotropic virus type I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis in an Australian Caucasian, a disease reported in Aboriginal and immigrant populations where the virus is often endemic. Case presentation A 41-year-old Caucasian Australian man had a 3-year background of progressive functional decline from a myelopathy with spastic paraparesis and sphincteric dysfunction. Conclusions Although studies have shown a very low prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus type I in the greater Australian population, increased focus on Aboriginal health, and the expanding diversity and integration of the Australian population means that presentation of human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated disease is likely to increase. PMID:25416840

  11. Atlantoaxial Subluxation due to an Os Odontoideum in an Achondroplastic Adult: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Rahimizadeh, Abolfazl; Soufiani, Housain F; Hassani, Valiolah; Rahimizadeh, Ava

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the first example of an adult achondroplastic dwarf with progressive quadriparesis secondary to atlantoaxial subluxation as a consequence of an os odontoideum. Actually, craniocervical region is a frequent site of compression and myelopathy in achondroplasia particularly in children as a result of small foramen magnum and hypertrophied opisthion. Moreover, very rarely in achondroplastic patients, coexistence of atlantoaxial instability as the sequel of os odontoideum can result in further compression of the already compromised cervicomedullary neural tissues, the scenario that has been reported only in five achondroplastic children. Herein, a 39-year-old achondroplastic male suffering such an extremely rare combination is presented. With C1-C2 screw rod instrumentation, atlas arch laminectomy, limited suboccipital craniectomy, and release of dural fibrous bands, reduction, decompression, and stabilization could be achieved properly resulting in steady but progressive recovery. PMID:26693369

  12. [Retro-odontoid pseudotumor in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis].

    PubMed

    Castro-Castro, Julián; Castro-Bouzas, Daniel; Pinzón-Millán, Alfonso; Pastor-Zapata, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are lesions caused by inflammatory granulation or reactive soft tissue hypertrophy from chronic atlantoaxial subluxation. However, one-third of the cases reported in the medical literature did not show atlantoaxial instability clearly. The authors present the case of a 76-year-old man previously diagnosed with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis who presented with severe progressive myelopathy. A magnetic resonance imaging of his cervical spine revealed a retro-odontoid predural mass, which caused a severe compression of the cervical spinal cord. The patient underwent a posterior laminectomy of the atlas and an occipitocervical fusion. After surgery, the pseudotumor was considerably smaller and the neurological symptoms improved. PMID:23465746

  13. [Syringomyelobulbia associated with cervical spondylosis. Pathophysiology and therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Rebai, R; Boudawara, M Z; Ben Yahia, M; Mhiri, C; Ben Mansour, H

    2002-05-01

    Spinal spondylosis is rarely implicated in syringomyelia. We report the case of a 70-year-old patient with a 10-year history of gait disturbance; constrictive pain of lower limbs and urinary incontinance. Physical examination disclosed spastic tetraparesis. In the upper limbs, deep tendon reflexes were abolished, with hyposthesia and hands amyotrophy. Brain and cervical MRI showed syringomyelobulbia with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Extensive cervical laminectomy induced a mild clinical improvement. A second MRI performed 6 months after surgery depicted a complete disappearance of the bulbo-medullar cavitation with secondary atrophy. Extradural spondylotic compression of the spinal cord should be firmly considered as an etiology of syringomyelia. A purely extradural decompression could be sufficient to induce regression of the medullary cavitation. PMID:12053170

  14. Spontaneous Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma in the Rigid Thoracic Spine : A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Woo; Song, Joon-Ho; Chang, In-Bok

    2008-01-01

    Ligamentum flavum hematoma is a rare condition. Twenty cases including present case have been reported in English-language literature. Among them, only one case reported in pure thoracic spine. A 72-year-old man presented with thoracic myelopathy without precedent cause. Magnetic resonance images revealed a posterior semicircular mass which was located in T7 and T8 level compressing the spinal cord dorsally. T7-8 total laminectomy and extirpation of the mass was performed. One month later following surgery, the patient fully recovered to normal state. Pathologic result was confirmed as ligamentum flavum hematoma. Ligamentum flavum hematoma of rigid thoracic spine is a very rare disease entity. Most reported cases were confined to mobile cervical and lumbar spine. Surgeons should be aware that there seems to be another different pathogenesis other than previously reported cases of mobile cervical and lumbar spine. PMID:19096657

  15. Atlantoaxial Subluxation due to an Os Odontoideum in an Achondroplastic Adult: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rahimizadeh, Abolfazl; Soufiani, Housain F.; Hassani, Valiolah; Rahimizadeh, Ava

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the first example of an adult achondroplastic dwarf with progressive quadriparesis secondary to atlantoaxial subluxation as a consequence of an os odontoideum. Actually, craniocervical region is a frequent site of compression and myelopathy in achondroplasia particularly in children as a result of small foramen magnum and hypertrophied opisthion. Moreover, very rarely in achondroplastic patients, coexistence of atlantoaxial instability as the sequel of os odontoideum can result in further compression of the already compromised cervicomedullary neural tissues, the scenario that has been reported only in five achondroplastic children. Herein, a 39-year-old achondroplastic male suffering such an extremely rare combination is presented. With C1-C2 screw rod instrumentation, atlas arch laminectomy, limited suboccipital craniectomy, and release of dural fibrous bands, reduction, decompression, and stabilization could be achieved properly resulting in steady but progressive recovery. PMID:26693369

  16. Anomalous vertebral artery compression of the spinal cord at the cervicomedullary junction

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Bret Gene; Krueger, Bruce R; Piepgras, David G

    2011-01-01

    Background: Myelopathy from ectatic vertebral artery compression of the spinal cord at the cervicomedullary junction is a rare condition. Case Description: A 63-year-old female was originally diagnosed with occult hydrocephalus syndrome after presenting with symptoms of ataxia and urinary incontinence. Ventriculoperitoneal shunting induced an acute worsening of the patient′s symptoms as she immediately developed a sensory myelopathy. An MR scan demonstrated multiple congenital abnormalities including cervicomedullary stenosis with anomalous vertebral artery compression of the dorsal spinal cord at the cervicomedullary junction. The patient was taken to surgery for a suboccipital craniectomy, C1-2 laminectomy, vertebral artery decompression, duraplasty, and shunt ligation. Intraoperative findings confirmed preoperative radiography with ectactic vertebral arteries deforming the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. There were no procedural complications and at a 6-month follow-up appointment, the patient had experienced a marked improvement in her preoperative signs and symptoms. Conclusion: Myelopathy from ectatic vertebral artery compression at the cervicomedullary junction is a rare disorder amenable to operative neurovascular decompression. PMID:21886876

  17. Comparisons of three anterior cervical surgeries in treating cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was one of the preferred treatments for degenerative cervical spondylosis. However, the motion of adjacent segment was significantly increased after operation. So cervical disc arthroplasty have been suggested to keep the motion of adjacent segment. A new implant named dynamic cervical implant (DCI) has been developed to keep the motion of adjacent segment. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 91 patients treated for single level cervical spondylotic myelopathy with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), dynamic cervical implant (DCI) and cervical total disc replacement (CTDR) between sep 2009 and Mar 2011 in our hospital. They were divided into three groups by surgical methods: ACDF group (group A, 34 cases), DCI group (group B, 25 cases), CTDR group (group C, 32 cases). Operation time, intraoperative blood loss, preoperative and postoperative JOA score and JOA recovery rate were compared among the three groups. Pre-and postoperative hyperextension and hyperflexion radiograms were observed to measure range of motion (ROM) of C2–7, operative and adjacent levels. Results There was no statistical difference in operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and JOA recovery rate (P > 0.05) among three groups. But the differences of their postoperative JOA scores and preoperative JOA scores were of statistical significance (P < 0.05). Compared the pre-and postoperative ROM of C2–7, operative, upper and lower levels of each group respectively, the difference between preoperative ROM and postoperative ROM of group A were of statistically significant (P < 0.05), while was no statistically significant of group C (P > 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between preoperative ROM and postoperative ROM of upper and lower levels in group B (P > 0.05), but had statistically significance of C2–7 and operative levels (P < 0.05). Conclusions Three operations are

  18. Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potential in HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boostani, Reza; Poorzahed, Ali; Ahmadi, Zahra; Mellat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive Myelopathy that mainly involves the corticospinal tract. Despite pronounced involvement of the lower limbs, patients also have abnormalities in their upper limbs. So, we studied somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) of the median nerve in HAM/TSP patients to determine the extent of the involvement of the pathway of the central nervous system, especially the cervical spinal cord. Methods In this cross sectional study, 48 patients with HAM/TSP who were referred to Qaem Hospital in Mashhad from October 2010 to October 2011 were evaluated for various indices, including SSEPs of the median nerve for N9, N11, N13, and N20 waveforms and also N11–13 and N13–20 Inter Peak Latency (IPL), severity of disease (based on Osama criteria), disease duration (less or more than 2 years), age, and gender. SPSS software was used for data analysis. The t-test was used for quantitative data, and the chi-squared test was used for the qualitative variables. Results Thirty-four patients (70.2%) were females. The mean age was 45.6 ± 14.2 years. About SSEPs indices of the median nerve, N9 and N11 were normal in all patients, but N13 (50%), N20 (16.7%), IPL11–13 (58.3%), and IPL13–20 (22.9%) were abnormal. No significant relationships were found between age, gender, disease duration, and SSEPs indices (p > 0.05), but IPL11–13 and IPL13–20 had significant relationships with disease disability (p = 0.017 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Despite the lack of obvious complaints of upper limbs, SSEPs indices of the median nerve from the cervical spinal cord to the cortex were abnormal, which indicated extension of the lesion from the thoracic spinal cord up to the cervical spinal cord and thalamocortical pathways. Also, abnormalities in the cervical spinal cord had a direct correlation with the severity of disability in patients with HAM/TSP. PMID:27382445

  19. Variants within the SP110 nuclear body protein modify risk of canine degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Ivansson, Emma L; Megquier, Kate; Kozyrev, Sergey V; Murén, Eva; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Zeng, Rong; Kolicheski, Ana L; Hansen, Liz; Katz, Martin L; Johnson, Gayle C; Johnson, Gary S; Coates, Joan R; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2016-05-31

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a naturally occurring neurodegenerative disease with similarities to some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Most dogs that develop DM are homozygous for a common superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1) mutation. However, not all dogs homozygous for this mutation develop disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) breed comparing DM-affected and -unaffected dogs homozygous for the SOD1 mutation. The analysis revealed a modifier locus on canine chromosome 25. A haplotype within the SP110 nuclear body protein (SP110) was present in 40% of affected compared with 4% of unaffected dogs (P = 1.5 × 10(-5)), and was associated with increased probability of developing DM (P = 4.8 × 10(-6)) and earlier onset of disease (P = 1.7 × 10(-5)). SP110 is a nuclear body protein involved in the regulation of gene transcription. Our findings suggest that variations in SP110-mediated gene transcription may underlie, at least in part, the variability in risk for developing DM among PWCs that are homozygous for the disease-related SOD1 mutation. Further studies are warranted to clarify the effect of this modifier across dog breeds. PMID:27185954

  20. Comparative Analysis of VOCs in Exhaled Breath of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changsong; Li, Mingjuan; Jiang, Hongquan; Tong, Hongshuang; Feng, Yue; Wang, Yue; Pi, Xin; Guo, Lei; Nie, Maomao; Feng, Honglin; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurological degenerative disease. It can cause irreversible neurological damage to motor neurons; typical symptoms include muscle weakness and atrophy, bulbar paralysis and pyramidal tract signs. The ALS-mimicking disease cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) presents similar symptoms, but analysis of breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can potentially be used to distinguish ALS from CSM. In this study, breath samples were collected from 28 ALS and 13 CSM patients. Subsequently, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) was used to analyze breath VOCs. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) were the statistical methods used to process the final data. We identified 4 compounds with significantly decreased levels in ALS patients compared with CSM controls: (1) carbamic acid, monoammonium salt; (2) 1-alanine ethylamide, (S)-; (3) guanidine, N,N-dimethyl-; and (4) phosphonic acid, (p-hydroxyphenyl)-. Currently, the metabolic origin of the VOCs remains unclear; however, several pathways might explain the decreasing trends observed. The results of this study demonstrate that there are specific VOC profiles associated with ALS and CSM patients that can be used to differentiate between the two. In addition, these metabolites could contribute to a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ALS. PMID:27212435

  1. Accumulation and aggregate formation of mutant superoxide dismutase 1 in canine degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, S; Kobatake, Y; Suzuki, R; Tsukui, T; Kato, S; Yamato, O; Sakai, H; Urushitani, M; Maeda, S; Kamishina, H

    2015-09-10

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder that has recently been linked to mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. We generated a polyclonal antibody against canine SOD1 to further characterize the mutant SOD1 protein and its involvement in DM pathogenesis. This antibody (SYN3554) was highly specific to canine SOD1 and had the ability to reveal distinct cytoplasmic aggregates in cultured cells expressing canine mutant SOD1 and also in the spinal neurons of symptomatic homozygotes. A similar staining pattern was observed in asymptomatic homozygotes. SOD1 aggregates were not detected in the spinal neurons of heterozygotes; the accumulation of SOD1 was also detected in the reactive astrocytes of homozygotes and heterozygotes to a similar extent. Our results support the hypothesis that the cytoplasmic accumulation and aggregate formation of the mutant SOD1 protein, especially in astrocytes, are closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM. Therefore, this disease is regarded as a spontaneous large-animal model of SOD1-mediated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in humans. PMID:26162235

  2. Daily controlled physiotherapy increases survival time in dogs with suspected degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, I; Cizinauskas, S; Doherr, M G; Steffen, F; Jaggy, A

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of the study reported here were to evaluate the signalment and clinical presentation in 50 dogs with degenerative myelopathy, to evaluate whether mean survival time was significantly affected by various means of physiotherapy performed in 22 dogs, and to determine whether neurologic status, anatomic localization, or age at onset had an influence on survival time in dogs that received physiotherapy. We found a significant (P < .05) breed predisposition for the German Shepherd Dog, Kuvasz, Hovawart, and Bernese Mountain Dog. Mean age at diagnosis was 9.1 years, and both sexes were affected equally. The anatomic localization of the lesion was spinal cord segment T3-L3 in 56% (n = 28) and L3-S3 in 44% (n = 22) of the dogs. Animals that received intensive (n = 9) physiotherapy had longer (P < .05) survival time (mean 255 days), compared with that for animals with moderate (n = 6; mean 130 days) or no (n = 7; mean 55 days) physiotherapy. In addition, our results indicate that affected dogs which received physiotherapy remained ambulatory longer than did animals that did not receive physical treatment. PMID:16955818

  3. Characterization of intercostal muscle pathology in canine degenerative myelopathy: a disease model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brandie R; Coates, Joan R; Johnson, Gayle C; Bujnak, Alyssa C; Katz, Martin L

    2013-12-01

    Dogs homozygous for missense mutations in the SOD1 gene develop a late-onset neuromuscular disorder called degenerative myelopathy (DM) that has many similarities to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Both disorders are characterized by widespread progressive declines in motor functions, accompanied by atrophic changes in the descending spinal cord tracts. Some forms of ALS are also associated with SOD1 mutations. In end-stage ALS, death usually occurs as a result of respiratory failure from severe functional impairment of respiratory muscles. The mechanisms that lead to this loss of function are not known. Dogs with DM are euthanized at all stages of disease progression, providing an opportunity to characterize the onset and progression of any pathological changes in the respiratory muscles that may precede respiratory failure. To characterize such potential disease-related pathology, we evaluated intercostal muscles from Boxer and Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs that were euthanized at various stages of DM disease progression. DM was found to result in intercostal muscle atrophy, fibrosis, increased variability in muscle fiber size and shape, and alteration in muscle fiber type composition. This pathology was not accompanied by retraction of the motor neuron terminals from the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes, suggesting that the muscle atrophy did not result from physical denervation. These findings provide a better understanding of the mechanisms that likely lead to respiratory failure in at least some forms of ALS and will be useful in the development and evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions using the DM model. PMID:24043596

  4. Variants within the SP110 nuclear body protein modify risk of canine degenerative myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ivansson, Emma L.; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Murén, Eva; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Zeng, Rong; Kolicheski, Ana L.; Hansen, Liz; Katz, Martin L.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Johnson, Gary S.; Coates, Joan R.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a naturally occurring neurodegenerative disease with similarities to some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Most dogs that develop DM are homozygous for a common superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1) mutation. However, not all dogs homozygous for this mutation develop disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) breed comparing DM-affected and -unaffected dogs homozygous for the SOD1 mutation. The analysis revealed a modifier locus on canine chromosome 25. A haplotype within the SP110 nuclear body protein (SP110) was present in 40% of affected compared with 4% of unaffected dogs (P = 1.5 × 10−5), and was associated with increased probability of developing DM (P = 4.8 × 10−6) and earlier onset of disease (P = 1.7 × 10−5). SP110 is a nuclear body protein involved in the regulation of gene transcription. Our findings suggest that variations in SP110-mediated gene transcription may underlie, at least in part, the variability in risk for developing DM among PWCs that are homozygous for the disease-related SOD1 mutation. Further studies are warranted to clarify the effect of this modifier across dog breeds. PMID:27185954

  5. Posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko; Fujiyoshi, Takayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical results of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF) for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A total of 24 patients underwent PDF, and their surgical outcomes were evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores (0-11 points) and by recovery rates calculated at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery and at a mean final follow-up of 4 years and 5 months. The mean JOA score before surgery was 3.7 points. Although transient paralysis occurred immediately after surgery in one patient (3.8%), all patients showed neurological recovery at the final follow-up with a mean JOA score of 8.0 points and a mean recovery rate of 58.1%. The mean recovery rate at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery was 36.7, 48.8, 54.0 and 56.8%, respectively. The median time point that the JOA score reached its peak value was 9 months after surgery. No patient chose additional anterior decompression surgery via thoracotomy. The present findings demonstrate that despite persistent anterior impingement of the spinal cord by residual OPLL, PDF can result in considerable neurological recovery with a low risk of postoperative paralysis. Since neurological recovery progresses slowly after PDF, we suggest that additional anterior decompression surgery is not desirable during the early stage of recovery. PMID:20049486

  6. Etanercept-Induced Myelopathy in a Pediatric Case of Blau Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Caracseghi, Fabiola; Izquierdo-Blasco, Jaume; Sanchez-Montanez, Angel; Melendo-Perez, Susana; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Modesto, Consuelo

    2011-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autoinflammatory disorder within the group of pediatric granulomatous diseases. Mutations in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2/CARD15) are responsible for this condition, which has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and variable expressivity. The clinical picture includes arthritis, uveitis, skin rash, and granulomatous inflammation. Central nervous system involvement is seldom reported, although some isolated cases of seizures, neurosensorial hearing loss, and transient cranial nerve palsy have been described. Treatment consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive agents, among which anti-tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha (TNF-α) biologic agents, such as etanercept, play an important role. Among the major adverse effects of TNF-α inhibitors, demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis, and acute transverse myelitis have been reported in adults. We describe a case of pediatric Blau syndrome affected by etanercept-induced myelopathy, manifesting as a clinical syndrome of transverse myelitis. The patient experienced rapid recovery after etanercept was discontinued. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature and, possibly, the one with the latest onset, following 8 years of treatment. We discuss the etiopathogenic mechanisms of this reaction and possible explanations for the imaging findings. PMID:22937436

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging of cervical spinal cord: A quantitative diagnostic tool in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Toktas, Zafer Orkun; Tanrıkulu, Bahattin; Koban, Orkun; Kilic, Turker; Konya, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique potentially able to evaluate the microscopic structural organization of white matter fibers. Aim: This study aimed to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values obtained by DTI in stenotic versus nonstenotic cervical spinal segments of patients with clinical and neurological evidence of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 21 patients with CSM but without T2 changes on conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor (DT) images from the stenotic and nonstenotic segments of the subjects were obtained. FA and ADC values were estimated and compared with stenotic versus nonstenotic segments. Statistical Analysis: Paired t-test was used [Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 12.0]. Results: In the most stenotic segments, the mean FA value was significantly lower (0.4228 ± 0.1090 vs 0.6884 ± 0.0075, P < 0.001) and the mean ADC value was significantly higher (1.312 ± 0.2405 vs 0.9183 ± 0.1477, P < 0.001) when compared to nonstenotic segments. In addition, there was a negative correlation between FA and ADC values (r = 0.63, P = 0.002). Conclusions: DTI of the cervical spine seems to be a promising novel imaging modality in patients with CSM. Advances in Knowledge: DTI may offer increased diagnostic sensitivity as compared to standard MRI and enables earlier detection of the disease. PMID:27041882

  8. Clinical predictors of surgical outcome in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: an analysis of 248 patients.

    PubMed

    Pumberger, M; Froemel, D; Aichmair, A; Hughes, A P; Sama, A A; Cammisa, F P; Girardi, F P

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical predictors of surgical outcome in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). We reviewed a consecutive series of 248 patients (71 women and 177 men) with CSM who had undergone surgery at our institution between January 2000 and October 2010. Their mean age was 59.0 years (16 to 86). Medical records, office notes, and operative reports were reviewed for data collection. Special attention was focused on pre-operative duration and severity as well as post-operative persistence of myelopathic symptoms. Disease severity was graded according to the Nurick classification. Our multivariate logistic regression model indicated that Nurick grade 2 CSM patients have the highest chance of complete symptom resolution (p < 0.001) and improvement to normal gait (p = 0.004) following surgery. Patients who did not improve after surgery had longer duration of myelopathic symptoms than those who did improve post-operatively (17.85 months (1 to 101) vs 11.21 months (1 to 69); p = 0.002). More advanced Nurick grades were not associated with a longer duration of symptoms (p = 0.906). Our data suggest that patients with Nurick grade 2 CSM are most likely to improve from surgery. The duration of myelopathic symptoms does not have an association with disease severity but is an independent prognostic indicator of surgical outcome. PMID:23814251

  9. A case report of HTLV-I associated myelopathy presenting with cerebellar ataxia and nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Taki, Masakatsu; Nin, Fumiaki; Hasegawa, Tatsuhisa; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Azuma, Yumiko; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is characterized by spastic paraparesis in the lower extremities, and urinary disturbance. HAM/TSP has also been less frequently associated with cerebellar syndromes and nystagmus. We report a case of HAM/TSP presenting with cerebellar ataxia and nystagmus. The patient was a 73-year-old woman who was born in southern Japan. At age 41, she developed pain and spasticity in the bilateral lower limbs and gradually progressive gait disturbance. At age 57, she was diagnosed with HAM/TSP based on spastic paraparesis in the lower limbs, urinary disturbance and positive anti HTLV-I antibody in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In June 2008, she was referred to our university and hospitalized for rehabilitation. Twenty days later, she experienced rotatory vertigo sensation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pontocerebellar atrophy. The patient presented with cerebellar signs in the upper limbs, gaze-evoked nystagmus in the sitting position and right-beating horizontal nystagmus in the supine and head-hanging positions. Electronystagmography (ENG) showed horizontal saccadic overshoot dysmetria and horizontal saccadic pursuit. Nystagmus is rare among the literature on HAM/TSP. ENG is helpful to evaluate and confirm the cerebellar syndromes of HAM/TSP. PMID:21035292

  10. Characterization of Intercostal Muscle Pathology in Canine Degenerative Myelopathy: A Disease Model for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brandie R.; Coates, Joan R.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Bujnak, Alyssa C.; Katz, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Dogs homozygous for missense mutations in the SOD1 gene develop a late-onset neuromuscular disorder called degenerative myelopathy (DM) that has many similarities to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Both disorders are characterized by widespread progressive declines in motor functions accompanied by atrophic changes in the descending spinal cord tracts , and some forms of ALS are also associated with SOD1 mutations. In end-stage ALS, death usually occurs as a result of respiratory failure due to severe functional impairment of respiratory muscles. The mechanisms that lead to this loss of function are not known. Dogs with DM are euthanized at all stages of disease progression providing an opportunity to characterize the onset and progression of any pathological changes in the respiratory muscles that may precede respiratory failure. To characterize such potential disease-related pathology we evaluated intercostal muscles from Boxer and Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs that were euthanized at various stages of DM disease progression. DM was found to result in intercostal muscle atrophy, fibrosis, increased variability in muscle fiber size and shape, and an alteration in muscle fiber type composition. This pathology was not accompanied by retraction of the motor neuron terminals from the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes, suggesting that the muscle atrophy did not result from physical denervation. These findings provide a better understanding of the mechanisms that likely lead to respiratory failure in at least some forms of ALS and will be useful in the development and evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions using the DM model. PMID:24043596

  11. Comparative Analysis of VOCs in Exhaled Breath of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Li, Mingjuan; Jiang, Hongquan; Tong, Hongshuang; Feng, Yue; Wang, Yue; Pi, Xin; Guo, Lei; Nie, Maomao; Feng, Honglin; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurological degenerative disease. It can cause irreversible neurological damage to motor neurons; typical symptoms include muscle weakness and atrophy, bulbar paralysis and pyramidal tract signs. The ALS-mimicking disease cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) presents similar symptoms, but analysis of breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can potentially be used to distinguish ALS from CSM. In this study, breath samples were collected from 28 ALS and 13 CSM patients. Subsequently, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) was used to analyze breath VOCs. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) were the statistical methods used to process the final data. We identified 4 compounds with significantly decreased levels in ALS patients compared with CSM controls: (1) carbamic acid, monoammonium salt; (2) 1-alanine ethylamide, (S)-; (3) guanidine, N,N-dimethyl-; and (4) phosphonic acid, (p-hydroxyphenyl)-. Currently, the metabolic origin of the VOCs remains unclear; however, several pathways might explain the decreasing trends observed. The results of this study demonstrate that there are specific VOC profiles associated with ALS and CSM patients that can be used to differentiate between the two. In addition, these metabolites could contribute to a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ALS. PMID:27212435

  12. Comparison of Two Reconstructive Techniques in the Surgical Management of Four-Level Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, FengNing; Li, ZhongHai; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Fan; Shen, HongXing; Kang, YiFan; Zhang, YinQuan; Cai, Bin; Hou, TieSheng

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy and radiological outcome of treating 4-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) with either anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or “skip” corpectomy and fusion, 48 patients with 4-level CSM who had undergone ACDF or SCF at our hospital were analyzed retrospectively between January 2008 and June 2011. Twenty-seven patients received ACDF (Group A) and 21 patients received SCF. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, and Cobb's angles of the fused segments and C2-7 segments were compared in the two groups. The minimum patient follow-up was 2 years. No significant differences between the groups were found in demographic and baseline disease characteristics, duration of surgery, or follow-up time. Our study demonstrates that there was no significant difference in the clinical efficacy of ACDF and SCF, but ACDF involves less intraoperative blood loss, better cervical spine alignment, and fewer postoperative complications than SCF. PMID:25692140

  13. Prognostic Value of Preoperative Coping Strategies for Pain in Patients with Residual Neuropathic Pain after Laminoplasty for Compressive Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective cohort study. Purpose To clarify the prognostic value of preoperative coping strategies for pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. Overview of Literature Preoperative physical function, imaging and electrophysiological findings are known predictors of surgical outcomes. However, coping strategies for pain have not been considered. Methods Postoperative questionnaires, concerning health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and daily living activities, were sent to 78 patients with compressive cervical myelopathy who had suffered from neuropathic pain before laminoplasty, and been preoperatively assessed with respect to their physical and mental status and coping strategies for pain. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to clarify the extent to which the patient's preoperative coping strategies could explain the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity levels. Results Forty-two patients with residual neuropathic pain after laminoplasty were analyzed by questionnaires (28 men, 14 women; mean age, 62.7±10.2 years; symptom duration, 48.0±66.0 months). The valid response rate was 53.8%. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that preoperative coping strategies, which involved coping self-statements, diverting attention, and catastrophizing, were independently associated with postoperative HRQOL and activity level, and could explain 7% to 11% of their variance. Combinations of the coping strategies for pain and upper/lower motor functions could explain 26% to 36% of the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity level. Conclusions Preoperative coping strategies for pain are good predictors of postoperative HRQOL and activities of daily living in patients with postoperative residual neuropathic pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. PMID:26435783

  14. Value of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring to reduce neurological complications in patients undergoing anterior cervical spine procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Muralidharan, Aditya; Loke, Yoon K; Habeych, Miguel; Crammond, Donald; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of reports of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and to assess the value of intraoperative monitoring (IOM), including somatosensory evoked potentials, transcranial motor evoked potentials and electromyography, in anterior cervical procedures. A search was conducted to collect a small database of relevant papers using key words describing disorders and procedures of interest. The database was then shortlisted using selection criteria and data was extracted to identify complications as a result of anterior cervical procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and outcome analysis on a continuous scale. In the 22 studies that matched the screening criteria, only two involved the use of IOM. The average sample size was 173 patients. In procedures done without IOM a mean change in Japanese Orthopaedic Association score of 3.94 points and Nurick score by 1.20 points (both less severe post-operatively) was observed. Within our sub-group analysis, worsening myelopathy and/or quadriplegia was seen in 2.71% of patients for studies without IOM and 0.91% of patients for studies with IOM. Variations persist in the existing literature in the evaluation of complications associated with anterior cervical spinal procedures. Based on the review of published studies, sufficient evidence does not exist to make recommendations regarding the use of different IOM modalities to reduce neurological complications during anterior cervical procedures. However, future studies with objective measures of neurological deficits using a specific IOM modality may establish it as an effective and reliable indicator of injury during such surgeries. PMID:26677786

  15. One stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Bin; Chen, Bohua; Ma, Xue-Xiao; Xi, Yong-Ming; Xiang, Hong-Fei; Hu, You-Gu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a method of one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation and to evaluate the clinical efficacy of this surgery. From 1999 to 2008, 18 patients with myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation who underwent this procedure were included. The average age was 63 years (range 48-74 years), and the average follow-up period was 46 months (range 3-108 months). Neurologic status was evaluated using the JOA scoring system. Neurological symptoms improvement was seen in all patients after surgery. The average JOA score was 14.22±1.86 by final follow-up, which was higher than preoperative values (P<0.01), and the average improvement in neurological function was 76.63%. Neurologic examination showed that excellent results had been obtained by 10 patients, good results by 8 patients, with no fair or poor results. 2 patients developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage after surgery and recovered during the follow-up period. One patient with cervical disc herniation developed postoperative C5 palsy on the axle side on the third day after surgery. She completely recovered by 1 month after surgery. No other patients experienced postoperative neurologic complications. Complete anterior and posterior decompression of the spinal cord was achieved after surgery. We concluded that one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation. PMID:26309625

  16. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM): two cases of SPAM following surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Kamran; Kandwal, Pankaj; Gupta, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    To report two cases of traumatic paraplegia who developed Sub-acute Post-Traumatic Ascending Myelopathy (SPAM) following surgical decompression.We hereby report two cases (both 35yr old male) with traumatic paraplegia that developed ascending weakness at 3rd and 5th Post-Op day respectively following surgical decompression. Both the patients experienced remarkable improvement in Neurology after treatment with steroids. The authors conclude by emphasizing on minimum cord handling during surgical decompression of the spinal cord to avoid this potentially life threatening complication. PMID:24823733

  17. Ipilimumab-induced necrotic myelopathy in a patient with metastatic melanoma: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Al-Ola; Herlopian, Aline; Ravilla, Rahul; Bansal, Meghana; Chandra-Reddy, Sowmya; Mahmoud, Fade; Ong, Shirley; Gokden, Murat; Hutchins, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Ipilimumab is a novel humanized monoclonal antibody directed against cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4, a T-cell surface molecule involved in down-regulation and suppression of the T cell response to stimuli. Patients treated with ipilimumab are at risk for immune-related adverse events involving the skin, digestive tract, liver and endocrine organs. Few case reports of immune-related adverse effects involving central or peripheral nervous system due to ipilimumab are published. These include inflammatory myopathy, aseptic meningitis, severe meningo-radiculo-neuritis, temporal arteritis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. We report the first case of ipilimumab-induced progressive necrotic myelopathy. PMID:25712627

  18. Tropical spastic paraparesis and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy: clinical, epidemiological, virological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Mahieux, R

    2012-03-01

    In 1980, Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first oncogenic human retrovirus to be discovered. HTLV-1 belongs to the Retroviridae family, the Orthoretrovirinae subfamily and to the deltaretrovirus genus. HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4(+) lymphoid cells in vivo. Three molecules have been identified for binding and/or entry of HTLV-1: heparan sulfate proteoglycans, neuropilin-1, and glucose transporter 1. An efficient transfer of the virus from an infected cell to a target cell can occur through the formation of a viral synapse and/or by virofilm structure. As for all retroviruses, HTLV-1 genome possesses three major ORFs (gag, pol and env) encoding the structural and enzymatic proteins. HTLV-1 encodes also some regulatory and auxillary proteins including the tax protein with transforming activities and the HBZ protein which plays a role in the proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic cells. HTLV-1 is present throughout the world with clusters of high endemicity including mainly Southern Japan, the Caribbean region, areas in South America and in intertropical Africa. The worldwide HTLV-1 infected population is estimated to be around 10-20 million. HTLV-1 has three modes of transmission: (1): mother to child, mainly linked to prolonged breast-feeding; (2): sexual, mainly occurring from male to female and (3): contaminated blood products. HTLV-1 possesses a remarkable genetic stability. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of mainly two severe diseases: a malignant T CD4(+) cell lymphoproliferation, of very poor prognosis, named Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), and a chronic neuro-myelopathy named Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy (TSP/HAM). The lifetime risk among HTLV-1 carriers is estimated to be around 0.25 to 3%. TSP/HAM mainly occurs in adults, with a mean age at onset of 40-50 years and it is more common in women than in men. Blood transfusion is a major risk factor for TSP/HAM development. Clinically

  19. Genetic testing of canine degenerative myelopathy in the South African Boxer dog population.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Gareth E; Van der Zwan, Henriette; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2013-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive disease process that is diagnosed late in life and mainly affects the pelvic limbs. Factors that make an ante-mortem definitive diagnosis of DM include: an insidious onset and clinical manifestation that mimics other disease processes of the pelvic limbs (hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament rupture, etc.) or there may even be concurrent disease processes, old-age onset and lack of reliable diagnostic methods. Until recently, South African dog owners had to submit samples to laboratories overseas for genetic testing in order to confirm an affected dog (homozygous A/A) and to aid in the ante-mortem diagnosis of DM. Only affected dogs have been confirmed to manifest the clinical signs of DM. This study aimed to verify whether genetic testing by a local genetic laboratory was possible in order to detect a missense mutation of the superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) that is implicated in causing the clinical signs of DM. The study also aimed to detect and map the inheritance of this disease process in a local Boxer dog population where the pedigree of the sampled population was known. Venous blood collected from Boxer dogs using a simple random sampling technique. The samples were genotyped for the SOD1:c.118G>A polymorphism. Carrier and affected Boxer dogs were detected. A pedigree that demonstrated the significance of inheriting a carrier or affected state in the population was mapped. The present study concludes that genotyping of the missense mutation in Boxer dogs is possible in South Africa. There are carrier and affected Boxer dogs in the local population, making DM a plausible diagnosis in aged dogs presenting with pelvic limb pathology. PMID:27476391

  20. Risk Factor Analysis for C5 Palsy after Double-Door Laminoplasty for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Ko; Ikeuchi, Hiroko; Shiraki, Makoto; Komiya, Norihiro; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective comparative study. Purpose To clarify the risk factors related to the development of postoperative C5 palsy through radiological studies after cervical double-door laminoplasty (DDL). Overview of Literature Although postoperative C5 palsy is generally considered to be the result of damage to the nerve root or segmental spinal cord, the associated pathology remains controversial. Methods A consecutive case series of 47 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy treated by DDL at our institution between April 2008 and April 2015 were reviewed. Postoperative C5 palsy occurred in 5 of 47 cases after DDL. We investigated 9 radiologic factors that have been reported to be risk factors for C5 palsy in various studies, and statistically examined these between the two groups of palsy and the non-palsy patients. Results We found a significant difference between patients with and without postoperative C5 palsy with regards to the posterior shift of spinal cord at C4/5 (p=0.008). The logistic regression analyses revealed posterior shift of the spinal cord at C4/5 (odds ratio, 12.066; p=0.029; 95% confidence interval, 1.295–112.378). For the other radiologic factors, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions In the present study, we showed a significant difference in the posterior shift of the spinal cord at C4/5 between the palsy and the non-palsy groups, indicating that the "tethering phenomenon" was likely a greater risk factor for postoperative C5 palsy. PMID:27114771

  1. Neurogenic Bladder and Urodynamic Outcomes in Patients with Spinal Cord Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urodynamics (UDs) are routine in traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), but there are few reports regarding nontraumatic spinal cord myelopathy (SCM) patients. Purpose: To describe the neurogenic bladder and UD outcomes in SCM patients and determine whether the UD recommendations result in clinically important changes to bladder management. Methods: This retrospective case study examined a series of SCM patients admitted to a spinal rehabilitation service who underwent UDs between January 1, 2000 and June 30, 2010. Results: Sixty-five UD tests were performed a median of 7 months post SCM. Most (n = 34; 57%) patients were male, and the median age was 60 years. Most patients (n = 46; 77%) were paraplegic and were continent of urine (n = 38; 58%). Thirty-five (46%) patients voided on sensation, 26 (40%) performed intermittent self-catheterization, and 9 (14%) had an indwelling catheter. The most common UD finding was overactive detrusor with no dysynergia (n = 31; 48%), followed by overactive detrusor with sphincter dysynergia (n = 16; 25%) and detrusor areflexia/underactive (n = 12; 18%). Key UD findings were median cystometric capacity 414 mL (interquartile range [IQR], 300–590), median maximum detrusor contraction 49.5 cmH2O (IQR, 25–85), and median residual volume post voiding 100 mL (IQR, 5–200). The recommendations for changes to bladder management following UDs resulted in clinically important changes to existing strategies in 57 studies (88%). Conclusions: Future studies should ascertain whether our screening protocol is appropriate, and a longer-term follow-up should examine the relationship between UD recommendations and prevention of complications. PMID:26363592

  2. Embolization followed by surgery for treatment of perimedullary arteriovenous fistula causing acute myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, I-Han; Lee, Han-Chung; Yen, Pao-Sheng; Cho, Der-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is rare. There are three subtypes, and the treatment strategies for each are different. Subtype B (multiple fistulas) can be treated by either embolization or surgery. On the basis of a case from our treatment experience, we propose a method for achieving optimal outcome while minimizing nerve injury. Case Description: A 51-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with acute myelopathy caused by a perimedullary AVF. Initially, we treated her by embolization using the chemical agent Onyx. Her symptoms improved immediately but gradually returned beginning 1 week later. Two months later, the symptoms had returned to pretreatment status, so we removed the fistulas surgically. Severe adhesions between nerve and occult venous varices were noted during the operation. Afterward, the patient's symptoms improved significantly. Histopathological sections showed an inflammatory reaction around the varices. Conclusions: We initially considered several possible reasons for the return of symptoms: (a) Hypoperfusion of the spinal cord; (b) mass effect of the occult vein varices; (c) residual AVF or vascular remodeling resulting in recurrent cord hypertension; (d) Onyx-induced perivascular inflammation resulting in nerves adhering to each other and to occult venous varices. Clinical, surgical, and pathological findings ruled out the first three, leaving Onyx-induced perivascular inflammation as the probable reason. Given our treatment experience and the pros and cons of the two methods, we propose that initial embolization followed by surgery after 5 days to remove occult venous varices is the ideal strategy for treating perimedullary AVF of subtype B. PMID:26069849

  3. Voxel-based analysis of grey and white matter degeneration in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grabher, Patrick; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Trachsler, Aaron; Friedl, Susanne; David, Gergely; Sutter, Reto; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Thompson, Alan J.; Curt, Armin; Freund, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective study, we made an unbiased voxel-based analysis to investigate above-stenosis spinal degeneration and its relation to impairment in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Twenty patients and 18 controls were assessed with high-resolution MRI protocols above the level of stenosis. Cross-sectional areas of grey matter (GM), white matter (WM), and posterior columns (PC) were measured to determine atrophy. Diffusion indices assessed tract-specific integrity of PC and lateral corticospinal tracts (CST). Regression analysis was used to reveal relationships between MRI measures and clinical impairment. Patients showed mainly sensory impairment. Atrophy was prominent within the cervical WM (13.9%, p = 0.004), GM (7.2%, p = 0.043), and PC (16.1%, p = 0.005). Fractional anisotropy (FA) was reduced in the PC (−11.98%, p = 0.006) and lateral CST (−12.96%, p = 0.014). In addition, radial (+28.47%, p = 0.014), axial (+14.72%, p = 0.005), and mean (+16.50%, p = 0.001) diffusivities were increased in the PC. Light-touch score was associated with atrophy (R2 = 0.3559, p = 0.020) and FA (z score 3.74, p = 0.003) in the PC, as was functional independence and FA in the lateral CST (z score 3.68, p = 0.020). This study demonstrates voxel-based degeneration far above the stenosis at a level not directly affected by the compression and provides unbiased readouts of tract-specific changes that relate to impairment. PMID:27095134

  4. Probabilities of Radiation Myelopathy Specific to Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to Guide Safe Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Weinberg, Vivian; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Eric; Chao, Sam; Muacevic, Alexander; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Soltys, Scott; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Angelov, Lilyana; Gibbs, Iris; Wong, C. Shun; Larson, David A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) results for 9 cases of post spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) radiation myelopathy (RM) are reported and compared with a cohort of 66 spine SBRT patients without RM. Methods and Materials: DVH data were centrally analyzed according to the thecal sac point maximum (Pmax) volume, 0.1- to 1-cc volumes in increments of 0.1 cc, and to the 2 cc volume. 2-Gy biologically equivalent doses (nBED) were calculated using an {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy (units = Gy{sub 2/2}). For the 2 cohorts, the nBED means and distributions were compared using the t test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Significance (P<.05) was defined as concordance of both tests at each specified volume. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the probability of RM using the dose distribution for a given volume. Results: Significant differences in both the means and distributions at the Pmax and up to the 0.8-cc volume were observed. Concordant significance was greatest for the Pmax volume. At the Pmax volume the fit of the logistic regression model, summarized by the area under the curve, was 0.87. A risk of RM of 5% or less was observed when limiting the thecal sac Pmax volume doses to 12.4 Gy in a single fraction, 17.0 Gy in 2 fractions, 20.3 Gy in 3 fractions, 23.0 Gy in 4 fractions, and 25.3 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusion: We report the first logistic regression model yielding estimates for the probability of human RM specific to SBRT.

  5. Predictors of Outcome in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Undergoing Unilateral Open-Door Laminoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji-Won; Jin, Sung-Won; Choi, Jong-Il; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Lim, Dong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze prognostic factors affecting surgical outcomes of expansive laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods Using the Frankel scale and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale, we retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 45 consecutive patients who underwent modified unilateral open-door laminoplasty using hydroxyapatite spacers and malleable titanium miniplates between June 2008 and May 2014. The patients were assigned to the good and poor clinical outcome groups, with good outcome defined as a JOA recovery rate >75%. Results The mean preoperative JOA scale was significantly higher in the good outcome group (14.95±3.21 vs. 10.78±6.07, p<0.001), whereas the preoperative cervical range of motion (ROM) in this group was significantly lower (29.89°±10.11 vs. 44.35°± 8.88, p<0.001). In univariate analysis, a high preoperative JOA scale (odds ratio (OR) 1.271, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.005-1.607) and low preoperative cervical ROM(OR 0.858, 95% CI 0.786-0.936) were statistically correlated with good outcomes. Furthermore, these factors demonstrated an independent association with clinical outcomes (preoperative JOA scale: OR 1.344, 95% CI 1.019-1.774, p=0.036; preoperative cervical ROM: OR 0.860, 95% CI 0.788-0.940, p=0.001). Conclusion In this study, a high preoperative JOA scale was associated with good clinical outcome after laminoplasty, whereas a higher preoperative cervical spine ROM was associated with poor clinical outcome. This may suggests that cervical mobility and preoperative neurological status affect clinical outcomes of laminoplasty. PMID:26834814

  6. Effects of brain derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Stoner, Kirsten E; Grossbach, Andrew J; Viljoen, Stephanus V; McHenry, Colleen L; Petrie, Michael A; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Grosland, Nicole M; Shields, Richard K; Howard, Matthew A

    2016-02-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the leading cause of spinal cord related disability in the elderly. It results from degenerative narrowing of the spinal canal, which causes spinal cord compression. This leads to gait instability, loss of dexterity, weakness, numbness and urinary dysfunction. There has been indirect data that implicates a genetic component to CSM. Such a finding may contribute to the variety in presentation and outcome in this patient population. The Val66Met polymorphism, a mutation in the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, has been implicated in a number of brain and psychological conditions, and here we investigate its role in CSM. Ten subjects diagnosed with CSM were enrolled in this prospective study. Baseline clinical evaluation using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale, Nurick and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were collected. Each subject underwent objective testing with gait kinematics, as well as hand functioning using the Purdue Peg Board. Blood samples were analyzed for the BDNF Val66Met mutation. The prevalence of the Val66Met mutation in this study was 60% amongst CSM patients compared to 32% in the general population. Individuals with abnormal Met allele had worse baseline mJOA and Nurick scores. Moreover, baseline gait kinematics and hand functioning testing were worse compared to their wild type counterpart. BDNF Val66Met mutation has a higher prevalence in CSM compared to the general population. Those with BDNF mutation have a worse clinical presentation compared to the wild type counterpart. These findings suggest implication of the BDNF mutation in the development and severity of CSM. PMID:26461908

  7. Immunohistochemical evidence for immunoglobulin and complement deposition in spinal cord lesions in degenerative myelopathy in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Barclay, K B; Haines, D M

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution of immunoglobulin and complement component C3 in spinal cord tissues of dogs with degenerative myelopathy. Sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded spinal cord from five German Shepherd dogs with clinical and histological features consistent with degenerative myelopathy (DM) and one normal dog were tested immunohistochemically for deposition of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the third component of complement (C3). In all dogs there was staining associated with large and small blood vessels. In addition, in the dogs with DM there was focal staining for IgG and C3 in spinal nerve tracts characteristically affected in DM. Deposition of IgG and C3 was found in histological lesions, and in addition, in other areas independent of visible lesions, suggesting that IgG and C3 deposition may precede histological evidence of spinal cord damage. These findings suggest a role for immune-mediated destruction of the spinal cord which may contribute to the pathogenesis of DM in German Shepherd dogs. PMID:8143248

  8. Intravenous Injections of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Modulated the Redox State in a Rat Model of Radiation Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Lian-Bing; Qiu, Zhu; Ren, Hong-Bo; Wu, Jia-Yan; Wang, Tao; Bao, Zhong-Hui; Yang, Ji-Fan; Zheng, Ke; Li, Shao-Lin; Wei, Li; You, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to assess the antioxidative effects of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) in a rat model of radiation myelopathy. UC-MSCs were isolated from Wharton's jelly (WJ) of umbilical cords. An irradiated cervical spinal cord rat model (C2-T2 segment) was generated using a 60Co irradiator to deliver 30 Gy of radiation. UC-MSCs were injected through the tail vein at 90 days, 97 days, 104 days, and 111 days after-irradiation. Histological damage was examined by cresyl violet/Nissl staining. The activities of two antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the spinal cord were measured by the biomedical assay. In addition, the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in the spinal cord were determined by ELISA methods. Multiple injections of UC-MSCs through the tail vein ameliorated neuronal damage in the spinal cord, increased the activities of the antioxidant enzymes CAT and GPX, and increased the levels of VEGF and Ang-2 in the spinal cord. Our results suggest that multiple injections of UC-MSCs via the tail vein in the rat model of radiation myelopathy could significantly improve the antioxidative microenvironment in vivo. PMID:26366180

  9. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported. From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36–112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease. Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  10. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-02-01

    Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported.From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores.Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36-112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease.Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  11. Surgical outcomes of elderly patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a meta-analysis of studies reporting on 2868 patients.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Foong, Hanyao; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical spondylotic myelopathy usually presents in the 5th decade of life or later but can also present earlier in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. As life expectancy continues to increase in the United States, the preconceived reluctance toward operating on the elderly population based on older publications must be rethought. It is a known fact that outcomes in the elderly cannot be as robust as those in the younger population. There are no publications with detailed meta-analyses to determine an acceptable level of outcome in this population. In this review, the authors compare elderly patients older than 75 years to a nonelderly population, and they discuss some of the relevant strategies to minimize complications. METHODS In accordance with PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, the authors performed a PubMed database search to identify English-language literature published between 1995 and 2015. Combinations of the following phrases that describe the age group ("elderly," "non-elderly," "old," "age") and the disease of interest as well as management ("surgical outcome," "surgery," "cervical spondylotic myelopathy," "cervical degenerative myelopathy") were constructed when searching for relevant articles. Two reviewers independently assessed the outcomes, and any disagreement was discussed with the first author until it was resolved. A random-effects model was applied to assess pooled data due to high heterogeneity between studies. The mean difference (MD) and odds ratio were calculated for continuous and dichromatic parameters, respectively. RESULTS Eighteen studies comprising elderly (n = 1169) and nonelderly (n = 1699) patients who received surgical treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy were included in this meta-analysis. Of these studies, 5 were prospective and 13 were retrospective. Intraoperatively, both groups required a similar amount of operation time (p = 0.35). The elderly

  12. Functional cortical reorganization in cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and changes associated with surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Indira Devi; Shukla, Dhaval; Sadashiva, Nishanth; Saligoudar, Praveen; Prasad, Chandrajit; Bhat, Dhananjaya I

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The physiological mechanisms underlying the recovery of motor function after cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) surgery are poorly understood. Neuronal plasticity allows neurons to compensate for injury and disease and to adjust their activities in response to new situations or changes in their environment. Cortical reorganization as well as improvement in corticospinal conduction happens during motor recovery after stroke and spinal cord injury. In this study the authors aimed to understand the cortical changes that occur due to CSM and following CSM surgery and to correlate these changes with functional recovery by using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI). METHODS Twenty-two patients having symptoms related to cervical cord compression due to spondylotic changes along with 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Patients underwent cervical spine MRI and BOLD fMRI at 1 month before surgery (baseline) and 6 months after surgery. RESULTS Five patients were excluded from analysis because of technical problems; thus, 17 patients made up the study cohort. The mean overall modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved in patients following surgery. Mean upper-extremity, lower-extremity, and sensory scores improved significantly. In the preoperative patient group the volume of activation (VOA) was significantly higher than that in controls. The VOA after surgery was reduced as compared with that before surgery, although it remained higher than that in the control group. In the preoperative patient group, activations were noted only in the left precentral gyrus (PrCG). In the postoperative group, activations were seen in the left postcentral gyrus (PoCG), as well as the PrCG and premotor and supplementary motor cortices. In postoperative group, the VOA was higher in both the PrCG and PoCG as compared with those in the control group. CONCLUSIONS There is over-recruitment of sensorimotor cortices

  13. Comparison of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score and the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire Scores: Time-Dependent Changes in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy and Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Motoki; Sakaura, Hironobu; Fujimori, Takahito; Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To identify differences in time-dependent perioperative changes between the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and the JOA Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) score in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) who underwent cervical laminoplasty. Overview of Literature The JOA score does not take into consideration patient satisfaction or quality of life. Accordingly, the JOACMEQ was designed in 2007 as a patient-centered assessment tool. Methods We studied 21 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty. We objectively evaluated the time-dependent changes in JOACMEQ scores and JOA scores for all patients before surgery and at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Results The average total JOA score and the recovery rate improved significantly after surgery in both groups, with a slightly better recovery rate in the OPLL group. Cervical spine function improved significantly in the CSM group but not in the OPLL group. Upper- and lower-extremity functions were more stable in the CSM group than in the OPLL group. The effectiveness rate of the JOACMEQ for measuring quality of life was quite low in both groups. In both groups, the Spearman contingency coefficients were dispersed widely except for upper- and lower-extremity function. Conclusions Scores for upper- and lower-extremity function on the JOACMEQ correlated well with JOA scores. Because the JOACMEQ can also assess cervical spine function and quality of life, factors that cannot be assessed by the JOA score alone, the JOACMEQ is a more comprehensive evaluation tool. PMID:25705334

  14. Postoperative paralysis following posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko; Mannoji, Chikato; Fujiyoshi, Takayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). His spinal cord was severely impinged anteriorly by a beak-type OPLL and posteriorly by ossification of the ligamentum flavum at T4/5. He underwent surgical posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF). Immediately after surgery, he developed a Brown-Séquard-type paralysis, which spontaneously resolved without requiring the addition of OPLL extirpation. This example highlights that the risk of postoperative neurological deterioration cannot be eliminated even when PDF is selected as the surgical procedure for thoracic OPLL, especially in instances in which the spinal cord is severely compressed. PMID:21030260

  15. Scheie syndrome: enzyme replacement therapy does not prevent progression of cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Illsinger, S; Lücke, T; Hartmann, H; Mengel, E; Müller-Forell, W; Donnerstag, F; Das, A M

    2009-12-01

    Hurler-Scheie syndrome is caused by alpha-l-iduronidase deficiency. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can improve physical capacity and reduces organomegaly. However, the effect on bradytrophic connective tissue is limited. As intravenously administered enzyme cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, the therapy of choice for the more severe Hurler syndrome is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). In the more attenuated Scheie syndrome, neurological impairment is less severe; therefore, ERT may be appropriate to treat these patients. Information on long-term outcome in Scheie patients undergoing ERT is scarce. We report a 38-year-old female Scheie patient who has been on ERT for 8 years. While non-neurological symptoms improved, she developed paresthesias in her hands and feet and progressive pain in her legs. Somatosensory evoked potentials were abnormal, suggesting dysfunction of the dorsal funiculus and lemniscus medialis. After 6 years of ERT, a spinal MRI showed dural thickening at the upper cervical spine. These soft-tissue deposits are presumably due to the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides. Intramedullary hyperintensities at the level of C1/2 revealed cervical myelopathy. An MRI before the start of ERT had shown milder spinal lesions. Cystic lesions in the white matter of the centrum semiovale due to dilated Virchow-Robin spaces were essentially unchanged compared with the MRI scan before ERT. Decompression of the spinal cord resulted in clinical improvement. In an adult patient with Scheie syndrome, ERT failed to prevent progression of cervical myelopathy. Clinical significance of cerebral changes is unclear. Whether early HCT or intrathecal ERT could have prevented these lesions remains speculative. PMID:19894140

  16. A new model of radiation-induced myelopathy: A comparison of the response of mature and immature pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Aardweg, G.J.M.J. van den; Hopewell, J.W.; Whitehouse, E.M.; Calvo, W.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose was development of an experimental model of radiation-induced myelopathy in the pig which would facilitate the study of the effects of clinically relevant treatment volumes. The effects of local spinal cord irradiation, to a standard 10 X 5 cm field, have been evaluated in mature (37-42.5 weeks) and immature (15.5-23 weeks) pigs. Irradiation was with single doses of {sup 60}Co {gamma}rays at a dose-rate of 0.21-0.65 Gy/min. The incidence of paralysis was used as an endpoint. Irradiation of mature animals resulted in the development of frank paralysis with animals showing combined parenchymal and vascular pathologic changes in their white matter. These lesions, in common with those seen in patients, had a clear evidence of an inflammatory component. The latency for paralysis was short, 7.5-16.5 weeks, but within the wide range reported for patients. However, it was shorter than that reported in other large animal models. The ED{sub 50} value ({+-}SE) for paralysis was 27.02{+-}0.36 Gy, similar to that in rats taking into account dose-rate factors. The irradiation of immature pigs only resulted in transient neurological changes after doses comparable to those used in the mature animals, ED{sub 50} value ({+-}SE) 26.09{+-}0.37 Gy. The reasons for these transient neurological symptoms are uncertain. A reliable experimental model of radiation-induced myelopathy has been developed for mature pigs. This model is suitable for the study of clinically relevant volume effects. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. [Elusive thoracic spine tumour. Report of an exceptional case and literature review].

    PubMed

    Botana-Fernández, Marcos; Cabezudo-Artero, José Manuel; Royano-Sánchez, Manuel; García-Moreno, Rafael; Murias-Quintana, Eduardo; Ortega-Martínez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Elusive tumours in the spine, most of them schwannomas of the cauda equina, have been reported very rarely. We present the case of a woman with a preoperative radiological diagnosis of schwannoma at D10 level in whom a laminectomy was performed to remove the tumour. Although the laminectomy was correctly positioned, there was no tumour upon opening the dura and the laminectomy had to be extended cephalad to find and remove the tumour. Mobile intradural extramedullary spinal tumours, the so-called «elusive tumours», occur very rarely, and it is exceptional when they are located in the thoracic spine. Knowing preoperatively which tumour is going to behave in this way is almost impossible. However, in the reported cases there are common features such as symptoms changing with different body positions, small tumour size and weak attachment to nearby structures. Neurosurgeons must be able to resolve this situation when confronted with a negative correctly-positioned laminectomy. PMID:25441419

  18. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  19. Foraminotomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... no relief of pain after surgery Return of back pain in the future Thrombophlebitis Before the Procedure You ... 2012:chap 53. Read More Diskectomy Laminectomy Low back pain - acute Low back pain - chronic Neck pain Sciatica ...

  20. Foraminotomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or laminectomy ). The surgeon may do a spinal fusion to make sure your spinal column is stable ... spine surgery. If you had foraminotomy and spinal fusion, the spinal column above and below the fusion ...

  1. Diskectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... foraminotomy , or spinal fusion . Diskectomy in your neck (cervical spine) is most often done along with laminectomy, ... 42. Wilson AS, Samartzis D, Shen FH. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. In: Shen FH, Samartzis D, ...

  2. [Cervical laminoplasty--review of surgical techniques, indications, methods of efficacy evaluation, and complications].

    PubMed

    Derenda, Marek; Kowalina, Ireneusz

    2006-01-01

    Techniques of expansive cervical laminoplasty evolved in the 1970s in Japan as an alternative to laminectomy connected with many complications. They were developed and modified in the following years. Nowadays cervical laminoplasty is the standard method of posterior decompression of the cervical spine which reflects the aspiration to preserve the spine stabilising structures. Indications for laminoplasty are multilevel cervical pathological changes leading to spinal canal stenosis and myelopathy as a consequence. Historical background is discussed. Technical details of Z-type laminoplasty (Oyama), open-door laminoplasty (Hirabayashi), spinous process-splitting laminoplasty (Kurokawa), hardware-augmented laminoplasty (O'Brien with Shaffrey's modification) and dorso-lateral decompression (Ohtsuka) are described. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale is widely accepted for the clinical evaluation of cervical myelopathy. Effectiveness of surgical treatment is evaluated using the Hirabayashi recovery rate. Postoperative complications are: diminution of neck motion range, kyphotic deformity, axial neck pain, C5 nerve root palsy, restenosis and late deterioration of neurological postoperative outcome. Contemporary theories explaining problems connected with the complications are described. The subject is discussed based on a review of literature and own practice. PMID:17103356

  3. Surgical treatment for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    An, Howard S; Al-Shihabi, Laith; Kurd, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Although classically associated with patients of East Asian origin, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) may cause myelopathy in patients of any ethnic origin. Degeneration of the PLL is followed by endochondral ossification, resulting in spinal cord compression. Specific genetic polymorphisms and medical comorbidities have been implicated in the development of OPLL. Patients should be evaluated with a full history and neurologic examination, along with cervical radiographs. Advanced imaging with CT and MRI allows three-dimensional evaluation of OPLL. Minimally symptomatic patients can be treated nonsurgically, but patients with myelopathy or severe stenosis are best treated with surgical decompression. OPLL can be treated via an anterior (ie, corpectomy and fusion) or posterior (ie, laminectomy and fusion or laminoplasty) approach, or both. The optimal approach is dictated by the classification and extent of OPLL, cervical spine sagittal alignment, severity of stenosis, and history of previous surgery. Anterior surgery is associated with superior outcomes when OPLL occupies >50% to 60% of the canal, despite increased technical difficulty and higher complication rates. Posterior surgery is technically easier and allows decompression of the entire cervical spine, but patients may experience late deterioration because of disease progression. PMID:24966248

  4. Juvenile Xanthogranuloma of adult spine: A rare case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Devendra; Chanduka, Amit Kumar; Sharma, Vinod; Mittal, Radhey Shyam; Singhvi, Shashi

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a rare disorder of central nervous system. It rarely produces compressive myelopathy. On reviewing world literature, we could find only nine cases of this disease involving spine and of which only four cases were in adults’ i.e., 18 years and above. We are presenting a case of Spinal JXG in an 18-year-old male with thoracic compressive myelopathy presenting as short duration progressive paraparesis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Spine showed mass lesion in epidural space compressing cord from behind without any bony involvement at D7 to D10 vertebral segment. It was isointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 with no contrast enhancement. D7 to D10 Laminectomy with complete excision of firm epidural mass was carried out. The histopathology with tumor markers confirmed the diagnosis of JXG. Post-operative neurological recovery in this patient was good. His power improved to grade 5/5 with decreased spasticity. Follow-up MRI at 3 months showed no residual tumor. This case appears to be the first in the series with entirely extradural component in adult thoracic spine. PMID:25685229

  5. Paraplegia after thoracotomy for division and suture Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA).

    PubMed

    Sayasathid, Jarun; Somboonna, Naraporn; Numchaisiri, Chun

    2006-12-01

    A Thai women, aged 22 years old, came to hospital with Patent Ductus Arteriosis (PDA). Left thoracotomy, with division and suturing PDA, was performed. The second day after operation, she developed paraplegia below umbilical level. The CT-scan detected an extradural hematoma in the spinal cavity from T3-T6. To remove the blood clot, the T spine laminectomy was performed. 6 months after the laminectomy, the patient was able to perform her regular exercise. PMID:17214069

  6. Analysis of the outcome in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, undergone canal expansive laminoplasty supported with instrumentation in a group of Indian population – a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Subhadip; Banerjee, U.; Mukherjee, A.S.; Kundu, Srikanta

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic compression of the cervical spinal cord leads to a clinical syndrome of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Clinical symptoms of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) or cervical myeloradiculopathies result in spinal cord and root dysfunction. The primary aims of surgical intervention for multilevel myelopathy are to decompress the spinal cord and maintain stability of the cervical spine. Secondary aims are to minimize complications which include long-term pain and motion loss. Laminoplasty as either single-door or double-door technique and with/without instrumentation is an established mode of surgical treatment. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the result of single-door laminoplasty technique, supported with instrumented fixation in patients with multilevel degenerative cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy. Methods A prospective and without control study has been conducted in the institution in 17 patients with CSM, operated by canal expansive single-door laminoplasty (Hirabayashi technique) between April 2010 to April 2015. These patients were followed up for at least 3 years with both clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results On clinical evaluation, 15 of the 17 patients (87%) experienced relief of their symptoms. According to the Nurick classification, 11 patients’ demonstrated improvement by one grade, two patients improved by two grades, two patients were unchanged and two had worsening of the Nurick grade. Conclusions The results of this study regarding the use of open-door laminoplasty with instrumented fixation suggest that this technique is a satisfactory alternative for cases of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy without deformation. Level of Evidence Level III therapeutic study. PMID:27441175

  7. Medicolegal Corner: When minimally invasive thoracic surgery leads to paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    A patient with mild cervical myelopathy due to multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) initially underwent a cervical C3-T1 laminectomy with C2-T2 fusion utilizing lateral mass screws. The patient's new postoperative right upper extremity paresis largely resolved within several postoperative months. However, approximately 6 months later, the patient developed increased paraparesis attributed to thoracic OPLL and Ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) at the T2-T5 and T10-T11 levels. The patient underwent simultaneous minimally invasive (MIS) unilateral MetRx approaches to both regions. Postoperatively, the patient was paraplegic and never recovered function. Multiple mistakes led to permanent paraplegia due to MIS MetRx decompressions for T2-T5 and T10-11 OPLL/OYL in this patient. First, both thoracic procedures should have been performed "open" utilizing a full laminectomy rather than MIS; adequate visualization would have likely averted inadvertent cord injury, and the resultant CSF leak. Second, the surgeon should have used an operating microscope. Third, the operation should have been monitored with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and EMG (electromyography). Fourth, preoperatively the patient should have received a 1-gram dose of Solumedrol for cord "protection". Fifth, applying Gelfoam as part of the CSF leak repair is contraindicated (e.g. due to swelling in confined spaces- see insert). Sixth, if the patient had not stopped Excedrin prior to the surgery, the surgery should have been delayed to avoid the increased perioperative risk of bleeding/hematoma. PMID:24843811

  8. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and Chiari type 1 malformation: A case report and literature review of a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Pozetti, Marianne; Belsuzarri, Telmo Augusto Barba; Belsuzarri, Natalia C. B.; Seixas, Naira B.; Araujo, João F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The association between neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-I) and Chiari I malformation (CMI) is rare, and not many studies are reported in the literature. Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with NF-1 is essential because several cases of Chiari type I are completely asymptomatic. We emphasize the need for inclusion of Chiari I as diagnosis in association with NF-1. Case Description: The patient was a 51-year-old black man who presented with complaints of pain and decreased motion and sensibility of his hands, wrists, and forearms, along with progressive dysarthria. Even though the computed tomography (CT) scan of the skull did not show changes, the MRI showed hydro/syringomyelia in the cervical spine area. Midline suboccipital craniectomy with total laminectomy of c1 and partial laminectomy of c2 was performed; tonsillectomy was also performed for cistern expansion because of intense thickening and obliteration of the obex by the cerebellar tonsils. Following treatment, the patient showed remission of symptoms. Conclusion: NF-1 in association with CMI is rare, and early diagnosis and surgical treatment are essential to slow down the myelopathy; although they prevent neurological damages, patients with NF-1 must remain under doctor's attention in case of association with CMI. Our literature review showed that symptoms can vary and include headache, gait disturbance, and sensory/motor diminution, until asymptomatic patients. Moreover, the incidence of NF-1 is considerably higher in CMI patients in comparison to the global incidence (8.6–11.8% and 0.775%, respectively). The surgical technique must be evaluated case by case according to the degree of cerebrospinal fluid obstruction. PMID:27500008

  9. Cervical anterior hybrid technique with bi-level Bryan artificial disc replacement and adjacent segment fusion for cervical myelopathy over three consecutive segments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang; Xu, Lin; Jia, Yu-Song; Sun, Qi; Li, Jin-Yu; Zheng, Chen-Ying; Bai, Chun-Xiao; Yu, Qin-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the preliminary clinical efficacy and feasibility of the hybrid technique for multilevel cervical myelopathy. Considering the many shortcomings of traditional treatment methods for multilevel cervical degenerative myelopathy, hybrid surgery (bi-level Bryan artificial disc [Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA] replacement and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion) should be considered. Between March 2006 and November 2012, 108 patients (68 men and 40 women, average age 45years) underwent hybrid surgery. Based on the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Odom's criteria, the clinical symptoms and neurological function before and after surgery were evaluated. Mean surgery duration was 90minutes, with average blood loss of 30mL. Mean follow-up duration was 36months. At the final follow-up, the mean JOA (± standard deviation) scores were significantly higher compared with preoperative values (15.08±1.47 versus 9.18±1.22; P<0.01); meanwhile, NDI values were markedly decreased (12.32±1.03 versus 42.68±1.83; P<0.01). Using Odom's criteria, the clinical outcomes were rated as excellent (76 patients), good (22 patients), fair (six patients), and poor (four patients). These findings indicate that the hybrid method provides an effective treatment for cervical myelopathy over three consecutive segments, ensuring a good clinical outcome. PMID:26758702

  10. The value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging in predicting postoperative recovery in patients with cervical spondylosis myelopathy: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Pan, Jun; Nisar, Majid; Zeng, Huan Bei; Dai, Li Fang; Lou, Chao; Zhu, Si Pin; Dai, Bing; Xiang, Guang Heng

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis was designed to elucidate whether preoperative signal intensity changes could predict the surgical outcomes of patients with cervical spondylosis myelopathy on the basis of T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging images. We searched the Medline database and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for this purpose and 10 studies meeting our inclusion criteria were identified. In total, 650 cervical spondylosis myelopathy patients with (+) or without (-) intramedullary signal changes on their T2-weighted images were examined. Weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were used to summarize the data. Patients with focal and faint border changes in the intramedullary signal on T2 magnetic resonance imaging had similar Japanese Orthopaedic Association recovery ratios as those with no signal changes on the magnetic resonance imaging images of the spinal cord did. The surgical outcomes were poorer in the patients with both T2 intramedullary signal changes, especially when the signal changes were multisegmental and had a well-defined border and T1 intramedullary signal changes compared with those without intramedullary signal changes. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging including T1 and T2 imaging can thus be used to predict postoperative recovery in cervical spondylosis myelopathy patients. PMID:27074180