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Sample records for mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis

  1. Genome segment 5 of Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus encodes a bona fide guanylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (AmCPV), a cypovirus of Reoviridae family, infects non mulberry Indian silk worm, Antheraea mylitta, and contains eleven segmented double stranded RNA in its genome (S1-S11). Some of its genome segments (S1-S3, and S6-S11) have been previously characterized but genome segment encoding the viral guanylyltransferase which helps in RNA capping has not been characterized. Results In this study genome segment 5 (S5) of AmCPV was converted to cDNA, cloned and sequenced. S5 consisted of 2180 nucleotides, with one long ORF of 1818 nucleotides and could encode a protein of 606 amino acids with molecular mass of ~65 kDa (p65). Bioinformatics analysis showed presence of KLRS and HxnH motifs as observed in some other reoviral guanylyltransferase and suggests that S5 may encodes viral guanylyltransferase. The ORF of S5 was expressed in E. coli as 65 kDa his tagged fusion protein, purified through Ni-NTA chromatography and polyclonal antibody was raised. Immunoblot analysis of virion particles with the purified antibody showed specific immunoreactive band and suggests p65 as a viral structural protein. Functional analysis showed that recombinant p65 possesses guanylyltransferase activity, and transfers GMP moiety to the 5' diphosphate (A/G) ended viral RNA after the formation of p65-GMP complex for capping. Kinetic analysis showed Km of this enzyme for GTP and RNA was 34.24 uM and 98.35 nM, respectively. Site directed mutagenesis at K21A in KLRS motif, and H93A or H105A in HxnH motif completely abolished the autoguanylylation activity and indicates importance of these residues at these sites. Thermodynamic analysis showed p65-GTP interaction was primarily driven by enthalpy (ΔH = -399.1 ± 4.1 kJ/mol) whereas the p65-RNA interaction by favorable entropy (0.043 ± 0.0049 kJ/ mol). Conclusion Viral capping enzymes play a critical role in the post transcriptional or post replication modification in case of

  2. Genome segment 4 of Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus encodes RNA triphosphatase and methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Poulomi; Kundu, Anirban; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cloning and sequencing of Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (AmCPV) genome segment S4 showed that it consists of 3410 nt with a single ORF of 1110 aa which could encode a protein of ~127 kDa (p127). Bioinformatics analysis showed the presence of a 5' RNA triphosphatase (RTPase) domain (LRDR), a S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-binding (GxGxG) motif and the KDKE tetrad of 2'-O-methyltransferase (MTase), which suggested that S4 may encode RTPase and MTase. The ORF of S4 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged fusion protein and purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Biochemical analysis of recombinant p127 showed its RTPase as well as SAM-dependent guanine N(7)-and ribose 2'-O-MTase activities. A MTase assay using in vitro transcribed AmCPV S2 RNA having a 5' G*pppG end showed that guanine N(7) methylation occurred prior to the ribose 2'-O methylation to yield a m(7)GpppG/m(7)GpppGm RNA cap. Mutagenesis of the SAM-binding (GxGxG) motif (G831A) completely abolished N(7)- and 2'-O-MTase activities, indicating the importance of these residues for capping. From the kinetic analysis, the Km values of N(7)-MTase for SAM and RNA were calculated as 4.41 and 0.39 µM, respectively. These results suggested that AmCPV S4-encoded p127 catalyses RTPase and two cap methylation reactions for capping the 5' end of viral RNA. PMID:25228490

  3. Molecular characterization of genome segment 2 encoding RNA dependent RNA polymerase of Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Suvankar; Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Roy, Sobhan; Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Bagchi, Abhisek; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar

    2010-08-15

    Genome segment 2 (S2) from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) was converted into cDNA, cloned and sequenced. S2 consisted of 3798 nucleotides with a long ORF encoding a 1116 amino acid long protein (123 kDa). BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed 29% sequence identity and close relatedness of AmCPV S2 with RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of other insect cypoviruses, suggesting a common origin of all insect cypoviruses. The ORF of S2 was expressed as 123 kDa soluble His-tagged fusion protein in insect cells via baculovirus recombinants which exhibited RdRp activity in an in vitro RNA polymerase assay without any intrinsic terminal transferase activity. Maximum activity was observed at 37 deg. C at pH 6.0 in the presence of 3 mM MgCl{sub 2.} Site directed mutagenesis confirmed the importance of the conserved GDD motif. This is the first report of functional characterization of a cypoviral RdRp which may lead to the development of anti-viral agents.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of interactions between silkworm and cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liang; Peng, Zhengwen; Guo, Youbing; Cheng, Tingcai; Guo, Huizhen; Sun, Qiang; Huang, Chunlin; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-01-01

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) specifically infects silkworm midgut (MG) and multiplication occurs mainly in posterior midgut (PM). In this study, MG and fat body (FB) were extracted at 0, 3, 24, and 72 h after BmCPV infection. The total sequence reads of each sample were more than 1510000, and the mapping ratio exceeded 95.3%. Upregulated transcripts increased in MG during the infection process. Gene ontology (GO) categories showed that antioxidants were all upregulated in FB but not in MG. BGI001299, BGI014434, BGI012068, and BGI009201 were MG-specific genes with transmembrane transport function, the expression of which were induced by BmCPV. BGI001299, BGI014434, and BGI012068 expressed in entire MG and may be involved in BmCPV invasion. BGI009201 expressed only in PM and may be necessary for BmCPV proliferation. BmPGRP-S2 and BGI012452 (a putative serine protease) were induced by BmCPV and may be involved in immune defense against BmCPV. The expression level of BmCPV S1, S2, S3, S6, and S7 was high and there was no expression of S9 in MG 72 h, implying that the expression time of structural protein coding genes is earlier. These results provide insights into the mechanism of BmCPV infection and host defense. PMID:27118345

  5. Characterization of a Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase Activity Associated with Purified Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus of the Silkworm Bombyx mori1

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, L. J.; Kalmakoff, J.; Tanada, Y.

    1969-01-01

    Purified cytoplasmic-polyhedrosis virus has been found to have associated with it a polymerase activity capable of catalyzing the synthesis of virus-specific, single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) from the double-stranded RNA genome. PMID:16789118

  6. A cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus isolated from the pine processionary caterpillar, Thaumetopoea pityocampa.

    PubMed

    Ince, Ikbal Agah; Demir, Ismail; Demirbag, Zihni; Nalcacioglu, Remziye

    2007-04-01

    A cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) was isolated from the larvae of Thaumetopoea pityocampa and shown to cause an infection of midgut cells. This viral infection revealed several important diagnostic symptoms, including discoloration of the posterior midgut, reduced feeding, and extended development time of the larvae. The virus infection is lethal to Thaumetopoea pityocampa, and with the increasing doses kills the larvae within 4-5 days post infection. Electron microscopy studies showed typical cytoplasmic polyhedral inclusion bodies that are icosahedral, and ranged from 2.4 to 5.3 microm in diameter. Electrophoretic analysis of the RNA genome showed that the virus has a genome composed of 10 equimolar RNA segments with the sizes of 3,907, 3,716, 3,628, 3,249, 2,726, 1,914, 1,815, 1,256, 1,058, and 899 bp, respectively. Based on morphology and nucleic acid analysis, this virus was named Thaumetopoea pityocampa cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (TpCPV), and belongs to the genus Cypovirus, family Reoviridae. PMID:18051275

  7. X-ray powder pattern analysis of cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus inclusion bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Di, X.; Sun, Y.K.; McCrae, M.A.; Rossmann, M.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus is an insect reovirus which is occluded in crystalline inclusion bodies that form in the mid-gut of certain insects. Inclusion bodies of cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus from Bombyx mori were isolated and purified. These crystalline bodies, about 1-3 microns in linear size, were compacted in a capillary tube while immersed in buffer. X-ray diffraction photographs showed powder rings, extending to 8.2 A resolution, which could be indexed with a cell measuring a = b = 49.9 +/- 0.4 A, c = 41.5 +/- 0.4 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. The polyhedrin protein, which is the major component of the inclusion body, has a molecular weight of about 30,000 daltons and, hence, there are probably two molecules in the unit cell. Thus, the unit cell is monoclinic or possibly triclinic. A Patterson derived from the measured powder pattern intensities, assuming monoclinic symmetry, could be interpreted in terms of a molecule with two larger globes. Such a structure is roughly consistent with the breakdown of the polyhedrin into two larger fragments of molecular weight 17,000 and 14,000 when raising the pH to near 10. Under these conditions the inclusion bodies disintegrate, releasing virus and catalyzing the proteolysis of the polyhedrin.

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of Bombyx mori Larval Midgut during Persistent and Pathogenic Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kolliopoulou, Anna; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J.; Deforce, Dieter; Swevers, Luc; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Many insects can be persistently infected with viruses but do not show any obvious adverse effects with respect to physiology, development or reproduction. Here, Bombyx mori strain Daizo, persistently infected with cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV), was used to study the host’s transcriptional response after pathogenic infection with the same virus in midgut tissue of larvae persistently and pathogenically infected as 2nd and 4th instars. Next generation sequencing revealed that from 13,769 expressed genes, 167 were upregulated and 141 downregulated in both larval instars following pathogenic infection. Several genes that could possibly be involved in B. mori immune response against BmCPV or that may be induced by the virus in order to increase infectivity were identified, whereas classification of differentially expressed transcripts (confirmed by qRT-PCR) resulted in gene categories related to physical barriers, immune responses, proteolytic / metabolic enzymes, heat-shock proteins, hormonal signaling and uncharacterized proteins. Comparison of our data with the available literature (pathogenic infection of persistently vs. non-persistently infected larvae) unveiled various similarities of response in both cases, which suggests that pre-existing persistent infection does not affect in a major way the transcriptome response against pathogenic infection. To investigate the possible host’s RNAi response against BmCPV challenge, the differential expression of RNAi-related genes and the accumulation of viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) were studied. During pathogenic infection, siRNA-like traces like the 2-fold up-regulation of the core RNAi genes Ago-2 and Dcr-2 as well as a peak of 20 nt small RNAs were observed. Interestingly, vsRNAs of the same size were detected at lower rates in persistently infected larvae. Collectively, our data provide an initial assessment of the relative significance of persistent infection of silkworm larvae on the host response following

  9. Roles of miR-278-3p in IBP2 regulation and Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus replication.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Qin, Guangxing; Qian, Heying; Chen, Tao; Guo, Xijie

    2016-01-10

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) is a major viral pathogen of silkworm and remains a big challenge to the sericultural industry. Insulin-related peptide binding protein 2 (IBP2) gene, induced by BmCPV infection may play an important role in B. mori immune response. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in various processes, including immunity and antiviral response. In this study, we identified IBP2 as one of the targets for miR-278-3p by using luciferase reporter assay. Overexpression of miR-278-3p negatively regulates the expression of IBP2 in silkworm larvae and positively regulates the mRNA transcript level of BmCPV. Our results suggest that miR-278-3p may play an important role in BmCPV replication. It's the first report on bmo-miRNAs in response to BmCPV infection and could provide a new clue to explore the molecular mechanism of BmCPV infection and host immunity. PMID:26348138

  10. dsRNA interference on expression of a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhong-Hua; Gao, Kun; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Wu, Ping; Qin, Guang-Xing; Geng, Tao; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) is one of the major viral pathogens in silkworm. Its infection often results in significant losses to sericulture. Studies have demonstrated that RNAi is one of the important anti-viral mechanisms in organisms. In this study, three dsRNAs targeting the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) gene of BmCPV were designed and synthesized with 2'-F modification to explore their interference effects on BmCPV replication in silkworm larvae. The results showed that injecting dsRNA in the dosage of 4-6 ng per mg body weight into the 5th instar larvae can interfere with the BmCPV-RDRP expression by 93% after virus infection and by 99.9% before virus infection. In addition, the expression of two viral structural protein genes (genome RNA segments 1 and 5) was also decreased with the decrease of RDRP expression, suggesting that RNAi interference of BmCPV-RDRP expression could affect viral replication. The study provides an effective method for investigating virus replication as well as the virus-host interactions in the silkworm larvae using dsRNA. PMID:25839934

  11. Viral Small-RNA Analysis of Bombyx mori Larval Midgut during Persistent and Pathogenic Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Kolliopoulou, Anna; Apostolou-Karampelis, Konstantinos; Head, Steven R.; Deforce, Dieter; Smagghe, Guy; Swevers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lepidopteran innate immune response against RNA viruses remains poorly understood, while in other insects several studies have highlighted an essential role for the exo-RNAi pathway in combating viral infection. Here, by using deep-sequencing technology for viral small-RNA (vsRNA) assessment, we provide evidence that exo-RNAi is operative in the silkworm Bombyx mori against both persistent and pathogenic infection of B. mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) which is characterized by a segmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome. Further, we show that Dicer-2 predominantly targets viral dsRNA and produces 20-nucleotide (nt) vsRNAs, whereas an additional pathway is responsive to viral mRNA derived from segment 10. Importantly, vsRNA distributions, which define specific hot and cold spot profiles for each viral segment, to a considerable degree overlap between Dicer-2-related (19 to 21 nt) and Dicer-2-unrelated vsRNAs, suggesting a common origin for these profiles. We found a degenerate motif significantly enriched at the cut sites of vsRNAs of various lengths which link an unknown RNase to the origins of vsRNAs biogenesis and distribution. Accordingly, the indicated RNase activity may be an important early factor for the host's antiviral defense in Lepidoptera. IMPORTANCE This work contributes to the elucidation of the lepidopteran antiviral response against infection of segmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus (CPV; Reoviridae) and highlights the importance of viral small-RNA (vsRNA) analysis for getting insights into host-pathogen interactions. Three vsRNA pathways are implicated in antiviral defense. For dsRNA, two pathways are proposed, either based on Dicer-2 cleavage to generate 20-nucleotide vsRNAs or based on the activity of an uncharacterized endo-RNase that cleaves the viral RNA substrate at a degenerate motif. The analysis also indicates the existence of a degradation pathway that targets the positive strand of segment 10. PMID

  12. Reconstitution of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus in vitro using separately expressed different functional domains of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anirban; Roychowdhury, Amlan; Bose, Madhuparna; Das, Amit Kumar; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2016-07-01

    Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus is a segmented dsRNA virus of the family Reoviridae. Segment 2 (S2)-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) helps the virus to propagate its genome in the host cell of the silkworm, Antheraea mylitta. Cloning, expression, purification and functional analysis of individual domains of RdRp have demonstrated that the purified domains interact in vitro. The central polymerase domain (PD) shows nucleotide binding properties, but neither the N-terminal domain (NTD) nor the C-terminal domain (CTD). Isolated PD does not exhibit RdRp activity but this activity can be reconstituted when all three domains are included in the reaction mixture. Molecular dynamics simulation suggests that the isolated PD has increased internal motions in comparison to when it is associated with the NTD and CTD. The motions of the separated PD may lead to the formation of a less accessible RNA template-binding channel and, thus, impair RdRp activity. PMID:27008451

  13. Characterization of Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Max D.; Anderson, David L.

    1973-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNAs characterized and compared in this study consist of the singly-enveloped nucleocapsids (SNPV) of Trichoplusia ni and the bundles of nucleocapsids common to a single envelope (MNPV) from Spodoptera frugiperda and Rachiplusia ou. The SNPV and MNPV DNAs are very similar in hydrodynamic properties and molecular weights. In addition, the NPV DNAs are similar in size to those extracted from the granulosis viruses that infect T. ni and S. frugiperda. As isolated from purified virus or directly from occluded virus, the nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNAs consist of a mixture of about 20 to 30% double-stranded covalently closed molecules and approximately 60% relaxed circles, with less than 10% in linear duplex form. The molecular weights of all nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNAs as compared in this study are slightly smaller than those of T4 bacteriophage DNA and perhaps slightly smaller than those of the granulosis virus DNAs. The best estimates of these molecular weights by neutral sucrose sedimentation for the nuclear polyhedrosis viruses range from 90 to 100 × 106 relative to a size of 108 × 106 for T4 DNA. The base compositions of the nuclear polyhedrosis viruses that infect T. ni and S. frugiperda are compared with the respective insect host DNAs. Images PMID:4761726

  14. Structure of Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue-Kui; Lu, Xin-Yin; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Zhen-Hong; Zhang, Qin-Fen; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Jing-Qiang

    1999-01-01

    The structures of full and empty capsids of CPV were studied by negative staining and electron cryomicroscopy and computer reconstruction techniques. By comparing the structures and biochemical compositions, the CPV was identified as a single-layered capsid with its five structural proteins located on it. This single capsid is arranged according to T=1 icosahedral symmetry with 12 turret-like spikes at its icosahedral vertices. The empty and full CPV show identical capsid but differ inside. The dense and ordered genomic dsRNA is located inside the full CPV. The internal space of the empty CPV has almost no electron density except for 12 electron densities attributed the transcriptional enzyme complexes extending inward from the base part of CPV spikes. PMID:12114971

  15. Genetic analysis of Indian tasar silkmoth (Antheraea mylitta) populations.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Muthulakshmi, M; Vardhini, Deena; Jayaprakash, P; Nagaraju, J; Arunkumar, K P

    2015-01-01

    Indian tasar silkmoth, Antheraea mylitta is an economically important wild silkmoth species distributed across India. A number of morphologically and ethologically well-defined ecotypes are known for this species that differ in their primary food plant specificity. Most of these ecotypes do not interbreed in nature, but are able to produce offspring under captive conditions. Microsatellite markers were developed for A. mylitta, and out of these, ten well-behaved microsatellite loci were used to analyze the population structure of different ecoraces. A total of 154 individual moths belonging to eight different ecoraces, were screened at each locus. Hierarchical analysis of population structure using Analysis of MOlecular VAriance (AMOVA) revealed significant structuring (FST = 0.154) and considerable inbreeding (FIS = 0.505). A significant isolation by distance was also observed. The number of possible population clusters was investigated using distance method, Bayesian algorithm and self organization maps (SOM). The first two methods revealed two distinct clusters, whereas the SOM showed the different ecoraces not to be clearly differentiated. These results suggest that although there is a large degree of phenotypic variation among the different ecoraces of A. mylitta, genetically they are not very different, and the phenotypic differences may largely be a result of their respective ecology. PMID:26510465

  16. Genetic analysis of Indian tasar silkmoth (Antheraea mylitta) populations

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Muthulakshmi, M; Vardhini, Deena; Jayaprakash, P; Nagaraju, J; Arunkumar, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Indian tasar silkmoth, Antheraea mylitta is an economically important wild silkmoth species distributed across India. A number of morphologically and ethologically well-defined ecotypes are known for this species that differ in their primary food plant specificity. Most of these ecotypes do not interbreed in nature, but are able to produce offspring under captive conditions. Microsatellite markers were developed for A. mylitta, and out of these, ten well-behaved microsatellite loci were used to analyze the population structure of different ecoraces. A total of 154 individual moths belonging to eight different ecoraces, were screened at each locus. Hierarchical analysis of population structure using Analysis of MOlecular VAriance (AMOVA) revealed significant structuring (FST = 0.154) and considerable inbreeding (FIS = 0.505). A significant isolation by distance was also observed. The number of possible population clusters was investigated using distance method, Bayesian algorithm and self organization maps (SOM). The first two methods revealed two distinct clusters, whereas the SOM showed the different ecoraces not to be clearly differentiated. These results suggest that although there is a large degree of phenotypic variation among the different ecoraces of A. mylitta, genetically they are not very different, and the phenotypic differences may largely be a result of their respective ecology. PMID:26510465

  17. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1149 - Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1149 Section 180... Inclusion bodies of the multi-nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera; exemption from the... polyhedrosis virus of Anagrapha falcifera is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1027 - Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1027 Nuclear polyhedrosis virus of... Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HzSNPV). The identity of the seed virus must be assured...

  7. Safety evaluation of nuclear polyhedrosis virus replication in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Döller, G; Gröner, A; Straub, O C

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the hygienic risk involved in using baculoviruses for insect pest control, safety studies are required. Pigs were chosen as representative test animals of commercial and agricultural importance. The tests were aimed at detecting virus propagation, immune reactions, and signs of acute infection (changes in body temperature and hematology profile, swelling of lymph nodes). Four of five animals inoculated with nuclear polyhedrosis virus showed a slight temperature rise at day 2 postinfection. After day 4 postinfection, no differences between infected animals and controls were observed. In the bioassay, virus activity could be recovered from fecal samples; however, no activity was found in organ extracts. The data did not indicate hygienic risks involved in the application of nuclear polyhedrosis virus, especially that from Mamestra brassicae, in biological pest control. PMID:6344789

  8. Safety evaluation of nuclear polyhedrosis virus replication in pigs.

    PubMed

    Döller, G; Gröner, A; Straub, O C

    1983-04-01

    To evaluate the hygienic risk involved in using baculoviruses for insect pest control, safety studies are required. Pigs were chosen as representative test animals of commercial and agricultural importance. The tests were aimed at detecting virus propagation, immune reactions, and signs of acute infection (changes in body temperature and hematology profile, swelling of lymph nodes). Four of five animals inoculated with nuclear polyhedrosis virus showed a slight temperature rise at day 2 postinfection. After day 4 postinfection, no differences between infected animals and controls were observed. In the bioassay, virus activity could be recovered from fecal samples; however, no activity was found in organ extracts. The data did not indicate hygienic risks involved in the application of nuclear polyhedrosis virus, especially that from Mamestra brassicae, in biological pest control. PMID:6344789

  9. Generation of cytotoxic molecules and oxidative stress in haemolymph of pebrinised tasar silkworm Antheraea mylitta Drury.

    PubMed

    Jena, Karmabeer; Pandey, Jay Prakash; Priya, Anshu; Kundu, Papri; Sinha, Ajit Kumar; Yadav, Harendra; Sahay, Alok

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of microsporidial infection on redox regulation mechanism and oxidative stress in tasar silkworm Antheraea mylitta. High level of superoxide radical (p < 0.05), nitric oxide (p < 0.001) and lipid peroxidation (p < 0.001) was observed in haemolymph of pebrinised larvae, which indicated the resultant generation of cytotoxic molecules and oxidative damage. Increased phenol oxidase (PO) activity in haemolymph of pebrinised larvae indicated the activation of immune defences during pathological conditions. In addition, higher level of glutathione-S-tranferase (GST) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) level observed in pebrinised larvae indicated adaptive behaviour of tissue against toxic oxyradicals (p < 0.05). Conversely, low level of ascorbic acid (ASA) content suggested that the larvae might have used these compounds to counteract stress in tissues or low uptake under microspridial infection (p < 0.05). Present findings provide new insights into the cellular and biochemical bases of host-pathogen interactions in tasar silkworm A. mylitta. PMID:26930859

  10. Estimation of amino acids, urea and uric acid in tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury.

    PubMed

    Shamitha, G; Rao, A Purushotham

    2008-11-01

    The tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury, Andhra local ecorace is an exclusive race of Andhra Pradesh. It is on the verge of extinction due to difficulty of acclimatisation at breeding and rearing stages. As an attempt to protect this race, a method of total indoor rearing has been done. In this context, the estimation of free amino acids, excretory products- urea and uric acid were compared during the fourth and fifth instars of tasar silkworm, reared under outdoor and indoor conditions. The study has revealed that amino acids decreased in the fat body in outdoor and indoor reared larvae in contrast to that in the haemolymph where it has gradually increased from first to third crops. This is an important finding as it reveals that indoor worms seem to adopt proteolytic activity in the haemolymph. Secondly, in the fifth instar the excretory products are more compared to fourth instar in the indoor reared worms. During fifth instar, formation of nitrogenous products lessens as silk synthesis enhances. The present study reveals that decrease in uric acid in fifth instar implies increase in growth rate and silk synthesis in both outdoor and indoor worms. The findings of the present investigation is helpful in the conservation and protection of the A. mylitta, Andhra local ecorace. PMID:19297987

  11. Attacin gene sequence variations in different ecoraces of tasar silkworm Antheraea mylitta

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Rati; Murthy, Geetha N; Awasthi, Arvind K; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M

    2015-01-01

    Attacin gene exists as paralogous conversion and is being used for identification of strain variations in insects based on the sequence variation. Hence, a study was undertaken to analyze the sequence variation of the attacin gene isoforms in the tasar silkworm Anthereae mylitta that exists in the form of different ecoraces depending upon the environment, food plant and location. Comparison of the previously reported attacin sequences with the DNA sequences of attacin A and B genes revealed six amino acid substitutions among the sequences of the ecoraces which however did not affect the functional domain of Attacin. The generated dendrogram clearly indicated unique branches for each ecorace with two separate gene clusters for attacin A and B. The Sarihan ecorace formed a separate sub-group under both the gene clusters. The present study also revealed the presence of Attacin_N Superfamily domain exclusively in Exon I separated from the Attacin_C Superfamily domain that was present in Exon II and part of Exon III, a prominent character of attacin gene. The phylogenetic reconstruction analysis of attacin gene in A.mylitta supported the common evolutionary origin of attacin genes belonging to the Lepidoteran and Dipteran families that formed two separate clusters. PMID:26664033

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE 'SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA' NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS GENOME BY RESTRICTION ENDONUCLEASES AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restriction endonuclease analysis was used to differentiate between four strains of Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear polyhedrosis virus from different geographical areas. In addition, partial denaturation was performed, and a partial denaturation map was constructed for the Ohio str...

  13. [Comparative biochemical studies of polyhedral proteins of nuclear polyhedrosis viruses].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, E A; Levitina, T L; Gusak, N M; Larionov, G V; Veremeĭchenko, S N

    1978-12-01

    Using disc polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the molecular weights of polyhedral proteins of nuclear polyhedrosis viruses (NPV) of Porthetria dispar, Mamestra brassicae, and Aporia crataegi were found to be 28000 +/- 3000. It was shown that NPV polyhedra of Bombyx mori, Galleria mellonella, P. dispar, and M. brassicae contain a protease. During dissolution of the polyhedra at pH 10,5 this protease specifically cleaves the matrix protein into 2--5 fragments. The amino acid compositions of NPV polyhedral proteins of P. dispar, M. brassicae, A. crataegi, Hyphantria cunae were shown to be very similar. It was found that tyrosine is a C-terminal amino acid of NPV polyhedral proteins of P. dispar, M. brassicae, and A. crataegi. PMID:33725

  14. ISSR profiling of genetic variability in the ecotypes of Antheraea mylitta Drury, the tropical Tasar silkworm.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, S N; Vijayan, K; Roy, G C; Nair, C V

    2004-02-01

    Antheraea mylitta, Drury, the semi-wild silk-producing lepidopteran insect commonly known as tasar silkworm is unique to India and is distributed over a wide tropical forest range covering the states of Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Madnya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa and Uttaranchal. The populations found in different areas are know by their specific local names and are considered as different ecotypes, but it is difficult to separate the populations on the basis of morphological and life-cycle traits and thus molecular characterization was attempted. The present communication relates to the results obtained from the analysis of polymorphism unraveled by twelve ISSR primers for 11 populations of A. mylitta belonging to six ecotypes and 41 individuals of "Railey"--ecotype collected from five zones of Dandakarnya forest in Madnya Pradesh. This communication, further, presents molecular evidences on genetic differences between eleven ecotype populations and highlights the genotypic diversification of a single ecotype into further separate discrete gene pools. The canonical discriminant function analysis revealed grouping of the five populations of Railey ecotype into two "clumps", while accessions of other ecotypes stood separated from each other. Thr "Railey" populations on detailed study, further, revealed separation of two (Tokapal and Nangur) populations into discrete gene pools and the other three (Kondagaon, Darba and Tongpal) populations, in spite of larger geographic distance between them, overlapped one on the other. The analysis also identified nine markers, which can be utilized to characterize specific population and will be of help to follow the ongoing genetic changes triggered by various ecological factors and human influences on the "Railey" ecotype. PMID:15065428

  15. 40 CFR 180.1118 - Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1118 Section 180.1118 Protection of... polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the microbial pest control agent Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1118 - Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1118 Section 180.1118 Protection of... polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the microbial pest control agent Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1118 - Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1118 Section 180.1118 Protection of... polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the microbial pest control agent Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1118 - Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1118 Section 180.1118 Protection of... polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the microbial pest control agent Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1118 - Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1118 Section 180.1118 Protection of... polyhedrosis virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the microbial pest control agent Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis...

  20. Purification and biochemical characterization of a 70 kDa sericin from tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta.

    PubMed

    Dash, Rupesh; Ghosh, Sudip K; Kaplan, David L; Kundu, S C

    2007-05-01

    Sericin isolated from the cocoon of the tropical tasar silkmoth Antheraea mylitta showed three major bands, with the lowest 70 kDa. This band was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Immunoblotting with concanavalin-A suggests a glycoprotein and CD analysis of secondary structure includes beta-sheet. Amino acid analysis shows that the protein is enriched in glycine and serine while the mole percentages of these two amino acids are different from sericin of mulberry silkworm. An anti A. mylitta sericin antibody was able to cross-react with sericin from A. assamensis but not the sericin of Bombyx mori and Philosamia ricini. Immunoblot analysis with proteins isolated from middle silk gland of A. mylitta at different developmental stages of larva showed that the 70 kDa sericin is developmentally regulated. These data extend the range of biochemical features found in this unusual family of proteins and may help in developing an improved understanding of their role in forming environmentally stable fibroin fiber-sericin composite structures (cocoons). PMID:17350301

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a protease inhibitor from the haemolymph of the Indian tasar silkworm Antheraea mylitta

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sobhan; Aravind, Penmatsa; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Das, Amit Kumar

    2006-07-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a protease inhibitor from the haemolymph of the Indian tasar silk worm A. mylitta is reported. A protein with inhibitory activity against fungal proteases was purified from the haemolymph of the Indian tasar silkworm Antheraea mylitta and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Polyethylene glycol 3350 was used as a precipitant. Crystals belonged to space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 60.6, c = 85.1 Å. X-ray diffraction data were collected and processed to a maximum resolution of 2.1 Å.

  2. Genome segment 6 of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus encodes a structural protein with ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chavali, Venkata R.M.; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Ghorai, Suvankar; Roy, Sobhan; Das, Amit K.; Ghosh, Ananta K.

    2008-07-20

    The genome segment 6 (S6) of the 11 double stranded RNA genomes from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus was converted into cDNA, cloned and sequenced. S6 consisted of 1944 nucleotides with an ORF of 607 amino acids and could encode a protein of 68 kDa, termed P68. Motif scan and molecular docking analysis of P68 showed the presence of two cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) domains and ATP binding sites. The ORF of AmCPV S6 was expressed in E. coli as His-tag fusion protein and polyclonal antibody was raised. Immunoblot analysis of virus infected gut cells and purified polyhedra using raised anti-p68 polyclonal antibody showed that S6 encodes a viral structural protein. Fluorescence and ATPase assay of soluble P68 produced in Sf-9 cells via baculovirus expression system showed its ability to bind and cleave ATP. These results suggest that P68 may bind viral RNA through CBS domains and help in replication and transcription through ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  3. Genetic characterisation of microsporidia infecting Indian tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta, using morphology and molecular tools.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Wazid; Surendra Nath, B

    2015-01-01

    The utility of inter simple sequence repeat-PCR (ISSR-PCR) assay in the genetic characterisation and elucidation of the phylogenetic relationship of different microsporidian isolates infecting tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta Drury, is demonstrated. A total of 22 different microsporidians collected from the diseased tasar silkworms from Jharkhand state of India were analysed using morphological characters and ISSR-PCR. Observations spores under phase contrast microscope revealed oval to elongate in shape with length ranging from 3.8 μm to 5.1 μm and width from 2.6 μm to 3.3 μm. All the microsporidian isolates except MIJ-1gC showed gonadal infection and transovarial transmission in infected tasar silkworms. Fourteen out of 20 ISSR primers tested generated reproducible profiles and yielded a total of 281 fragments, of which 273 were polymorphic (97%). The degree of banding pattern was used to evaluate genetic distances and for phylogenetic analysis. The results demonstrated that ISSR analysis may be a useful and efficient tool for taxonomical grouping and phylogenetic classification of different microsporidians in general. PMID:26198429

  4. 'SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA' NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS GENOME: PHYSICAL MAPS FOR RESTRICTION ENDONUCLEASES BAMHI AND HINDIII

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical map for the genome of Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear polyhedrosis virus was constructed for restriction endonucleases BamHI and HindIII. The ordering of the restriction fragments was accomplished by cross-blot hybridization of BamHI, HindIII, and EcoRI fragments. The ...

  5. Inactivation of nuclear polyhedrosis virus (Baculovirus subgroup A) by monochromatic UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Griego, V.M.; Martignoni, M.E.; Claycomb, A.E.

    1985-03-01

    Monochromatic radiation at wavelengths of 290, 300, 310, and 320 nm inactivated occluded nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata. Data indicate that all of the wavelengths are capable of causing virus inactivation; much greater fluences are needed for virus inactivation as the wavelength increases.

  6. PHYSICAL MAPS OF 'AUTOGRAPHA CALIFORNICA' AND 'RACHIPLUSIA OU' NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS RECOMBINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TN-368 cells were infected simultaneously with the closely related Autographa californica (AcMNPV) and Rachiplusia ou (RoMNPV) nuclear polyhedrosis viruses. Progeny viral isolates were plaque purified, and their DNAs were analyzed with restriction endonucleases. Of 100 randomly c...

  7. AUTOGRAPHA CALIFORNICA NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS EFFICIENTLY ENTERS BUT DOES NOT REPLICATE IN POIKILOTHERMIC VERTEBRATE CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The host range of the insect virus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) was examined. AcMNPV could not initiate a productive infection in frog, turtle, trout, or moth cell lines. After exposure to AcMNPV, neither viral DNA nor RNA synthesis could be detected...

  8. Identification of RAPD and SCAR markers associated with yield traits in the Indian tropical tasar silkworm Antheraea mylitta drury.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suhrid R; Kar, Prasanta K; Srivastava, Ashok K; Sinha, Manoj K; Shankar, Jai; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2012-12-01

    The tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta, is a semi-domesticated vanya silk-producing insect of high economic importance. To date, no molecular marker associated with cocoon and shell weights has been identified in this species. In this report, we identified a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker and examined its inheritance, and also developed a stable diagnostic sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Silkworms were divided into groups with high (HCSW) and low (LCSW) cocoon and shell weights, and the F(2) progeny of a cross between these two groups were obtained. DNA from these silkworms was screened by PCR using 34 random primers and the resulting RAPD fragments were used for cluster analysis and discriminant function analysis (DFA). The clustering pattern in a UPGMA-based dendogram and DFA clearly distinguished the HCSW and LCSW groups. Multiple regression analysis identified five markers associated with cocoon and shell weights. The marker OPW16(905 bp) showed the most significant association with cocoon and shell weights, and its inheritance was confirmed in F(2) progeny. Cloning and sequencing of this 905 bp fragment showed 88% identity between its 134 nucleotides and the Bmc-1/Yamato-like retroposon of A. mylitta. This marker was further converted into a diagnostic SCAR marker (SCOPW 16(826 bp)). The SCAR marker developed here may be useful in identifying the right parental stock of tasar silk-worms for high cocoon and shell weights in breeding programs designed to enhance the productivity of tasar silk. PMID:23271934

  9. Effects of Substituting Granulin or a Granulin-Polyhedrin Chimera for Polyhedrin on Virion Occlusion and Polyhedral Morphology in Autographa californica Multinucleocapsid Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Eason, Jane E.; Hice, Robert H.; Johnson, Jeffrey J.; Federici, Brian A.

    1998-01-01

    Substitution of granulin from the Trichoplusia ni granulosis virus (TnGV) for polyhedrin of the Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) yielded a few very large (2 to 5 μm) cuboidal inclusions in the cytoplasm and nucleus of infected cells. These polyhedra lacked the beveled edges characteristic of wild-type AcMNPV polyhedra, contained fractures, and occluded few virions. Placing a nuclear localization signal (KRKK) in granulin directed more granulin to the nucleus and resulted in more structurally uniform cuboidal inclusions in which no virions were observed. A granulin-polyhedrin chimera produced tetrahedral occlusions with more virions than granulin inclusions but many fewer than wild-type polyhedra. Despite the unusual structure of the granulin and granulin-polyhedrin inclusions, they interacted with AcMNPV p10 fibrillar structures and electron-dense spacers that are precursors of the polyhedral calyx. The change in inclusion shape obtained with the granulin-polyhedrin chimera demonstrates that the primary amino acid sequence affects occlusion body shape, but the large cuboidal inclusions formed by granulin indicate that the amino acid sequence is not the only determinant. The failure of granulin or the granulin-polyhedrin chimera to properly occlude AcMNPV virions suggests that specific interactions occur between polyhedrin and other viral proteins which facilitate normal virion occlusion and occlusion body assembly and shape in baculoviruses. PMID:9621097

  10. COMPARISON OF BIOASSAY AND ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR QUANTIFICATION OF 'SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA' NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard curves with known amounts of Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) in soil were established with a bioassay and with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The bioassay detected as few as 4 x 10 to the 4th power polyhedral inclusion bodies (PIB)/g...

  11. Molecular Engineering of the Autographa californica Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus Genome: Deletion Mutations Within the Polyhedrin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gale E.; Fraser, M. J.; Summers, Max D.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a method to introduce site-specific mutations into the genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Specifically, the A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus gene for polyhedrin, the major protein that forms viral occlusions in infected cells, was mutagenized by introducing deletions into the cloned DNA fragment containing the gene. The mutagenized polyhedrin gene was transferred to the intact viral DNA by mixing fragment and viral DNAs, cotransfecting Spodoptera frugiperda cells, and screening for viral recombinants that had undergone allelic exchange. Recombinant viruses with mutant polyhedrin genes were obtained by selecting the progeny virus that did not produce viral occlusions in infected cells (occlusion-negative mutants). Analyses of occlusion-negative mutants demonstrated that the polyhedrin gene was not essential for the production of infectious virus and that deletion of certain sequences within the gene did not alter the control, or decrease the level of expression, of polyhedrin. An early viral protein of 25,000 molecular weight was apparently not essential for virus replication in vitro, as the synthesis of this protein was not detected in cells infected with a mutant virus. Images PMID:16789242

  12. Chloroplast and Cytoplasmic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise E.; Pacold, Ivan

    1972-01-01

    Several peaks of aldolase activity are found in the isoelectric focusing pattern of pea (Pisum sativum) leaf chloroplast extracts. One peak, separated by 0.5 pH unit from the major chloroplast aldolase peak, is found when cytoplasmic extracts are focused. The chloroplast and cytoplasmic enzymes have a pH 7.4 optimum with fructose 1,6-diphosphate. The Michaelis constant for fructose-1,6-diphosphate is 19 μM for the chloroplast, 21 μM for the cytoplasmic enzyme, and for sedoheptulose 1,7-diphosphate, 8 μM for the chloroplast enzyme, 18 μM for the cytoplasmic enzyme. Both enzymes are inhibited by d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and by ribulose 1,5-diphosphate. The similarity in the catalytic properties of the isoenzymes suggests that both enzymes have an amphibolic role in carbon metabolism in the green leaf. PMID:16657968

  13. Photoreactivation and ultraviolet-enhanced reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated nuclear polyhedrosis virus by insect cells.

    PubMed

    Witt, D J

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus (Baculovirus) of Galleria mellonella (Pryalidae: Lepidoptera) was used to investigate the capability of cultured insect cells to repair ultraviolet (UV) induced damage in the viral genome. When assayed by the formation of plaques in the cell line TN-368, the survival of the virus was found to decrease linearly with increased ultraviolet exposure. The infectious capacity of UV-irradiated virions was significantly restored after exposing the TN-368 monolayers to either photoreactivation conditions (white fluorescent and black light) or to UV-enhanced reactivation conditions (far ultraviolet radiation). Using both types of repair sequentially resulted in higher reactivation than when either was used alone. These results indicate that pyrimidine dimers are the major factor responsible for inactivation of this virus by UV radiation but that other photolesions not repairable by photoreactivation partially account for the inactivation of the virus. PMID:6365037

  14. Efficient large-scale protein production of larvae and pupae of silkworm by Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus bacmid system.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y

    2005-01-21

    Silkworm is one of the most attractive hosts for large-scale production of eukaryotic proteins as well as recombinant baculoviruses for gene transfer to mammalian cells. The bacmid system of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) has already been established and widely used. However, the AcNPV does not have a potential to infect silkworm. We developed the first practical Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus bacmid system directly applicable for the protein expression of silkworm. By using this system, the green fluorescence protein was successfully expressed in silkworm larvae and pupae not only by infection of its recombinant virus but also by direct injection of its bacmid DNA. This method provides the rapid protein production in silkworm as long as 10 days, is free from biohazard, thus will be a powerful tool for the future production factory of recombinant eukaryotic proteins and baculoviruses. PMID:15596136

  15. Tissue-specific expression of silkmoth chorion genes in vivo using Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus as a transducing vector.

    PubMed Central

    Iatrou, K; Meidinger, R G

    1990-01-01

    A pair of silkmoth chorion chromosomal genes, HcA.12-HcB.12, was inserted into a baculovirus transfer vector, pBmp2, derived from the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Bombyx mori. This vector, which permits the insertion of foreign genetic material in the vicinity of a mutationally inactivated polyhedrin gene, was used to acquire the corresponding recombinant virus. Injection of mutant silkmoth pupae that lack all Hc chorion genes with the recombinant virus resulted in the infection of all internal organs including follicular tissue. Analysis of RNA from infected tissues has demonstrated that the two chorion genes present in the viral genome are correctly transcribed under the control of their own promoter in follicular cells, the tissue in which chorion genes are normally expressed. The chorion primary transcripts are also correctly processed in the infected follicular cells and yield mature mRNAs indistinguishable from authentic chorion mRNAs present in wild-type follicles. These results demonstrate that recombinant nuclear polyhedrosis viruses can be used as transducing vectors for introducing genetic material of host origin into the cells of the organism and that the transduced genes are transiently expressed in a tissue-specific manner under the control of their resident regulatory sequences. Thus we show the in vivo expression of cloned genes under cellular promoter control in an insect other than Drosophila melanogaster. The approach should be applicable to all insect systems that are subject to nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection. Images PMID:2187186

  16. α-Amanitin-Resistant Viral RNA Synthesis in Nuclei Isolated from Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus-Infected Heliothis zea Larvae and Spodoptera frugiperda Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grula, Marjori A.; Buller, Patricia L.; Weaver, Robert F.

    1981-01-01

    [3H]RNA was synthesized in nuclei isolated at various times postinfection from the fat bodies of Heliothis zea larvae infected with H. zea nuclear polyhedrosis virus and from cultured Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. To detect virus-specific RNA synthesis, the [3H]RNA was hybridized to denatured viral DNA immobilized on nitrocellulose filters. Nuclear polyhedrosis virus-specific RNA synthesis in the infected nuclei isolated from H. zea larval fat bodies and S. frugiperda cells was only inhibited 20 to 25% by concentrations of α-amanitin sufficient to inhibit the host RNA polymerase II. In addition, a productive nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection was obtained in S. frugiperda cells grown in the presence of an α-amanitin concentration that inhibited 90% of the cellular RNA polymerase II activity. The cellular RNA polymerase II enzyme remained sensitive to α-amanitin during infection, and there was no evidence that a virus-coded, α-amanitin-resistant enzyme was synthesized after the onset of infection. The data suggest that the bulk of nuclear polyhedrosis virus-specific RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei is transcribed by an enzyme other than the host RNA polymerase II. PMID:16789208

  17. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  18. Semipermissive replication of a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Autographa californica in a gypsy moth cell line

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, J.T.; Dougherty, E.M.; Weiner, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Several gypsy moth cell lines have been previously described as nonpermissive for the multiple-embedded nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Autographa californica (AcMNPV). In this report, the authors demonstrate the semipermissive infection of a gypsy moth cell line, IPLB-LD-652Y, with AcMNPV. IPLB-LD-652Y cells infected with AcMNPV produced classic cytopathic effects but failed to yield infectious progeny virus. Results of experiments employing DNA-DNA dot hybridization suggested that AcMNPV DNA synthesis was initiated from 8 to 12 h postinfection (p.i.), continued at a maximum rate from 12 to 20 h p.i., and declined from 20 to 36 h p.i. The rate of AcMNPV DNA synthesis approximated that observed in the permissive TN-368 cell line. AcMNPV-infected IPLB-LD-652Y cells, pulse-labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine at various time intervals p.i. and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, revealed four virus-induced proteins, one novel to the semipermissive system and three early ..cap alpha.. proteins, synthesized from 1 to 20 h p.i. Thereafter, both host and viral protein synthesis was completely suppressed. These results suggest that AcMNPV adsorbed, penetrated, and initiated limited macromolecular synthesis in the semipermissive gypsy moth cell line. However, the infection cycle was restricted during the early phase of AcMNPV replication.

  19. Characterization of a Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus Isolated from Diseased Gonometa podocarpi (Lepidoptera:Lasiocampidae)

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Norman F.; Armstrong, Terry; Green, Bernadette; Brown, David; Hibbin, Jill; Kelly, David C.; Tinsley, Thomas W.; Aloo, Theresa C.

    1981-01-01

    Gonometa podocarpi is an important pest of several species of pine in East Africa, and large numbers of trees in plantations in Kenya were partially or completely defoliated by the larval stage of this insect. After the infestation in the Mt. Elgon region, large numbers of dead and moribund larvae were found on the ground. Examination of extracts of these larvae demonstrated the presence of an occluded virus. Electron microscopy of purified sectioned polyhedra demonstrated the presence of virus particles containing from 1 to 12 nucleocapsids. Purification of virus particles from polyhedra was accomplished by using alkali solubilization and sucrose gradient centrifugation. Virus particles contained 15 proteins as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Detergent solubilization of the virus particles released polyhedra containing one major structural protein. Electron microscopy of purified virus particles and nucleocapsids demonstrated them to be similar in structure to previously recorded nuclear polyhedrosis viruses. The viral deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted and spread for electron microscopy and was determined to have a size of approximately 80 × 106 daltons. Images PMID:16345830

  20. Data for increase of Lymantria dispar male survival after topical application of single-stranded RING domain fragment of IAP-3 gene of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus

    PubMed Central

    Oberemok, Volodymyr V.; Laikova, Kateryna V.; Zaitsev, Aleksei S.; Gushchin, Vladimir A.; Skorokhod, Oleksii A.

    2016-01-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled “The RING for gypsy moth control: topical application of fragment of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus anti-apoptosis gene as insecticide” [1]. This article reports on significantly higher survival of gypsy moth Lymantria dispar male individuals in response to topical application of single-stranded DNA, based on RING (really interesting new gene) domain fragment of LdMNPV (L. dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus) IAP-3 (inhibitor of apoptosis) gene and acted as DNA insecticide. PMID:27054151

  1. Data for increase of Lymantria dispar male survival after topical application of single-stranded RING domain fragment of IAP-3 gene of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Oberemok, Volodymyr V; Laikova, Kateryna V; Zaitsev, Aleksei S; Gushchin, Vladimir A; Skorokhod, Oleksii A

    2016-06-01

    This data article is related to the research article entitled "The RING for gypsy moth control: topical application of fragment of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus anti-apoptosis gene as insecticide" [1]. This article reports on significantly higher survival of gypsy moth Lymantria dispar male individuals in response to topical application of single-stranded DNA, based on RING (really interesting new gene) domain fragment of LdMNPV (L. dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus) IAP-3 (inhibitor of apoptosis) gene and acted as DNA insecticide. PMID:27054151

  2. Genetic variability and genetic structure of wild and semi-domestic populations of tasar silkworm (Antheraea mylitta ) ecorace Daba as revealed through ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Kar, P K; Vijayan, K; Mohandas, T P; Nair, C V; Saratchandra, B; Thangavelu, K

    2005-11-01

    The genetic diversity in the wild and semi-domestic populations of Daba ecorace of Antheraea mylitta was studied to ascertain the distribution of variability within and among populations of semi-domestic bivoltine (DB), trivoltine (DT) and nature grown wild populations (DN) with inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. A total of 138 markers were produced among 56 individuals of the three populations, of which 98% were polymorphic. For the individual populations, the percentage polymorphism was 58.69, 52.9 and 77.54 for DB, DT and DN, respectively. Average number of observed (1.791+/- 0.408) and effective alleles (1.389+/-0.348) was also high in the wild populations in comparison to the bivoltine and trivoltine semi-domestic populations. Genetic diversity (H(t)) in DB, DT and DN was 0.180+/- 0.033, 0.153+/- 0.032 and 0.235+/- 0.033, respectively and within-population genetic diversity (H(s)) ranged from 0.166 to 0.259 with a mean of 0.189. Mean gene differentiation (G(ST)) was found to be 0.25. Shanon's diversity index was 0.278, 0.237 and 0.361 for DB, DT and DN and overall it was 0.391. Gene flow (N(m)) among the populations was 1.509. The dendrogram produced by UPGMA with Dice's genetic distance matrices resulted in the formation of three major clusters separating the three populations. Considerable intra- and inter-population variability is found in all three populations. The population structure analysis further suggests that the semi-domestic populations of Daba ecorace are at the threshold of differentiating themselves. The high genetic variability present within wild Daba population of A. mylitta is of much importance for conservation as well as utilization in systematic breeding program. PMID:16247690

  3. DNA hybridization assay for detection of gypsy moth nuclear polyhedrosis virus in infected gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L. ) larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, S.T.; Burand, J.P.; Elkinton, J.S. )

    1989-11-01

    Radiolabeled Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA probes were used in a DNA hybridization assay to detect the presence of viral DNA in extracts from infected larvae. Total DNA was extracted from larvae, bound to nitrocellulose filters, and assayed for the presence of viral DNA by two methods: slot-blot vacuum filtration and whole-larval squashes. The hybridization results were closely correlated with mortality observed in reared larvae. Hybridization of squashes of larvae frozen 4 days after receiving the above virus treatments also produced accurate measures of the incidence of virus infection.

  4. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  5. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  6. A cysteine protease encoded by the baculovirus Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, T; Majima, K; Maeda, S

    1994-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the BamHI F fragment of the genome of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) revealed an open reading frame whose deduced amino acid sequence had homology to those of cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily. The putative cysteine protease sequence (BmNPV-CP) was 323 amino acids long and showed 35% identity to a cysteine proteinase precursor from Trypanosoma brucei. Of 36 residues conserved among cathepsins B, H, L, and S and papain, 31 were identical in BmNPV-CP. In order to determine the activity and function of the putative cysteine protease, a BmNPV mutant (BmCysPD) was constructed by homologous recombination of the protease gene with a beta-galactosidase gene cassette. BmCysPD-infected BmN cell extracts were significantly reduced in acid protease activity compared with wild-type virus-infected cell extracts. The cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 [trans-epoxysuccinylleucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane] inhibited wild-type virus-expressed protease activity. Deletion of the cysteine protease gene had no significant effect on viral growth or polyhedron production in BmN cells, indicating that the cysteine protease was not essential for viral replication in vitro. However, B. mori larvae infected with BmCysPD showed symptoms different from those of wild-type BmNPV-infected larvae, e.g., less degradation of the body, including fat body cells, white body surface color due presumably to undegraded epidermal cells, and an increase in the number of polyhedra released into the hemolymph. This is the first report of (i) a virus-encoded protease with activity on general substrates and (ii) evidence that a virus-encoded protease may play a role in degradation of infected larvae to facilitate horizontal transmission of the virus. Images PMID:8083997

  7. Characterization of baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitajima, Masayuki; Hamazaki, Hiroyuki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Takaku, Hiroshi . E-mail: hiroshi.takaku@it-chiba.ac.jp

    2006-05-05

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is used as a vector in many gene therapy studies. Wild-type AcMNPV infects many mammalian cell types in vitro, but does not replicate. We investigated the dynamics of AcMNPV genomic DNA in infected mammalian cells and used flow cytometric analysis to demonstrate that recombinant baculovirus containing a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed high levels of GFP in Huh-7 cells, but not B16, Raw264.7, or YAC-1 cells. The addition of butyrate, a deacetylase inhibitor, markedly enhanced the percentage of GFP-expressing Huh-7 and B16 cells, but not Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells. The addition of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor, had no enhancing effect. Polymerase chain reaction analysis using AcMNPV-gp64-specific primers indicated that AcMNPV infected not only Huh-7 and B16 cells, but also Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells in vitro. The genomic DNA was detected in Huh-7 and B16 cells 96 h after infection. Genomic AcMNPV DNA in YAC-1 cells was not transported to the nucleus. Luciferase assay indicated that AcMNPV p35 gene mRNA and p35 promoter activity were clearly expressed only in Huh-7 and B16 cells. These results suggest that viral genomic DNA expression is restricted by different host cell factors, such as degradation, deacetylation, and inhibition of nuclear transport, depending on the mammalian cell type.

  8. Characterization of baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Masayuki; Hamazaki, Hiroyuki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is used as a vector in many gene therapy studies. Wild-type AcMNPV infects many mammalian cell types in vitro, but does not replicate. We investigated the dynamics of AcMNPV genomic DNA in infected mammalian cells and used flow cytometric analysis to demonstrate that recombinant baculovirus containing a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed high levels of GFP in Huh-7 cells, but not B16, Raw264.7, or YAC-1 cells. The addition of butyrate, a deacetylase inhibitor, markedly enhanced the percentage of GFP-expressing Huh-7 and B16 cells, but not Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells. The addition of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor, had no enhancing effect. Polymerase chain reaction analysis using AcMNPV-gp64-specific primers indicated that AcMNPV infected not only Huh-7 and B16 cells, but also Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells in vitro. The genomic DNA was detected in Huh-7 and B16 cells 96 h after infection. Genomic AcMNPV DNA in YAC-1 cells was not transported to the nucleus. Luciferase assay indicated that AcMNPV p35 gene mRNA and p35 promoter activity were clearly expressed only in Huh-7 and B16 cells. These results suggest that viral genomic DNA expression is restricted by different host cell factors, such as degradation, deacetylation, and inhibition of nuclear transport, depending on the mammalian cell type. PMID:16545777

  9. A mechanism for negative gene regulation in Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leisy, D.J.; Rasmussen, C.; Owusu, E.O.; Rohrmann, G.F.

    1997-01-01

    The Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) ie-1 gene product (IE-1) is thought to play a central role in stimulating early viral transcription. IE-1 has been demonstrated to activate several early viral gene promoters and to negatively regulate the promoters of two other AcMNPV regulatory genes, ie-0 and ie-2. Our results indicate that IE-1 negatively regulates the expression of certain genes by binding directly, or as part of a complex, to promoter regions containing a specific IE-1-binding motif (5'-ACBYGTAA-3') near their mRNA start sites. The IE-1 binding motif was also found within the palindromic sequences of AcMNPV homologous repeat (hr) regions that have been shown to bind IE-1. The role of this IE-1 binding motif in the regulation of the ie-2 and pe-38 promoters was examined by introducing mutations in these promoters in which the central 6 bp were replaced with Bg/II sites. GUS reporter constructs containing ie-2 and pe-38 promoter fragments with and without these specific mutations were cotransfected into Sf9 cells with various amounts of an ie-1-containing plasmid (ple-1). Comparisons of GUS expression produced by the mutant and wild-type constructs demonstrated that the IE-1 binding motif mediated a significant decrease in expression from the ie-2 and pe-38 promoters in response to increasing pIe-1 concentrations. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with pIe-1-transfected cell extracts and supershift assays with IE-1- specific antiserum demonstrated that IE-1 binds to promoter fragments containing the IE-1 binding motif but does not bind to promoter fragments lacking this motif.

  10. SELECTION KINETICS DURING SERIAL CELL CULTURE PASSAGE OF MIXTURES OF WILD TYPE AUTOGRAPHA CALIFORNICA NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS AND ITS RECOMBINANT AC360-B-GAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed analysis of the selection process in serial co-infections of cell cultures by wild type Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus, AcNPV/E2, and Ac36O-B-gal, a "genetically engineered" strain, shows that the unaltered strain was clearly dominant even when it bega...

  11. Effect of aluminum chloride and zinc sulfate on Autographa california nuclear polyhedrosis virus (ACNPV) replication in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Weiss, S A; Smith, G C; Vaughn, J L; Dougherty, E M; Tompkins, G J

    1982-11-01

    When IPL-SF-21AE III continuous insect cell line was grown and maintained in IPL-41 insect cell culture medium supplemented with 16 microM of AlCl3 or 0.24 microM of ZnSO4 . 7H2O, or both metallic salts, and then infected with Autographa california nuclear polyhedrosis virus, virus replication was increased significantly. The yield of polyhedral inclusion bodies (PIB) was enhanced up to 121%. Synthesis of cell-free nonoccluded virus was increased to 365% when infectivity was assayed by the plaque method. Newly applied electron microscopic quantitation and stereological techniques also revealed a significant increase in virus particles (VP) and in amount and size of PIB as well as number of VP per PIB. PMID:6759370

  12. Risk Assessment Studies: Detailed Host Range Testing of Wild-Type Cabbage Moth, Mamestra brassicae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Cathy J.; Hirst, Mark L.; Cory, Jenny S.; Entwistle, Philip F.

    1990-01-01

    The host range of a multiply enveloped nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) (Baculoviridae) isolated from the cabbage moth, Mamestra brassicae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was determined by challenging a wide range of insect species with high (106 polyhedral inclusion bodies) and low (103 polyhedral inclusion bodies) doses of the virus. The identity of the progeny virus was confirmed by dot blotting. Analysis of 50% lethal dose was carried out on selected species, and the progeny virus was identified by using restriction enzyme analysis and Southern blotting. Other than the Lepidoptera, none of the species tested was susceptible to M. brassicae NPV. Within the Lepidoptera, M. brassicae NPV was infective to members of four families (Noctuidae, Geometridae, Yponomeutidae, and Nymphalidae). Of 66 lepidopterous species tested, M. brassicae NPV was cross-infective to 32 of them; however, 91% of the susceptible species were in the Noctuidae. The relevance of host range data in risk assessment studies is discussed. Images PMID:16348279

  13. Oxidative Damaged Products, Level of Hydrogen Peroxide, and Antioxidant Protection in Diapausing Pupa of Tasar Silk Worm, Antheraea mylitta: A Comparative Study in Two Voltine Groups.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Alpana; Dandapat, Jagneshwar; Samanta, Luna

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates tissue-specific (hemolymph and fat body) and inter-voltine [bivoltine (BV) and trivoltine (TV)] differences in oxidatively damaged products, H2O2 content, and the relative level of antioxidant protection in the diapausing pupae of Antheraea mylitta. Results suggest that fat body (FB) of both the voltine groups has oxidative predominance, as evident from the high value of lipid peroxidation and H2O2 content, despite better enzymatic defenses in comparison to hemolymph (HL). This may be attributed to the higher metabolic rate of the tissue concerned, concomitant with high lipid content and abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Nondetectable catalase activity in the pupal hemolymph of both strains apparently suggests an additional mechanism for H2O2 metabolism in the tissue. Inter-voltine comparison of the oxidative stress indices and antioxidant defense potential revealed that the TV group has a higher oxidative burden, lower activities for the antioxidant enzymes, and compensatory nonenzymatic protection from reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid. PMID:26816485

  14. Oxidative Damaged Products, Level of Hydrogen Peroxide, and Antioxidant Protection in Diapausing Pupa of Tasar Silk Worm, Antheraea mylitta: A Comparative Study in Two Voltine Groups

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Alpana; Dandapat, Jagneshwar; Samanta, Luna

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates tissue-specific (hemolymph and fat body) and inter-voltine [bivoltine (BV) and trivoltine (TV)] differences in oxidatively damaged products, H2O2 content, and the relative level of antioxidant protection in the diapausing pupae of Antheraea mylitta. Results suggest that fat body (FB) of both the voltine groups has oxidative predominance, as evident from the high value of lipid peroxidation and H2O2 content, despite better enzymatic defenses in comparison to hemolymph (HL). This may be attributed to the higher metabolic rate of the tissue concerned, concomitant with high lipid content and abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Nondetectable catalase activity in the pupal hemolymph of both strains apparently suggests an additional mechanism for H2O2 metabolism in the tissue. Inter-voltine comparison of the oxidative stress indices and antioxidant defense potential revealed that the TV group has a higher oxidative burden, lower activities for the antioxidant enzymes, and compensatory nonenzymatic protection from reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid. PMID:26816485

  15. Occluded and nonoccluded nuclear polyhedrosis virus grown in Trichoplusia ni: comparative neutralization comparative infectivity, and in vitro growth studies.

    PubMed Central

    Volkman, L E; Summers, M D; Hsieh, C H

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear polyhedrosis virus infections of lepidopteran cells often result in the production of both occluded and nonoccluded virus. The characterization of these two different forms has been the subject of several papers. We have divided the nonoccluded virus (NOV) category further into plasma membrane-budded non-occluded virus (PMB-NOV), intracellular NOV, and hemolymph-derived NOV, and have done additional studies investigating the differences between these nonoccluded forms and the alkali-liberated forms from occlusions of the nuclear polyhedrosis viruses of Autographa californica and Rachiplusa ou. The methods used to discern differences and similarities among the forms were serological, biochemical, and visual, all related to their biological acitivity. Neutralization studies revealed that alkali-liberated virus and PMB-NOV had both similar and different antigens. Antisera raised against alkali-liberated virus from occlusions neutralized the alkali-liberated form of the virus, but did not neutralize the intracellular or extracellular nonoccluded forms. Antisera raised against the TN-368-13 PMB-NOV, however, neutralized the alkali-liberated forms as well as all forms of the NOV. Adsorption of this antisera with alkali-liberated virus did not diminish the neutralization titer against the nonoccluded forms, thus confirming the antigenic differences between the alkali-liberated and nonoccluded forms of the virus. Physical-infectious particle ratio calculations indicated that the PMB-NOV of Autographa californica are about 1,900-fold more infectious than the single-nucleocapsid-per-envelope alkali-liberated particles and about 1,700-fold more infectious than the multiple-nucleocapsid-per-envelope particles, as assayed in vitro. In addition, a study of viral growth kinetics monitored concurrently with the appearance of polyhedra showed that PMB-NOV production is shut down with the onset of polyhedron formation. PMID:787558

  16. Identification of three late expression factor genes within the 33.8- to 43.4-map-unit region of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, A; Miller, L K

    1994-01-01

    A transient transactivation assay system was used in combination with an overlapping Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus clone library to identify genes involved in late and very late baculovirus gene expression. We have identified three genes within the 33.8- to 43.4-map-unit region of the A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus genome which contribute to expression from promoters of the vp39 major capsid protein and polyhedrin genes. One of these three genes corresponds to the previously identified DNA polymerase gene, while the other two genes encode previously unidentified polypeptides of 59,418 and 8,706 Da. None of these genes were required for expression from the early etl promoter. Images PMID:8084003

  17. Structural studies on the polyhedral inclusion bodies, virions, and DNA of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the cotton bollworm Heliothis zea.

    PubMed Central

    Scharnhorst, D W; Saving, K L; Vuturo, S B; Cooke, P H; Weaver, R F

    1977-01-01

    The polyhedral inclusion body of the cotton bollworm nuclear polyhedrosis virus contains virions occluded in an orthogonal crystalline matrix. The virions appear as rods or, more frequently, as oval structures that form upon bending of the nucleocapsid within the viral membrane. The nucleocapsid consists at least of DNA surrounded by a capsid composed of subunits, possibly helically arranged. The viral DNA is circular and supercoiled. It is heterogenous in size with contour lengths ranging from 15 to 45 mum. Images PMID:319251

  18. An apoptosis-inhibiting gene from a nuclear polyhedrosis virus encoding a polypeptide with Cys/His sequence motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, M J; Clem, R J; Miller, L K

    1994-01-01

    Two different baculovirus genes are known to be able to block apoptosis triggered upon infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells with p35 mutants of the insect baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV):p35 (P35-encoding gene) of AcMNPV (R. J. Clem, M. Fechheimer, and L. K. Miller, Science 254:1388-1390, 1991) and iap (inhibitor of apoptosis gene) of Cydia pomonella granulosis virus (CpGV) (N. E. Crook, R. J. Clem, and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 67:2168-2174, 1993). Using a genetic complementation assay to identify additional genes which inhibit apoptosis during infection with a p35 mutant, we have isolated a gene from Orgyia pseudotsugata NPV (OpMNPV) that was able to functionally substitute for AcMNPV p35. The nucleotide sequence of this gene, Op-iap, predicted a 30-kDa polypeptide product with approximately 58% amino acid sequence identity to the product of CpGV iap, Cp-IAP. Like Cp-IAP, the predicted product of Op-iap has a carboxy-terminal C3HC4 zinc finger-like motif. In addition, a pair of additional cysteine/histidine motifs were found in the N-terminal regions of both polypeptide sequences. Recombinant p35 mutant viruses carrying either Op-iap or Cp-iap appeared to have a normal phenotype in S. frugiperda cells. Thus, Cp-IAP and Op-IAP appear to be functionally analogous to P35 but are likely to block apoptosis by a different mechanism which may involve direct interaction with DNA. Images PMID:8139034

  19. An apoptosis-inhibiting gene from a nuclear polyhedrosis virus encoding a polypeptide with Cys/His sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, M J; Clem, R J; Miller, L K

    1994-04-01

    Two different baculovirus genes are known to be able to block apoptosis triggered upon infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells with p35 mutants of the insect baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV):p35 (P35-encoding gene) of AcMNPV (R. J. Clem, M. Fechheimer, and L. K. Miller, Science 254:1388-1390, 1991) and iap (inhibitor of apoptosis gene) of Cydia pomonella granulosis virus (CpGV) (N. E. Crook, R. J. Clem, and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 67:2168-2174, 1993). Using a genetic complementation assay to identify additional genes which inhibit apoptosis during infection with a p35 mutant, we have isolated a gene from Orgyia pseudotsugata NPV (OpMNPV) that was able to functionally substitute for AcMNPV p35. The nucleotide sequence of this gene, Op-iap, predicted a 30-kDa polypeptide product with approximately 58% amino acid sequence identity to the product of CpGV iap, Cp-IAP. Like Cp-IAP, the predicted product of Op-iap has a carboxy-terminal C3HC4 zinc finger-like motif. In addition, a pair of additional cysteine/histidine motifs were found in the N-terminal regions of both polypeptide sequences. Recombinant p35 mutant viruses carrying either Op-iap or Cp-iap appeared to have a normal phenotype in S. frugiperda cells. Thus, Cp-IAP and Op-IAP appear to be functionally analogous to P35 but are likely to block apoptosis by a different mechanism which may involve direct interaction with DNA. PMID:8139034

  20. Splicing is required for transactivation by the immediate early gene 1 of the Lymantria dispar multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M N; Rohrmann, G F

    1997-08-18

    A region of the Lymantria disper multinucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) genome containing the homolog of the baculovirus ie-1 gene was identified using a series of overlapping cosmids and individual plasmids in a transient transcriptional expression assay. Sequence analysis of the active region identified two ORFs, one of which is 32% identical to AcMNPV ORF141 (ie-0) and contains a putative splice donor site and the other of which is 29% identical to AcMNPV ie-1 and contains a highly conserved splice acceptor consensus sequences. Plasmids containing the LdMNPV ORF141 and ie-1 regions were able to stimulate expression of a GUS reporter gene, while plasmids containing the ie-1 region alone were inactive, suggesting that only the spliced, IE-0 form of the gene product is an active transactivator. Primer extension analysis confirmed the presence of spliced ie-0 mRNA transcripts starting at 6 hr and continuing throughout the time course of viral infection of the L dispar cell line Ld652Y. Using a plasmid containing the ie-0 spliced form of the gene as a transactivator, hr4, one of the eight homologous regions of LdMNPV, was shown to act as a transcriptional enhancer. In contrast, a reporter plasmid containing the AcMNPV hr5 enhancer did not show increased activity when cotransfected with LdMNPV ie-0, suggesting that these enhancer sequences are viral specific. In a transient replication assay system. LdMNPV ie-0 acted as an essential replication gene, but LdMNPV ie-1 was inactive. These results indicate that splicing is required to obtain an active gene product in LdMNPV in the Ld652Y cell line. PMID:9300047

  1. The role of cytochrome c on apoptosis induced by Anagrapha falcifera multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus in insect Spodoptera litura cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyu; Shu, Duanyang; Song, Na; Gai, Zhongchao; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Juan; Li, Min; Guo, Shuying; Peng, Jianxin; Hong, Huazhu

    2012-01-01

    There are conflicting reports on the role of cytochrome c during insect apoptosis. Our previous studies have showed that cytochrome c released from the mitochondria was an early event by western blot analysis and caspase-3 activation was closely related to cytochrome c release during apoptosis induced by baculovirus in Spodoptera litura cells (Sl-1 cell line). In the present study, alteration in mitochondrial morphology was observed by transmission electron microscopy, and cytochrome c release from mitochondria in apoptotic Sl-1 cells induced with Anagrapha falcifera multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AfMNPV) has further been confirmed by immunofluoresence staining protocol, suggesting that structural disruption of mitochondria and the release of cytochrome c are important events during Lepidoptera insect cell apoptosis. We also used Sl-1 cell-free extract system and the technique of RNA interference to further investigate the role of cytochrome c in apoptotic Sl-1 cells induced by AfMNPV. Caspase-3 activity in cell-free extracts supplemented with exogenous cytochrome c was determined and showed an increase with the extension of incubation time. DsRNA-mediated silencing of cytochrome c resulted in the inhibition of apoptosis and protected the cells from AfMNPV-induced cell death. Silencing of expression of cytochrome c had a remarkable effect on pro-caspase-3 and pro-caspase-9 activation and resulted in the reduction of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity in Sl-1 cells undergoing apoptosis. Caspase-9 inhibitor could inhibit activation of pro-caspase-3, and the inhibition of the function of Apaf-1 with FSBA blocked apoptosis, hinting that Apaf-1 could be involved in Sl-1 cell apoptosis induced by AfMNPV. Taken together, these results strongly demonstrate that cytochrome c plays an important role in apoptotic signaling pathways in Lepidopteran insect cells. PMID:22952575

  2. Isolation of Cytoplasmic Enzymes from Pollen 1

    PubMed Central

    Weeden, Norman F.; Gottlieb, Leslie D.

    1980-01-01

    The cytoplasmic isozyme of many cytoplasmic-organelle isozyme pairs, as well as other cytoplasmic enzymes in plants, can be readily obtained from pollen by soaking it in an appropriate buffer for 4 hours. Enzymes localized in subcellular organelles appear not to be released during the soaking period, although they are released if the pollen is crushed. The technique is a useful initial step in studies of subcellular localization of enzymes or for obtaining small quantities of cytoplasmic enzymes free of organellar contaminants. Images PMID:16661444

  3. Measurement of Cytoplasmic Streaming in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sujoy; Williams, Lucy; Palacios, Isabel; Goldstein, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    During stage 9 of Drosophila melanogastor oogenesis flow of the oocyte cytoplasm, driven by kinesin 1 motor protein is observed. This cytoplasmic streaming is analyzed by PIV in both wild type and kinesin light chain mutants, revealing striking statistical differences. Further measurements of the rheology of the oocyte allow for estimations of the mechanical energy needed to generate the observed flows.

  4. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  5. Single-stranded DNA fragments of insect-specific nuclear polyhedrosis virus act as selective DNA insecticides for gypsy moth control.

    PubMed

    Oberemok, Volodymyr V; Skorokhod, Oleksii A

    2014-07-01

    This paper focuses on the DNA insecticides as a novel preparation against gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) based on DNA fragments of the anti-apoptotic gene of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus. It was found that the external application of a solution with two single-stranded DNA fragments from BIR and RING domains of LdMNPV (L.dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus) IAP-3 (inhibitor of apoptosis) gene induces a significantly higher mortality of gypsy moth caterpillars in comparison with the application of the control solutions. This effect does not depend on the infection of caterpillars with LdMNPV. The results also show that DNA insecticides based on LdMNPV IAP-3 gene fragments can be selective in action, and at least are not harmful to tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) and black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon). Part of the gypsy moth genome cloned with the fragments of BIR and RING domains of LdMNPV IAP-3 gene as primers, has an overlap with the corresponding part of the LdMNPV IAP-3 gene and L.dispar IAP-1 mRNA for an inhibitor of apoptosis protein with the high cover by query, allows assuming that we cloned a part of gypsy moth anti-apoptosis gene. This finding gives the grounding that proposed here DNA insecticides might act through the blocking of the mechanisms involved in post transcriptional expression of insect anti-apoptosis genes. The results show the insecticidal potential of the viral genome fragments that can be used to create safe and relatively fast-acting DNA insecticides to control the quantity of gypsy moth populations, important task for forestry and agriculture. PMID:25052520

  6. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in ventralized Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Following fertilization in Xenopus, dramatic rearrangements of the egg cytoplasm relocalize maternally synthesized egg components. During the first cell cycle the vegetal yolk mass rotates relative to the egg surface, toward the sperm entry point (SEP) (J. P. Vincent, G. F. Oster, and J. C. Gerhart, 1986, Dev. Biol. 113, 484-500), while concomitant deep cytoplasmic rearrangements occur in the animal hemisphere (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). In this paper we examine the role of vegetal yolk mass rotation in producing the animal cytoplasmic rearrangements. We inhibited rotation by uv-irradiating embryos during the first cell cycle, a treatment that yields an extremely ventralized phenotype. Both uv-irradiated embryos and unirradiated control embryos show cytoplasmic rearrangements in the animal hemisphere during the first cell cycle. Cytoplasmic rearrangements on the SEP side of the embryo associated with the path of the sperm pronucleus, plus a swirl on the anti-SEP (dorsal) side, are seen, whether or not yolk mass rotation has occurred. This result suggests a role for the expanding sperm aster in directing animal hemisphere cytoplasmic movements. In unirradiated control embryos the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl is larger than that in uv-irradiated embryos and often extends into the vegetal hemisphere, consistent with the animal cytoplasm having been pulled dorsally and vegetally by the sliding vegetal yolk mass. Thus the yolk mass rotation may normally enhance the dorsalward cytoplasmic movement, begun by the sperm aster, enough to induce normal axis formation. We extended our observations of unirradiated control and uv-irradiated embryos through early cleavages. The vegetal extent of the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl pattern seen in control embryos persists through the early cleavage period, such that labeled animal cytoplasm extends deep into dorsal third-tier blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. Significantly, in uv-irradiated embryos

  7. Cytoplasmic rearrangements associated with amphibian egg symmetrization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Cytoplasmic rearrangements which follow fertilization were mentioned in normal and inverted eggs. A set of yolk compartments was resolved by cytological analyses of both normally oriented and inverted eggs. Those compartments were characterized by their yolk platelet compositions and movement during egg inversion. It is found that during egg inversion the yolk compartments shift minor cytoplasmic compartments which line the egg cortex. Those yolk mass shifts occurred only after the inverted egg was activated. The direction of shift of the major yolk components, rather than the sperm entrance site, determines the dorsal/ventral polarity of the inverted egg. Among different spawnings the rate of shift varied. Eggs that displayed the fastest rate of shift exhibited the highest frequency of developmental abnormalities during organogenesis. Interpretation of novel observations on cytoplasmic organization provide criticism of some earlier models. A new density compartment model is presented as a coherent way to view the organization of the egg cytoplasm and the development of bilateral symmetry.

  8. The mechanics of motility in dissociated cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, M

    1986-01-01

    We stimulate the dynamical behavior of dissociated cytoplasm using the Reactive Flow Model (Dembo, M., and F. Harlow, 1986, Biophys. J., 50:109-121). We find that for the most part the predicted dynamical behavior of the cytoplasm is governed by three nondimensional numbers. Several other nondimensional parameters, the initial conditions, and boundary conditions are found to have lesser effects. Of the three major nondimensional parameters, one (D#) controls the percentage of ectoplasm, the second (C#) controls the sharpness of the endoplasm-ectoplasm boundary, and the third (R#) controls the topological complexity of the endoplasm-ectoplasm distribution. If R# is very small, then the cytoplasm contracts into a single uniform mass, and there is no bulk streaming. If R# is very large, then the cytoplasmic mass breaks up into a number of clumps scattered throughout the available volume. Between these clumps the solution undergoes turbulent or chaotic patterns of streaming. Intermediate values of R# can be found such that the mass of cytoplasm remains connected and yet undergoes coherent modes of motility similar to flares (Taylor, D.L., J.S. Condeelis, P.L. Moore, and R.D. Allen, 1973, J. Cell Biol., 59:378-394) and rosettes (Kuroda, K., 1979, Cell Motility: Molecules and Organization, 347-362). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 1B FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:3801576

  9. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts. PMID:24630119

  10. How crowded is the prokaryotic cytoplasm?

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2013-07-11

    We consider biomacromolecular crowding within the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells as a two-phase system of 'supercrowded' cytogel and 'dilute' cytosol; we simplify and quantify this model for a coccoid cell over a wide range of biomacromolecular crowding. The key result shows that the supercrowded cytogel extends the vectorial character of the plasma membrane deeper into the cytoplasm by about 20-70 nm. We discuss useful physiological insights that this model gives into the functioning of a prokaryotic cell on the micrometer scale. PMID:23735698

  11. Consequences of Cytoplasmic Irradiation: Studies from Microbeam

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongning; Hong, Mei; Chai, Yunfei; Hei, Tom K.

    2013-01-01

    The prevailing dogma for radiation biology is that genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation such as mutations and carcinogenesis are attributed mainly to direct damage to the nucleus. However, with the development of microbeam that can target precise positions inside the cells, accumulating evidences have shown that energy deposit by radiation in nuclear DNA is not required to trigger the damage, extra-nuclear or extra-cellular radiation could induce the similar biological effects as well. This review will summarize the biological responses after cytoplasm irradiated by microbeam, and the possible mechanisms involved in cytoplasmic irradiation. PMID:19346686

  12. Detection of cytoplasmic glycosylation associated with hydroxyproline.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher M; van der Wel, Hanke; Blader, Ira J

    2006-01-01

    A special class of glycosylation occurs on a proline residue of the cytoplasmic/nuclear protein Skp1 in the social amoeba Dictyostelium. For this glycosylation to occur, the proline must first be hydroxylated by the action of a soluble prolyl 4-hydroxylase acting on the protein. Cytoplasmic prolyl 4-hydroxylases are dioxygen-dependent enzymes that have low affinity for their O2 substrate and, therefore, have been implicated in O2-sensing in Dictyostelium, as well as in vertebrates and invertebrates. The sugar-hydroxyproline linkage has low abundance, is resistant to alkali cleavage and known glycosidases, and does not bind known lectins. However, initial screens for this modification can be made by assessing changes in electrophoretic mobility of candidate proteins after treatment of cells with prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors, and/or by metabolic labeling with [3H]sugar precursors. In addition, cytoplasmic hydroxylation/glycosylation can be assessed by assaying for cytoplasmic glycosyltransferases. Here we describe these methods and examples of their use in analyzing Skp1 glycosylation in Dictyostelium and the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis in humans. PMID:17132515

  13. CNS Myelination Requires Cytoplasmic Dynein Function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Michele L.; Shin, Jimann; Kearns, Christina A.; Langworthy, Melissa M.; Snell, Heather; Walker, Macie B.; Appel, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytoplasmic dynein provides the main motor force for minus-end-directed transport of cargo on microtubules. Within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS), proliferation, neuronal migration and retrograde axon transport are among the cellular functions known to require dynein. Accordingly, mutations of DYNC1H1, which encodes the heavy chain subunit of cytoplasmic dynein, have been linked to developmental brain malformations and axonal pathologies. Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glial cell type of the CNS, migrate from their origins to their target axons and subsequently extend multiple long processes that ensheath axons with specialized insulating membrane. These processes are filled with microtubules, which facilitate molecular transport of myelin components. However, whether oligodendrocytes require cytoplasmic dynein to ensheath axons with myelin is not known. Results We identified a mutation of zebrafish dync1h1 in a forward genetic screen that caused a deficit of oligodendrocytes. Using in vivo imaging and gene expression analyses, we additionally found evidence that dync1h1 promotes axon ensheathment and myelin gene expression. Conclusions In addition to its well known roles in axon transport and neuronal migration, cytoplasmic dynein contributes to neural development by promoting myelination. PMID:25488883

  14. Nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of the HindIII P region of a temperature-sensitive mutant of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Carstens, E B; Lu, A

    1990-12-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the HindIII P region of a temperature-sensitive mutant of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus confirmed the specific amplification of 1.4 kb of viral DNA from this region of the genome. The sequenced region included an open reading frame, translated in a counterclockwise direction, which would potentially encode a 74K protein. The amplified DNA was contained within this open reading frame, resulting in in-frame amplifications of a domain within the protein. Transcription studies revealed the presence of a ladder of viral RNA species corresponding to a 2.5 kb transcript carrying tandem repeats of about 1.4 kb. This indicated that the duplicated DNA was transcribed in the same orientation as the p10 gene. We predict that transcripts synthesized from the opposite DNA strand also consist of a ladder of related mRNAs which would be translated to produce a family of p74 proteins with multiple internal domains. PMID:2273394

  15. Baculovirus replication: characterization of DNA and proteins synthesized by a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Lymantria dispar, the gypsy moth, in a homologous cell line

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    A multiple-embedded nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (LdMNPV), is used for biological control. However, LdMNPV has low natural virulence and a long infection cycle in relation to other NPVs. Therefore, the replicative cycle of LdMNPV was investigated using a homologous cell line, IPLB-LD-652Y. Based on analyses of virus growth curves LdMNPV nonoccluded virus and polyhedral inclusion bodies appeared approximately 20 and 50 hr postinfection (p.i.), respectively. LdMNPV polypeptides, identified by autoradiography of (/sup 35/S)-methionine labeled fractions in SDS-PAGE, were synthesized in sequential phases: (1) an early ..cap alpha.. phase of replication (4 polypeptides from 4 to 12 hr p.i.), (2) an intermediate ..beta.. phase (20 polypeptides from 12 to 24 hr p.i.), and a late ..gamma.. phase (4 polypeptides from 24 to 28 hr p.i.). In infected cells at least four polypeptides were post-translational cleaved and/or modified. Pulse-labeling with (/sup 3/H)-mannose, (/sup 3/H)-N-acetyl-glucosamine or (/sup 32/P)-monosodium phosphate revealed several viral polypeptides which were glycosylated and/or phosphorylated. DNA:DNA dot hybridization experiments suggested that LdMNPV DNA synthesis was initiated between 12 to 16 hr p.i., increasing significantly thereafter.

  16. The RING for gypsy moth control: Topical application of fragment of its nuclear polyhedrosis virus anti-apoptosis gene as insecticide.

    PubMed

    Oberemok, Volodymyr V; Laikova, Kateryna V; Zaitsev, Aleksei S; Gushchin, Vladimir A; Skorokhod, Oleksii A

    2016-07-01

    Numerous studies suggest a cellular origin for the Lymantria dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) anti-apoptosis genes IAPs, thus opening a possibility to use the fragments of these genes for modulation of host metabolism. We report here the strong insecticidal and metabolic effect of single-stranded antisense DNA fragment from RING (really interesting new gene) domain of gypsy moth LdMNPV IAP-3 gene: specifically, on reduction of biomass (by 35%) and survival of L. dispar caterpillars. The treatment with this DNA fragment leads to a significantly higher mortality rates of female insects (1.7 fold) accompanied with the signs of apoptosis. Additionally, we show increased expression of host IAP-1, caspase-4 and gelsolin genes in eggs laid by survived females treated with RING DNA fragment accompanied with calcium and magnesium imbalance, indicating that the strong stress reactions and metabolic effects are not confined to treated insects but likely led to apoptosis in eggs too. The proposed new approach for insect pest management, which can be considered as advancement of "microbial pesticides", is based on the application of the specific virus DNA, exploiting the knowledge about virus-pest interactions and putting it to the benefit of mankind. PMID:27265824

  17. Influence of cytochrome c on apoptosis induced by Anagrapha (Syngrapha) falcifera multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AfMNPV) in insect Spodoptera litura cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Peng, Jianxin; Liu, Kaiyu; Yang, Hong; Li, Yi; Hong, Huazhu

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the influence of cytochrome c on apoptosis induced by Anagrapha (Syngrapha) falcifera multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AfMNPV). Microscopic observation revealed that infection of SL-1 cells with AfMNPV resulted in apoptosis, displaying apoptotic bodies in fluorescent-stained nuclei of AfMNPV-infected SL-1cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated that AfMNPV-induced apoptosis in insect SL-1 cells was significantly inhibited by cyclosporin A which blocked a translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol. As determined by using AC-DEVD-AFC as substrate, the activity of caspase-3 in AfMNPV-induced cells was detected as early as 4h post infection, gradually increased with time extension, and reached a highest level after 16h of infection. However, activity of caspase-3 in apoptotic cells decreased in the presence of cyclosporin A (30microM), indicating that activation of caspase-3 in SfaMNPV-induced cells was dependent on the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. In addition, cyclosporin A could markedly inhibit mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim) disruption in undergoing apoptotic cells. These data indicate that cytochrome c plays a key role in AfMNPV-induced apoptosis in S. litura cells and may be required for caspase activation during the induction of apoptosis. PMID:17478109

  18. An integrated model for the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Hannah M; Gray, Nicola K

    2012-05-01

    Cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) regulate mRNA stability and translation. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, PABP proteins also cycle through the nucleus. Recent work has established that their steady-state localization can be altered by cellular stresses such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and infection by several viruses, resulting in nuclear accumulation of PABPs. Here, we present further evidence that their interaction with and release from mRNA and translation complexes are important in determining their sub-cellular distribution and propose an integrated model for regulated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of PABPs. PMID:22896784

  19. Arrest of cytoplasmic streaming induces algal proliferation in green paramecia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Yohji; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    A green ciliate Paramecium bursaria, bearing several hundreds of endosymbiotic algae, demonstrates rotational microtubule-based cytoplasmic streaming, in which cytoplasmic granules and endosymbiotic algae flow in a constant direction. However, its physiological significance is still unknown. We investigated physiological roles of cytoplasmic streaming in P. bursaria through host cell cycle using video-microscopy. Here, we found that cytoplasmic streaming was arrested in dividing green paramecia and the endosymbiotic algae proliferated only during the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. Interestingly, arrest of cytoplasmic streaming with pressure or a microtubule drug also induced proliferation of endosymbiotic algae independently of host cell cycle. Thus, cytoplasmic streaming may control the algal proliferation in P. bursaria. Furthermore, confocal microscopic observation revealed that a division septum was formed in the constricted area of a dividing paramecium, producing arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. This is a first report to suggest that cytoplasmic streaming controls proliferation of eukaryotic cells. PMID:18159235

  20. Hybridization using cytoplasmic male sterility, cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance, and herbicide tolerance from nuclear genes

    SciTech Connect

    Beversdorf, W.D.; Erickson, L.R.; Grant, I.

    1987-04-14

    An improved process is described for producing a substantially homogeneous population of plants of a predetermined hybrid variety of crop which is capable of undergoing self-pollination and cross-pollination. The process comprises: growing in a first planting area a substantially random population of cytoplasmic male sterile plants which exhibit cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide which is attributable solely to homozygous dominant nuclear genes and male fertile plants which are homozygous recessive maintainer plants for the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and which lack the cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide attributable solely to the homozygous dominant nuclear genes.

  1. Nuclear and cytoplasmic actin in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Soyer-Gobillard, M O; Ausseil, J; Géraud, M L

    1996-01-01

    Experiments using monoclonal and polyclonal anti-actin antibodies allowed us to demonstrate the presence of F- or G-actin in original protists, dinoflagellates, either by biochemistry, immunofluorescence and in TEM. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and immunoblottings made either from total or nuclear protein extracts revealed the presence of a 44-kDa band reacting with monoclonal anti-actin antibody in two species, Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii, and thus demonstrated the presence of actin in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. After squash preparation of P micans cells, actin was identified within the nucleus and in some regions of the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence microscopy. Labelling of both the nucleolus and the centrosome region was evident together with amorphous nucleoplasmic material surrounding the chromosomes. The use of cryosections of intact P micans and C cohnii cells for immunofluorescence along with staining with DAPI to delineate the chromosomes themselves, yielded finer resolution of the intranuclear network labelling pattern and allowed us to complete our observations, in particular on the cytoplasmic labelling. In P micans, in addition to the centrosome region, the cytoplasmic channels passing through the nucleus in dividing cells are labelled. In C cohnii, the cortex, the centrosome region, the cytoplasmic channels, the region surrounding the nucleus, the filaments linking it to the cortex and the cleavage furrow are also labelled. In the nucleus of the two species, there is a prominent "weft' of fine actin filaments in the nucleoplasm forming a matrix of varying density around the persistent chromosomes. This actin matrix, of unknown function, is most conspicuous at the end of the S-phase of the cell cycle. Fluorescent derivatives of phalloidin, used as diagnostic cytochemical probes for polymeric actin (F-actin), gave similar results. Positive TEM immunolabelling of intranuclear actin confirms its presence in the nucleoplasm, in the

  2. The primary structure of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein heavy chain, a cytoplasmic motor enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z; Tanaka, Y; Nonaka, S; Aizawa, H; Kawasaki, H; Nakata, T; Hirokawa, N

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping cDNA clones encoding the heavy chain of rat brain cytoplasmic dynein have been isolated. The isolated cDNA clones contain an open reading frame of 13,932 bp encoding 4644 aa (M(r), 532,213). The deduced protein sequence of the heavy chain of rat brain dynein shows significant similarity to sea urchin flagellar beta-dynein (27.0% identical) and to Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein (53.5% identical) throughout the entire sequence. The heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein contains four putative nucleotide-binding consensus sequences [GX4GK(T/S)] in the central one-third region that are highly similar to those of sea urchin and Dictyostelium dyneins. The N-terminal one-third of the heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein shows high similarity (43.8% identical) to that of Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein but poor similarity (19.4% identical) to that of sea urchin flagellar dynein. These results suggested that the C-terminal two-thirds of the dynein molecule is conserved and plays an essential role in microtubule-dependent motility activity, whereas the N-terminal regions are different between cytoplasmic and flagellar dyneins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7690137

  3. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  4. Protein diffusion in mammalian cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Thomas; Ihalainen, Teemu O; Hyväluoma, Jari; Dross, Nicolas; Willman, Sami F; Langowski, Jörg; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new method for mesoscopic modeling of protein diffusion in an entire cell. This method is based on the construction of a three-dimensional digital model cell from confocal microscopy data. The model cell is segmented into the cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, and nuclear envelope, in which environment protein motion is modeled by fully numerical mesoscopic methods. Finer cellular structures that cannot be resolved with the imaging technique, which significantly affect protein motion, are accounted for in this method by assigning an effective, position-dependent porosity to the cell. This porosity can also be determined by confocal microscopy using the equilibrium distribution of a non-binding fluorescent protein. Distinction can now be made within this method between diffusion in the liquid phase of the cell (cytosol/nucleosol) and the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. Here we applied the method to analyze fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP) experiments in which the diffusion coefficient of a freely-diffusing model protein was determined for two different cell lines, and to explain the clear difference typically observed between conventional FRAP results and those of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A large difference was found in the FRAP experiments between diffusion in the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm and in the cytosol/nucleosol, for all of which the diffusion coefficients were determined. The cytosol results were found to be in very good agreement with those by FCS. PMID:21886771

  5. Replication of simian virus 40 origin-containing DNA during infection with a recombinant Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus expressing large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, D W; Weber, P C

    1997-01-01

    Autographica californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) has been shown to encode many of the enzymes involved in the replication of its own DNA. Although the AcMNPV genome contains multiple sets of reiterated sequences that are thought to function as origins of DNA replication, no initiator protein has yet been identified in the set of viral replication enzymes. In this study, the ability of a heterologous origin initiator system to promote DNA replication in AcMNPV-infected cells was examined. A recombinant AcMNPV that expressed the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen was surprisingly found to induce the efficient replication of a transfected plasmid containing an SV40 origin. This replication was subsequently found to involve three essential components: (i) T antigen, since replication of SV40 origin-containing plasmids was not induced by wild-type AcMNPV which did not express this protein; (ii) an intact SV40 core origin, since deletion of specific functional motifs within the origin resulted in a loss of replicative abilities; and (iii) one or more AcMNPV-encoded proteins, since viral superinfection was required for plasmid amplification. Characterization of the replicated DNA revealed that it existed as a high-molecular-weight concatemer and underwent significant levels of homologous recombination between inverted repeat sequences. These properties were consistent with an AcMNPV-directed mode of DNA synthesis rather than that of SV40 and suggested that T antigen-SV40 origin complexes may be capable of initiating DNA replication reactions that can be completed by AcMNPV-encoded enzymes. PMID:8985377

  6. Connexin channel permeability to cytoplasmic molecules.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew L

    2007-01-01

    Connexin channels are known to be permeable to a variety of cytoplasmic molecules. The first observation of second messenger junctional permeability, made approximately 30 years ago, sparked broad interest in gap junction channels as mediators of intercellular molecular signaling. Since then, much has been learned about the diversity of connexin channels with regard to isoform diversity, tissue and developmental distribution, modes of channel regulation, assembly, expression, biochemical modification and permeability, all of which appear to be dynamically regulated. This information has expanded the potential roles of connexin channels in development, physiology and disease, and made their elucidation much more complex--30 years ago such an orchestra of junctional dynamics was unanticipated. Only recently, however, have investigators been able to directly address, in this more complex framework, the key issue: what specific biological molecules, second messengers and others, are able to permeate the various types of connexin channels, and how well? An important related issue, given the ever-growing list of connexin-related pathologies, is how these permeabilities are altered by disease-causing connexin mutations. Together, many studies show that a variety of cytoplasmic molecules can permeate the different types of connexin channels. A few studies reveal differences in permeation by different molecules through a particular type of connexin channel, and differences in permeation by a particular molecule through different types of connexin channels. This article describes and evaluates the various methods used to obtain these data, presents an annotated compilation of the results, and discusses the findings in the context of what can be inferred about mechanism of selectivity and potential relevance to signaling. The data strongly suggest that highly specific interactions take place between connexin pores and specific biological molecular permeants, and that those

  7. A model for the coordinated stepping of cytoplasmic dynein.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X Y; Sun, W; Zhang, J P; Tala; Guo, W S

    2014-10-31

    Cytoplasmic dynein play an important role in transporting various intracellular cargos by coupling their ATP hydrolysis cycle with their conformational changes. Recent experimental results showed that the cytoplasmic dynein had a highly variable stepping pattern including "hand-over-hand", "inchworm" and "nonalternating-inchworm". Here, we developed a model to describe the coordinated stepping patterns of cytoplasmic dynein, based on its working cycle, construction and the interaction between its leading head and tailing head. The kinetic model showed how change in the distance between the two heads influences the rate of cytoplasmic dynein under different stepping patterns. Numerical simulations of the distribution of step size and striding rate are in good quantitative agreement with experimental observations. Hence, our coordinated stepping model for cytoplasmic dynein successfully explained its diverse stepping patterns as a molecular motor. The cooperative mechanism carried out by the two heads of cytoplasmic dynein shed light on the strategies adopted by the cytoplasmic dynein in executing various functions. PMID:25301561

  8. PTEN functions by recruitment to cytoplasmic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Adam; Bencze, Gyula; Cho, Hyejin; Zheng, Wu; Tocilj, Ante; Elkayam, Elad; Faehnle, Christopher R; Jaber, Nadia; Pratt, Christopher P; Chen, Muhan; Zong, Wei-Xing; Marks, Michael S; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Pappin, Darryl J; Trotman, Lloyd C

    2015-04-16

    PTEN is proposed to function at the plasma membrane, where receptor tyrosine kinases are activated. However, the majority of PTEN is located throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we show that cytoplasmic PTEN is distributed along microtubules, tethered to vesicles via phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), the signature lipid of endosomes. We demonstrate that the non-catalytic C2 domain of PTEN specifically binds PI(3)P through the CBR3 loop. Mutations render this loop incapable of PI(3)P binding and abrogate PTEN-mediated inhibition of PI 3-kinase/AKT signaling. This loss of function is rescued by fusion of the loop mutant PTEN to FYVE, the canonical PI(3)P binding domain, demonstrating the functional importance of targeting PTEN to endosomal membranes. Beyond revealing an upstream activation mechanism of PTEN, our data introduce the concept of PI 3-kinase signal activation on the vast plasma membrane that is contrasted by PTEN-mediated signal termination on the small, discrete surfaces of internalized vesicles. PMID:25866245

  9. The epididymis, cytoplasmic droplets and male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Trevor G

    2011-01-01

    The potential of spermatozoa to become motile during post-testicular maturation, and the relationship between the cytoplasmic droplet and fertilizing capacity are reviewed. Post-testicular maturation of spermatozoa involves the autonomous induction of motility, which can occur in vivo in testes with occluded excurrent ducts and in vitro in testicular explants, and artefactual changes in morphology that appear to occur in the testis in vitro. Both modifications may reflect time-dependent oxidation of disulphide bonds of head and tail proteins. Regulatory volume decrease (RVD), which counters sperm swelling at ejaculation, is discussed in relation to loss of cytoplasmic droplets and consequences for fertility. It is postulated that: (i) fertile males possess spermatozoa with sufficient osmolytes to drive RVD at ejaculation, permitting the droplet to round up and pinch off without membrane rupture; and (ii) infertile males possess spermatozoa with insufficient osmolytes so that RVD is inadequate, the droplet swells and the resulting flagellar angulation prevents droplet loss. Droplet retention at ejaculation is a harbinger of infertility caused by failure of the spermatozoon to negotiate the uterotubal junction or mucous and reach the egg. In this hypothesis, the epididymis regulates fertility indirectly by the extent of osmolyte provision to spermatozoa, which influences RVD and therefore droplet loss. Man is an exception, because ejaculated human spermatozoa retain their droplets. This may reflect their short midpiece, approximating head length, permitting a swollen droplet to extend along the entire midpiece; this not only obviates droplet migration and flagellar angulation but also hampers droplet loss. PMID:21076437

  10. Non-ideal solution thermodynamics of cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Ross-Rodriguez, Lisa U; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2012-10-01

    Quantitative description of the non-ideal solution thermodynamics of the cytoplasm of a living mammalian cell is critically necessary in mathematical modeling of cryobiology and desiccation and other fields where the passive osmotic response of a cell plays a role. In the solution thermodynamics osmotic virial equation, the quadratic correction to the linear ideal, dilute solution theory is described by the second osmotic virial coefficient. Herein we report, for the first time, intracellular solution second osmotic virial coefficients for four cell types [TF-1 hematopoietic stem cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), porcine hepatocytes, and porcine chondrocytes] and further report second osmotic virial coefficients indistinguishable from zero (for the concentration range studied) for human hepatocytes and mouse oocytes. PMID:23840923

  11. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:25975455

  12. Quantifying intermittent transport in cell cytoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagache, Thibault; Holcman, David

    2008-03-01

    Active cellular transport is a fundamental mechanism for protein and vesicle delivery, cell cycle, and molecular degradation. Viruses can hijack the transport system and use it to reach the nucleus. Most transport processes consist of intermittent dynamics, where the motion of a particle, such as a virus, alternates between pure Brownian and directed movement along microtubules. In this Rapid Communication, we estimate the mean time for a particle to attach to a microtubule network. This computation leads to a coarse grained equation of the intermittent motion in radial and cylindrical geometries. Finally, by using the degradation activity inside the cytoplasm, we obtain refined asymptotic estimations for the probability and the mean time a virus reaches a small nuclear pore.

  13. Quantifying intermittent transport in cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lagache, Thibault; Holcman, David

    2008-03-01

    Active cellular transport is a fundamental mechanism for protein and vesicle delivery, cell cycle, and molecular degradation. Viruses can hijack the transport system and use it to reach the nucleus. Most transport processes consist of intermittent dynamics, where the motion of a particle, such as a virus, alternates between pure Brownian and directed movement along microtubules. In this Rapid Communication, we estimate the mean time for a particle to attach to a microtubule network. This computation leads to a coarse grained equation of the intermittent motion in radial and cylindrical geometries. Finally, by using the degradation activity inside the cytoplasm, we obtain refined asymptotic estimations for the probability and the mean time a virus reaches a small nuclear pore. PMID:18517320

  14. Inborn errors of cytoplasmic triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang Wei; Yang, Hao; Wang, Shu Pei; Soni, Krishnakant G; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Mitchell, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    Triglyceride (TG) synthesis, storage, and degradation together constitute cytoplasmic TG metabolism (CTGM). CTGM is mostly studied in adipocytes, where starting from glycerol-3-phosphate and fatty acyl (FA)-coenzyme A (CoA), TGs are synthesized then stored in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. TG hydrolysis proceeds sequentially, producing FAs and glycerol. Several reactions of CTGM can be catalyzed by more than one enzyme, creating great potential for complex tissue-specific physiology. In adipose tissue, CTGM provides FA as a systemic energy source during fasting and is related to obesity. Inborn errors and mouse models have demonstrated the importance of CTGM for non-adipose tissues, including skeletal muscle, myocardium and liver, because steatosis and dysfunction can occur. We discuss known inborn errors of CTGM, including deficiencies of: AGPAT2 (a form of generalized lipodystrophy), LPIN1 (childhood rhabdomyolysis), LPIN2 (an inflammatory condition, Majeed syndrome, described elsewhere in this issue), DGAT1 (protein loosing enteropathy), perilipin 1 (partial lipodystrophy), CGI-58 (gene ABHD5, neutral lipid storage disease (NLSD) with ichthyosis and "Jordan's anomaly" of vacuolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, gene PNPLA2, NLSD with myopathy, cardiomyopathy and Jordan's anomaly), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, gene LIPE, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin resistance). Two inborn errors of glycerol metabolism are known: glycerol kinase (GK, causing pseudohypertriglyceridemia) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1, childhood hepatic steatosis). Mouse models often resemble human phenotypes but may diverge markedly. Inborn errors have been described for less than one-third of CTGM enzymes, and new phenotypes may yet be identified. PMID:25300978

  15. Internal Sense of Direction: Sensing and Signaling from Cytoplasmic Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kieran D.; Lacal, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chemoreceptors sense environmental signals and drive chemotactic responses in Bacteria and Archaea. There are two main classes of chemoreceptors: integral inner membrane and soluble cytoplasmic proteins. The latter were identified more recently than integral membrane chemoreceptors and have been studied much less thoroughly. These cytoplasmic chemoreceptors are the subject of this review. Our analysis determined that 14% of bacterial and 43% of archaeal chemoreceptors are cytoplasmic, based on currently sequenced genomes. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors appear to share the same key structural features as integral membrane chemoreceptors, including the formations of homodimers, trimers of dimers, and 12-nm hexagonal arrays within the cell. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors exhibit varied subcellular locations, with some localizing to the poles and others appearing both cytoplasmic and polar. Some cytoplasmic chemoreceptors adopt more exotic locations, including the formations of exclusively internal clusters or moving dynamic clusters that coalesce at points of contact with other cells. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors presumably sense signals within the cytoplasm and bear diverse signal input domains that are mostly N terminal to the domain that defines chemoreceptors, the so-called MA domain. Similar to the case for transmembrane receptors, our analysis suggests that the most common signal input domain is the PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain, but a variety of other N-terminal domains exist. It is also common, however, for cytoplasmic chemoreceptors to have C-terminal domains that may function for signal input. The most common of these is the recently identified chemoreceptor zinc binding (CZB) domain, found in 8% of all cytoplasmic chemoreceptors. The widespread nature and diverse signal input domains suggest that these chemoreceptors can monitor a variety of cytoplasmically based signals, most of which remain to be determined. PMID:25428939

  16. Molecular analysis of cytoplasmic male sterility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate aims of the project are to understand the molecular mechanism of the disruption in pollen development which occurs in cytoplasmic male sterile plants and to understand the control of respiratory energy flow in the higher plant cell. A mitochondrial locus termed S-pcf segregates with sterility and with an alteration in respiration in Petunia. This cloned locus contains three genes, an abnormal fused gene termed pcf, a gene for a subunit of an NADH dehydrogenase complex, and a small ribosomal subunit protein. The pcf gene is comprised of partial sequences of ATPase subunit 9, cytochrome oxidase subunit II, and an unidentified reading frame. Components of the S-Pcf locus will be introduced into the nuclear of a fertile genotype under the control of appropriate regulatory signals, and polypeptide products of introduced genes will be directed to the mitochondrion with a transit peptide. By examining transgenic plants, we can determine what elements of the locus are critical for altered respiration or sterility. Such knowledge could explain how mitochondrial DNA affects pollen development in the large number of plant species which exhibit the agronomically important trait of male sterility. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  17. The synthesis of polyribonucleotides by cytoplasmic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wykes, J. R.; Smellie, R. M. S.

    1966-01-01

    1. The possibility that the cell cytoplasm contains enzymes catalysing the biosynthesis of RNA was investigated in fractions obtained by differential centrifugation of homogenates of Landschutz ascites-tumour cells. 2. The microsomal fraction was shown to be most active in incorporating UMP residues from [α-32P]UTP into polyribonucleotide material. 3. The same fraction also incorporated [3H]CTP, [3H]ATP and [3H]GTP separately and independently of the presence of complementary ribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates. 4. The reaction was promoted by the addition of RNA and showed an absolute requirement for Mg2+ ions. 5. Analysis of alkaline hydrolysates of the reaction products after the incorporation of [α-32P]UTP showed that most of the radioactivity was recovered in (2′,3′)-UMP residues irrespective of whether CTP, ATP and GTP were present in the reaction mixture. 6. Extraction of RNA from the reaction mixtures after the incorporation of [3H]ATP, [3H]GTP or [3H]CTP and analysis by sucrosedensity-gradient centrifugation showed no labelling of the ribosomal RNA. Radioactive material appeared between the 4s region and the meniscus of the sucrose gradient. In agreement with this observation, determinations of the chain length of the product showed that only short sequences of polynucleotides were synthesized. It is concluded that only homopolyribonucleotide synthesis is catalysed by the microsomal fractions and that there is little or no synthesis of RNA-like heteropolymers. PMID:5947148

  18. Tropomyosin-Mediated Regulation of Cytoplasmic Myosins.

    PubMed

    Manstein, Dietmar J; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2016-08-01

    The ability of the actin-based cytoskeleton to rapidly reorganize is critical for maintaining cell organization and viability. The plethora of activities in which actin polymers participate require different biophysical properties, which can vary significantly between the different events that often occur simultaneously at separate cellular locations. In order to modify the biophysical properties of an actin polymer for a particular function, the cell contains diverse actin-binding proteins that modulate the growth, regulation and molecular interactions of actin-based structures according to functional requirements. In metazoan and yeast cells, tropomyosin is a key regulator of actin-based structures. Cells have the capacity to produce multiple tropomyosin isoforms, each capable of specifically associating as copolymers with actin at distinct cellular locations to fine-tune the functional properties of discrete actin structures. Here, we present a unifying theory in which tropomyosin isoforms critically define the surface landscape of copolymers with cytoplasmic β- or γ-actin. Decoration of filamentous actin with different tropomyosin isoforms determines the identity and modulates the activity of the interacting myosin motor proteins. Conversely, changes in the nucleotide state of actin and posttranslational modifications affect the composition, morphology, subcellular localization and allosteric coupling of the associated actin-based superstructures. PMID:27060364

  19. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  20. A physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; van de Meent, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Organisms show a remarkable range of sizes, yet the dimensions of a single cell rarely exceed 100 µm. While the physical and biological origins of this constraint remain poorly understood, exceptions to this rule give valuable insights. A well-known counterexample is the aquatic plant Chara, whose cells can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. Two spiralling bands of molecular motors at the cell periphery drive the cellular fluid up and down at speeds up to 100 µm s−1, motion that has been hypothesized to mitigate the slowness of metabolite transport on these scales and to aid in homeostasis. This is the most organized instance of a broad class of continuous motions known as ‘cytoplasmic streaming’, found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms—algae, plants, amoebae, nematodes and flies—often in unusually large cells. In this overview of the physics of this phenomenon, we examine the interplay between streaming, transport and cell size and discuss the possible role of self-organization phenomena in establishing the observed patterns of streaming. PMID:26464789

  1. Evolution of Wolbachia cytoplasmic incompatibility types.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Stephen L

    2004-10-01

    The success of obligate endosymbiotic Wolbachia infections in insects is due in part to cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), whereby Wolbachia bacteria manipulate host reproduction to promote their invasion and persistence within insect populations. The observed diversity of CI types raises the question of what the evolutionary pathways are by which a new CI type can evolve from an ancestral type. Prior evolutionary models assume that Wolbachia exists within a host individual as a clonal infection. While endosymbiotic theory predicts a general trend toward clonality, Wolbachia provides an exception in which there is selection to maintain diversity. Here, evolutionary trajectories are discussed that assume that a novel Wolbachia variant will co-exist with the original infection type within a host individual as a superinfection. Relative to prior models, this assumption relaxes requirements and allows additional pathways for the evolution of novel CI types. In addition to describing changes in the Wolbachia infection frequency associated with the hypothesized evolutionary events, the predicted impact of novel CI variants on the host population is also described. This impact, resulting from discordant evolutionary interests of symbiont and host, is discussed as a possible cause of Wolbachia loss from the host population or host population extinction. The latter is also discussed as the basis for an applied strategy for the suppression of insect pest populations. Model predictions are discussed relative to a recently published Wolbachia genome sequence and prior characterization of CI in naturally and artificially infected insects. PMID:15562682

  2. Cytoplasmic Adenylation and Processing of Maternal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Isabel; Gillespie, David; Slater, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Molecular hybridization between [3H]-poly(U) and unlabeled RNA prepared from sea urchin eggs and embryos has been used to contrast the subcellular localization as well as the size distribution of adenylylated maternal RNA preexisting in the unfertilized egg with that adenylylated as a function of fertilization. Evidence reported establishes that such preadenylylated genetic messages are predominantly located in the ovum's subribosomal fraction and that fertilization elicits a rapid reallocation of these latent transcripts into the zygote's ribosomal fraction. Examination of the size distribution of the adenylylated RNA further demonstrates that the unfertilized egg contains a substantial population of RNA transcripts of exceptionally high molecular weight that are used as primers for the 2-fold net synthesis of poly(A) that follows fertilization. The poly(A)-rich tracts are shown to be covalently bonded to RNA. Assessment of the poly(A) content of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions suggests that the function of poly(A) is not confined to the transport of genetic messages from the nucleus. PMID:4510284

  3. Substrate Specificity of Cytoplasmic N-Glycosyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Naegeli, Andreas; Michaud, Gaëlle; Schubert, Mario; Lin, Chia-Wei; Lizak, Christian; Darbre, Tamis; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Aebi, Markus

    2014-01-01

    N-Linked protein glycosylation is a very common post-translational modification that can be found in all kingdoms of life. The classical, highly conserved pathway entails the assembly of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide and its transfer to an asparagine residue in the sequon NX(S/T) of a secreted protein by the integral membrane protein oligosaccharyltransferase. A few species in the class of γ-proteobacteria encode a cytoplasmic N-glycosylation system mediated by a soluble N-glycosyltransferase (NGT). This enzyme uses nucleotide-activated sugars to modify asparagine residues with single monosaccharides. As these enzymes are not related to oligosaccharyltransferase, NGTs constitute a novel class of N-glycosylation catalyzing enzymes. To characterize the NGT-catalyzed reaction, we developed a sensitive and quantitative in vitro assay based on HPLC separation and quantification of fluorescently labeled substrate peptides. With this assay we were able to directly quantify glycopeptide formation by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae NGT and determine its substrate specificities: NGT turns over a number of different sugar donor substrates and allows for activation by both UDP and GDP. Quantitative analysis of peptide substrate turnover demonstrated a strikingly similar specificity as the classical, oligosaccharyltransferase-catalyzed N-glycosylation, with NX(S/T) sequons being the optimal NGT substrates. PMID:24962585

  4. Cytoplasmic dynein promotes HIV-1 uncoating.

    PubMed

    Pawlica, Paulina; Berthoux, Lionel

    2014-11-01

    Retroviral capsid (CA) cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus), and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC) using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable) CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating. PMID:25375884

  5. Can paternal leakage maintain sexually antagonistic polymorphism in the cytoplasm?

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, B; Lane, N; Pomiankowski, A

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies in multicellular organisms highlight low or moderate frequencies of paternal transmission of cytoplasmic organelles, including both mitochondria and chloroplasts. It is well established that strict maternal inheritance is selectively blind to cytoplasmic elements that are deleterious to males – ’mother's curse’. But it is not known how sensitive this conclusion is to slight levels of paternal cytoplasmic leakage. We assess the scope for polymorphism when individuals bear multiple cytoplasmic alleles in the presence of paternal leakage, bottlenecks and recurrent mutation. When fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements within an individual are additive, we find that sexually antagonistic polymorphism is restricted to cases of strong selection on males. However, when fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements are nonlinear, much more extensive polymorphism can be supported in the cytoplasm. In particular, mitochondrial mutants that have strong beneficial fitness effects in males and weak deleterious fitness effects in females when rare (i.e. ’reverse dominance’) are strongly favoured under paternal leakage. We discuss how such epistasis could arise through preferential segregation of mitochondria in sex-specific somatic tissues. Our analysis shows how paternal leakage can dampen the evolution of deleterious male effects associated with predominant maternal inheritance of cytoplasm, potentially explaining why ’mother's curse’ is less pervasive than predicted by earlier work. PMID:25653025

  6. Developing improved durum wheat germplasm by altering the cytoplasmic genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotic organisms, nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes interact to drive cellular functions. These genomes have co-evolved to form specific nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions that are essential to the origin, success, and evolution of diploid and polyploid species. Hundreds of genetic diseases in h...

  7. Nucleotide sequence of Neurospora crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, A M; Hecker, L I; Silberklang, M; Schwartzbach, S D; RajBhandary, U L; Barnett, W E

    1977-01-01

    Initiator methionine tRNA from the cytoplasm of Neurospora crassa has been purified and sequenced. The sequence is: pAGCUGCAUm1GGCGCAGCGGAAGCGCM22GCY*GGGCUCAUt6AACCCGGAGm7GU (or D) - CACUCGAUCGm1AAACGAG*UUGCAGCUACCAOH. Similar to initiator tRNAs from the cytoplasm of other eukaryotes, this tRNA also contains the sequence -AUCG- instead of the usual -TphiCG (or A)- found in loop IV of other tRNAs. The sequence of the N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA is quite different from that of the corresponding mitochondrial initiator tRNA. Comparison of the sequence of N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA to those of yeast, wheat germ and vertebrate cytoplasmic initiator tRNA indicates that the sequences of the two fungal tRNAs are no more similar to each other than they are to those of other initiator tRNAs. Images PMID:146192

  8. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies Associated With Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Vincent; Lesourd, Anais; Girszyn, Nicolas; Ménard, Jean-Francois; Levesque, Hervé; Caron, Francois; Marie, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the prevalence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with infective endocarditis (IE) in internal medicine; and to compare clinical and biochemical features and outcome between patients exhibiting IE with and without ANCA. Fifty consecutive patients with IE underwent ANCA testing. The medical records of these patients were reviewed. Of the 50 patients with IE, 12 exhibited ANCA (24%). ANCA-positive patients with IE exhibited: longer duration between the onset of first symptoms and IE diagnosis (P = 0.02); and more frequently: weight loss (P = 0.017) and renal impairment (P = 0.08), lower levels of C-reactive protein (P = 0.0009) and serum albumin (P = 0.0032), involvement of both aortic and mitral valves (P = 0.009), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.016). Under multivariate analysis, significant factors for ANCA-associated IE were: longer hospital stay (P = 0.004), lower level of serum albumin (P = 0.02), and multiple valve involvement (P = 0.04). Mortality rate was 25% in ANCA patients; death was because of IE complications in all these patients. Our study identifies a high prevalence of ANCA in unselected patients with IE in internal medicine (24%). Our findings further underscore that ANCA may be associated with a subacute form of IE leading to multiple valve involvement and more frequent renal impairment. Because death was due to IE complications in all patients, our data suggest that aggressive therapy may be required to improve such patients’ outcome. PMID:26817911

  9. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  10. Single cytoplasmic dynein molecule movements: characterization and comparison with kinesin.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Khan, S; Sheetz, M P

    1995-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a major microtubule motor for minus-end directed movements including retrograde axonal transport. To better understand the mechanism by which cytoplasmic dynein converts ATP energy into motility, we have analyzed the nanometer-level displacements of latex beads coated with low numbers of cytoplasmic dynein molecules. Cytoplasmic dynein-coated beads exhibited greater lateral movements among microtubule protofilaments (ave. 5.1 times/microns of displacement) compared with kinesin (ave. 0.9 times/micron). In addition, dynein moved rearward up to 100 nm over several hundred milliseconds, often in correlation with off-axis movements from one protofilament to another. We suggest that single molecules of cytoplasmic dynein move the beads because 1) there is a linear dependence of bead motility on dynein/bead ratio, 2) the binding of beads to microtubules studied by laser tweezers is best fit by a first-order Poisson, and 3) the run length histogram of dynein beads follows a first-order decay. At the cellular level, the greater disorder of cytoplasmic dynein movements may facilitate transport by decreasing the duration of collisions between kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein-powered vesicles. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 PMID:8580344

  11. Cytoplasmic streaming direction reverses in dividing Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Sikora, J; Wasik, A; Zajaczkowska, M

    1991-11-29

    Using the interference-contrast videomicroscopy the speed of cytoplasmic streaming was measured during the sequence of division stages in thigmotactically settled specimens of Paramecium bursaria. The speed of cytoplasmic flow gradually decreased during the first stages of binary fission and movement became indistinguishable at stage D(3). Almost at the same time cytoplasm started to move in the opposite direction, pushing or pulling the dividing micronucleus into the prospective posterior daughter cell and eventually stopped at stage D(5)-D(6). Further cell division events proceeded without detectable movement of cytoplasmic components. Cytoplasmic streaming in the normal interphase route was gradually restored in daughter cells about 30-40 min after cell separation. During the whole period of binary fission phagocytosis was arrested. Transportation and participation in the positioning of prospective micronuclei in daughter cells seems to be the main function of cytoplasmic streaming activity in cell division of Paramecium bursaria. The possible relationship between the stages of cytoskeleton transitions and the kinetics of cytoplasmic streaming associated with cell divison is discussed. PMID:23194845

  12. CYTOPLASMIC VACUOLIZATION RESPONSES TO CYTOPATHIC BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHOEA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Alexander V.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Cohen-Gould, Leona; Donis, Ruben; Szeto, Hazel. H.

    2008-01-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) is a positive sense, single-stranded RNA virus which exhibits two biotypes in standard cell culture systems. The cytopathic strains of this virus (cpBVDV) induce dramatic cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell cultures, while infection with the non-cytopathic (NCP-BVDV) strains produces no overt changes in the host cells. Our results show that extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization is the earliest morphological change in response to cpBVDV infection in MDBK cells. Cells with extensive vacuolization showed no co-existing chromatin condensation, caspase activation, or loss of membrane integrity. In addition, the caspase inhibitor (zVAD-fmk), although improving cell viability of infected cells from 6.7±2.2% to 18.8±2.2%, did not prevent vacuolization. On the ultrastructural level, the virus-induced cytoplasmic vacuoles are single membrane structures containing organelles and cellular debris, which appear capable of fusing with other vacuoles and engulfing surrounding cytoplasmic materials. LysoTracker Red which marks lysosomes did not stain the virus-induced cytoplasmic vacuoles. In addition, this lysosomal dye could be observed in the cytoplasm of vacuolized cells, suggesting a lysosomal abnormality. Our data demonstrate that cpBVDV induced a novel cell death pathway in MDBK cells that is primarily associated with lysosomal dysfunction and the formation of phagocytic cytoplasmic vacuoles, and this mode of cell death is different from apoptosis and necrosis. PMID:18054406

  13. Mechanism of genotoxicity induced by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, M; Xu, A; Zhou, H; Wu, L; Randers-Pehrson, G; Santella, R M; Yu, Z; Hei, T K

    2010-01-01

    Background: Direct damage to DNA is generally accepted as the main initiator of mutation and cancer induced by environmental carcinogens or ionising radiation. However, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that extracellular/extranuclear targets may also have a key role in mediating the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation. As the possibility of a particle traversal through the cytoplasm is much higher than through the nuclei in environmental radiation exposure, the contribution to genotoxic damage from cytoplasmic irradiation should not be ignored in radiation risk estimation. Although targeted cytoplasmic irradiation has been shown to induce mutations in mammalian cells, the precise mechanism(s) underlying the mutagenic process is largely unknown. Methods: A microbeam that can target the cytoplasm of cells with high precision was used to study mechanisms involved in mediating the genotoxic effects in irradiated human–hamster hybrid (AL) cells. Results: Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation induces oxidative DNA damages and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in AL cells. Lipid peroxidation, as determined by the induction of 4-hydroxynonenal was enhanced in irradiated cells, which could be suppressed by butylated hydroxyl toluene treatment. Moreover, cytoplasmic irradiation of AL cells increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway. Conclusion: We herein proposed a possible signalling pathway involving reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and COX-2 in the cytoplasmic irradiation-induced genotoxicity effect. PMID:20842121

  14. Functional insights from molecular modeling, docking, and dynamics study of a cypoviral RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anirban; Dutta, Anirudha; Biswas, Poulomi; Das, Amit Kumar; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (AmCPV) contains 11 double stranded RNA genome segments and infects tasar silkworm A. mylitta. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is reported as a key enzyme responsible for propagation of the virus in the host cell but its structure function relationship still remains elusive. Here a computational approach has been taken to compare sequence and secondary structure of AmCPV RdRp with other viral RdRps to identify consensus motifs. Then a reliable pairwise sequence alignment of AmCPV RdRp with its closest sequence structure homologue λ3 RdRp is done to predict three dimensional structure of AmCPV RdRp. After comparing with other structurally known viral RdRps, important sequence and/or structural features involved in substrate entry or binding, polymerase reaction and the product release events have been identified. A conserved RNA pentanucleotide (5'-AGAGC-3') at the 3'-end of virus genome is predicted as cis-acting signal for RNA synthesis and its docking and simulation study along with the model of AmCPV RdRp has allowed to predict mode of template binding by the viral polymerase. It is found that template RNA enters into the catalytic center through nine sequence-independent and two sequence-dependent interactions with the specific amino acid residues. However, number of sequence dependent interactions remains almost same during 10 nano-second simulation time while total number of interactions decreases. Further, docking of N(7)-methyl-GpppG (mRNA cap) on the model as well as prediction of RNA secondary structure has shown the template entry process in the active site. These findings have led to postulate the mechanism of RNA-dependent RNA polymerization process by AmCPV RdRp. To our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate structure function relationship of a cypoviral RdRp. PMID:26264734

  15. Nuclear Proteins Hijacked by Mammalian Cytoplasmic Plus Strand RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. PMID:25818028

  16. CYTOPLASMIC MICROTUBULAR DYNAMIC AND CHROMATIN ORGANIZATION DURING MAMMALIAN OOCYTE MATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coordinated alterations in oocyte chromosome and microtubule disposition occur during oogenesis and oocyte maturation in the mammal. imely transitions in meiotic spindle and cytoplasmic microtubules, due to modifications in both the assembly competence of the tubulin pool and nuc...

  17. Stabilization and Degradation Mechanisms of Cytoplasmic Ataxin-1

    PubMed Central

    Kohiyama, Mayumi F.; Lagalwar, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation-prone proteins in neurodegenerative disease disrupt cellular protein stabilization and degradation pathways. The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is caused by a coding polyglutamine expansion in the Ataxin-1 gene (ATXN1), which gives rise to the aggregation-prone mutant form of ATXN1 protein. Cerebellar Purkinje neurons, preferentially vulnerable in SCA1, produce ATXN1 protein in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. Cytoplasmic stabilization of ATXN1 by phosphorylation and 14-3-3-mediated mechanisms ultimately drive translocation of the protein to the nucleus where aggregation may occur. However, experimental inhibition of phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding results in rapid degradation of ATXN1, thus preventing nuclear translocation and cellular toxicity. The exact mechanism of cytoplasmic ATXN1 degradation is currently unknown; further investigation of degradation may provide future therapeutic targets. This review examines the present understanding of cytoplasmic ATXN1 stabilization and potential degradation mechanisms during normal and pathogenic states. PMID:27168726

  18. Population replacement in Culex fatigans by means of cytoplasmic incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    Three experiments were carried out in field cages to test the principle of “transport” of a desirable gene or chromosome into a wild Culex fatigans population as a result of the sterility in cross-matings associated with cytoplasmic incompatibility. Cycling populations of Delhi origin were established in the cages and daily releases were made of the IS31B strain, which has Paris cytoplasm and carries a male-linked translocation. It was shown that, if sufficient releases were made to establish a majority of the Paris cytoplasmic type, complete replacement by this cytoplasmic type subsequently occurred. However, as a result of partial compatibility of males of the Delhi population with Paris females, “recombinant” males with Paris cytoplasm and no translocation were produced. In an experiment in which a continuous low rate of “immigration” of a strain of Delhi origin was simulated, a gradual increase of the Paris cytoplasm nontranslocated type occurred, and renewed IS31B releases were necessary after 5 months to restore the predominance of this type. The results are compared with computer predictions and discussed in relation to the transport of genes for filaria refractoriness or chromosome translocations into wild populations. PMID:1085660

  19. Growth signalobody selects functional intrabodies in the mammalian cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Songhee; Kaku, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    A versatile strategy to inhibit protein functions in the cytoplasmic environment is eagerly anticipated for drug discovery. In this study, we demonstrate a novel system to directly select functional intrabodies from a library in the mammalian cytoplasm. In this system, a target homo-oligomeric antigen is expressed together with a single-chain Fv (scFv) library that is linked to the cytoplasmic domain of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) in the cytoplasm of murine interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent cells. As the tyrosine kinase is activated by dimerization, only scFv-RTK clones that can bind to the target antigen would be oligomerized and transduce a growth signal under the IL-3-deprived condition, which leads to selection of functional intrabodies. To demonstrate this system, we used rabies virus phosphoprotein (RV-P) that forms dimers in the cytoplasm as a target antigen. As a result, functional intrabodies were selected using our system from a naïve scFv library as well as from a pre-selected anti-RV-P library generated by phage display. This system may be applied for screening intrabodies that can prevent progression of various severe diseases. PMID:26647155

  20. Cytoplasmic pH influences cytoplasmic calcium in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. S.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Kumegawa, M.; Pitts, A. C.; Snowdowne, K. W.

    1993-01-01

    We found that the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium (Cai) of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts was influenced by the type of pH buffer we used in the perfusing medium, suggesting that intracellular pH (pHi) might influence Cai. To study this effect, the Cai and pHi were monitored as we applied various experimental conditions known to change pHi. Exposure to NH4Cl caused a transient increase in both pHi and Cai without a change in extracellular pH (pHo). Decreasing pHo and pHi by lowering the bicarbonate concentration of the medium decreased Cai, and increasing pHi by the removal of 5% CO2 increased Cai. Clamping pHi to known values with 10 microM nigericin, a potassium proton ionophore, also influenced Cai: acid pHi lowered Cai, whereas alkaline pHi increased it. The rise in Cai appears to be very sensitive to the extracellular concentration of calcium, suggesting the existence of a pH-sensitive calcium influx mechanism. We conclude that physiologic changes in pH could modulate Cai by controlling the influx of calcium ions and could change the time course of the Cai transient associated with hormonal activation.

  1. Cleavage of cytoplasm within the oligonucleate zoosporangia of allomyces macrogynus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yunjeong; Song, Youngsun; Kim, Namhun; Youn, Hyunjoo; Kang, Minkook; Song, Yurim; Cho, Chungwon

    2014-01-01

    Allomyces macrogynus produces zoosporangia that discharge uninucleate zoospores after cleavage of multinucleate cytoplasm. Cleavage of cytoplasm within the oligonucleate zoosporangia of A. macrogynus was visualized by constructing three-dimensional models based on electron micrographs and confocal images. In oligonucleate zoosporangia, three adjacent nuclei can form three cleavage planes with a line of intersection of the planes. The position and boundary of the cleavage planes are thought to be determined by the relative positions of the nuclei. The establishment of three cleavage planes by cleavage membranes occurred sequentially, and the nuclear axis connecting the centers of two nuclei affected the development of cleavage membranes on each cleavage plane. In multinucleate zoosporangia, groups of three neighboring nuclei near the cell cortex may initiate the sequential establishment of cleavage planes and then may interact with the nuclei further from the cortex until the interactions of nuclei are propagated to the central region of the cytoplasm. PMID:24871589

  2. Nuclear export modulates the cytoplasmic Sir2 homologue Hst2

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jeanne M; Le, Viet Q; Zimmerman, Collin; Marmorstein, Ronen; Pillus, Lorraine

    2006-01-01

    Modulating transcription factors is crucial to executing sophisticated gene expression programs. The silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) family of NAD-dependent protein deacetylases influences transcription by targeting proteins such as histones, p53 and forkhead-box family transcription factors. Although apparently cytoplasmic, both mammalian SIRT2 and its yeast orthologue Hst2 have been implicated in transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that Hst2 moves between the nucleus and cytoplasm, but is largely cytoplasmic owing to efficient nuclear export. This nuclear exclusion is mediated by the exportin chromosomal region maintenance 1 (Crm1) and a putative leucine-rich nuclear export sequence in Hst2, which overlaps a unique autoregulatory helix. Disruption of Hst2 export shows that nuclear exclusion inhibits the activity of Hst2 as a transcriptional repressor. Our identification of putative nuclear export sequences in numerous vertebrate SIRT2 proteins shows that active nuclear export can be a conserved mechanism for regulating Sir2 homologues. PMID:17110954

  3. Cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain: the servant of many masters

    PubMed Central

    Schiavo, Giampietro; Greensmith, Linda; Hafezparast, Majid; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the main retrograde motor in all eukaryotic cells. This complex comprises different subunits assembled on a cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain 1 (DYNC1H1) dimer. Cytoplasmic dynein is particularly important for neurons because it carries essential signals and organelles from distal sites to the cell body. In the past decade, several mouse models have helped to dissect the numerous functions of DYNC1H1. Additionally, several DYNC1H1 mutations have recently been found in human patients that give rise to a broad spectrum of developmental and midlife-onset disorders. Here, we discuss the effects of mutations of mouse and human DYNC1H1 and how these studies are giving us new insight into the many critical roles DYNC1H1 plays in the nervous system. PMID:24035135

  4. Biotoxicity assays for fruiting body lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Garbani, Mattia; Lüthy, Peter; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a specific class of fungal lectins, commonly referred to as fruiting body lectins, play a role as effector molecules in the defense of fungi against predators and parasites. Hallmarks of these fungal lectins are their specific expression in reproductive structures, fruiting bodies, and/or sclerotia and their synthesis on free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Fruiting body lectins are released upon damage of the fungal cell and bind to specific carbohydrate structures of predators and parasites, which leads to deterrence, inhibition of growth, and development or even killing of these organisms. Here, we describe assays to assess the toxicity of such lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins toward three different model organisms: the insect Aedes aegypti, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. All three assays are based on heterologous expression of the examined proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and feeding of these recombinant bacteria to omnivorous and bacterivorous organisms. PMID:20816208

  5. AMPK Signaling Results in Cytoplasmic Sequestration of p27

    PubMed Central

    Short, John D.; Houston, Kevin D.; Dere, Ruhee; Cai, Sheng-Li; Kim, Jinhee; Johnson, Charles L.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Shen, Jianjun; Miyamoto, Susie; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Kwiatkowski, David; Mills, Gordon B.; Walker, Cheryl Lyn

    2009-01-01

    Tuberin, the Tsc2 gene product, integrates PI3K/MAPK (mitogenic) and LKB1/AMPK (energy) signaling pathways, and previous independent studies have shown that loss of tuberin is associated with elevated AMPK signaling and altered p27 function. In Tsc2-null tumors and tumor-derived cells from Eker rats, we observed elevated AMPK signaling and concordant cytoplasmic mislocalization of p27. Cytoplasmic localization of p27 in Tsc2-null cells was reversible pharmacologically using inhibitors of the LKB1/AMPK pathway, and localization of p27 to the cytoplasm could be induced directly by activating AMPK physiologically (glucose deprivation) or genetically (constitutively-active AMPK) in Tsc2-proficient cells. Furthermore, AMPK phosphorylated p27 in vitro on at least three sites including T170 near the NLS, and T170 was demonstrated to determine p27 localization in response to AMPK signaling. p27 functions in the nucleus to suppress Cdk2 activity, and has been reported to mediate an anti-apoptotic function when localized to the cytoplasm. We found that cells with elevated AMPK signaling and cytoplasmic p27 localization exhibited elevated Cdk2 activity, which could be suppressed by inhibiting AMPK signaling. In addition, cells with elevated AMPK signaling and cytoplasmic p27 localization were resistant to apoptosis, which could be overcome by inhibition of AMPK signaling and relocalization of p27 to the nucleus. These data demonstrate that AMPK signaling determines the subcellular localization of p27, and identifies loss of integration of pathways controlling energy balance, the cell cycle and apoptosis due to aberrant AMPK and p27 function as a feature of cells that have lost the Tsc2 tumor suppressor gene. PMID:18701472

  6. Transcription factor TFII-I conducts a cytoplasmic orchestra.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananda L

    2006-11-21

    In response to extracellular ligands, surface receptor tyrosine kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors activate isoforms of phospholipase C (PLC) and initiate calcium signaling. PLC can activate expression of surface transient receptor potential channels (TRPC) such as TRPC3, which modulate calcium entry through the plasma membrane. A recent paper shows that competitive binding of cytoplasmic TFII-I, a transcription factor, to PLC-gamma results in inhibition of TRPC3-mediated agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry. These results establish a novel cytoplasmic function for TFII-I. PMID:17168565

  7. Optomechatronic System For Automated Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Tiankov, Tihomir; Ignatova, Detelina; Kostadinov, Kostadin; Roussev, Ilia; Trifonov, Dimitar; Penchev, Valentin

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a complex optomechatronic system for In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF), offering almost complete automation of the Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) procedure. The compound parts and sub-systems, as well as some of the computer vision algorithms, are described below. System capabilities for ICSI have been demonstrated on infertile oocyte cells.

  8. Structure of a Cytoplasmic 11-Subunit RNA Exosome Complex.

    PubMed

    Kowalinski, Eva; Kögel, Alexander; Ebert, Judith; Reichelt, Peter; Stegmann, Elisabeth; Habermann, Bianca; Conti, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The RNA exosome complex associates with nuclear and cytoplasmic cofactors to mediate the decay, surveillance, or processing of a wide variety of transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the conserved core of the exosome (Exo10) functions together with the conserved Ski complex. The interaction of S. cerevisiae Exo10 and Ski is not direct but requires a bridging cofactor, Ski7. Here, we report the 2.65 Å resolution structure of S. cerevisiae Exo10 bound to the interacting domain of Ski7. Extensive hydrophobic interactions rationalize the high affinity and stability of this complex, pointing to Ski7 as a constitutive component of the cytosolic exosome. Despite the absence of sequence homology, cytoplasmic Ski7 and nuclear Rrp6 bind Exo10 using similar surfaces and recognition motifs. Knowledge of the interacting residues in the yeast complexes allowed us to identify a splice variant of human HBS1-Like as a Ski7-like exosome-binding protein, revealing the evolutionary conservation of this cytoplasmic cofactor. PMID:27345150

  9. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  10. Nuclear repulsion enables division autonomy in a single cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cori A.; Eser, Umut; Korndorf, Therese; Borsuk, Mark E.; Skotheim, Jan M.; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Current models of cell cycle control, based on classic studies of fused cells, predict that nuclei in a shared cytoplasm respond to the same CDK activities to undergo synchronous cycling. However, synchrony is rarely observed in naturally occurring syncytia, such as the multinucleate fungus Ashbya gossypii. In this system, nuclei divide asynchronously raising the question of how nuclear timing differences are maintained despite sharing a common milieu. Results We observe that neighboring nuclei are highly variable in division cycle duration and neighbors repel one another to space apart and demarcate their own cytoplasmic territories. The size of these territories increases as a nucleus approaches mitosis and can influence cycling rates. This non-random nuclear spacing is regulated by microtubules and is required for nuclear asynchrony, as nuclei that transiently come in very close proximity will partially synchronize. Sister nuclei born of the same mitosis are generally not persistent neighbors over their lifetimes yet remarkably retain similar division cycle times. This indicates that nuclei carry a memory of their birth state that influences their division timing and supports that nuclei subdivide a common cytosol into functionally distinct yet mobile compartments. Conclusions These findings support that nuclei use cytoplasmic microtubules to establish “cells within cells.” Individual compartments appear to push against one another to compete for cytoplasmic territory and insulate the division cycle. This provides a mechanism by which syncytial nuclei can spatially organize cell cycle signaling and suggests size control can act in a system without physical boundaries. PMID:24094857

  11. Method for Confirming Cytoplasmic Delivery of RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, David D; Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-01-01

    RNA aptamers are single-stranded RNA oligos that represent a powerful emerging technology with potential for treating numerous diseases. More recently, cell-targeted RNA aptamers have been developed for delivering RNA interference (RNAi) modulators (siRNAs and miRNAs) to specific diseased cells (e.g., cancer cells or HIV infected cells) in vitro and in vivo. However, despite initial promising reports, the broad application of this aptamer delivery technology awaits the development of methods that can verify and confirm delivery of aptamers to the cytoplasm of target cells where the RNAi machinery resides. We recently developed a functional assay (RIP assay) to confirm cellular uptake and subsequent cytoplasmic release of an RNA aptamer which binds to a cell surface receptor expressed on prostate cancer cells (PSMA). To assess cytoplasmic delivery, the aptamer was chemically conjugated to saporin, a ribosome inactivating protein toxin that is toxic to cells only when delivered to the cytoplasm (where it inhibits the ribosome) by a cell-targeting ligand (e.g., aptamer). Here, we describe the chemistry used to conjugate the aptamer to saporin and discuss a gel-based method to verify conjugation efficiency. We also detail an in vitro functional assay to confirm that the aptamer retains function following conjugation to saporin and describe a cellular assay to measure aptamer-mediated saporin-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26472453

  12. Cytoplasmic Domains and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Francisco; Domínguez, Pedro; de la Peña, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The basic architecture of the voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) corresponds to a transmembrane protein core in which the permeation pore, the voltage-sensing components and the gating machinery (cytoplasmic facing gate and sensor–gate coupler) reside. Usually, large protein tails are attached to this core, hanging toward the inside of the cell. These cytoplasmic regions are essential for normal channel function and, due to their accessibility to the cytoplasmic environment, constitute obvious targets for cell-physiological control of channel behavior. Here we review the present knowledge about the molecular organization of these intracellular channel regions and their role in both setting and controlling Kv voltage-dependent gating properties. This includes the influence that they exert on Kv rapid/N-type inactivation and on activation/deactivation gating of Shaker-like and eag-type Kv channels. Some illustrative examples about the relevance of these cytoplasmic domains determining the possibilities for modulation of Kv channel gating by cellular components are also considered. PMID:22470342

  13. Experimental Analysis of Cell Function Using Cytoplasmic Streaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssens, Peter; Waldhuber, Megan

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory exercise investigates the phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming in the fresh water alga "Nitella". Students use the fungal toxin cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, to investigate the mechanism of streaming. Students use simple statistical methods to analyze their data. Typical student data are provided. (Contains 3…

  14. Gravity-dependent polarity of cytoplasmic streaming in Nitellopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    The internodal cells of the characean alga Nitellopsis obtusa were chosen to investigate the effect of gravity on cytoplasmic streaming. Horizontal cells exhibit streaming with equal velocities in both directions, whereas in vertically oriented cells, the downward-streaming cytoplasm flows ca. 10% faster than the upward-streaming cytoplasm. These results are independent of the orientation of the morphological top and bottom of the cell. We define the ratio of the velocity of the downward- to the upward-streaming cytoplasm as the polar ratio (PR). The normal polarity of a cell can be reversed (PR < 1) by treatment with neutral red (NR). The NR effect may be the result of membrane hyperpolarization, caused by the opening of K+ channels. The K+ channel blocker TEA Cl- inhibits the NR effect. External Ca2+ is required for normal graviresponsiveness. The [Ca2+] of the medium determines the polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Less than 1 micromole Ca2+ resulted in a PR < 1 while greater than 1 micromole Ca2+ resulted in the normal gravity response. The voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channel blocker, nifedipine, inhibited the gravity response in a reversible manner, while treatment with LaCl3 resulted in a PR < 1, indicating the presence of two types of Ca2+ channels. A new model for graviperception is presented in which the whole cell acts as the gravity sensor, and the plasma membrane acts as the gravireceptor. This is supported by ligation and UV irradiation experiments which indicate that the membranes at both ends of the cell are required for graviperception. The density of the external medium also affects the PR of Nitellopsis. Calculations are presented that indicate that the weight of the protoplasm may provide enough potential energy to open ion channels.

  15. An osmotic system within the cytoplasm of cells.

    PubMed

    OPIE, E L

    1948-05-01

    The cytoplasm of cells of the liver and of the kidney is in large part occupied by bodies which respond to the water content of these cells and are modified by dissolved substances in the surrounding fluid or by physical change such as freezing. These bodies, in part mitochondria but designated more broadly cytochondria, constitute an osmotic system within the cytoplasm of cells. When the specific gravity of liver or kidney tissue is used as an index of changes in the water content of tissue, swelling of cytochondria in general follows the intake of water but this relation may be modified by a variety of conditions. When liver that has been frozen and thawed is immersed in water, cytochondria become swollen though the containing cells diminish in size. Solutions of sodium and of potassium chloride isotonic with blood plasma cause delayed swelling of cells and cytochondria, greater with the potassium salt; solutions of calcium chloride of equal molar concentration cause immediate swelling of cells and cytochondria. The basophile material of the cytoplasm (ribonucleic acid and related substances) and the material that gives to mitochondria their characteristic stain are removed by immersion in water but their disappearance is retarded by isotonic solutions of sodium or of potassium chloride and further delayed by hypertonic solutions. When the intensity of staining reactions is diminished by the partial loss of basophile substance or of the distinctive mitochondrial material, these are found at the surfaces of the cytoplasmic bodies, held perhaps by adsorption. When water, isotonic solutions of sodium chloride, or Ringer's solution comes into contact with immersed liver, they remove basophile and mitochondrial material from a superficial zone and substances with similar staining reactions appear in the cytoplasm of cells at a deeper level. Osmotic changes in the cytoplasmic bodies may be reversible. When liver tissue which has been for a short time immersed in water

  16. Mechanodelivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Nyssa T.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Yang, Haw

    2014-04-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials.Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials

  17. Nucleoporin Nup98 mediates galectin-3 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Balan, Vitaly; Raz, Avraham; Wong, Richard W.

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Nuclear pore protein Nup98 is a novel binding partner of galectin-3. •Nup98 transports galectin-3 into cytoplasm. •Nup98 depletion leads to galectin-3 nuclear transport and induces growth retardation. •Nup98 may involve in ß-catenin pathway through interaction with galectin-3. -- Abstract: Nucleoporin Nup98 is a component of the nuclear pore complex, and is important in transport across the nuclear pore. Many studies implicate nucleoporin in cancer progression, but no direct mechanistic studies of its effect in cancer have been reported. We show here that Nup98 specifically regulates nucleus–cytoplasm transport of galectin-3, which is a ß-galactoside-binding protein that affects adhesion, migration, and cancer progression, and controls cell growth through the ß-catenin signaling pathway in cancer cells. Nup98 interacted with galectin-3 on the nuclear membrane, and promoted galectin-3 cytoplasmic translocation whereas other nucleoporins did not show these functions. Inversely, silencing of Nup98 expression by siRNA technique localized galectin-3 to the nucleus and retarded cell growth, which was rescued by Nup98 transfection. In addition, Nup98 RNA interference significantly suppressed downstream mRNA expression in the ß-catenin pathway, such as cyclin D1 and FRA-1, while nuclear galectin-3 binds to ß-catenin to inhibit transcriptional activity. Reduced expression of ß-catenin target genes is consistent with the Nup98 reduction and the galectin-3–nucleus translocation rate. Overall, the results show Nup98’s involvement in nuclear–cytoplasm translocation of galectin-3 and ß-catenin signaling pathway in regulating cell proliferation, and the results depicted here suggest a novel therapeutic target/modality for cancers.

  18. Cytoplasmic Functions of the Tumor Suppressor p53

    PubMed Central

    Green, Douglas R.; Kroemer, Guido

    2010-01-01

    The principal tumor suppressor protein, p53, accumulates in cells in response to DNA damage, oncogene activation, and other stresses. It acts as a nuclear transcription factor that transactivates genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and numerous other processes. An emerging area of research unravels additional activities of p53 in the cytoplasm, where it triggers apoptosis and inhibits autophagy. These novel functions contribute to p53’s mission as a tumor suppressor. PMID:19407794

  19. Cytoplasmic Dynamics Reveals Two Modes of Nucleoid-Dependent Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Stylianidou, Stella; Kuwada, Nathan J.; Wiggins, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that forces resulting from the physical exclusion of macromolecules from the bacterial nucleoid play a central role in organizing the bacterial cell, yet this proposal has not been quantitatively tested. To investigate this hypothesis, we mapped the generic motion of large protein complexes in the bacterial cytoplasm through quantitative analysis of thousands of complete cell-cycle trajectories of fluorescently tagged ectopic MS2-mRNA complexes. We find the motion of these complexes in the cytoplasm is strongly dependent on their spatial position along the long axis of the cell, and that their dynamics are consistent with a quantitative model that requires only nucleoid exclusion and membrane confinement. This analysis also reveals that the nucleoid increases the mobility of MS2-mRNA complexes, resulting in a fourfold increase in diffusion coefficients between regions of the lowest and highest nucleoid density. These data provide strong quantitative support for two modes of nucleoid action: the widely accepted mechanism of nucleoid exclusion in organizing the cell and a newly proposed mode, in which the nucleoid facilitates rapid motion throughout the cytoplasm. PMID:25468347

  20. Coilin Shuttles between the Nucleus and Cytoplasm In Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Michel; Gall, Joseph G.

    1999-01-01

    Coiled bodies are discrete nuclear organelles often identified by the marker protein p80-coilin. Because coilin is not detected in the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence and Western blotting, it has been considered an exclusively nuclear protein. In the Xenopus germinal vesicle (GV), most coilin actually resides in the nucleoplasm, although it is highly concentrated in 50–100 coiled bodies. When affinity-purified anti-coilin antibodies were injected into the cytoplasm of oocytes, they could be detected in coiled bodies within 2–3 h. Coiled bodies were intensely labeled after 18 h, whereas other nuclear organelles remained negative. Because the nuclear envelope does not allow passive diffusion of immunoglobulins, this observation suggests that anti-coilin antibodies are imported into the nucleus as an antigen–antibody complex with coilin. Newly synthesized coilin is not required, because cycloheximide had no effect on nuclear import and subsequent targeting of the antibodies. Additional experiments with myc-tagged coilin and myc-tagged pyruvate kinase confirmed that coilin is a shuttling protein. The shuttling of Nopp140, NO38/B23, and nucleolin was easily demonstrated by the targeting of their respective antibodies to the nucleoli, whereas anti-SC35 did not enter the germinal vesicle. We suggest that coilin, perhaps in association with Nopp140, may function as part of a transport system between the cytoplasm and the coiled bodies. PMID:10512877

  1. The Interaction of Neurofilaments with the Microtubule Motor Cytoplasmic Dynein

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Oliver I.; Ascaño, Jennifer; Tokito, Mariko; Leterrier, Jean-Francois; Janmey, Paul A.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2004-01-01

    Neurofilaments are synthesized in the cell body of neurons and transported outward along the axon via slow axonal transport. Direct observation of neurofilaments trafficking in live cells suggests that the slow outward rate of transport is due to the net effects of anterograde and retrograde microtubule motors pulling in opposition. Previous studies have suggested that cytoplasmic dynein is required for efficient neurofilament transport. In this study, we examine the interaction of neurofilaments with cytoplasmic dynein. We used fluid tapping mode atomic force microscopy to visualize single neurofilaments, microtubules, dynein/dynactin, and physical interactions between these neuronal components. AFM images suggest that neurofilaments act as cargo for dynein, associating with the base of the motor complex. Yeast two-hybrid and affinity chromatography assays confirm this hypothesis, indicating that neurofilament subunit M binds directly to dynein IC. This interaction is blocked by monoclonal antibodies directed either to NF-M or to dynein. Together these data suggest that a specific interaction between neurofilament subunit M and cytoplasmic dynein is involved in the saltatory bidirectional motility of neurofilaments undergoing axonal transport in the neuron. PMID:15342782

  2. Increased cytoplasm viscosity hampers aggregate polar segregation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Samuel M D; Neeli-Venkata, Ramakanth; Goncalves, Nadia S M; Santinha, João A; Martins, Leonardo; Tran, Huy; Mäkelä, Jarno; Gupta, Abhishekh; Barandas, Marilia; Häkkinen, Antti; Lloyd-Price, Jason; Fonseca, José M; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2016-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, under optimal conditions, protein aggregates associated with cellular aging are excluded from midcell by the nucleoid. We study the functionality of this process under sub-optimal temperatures from population and time lapse images of individual cells and aggregates and nucleoids within. We show that, as temperature decreases, aggregates become homogeneously distributed and uncorrelated with nucleoid size and location. We present evidence that this is due to increased cytoplasm viscosity, which weakens the anisotropy in aggregate displacements at the nucleoid borders that is responsible for their preference for polar localisation. Next, we show that in plasmolysed cells, which have increased cytoplasm viscosity, aggregates are also not preferentially located at the poles. Finally, we show that the inability of cells with increased viscosity to exclude aggregates from midcell results in enhanced aggregate concentration in between the nucleoids in cells close to dividing. This weakens the asymmetries in aggregate numbers between sister cells of subsequent generations required for rejuvenating cell lineages. We conclude that the process of exclusion of protein aggregates from midcell is not immune to stress conditions affecting the cytoplasm viscosity. The findings contribute to our understanding of E. coli's internal organisation and functioning, and its fragility to stressful conditions. PMID:26507787

  3. Genetic studies on cytoplasmic male sterility in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Laughnan, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Our research concerns the basic mechanisms of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and fertility restoration in maize. The molecular determination of CMS is in the DNA of the mitochondria (mtDNA) but specific nuclear restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes can overrule the male-sterile effect of the cytoplasm. Our approach to the study of the Rf genes is threefold. We are attempting to tag the cms-S Rf genes and the cms-T Rf2 gene with controlling elements (CEs). Since we have identified a number of spontaneous Rf genes for cms-S and have demonstrated that they are themselves transposable, we are also searching for cases in which an Rf gene is inserted into a wild-type gene. The other aspect of our research involves the nuclear control over the organization of the mitochondrial genome. We found that the changes in mtDNA organization upon cytoplasmic reversion to fertility were characteristic of the nuclear background in which the reversion event occurred. We have investigated whether these differences are a reflection of differences in the organization of the mtDNA genome before reversion.

  4. Cytoplasmic Control of Sense-Antisense mRNA Pairs.

    PubMed

    Sinturel, Flore; Navickas, Albertas; Wery, Maxime; Descrimes, Marc; Morillon, Antonin; Torchet, Claire; Benard, Lionel

    2015-09-22

    Transcriptome analyses have revealed that convergent gene transcription can produce many 3'-overlapping mRNAs in diverse organisms. Few studies have examined the fate of 3'-complementary mRNAs in double-stranded RNA-dependent nuclear phenomena, and nothing is known about the cytoplasmic destiny of 3'-overlapping messengers or their impact on gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that the complementary tails of 3'-overlapping mRNAs can interact in the cytoplasm and promote post-transcriptional regulatory events including no-go decay (NGD) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genome-wide experiments confirm that these messenger-interacting mRNAs (mimRNAs) form RNA duplexes in wild-type cells and thus have potential roles in modulating the mRNA levels of their convergent gene pattern under different growth conditions. We show that the post-transcriptional fate of hundreds of mimRNAs is controlled by Xrn1, revealing the extent to which this conserved 5'-3' cytoplasmic exoribonuclease plays an unexpected but key role in the post-transcriptional control of convergent gene expression. PMID:26344770

  5. Female breast carcinomas: nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins versus steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Bryś, M; Romanowicz-Makowska, H; Nawrocka, A; Krajewska, W M

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins of human female breast cancer were analysed by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Oestrogen receptor and progesterone receptor expression was determined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. The electropherograms were developed by silver nitrate staining and quantitative analysis was carried out by video densitometer using the software Gel-Pro Analyzer. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins of breast carcinomas and normal tissue differed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Nuclear polypeptides of 108, 53 and 48 kD as well as the 36 kD cytoplasmic polypeptide were specific for tumour samples, while the 51 kD nuclear polypeptide was detected only in normal tissue. Quantitative differences in band density were noted in the 32 kD nuclear polypeptide. This polypeptide was expressed in greatest concentration in infiltrating ductal carcinomas which also indicated the greatest oestrogen receptor gene expression. This relationship appeared to be statistically significant (p < 0.005). No correlations were evident between the 32 kD protein expression and the progesterone receptor gene expression in any of the tissue types examined, nor between the 32 kD protein and the patient's age or tumour grade. PMID:10756981

  6. Cytoplasmic calcium buffers in intact human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tiffert, T; Lew, V L

    1997-01-01

    1. Precise knowledge of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering behaviour in intact human red cells is essential for the characterization of their [Ca2+]i-dependent functions. This was investigated by using a refined method and experimental protocols which allowed continuity in the estimates of [Ca2+]i, from nanomolar to millimolar concentrations, in the presence and absence of external Ca2+ chelators. 2. The study was carried out in human red cells whose plasma membrane Ca2+ pump was inhibited either by depleting the cells of ATP or by adding vanadate to the cell suspension. Cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering was analysed from plots of total cell calcium content vs. ionized cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([CaT]i vs. [Ca2+]i) obtained from measurements of the equilibrium distribution of 45Ca2+ at different external Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]o), in conditions known to clamp cell volume and pH. The equilibrium distribution of 45Ca2+ was induced by the divalent cation ionophore A23187. 3. The results showed the following. (i) The known red cell Ca2+ buffer represented by alpha, with a large capacity and low Ca2+ affinity, was the main cytoplasmic Ca2+ binding agent. (ii) The value of alpha was remarkably constant; the means for each of four donors ranged from 0.33 to 0.35, with a combined value of all independent measurements of 0.34 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 16). This contrasts with the variability previously reported. (iii) There was an additional Ca2+ buffering complex with a low capacity (approximately 80 micromol (340 g Hb)(-1)) and intermediate Ca2+ affinity (apparent dissociation constant, K(D,app) approximately 4-50 microM) whose possible identity is discussed. (iv) The cell content of putative Ca2+ buffers with submicromolar Ca2+ dissociation constants was below the detection limit of the methods used here (less than 2 micromol (340 g Hb)(-1)). 4. Vanadate (1 mM) inhibited the Vmax of the Ca2+ pump in inosine-fed cells by 99.7%. The cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering behaviour

  7. DNA methylation affected by male sterile cytoplasm in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male sterile cytoplasm plays an important role in hybrid rice and cytoplasmic effects are sufficiently documented. However, no reports are available on DNA methylation affected by male sterile cytoplasm in hybrid rice. We used a methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique to charac...

  8. Pro-autophagic polyphenols reduce the acetylation of cytoplasmic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Federico; Mariño, Guillermo; Lissa, Delphine; Vacchelli, Erika; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Zamzami, Naoufal; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol contained in red wine that has been amply investigated for its beneficial effects on organismal metabolism, in particular in the context of the so-called “French paradox,” i.e., the relatively low incidence of coronary heart disease exhibited by a population with a high dietary intake of cholesterol and saturated fats. At least part of the beneficial effect of resveratrol on human health stems from its capacity to promote autophagy by activating the NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1. However, the concentration of resveratrol found in red wine is excessively low to account alone for the French paradox. Here, we investigated the possibility that other mono- and polyphenols contained in red wine might induce autophagy while affecting the acetylation levels of cellular proteins. Phenolic compounds found in red wine, including anthocyanins (oenin), stilbenoids (piceatannol), monophenols (caffeic acid, gallic acid) glucosides (delphinidin, kuronamin, peonidin) and flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, myricetin), were all capable of stimulating autophagy, although with dissimilar potencies. Importantly, a robust negative correlation could be established between autophagy induction and the acetylation levels of cytoplasmic proteins, as determined by a novel immunofluorescence staining protocol that allows for the exclusion of nuclear components from the analysis. Inhibition of sirtuin 1 by both pharmacological and genetic means abolished protein deacetylation and autophagy as stimulated by resveratrol, but not by piceatannol, indicating that these compounds act through distinct molecular pathways. In support of this notion, resveratrol and piceatannol synergized in inducing autophagy as well as in promoting cytoplasmic protein deacetylation. Our results highlight a cause-effect relationship between the deacetylation of cytoplasmic proteins and autophagy induction by red wine components. PMID:23070521

  9. Cytoplasmic and nuclear polyglutamine aggregates in SCA6 Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, K; Owada, K; Ishida, K; Fujigasaki, H; Shun Li, M; Tsunemi, T; Ohkoshi, N; Toru, S; Mizutani, T; Hayashi, M; Arai, N; Hasegawa, K; Kawanami, T; Kato, T; Makifuchi, T; Shoji, S; Tanabe, T; Mizusawa, H

    2001-06-26

    Aggregations of the alpha1A-calcium channel protein have been previously demonstrated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Here the authors show that small aggregates, labeled by a monoclonal antibody 1C2 that preferentially detects expanded polyglutamine larger than that in SCA6 mutation, are present mainly in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus of Purkinje cells. Although the length of expansion is small in SCA6, the current finding might indicate that SCA6 conforms to the pathogenic mechanism(s) in other polyglutamine diseases. PMID:11425948

  10. NUCLEAR DNA AND CYTOPLASMIC DNA FROM TISSUES OF HIGHER PLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Yasuo; Bassel, Alix; Stern, Herbert

    1965-01-01

    Young wheat roots were labeled with 32P-inorganic phosphate. Following the labeling period, roots were homogenized in a sucrose medium and fractionated into nuclei, cytoplasmic particles (including proplastids and mitochondria), and a soluble fraction containing most of the microsomes. DNA prepared from the particles had a higher buoyant density than that from the nuclei and showed a marked loss in total label if the roots were exposed to non-radioactive medium for 48 hours prior to fractionation of the cells. PMID:5885425

  11. Cytoplasm affects grain weight and filled-grain ratio in indica rice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytoplasmic effects on agronomic traits -involving cytoplasmic and nuclear genomes of either different species or different cultivars - are well documented in wheat but have seldom been demonstrated in rice (Oryza sativa L.). To detect cytoplasmic effects, we introgressed the nuclear genomes of three indica cultivars - Guichao 2, Jiangchengkugu, and Dianrui 449 - into the cytoplasms of six indica cultivars - Dijiaowujian, Shenglixian, Zhuzhan, Nantehao, Aizizhan, and Peta. These 18 nuclear substitution lines were evaluated during the winter season of 2005 in Sanya, Hainan, China, and during the summer season of 2006 in Kunming, Yunnan, China. The effects of 6 cytoplasm sources, 3 nucleus sources, 2 locations and their interactions were estimated for plant height, panicle length, panicle number per plant, spikelet number per panicle, grain weight, filled-grain ratio, and yield per plot. Results For five of the seven traits, analysis of variance showed that there were no significant cytoplasmic effects or interactions involving cytoplasmic effects. The effect of cytoplasm on 1000-grain weight was highly significant. Mean 1000-grain weight over the two locations in four of the six cytoplasms clustered close to the overall mean, whereas plants with Nantehao cytoplasm had a high, and those with Peta cytoplasm a low mean grain weight. There was a highly significant three-way interaction affecting filled-grain ratio. At Sanya, cytoplasms varied in very narrow ranges within nuclear backgrounds. Strong cytoplasmic effects were observed only at Kunming and in only two of the three nuclear backgrounds; in the Jianchenkugu nuclear background, there was no evidence of strong cytoplasmic effects at either location. In the Dianrui 449 and Guichao 2 nuclear background evaluated at Kunming, filled-grain ratios of the six cytoplasms showed striking rank shifts Conclusions We detected cytoplasmic variation for two agronomically important traits in indica rice. The

  12. Cytoplasmic translocation of the retinoblastoma protein disrupts sarcomeric organization.

    PubMed

    Araki, Keigo; Kawauchi, Keiko; Hirata, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Mie; Taya, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle degeneration is a complication arising from a variety of chronic diseases including advanced cancer. Pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α plays a pivotal role in mediating cancer-related skeletal muscle degeneration. Here, we show a novel function for retinoblastoma protein (Rb), where Rb causes sarcomeric disorganization. In human skeletal muscle myotubes (HSMMs), up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and concomitant phosphorylation of Rb was induced by TNF-α treatment, resulting in the translocation of phosphorylated Rb to the cytoplasm. Moreover, induced expression of the nuclear exporting signal (NES)-fused form of Rb caused disruption of sarcomeric organization. We identified mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (mDia1), a potent actin nucleation factor, as a binding partner of cytoplasmic Rb and found that mDia1 helps maintain the structural integrity of the sarcomere. These results reveal a novel non-nuclear function for Rb and suggest a potential mechanism of TNF-α-induced disruption of sarcomeric organization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01228.001. PMID:24302570

  13. Cytoplasmic protein methylation is essential for neural crest migration

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Katie L.; Lidberg, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    As they initiate migration in vertebrate embryos, neural crest cells are enriched for methylation cycle enzymes, including S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), the only known enzyme to hydrolyze the feedback inhibitor of trans-methylation reactions. The importance of methylation in neural crest migration is unknown. Here, we show that SAHH is required for emigration of polarized neural crest cells, indicating that methylation is essential for neural crest migration. Although nuclear histone methylation regulates neural crest gene expression, SAHH and lysine-methylated proteins are abundant in the cytoplasm of migratory neural crest cells. Proteomic profiling of cytoplasmic, lysine-methylated proteins from migratory neural crest cells identified 182 proteins, several of which are cytoskeleton related. A methylation-resistant form of one of these proteins, the actin-binding protein elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (EF1α1), blocks neural crest migration. Altogether, these data reveal a novel and essential role for post-translational nonhistone protein methylation during neural crest migration and define a previously unknown requirement for EF1α1 methylation in migration. PMID:24379414

  14. Ulcerative colitis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in Hong Kong Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sung, J Y; Chan, K L; Hsu, R; Liew, C T; Lawton, J W

    1993-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are known to be rare among the Chinese. The diagnosis of ulcerative colitis has been difficult in some of the Asian countries where infective colitis is more prevalent. Twenty-three Hong Kong Chinese patients diagnosed to have ulcerative colitis were reviewed. The symptoms were relatively mild and extraintestinal manifestation had been rare. Patients responded well to steroid therapy and sulfasalazine. Three patients in this series were found to have cyst and/or trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica in stool. In this series, 19 patients were tested for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). Fourteen patients (73.5%) were positive, of which six (31.5%) showed a perinuclear staining pattern and eight (42%) demonstrated a cytoplasmic pattern. Five patients (26.5%) were negative for any ANCA, and none was positive for both. Sera of these patients were also tested for anti-alpha granules, anti-myeloperoxidase, and anti-lactoferrin activities. None was positive. Control sera collected from 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome were all negative for the tests. In conclusion, testing of ANCAs may help in making the diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease in difficult situations. PMID:8503382

  15. Cytoplasmic Dynein Antagonists with Improved Potency and Isoform Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins 1 and 2 are related members of the AAA+ superfamily (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) that function as the predominant minus-end-directed microtubule motors in eukaryotic cells. Dynein 1 controls mitotic spindle assembly, organelle movement, axonal transport, and other cytosolic, microtubule-guided processes, whereas dynein 2 mediates retrograde trafficking within motile and primary cilia. Small-molecule inhibitors are important tools for investigating motor protein-dependent mechanisms, and ciliobrevins were recently discovered as the first dynein-specific chemical antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that ciliobrevins directly target the heavy chains of both dynein isoforms and explore the structure–activity landscape of these inhibitors in vitro and in cells. In addition to identifying chemical motifs that are essential for dynein blockade, we have discovered analogs with increased potency and dynein 2 selectivity. These antagonists effectively disrupt Hedgehog signaling, intraflagellar transport, and ciliogenesis, making them useful probes of these and other cytoplasmic dynein 2-dependent cellular processes. PMID:26555042

  16. A cytoplasmic peptidoglycan amidase homologue controls mycobacterial cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Cara C; Baer, Christina E; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Liu, Weiru; Chase, Michael R; Meniche, Xavier; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell wall assembly is essential for bacterial survival and contributes to pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, little is known about how the cell wall is regulated in stress. We found that CwlM, a protein homologous to peptidoglycan amidases, coordinates peptidoglycan synthesis with nutrient availability. Surprisingly, CwlM is sequestered from peptidoglycan (PG) by localization in the cytoplasm, and its enzymatic function is not essential. Rather, CwlM is phosphorylated and associates with MurA, the first enzyme in PG precursor synthesis. Phosphorylated CwlM activates MurA ~30 fold. CwlM is dephosphorylated in starvation, resulting in lower MurA activity, decreased cell wall metabolism, and increased tolerance to multiple antibiotics. A phylogenetic analysis of cwlM implies that localization in the cytoplasm drove the evolution of this factor. We describe a system that controls cell wall metabolism in response to starvation, and show that this regulation contributes to antibiotic tolerance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14590.001 PMID:27304077

  17. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  18. Sodium channels in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.M. ); Black, J.A.; Waxman, S.G. Veterans Affairs Medical Center, West Haven, CT ); Angelides, K.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Immunoblotting, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, and tritiated saxitoxin (({sup 3}H)STX) binding experiments were used to study sodium channel localization in Schwann cells. Polyclonal antibody 7493, which is directed against purifed sodium channels from rat brain, specifically recognized a 260-kDa protein corresponding to the {alpha} subunit of the sodium channel in immunoblots of crude glycoproteins from rat sciatic nerve. Electron microscopic localization of sodium channel immunoreactivity within adult rat sciatic nerves reveals heavy staining of the axon membrane at the node of Ranvier, in contrast to the internodal axon membrane, which does not stain. Schwann cells including perinodal processes also exhibit antibody 7493 immunoreactivity, localized within both the cytoplasm and the plasmalemma of the Schwann cell. To examine further the possibility that sodium channels are localized within Schwann cell cytoplasm, ({sup 3}H)STX binding was studied in cultured rabbit Schwann cells, both intact and after homogenization. Saturable binding of STX was singificantly higher in homogenized Schwann cells than in intact Schwann cells. Moreover, the equilibrium dissociation constant was higher for homogenized preparations (1.77 {plus minus} 0.37 nM) than for intact Schwann cells (1.06 {plus minus} 0.29 nM). These data suggest the presence of an intracellular pool of sodium channels or channel presursors in Schwann cells.

  19. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) testing: detection methods and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Renato Alberto; Radice, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are considered the diagnostic biomarker of some necrotising vasculitis such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and, to a lesser extent, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). According to the current recommendations, combining indirect immunofluorescence and proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) antigen specific immunometric assays, in the proper clinical setting, assures the best diagnostic specificity. When such conditions are satisfied, ANCA are detected in up to 90% of patients with active generalised GPA and MPA and in about 40% of patients with EGPA. Cytoplasmic ANCA (C-ANCA) with specificity for PR3 are usually found in patients with GPA whereas perinuclear ANCA (P-ANCA) in patients with MPA and EGPA. However, ANCA antigen specificity is more closely associated with disease phenotype and prognosis than clinical diagnosis. The clinical value of serial ANCA testing in monitoring disease activity is still debated. Recently, new promising developments in methodology and techniques (computer-based image analysis of immunofluorescence patterns, novel generation of PR3-/MPO-ANCA immunometric assays and multiplex technology) have been proposed but studies comparing the performances of the different assays are scarce. PMID:24854381

  20. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Much, Christian; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O’Carroll, Dónal

    2016-01-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  1. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein.

    PubMed

    Much, Christian; Auchynnikava, Tania; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O'Carroll, Dónal

    2016-06-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  2. CryoEM structure of yeast cytoplasmic exosome complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Jie; Niu, Chu-Ya; Wu, Yao; Tan, Dan; Wang, Yang; Ye, Ming-Da; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Wenwei; Zhou, Ke; Liu, Quan-Sheng; Dai, Junbiao; Yang, Xuerui; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Huang, Niu; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2016-07-01

    The eukaryotic multi-subunit RNA exosome complex plays crucial roles in 3'-to-5' RNA processing and decay. Rrp6 and Ski7 are the major cofactors for the nuclear and cytoplasmic exosomes, respectively. In the cytoplasm, Ski7 helps the exosome to target mRNAs for degradation and turnover via a through-core pathway. However, the interaction between Ski7 and the exosome complex has remained unclear. The transaction of RNA substrates within the exosome is also elusive. In this work, we used single-particle cryo-electron microscopy to solve the structures of the Ski7-exosome complex in RNA-free and RNA-bound forms at resolutions of 4.2 Å and 5.8 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the N-terminal domain of Ski7 adopts a structural arrangement and interacts with the exosome in a similar fashion to the C-terminal domain of nuclear Rrp6. Further structural analysis of exosomes with RNA substrates harboring 3' overhangs of different length suggests a switch mechanism of RNA-induced exosome activation in the through-core pathway of RNA processing. PMID:27174052

  3. A cytoplasmic peptidoglycan amidase homologue controls mycobacterial cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Boutte, Cara C; Baer, Christina E; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Liu, Weiru; Chase, Michael R; Meniche, Xavier; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell wall assembly is essential for bacterial survival and contributes to pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, little is known about how the cell wall is regulated in stress. We found that CwlM, a protein homologous to peptidoglycan amidases, coordinates peptidoglycan synthesis with nutrient availability. Surprisingly, CwlM is sequestered from peptidoglycan (PG) by localization in the cytoplasm, and its enzymatic function is not essential. Rather, CwlM is phosphorylated and associates with MurA, the first enzyme in PG precursor synthesis. Phosphorylated CwlM activates MurA ~30 fold. CwlM is dephosphorylated in starvation, resulting in lower MurA activity, decreased cell wall metabolism, and increased tolerance to multiple antibiotics. A phylogenetic analysis of cwlM implies that localization in the cytoplasm drove the evolution of this factor. We describe a system that controls cell wall metabolism in response to starvation, and show that this regulation contributes to antibiotic tolerance. PMID:27304077

  4. Sodium channels in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, J M; Black, J A; Waxman, S G; Angelides, K J

    1990-01-01

    Immunoblotting, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, and tritiated saxitoxin ([3H]STX) binding experiments were used to study sodium channel localization in Schwann cells. Polyclonal antibody 7493, which is directed against purified sodium channels from rat brain, specifically recognizes a 260-kDa protein corresponding to the alpha subunit of the sodium channel in immunoblots of crude glycoproteins from rat sciatic nerve. Electron microscopic localization of sodium channel immunoreactivity within adult rat sciatic nerves reveals heavy staining of the axon membrane at the node of Ranvier, in contrast to the internodal axon membrane, which does not stain. Schwann cells including perinodal processes also exhibit antibody 7493 immunoreactivity, localized within both the cytoplasm and the plasmalemma of the Schwann cell. To examine further the possibility that sodium channels are localized within Schwann cell cytoplasm, [3H]STX binding was studied in cultured rabbit Schwann cells, both intact and after homogenization. Saturable binding of STX was significantly higher in homogenized Schwann cells (410 +/- 37 fmol/mg of protein) than in intact Schwann cells (214 +/- 21 fmol/mg of protein). Moreover, the equilibrium dissociation constant was higher for homogenized preparations (1.77 +/- 0.37 nM) than for intact Schwann cells (1.06 +/- 0.29 nM). These data suggest the presence of an intracellular pool of sodium channels or channel precursors in Schwann cells. Images PMID:2174558

  5. A Balance between Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Volumes Controls Spindle Length

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Lucia; Kovacovicova, Kristina; Dang-Nguyen, Thanh Quang; Sodek, Martin; Skultety, Michal; Anger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Proper assembly of the spindle apparatus is crucially important for faithful chromosome segregation during anaphase. Thanks to the effort over the last decades, we have very detailed information about many events leading to spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, however we still do not understand certain aspects, including, for example, spindle length control. When tight regulation of spindle size is lost, chromosome segregation errors emerge. Currently, there are several hypotheses trying to explain the molecular mechanism of spindle length control. The number of kinetochores, activity of molecular rulers, intracellular gradients, cell size, limiting spindle components, and the balance of the spindle forces seem to contribute to spindle size regulation, however some of these mechanisms are likely specific to a particular cell type. In search for a general regulatory mechanism, in our study we focused on the role of cell size and nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio in this process. To this end, we used relatively large cells isolated from 2-cell mouse embryos. Our results showed that the spindle size upper limit is not reached in these cells and suggest that accurate control of spindle length requires balanced ratio between nuclear and cytoplasmic volumes. PMID:26886125

  6. Cytoplasm dynamics and cell motion: two-phase flow models.

    PubMed

    Alt, W; Dembo, M

    1999-03-01

    The motion of amoeboid cells is characterized by cytoplasmic streaming and by membrane protrusions and retractions which occur even in the absence of interactions with a substratum. Cell translocation requires, in addition, a transmission mechanism wherein the power produced by the cytoplasmic engine is applied to the substratum in a highly controlled fashion through specific adhesion proteins. Here we present a simple mechano-chemical model that tries to capture the physical essence of these complex biomolecular processes. Our model is based on the continuum equations for a viscous and reactive two-phase fluid model with moving boundaries, and on force balance equations that average the stochastic interactions between actin polymers and membrane proteins. In this paper we present a new derivation and analysis of these equations based on minimization of a power functional. This derivation also leads to a clear formulation and classification of the kinds of boundary conditions that should be specified at free surfaces and at the sites of interaction of the cell and the substratum. Numerical simulations of a one-dimensional lamella reveal that even this extremely simplified model is capable of producing several typical features of cell motility. These include periodic 'ruffle' formation, protrusion-retraction cycles, centripetal flow and cell-substratum traction forces. PMID:10204394

  7. Cytoplasmic Incompatibility and Bacterial Density in Nasonia Vitripennis

    PubMed Central

    Breeuwer, JAJ.; Werren, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Cytoplasmically (maternally) inherited bacteria that cause reproductive incompatibility between strains are widespread among insects. In the parasitoid wasp Nasonia, incompatibility results in improper condensation and fragmentation of the paternal chromosomes in fertilized eggs. Some form of genome imprinting may be involved. Because of haplodiploidy, incompatibility results in conversion of (diploid) female eggs into (haploid) males. Experiments show that bacterial density is correlated with compatibility differences between male and female Nasonia. Males from strains with high bacterial numbers are incompatible with females from strains with lower numbers. Temporal changes in compatibility of females after tetracycline treatment are generally correlated with decreases in bacterial levels in eggs. However, complete loss of bacteria in mature eggs precedes conversion of eggs to the ``asymbiont'' compatibility type by 3-4 days. This result is consistent with a critical ``imprinting'' period during egg maturation, when cytoplasmic bacteria determine compatibility. Consequent inheritance of reduced bacterial numbers in F(1) progeny has different effects on compatibility type of subsequent male vs. female progeny. In some cases, partial incompatibility occurs which results in reduced offspring numbers, apparently due to incomplete paternal chromosome elimination resulting in aneuploidy. PMID:8244014

  8. A meta-analysis of the strength and nature of cytoplasmic genetic effects.

    PubMed

    Dobler, R; Rogell, B; Budar, F; Dowling, D K

    2014-10-01

    Genetic variation in cytoplasmic genomes (i.e. the mitochondrial genome in animals, and the combined mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes in plants) was traditionally assumed to accumulate under a neutral equilibrium model. This view has, however, come under increasing challenge from studies that have experimentally linked cytoplasmic genetic effects to the expression of life history phenotypes. Such results suggest that genetic variance located within the cytoplasm might be of evolutionary importance and potentially involved in shaping population evolutionary trajectories. As a step towards assessing this assertion, here we conduct a formal meta-analytic review to quantitatively assess the extent to which cytoplasmic genetic effects contribute to phenotypic expression across animal and plant kingdoms. We report that cytoplasmic effect sizes are generally moderate in size and associated with variation across a range of factors. Specifically, cytoplasmic effects on morphological traits are generally larger than those on life history or metabolic traits. Cytoplasmic effect sizes estimated at the between-species scale (via interspecies mix-and-matching of cytoplasmic and nuclear genomes) are larger than those at the within-species scale. Furthermore, cytoplasmic effects tied to epistatic interactions with the nuclear genome tend to be stronger than additive cytoplasmic effects, at least when restricting the data set to gonochorous animal species. Our results thus confirm that cytoplasmic genetic variation is commonly tied to phenotypic expression across plants and animals, implicate the cytoplasmic-nuclear interaction as a key unit on which natural selection acts and generally suggest that the genetic variation that lies within the cytoplasm is likely to be entwined in adaptive evolutionary processes. PMID:25196503

  9. The Genes for Cytoplasmic Ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Scott, N. Steele; Ingle, J.

    1973-01-01

    The genes for cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA are partially resolved from the bulk of the DNA by CsCl equilibrium centrifugation. Although in some plants the buoyant density of the ribosomal RNA genes is as expected from the base composition of ribosomal RNA, others show a large discrepancy which cannot be due to the presence of low G-C spacer-DNA. The cross-hybridization observed with 1.3 and 0.7 × 106 molecular weight ribosomal RNAs and DNA, which varies greatly with different plant species, is not due to contamination of the ribosomal RNAs, and is specific for the ribosomal DNA of each species, probably largely restricted to those sequences coding for the two stable ribosomal RNAs. The double reciprocal plot may be used for the extrapolation of saturation values only with caution, because in these cases such plots are not linear over the whole of the hybridization reaction. PMID:16658392

  10. The Whereabouts of microRNA Actions: Cytoplasm and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Leung, Anthony K L

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a conserved class of approximately 22 nucleotide (nt) short noncoding RNAs that normally silence gene expression via translational repression and/or degradation of targeted mRNAs in plants and animals. Identifying the whereabouts of miRNAs potentially informs miRNA functions, some of which are perhaps specialized to specific cellular compartments. In this review, the significance of miRNA localizations in the cytoplasm, including those at RNA granules and endomembranes, and the export of miRNAs to extracellular space will be discussed. How miRNA localizations and functions are regulated by protein modifications on the core miRNA-binding protein Argonaute (AGO) during normal and stress conditions will be explored, and in conclusion new AGO partners, non-AGO miRNA-binding proteins, and the emergent understanding of miRNAs found in the nucleoplasm, nucleoli, and mitochondria will be discussed. PMID:26410406

  11. Fighting an enemy within: cytoplasmic inhibitors of bacterial cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Jan; Golonka, Ewa; Filipek, Renata; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2005-08-01

    The genes encoding secreted, broad-spectrum activity cysteine proteases of Staphylococcus spp. (staphopains) and Streptococcus pyogenes (streptopain, SpeB) are genetically linked to genes encoding cytoplasmic inhibitors. While staphopain inhibitors have lipocalin-like folds, streptopain is inhibited by a protein bearing the scaffold of the enzyme profragment. Bioinformatic analysis of other prokaryotic genomes has revealed that two more species may utilize this same genetic arrangement to control streptopain-like proteases with lipocalin-like inhibitors, while three other species may employ a C-terminally located domain that resembles the profragment. This apparently represents a novel system that bacteria use to control the intracellular activity of their proteases. PMID:16045606

  12. Apoptosis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction causes cytoplasmic lipid droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Boren, J; Brindle, K M

    2012-09-01

    A characteristic of apoptosis is the rapid accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets, which are composed largely of neutral lipids. The proton signals from these lipids have been used for the non-invasive detection of cell death using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We show here that despite an apoptosis-induced decrease in the levels and activities of enzymes involved in lipogenesis, which occurs downstream of p53 activation and inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway, the increase in lipid accumulation is due to increased de novo lipid synthesis. This results from inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, which coupled with an increase in acyl-CoA synthetase activity, diverts fatty acids away from oxidation and into lipid synthesis. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation can be explained by a rapid rise in mitochondrial membrane potential and an attendant increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species. PMID:22460322

  13. The kinase domain of mitochondrial PINK1 faces the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chun; Huang, Yong; Shao, Yufang; May, Jessica; Prou, Delphine; Perier, Celine; Dauer, William; Schon, Eric A.; Przedborski, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) are a cause of autosomal recessive familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Efforts in deducing the PINK1 signaling pathway have been hindered by controversy around its subcellular and submitochondrial localization and the authenticity of its reported substrates. We show here that this mitochondrial protein exhibits a topology in which the kinase domain faces the cytoplasm and the N-terminal tail is inside the mitochondria. Although deletion of the transmembrane domain disrupts this topology, common PD-linked PINK1 mutations do not. These results are critical in rectifying the location and orientation of PINK1 in mitochondria, and they should help decipher its normal physiological function and potential pathogenic role in PD. PMID:18687899

  14. The Potassium Binding Protein Kbp Is a Cytoplasmic Potassium Sensor.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Khuram U; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Kelly, Sharon M; Byron, Olwyn; Smith, Brian O; Walker, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Escherichia coli possesses a number of specific K(+) influx and efflux systems that maintain an appropriate intracellular K(+) concentration. Although regulatory mechanisms have been identified for a number of these transport systems, the exact mechanism through which K(+) concentration is sensed in the cell remains unknown. In this work we show that Kbp (K(+) binding protein, formerly YgaU), a soluble 16-kDa cytoplasmic protein from Escherichia coli, is a highly specific K(+) binding protein and is required for normal growth in the presence of high levels of external K(+). Kbp binds a single potassium ion with high specificity over Na(+) and other metal ions found in biological systems, although, in common with K(+) transporters, it also binds Rb(+) and Cs(+). Dissection of the K(+) binding determinants of Kbp suggests a mechanism through which Kbp is able to sense changes in K(+) concentration over the relevant range of intracellular K(+) concentrations. PMID:27112601

  15. Nucleo-cytoplasmic transport as a therapeutic target of cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Senapedis, William; McCauley, Dilara; Baloglu, Erkan; Shacham, Sharon; Festuccia, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Shuttling of specific proteins out of the nucleus is essential for the regulation of the cell cycle and proliferation of both normal and malignant tissues. Dysregulation of this fundamental process may affect many other important cellular processes such as tumor growth, inflammatory response, cell cycle, and apoptosis. It is known that XPO1 (Exportin-1/Chromosome Region Maintenance 1/CRM1) is the main mediator of nuclear export in many cell types. Nuclear proteins exported to the cytoplasm by XPO1 include the drug targets topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) and BCR-ABL and tumor suppressor proteins such as Rb, APC, p53, p21, and p27. XPO1 can mediate cell proliferation through several pathways: (i) the sub-cellular localization of NES-containing oncogenes and tumor suppressor proteins, (ii) the control of the mitotic apparatus and chromosome segregation, and (iii) the maintenance of nuclear and chromosomal structures. The XPO1 protein is elevated in ovarian carcinoma, glioma, osteosarcoma, pancreatic and cervical cancer. There is a growing body of research indicating that XPO1 may have an important role as a prognostic marker in solid tumors. Because of this, nuclear export inhibition through XPO1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in many cancers. The best understood XPO1 inhibitors are the small molecule nuclear export inhibitors (NEIs; Leptomycin B and derivatives, ratjadones, PKF050-638, valtrate, ACA, CBS9106, selinexor/KPT-330, and verdinexor/KPT-335). Selinexor and verdinexor are orally bioavailable, highly potent, small molecules that are classified as Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE). KPT-330 is the only NEI currently in Phase I/II human clinical trials in hematological and solid cancers. Of all the potential targets in nuclear cytoplasmic transport, the nuclear export receptor XPO1 remains the best understood and most advanced therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25476752

  16. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in axis-respecified Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    In fertilized eggs of the frog Xenopus, the vegetal yolk mass rotates away from the future dorsal side (J. P. Vincent and J. Gerhart, 1987, Dev. Biol. 123, 526-539), and a major rearrangement of the deep animal hemisphere cytoplasm produces a characteristic swirl in the prospective dorsal side (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). The relationship between this swirl and determination of the dorsal-ventral axis was further investigated by attempting to experimentally separate the positions of the swirl and the dorsal-ventral axis. Eggs were obliquely oriented in the gravity field to respecify the direction of yolk mass rotation and the position of the dorsal-ventral axis. When yolk mass rotation occurred in the absence of a sperm, as in activated eggs, a swirl pattern formed on the side away from which the yolk mass had rotated. In fertilized eggs tipped with the sperm entry point (SEP) down or to the side, swirl patterns were always found to form on the side away from which the yolk mass was displaced. However, in eggs tipped SEP up, in which the yolk mass was forced to rotate away from the SEP, more complicated rearrangements were observed in addition to the rotation-oriented swirl. Because the direction of yolk mass rotation was found to be influenced by both gravity and the actual position of the SEP in obliquely oriented eggs (SEP to the side), such complicated rearrangement patterns may result from opposing forces generated by both yolk mass rotation and the expanding sperm aster. Thus, except in cases in which the influences of SEP position and unit gravity opposed each other, it was not possible to experimentally separate the position of the deep cytoplasmic swirl from the direction of yolk mass rotation, and therefore the position of the prospective dorsal side.

  17. Cytoplasmic alkalization reduces calcium buffering in molluscan central neurons.

    PubMed

    Zucker, R S

    1981-11-23

    The effect of raised cytoplasmic pH (pHi) on intracellular concentration ([Ca2+]i) transients following calcium influx during membrane depolarization was studied in identified neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. The pHi was monitored with pH-sensitive microelectrodes. Sea water containing 15 mM NH4Cl at pH 7.7 elevated pHi about 0.35 pH units from the normal level of 7.17. These cells have an estimated buffering power of about 60 mM/pH unit. Calcium influx was elicited by depolarizing pulses under voltage clamp and [Ca2+]i transients were monitored with the photoprotein aequorin or the metallochromic dye arsenazo III. Aequorin photo-emissions increased by 21--131% (mean, 48%) and arsenazo III absorbance changes accompanying depolarization increased by 9--33% (mean, 20%) after 30 min in NH4+, corresponding roughly to a 14% increase in [Ca2+]i transients. Calcium-dependent potassium tail currents following a depolarizing pulse were somewhat slower and 4--91% (mean, 38%) large in NH4+. The magnitude and time- and voltage-dependence of the membrane calcium conductance was studied using calcium tail currents following depolarizing pulses. The calcium current was unaffected by NH4+, so the enhanced [Ca2+]i transients must reflect reduced calcium buffering at high pHi. Either reduced cytoplasmic calcium binding or slowed active extrusion of calcium may be responsible for this effect. PMID:6271335

  18. Cytoplasmic genetic variation and extensive cytonuclear interactions influence natural variation in the metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Bindu; Corwin, Jason A; Li, Baohua; Atwell, Suzi; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Understanding genome to phenotype linkages has been greatly enabled by genomic sequencing. However, most genome analysis is typically confined to the nuclear genome. We conducted a metabolomic QTL analysis on a reciprocal RIL population structured to examine how variation in the organelle genomes affects phenotypic variation. This showed that the cytoplasmic variation had effects similar to, if not larger than, the largest individual nuclear locus. Inclusion of cytoplasmic variation into the genetic model greatly increased the explained phenotypic variation. Cytoplasmic genetic variation was a central hub in the epistatic network controlling the plant metabolome. This epistatic influence manifested such that the cytoplasmic background could alter or hide pairwise epistasis between nuclear loci. Thus, cytoplasmic genetic variation plays a central role in controlling natural variation in metabolomic networks. This suggests that cytoplasmic genomes must be included in any future analysis of natural variation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00776.001 PMID:24150750

  19. [Possible role of the cytoplasm in the course of morphogenesis, namely, in the case of twinning].

    PubMed

    Giroud, A

    1975-01-01

    A number of facts that cannot be interpreted in terms of nuclear genes would seem to be interpretable in terms of cytoplasmic heredity. The hereditary role of the mitochondria has already been demonstrated in molds. The role of the cytoplasm (matrilineal heredity) has also been shown in some phanerogams, and analogous facts have been noted in insects and molluscs. In amphibians, the influence of an alteration of the egg cortical cytoplasm has been shown to reappear in the following generations. This cortical cytoplasm includes the morphological plan of the organism with its bilateral symmetry. In Tatusia novemcincta the twins may be morphologically or chemically different, which may only be explained by an unequal subdivision of a heterogenic cytoplasm. Similar facts are observed in human twinning. Monozygotic twins are usually discordant with respect to congenital malformations (especially symmelia and anencephaly), which may only be interpreted in terms of unequal distribution of cytoplasmic properties. PMID:1242075

  20. A Phosphorylated Cytoplasmic Autoantigen, GW182, Associates with a Unique Population of Human mRNAs within Novel Cytoplasmic Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Eystathioy, Theophany; Chan, Edward K. L.; Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Keene, Jack D.; Griffith, Kevin; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2002-01-01

    A novel human cellular structure has been identified that contains a unique autoimmune antigen and multiple messenger RNAs. This complex was discovered using an autoimmune serum from a patient with motor and sensory neuropathy and contains a protein of 182 kDa. The gene and cDNA encoding the protein indicated an open reading frame with glycine-tryptophan (GW) repeats and a single RNA recognition motif. Both the patient's serum and a rabbit serum raised against the recombinant GW protein costained discrete cytoplasmic speckles designated as GW bodies (GWBs) that do not overlap with the Golgi complex, endosomes, lysosomes, or peroxisomes. The mRNAs associated with GW182 represent a clustered set of transcripts that are presumed to reside within the GW complexes. We propose that the GW ribonucleoprotein complex is involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by sequestering a specific subset of gene transcripts involved in cell growth and homeostasis. PMID:11950943

  1. Identification of cytoplasm types in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) accessions by a multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H X; Li, Z J; Hu, S W; Sun, G L; Chang, J J; Zhang, Z H

    2010-08-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has widely been used as an efficient pollination control system in rapeseed hybrid production. Identification of cytoplasm type of rapeseed accessions is becoming the most important basic work for hybrid-rapeseed breeding. In this study, we report a simple multiplex PCR method to distinguish the existing common cytoplasm resources, Pol, Nap, Cam, Ogu and Ogu-NWSUAF cytoplasm, in rapeseed. Cytoplasm type of 35 F(1) hybrids and 140 rapeseed open pollinated varieties or breeding lines in our rapeseed breeding programme were tested by this method. The results indicated that 10 of 35 F(1) hybrids are the Nap, and 25 the Pol cytoplasm type, which is consistent with the information provided by the breeders. Out of 140 accessions tested, 100 (71.4%), 21 (15%) and 19 (13.6%) accessions possess Nap, Cam and Pol cytoplasm, respectively. All 19 accessions with Pol cytoplasm are from China. Pedigree analysis indicated that these accessions with Pol cytoplasm were either restorers for Pol CMS, including Shaan 2C, Huiyehui, 220, etc. or derived from hybrids with Pol CMS as female parent. Our molecular results are consistent with those of the classical testcross, suggesting the reliability of this method. The multiplex PCR assay method can be applied to CMS "three-line" breeding, selection and validation of hybrid rapeseed. PMID:20401459

  2. Hindered Diffusion of Inert Tracer Particles in the Cytoplasm of Mouse 3T3 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Castle, Philip E.; Lansing Taylor, D.; Lanni, Frederick

    1987-07-01

    Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we have studied the diffusion of fluorescein-labeled, size-fractionated Ficoll in the cytoplasmic space of living Swiss 3T3 cells as a probe of the physical chemical properties of cytoplasm. The results reported here corroborate and extend the results of earlier experiments with fluorescein-labeled, size-fractionated dextran: diffusion of nonbinding particles in cytoplasm is hindered in a size-dependent manner. Extrapolation of the data suggests that particles larger than 260 angstrom in radius may be completely nondiffusible in the cytoplasmic space. In contrast, diffusion of Ficoll in protein solutions of concentration comparable to the range reported for cytoplasm is not hindered in a size-dependent manner. Although we cannot at present distinguish among several physical chemical models for the organization of cytoplasm, these results make it clear that cytoplasm possesses some sort of higher-order intermolecular interactions (structure) not found in simple aqueous protein solutions, even at high concentration. These results also suggest that, for native cytoplasmic particles whose smallest radial dimension approaches 260 angstrom, size may be as important a determinant of cytoplasmic diffusibility as binding specificity. This would include most endosomes, polyribosomes, and the larger multienzyme complexes.

  3. Amphibian egg cytoplasm response to altered g-forces and gravity orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, A. W.; Smith, R. C.; Malacinski, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Elucidation of dorsal/ventral polarity and primary embryonic axis development in amphibian embryos requires an understanding of cytoplasmic rearrangements in fertile eggs at the biophysical, physiological, and biochemical levels. Evidence is presented that amphibian egg cytoplasmic components are compartmentalized. The effects of altered orientation to the gravitational vector (i.e., egg inversion) and alterations in gravity force ranging from hypergravity (centrifugation) to simulated microgravity (i.e., horizontal clinostat rotation) on cytoplasmic compartment rearrangements are reviewed. The behavior of yolk compartments as well as a newly defined (with monoclonal antibody) nonyolk cytoplasmic compartment, in inverted eggs and in eggs rotated on horizontal clinostats at their buoyant density, is discussed.

  4. Isolation of Cytoplasmic Pituitary Granules with Gonadotropic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marshall W.; McShan, W. H.; Ris, Hans

    1960-01-01

    A fraction isolated from the anterior pituitary glands of rats castrate for 8 weeks contained essentially a single cytoplasmic constituent with which the major portion of the gonadotropic hormone activity was associated. The glands were homogenized in an 0.25 M sucrose + 7.3 per cent polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution and fractionated by differential centrifugation to give a heterogeneous small granule fraction which contained almost all the gonadotropic hormone activity. The active supernatant containing this small granule fraction was separated into layers by isopycnic gradient centrifugation on a continuous 6 to 45 per cent sucrose + 17.5 per cent "diodrast" + 5 x 10-4 M "versene" gradient at 100,000 g for 2 hours. Three layers were obtained and the pellet from the active bottom layer was sectioned, examined with the electron microscope, and found to contain 200 mµ granules, mitochondria, ergastoplasm, and other cellular debris. This layer was fractionated further by isopycnic and differential centrifugation to obtain a pellet which contained the major portion of the gonadotropic hormone activity. Because of the heterogeneity of this fraction, due to the contamination of the 200 mµ granules with mitochondria and other cellular debris, the active layer and the resuspended active pellet, obtained by centrifuging this layer first at 17,000 g then diluting the supernatant and centrifuging at 30,000 g for 1 hour, were filtered through Millipore HA paper with a pore size of 0.45 µ. The cytoplasmic material containing the gonadotropic hormone activity passed through the filter paper and this activity was recovered in the pellets obtained by centrifuging at 100,000 g for 1 hour. These active pellets consisted almost entirely of 200 mµ granules with a minimum amount of contamination, and they contained the major portion of the gonadotropic hormone activity with practically none remaining in the supernatant fraction. These results are discussed in view of their

  5. Effects of alien and intraspecies cytoplasms on manifestation of nuclear genes for wheat resistance to brown rust: II. Specificity of cytoplasm influence on different Lr genes

    SciTech Connect

    Voluevich, E.A.; Buloichik, A.A.; Palilova, A.N.

    1995-04-01

    Specificity of expression of the major nuclear genes Lr to two brown rust clones in hybrids with the same maternal cytoplasm was analyzed. It was evaluated by a resistant: susceptible ratio in the F{sub 2}. Reciprocal hybrids were obtained from the cross between the progeny of homozygous susceptible plants of the cultivar Penjamo 62 and its alloplasmatic lines carrying cytoplasms of Triticum dicoccoides var. fulvovillosum, Aegilops squarrosa var. typical, Agropyron trichophorum, and isogenic lines of the cultivar Thatcher (Th) with the Lr1, Lr9, Lr15, and Lr19 genes. It was shown that the effect of the Lr1 gene in the cytoplasm of cultivar Thatcher and in eu-, and alloplasmatic forms of Penjamo 62 was less expressed than that of other Lr genes. Cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (dicoccoides)-Penjamo 62 was the only exception: in the F{sub 2}, hybrids with Th (Lr1) had a higher yield of resistant forms than those with Th (Lr15). In the hybrid combinations studied, expression and/or transmission of the Lr19 gene was more significant than that of other genes. This gene had no advantages over Lr15 and Lr19 only in cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (squarrosa)-Penjamo 62. In certain hybrid cytoplasms, the display of the Lr1, Lr15, and Lr19 genes, in contrast to Lr9, varied with the virulence of the pathogen clones. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. Responses of alloplasmic (cytoplasm=Triticum timopheevii) and euplasmic wheats (Triticum aestivum) to photoperiod and vernalization.

    PubMed

    Ward, R W; Heyne, E G; Paulsen, G M

    1983-07-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the influence of the male sterility-inducing cytoplasm of Triticum timopheevii (Zhuk.) Zhuk. on response of several common winter wheat (T. aestivum L.) nuclear genotypes to photoperiod and vernalization. Comparative studies of cytoplasmic substitution lines provide information on the role of the cytoplasmic genetic mechanism in growth and development. In the case of cytoplasmic male sterility-based hybrid production systems, ubiquity of sterility-inducing cytoplasm in derived hybrids warrants thorough characterization of its influence on plant phenotype. Factorial combinations of cytoplasm (T. timopheevii and T. aestivum), nuclear genotype, and photoperiod or vernalization treatments were evaluated under hydroponic conditions in controlled environment chambers. Interaction of cytoplasm, photoperiod, and nuclear genotype was significant in one or more experiments for days to anthesis and potential spikelet number, and interaction of cytoplasm, vernalization, and nuclear genotype was significant for days to spike emergence. Long day length was associated with increased percentage seed set in one study, but interactions of photoperiod and cytoplasm were not detected for percentage seed set. Interactions involving cytoplasm and photoperiod or vernalization were interpreted as evidence of the existence of genetic factors in cytoplsam of T. timopheevii which alter photoperiod or vernalization responses of alloplasmic plants relative to responses exhibited by euplasmic plants. Since photoperiod and vernalization responses are critical to adaptation, T. timopheevii cytoplasm can alter adaptability of T. aestivum. The specific effect would be nuclear genotype dependent, and does not appear to be of a magnitude greater than that induced by nuclear genetic variability at loci conditioning photoperiod or vernalization responses or other adaptation-determining characteristics. Normal multilocation/year testing of alloplasmic hybrids should

  7. Association of Endophilin B1 with Cytoplasmic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhui; Barylko, Barbara; Eichorst, John P; Mueller, Joachim D; Albanesi, Joseph P; Chen, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Endophilins are SH3- and BAR domain-containing proteins implicated in membrane remodeling and vesicle formation. Endophilins A1 and A2 promote the budding of endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, whereas endophilin B1 has been implicated in vesicle budding from intracellular organelles, including the trans-Golgi network and late endosomes. We previously reported that endophilins A1 and A2 exist almost exclusively as soluble dimers in the cytosol. Here, we present results of fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy analyses indicating that, in contrast, the majority of endophilin B1 is present in multiple copies on small, highly mobile cytoplasmic vesicles. Formation of these vesicles was enhanced by overexpression of wild-type dynamin 2, but suppressed by expression of a catalytically inactive dynamin 2 mutant. Using dual-color heterospecies partition analysis, we identified the epidermal growth factor receptor on endophilin B1 vesicles. Moreover, a proportion of endophilin B1 vesicles also contained caveolin, whereas clathrin was almost undetectable on those vesicles. These results raise the possibility that endophilin B1 participates in dynamin 2-dependent formation of a population of transport vesicles distinct from those generated by A-type endophilins. PMID:27508440

  8. Novel clinical and diagnostic aspects of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Pelkum, Johannes; Radice, Antonella; Norman, Gary L; Lόpez Hoyos, Marcos; Lakos, Gabriella; Buchner, Carol; Musset, Lucile; Miyara, Makoto; Stinton, Laura; Mahler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are the serological hallmark of some idiopathic systemic vasculitides. Besides the investigation of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and constant effort for a standardized nomenclature and classification of the AAV, a main focus of research during the last few years has been to constantly improve the performance of enzyme immunoassays. With the latest so called third generation ELISA, this goal seemed to be fulfilled. The International Consensus Statement on Testing and Reporting of ANCA gave recommendations for standardized strategies for the serological diagnosis of ANCA. New developments now target the system immanent drawbacks of the respective diagnostic methods, be it the need for batching and the long time to result for ELISA, or the high likelihood of error and subjectivity of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Random access technology and multiplexing for solid phase assays as well as digital imaging for IIF are tools which may help to expedite and simplify routine diagnostics in the lab and in emergency settings. Recent findings indicate that PR3-ANCA have clinical utility beyond the diagnosis of AAV. PR3-ANCA can also serve as an aid for the differentiation between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CrD) and the stratification of UC patients. This review provides a detailed review of what is known about ANCA and highlights the latest research and state-of-the-art developments in this area. PMID:24995343

  9. Novel Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Pelkum, Johannes; Radice, Antonella; Norman, Gary L.; Lόpez Hoyos, Marcos; Buchner, Carol; Musset, Lucile; Miyara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are the serological hallmark of some idiopathic systemic vasculitides. Besides the investigation of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and constant effort for a standardized nomenclature and classification of the AAV, a main focus of research during the last few years has been to constantly improve the performance of enzyme immunoassays. With the latest so called third generation ELISA, this goal seemed to be fulfilled. The International Consensus Statement on Testing and Reporting of ANCA gave recommendations for standardized strategies for the serological diagnosis of ANCA. New developments now target the system immanent drawbacks of the respective diagnostic methods, be it the need for batching and the long time to result for ELISA, or the high likelihood of error and subjectivity of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Random access technology and multiplexing for solid phase assays as well as digital imaging for IIF are tools which may help to expedite and simplify routine diagnostics in the lab and in emergency settings. Recent findings indicate that PR3-ANCA have clinical utility beyond the diagnosis of AAV. PR3-ANCA can also serve as an aid for the differentiation between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CrD) and the stratification of UC patients. This review provides a detailed review of what is known about ANCA and highlights the latest research and state-of-the-art developments in this area. PMID:24995343

  10. Excreted Cytoplasmic Proteins Contribute to Pathogenicity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Patrick; Rinker, Janina; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Popella, Peter; Nega, Mulugeta; Luqman, Arif; Schittek, Birgit; Di Marco, Moreno; Stevanovic, Stefan; Götz, Friedrich

    2016-06-01

    Excretion of cytoplasmic proteins in pro- and eukaryotes, also referred to as "nonclassical protein export," is a well-known phenomenon. However, comparatively little is known about the role of the excreted proteins in relation to pathogenicity. Here, the impact of two excreted glycolytic enzymes, aldolase (FbaA) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), on pathogenicity was investigated in Staphylococcus aureus Both enzymes bound to certain host matrix proteins and enhanced adherence of the bacterial cells to host cells but caused a decrease in host cell invasion. FbaA and GAPDH also bound to the cell surfaces of staphylococcal cells by interaction with the major autolysin, Atl, that is involved in host cell internalization. Surprisingly, FbaA showed high cytotoxicity to both MonoMac 6 (MM6) and HaCaT cells, while GAPDH was cytotoxic only for MM6 cells. Finally, the contribution of external FbaA and GAPDH to S. aureus pathogenicity was confirmed in an insect infection model. PMID:27001537

  11. Lipogenic Enzymes Complexes and Cytoplasmic Lipid Droplet Formation During Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Velez-delValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Muñozledo, Federico; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2016-10-01

    Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles that store triglycerides and participate in their mobilization in adipose cells. These organelles require the reorganization of some structural components, the cytoskeleton, and the activation of lipogenic enzymes. Using confocal microscopy, we analyzed the participation of cytoskeletal components and two lipogenic enzymes, fatty acid synthase and glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, during lipid droplet biogenesis in differentiating 3T3-F442A cells into adipocytes. We show that subcortical actin microfilaments are extended at the basal side of the cells in parallel arrangement to the culture dish substrate, and that the microtubule network traverses the cytoplasm as a scaffold that supports the round shape of the mature adipocyte. By immunoprecipitation, we show that vimentin and perilipin1a associate during the early stages of the differentiation process for lipid droplet formation. We also report that the antibody against perilipin1 detected a band that might correspond to a modified form of the molecule. Finally, the cytosolic distribution and punctate organization of lipogenic enzymes and their co-localization in the proximity of lipid droplets suggest the existence of dynamic protein complexes involved in synthesis and storage of triglycerides. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2315-2326, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928794

  12. Cargo transport by cytoplasmic Dynein can center embryonic centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Longoria, Rafael A; Shubeita, George T

    2013-01-01

    To complete meiosis II in animal cells, the male DNA material needs to meet the female DNA material contained in the female pronucleus at the egg center, but it is not known how the male pronucleus, deposited by the sperm at the periphery of the cell, finds the cell center in large eggs. Pronucleus centering is an active process that appears to involve microtubules and molecular motors. For small and medium-sized cells, the force required to move the centrosome can arise from either microtubule pushing on the cortex, or cortically-attached dynein pulling on microtubules. However, in large cells, such as the fertilized Xenopus laevis embryo, where microtubules are too long to support pushing forces or they do not reach all boundaries before centrosome centering begins, a different force generating mechanism must exist. Here, we present a centrosome positioning model in which the cytosolic drag experienced by cargoes hauled by cytoplasmic dynein on the sperm aster microtubules can move the centrosome towards the cell's center. We find that small, fast cargoes (diameter ∼100 nm, cargo velocity ∼2 µm/s) are sufficient to move the centrosome in the geometry of the Xenopus laevis embryo within the experimentally observed length and time scales. PMID:23840877

  13. Cytoplasmic sphingosine-1-phosphate pathway modulates neuronal autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Moruno Manchon, Jose Felix; Uzor, Ndidi-Ese; Dabaghian, Yuri; Furr-Stimming, Erin E.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Tsvetkov, Andrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important homeostatic mechanism that eliminates long-lived proteins, protein aggregates and damaged organelles. Its dysregulation is involved in many neurodegenerative disorders. Autophagy is therefore a promising target for blunting neurodegeneration. We searched for novel autophagic pathways in primary neurons and identified the cytosolic sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway as a regulator of neuronal autophagy. S1P, a bioactive lipid generated by sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) in the cytoplasm, is implicated in cell survival. We found that SK1 enhances flux through autophagy and that S1P-metabolizing enzymes decrease this flux. When autophagy is stimulated, SK1 relocalizes to endosomes/autophagosomes in neurons. Expression of a dominant-negative form of SK1 inhibits autophagosome synthesis. In a neuron model of Huntington’s disease, pharmacologically inhibiting S1P-lyase protected neurons from mutant huntingtin-induced neurotoxicity. These results identify the S1P pathway as a novel regulator of neuronal autophagy and provide a new target for developing therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26477494

  14. TRIM5{alpha} association with cytoplasmic bodies is not required for antiretroviral activity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Byeongwoon; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Park, Do Hyun; Rogers, Thomas; Stremlau, Matthew; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-12-20

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM5{alpha}, restricts infection by particular retroviruses. Many TRIM proteins form cytoplasmic bodies of unknown function. We investigated the relationship between cytoplasmic body formation and the structure and antiretroviral activity of TRIM5{alpha}. In addition to diffuse cytoplasmic staining, the TRIM5{alpha} proteins from several primate species were located in cytoplasmic bodies of different sizes; by contrast, TRIM5{alpha} from spider monkeys did not form cytoplasmic bodies. Despite these differences, all of the TRIM5{alpha} proteins exhibited the ability to restrict infection by particular retroviruses. Treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an Hsp90 inhibitor, resulted in disappearance or reduction of the TRIM5{alpha}-associated cytoplasmic bodies, yet exerted little effect on the restriction of retroviral infection. Studies of green fluorescent protein-TRIM5{alpha} fusion proteins indicated that no TRIM5{alpha} domain is specifically required for association with cytoplasmic bodies. Apparently, the formation of cytoplasmic bodies is not required for the antiretroviral activity of TRIM5{alpha}.

  15. Cytoplasmic pathway followed by chloride ions to enter the CFTR channel pore.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Negoda, Alexander; Linsdell, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Most ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins function as ATP-dependent membrane pumps. One exception is the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an ABC protein that functions as a Cl(-) ion channel. As such, the CFTR protein must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm to the extracellular solution when in its open channel state. Extensive functional investigations have characterized most parts of this Cl(-) permeation pathway. However, one region remains unexplored-the pathway connecting the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning pore. We used patch clamp recording and extensive substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify amino acid side-chains in cytoplasmic regions of CFTR that lie close to the pathway taken by Cl(-) ions as they pass from the cytoplasm through this pathway. Our results suggest that Cl(-) ions enter the permeation pathway via a single lateral tunnel formed by the cytoplasmic parts of the protein, and then follow a fairly direct central pathway towards the membrane-spanning parts of the protein. However, this pathway is not lined continuously by any particular part of the protein; instead, the contributions of different cytoplasmic regions of the protein appear to change as the permeation pathway approaches the membrane, which appears to reflect the ways in which different cytoplasmic regions of the protein are oriented towards its central axis. Our results allow us to define for the first time the complete Cl(-) permeation pathway in CFTR, from the cytoplasm to the extracellular solution. PMID:26659082

  16. Effect of wild Helianthus cytoplasms on agronomic and oil characteristics of cultivated sunflower (H. annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) productions reliance on a single source of cytoplasmic male-sterility, PET1, derived from H. petiolaris Nutt., makes the crop genetically vulnerable. Twenty diverse cytoplasmic substitution lines from annual and perennial wild species were compared with the inbred li...

  17. A perspective on the mobilization, localization and delivery of molecules in the crowded bacterial cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T

    2012-01-01

    It has been assumed that diffusion of molecules in the bacterial cytoplasm is the mechanism that moves molecules in the absence of cytoplasmic streaming. However, is there an undiscovered mechanism present that mobilizes cytoplasm and its molecular contents, and delivers tRNAs to specific ribosomes at specific bacterial cytoplasmic locations? Mobilization of specific tRNA (and also mRNA transcripts and ribosomes) and cell division proteins to specific intracellular locations may suggest that instructions and/or mechanism(s) are needed. The alternative is that molecular crowding in the cytoplasm is sufficient for gentle contact between mRNA, ribosomes and tRNA. Or is it plausible that the bacterial cytoplasm (and its contents) are mobilized with the outcome being more gentle collisions between molecules than by a diffusion only mechanism? One hypothesis is that cytoplasmic and molecule mobilization and spatial organization are possibly driven by the photons in thermal infrared (IR) radiation and generation of exclusion zone (EZ) water in the cytoplasm. PMID:22086198

  18. CYTOLOGY OF CANDIDA ALBICANS AS INFLUENCED BY DRUGS ACTING ON THE CYTOPLASMIC MEMBRANE

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Glen R.

    1963-01-01

    Gale, Glen R. (Veterans Administration Hospital, Durham, N.C.) Cytology of Candida albicans as influenced by drugs acting on the cytoplasmic membrane. J. Bacteriol. 86:151–157. 1963.—An electron microscopic comparison was made of the cytological responses of Candida albicans to benzalkonium chloride, amphotericin B, and filipin, all of which are thought to exert their primary pharmacological actions on the cytoplasmic membrane of susceptible microorganisms. After 5 to 15 min of exposure to benzalkonium chloride, most of the cytoplasm became less dense, and intact nuclei, mitochondria, or intracytoplasmic membranes were not observed. The remaining dense cytoplasm contained numerous small holes. The polyene antifungal agents, amphotericin B and filipin, caused a reduction in cytoplasmic density, but had no observable effect on nuclei or mitochondria. The intervals before onset of changes induced by the polyene agents correlated with the known time-dependent binding of these drugs by cells, and the decreased electron scattering induced by all three agents was compatible with their known abilities to cause a loss of integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane with resultant leakage of cytoplasmic components. No consistent morphological effect of any of these drugs on the cytoplasmic membrane could be shown. Images PMID:14054376

  19. Response of amphibian egg non-yolk cytoplasm to gravity orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.; Neff, A. W.; Malacinski, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study amphibian egg cytoplasmic organization and egg symmetrization at the molecular level, a library of seventeen monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against Xenopus laevis non-yolk egg proteins was produced. Several of these MoAbs react with non-yolk cytoplasmic antigens which are unevenly distributed in the fertile Xenopus egg.

  20. Cytoplasmic Rbfox1 Regulates the Expression of Synaptic and Autism-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Ann; Damianov, Andrey; Lin, Chia-Ho; Fontes, Mariana; Parikshak, Neelroop N; Anderson, Erik S; Geschwind, Daniel H; Black, Douglas L; Martin, Kelsey C

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic studies have identified the neuronal RNA binding protein, Rbfox1, as a candidate gene for autism spectrum disorders. While Rbfox1 functions as a splicing regulator in the nucleus, it is also alternatively spliced to produce cytoplasmic isoforms. To investigate the function of cytoplasmic Rbfox1, we knocked down Rbfox proteins in mouse neurons and rescued with cytoplasmic or nuclear Rbfox1. Transcriptome profiling showed that nuclear Rbfox1 rescued splicing changes, whereas cytoplasmic Rbfox1 rescued changes in mRNA levels. iCLIP-seq of subcellular fractions revealed that Rbfox1 bound predominantly to introns in nascent RNA, while cytoplasmic Rbox1 bound to 3' UTRs. Cytoplasmic Rbfox1 binding increased target mRNA stability and translation, and Rbfox1 and miRNA binding sites overlapped significantly. Cytoplasmic Rbfox1 target mRNAs were enriched in genes involved in cortical development and autism. Our results uncover a new Rbfox1 regulatory network and highlight the importance of cytoplasmic RNA metabolism to cortical development and disease. PMID:26687839

  1. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  2. Downy mildew incidence of pearl millet hybrids with different male-sterility inducing cytoplasms.

    PubMed

    Yadav, O P

    1996-02-01

    The use of different sources of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in hybrid seed production of pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.] is advocated to avoid possible disease epidemics occurring due to cytoplasmic uniformity. The effects of commercially unexploited, but potentially exploitable, sources of CMS, like A2, A3 and A4, on downy mildew [Sclerospora graminicola (Sacc.) Schroet] incidence were studied by using the disease incidence of isonuclear hybrids with male-sterile and fertile cytoplasm. The mean downy mildew incidence of hybrids carrying different male-sterile cytoplasm was similar to that of hybrids retaining the fertile cytoplasm. The cytoplasm accounted for only 0.6% of the total variation and its effect was non-significant; pollinators could explain most of the variation in determining the disease incidence of hybrids. This suggested that these male-sterile cytoplasms are not linked to downy mildew susceptibility and thus can be exploited commercially to broaden the cytoplasmic base of the male-sterile lines and, ultimately, of hybrids. PMID:24166178

  3. Efficient expression of full-length antibodies in the cytoplasm of engineered bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Michael-Paul; Ke, Na; Lobstein, Julie; Peterson, Cristen; Szkodny, Alana; Mansell, Thomas J.; Tuckey, Corinna; Riggs, Paul D.; Colussi, Paul A.; Noren, Christopher J.; Taron, Christopher H.; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Berkmen, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Current methods for producing immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in engineered cells often require refolding steps or secretion across one or more biological membranes. Here, we describe a robust expression platform for biosynthesis of full-length IgG antibodies in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm. Synthetic heavy and light chains, both lacking canonical export signals, are expressed in specially engineered E. coli strains that permit formation of stable disulfide bonds within the cytoplasm. IgGs with clinically relevant antigen- and effector-binding activities are readily produced in the E. coli cytoplasm by grafting antigen-specific variable heavy and light domains into a cytoplasmically stable framework and remodelling the fragment crystallizable domain with amino-acid substitutions that promote binding to Fcγ receptors. The resulting cytoplasmic IgGs—named ‘cyclonals'—effectively bypass the potentially rate-limiting steps of membrane translocation and glycosylation. PMID:26311203

  4. Cytoplasmic dynein is a minus end-directed motor for membranous organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Schroer, T.A.; Steuer, E.R.; Sheetz, M.P.

    1989-03-24

    The role of cytoplasmic dynein in microtubule-based organelle transport was examined using a reconstituted assay developed from chick embryo fibroblasts. Factors present in a high-speed cytosol caused the movement of purified organelles on microtubules predominantly in the minus end direction. Inactivation of cytoplasmic dynein in the high-speed cytosol by vanadate-mediated UV photocleavage inhibited minus end-directed organelle motility by over 90%. Addition of purified cytoplasmic dynein to the inactive cytosol restored minus end-directed organelle motility, although purified cytoplasmic dynein by itself did not support organelle movement. We propose that cytoplasmic dynein is the motor for minus end-directed organelle movement, but that additional cytosolic factors are also required to produce organelle motility.

  5. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated glomerulonephritis in children.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Kurayama, H; Koitabashi, Y

    2001-07-01

    Aretrospective investigation was conducted by members of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Nephrology from 1990 to 1997 to define the clinical features and outcome of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis in children. Thirty-four ANCA-seropositive Japanese pediatric patients with biopsy-proven pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis were identified. Of these, 3 cases associated with Wegener's granulomatosis were excluded because of the small sample size. Among the 31 patients studied, 10 had a diagnosis of necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis alone and 21 had microscopic polyangiitis. Females predominated (87%), and the median age at onset was 12 yr. Twenty-six patients received treatment with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids, and five patients received treatment with corticosteroids alone; 84% of patients achieved remission, and 39% of responders relapsed in a median of 24 mo. ANCA titers correlated with response to treatment and disease activity, with some exceptions. Patients were followed for a median of 42 mo (range, 3 to 96 mo). Nine of 31 patients (29.0%) progressed to end-stage renal disease, 6 (19.4%) had reduced renal function, and 15 (48.4%) had normal renal function at the last observation. One patient (3.2%) died from cytomegalovirus infection 3 mo after initiation of therapy. Life-table analysis showed 75% renal survival at 39 mo. Patients who subsequently developed end-stage renal disease (n = 9) had significantly higher average peak serum creatinine levels and more chronic pathologic lesions at diagnosis compared with patients with favorable renal outcome (n = 15). In conclusion, our clinical experience suggests that the clinical disease spectrum of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis is similar in pediatric and adult patients, but there is a female predominance in children. PMID:11423578

  6. Studying Genome Heterogeneity within the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Halary, Sébastien; Bapteste, Eric; Hijri, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Although heterokaryons have been reported in nature, multicellular organisms are generally assumed genetically homogeneous. Here, we investigate the case of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that form symbiosis with plant roots. The growth advantages they confer to their hosts are of great potential benefit to sustainable agricultural practices. However, measuring genetic diversity for these coenocytes is a major challenge: Within the same cytoplasm, AMF contain thousands of nuclei and show extremely high levels of genetic variation for some loci. The extent and physical location of polymorphism within and between AMF genomes is unclear. We used two complementary strategies to estimate genetic diversity in AMF, investigating polymorphism both on a genome scale and in putative single copy loci. First, we used data from whole-genome pyrosequencing of four AMF isolates to describe genetic diversity, based on a conservative network-based clustering approach. AMF isolates showed marked differences in genome-wide diversity patterns in comparison to a panel of control fungal genomes. This clustering approach further allowed us to provide conservative estimates of Rhizophagus spp. genomes sizes. Second, we designed new putative single copy genomic markers, which we investigated by massive parallel amplicon sequencing for two Rhizophagus irregularis and one Rhizophagus sp. isolates. Most loci showed high polymorphism, with up to 103 alleles per marker. This polymorphism could be distributed within or between nuclei. However, we argue that the Rhizophagus isolates under study might be heterokaryotic, at least for the putative single copy markers we studied. Considering that genetic information is the main resource for identification of AMF, we suggest that special attention is warranted for the study of these ecologically important organisms. PMID:25573960

  7. Cytoplasmic membrane response to copper and nickel in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Mykytczuk, N C S; Trevors, J T; Ferroni, G D; Leduc, L G

    2011-03-20

    Metal tolerance has been found to vary among Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains and this can impact the efficiency of biomining practices. To explain observed strain variability for differences in metal tolerance we examined the effects of Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) concentrations (1-200 mM) on cytoplasmic membrane properties of two A. ferrooxidans type strains (ATCC 23270 and 19859) and four strains isolated from AMD water around Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Growth rate, membrane fluidity and phase, determined from the fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), and fatty acid profiles indicated that three different modes of adaptation were present and could separate between strains showing moderate, or high metal tolerance from more sensitive strains. To compensate for the membrane ordering effects of the metals, significant remodelling of the membrane was used to either maintain homeoviscous adaptation in the moderately tolerant strains or to increase membrane fluidity in the sensitive strains. Shifts in the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature in the moderately tolerant strains led to multiple phase transitions, increasing the potential for phase separation and compromised membrane integrity. The metal-tolerant strain however, was able to tolerate increases in membrane order without significant compensation via fatty acid composition. Our multivariate analyses show a common adaptive response which involves changes in the abundant 16:0 and 18:1 fatty acids. However, fatty acid composition and membrane properties showed no difference in response to either copper or nickel suggesting that adaptive response was non-specific and tolerance dependent. We demonstrate that strain variation can be evaluated using differences in membrane properties as intrinsic determinants of metal susceptibility. PMID:20630730

  8. Single-molecule study of molecular mobility in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lill, Yoriko; Kaserer, Wallace A.; Newton, Salete M.; Lill, Markus; Klebba, Phillip E.; Ritchie, Ken

    2012-08-01

    The cytoplasm of bacterial cells is filled with individual molecules and molecular complexes that rely on diffusion to bring them together for interaction. The mobility of molecules in the cytoplasm has been characterized by several techniques mainly using fluorescent probes and ensemble methods. In order to probe the microenvrionment inside the cytoplasm as viewed by an individual molecule, we have studied single green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) diffusing in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli cells at observation at rates ranging from 60 to 1000 Hz. Over long times the diffusion shows confinement due to the geometry of the cells themselves. A simulation in model cells using the actual distribution of cell sizes found in the experiments describes accurately the experimental results as well as reveals a short time diffusion coefficient that agrees well with that determined by ensemble methods. Higher short time diffusion coefficients can be obtained by filling the simulated cell with small spheres modeling cytoplasmic molecules and, depending on the density of particles included in the modeled cytoplasm, can approach the diffusion coefficient of GFPs found in water. Thus, single-molecule tracking combined with analysis using simple simulation of Brownian motion is able to reveal the main contributors to the GFP mobility in the cytoplasm of E. coli.

  9. Single-molecule study of molecular mobility in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lill, Yoriko; Kaserer, Wallace A; Newton, Salete M; Lill, Markus; Klebba, Phillip E; Ritchie, Ken

    2012-08-01

    The cytoplasm of bacterial cells is filled with individual molecules and molecular complexes that rely on diffusion to bring them together for interaction. The mobility of molecules in the cytoplasm has been characterized by several techniques mainly using fluorescent probes and ensemble methods. In order to probe the microenvrionment inside the cytoplasm as viewed by an individual molecule, we have studied single green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) diffusing in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli cells at observation at rates ranging from 60 to 1000 Hz. Over long times the diffusion shows confinement due to the geometry of the cells themselves. A simulation in model cells using the actual distribution of cell sizes found in the experiments describes accurately the experimental results as well as reveals a short time diffusion coefficient that agrees well with that determined by ensemble methods. Higher short time diffusion coefficients can be obtained by filling the simulated cell with small spheres modeling cytoplasmic molecules and, depending on the density of particles included in the modeled cytoplasm, can approach the diffusion coefficient of GFPs found in water. Thus, single-molecule tracking combined with analysis using simple simulation of Brownian motion is able to reveal the main contributors to the GFP mobility in the cytoplasm of E. coli. PMID:23005785

  10. Cytoplasmic Acidification Induced by Inorganic Phosphate Uptake in Suspension Cultured Catharanthus roseus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakano, Katsuhiro; Yazaki, Yoshiaki; Mimura, Tetsuro

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic acidification during inorganic phosphate (Pi) absorption by Catharanthus roseus cells were studied by means of a fluorescent pH indicator, 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 carboxyfluorescein (acetomethylester) (BCECF), and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cytoplasmic acidification measured by decrease in the fluorescence intensity started immediately after Pi application. Within a minute or so, a stable state was attained and no further acidification occurred, whereas Pi absorption was still proceeding. As soon as Pi in the medium was exhausted, cytoplasmic pH started to recover. Coincidentally, the medium pH started to recover toward the original acidic pH. The Pi-induced changes in the cytoplasmic pH were confirmed by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance study. Maximum acidification of the cytoplasm induced by 1.7 millimolar Pi was 0.2 pH units. Vacuolar pH was also affected by Pi. In some experiments, but not all, pH decreased reversibly by 0.2 to 0.3 pH units during Pi absorption. Results suggest that the cytoplasmic pH is regulated by proton pumps in the plasma membrane and in the tonoplast. In addition, other mechanisms that could consume extra protons in the cytoplasm are suggested. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668939

  11. Novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction in wheat (Triticum aestivum) induces vigorous plants.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ali; Kumar, Ajay; Mergoum, Mohamed; Pirseyedi, Seyed Mostafa; Hegstad, Justin B; Mazaheri, Mona; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2016-03-01

    Interspecific hybridization can be considered an accelerator of evolution, otherwise a slow process, solely dependent on mutation and recombination. Upon interspecific hybridization, several novel interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes emerge which provide additional sources of diversity. The magnitude and essence of intergenomic interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes remain unknown due to the direction of many crosses. This study was conducted to address the role of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions as a source of variation upon hybridization. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) alloplasmic lines carrying the cytoplasm of Aegilops mutica along with an integrated approach utilizing comparative quantitative trait locus (QTL) and epigenome analysis were used to dissect this interaction. The results indicate that cytoplasmic genomes can modify the magnitude of QTL controlling certain physiological traits such as dry matter weight. Furthermore, methylation profiling analysis detected eight polymorphic regions affected by the cytoplasm type. In general, these results indicate that novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions can potentially trigger an epigenetic modification cascade in nuclear genes which eventually change the genetic network controlling physiological traits. These modified genetic networks can serve as new sources of variation to accelerate the evolutionary process. Furthermore, this variation can synthetically be produced by breeders in their programs to develop epigenomic-segregating lines. PMID:26860316

  12. Stable association of RNAi machinery is conserved between the cytoplasm and nucleus of human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Roya; Hicks, Jessica A.; Li, Liande; Gagnon, Keith T.; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Lemoff, Andrew; Mirzaei, Hamid; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Argonaute 2 (AGO2), the catalytic engine of RNAi, is typically associated with inhibition of translation in the cytoplasm. AGO2 has also been implicated in nuclear processes including transcription and splicing. There has been little insight into AGO2's nuclear interactions or how they might differ relative to cytoplasm. Here we investigate the interactions of cytoplasmic and nuclear AGO2 using semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry often reveals long lists of candidate proteins, complicating efforts to rigorously discriminate true interacting partners from artifacts. We prioritized candidates using orthogonal analytical strategies that compare replicate mass spectra of proteins associated with Flag-tagged and endogenous AGO2. Interactions with TRNC6A, TRNC6B, TNRC6C, and AGO3 are conserved between nuclei and cytoplasm. TAR binding protein interacted stably with cytoplasmic AGO2 but not nuclear AGO2, consistent with strand loading in the cytoplasm. Our data suggest that interactions between functionally important components of RNAi machinery are conserved between the nucleus and cytoplasm but that accessory proteins differ. Orthogonal analysis of mass spectra is a powerful approach to streamlining identification of protein partners. PMID:27198507

  13. Influence of A1 cytoplasmic substitution on the downy-mildew incidence of pearl millet.

    PubMed

    Yadav, O P; Manga, V K; Gupta, G K

    1993-12-01

    Large-scale cultivation of pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br. F1 hybrids in India has led to increased incidence of downy-mildew (Sclerospora graminicola). There is concern that the A1 male-sterile cytoplasm used in all the hybrids released so far is responsible for this increase. The influence of A1 malesterile cytoplasm on downy-mildew incidence in pearl millet was studied by comparing the disease reaction of 40 pairs of F1 hybrids, each pair carrying respectively a1 male-sterile and normal B cytoplasm. Mean downy-mildew incidence was similar in the hybrids carrying either A1 male-sterile or B cytoplasm. The general combining ability of lines with and without A1 cytoplasm was found to be similar for downy-mildew incidence. These results indicated that in pearl millet A1 cytoplasm is not associated with increased downymildew incidence. The possible danger of using only one source of cytoplasm has been briefly discussed. PMID:24190349

  14. Stable association of RNAi machinery is conserved between the cytoplasm and nucleus of human cells.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Roya; Hicks, Jessica A; Li, Liande; Gagnon, Keith T; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Lemoff, Andrew; Mirzaei, Hamid; Corey, David R

    2016-07-01

    Argonaute 2 (AGO2), the catalytic engine of RNAi, is typically associated with inhibition of translation in the cytoplasm. AGO2 has also been implicated in nuclear processes including transcription and splicing. There has been little insight into AGO2's nuclear interactions or how they might differ relative to cytoplasm. Here we investigate the interactions of cytoplasmic and nuclear AGO2 using semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry often reveals long lists of candidate proteins, complicating efforts to rigorously discriminate true interacting partners from artifacts. We prioritized candidates using orthogonal analytical strategies that compare replicate mass spectra of proteins associated with Flag-tagged and endogenous AGO2. Interactions with TRNC6A, TRNC6B, TNRC6C, and AGO3 are conserved between nuclei and cytoplasm. TAR binding protein interacted stably with cytoplasmic AGO2 but not nuclear AGO2, consistent with strand loading in the cytoplasm. Our data suggest that interactions between functionally important components of RNAi machinery are conserved between the nucleus and cytoplasm but that accessory proteins differ. Orthogonal analysis of mass spectra is a powerful approach to streamlining identification of protein partners. PMID:27198507

  15. Targeted Cytoplasmic Irradiation with Alpha Particles Induces Mutations in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Jun; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, An; Waldren, Charles A.; Geard, Charles R.; Yu, Zengliang; Hei, Tom K.

    1999-04-01

    Ever since x-rays were shown to induce mutation in Drosophila more than 70 years ago, prevailing dogma considered the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutations and carcinogenesis, as being due mostly to direct damage to the nucleus. Although there was indication that alpha particle traversal through cellular cytoplasm was innocuous, the full impact remained unknown. The availability of the microbeam at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility of Columbia University made it possible to target and irradiate the cytoplasm of individual cells in a highly localized spatial region. By using dual fluorochrome dyes (Hoechst and Nile Red) to locate nucleus and cellular cytoplasm, respectively, thereby avoiding inadvertent traversal of nuclei, we show here that cytoplasmic irradiation is mutagenic at the CD59 (S1) locus of human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, while inflicting minimal cytotoxicity. The principal class of mutations induced are similar to those of spontaneous origin and are entirely different from those of nuclear irradiation. Furthermore, experiments with radical scavenger and inhibitor of intracellular glutathione indicated that the mutagenicity of cytoplasmic irradiation depends on generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that cytoplasm is an important target for genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. In addition, cytoplasmic traversal by alpha particles may be more dangerous than nuclear traversal, because the mutagenicity is accomplished by little or no killing of the target cells.

  16. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis: significance of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    PubMed

    Yokoseki, Akiko; Saji, Etsuji; Arakawa, Musashi; Kosaka, Takayuki; Hokari, Mariko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Takeda, Shigeki; Sanpei, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Akazawa, Kouhei; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kawachi, Izumi

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics, pathogenesis and treatment strategy of hypertrophic pachymeningitis that is associated with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). We retrospectively investigated clinical, radiological, immunological and pathological profiles of 36 patients with immune-mediated or idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis, including 17 patients with myeloperoxidase-ANCA, four patients with proteinase 3-ANCA, six patients with other immune-mediated disorders, and nine patients with 'idiopathic' variety. Myeloperoxidase-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis was characterized by: (i) an elderly female predominance; (ii) 82% of patients diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (previously known as Wegener's granulomatosis) according to Watts' algorithm; (iii) a high frequency of patients with lesions limited to the dura mater and upper airways, developing headaches, chronic sinusitis, otitis media or mastoiditis; (iv) a low frequency of patients with the 'classical or generalized form' of granulomatosis with polyangiitis involving the entire upper and lower airways and kidney, or progressing to generalized disease, in contrast to proteinase 3-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis; (v) less severe neurological damage according to the modified Rankin Scale and low disease activity according to the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score compared with proteinase 3-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis; (vi) increased levels of CXCL10, CXCL8 and interleukin 6 in cerebrospinal fluids, and increased numbers of T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, plasma cells and monocytes/macrophages in autopsied or biopsied dura mater with pachymeningitis, suggesting TH1-predominant granulomatous lesions in hypertrophic pachymeningitis, as previously reported in pulmonary or renal lesions of granulomatosis with polyangiitis; and (vii) greater efficacy of combination therapy with prednisolone and

  17. Pulmonary Fibrosis in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA)-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Comarmond, Cloé; Crestani, Bruno; Tazi, Abdellatif; Hervier, Baptiste; Adam-Marchand, Sylvain; Nunes, Hilario; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Wislez, Marie; Cadranel, Jacques; Housset, Bruno; Lloret-Linares, Célia; Sève, Pascal; Pagnoux, Christian; Abad, Sébastien; Camuset, Juliette; Bienvenu, Boris; Duruisseaux, Michaël; Hachulla, Eric; Arlet, Jean-Benoît; Hamidou, Mohammed; Mahr, Alfred; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Brun, Anne-Laure; Grenier, Philippe; Cacoub, Patrice; Saadoun, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is an uncommon manifestation observed in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). While patients with PF associated with AAV seem to have a worse prognosis, these patients have been described only in case reports or small retrospective case series. In this retrospective multicenter study, we report the main features and long-term outcomes of patients with PF associated with AAV, fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria and/or Chapel Hill definitions. Forty-nine patients (30 men [61%]; median age at diagnosis of AAV, 68 [interquartile range, 58–73] years) with PF associated with AAV were identified. Forty (81.6%) patients had MPA and 9 (18.4%) had granulomatosis with polyangiitis. The diagnosis of PF preceded the onset of vasculitis in 22 (45%) patients. Usual interstitial pneumonia was the main radiologic pattern (n = 18, 43%). ANCA were mostly of antimyeloperoxidase specificity (88%). All patients were treated with glucocorticoids as induction therapy, combined with cyclophosphamide (CYC) (n = 36, 73.5%) or rituximab (RTX) (n = 1, 2%). Factors associated with mortality included occurrence of chronic respiratory insufficiency (hazard ratio [HR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–34.5; p = 0.003), induction therapy with glucocorticoids alone (HR, 2.94; CI, 1.05–8.33; p = 0.04), and initial weigh loss (HR, 2.83; CI, 1.05–7.65; p = 0.041). The 3-year survival rate in patients treated with glucocorticoids alone or combined with an immunosuppressant (CYC or RTX) as induction therapy was 64% (95% CI, 41–99) and 94% (95% CI, 86–100), respectively (p = 0.03). After a median follow-up of 48 months [interquartile range, 14–88 mo], 18 (37%) patients died, including 11 related to respiratory insufficiency. PF is a rare manifestation of AAV with a very poor prognosis. Induction therapy with

  18. Cytoplasm segmentation on cervical cell images using graph cut-based approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Kong, Hui; Chin, Chien Ting; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to segment the cytoplasm in cervical cell images using graph cut-based algorithm. First, the A* channel in CIE LAB color space is extracted for contrast enhancement. Then, in order to effectively extract cytoplasm boundaries when image histograms present non-bimodal distribution, Otsu multiple thresholding is performed on the contrast enhanced image to generate initial segments, based on which the segments are refined by the multi-way graph cut method. We use 21 cervical cell images with non-ideal imaging condition to evaluate cytoplasm segmentation performance. The proposed method achieved a 93% accuracy which outperformed state-of-the-art works. PMID:24212005

  19. Cytoplasmic streaming affects gravity-induced amyloplast sedimentation in maize coleoptiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.; Leopold, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Living maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile cells were observed using a horizontal microscope to determine the interaction between cytoplasmic streaming and gravity-induced amyloplast sedimentation. Sedimentation is heavily influenced by streaming which may (1) hasten or slow the velocity of amyloplast movement and (2) displace the plastid laterally or even upwards before or after sedimentation. Amyloplasts may move through transvacuolar strands or through the peripheral cytoplasm which may be divided into fine cytoplasmic strands of much smaller diameter than the plastids. The results indicate that streaming may contribute to the dynamics of graviperception by influencing amyloplast movement.

  20. Life as a moving fluid: fate of cytoplasmic macromolecules in dynamic fungal syncytia

    PubMed Central

    Roper, Marcus; Lee, ChangHwan; Hickey, Patrick C.; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    In fungal syncytia dozens, or even millions of nuclei may coexist in a single connected cytoplasm. Recent discoveries have exposed some of the adaptations that enable fungi to marshall these nuclei to produce complex coordinated behaviors, including cell growth, nuclear division, secretion and communication. In addition to shedding light on the principles by which syncytia (including embryos and osteoplasts) are organized, fungal adaptations for dealing with internal genetic diversity and physically dynamic cytoplasm may provide mechanistic insights into how cells generally are carved into different functional compartments. In this review we focus on enumerating the physical constraints associated with maintaining macromolecular distributions within a fluctuating and often flowing cytoplasmic interior. PMID:26226449

  1. Geologic Map of the Mylitta Fluctus Quadrangle (V-61), Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Head, James W., III

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Magellan Mission The Magellan spacecraft orbited Venus from August 10, 1990, until it plunged into the Venusian atmosphere on October 12, 1994. Magellan Mission objectives included: (1) improving knowledge of the geological processes, surface properties, and geologic history of Venus by analysis of surface radar characteristics, topography, and morphology, and (2) improving the knowledge of the geophysics of Venus by analysis of Venusian gravity. The Magellan spacecraft carried a 12.6-cm radar system to map the surface of Venus. The transmitter and receiver systems were used to collect three data sets: (1) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the surface, (2) passive microwave thermal emission observations, and (3) measurements of the backscattered power at small angles of incidence, which were processed to yield altimetric data. Radar imaging, altimetric, and radiometric mapping of the Venusian surface was done in mission cycles 1, 2, and 3 from September 1990 until September 1992. Ninety-eight percent of the surface was mapped with radar resolution on the order of 120 meters. The SAR observations were projected to a 75-m nominal horizontal resolution, and these full-resolution data compose the image base used in geologic mapping. The primary polarization mode was horizontal-transmit, horizontal-receive (HH), but additional data for selected areas were collected for the vertical polarization sense. Incidence angles varied between about 20? and 45?. High resolution Doppler tracking of the spacecraft took place from September 1992 through October 1994 (mission cycles 4, 5, 6). Approximately 950 orbits of high-resolution gravity observations were obtained between September 1992 and May 1993 while Magellan was in an elliptical orbit with a periapsis near 175 km and an apoapsis near 8,000 km. An additional 1,500 orbits were obtained following orbit-circularization in mid-1993. These data exist as a 75? by 75? harmonic field.

  2. Molecular probes for identification of pathogenic viruses in mosquitoes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral pathogens that cause disease in mosquitoes belong to three major groups: baculoviruses (DBVs) (Baculoviridae: Deltabaculovirus); iridoviruses (MIVs) (Iridoviridae: Chloriridovirus); and cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPVs) (Reoviridae: Cypovirus). Baculoviruses and iridoviruses are DNA vir...

  3. Current Status of Deltabaculoviruses, Cypoviruses and Chloriridoviruses Pathogenic for Mosquitoes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are a variety of viral pathogens that cause disease in mosquitoes with most belonging to three major groups. The most common viruses of mosquitoes are the baculoviruses (DBVs) (Baculoviridae: Deltabaculovirus), cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPVs) (Reoviridae: Cypovirus) and the iridovirus...

  4. Evolutionary genomics of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Balaji, S; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2006-04-01

    A previous comparative-genomic study of large nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA viruses (NCLDVs) of eukaryotes revealed the monophyletic origin of four viral families: poxviruses, asfarviruses, iridoviruses, and phycodnaviruses [Iyer, L.M., Aravind, L., Koonin, E.V., 2001. Common origin of four diverse families of large eukaryotic DNA viruses. J. Virol. 75 (23), 11720-11734]. Here we update this analysis by including the recently sequenced giant genome of the mimiviruses and several additional genomes of iridoviruses, phycodnaviruses, and poxviruses. The parsimonious reconstruction of the gene complement of the ancestral NCLDV shows that it was a complex virus with at least 41 genes that encoded the replication machinery, up to four RNA polymerase subunits, at least three transcription factors, capping and polyadenylation enzymes, the DNA packaging apparatus, and structural components of an icosahedral capsid and the viral membrane. The phylogeny of the NCLDVs is reconstructed by cladistic analysis of the viral gene complements, and it is shown that the two principal lineages of NCLDVs are comprised of poxviruses grouped with asfarviruses and iridoviruses grouped with phycodnaviruses-mimiviruses. The phycodna-mimivirus grouping was strongly supported by several derived shared characters, which seemed to rule out the previously suggested basal position of the mimivirus [Raoult, D., Audic, S., Robert, C., Abergel, C., Renesto, P., Ogata, H., La Scola, B., Suzan, M., Claverie, J.M. 2004. The 1.2-megabase genome sequence of Mimivirus. Science 306 (5700), 1344-1350]. These results indicate that the divergence of the major NCLDV families occurred at an early stage of evolution, prior to the divergence of the major eukaryotic lineages. It is shown that subsequent evolution of the NCLDV genomes involved lineage-specific expansion of paralogous gene families and acquisition of numerous genes via horizontal gene transfer from the eukaryotic hosts, other viruses, and bacteria

  5. Cytoplasm enhancement operator of peripheral blood smear images that are instable-stained and overexposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xin; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Nucleus and cytoplasm are both essential for white blood cell recognition but the edges of cytoplasm are too blurry to be detected because of instable staining and overexposure. This paper aims at proposing a cytoplasm enhancement operator (CEO) to achieve accurate convergence of the active contour model. The CEO contains two parts. First, a nonlinear over-exposure enhancer map is yielded to correct over-exposure, which suppresses background noise while preserving details and improving contrast. Second, the over-exposed regions of cytoplasm in particular is further enhanced by a tri- modal histogram specification based on the scale-space filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed CEO and its corresponding GVF snake is superior to other unsupervised segmentation approaches.

  6. Novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction in wheat (Triticum aestivum) induces vigorous plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecific hybridization can be considered an accelerator of evolution, otherwise a slow process, solely dependent on mutation and recombination. Upon interspecific hybridization, several novel interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes emerge which provide additional sources of diversi...

  7. Relation Between Basophilia and Fine Structure of Cytoplasm in the Fungus Allomyces macrogynus Em

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Benigna; Turian, Gilbert

    1960-01-01

    In a fungus, Allomyces macrogynus Em., staining tests have revealed changes in the location of cytoplasmic basophilia following different phases of the developmental cycle. These variations in location were used to observe which fine structures correspond to basophile and non-basophile areas of the cytoplasm. Hyphae, gametangia, zygotes, and plants were fixed at various developmental stages in OsO4, pH 6.1, and embedded in vestopal. Sections were examined in the electron microscope. Comparison of basophile and non-basophile cytoplasms leads to the conclusion that cytoplasmic particles of 150 to 200 A in diameter are responsible for basophilia. The possibility of these particles being ribosomes is discussed and confirmed. The present paper also describes some observations on the fine structure of other cellular components of this fungus, such as nuclei, mitochondria, various granules, and flagella. PMID:13801597

  8. Hybridization using cytoplasmic male sterility and herbicide tolerance from nuclear genes

    SciTech Connect

    Beversdorf, W.D.; Erickson, L.R.; Grant, I.

    1987-04-14

    An improved process is described for producing a substantially homogeneous population of plants of a predetermined hybrid variety of a crop which is capable of undergoing both self-pollination and cross-pollination. This process comprises: growing in a first planting area a substantially random population of cytoplasmic male sterile plants which exhibit tolerance to at least one herbicide attributable solely to homozygous dominant nuclear genes, and male fertile plants which are capable of pollinating the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and which lack the herbicide tolerance because the presence of homozygous recessive nuclear genes for such trait. The cytoplasmic male sterile plants and the male fertile plants are pollinated with pollen derived from the male fertile plants. Seed is formed on the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and on the male fertile plants. Harvesting in bulk the seed is formed on the plants of the first planting area.

  9. Nonlinearity in cytoplasm viscosity can generate an essential symmetry breaking in cellular behaviors.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Masashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The cytoplasms of ameboid cells are nonlinearly viscous. The cell controls this viscosity by modulating the amount, localization and interactions of bio-polymers. Here we investigated how the nonlinearity infers the cellular behaviors and whether nonlinearity-specific behaviors exist. We modeled the developed plasmodium of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum as a network of branching tubes and examined the linear and nonlinear viscous cytoplasm flows in the tubes. We found that the nonlinearity in the cytoplasm׳s viscosity induces a novel type of symmetry breaking in the protoplasmic flow. We also show that symmetry breaking can play an important role in adaptive behaviors, namely, connection of behavioral modes implemented on different time scales and transportation of molecular signals from the front to the rear of the cell during cellular locomotion. PMID:25261729

  10. The microtubule nucleation activity of centrobin in both the centrosome and cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Wonjung; Yu, Nam-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Centrobin resides in daughter centriole and play a critical role in centriole duplication. Nucleation and stabilization of microtubules are known biological activities of centrobin. Here, we report a specific localization of centrobin outside the centrosome. Centrobin was associated with the stable microtubules. In hippocampal cells, centrobin formed cytoplasmic dots in addition to the localization at both centrosomes with the mother and daughter centrioles. Such specific localization pattern suggests that cytoplasmic centrobin is not just a reserved pool for centrosomal localization but also has a specific role in the cytoplasm. In fact, centrobin enhanced microtubule formation outside as well as inside the centrosome. These results propose specific roles of the cytoplasmic centrobin for noncentrosomal microtubule formation in specific cell types and during the cell cycle. PMID:26083938

  11. Beyond Histone and Deacetylase: An Overview of Cytoplasmic Histone Deacetylases and Their Nonhistone Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysines is a prominent form of modification in mammalian proteins. Deacetylation of proteins is catalyzed by histone deacetylases, traditionally named after their role in histone deacetylation, transcriptional modulation, and epigenetic regulation. Despite the link between histone deacetylases and chromatin structure, some of the histone deacetylases reside in various compartments in the cytoplasm. Here, we review how these cytoplasmic histone deacetylases are regulated, the identification of nonhistone substrates, and the functional implications of their nondeacetylase enzymatic activities. PMID:21234400

  12. Mitochondrial import of a cytoplasmic lysine-tRNA in yeast is mediated by cooperation of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial lysyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Tarassov, I; Entelis, N; Martin, R P

    1995-01-01

    Cytoplasmic tRNA(Lys)CUU is the only nuclear-encoded tRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae found to be associated with mitochondria. Selective import of this tRNA into isolated organelles requires cytoplasmic factors. Here we identify two of these factors as the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial lysyl-tRNA synthetases. The cytoplasmic enzyme is obligatory for in vitro import of the deacylated, but not of the aminoacylated tRNA. We thus infer that it is needed for aminoacylation of the tRNA, which is a prerequisite for its import. The mitochondrial synthetase, which cannot aminoacylate tRN(Lys)CUU, is required for import of both aminoacylated and deacylated forms. Its depletion leads to a total arrest of tRNA import, in vitro and in vivo. The mitochondrial lysyl-tRNA synthetase is able to form specific and stable RNP complexes with the amino-acylated tRNA. Furthermore, an N-terminal truncated form of the synthetase which cannot be targeted into mitochondria is unable to direct the import of the tRNA. We therefore hypothesize that the cytosolic precursor form of the mitochondrial synthetase has a carrier function for translocation of the tRNA across the mitochondrial membranes. However, cooperation of the two synthetases is not sufficient to direct tRNA import, suggesting the need of additional factor(s). Images PMID:7628447

  13. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui; Wen, Jin-kun

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  14. The bacterial cytoplasm has glass-like properties and is fluidized by metabolic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Brad; Surovtsev, Ivan; Cabeen, Matthew; O'Hern, Corey; Dufresne, Eric; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-03-01

    In eukaryotes, active transport involves motor proteins and cytoskeletal filaments. In contrast, bacteria (which lack cytoskeletal motor proteins) are thought to rely on diffusion for molecular transport, though the physical properties of the bacterial cytoplasm are poorly understood. Through single particle tracking of foreign particles of different sizes, we have found that the bacterial cytoplasm exhibits striking similarities to glass-forming liquids. Glass-forming liquids are noted for their metastability near the glass transition where their behavior changes from liquid-like to amorphous solid with even small perturbations. Particles of different sizes exhibit distinct dynamics and their mobility changes from fluid-like to glassy with increasing size. This size dependency provides an explanation for previous reports of both normal and anomalous diffusion in the bacterial cytoplasm. Moreover, we find that cellular metabolism attenuates the glassy properties of the bacterial cytoplasm. As a result, components that would otherwise be caged in narrow regions of confinement are able to explore the cytoplasmic space under metabolically active conditions. These findings have broad implications for our understanding of bacterial physiology as the glassy behavior of the cytoplasm impacts all intracellular processes involving large cellular components. Supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  15. Spatial regulation of cytoplasmic snRNP assembly at the cellular level

    PubMed Central

    Hyjek, Malwina; Wojciechowska, Natalia; Rudzka, Magda; Kołowerzo-Lubnau, Agnieszka; Smoliński, Dariusz Jan

    2015-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) play a crucial role in pre-mRNA splicing in all eukaryotic cells. In contrast to the relatively broad knowledge on snRNP assembly within the nucleus, the spatial organization of the cytoplasmic stages of their maturation remains poorly understood. Nevertheless, sparse research indicates that, similar to the nuclear steps, the crucial processes of cytoplasmic snRNP assembly may also be strictly spatially regulated. In European larch microsporocytes, it was determined that the cytoplasmic assembly of snRNPs within a cell might occur in two distinct spatial manners, which depend on the rate of de novo snRNP formation in relation to the steady state of these particles within the nucleus. During periods of moderate expression of splicing elements, the cytoplasmic assembly of snRNPs occurred diffusely throughout the cytoplasm. Increased expression of both Sm proteins and U snRNA triggered the accumulation of these particles within distinct, non-membranous RNP-rich granules, which are referred to as snRNP-rich cytoplasmic bodies. PMID:26320237

  16. Studies on maternal inheritance in polyploid wheats with cytoplasmic DNAs as genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Vedel, F; Quetier, F; Cauderon, Y; Dosba, F; Doussinault, G

    1981-07-01

    Restriction fragment patterns of DNA fragments obtained after EcoRI cleavage of chloroplastic (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) DNAs isolated from different wheat species were compared. T. aestivum, T. timopheevi, Ae. speltoides, Ae. sharonensis and T. urartu gave species specific mt DNA patterns. Consequently, the cytoplasmic genomes of wheat cannot have originated from contemporary Ae. speltoides, Ae. sharonensis and T. urartu species. It is shown that cp and mt DNAs of Ae. ventricosa, a tetraploid used to transfer eyespot resistance into T. aestivum, contains cp and mt DNAs differing from DNAs isolated from T. aestivum and other wheats. In contrast, the cytoplasmic DNAs of Ae. ventricosa and Ae. squarrosa reveal an important homology, suggesting that Ae. squarrosa was the female parent of Ae. ventricosa. Disomic addition lines (T. aestivum - Ae. ventricosa) in both Ae. ventricosa cytoplasm and T. aestivum cytoplasm contained cytoplasmic DNAs identical to those of the maternal parent. Restriction patterns of the cp and mt DNAs isolated from eight lines of Triticale differing in their cytoplasm have been compared to those of the maternal parent. A strict maternal inheritance has been observed in each case. PMID:24276485

  17. Evaluation of line and breed of cytoplasm effects on performance of purebred Brangus cattle.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, G A; Taylor, J F; Sanders, J O; Thallman, R M

    1994-11-01

    Substantial differences between reciprocally crossed Bos taurus x Bos indicus calves for birth, weaning, and yearling weights have been reported. To determine whether cytoplasmic inheritance is responsible for a portion of these differences, field records for birth and weaning weight (n = 7,353) and postweaning average daily gain (n = 2,746) from registered Brangus calves were analyzed. An animal model that included maternal effects was fit for each trait. Breed of cytoplasmic origin was fit as a fixed effect and coded as Angus, Brahman, or unknown. Cytoplasmic line within each breed of origin was treated as a random effect. Variance components for random effects were estimated using derivative-free REML procedures. Line of cytoplasm accounted for less than .002% of the phenotypic variance in all three traits. Estimates for cytoplasmic breed of origin effects were small in magnitude, and contrasts tested (Angus vs Brahman and Angus vs Unknown) were not significant (P > .10). Estimates of heritability of direct (maternal) effects were .36 (.20), .41 (.27), and .21 (.08) for birth weight, weaning weight, and postweaning average daily gain, respectively. Estimates of genetic correlations between direct and maternal effects ranged from -.27 for postweaning average daily gain to -.58 for birth weight. No evidence for breed or line within breed of cytoplasmic origin effects was detected in these data. PMID:7730171

  18. Novel origin of lamin-derived cytoplasmic intermediate filaments in tardigrades

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Lars; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Reichelt, Julian; Magin, Thomas M; Mayer, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins, including nuclear lamins and cytoplasmic IF proteins, are essential cytoskeletal components of bilaterian cells. Despite their important role in protecting tissues against mechanical force, no cytoplasmic IF proteins have been convincingly identified in arthropods. Here we show that the ancestral cytoplasmic IF protein gene was lost in the entire panarthropod (onychophoran + tardigrade + arthropod) rather than arthropod lineage and that nuclear, lamin-derived proteins instead acquired new cytoplasmic roles at least three times independently in collembolans, copepods, and tardigrades. Transcriptomic and genomic data revealed three IF protein genes in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, one of which (cytotardin) occurs exclusively in the cytoplasm of epidermal and foregut epithelia, where it forms belt-like filaments around each epithelial cell. These results suggest that a lamin derivative has been co-opted to enhance tissue stability in tardigrades, a function otherwise served by cytoplasmic IF proteins in all other bilaterians. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11117.001 PMID:26840051

  19. Cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs are frequently bound to and degraded at ribosomes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Carlevaro-Fita, Joana; Rahim, Anisa; Guigó, Roderic; Vardy, Leah A; Johnson, Rory

    2016-06-01

    Recent footprinting studies have made the surprising observation that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) physically interact with ribosomes. However, these findings remain controversial, and the overall proportion of cytoplasmic lncRNAs involved is unknown. Here we make a global, absolute estimate of the cytoplasmic and ribosome-associated population of stringently filtered lncRNAs in a human cell line using polysome profiling coupled to spike-in normalized microarray analysis. Fifty-four percent of expressed lncRNAs are detected in the cytoplasm. The majority of these (70%) have >50% of their cytoplasmic copies associated with polysomal fractions. These interactions are lost upon disruption of ribosomes by puromycin. Polysomal lncRNAs are distinguished by a number of 5' mRNA-like features, including capping and 5'UTR length. On the other hand, nonpolysomal "free cytoplasmic" lncRNAs have more conserved promoters and a wider range of expression across cell types. Exons of polysomal lncRNAs are depleted of endogenous retroviral insertions, suggesting a role for repetitive elements in lncRNA localization. Finally, we show that blocking of ribosomal elongation results in stabilization of many associated lncRNAs. Together these findings suggest that the ribosome is the default destination for the majority of cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs and may play a role in their degradation. PMID:27090285

  20. [Variation of the cytoplasm type in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) upon inbreeding. The influence of hybridization].

    PubMed

    Veprev, S G; Khvorostov, I B; Dymshits, G M

    2003-06-01

    Hybrid combinations of inbred sugar beet lines that undergo conversion of N-cytoplasm into S-state were screened for the marker mitochondrial genes atpA and atp6. The involvement of nuclear factors into cytoplasm conversion and possible identity of these factors in different lines have been studied. The cytoplasm conversion factor was localized to nucleus. In different lines with cytoplasm conversion, the nuclear conversion factors are not identical. The state of the mitochondrial genome is normalized after outcrosses with plants having the stable cytoplasm. PMID:12884519

  1. Cytoplasmic Kaiso is associated with poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Kaiso has been identified as a new member of the POZ-zinc finger family of transcription factors that are implicated in development and cancer. Although controversy still exists, Kaiso is supposed to be involved in human cancer. However, there is limited information regarding the clinical significance of cytoplasmic/nuclear Kaiso in human lung cancer. Methods In this study, immunohistochemical studies were performed on 20 cases of normal lung tissues and 294 cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including 50 cases of paired lymph node metastases and 88 cases with complete follow-up records. Three lung cancer cell lines showing primarily nuclear localization of Kaiso were selected to examine whether roles of Kaiso in cytoplasm and in nucleus are identical. Nuclear Kaiso was down-regulated by shRNA technology or addition a specific Kaiso antibody in these cell lines. The proliferative and invasive abilities were evaluated by MTT and Matrigel invasive assay, transcription of Kaiso's target gene matrilysin was detected by RT-PCR. Results Kaiso was primarily expressed in the cytoplasm of lung cancer tissues. Overall positive cytoplasmic expression rate was 63.61% (187/294). The positive cytoplasmic expression of Kaiso was higher in advanced TNM stages (III+IV) of NSCLC, compared to lower stages (I+II) (p = 0.019). A correlation between cytoplasmic Kaiso expression and lymph node metastasis was found (p = 0.003). In 50 paired cases, cytoplasmic expression of Kaiso was 78.0% (41/50) in primary sites and 90.0% (45/50) in lymph node metastases (p = 0.001). The lung cancer-related 5-year survival rate was significantly lower in patients who were cytoplasmic Kaiso-positive (22.22%), compared to those with cytoplasmic Kaiso-negative tumors (64.00%) (p = 0.005). Nuclear Kaiso staining was seen in occasional cases with only a 5.10% (15/294) positive rate and was not associated with any clinicopathological features of NSCLC. Furthermore, after the down

  2. Cytoplasmic Cyclin E and Phospho-Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Are Biomarkers of Aggressive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Cansu; Biernacka, Anna; Bui, Tuyen; Sahin, Aysegul A; Yi, Min; Akli, Said; Schafer, Jolie; Alexander, Angela; Adjapong, Opoku; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin E and its co-activator, phospho-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (p-CDK2), regulate G1 to S phase transition and their deregulation induces oncogenesis. Immunohistochemical assessments of these proteins in cancer have been reported but were based only on their nuclear expression. However, the oncogenic forms of cyclin E (low molecular weight cyclin E or LMW-E) in complex with CDK2 are preferentially mislocalized to the cytoplasm. Here, we used separate nuclear and cytoplasmic scoring systems for both cyclin E and p-CDK2 expression to demonstrate altered cellular accumulation of these proteins using immunohistochemical analysis. We examined the specificity of different cyclin E antibodies and evaluated their concordance between immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses in a panel of 14 breast cell lines. Nuclear versus cytoplasmic staining of cyclin E readily differentiated full-length from LMW-E, respectively. We also evaluated the expression of cyclin E and p-CDK2 in 1676 breast carcinoma patients by immunohistochemistry. Cytoplasmic cyclin E correlated strongly with cytoplasmic p-CDK2 (P < 0.0001), high tumor grade, negative estrogen/progesterone receptor status, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positivity (all P < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, cytoplasmic cyclin E plus phosphorylated CDK2 (as one variable) predicted breast cancer recurrence-free and overall survival. These results suggest that cytoplasmic cyclin E and p-CDK2 can be readily detected with immunohistochemistry and used as clinical biomarkers for aggressive breast cancer. PMID:27182644

  3. Cytoplasmic SET induces tau hyperphosphorylation through a decrease of methylated phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The neuronal cytoplasmic localization of SET, an inhibitor of the phosphatase 2A (PP2A), results in tau hyperphosphorylation in the brains of Alzheimer patients through mechanisms that are still not well defined. Results We used primary neurons and mouse brain slices to show that SET is translocated to the cytoplasm in a manner independent of both its cleavage and over-expression. The localization of SET in the cytoplasm, either by the translocation of endogenous SET or by internalization of the recombinant full-length SET protein, induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Cytoplasmic recombinant full-length SET in mouse brain slices induced a decrease of PP2A activity through a decrease of methylated PP2A levels. The levels of methylated PP2A were negatively correlated with tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser-202 but not with the abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-422. Conclusions The presence of full-length SET in the neuronal cytoplasm is sufficient to impair PP2A methylation and activity, leading to tau hyperphosphorylation. In addition, our data suggest that tau hyperphosphorylation is regulated by different mechanisms at distinct sites. The translocation of SET to the neuronal cytoplasm, the low activity of PP2A, and tau hyperphosphorylation are associated in the brains of Alzheimer patients. Our data show a link between the translocation of SET in the cytoplasm and the decrease of methylated PP2A levels leading to a decrease of PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation. This chain of events may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. PMID:24981783

  4. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-06-19

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl(-) ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl(-) flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl(-). The location of these Cl(-)-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  5. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl− and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl− ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl− ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl− permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl− flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl−. The location of these Cl−-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl− ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl− ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  6. In situ calibration of nucleoplasmic versus cytoplasmic Ca²+ concentration in adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ljubojević, Senka; Walther, Stefanie; Asgarzoei, Mojib; Sedej, Simon; Pieske, Burkert; Kockskämper, Jens

    2011-05-18

    Quantification of subcellularly resolved Ca²⁺ signals in cardiomyocytes is essential for understanding Ca²⁺ fluxes in excitation-contraction and excitation-transcription coupling. The properties of fluorescent indicators in intracellular compartments may differ, thus affecting the translation of Ca²⁺-dependent fluorescence changes into [Ca²⁺] changes. Therefore, we determined the in situ characteristics of a frequently used Ca²⁺ indicator, Fluo-4, and a ratiometric Ca²⁺ indicator, Asante Calcium Red, and evaluated their use for reporting and quantifying cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic Ca²⁺ signals in isolated cardiomyocytes. Ca²⁺ calibration curves revealed significant differences in the apparent Ca²⁺ dissociation constants of Fluo-4 and Asante Calcium Red between cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. These parameters were used for transformation of fluorescence into nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic [Ca²⁺]. Resting and diastolic [Ca²⁺] were always higher in the nucleoplasm. Systolic [Ca²⁺] was usually higher in the cytoplasm, but some cells (15%) exhibited higher systolic [Ca²⁺] in the nucleoplasm. Ca²⁺ store depletion or blockade of Ca²⁺ leak pathways eliminated the resting [Ca²⁺] gradient between nucleoplasm and cytoplasm, whereas inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors by 2-APB reversed it. The results suggest the presence of significant nucleoplasmic-to-cytoplasmic [Ca²⁺] gradients in resting myocytes and during the cardiac cycle. Nucleoplasmic [Ca²⁺] in cardiomyocytes may be regulated via two mechanisms: diffusion from the cytoplasm and active Ca²⁺ release via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors from perinuclear Ca²⁺ stores. PMID:21575569

  7. Detection of cytoplasmic and surface membrane markers in cells of some human hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Babusíková, O; Kusenda, J; Glasová, M

    1992-01-01

    The cells of some human leukemia-lymphoma T cell lines (JURKAT, MOLT4), B cell lines (DAUDI, U-266) and of myeloid U-937 cell line were characterized for their surface membrane and cytoplasmic marker profiles. The usefulness of some fixation and permeabilization methods of cell membrane for detection of cytoplasmic markers by flow cytometry was studied. The methods of cell fixation in suspension were found to be more sensitive than the methods of cell fixation in smears. With the very short buffered formaldehyde-acetone (BFA) fixation used in this study an optimal penetration of the monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) through the plasma membrane and specific binding to the appropriate structures were achieved. CD22 antigen was detected in cytoplasm but not on membrane of DAUDI cells. In another B cell line, U-266, CD22 antigen was present both in cell membrane and cytoplasm. The marker corresponding to anti-CD19 MoAb was detected in cytoplasm but was absent on membrane of U-266 cells. Furthermore, the antigen estimated by anti-CD3 MoAb could be detected intracellularly in cells of both T cell lines tested, while it was absent on cell membrane of these cells. The phenotypic study of U-937 cells showed that the majority of cells expressed myeloid associated antigens. In our study the CD14 marker detected on cell surface membrane of U-937 cells was missing in their cytoplasm. The surface antigens remained intact after BFA fixation enabling a simultaneous detection of membrane and cytoplasmic markers in double immunofluorescence studies. Through this combination of markers minor cell populations could be detected. Human hematopoietic cell lines could serve as a reliable model system for a rapid and quantitative immunodiagnosis. PMID:1491722

  8. Faint electric treatment-induced rapid and efficient delivery of extraneous hydrophilic molecules into the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mahadi; Nishimoto, Akinori; Ohgita, Takashi; Hama, Susumu; Kashida, Hiromu; Asanuma, Hiroyuki; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-04-28

    Effective delivery of extraneous molecules into the cytoplasm of the target cells is important for several drug therapies. Previously, we showed effective in vivo transdermal delivery of naked siRNA into skin cells induced by faint electric treatment (ET) iontophoresis, and significant suppression of target mRNA levels (Kigasawa et al., Int. J. Pharm., 2010). This result indicates that electricity promoted the delivery of siRNA into cytoplasm. In the present study, we analyzed the intracellular delivery of naked anti-luciferase siRNA by faint ET, and found that the luciferase activity of cells expressing luciferase was reduced by in vitro ET like in vivo iontophoresis. Cellular uptake of fluorescent-label siRNA was increased by ET, while low temperature exposure, macropinocytosis inhibitor amiloride and caveolae-mediated endocytosis inhibitor filipin significantly prevented siRNA uptake. These results indicate that the cellular uptake mechanism involved endocytosis. In addition, voltage sensitive fluorescent dye DiBAC4 (3) penetration was increased by ET, and the transient receptor potential channel inhibitor SKF96365 reduced siRNA uptake, suggesting that faint ET reduced membrane potentials by changing intracellular ion levels. Moreover, to analyze cytoplasmic delivery, we used in-stem molecular beacon (ISMB), which fluoresces upon binding to target mRNA in the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, cytoplasmic ISMB fluorescence appeared rapidly and homogeneously after ET, indicating that cytoplasmic delivery is markedly enhanced by ET. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that faint ET can enhance cellular uptake and cytoplasmic delivery of extraneous molecules. PMID:26944781

  9. Cytoplasmic Acidification and Secondary Metabolite Production in Different Plant Cell Suspensions (A Comparative Study).

    PubMed Central

    Hagendoorn, MJM.; Wagner, A. M.; Segers, G.; Van Der Plas, LHW.; Oostdam, A.; Van Walraven, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, a correlation is described between low cytoplasmic pH, measured with the fluorescent probes 2[prime],7[prime]-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (acetoxymethyl ester) and bis- [3-propyl-5-oxoisoxazol-4-yl]pentamethine oxonol, and the production of secondary metabolites for several plant cell-suspension systems. Anthraquinone production in Morinda citrifolia suspensions is negligible in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), whereas with naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) a significant accumulation is realized. NAA-grown cells showed a lower cytoplasmic pH than did 2,4-D-grown cells. Addition of 2,4-D or parachlorophenoxy acetic acid to NAA-grown cells resulted in an inhibition of anthraquinone production and an increase of the cytoplasmic pH, whereas addition of parachlorophenyl acetic acid had no effect on either parameter. Lignin production in Petunia hybrida cells could be induced by subculturing them in a medium without iron. These cells showed a lower cytoplasmic pH than control cells. Addition of Fe3+ led to a decreased lignin content and an increased cytoplasmic pH. Two cell lines of Linum flavum showed a different level of coniferin and lignin concentration in their cells. Cells that accumulated coniferin and lignin had a lower cytoplasmic pH than cells that did not accumulate these secondary metabolites. Apparently, in different species and after different kinds of treatment there is a correlation between acidification of the cytoplasm and the production of different secondary metabolites. The possible role of this acidification in secondary metabolite production is discussed. PMID:12232364

  10. Detection of gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming in Chara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, M. P.; Wayne, R.; Leopold, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gravity induces a polarity of cytoplasmic streaming in vertically-oriented internodal cells of characean algae. The motive force that powers cytoplasmic streaming is generated at the ectoplasmic/endoplasmic interface. The velocity of streaming, which is about 100 micrometers/s at this interface, decreases with distance from the interface on either side of the cell to 0 micrometers/s near the middle. Therefore, when discussing streaming velocity it is necessary to specify the tangential plane through the cell in which streaming is being measured. This is easily done with a moderate resolution light microscope (which has a lateral resolution of 0.6 micrometers and a depth of field of 1.4 micrometers), but is obscured when using any low resolution technique, such as low magnification light microscopy or laser Doppler spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of gravity on the polarity of cytoplasmic streaming declines with increasing physiological age of isolated cells. Using a classical mechanical analysis, we show that the effect of gravity on the polarity of cytoplasmic streaming cannot result from the effect of gravity acting directly on individual cytoplasmic particles. We suggest that gravity may best be perceived by the entire cell at the plasma membrane-extracellular matrix junction.

  11. A structural basis for integrin activation by the cytoplasmic tail of the αIIb-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Olga; Haas, Tom; Plow, Edward F.; Qin, Jun

    2000-01-01

    A key step in the activation of heterodimeric integrin adhesion receptors is the transmission of an agonist-induced cellular signal from the short α- and/or β-cytoplasmic tails to the extracellular domains of the receptor. The structural details of how the cytoplasmic tails mediate such an inside-out signaling process remain unclear. We report herein the NMR structures of a membrane-anchored cytoplasmic tail of the αIIb-subunit and of a mutant αIIb-cytoplasmic tail that renders platelet integrin αIIbβ3 constitutively active. The structure of the wild-type αIIb-cytoplasmic tail reveals a “closed” conformation where the highly conserved N-terminal membrane-proximal region forms an α-helix followed by a turn, and the acidic C-terminal loop interacts with the N-terminal helix. The structure of the active mutant is significantly different, having an “open” conformation where the interactions between the N-terminal helix and C-terminal region are abolished. Consistent with these structural differences, the two peptides differ in function: the wild-type peptide suppressed αIIbβ3 activation, whereas the mutant peptide did not. These results provide an atomic explanation for extensive biochemical/mutational data and support a conformation-based “on/off switch” model for integrin activation. PMID:10677482

  12. Export of Precursor tRNAIle from the Nucleus to the Cytoplasm in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Mi; Niu, Meijuan; Seif, Elias; Kleiman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In the current concept, tRNA maturation in vertebrate cells, including splicing of introns, trimming of 5' leader and 3' trailer, and adding of CCA, is thought to occur exclusively in the nucleus. Here we provide evidence to challenge this concept. Unspliced intron-containing precursor tRNAIle was identified in Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions, which are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Northern blot, confocal microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR further verified enrichment of this unspliced tRNAIle within the cytoplasm in human cells. In addition to containing an intron, the cytoplasmic precursor tRNAIle also contains a short incompletely processed 5´ leader and a 3´ trailer, which abundance is around 1000 fold higher than the nuclear precursor tRNAIle with long 5' leader and long 3' trailer. In vitro data also suggest that the cytoplasmic unspliced end-immature precursor tRNAIle could be processed by short isoform of RNase Z, but not long isoform of RNase Z. These data suggest that precursor tRNAs could export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in human cells, instead of be processed only in the nucleus. PMID:27101286

  13. Cytoplasmic Sequestration of Rel Proteins by IκBα Requires CRM1-Dependent Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Winnie F.; Lee, Linda H.; Davis, Laura; Sen, Ranjan

    2000-01-01

    Rel and IκB protein families form a complex cellular regulatory network. A major regulatory function of IκB proteins is to retain Rel proteins in the cell cytoplasm. In addition, IκB proteins have also been postulated to serve nuclear functions. These include the maintenance of inducible NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, as well as termination of inducible transcription. We show that IκBα shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, utilizing the nuclear export receptor CRM1. A CRM1-binding export sequence was identified in the N-terminal domain of IκBα but not in that of IκBβ or IκBɛ. By reconstituting major aspects of NF-κB–IκB sequestration in yeast, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic retention of p65 (also called RelA) by IκBα requires Crm1p-dependent nuclear export. In mammalian cells, inhibition of CRM1 by leptomycin B resulted in nuclear localization of cotransfected p65 and IκBα in COS cells and enhanced nuclear relocation of endogenous p65 in T cells. These observations suggest that the main function of IκBα is that of a nuclear export chaperone rather than a cytoplasmic tether. We propose that the nucleus is the major site of p65-IκBα association, from where these complexes must be exported in order to create the cytoplasmic pool. PMID:10688673

  14. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic spindle positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Rahimian, Abtin; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for asymmetric cell division and generating cell diversity during development. We use dynamic simulations to study the cytoplasmic flows generated by three possible active forcing mechanisms involved in positioning of the mitotic spindle in the first cell division of C.elegans embryo namely cortical pulling, cortical pushing, and cytoplasmic pulling mechanisms. The numerical platform we have developed for simulating cytoskeletal assemblies is the first to incorporate the interactions between the fibers and other intracellular bodies with the cytoplasmic fluid, while also accounting for their polymerization, and interactions with motor proteins. The hydrodynamic interactions are computed using boundary integral methods in Stokes flow coupled with highly efficient fast summation techniques that reduce the computational cost to scale linearly with the number of fibers and other bodies. We show that although all three force transduction mechanisms predict proper positioning and orientation of the mitotic spindle, each model produces a different signature in its induced cytoplasmic flow and MT conformation. We suggest that cytoplasmic flows and MT conformation can be used to differentiate between these mechanisms.

  15. Cytoplasmic calcium levels in protoplasts from the cap and elongation zone of maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, H. G.; Evans, M. L.; Johnson, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium has been implicated as a key component in the signal transduction process of root gravitropism. We measured cytoplasmic free calcium in protoplasts isolated from the elongation zone and cap of primary roots of light-grown, vertically oriented seedlings of Zea mays L. Protoplasts were loaded with the penta-potassium salts of fura-2 and indo-1 by incubation in acidic solutions of these calcium indicators. Loading increased with decreasing pH but the pH dependence was stronger for indo-1 than for fura-2. In the case of fura-2, loading was enhanced only at the lowest pH (4.5) tested. Dyes loaded in this manner were distributed predominantly in the cytoplasm as indicated by fluorescence patterns. As an alternative method of loading, protoplasts were incubated with the acetoxymethylesters of fura-2 and indo-1. Protoplasts loaded by this method exhibited fluorescence both in the cytoplasm and in association with various organelles. Cytoplasmic calcium levels measured using spectrofluorometry, were found to be 160 +/- 40 nM and 257 +/- 27 nM, respectively, in populations of protoplasts from the root cap and elongation zone. Cytoplasmic free calcium did not increase upon addition of calcium to the incubation medium, indicating that the passive permeability to calcium was low.

  16. Bayesian Inference of Forces Causing Cytoplasmic Streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos and Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Nagao, Hiromichi; Kitajima, Tomoya S; Hufnagel, Lars; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2016-01-01

    Cellular structures are hydrodynamically interconnected, such that force generation in one location can move distal structures. One example of this phenomenon is cytoplasmic streaming, whereby active forces at the cell cortex induce streaming of the entire cytoplasm. However, it is not known how the spatial distribution and magnitude of these forces move distant objects within the cell. To address this issue, we developed a computational method that used cytoplasm hydrodynamics to infer the spatial distribution of shear stress at the cell cortex induced by active force generators from experimentally obtained flow field of cytoplasmic streaming. By applying this method, we determined the shear-stress distribution that quantitatively reproduces in vivo flow fields in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos and mouse oocytes during meiosis II. Shear stress in mouse oocytes were predicted to localize to a narrower cortical region than that with a high cortical flow velocity and corresponded with the localization of the cortical actin cap. The predicted patterns of pressure gradient in both species were consistent with species-specific cytoplasmic streaming functions. The shear-stress distribution inferred by our method can contribute to the characterization of active force generation driving biological streaming. PMID:27472658

  17. Export of Precursor tRNAIle from the Nucleus to the Cytoplasm in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Mi; Niu, Meijuan; Seif, Elias; Kleiman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In the current concept, tRNA maturation in vertebrate cells, including splicing of introns, trimming of 5’ leader and 3’ trailer, and adding of CCA, is thought to occur exclusively in the nucleus. Here we provide evidence to challenge this concept. Unspliced intron-containing precursor tRNAIle was identified in Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions, which are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Northern blot, confocal microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR further verified enrichment of this unspliced tRNAIle within the cytoplasm in human cells. In addition to containing an intron, the cytoplasmic precursor tRNAIle also contains a short incompletely processed 5´ leader and a 3´ trailer, which abundance is around 1000 fold higher than the nuclear precursor tRNAIle with long 5’ leader and long 3’ trailer. In vitro data also suggest that the cytoplasmic unspliced end-immature precursor tRNAIle could be processed by short isoform of RNase Z, but not long isoform of RNase Z. These data suggest that precursor tRNAs could export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in human cells, instead of be processed only in the nucleus. PMID:27101286

  18. Enhanced electroporation in plant tissues via low frequency pulsed electric fields: influence of cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Asavasanti, Suvaluk; Stroeve, Pieter; Barrett, Diane M; Jernstedt, Judith A; Ristenpart, William D

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) are known to be effective at permeabilizing plant tissues. Prior research has demonstrated that lower pulse frequencies induce higher rates of permeabilization, but the underlying reason for this response is unclear. Intriguingly, recent microscopic observations with onion tissues have also revealed a correlation between PEF frequency and the subsequent speed of intracellular convective motion, i.e., cytoplasmic streaming. In this paper, we investigate the effect of cytoplasmic streaming on the efficacy of plant tissue permeabilization via PEF. Onion tissue samples were treated with Cytochalasin B, a known inhibitor of cytoplasmic streaming, and changes in cellular integrity and viability were measured over a wide range of frequencies and field strengths. We find that at low frequencies (f < 1 Hz), the absence of cytoplasmic streaming results in a 19% decrease in the conductivity disintegration index compared with control samples. Qualitatively, similar results were observed using a microscopic cell viability assay. The results suggest that at low frequencies convection plays a statistically significant role in distributing more conductive fluid throughout the tissue, making subsequent pulses more efficacious. The key practical implication is that PEF pretreatment at low frequency can increase the rate of tissue permeabilization in dehydration or extraction processes, and that the treatment will be most effective when cytoplasmic streaming is most active, i.e., with freshly prepared plant tissues. PMID:22246974

  19. Molecular analyses of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions affecting plant growth and yield. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, K.J.

    1998-11-01

    Mitochondria have a central role in the production of cellular energy. The biogenesis and functioning of mitochondria depends on the expression of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. One approach to investigating the role of nuclear-mitochondrial cooperation in plant growth and development is to identify combinations of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that result in altered but sublethal phenotypes. Plants that have certain maize nuclear genotypes in combination with cytoplasmic genomes from more distantly-related teosintes can exhibit incompatible phenotypes, such as reduced plant growth and yield and cytoplasmic male sterility, as well as altered mitochondrial gene expression. The characterization of these nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions was the focus of this grant. The authors were investigating the effects of two maize nuclear genes, RcmI and Mct, on mitochondrial function and gene expression. Plants with the teosinte cytoplasms and homozygous for the recessive rcm allele are small (miniature) and-slow-growing and the kernels are reduced in size. The authors mapped this locus to molecular markers on chromosome 7 and attempted to clone this locus by transposon tagging. The effects of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial protein profiles were also studied.

  20. Cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs are frequently bound to and degraded at ribosomes in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Carlevaro-Fita, Joana; Rahim, Anisa; Guigó, Roderic; Vardy, Leah A.; Johnson, Rory

    2016-01-01

    Recent footprinting studies have made the surprising observation that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) physically interact with ribosomes. However, these findings remain controversial, and the overall proportion of cytoplasmic lncRNAs involved is unknown. Here we make a global, absolute estimate of the cytoplasmic and ribosome-associated population of stringently filtered lncRNAs in a human cell line using polysome profiling coupled to spike-in normalized microarray analysis. Fifty-four percent of expressed lncRNAs are detected in the cytoplasm. The majority of these (70%) have >50% of their cytoplasmic copies associated with polysomal fractions. These interactions are lost upon disruption of ribosomes by puromycin. Polysomal lncRNAs are distinguished by a number of 5′ mRNA-like features, including capping and 5′UTR length. On the other hand, nonpolysomal “free cytoplasmic” lncRNAs have more conserved promoters and a wider range of expression across cell types. Exons of polysomal lncRNAs are depleted of endogenous retroviral insertions, suggesting a role for repetitive elements in lncRNA localization. Finally, we show that blocking of ribosomal elongation results in stabilization of many associated lncRNAs. Together these findings suggest that the ribosome is the default destination for the majority of cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs and may play a role in their degradation. PMID:27090285

  1. Tubulin dynamics during the cytoplasmic cohesiveness cycle in artificially activated sea urchin eggs.

    PubMed

    Coffe, G; Foucault, G; Raymond, M N; Pudles, J

    1983-12-01

    Sedimentation studies and [3H]colchicine-binding assays have demonstrated a relationship between the cytoplasmic cohesiveness cycles and the changes in tubulin organization in Paracentrotus lividus eggs activated by 2.5 mM procaine. The same amount of tubulin (20-25% of the total egg tubulin) is involved in these cyclic process and appears to undergo polymerization and depolymerization cycles. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the microtubules formed during these cytoplasmic cohesiveness cycles are under a particulate form which is sedimentable at low speed. Activation experiments carried out in the presence of cytochalasin B (CB) show that the increase in the cytoplasmic cohesiveness is highly reduced while tubulin polymerization and depolymerization cycles and pronuclear centration are not affected. Although tubulin or actin polymerization can be independently triggered in procaine-activated eggs, the increase in cytoplasmic cohesiveness requires the polymerization of both proteins. However, the cytoplasmic cohesiveness cycles appear to be regulated by tubulin polymerization and depolymerization cycles. PMID:6641809

  2. Detection of beta-tubulin in the cytoplasm of the interphasic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Vargas-Mejía, Miguel Ángel; Díaz-Orea, María Alicia; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Cárdenas-Perea, María Elena; Guerrero-González, Tayde; González-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José

    2016-08-01

    It is known that the microtubules (MT) of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites form an intranuclear mitotic spindle. However, electron microscopy studies and the employment of anti-beta-tubulin (β-tubulin) antibodies have not exhibited these cytoskeletal structures in the cytoplasm of these parasites. The purpose of this work was to detect β-tubulin in the cytoplasm of interphasic E. histolytica trophozoites. Activated or non-activated HMI-IMSS-strain E. histolytica trophozoites were used and cultured for 72 h at 37 °C in TYI-S-33 medium, and then these were incubated with the anti-β-tubulin antibody of E. histolytica. The anti-β-tubulin antibody reacted with the intranuclear mitotic spindle of E. histolytica-activated trophozoites as control. In contrast, in non-activated interphasic parasites, anti-β-tubulin antibody reacted with diverse puntiform structures in the cytoplasm and with ring-shaped structures localized in the cytoplasm, cellular membrane and endocytic stomas. In this work, for the first time, the presence of β-tubulin is shown in the cytoplasm of E. histolytica trophozoites. PMID:27156446

  3. Tunicamycin produces TDP-43 cytoplasmic inclusions in cultured brain organotypic slices.

    PubMed

    Leggett, Cadman; McGehee, Daniel S; Mastrianni, James; Yang, Wenbin; Bai, Tao; Brorson, James R

    2012-06-15

    The cellular distribution of TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is disrupted in several neurodegenerative disorders, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U subtype) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these conditions, TDP-43 is found in neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions, with loss of the normal nuclear expression. The mechanisms leading to TDP-43 redistribution and its role in disease pathophysiology remain unknown. We describe an in vitro neural tissue model that reproduces TDP-43 relocalization and inclusion formation. Two week-old coronal organotypic mouse brain slice cultures were treated with tunicamycin for 7 days. In cortical regions of treated slice cultures, cytoplasmic inclusions of TDP-43 immunoreactivity were observed, with loss of nuclear TDP-43 immunoreactivity. These inclusions were found in both astrocytes and neurons, and were of both skein-like and round morphologies. In contrast, TDP-43 cytoplasmic inclusions were not found in slices treated with staurosporine to induce apoptosis, or with trans-4-carboxy-l-proline (PDC) to induce chronic glutamate excitotoxicity. Furthermore, TDP-43 cytoplasmic inclusions did not co-localize with cleaved caspase-3, suggesting that TDP-43 mislocalization does not generally accompany caspase activation or apoptosis. The induction of TDP-43 cytoplasmic translocation in cerebrocortical slice cultures by tunicamycin provides a platform for further mechanistic investigations of pathological processing of TDP-43. PMID:22459357

  4. Cleavage, incomplete inversion, and cytoplasmic bridges in Gonium pectorale (Volvocales, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Iida, Hitoshi; Ota, Shuhei; Inouye, Isao

    2013-09-01

    Multicellularity arose several times in evolution of eukaryotes. The volvocine algae have full range of colonial organization from unicellular to colonies, and thus these algae are well-known models for examining the evolution and mechanisms of multicellularity. Gonium pectorale is a multicellular species of Volvocales and is thought to be one of the first small colonial organisms among the volvocine algae. In these algae, a cytoplasmic bridge is one of the key traits that arose during the evolution of multicellularity. Here, we observed the inversion process and the cytoplasmic bridges in G. pectorale using time-lapse, fluorescence, and electron microscopy. The cytoplasmic bridges were located in the middle region of the cell in 2-, 4-, 8-, and 16-celled stages and in inversion stages. However, there were no cytoplasmic bridges in the mature adult stage. Cytoplasmic bridges and cortical microtubules in G. pectorale suggest that a mechanism of kinesin-microtubule machinery similar to that in other volvocine algae is responsible for inversion in this species. PMID:23455615

  5. Microspectrofluorometry by digital image processing: measurement of cytoplasmic pH

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasugarn, L.; McNeil, P.; Reynolds, G.T.; Taylor, D.L.

    1984-02-01

    An interface of our microspectrofluorometer with an image processing system performs microspectrofluorometric measurements in living cells by digital image processing. Fluorescence spectroscopic parameters can be measured by digital image processing directly from microscopic images of cells, and are automatically normalized for pathlength and accessible volume. Thus, an accurate cytoplasmic map of various spectroscopic parameters can be produced. The resting cytoplasmic pH of fibroblasts (3T3 cells) has been determined by measuring the ratio of fluorescein fluorescence exited by two successive wavelengths (489 and 452 nm). Fluorescein-labeled dextran microinjected into the cells is used as a pH indicator, since it is trapped in the cytoplasm but is excluded from the nucleus and other organelles. The average cytoplasmic pH is 6.83 (+/- 0.38). However, cytoplasmic pH exhibits a non-unimodal distribution, the lower mean pH being 6.74 (+/- 0.23). When 3T3 cells pinocytose medium containing fluorescein dextran, pinosomes peripheral to the nucleus exhibit a lower pH than those closer to the ruffling edge of the cell. The present image processing system is analyzed for linearity of detection, light scattering artifacts, signal to noise ratio, standard curves, and spatial resolution. The results obtained from digital image analysis are shown to be comparable to the results from standard microspectrofluorometry. We also discuss several other applications of this ratio imaging technique in cell biology.

  6. α integrin cytoplasmic tails have tissue-specific roles during C. elegans development

    PubMed Central

    MEIGHAN, CHRISTOPHER M.; SCHWARZBAUER, JEAN E.

    2015-01-01

    Integrin signaling impacts many developmental processes. The complexity of these signals increases when multiple, unique integrin heterodimers are expressed during a single developmental event. Since integrin heterodimers have different signaling capabilities, the signals originating at each integrin type must be separated in the cell. C. elegans have two integrin heterodimers, α INA-1/β PAT-3 and α PAT-2/β PAT-3, which are expressed individually or simultaneously, based on tissue type. We used chimeric α integrins to assess the role of α integrin cytoplasmic tails during development. Chimeric integrin ina-1 with the pat-2 cytoplasmic tail rescued lethality and maintained neuron fasciculation in an ina-1 mutant. Interestingly, the pat-2 tail was unable to completely restore distal tip cell migration and vulva morphogenesis. Chimeric integrin pat-2 with the ina-1 cytoplasmic tail had a limited ability to rescue a lethal mutation in pat-2, with survivors showing aberrant muscle organization, yet normal distal tip cell migration. In a wild type background, α integrin pat-2 with the ina-1 cytoplasmic tail had a dominant negative effect which induced muscle disorganization, cell migration defects and lethality. These results show the α integrin cytoplasmic tails impact unique cellular behaviors that vary by tissue type during development. PMID:25354452

  7. Bayesian Inference of Forces Causing Cytoplasmic Streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos and Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Nagao, Hiromichi; Kitajima, Tomoya S.; Hufnagel, Lars; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular structures are hydrodynamically interconnected, such that force generation in one location can move distal structures. One example of this phenomenon is cytoplasmic streaming, whereby active forces at the cell cortex induce streaming of the entire cytoplasm. However, it is not known how the spatial distribution and magnitude of these forces move distant objects within the cell. To address this issue, we developed a computational method that used cytoplasm hydrodynamics to infer the spatial distribution of shear stress at the cell cortex induced by active force generators from experimentally obtained flow field of cytoplasmic streaming. By applying this method, we determined the shear-stress distribution that quantitatively reproduces in vivo flow fields in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos and mouse oocytes during meiosis II. Shear stress in mouse oocytes were predicted to localize to a narrower cortical region than that with a high cortical flow velocity and corresponded with the localization of the cortical actin cap. The predicted patterns of pressure gradient in both species were consistent with species-specific cytoplasmic streaming functions. The shear-stress distribution inferred by our method can contribute to the characterization of active force generation driving biological streaming. PMID:27472658

  8. Cytoplasmic and surface membrane phenotypic markers in cells of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Babusíková, O; Mesárosová, A; Kusenda, J; Glasová, M

    1994-01-01

    Peripheral blood cells of twenty-six patients with B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) were characterized for their surface membrane and cytoplasmic marker profiles using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. According to surface membrane marker analysis three distinct immunophenotypic subgroups of B-CLL were identified: group I (SIg+, MR+, CD5+, B Ag+, T Ag-; 19 cases), group II (SIg+, MR+, CD5+, B Ag+, TAg+; 3 cases), group III (SIg-, MR+, CD5+, B Ag+, T Ag-; 4 cases). Cells from all patients were positive for the CD19 antigen and at least one of other B cell antigens. Cells from all patients expressed also CD5 and HLA-DR antigens and formed mouse rosettes (MR). Great heterogeneity was found in the membrane and cytoplasmic marking by anti-CD22 MoAb. In four of 23 patients tested, CD22 antigen was expressed in the cytoplasm of CLL cells while it was absent on surface membrane of these cells. This finding was discussed from the point of certain cell heterogeneity in the followed B-CLL cases. Cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (CyIg) detection showed to be very important especially in group III of followed B-CLL cases with undetectable surface immunoglobulins (SIg). Cytoplasmic antigens and immunoglobulin determinations are useful in phenotyping every B-CLL patient, as well as in the immunological study of different maturation stages of B lymphocytes. PMID:8208317

  9. Agonist binding to the NMDA receptor drives movement of its cytoplasmic domain without ion flow.

    PubMed

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-11-24

    The NMDA receptor (R) plays important roles in brain physiology and pathology as an ion channel. Here we examine the ion flow-independent coupling of agonist to the NMDAR cytoplasmic domain (cd). We measure FRET between fluorescently tagged cytoplasmic domains of GluN1 subunits of NMDARs expressed in neurons. Different neuronal compartments display varying levels of FRET, consistent with different NMDARcd conformations. Agonist binding drives a rapid and transient ion flow-independent reduction in FRET between GluN1 subunits within individual NMDARs. Intracellular infusion of an antibody targeting the GluN1 cytoplasmic domain blocks agonist-driven FRET changes in the absence of ion flow, supporting agonist-driven movement of the NMDARcd. These studies indicate that extracellular ligand binding to the NMDAR can transmit conformational information into the cell in the absence of ion flow. PMID:26553997

  10. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells.

    PubMed

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD-an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  11. Smyd2 controls cytoplasmic lysine methylation of Hsp90 and myofilament organization

    PubMed Central

    Donlin, Laura T.; Andresen, Christian; Just, Steffen; Rudensky, Eugene; Pappas, Christopher T.; Kruger, Martina; Jacobs, Erica Y.; Unger, Andreas; Zieseniss, Anke; Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Voelkel, Tobias; Chait, Brian T.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein lysine methylation is one of the most widespread post-translational modifications in the nuclei of eukaryotic cells. Methylated lysines on histones and nonhistone proteins promote the formation of protein complexes that control gene expression and DNA replication and repair. In the cytoplasm, however, the role of lysine methylation in protein complex formation is not well established. Here we report that the cytoplasmic protein chaperone Hsp90 is methylated by the lysine methyltransferase Smyd2 in various cell types. In muscle, Hsp90 methylation contributes to the formation of a protein complex containing Smyd2, Hsp90, and the sarcomeric protein titin. Deficiency in Smyd2 results in the loss of Hsp90 methylation, impaired titin stability, and altered muscle function. Collectively, our data reveal a cytoplasmic protein network that employs lysine methylation for the maintenance and function of skeletal muscle. PMID:22241783

  12. [Recent advances in the treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitides].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Melinda Zsuzsanna; Pálfi, Patrícia; Bazsó, Anna; Poór, Gyula; Kiss, Emese

    2015-10-11

    The authors review the nomenclature of vasculitides and the classification of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitides and present the method of measuring disease activity (Five-factor Score, Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score) and its role in defining therapeutical needs. They discuss the treatment algorithm of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitides, present the sometimes equipotential medications used during the induction therapy followed by a maintenance regimen, and outline their usage and possible side-effects that may require medical attention. They point out the importance of plasmapheresis as an adjunctive treatment in some cases, as well as indications and possible outcome of kidney transplantation in therapy-resistant cases. Finally, they review several ongoing clinical studies, as their outcome will probably influence therapeutical opportunities of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitides in the next few years. PMID:26551168

  13. Complete Atomistic Model of a Bacterial Cytoplasm for Integrating Physics, Biochemistry, and Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Michael; Harada, Ryuhei; Mori, Takaharu; Yu, Isseki; Takahashi, Koichi; Sugita, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    A model for the cytoplasm of Mycoplasma genitalium is presented that integrates data from a variety of sources into a physically and biochemically consistent model. Based on gene annotations, core genes expected to be present in the cytoplasm were determined and a metabolic reaction network was reconstructed. The set of cytoplasmic genes and metabolites from the predicted reactions were assembled into a comprehensive atomistic model consisting of proteins with predicted structures, RNA, protein/RNA complexes, metabolites, ions, and solvent. The resulting model bridges between atomistic and cellular scales, between physical and biochemical aspects, and between structural and systems views of cellular systems and is meant as a starting point for a variety of simulation studies. PMID:25765281

  14. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD—an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  15. Magnetic particle motions within living cells. Measurement of cytoplasmic viscosity and motile activity.

    PubMed Central

    Valberg, P A; Feldman, H A

    1987-01-01

    Submicrometer magnetic particles, ingested by cells and monitored via the magnetic fields they generate, provide an alternative to optical microscopy for probing movement and viscosity of living cytoplasm, and can be used for cells both in vitro and in vivo. We present methods for preparing lung macrophages tagged with magnetic particles for magnetometric study. Interpretation of the data involves fitting experimental remanent-field decay curves to nonlinear mechanistic models of intracellular particle motion. The model parameters are sensitive to mobility and apparent cytoplasmic viscosity experienced by particle-containing organelles. We present results of parameter estimation for intracellular particle behavior both within control cells and after (a) variable magnetization duration, (b) incubation with cytochalasin D, and (c) particle twisting by external fields. Magnetometric analysis showed cytoplasmic elasticity, dose-dependent motion inhibition by cytochalasin D, and a shear-thinning apparent viscosity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3676436

  16. Agonist binding to the NMDA receptor drives movement of its cytoplasmic domain without ion flow

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) plays important roles in brain physiology and pathology as an ion channel. Here we examine the ion flow-independent coupling of agonist to the NMDAR cytoplasmic domain (cd). We measure FRET between fluorescently tagged cytoplasmic domains of GluN1 subunits of NMDARs expressed in neurons. Different neuronal compartments display varying levels of FRET, consistent with different NMDARcd conformations. Agonist binding drives a rapid and transient ion flow-independent reduction in FRET between GluN1 subunits within individual NMDARs. Intracellular infusion of an antibody targeting the GluN1 cytoplasmic domain blocks agonist-driven FRET changes in the absence of ion flow, supporting agonist-driven movement of the NMDARcd. These studies indicate that extracellular ligand binding to the NMDAR can transmit conformational information into the cell in the absence of ion flow. PMID:26553997

  17. DGKζ under stress conditions: “to be nuclear or cytoplasmic, that is the question”.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kaoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Topham, Matthew K; Martelli, Alberto M

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved to possess a distinct subcellular compartment, the nucleus, separated from the cytoplasm in a manner that allows the precise operation of the chromatin, thereby permitting controlled access to the regulatory elements in the DNA for transcription and replication. In the cytoplasm, genetic information contained in the DNA sequence is translated into proteins, including enzymes that catalyze various reactions, such as metabolic processes, energy control, and responses to changing environments. One mechanism that regulates these events involves phosphoinositide turnover signaling, which generates a lipid second messenger, diacylglycerol (DG). Since DG acts as a potent activator of several signaling molecules, it should be tightly regulated to keep cellular responsiveness within a physiological range. DG kinase (DGK) metabolizes DG by phosphorylating it to generate phosphatidic acid, thus serving as a critical regulator of DG signaling. Phosphoinositide turnover is employed differentially in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. A member of the DGK family, DGKζ, localizes to the nucleus in various cell types and is considered to regulate nuclear DG signaling. Recent studies have provided evidence that DGKζ shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in neurons under pathophysiological conditions. Transport of a signal regulator between the nucleus and the cytoplasm should be a critical function for maintaining basic processes in the nucleus, such as cell cycle regulation and gene expression, and to ensure communication between nuclear processes and cytoplasmic functions. In this review, a series of studies on nucleocytoplasmic translocation of DGKζ have been summarized, and the functional implications of this phenomenon in postmitotic neurons and cancer cells under stress conditions are discussed. PMID:24119575

  18. Day-to-night variations of cytoplasmic pH in a crassulacean acid metabolism plant.

    PubMed

    Hafke, J B; Neff, R; Hütt, M T; Lüttge, U; Thiel, G

    2001-01-01

    In crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) large amounts of malic acid are redistributed between vacuole and cytoplasm in the course of night-to-day transitions. The corresponding changes of the cytoplasmic pH (pHcyt) were monitored in mesophyll protoplasts from the CAM plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier by ratiometric fluorimetry with the fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6-)carboxyfluorescein as a pHcyt indicator. At the beginning of the light phase, pHcyt was slightly alkaline (about 7.5). It dropped during midday by about 0.3 pH units before recovering again in the late-day-to-early-dark phase. In the physiological context the variation in pHcyt may be a component of CAM regulation. Due to its pH sensitivity, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase appears as a likely target enzyme. From monitoring delta pHcyt in response to loading the cytoplasm with the weak acid salt K-acetate a cytoplasmic H(+)-buffer capacity in the order of 65 mM H+ per pH unit was estimated at a pHcyt of about 7.5. With this value, an acid load of the cytoplasm by about 10 mM malic acid can be estimated as the cause of the observed drop in pHcyt. A diurnal oscillation in pHcyt and a quantitatively similar cytoplasmic malic acid is predicted from an established mathematical model which allows simulation of the CAM dynamics. The similarity of model predictions and experimental data supports the view put forward in this model that a phase transition of the tonoplast is an essential functional element in CAM dynamics. PMID:11732184

  19. Transcriptomic Changes Due to Cytoplasmic TDP-43 Expression Reveal Dysregulation of Histone Transcripts and Nuclear Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Amlie-Wolf, Alexandre; Ryvkin, Paul; Tong, Rui; Dragomir, Isabelle; Suh, EunRan; Xu, Yan; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Gregory, Brian D.; Kwong, Linda K.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Wang, Li-San; Lee, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is normally a nuclear RNA-binding protein that exhibits a range of functions including regulation of alternative splicing, RNA trafficking, and RNA stability. However, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions (FTLD-TDP), TDP-43 is abnormally phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and cleaved, and is mislocalized to the cytoplasm where it forms distinctive aggregates. We previously developed a mouse model expressing human TDP-43 with a mutation in its nuclear localization signal (ΔNLS-hTDP-43) so that the protein preferentially localizes to the cytoplasm. These mice did not exhibit a significant number of cytoplasmic aggregates, but did display dramatic changes in gene expression as measured by microarray, suggesting that cytoplasmic TDP-43 may be associated with a toxic gain-of-function. Here, we analyze new RNA-sequencing data from the ΔNLS-hTDP-43 mouse model, together with published RNA-sequencing data obtained previously from TDP-43 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) knockdown mice to investigate further the dysregulation of gene expression in the ΔNLS model. This analysis reveals that the transcriptomic effects of the overexpression of the ΔNLS-hTDP-43 transgene are likely due to a gain of cytoplasmic function. Moreover, cytoplasmic TDP-43 expression alters transcripts that regulate chromatin assembly, the nucleolus, lysosomal function, and histone 3’ untranslated region (UTR) processing. These transcriptomic alterations correlate with observed histologic abnormalities in heterochromatin structure and nuclear size in transgenic mouse and human brains. PMID:26510133

  20. Transcriptomic Changes Due to Cytoplasmic TDP-43 Expression Reveal Dysregulation of Histone Transcripts and Nuclear Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Amlie-Wolf, Alexandre; Ryvkin, Paul; Tong, Rui; Dragomir, Isabelle; Suh, EunRan; Xu, Yan; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Gregory, Brian D; Kwong, Linda K; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Wang, Li-San; Lee, Edward B

    2015-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is normally a nuclear RNA-binding protein that exhibits a range of functions including regulation of alternative splicing, RNA trafficking, and RNA stability. However, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions (FTLD-TDP), TDP-43 is abnormally phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and cleaved, and is mislocalized to the cytoplasm where it forms distinctive aggregates. We previously developed a mouse model expressing human TDP-43 with a mutation in its nuclear localization signal (ΔNLS-hTDP-43) so that the protein preferentially localizes to the cytoplasm. These mice did not exhibit a significant number of cytoplasmic aggregates, but did display dramatic changes in gene expression as measured by microarray, suggesting that cytoplasmic TDP-43 may be associated with a toxic gain-of-function. Here, we analyze new RNA-sequencing data from the ΔNLS-hTDP-43 mouse model, together with published RNA-sequencing data obtained previously from TDP-43 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) knockdown mice to investigate further the dysregulation of gene expression in the ΔNLS model. This analysis reveals that the transcriptomic effects of the overexpression of the ΔNLS-hTDP-43 transgene are likely due to a gain of cytoplasmic function. Moreover, cytoplasmic TDP-43 expression alters transcripts that regulate chromatin assembly, the nucleolus, lysosomal function, and histone 3' untranslated region (UTR) processing. These transcriptomic alterations correlate with observed histologic abnormalities in heterochromatin structure and nuclear size in transgenic mouse and human brains. PMID:26510133

  1. Comparative assessment of genetic diversity in cytoplasmic and nuclear genome of upland cotton.

    PubMed

    Egamberdiev, Sharof S; Saha, Sukumar; Salakhutdinov, Ilkhom; Jenkins, Johnie N; Deng, Dewayne; Y Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim

    2016-06-01

    The importance of the cytoplasmic genome for many economically important traits is well documented in several crop species, including cotton. There is no report on application of cotton chloroplast specific SSR markers as a diagnostic tool to study genetic diversity among improved Upland cotton lines. The complete plastome sequence information in GenBank provided us an opportunity to report on 17 chloroplast specific SSR markers using a cost-effective data mining strategy. Here we report the comparative analysis of genetic diversity among a set of 42 improved Upland cotton lines using SSR markers specific to chloroplast and nuclear genome, respectively. Our results revealed that low to moderate level of genetic diversity existed in both nuclear and cytoplasm genome among this set of cotton lines. However, the specific estimation suggested that genetic diversity is lower in cytoplasmic genome compared to the nuclear genome among this set of Upland cotton lines. In summary, this research is important from several perspectives. We detected a set of cytoplasm genome specific SSR primer pairs by using a cost-effective data mining strategy. We reported for the first time the genetic diversity in the cytoplasmic genome within a set of improved Upland cotton accessions. Results revealed that the genetic diversity in cytoplasmic genome is narrow, compared to the nuclear genome within this set of Upland cotton accessions. Our results suggested that most of these polymorphic chloroplast SSRs would be a valuable complementary tool in addition to the nuclear SSR in the study of evolution, gene flow and genetic diversity in Upland cotton. PMID:27155886

  2. A Mechanism for Cytoplasmic Streaming: Kinesin-Driven Alignment of Microtubules and Fast Fluid Flows.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Corey E; Brunner, Matthew E; Djagaeva, Inna; Bielecki, Anthony M; Deutsch, Joshua M; Saxton, William M

    2016-05-10

    The transport of cytoplasmic components can be profoundly affected by hydrodynamics. Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes offers a striking example. Forces on fluid from kinesin-1 are initially directed by a disordered meshwork of microtubules, generating minor slow cytoplasmic flows. Subsequently, to mix incoming nurse cell cytoplasm with ooplasm, a subcortical layer of microtubules forms parallel arrays that support long-range, fast flows. To analyze the streaming mechanism, we combined observations of microtubule and organelle motions with detailed mathematical modeling. In the fast state, microtubules tethered to the cortex form a thin subcortical layer and undergo correlated sinusoidal bending. Organelles moving in flows along the arrays show velocities that are slow near the cortex and fast on the inward side of the subcortical microtubule layer. Starting with fundamental physical principles suggested by qualitative hypotheses, and with published values for microtubule stiffness, kinesin velocity, and cytoplasmic viscosity, we developed a quantitative coupled hydrodynamic model for streaming. The fully detailed mathematical model and its simulations identify key variables that can shift the system between disordered (slow) and ordered (fast) states. Measurements of array curvature, wave period, and the effects of diminished kinesin velocity on flow rates, as well as prior observations on f-actin perturbation, support the model. This establishes a concrete mechanistic framework for the ooplasmic streaming process. The self-organizing fast phase is a result of viscous drag on kinesin-driven cargoes that mediates equal and opposite forces on cytoplasmic fluid and on microtubules whose minus ends are tethered to the cortex. Fluid moves toward plus ends and microtubules are forced backward toward their minus ends, resulting in buckling. Under certain conditions, the buckling microtubules self-organize into parallel bending arrays, guiding varying directions

  3. Promotion of cytoplasmic mislocalization of p27 by Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, S; So, Y; Singh, K; Slingerland, J M; Resnick, M B; Zhang, S; Ruiz, V; Moss, S F

    2012-04-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27 has an important role in cell cycle regulation. Reduced expression of p27 is commonly associated with poor prognosis in many malignancies, including gastric cancer. Cytoplasmic p27 mislocalization may be an additional indicator of high-grade tumors and poor prognosis in cancer. As chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori is the most important risk factor for gastric cancer development, we evaluated the effects of H. pylori on p27 expression and localization in gastric cancer cells. Co-culture of gastric cells with H. pylori induced cytoplasmic p27 expression and reduced nuclear p27 expression in vitro. Cytoplasmic p27 expression was associated with and dependent upon phosphorylation of p27 at T157 and T198: wild-type p27 accumulated in the cytoplasm, but non-phosphorylatable mutants affecting T157 or T198 were nuclear in H. pylori-infected cells. These post-translational p27 changes were secondary to activation of cellular phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and AKT signaling pathways, and dependent upon a functional H. pylori cag pathogenicity island. We investigated the clinical significance of cytoplasmic p27 mislocalization in 164 cases of resected gastric cancer in tissue microarrays. In 97 cases (59%), cytoplasmic p27 mislocalization was observed, and this was associated with increased mortality in multivariate analysis. These results show that H. pylori infection induces AKT/PI3K-mediated phosphorylation of p27 at T157 and T198 to cause cytoplasmic p27 mislocalization in gastric cancer, and that p27 mislocalization is an adverse prognostic feature in gastric cancer. This is the first demonstration of the translocation of a specific bacterial virulence factor that post-translationally regulates a host cell CDK inhibitor. This is of particular significance, because p27 has both tumor-suppressive and oncogenic activities, depending upon its subcellular localization. Cytoplasmic mislocalization of p27 induced by H

  4. Perturbation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport affects size of nucleus and nucleolus in human cells.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharjee, Chumki; Bhave, Madhura; Kailaje, Vaishali; Jain, Bhawik K; Sengupta, Isha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2016-03-01

    Size regulation of human cell nucleus and nucleolus are poorly understood subjects. 3D reconstruction of live image shows that the karyoplasmic ratio (KR) increases by 30-80% in transformed cell lines compared to their immortalized counterpart. The attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes the KR value to increase by 30-50% in immortalized cell lines. Nucleolus volumes are significantly increased in transformed cell lines and the attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes a significant increase in the nucleolus volume of immortalized cell lines. A cytosol and nuclear fraction swapping experiment emphasizes the potential role of unknown cytosolic factors in nuclear and nucleolar size regulation. PMID:26813731

  5. Beyond the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli: localizing recombinant proteins where you want them.

    PubMed

    Boock, Jason T; Waraho-Zhmayev, Dujduan; Mizrachi, Dario; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli represents a cornerstone of the biotechnology enterprise. While cytoplasmic expression in this host has received the most attention, achieving substantial yields of correctly folded proteins in this compartment can sometimes be met with difficulties. These issues can often be overcome by targeting protein expression to extracytoplasmic compartments (e.g., membrane, periplasm) or to the culture medium. This chapter discusses various strategies for exporting proteins out of the cytoplasm as well as tools for monitoring and optimizing these different export mechanisms. PMID:25447860

  6. Promising SINEs for embargoing nuclear-cytoplasmic export as an anticancer strategy.

    PubMed

    Tan, David S P; Bedard, Philippe L; Kuruvilla, John; Siu, Lillian L; Razak, Albiruni R Abdul

    2014-05-01

    In cancer cells, the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport machinery is frequently disrupted, resulting in mislocalization and loss of function for many key regulatory proteins. In this review, the mechanisms by which tumor cells co-opt the nuclear transport machinery to facilitate carcinogenesis, cell survival, drug resistance, and tumor progression will be elucidated, with a particular focus on the role of the nuclear-cytoplasmic export protein. The recent development of a new generation of selective inhibitors of nuclear export (XPO1 antagonists) and how these novel anticancer drugs may bring us closer to the implementation of this therapeutic strategy in the clinic will be discussed. PMID:24743138

  7. Cytoplasmic tail domain of glycoprotein B is essential for HHV-6 infection.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Nora F; Jasirwan, Chyntia; Kanemoto, Satoshi; Wakata, Aika; Wang, Bochao; Hata, Yuuki; Nagamata, Satoshi; Kawabata, Akiko; Tang, Huamin; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-03-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) glycoprotein B (gB) is an abundantly expressed viral glycoprotein required for viral entry and cell fusion, and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. The present study examined the function of HHV-6 gB cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). A gB CTD deletion mutant was constructed which, in contrast to its revertant, could not be reconstituted. Moreover, deletion of gB cytoplasmic tail impaired the intracellular transport of gB protein to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Taken together, these results suggest that gB CTD is critical for HHV-6 propagation and important for intracellular transportation. PMID:26802210

  8. Evidence that the production of acetate in rat hepatocytes is a predominantly cytoplasmic process.

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, B; Souter, M J; Anderson, S E

    1989-01-01

    By using [1-14C]butyrate, the fluxes of butyrate to acetate and fatty acids were measured in rat hepatocytes. Both fluxes were inhibited to a similar extent by (-)-hydroxycitrate, with no significant effect on butyrate uptake. These results indicate that acetate formation takes place in the cytoplasm, presumably via ATP-stimulated acetyl-CoA hydrolase. Since acetate formation occurred despite a net uptake of acetate, the results are also consistent with the operation of a substrate cycle between acetate and acetyl-CoA, recently proposed by other workers, and suggest that this cycle is cytoplasmic. PMID:2564776

  9. Use of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in diagnosing vasculitis in a Chinese patient population.

    PubMed

    Li, P K; Leung, J C; Lai, F M; Wang, A; Lui, S F; Leung, C B; Lai, K N

    1994-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) have been used as markers of systemic vasculitides, including microscopic polyarteritis (MPA) and Wegener's granulomatosis. The diagnostic potential of ANCA assays together with antibodies against the neutrophil enzymes myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 for detecting a systemic vasculitis was tested in a Chinese patient population. 672 sera were received for ANCA assay, and ANCA detected by indirect immunofluorescence was positive in 73 sera from 42 patients. Of the 42 patients, 3 had cytoplasmic ANCA, while 39 had a perinuclear pattern. There was no patient with Wegener's granulomatosis. Two cytoplasmic ANCA positive patients suffered from ulcerative colitis. Another cytoplasmic ANCA positive patient was a carrier of human immunodeficiency virus. Of the 39 perinuclear ANCA positive patients, 10 had MPA. Eight of them were tested for anti-MPO antibody, and all were positive. Other immune disorders that were perinuclear ANCA positive included: 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 3 with mixed connective tissue disease, 1 with Goodpasture's syndrome, 2 with inflammatory bowel disease, and 2 patients with IgA nephropathy. Anti-MPO antibody was not specific for MPA, and 7 out of the 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were anti-MPO antibody positive. Our study suggests that ANCA and anti-MPO antibody are not specific for MPA in a Chinese population. They would alert the clinician of the possibility of vasculitis, but a clinicopathological correlation is essential in making the diagnosis. PMID:7915885

  10. ALS mutant FUS disrupts nuclear localization and sequesters wild-type FUS within cytoplasmic stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Caroline; Scotter, Emma L.; Nishimura, Agnes L.; Troakes, Claire; Mitchell, Jacqueline C.; Kathe, Claudia; Urwin, Hazel; Manser, Catherine; Miller, Christopher C.; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Dragunow, Mike; Rogelj, Boris; Shaw, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. FUS is a predominantly nuclear DNA- and RNA-binding protein that is involved in RNA processing. Large FUS-immunoreactive inclusions fill the perikaryon of surviving motor neurons of ALS patients carrying mutations at post-mortem. This sequestration of FUS is predicted to disrupt RNA processing and initiate neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that C-terminal ALS mutations disrupt the nuclear localizing signal (NLS) of FUS resulting in cytoplasmic accumulation in transfected cells and patient fibroblasts. FUS mislocalization is rescued by the addition of the wild-type FUS NLS to mutant proteins. We also show that oxidative stress recruits mutant FUS to cytoplasmic stress granules where it is able to bind and sequester wild-type FUS. While FUS interacts with itself directly by protein–protein interaction, the recruitment of FUS to stress granules and interaction with PABP are RNA dependent. These findings support a two-hit hypothesis, whereby cytoplasmic mislocalization of FUS protein, followed by cellular stress, contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may sequester FUS, disrupt RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. PMID:23474818

  11. Demonstration of cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in acute leukaemia using flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Farahat, N; van der Plas, D; Praxedes, M; Morilla, R; Matutes, E; Catovsky, D

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To detect cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens using flow cytometry in acute leukaemia and to use this technique for double marker combinations. METHODS--Cytoplasmic staining was carried out in samples from 40 cases of acute leukaemia with monoclonal antibodies against the myeloid antigen CD13, the lymphoid antigens CD3, CD22, mu chain and the enzymes terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde and permeabilised with Tween 20 and Becton Dickinson's FACS lysing solution. Flow cytometry results were compared in the same cases with immunocytochemistry results using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS--The gentle permeabilisation induced by this method permitted preservation of the membrane antigens and the size and morphology of the cells. The results using flow cytometry were comparable with those obtained using immunocytochemistry, with nearly complete concordance in most cases. CONCLUSIONS--This technique is simple, rapid, sensitive and reproducible and it is suitable for double staining procedures, such as nuclear and cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane, or cytoplasmic and membrane. It therefore provides a powerful tool for extending the use of immunophenotyping for the diagnosis and follow up of acute leukaemia. It could also be used for the investigation of minimal residual disease. PMID:7962655

  12. ALS mutant FUS disrupts nuclear localization and sequesters wild-type FUS within cytoplasmic stress granules.

    PubMed

    Vance, Caroline; Scotter, Emma L; Nishimura, Agnes L; Troakes, Claire; Mitchell, Jacqueline C; Kathe, Claudia; Urwin, Hazel; Manser, Catherine; Miller, Christopher C; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Dragunow, Mike; Rogelj, Boris; Shaw, Christopher E

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. FUS is a predominantly nuclear DNA- and RNA-binding protein that is involved in RNA processing. Large FUS-immunoreactive inclusions fill the perikaryon of surviving motor neurons of ALS patients carrying mutations at post-mortem. This sequestration of FUS is predicted to disrupt RNA processing and initiate neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that C-terminal ALS mutations disrupt the nuclear localizing signal (NLS) of FUS resulting in cytoplasmic accumulation in transfected cells and patient fibroblasts. FUS mislocalization is rescued by the addition of the wild-type FUS NLS to mutant proteins. We also show that oxidative stress recruits mutant FUS to cytoplasmic stress granules where it is able to bind and sequester wild-type FUS. While FUS interacts with itself directly by protein-protein interaction, the recruitment of FUS to stress granules and interaction with PABP are RNA dependent. These findings support a two-hit hypothesis, whereby cytoplasmic mislocalization of FUS protein, followed by cellular stress, contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may sequester FUS, disrupt RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. PMID:23474818

  13. Transport of the outer dynein arm complex to cilia requires a cytoplasmic protein Lrrc6.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yasuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Botilde, Yanick; Nabeshima, Ryo; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Ajima, Rieko; Lamri, Lynda; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Saga, Yumiko; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lrrc6 encodes a cytoplasmic protein that is expressed specifically in cells with motile cilia including the node, trachea and testes of the mice. A mutation of Lrrc6 has been identified in human patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Mutant mice lacking Lrrc6 show typical PCD defects such as hydrocephalus and laterality defects. We found that in the absence of Lrrc6, the morphology of motile cilia remained normal, but their motility was completely lost. The 9 + 2 arrangement of microtubules remained normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice, but the outer dynein arms (ODAs), the structures essential for the ciliary beating, were absent from the cilia. In the absence of Lrrc6, ODA proteins such as DNAH5, DNAH9 and IC2, which are assembled in the cytoplasm and transported to the ciliary axoneme, remained in the cytoplasm and were not transported to the ciliary axoneme. The IC2-IC1 interaction, which is the first step of ODA assembly, was normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice testes. Our results suggest that ODA proteins may be transported from the cytoplasm to the cilia by an Lrrc6-dependent mechanism. PMID:27353389

  14. ERAD of proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains requires ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Koay, Yee-Hui; Otsuka, Yuka; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clearance of misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in a process known as ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms through which proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains are degraded by ERAD are poorly understood. To address this question, we generated model ERAD substrates based on CD8 with either a non-native transmembrane domain but a folded ER luminal domain (CD8TMD*), or the native transmembrane domain but a misfolded luminal domain (CD8LUM*). Although both chimeras were degraded by ERAD, we found that the location of the folding defect determined the initial site of ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues was required for the extraction of CD8TMD* from the ER membrane during ERAD, whereas CD8LUM* continued to be degraded in the absence of cytoplasmic lysine residues. Cytoplasmic lysine residues were also required for degradation of an additional ERAD substrate containing an unassembled transmembrane domain and when a non-native transmembrane domain was introduced into CD8LUM*. Our results suggest that proteins with defective transmembrane domains are removed from the ER through a specific ERAD mechanism that depends upon ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues. PMID:26446255

  15. Cytoplasmic Streaming and Ion Transport: A Laboratory Exercise which Tests a Longstanding Botanical Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perley, James E.; Glass, A. D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a method for microscopically examining cytoplasmic streaming in root cells, and physiologically examining the delivery of ions to the xylem exudate. The expected result does not occur and the authors believe that students learn to re-examine the assumptions, thereby increasing their skills in scientific inquiry. (Authors/SA)

  16. Cytoplasmic membrane changes during adaptation of the fresh water cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6311 to salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefort-Tran, M.; Pouphile, M.; Spath, S.; Packer, L.

    1988-01-01

    In this investigation, changes were characterized in cell structure and cytoplasmic membrane organization that occur when the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6311 is transferred from 'low salt' (0.03 molar NaCl) to 'high salt' (0.5 molar NaCl) media (i.e. sea water concentration). Cells were examined at several time points after the imposition of the salt stress and compared to control cells, in thin sections and freeze fracture electron microscopy, and by flow cytometry. One minute after exposure to high salt, i.e. 'salt shock', virtually all intracellular granules disappeared, the density of the cytoplasm decreased, and the appearance of DNA material was changed. Glycogen and other granules, however, reappeared by 4 hours after salt exposure. The organization of the cytoplasmic membrane undergoes major reorganization following salt shock. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy showed that small intramembrane particles (diameter 7.5 and 8.5 nanometers) are reduced in number by two- to fivefold, whereas large particles, (diameters 14.5 and 17.5 nanometers) increase two- to fourfold in frequency, compared to control cells grown in low salt medium. The changes in particle size distribution suggest synthesis of new membrane proteins, in agreement with the known increases in respiration, cytochrome oxidase, and sodium proton exchange activity of the cytoplasmic membrane.

  17. Diffusive Promotion by Velocity Gradient of Cytoplasmic Streaming (CPS) in Nitella Internodal Cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Mochizuki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming (CPS) is well known to assist the movement of nutrients, organelles and genetic material by transporting all of the cytoplasmic contents of a cell. CPS is generated by motility organelles that are driven by motor proteins near a membrane surface, where the CPS has been found to have a flat velocity profile in the flow field according to the sliding theory. There is a consistent mixing of contents inside the cell by CPS if the velocity gradient profile is flattened, which is not assisted by advection diffusion but is only supported by Brownian diffusion. Although the precise flow structure of the cytoplasm has an important role for cellular metabolism, the hydrodynamic mechanism of its convection has not been clarified. We conducted an experiment to visualise the flow of cytoplasm in Nitella cells by injecting tracer fluorescent nanoparticles and using a flow visualisation system in order to understand how the flow profile affects their metabolic system. We determined that the velocity field in the cytosol has an obvious velocity gradient, not a flattened gradient, which suggests that the gradient assists cytosolic mixing by Taylor-Aris dispersion more than by Brownian diffusion. PMID:26694322

  18. The nuclear protein Sam68 is recruited to the cytoplasmic stress granules during enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Ning; Li, Pengfei; Pan, Ziye; Ding, Yun; Zou, Dehua; Li, Liyang; Xiao, Lijie; Shen, Binglei; Liu, Shuxia; Cao, Hongwei; Cui, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    Our previous study found that the nuclear protein, 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis protein (Sam68), is translocated to the cytoplasm and forms punctate pattern during enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection [Virus Research, 180 (2014), 1-11]. However, the exact function of this punctate pattern in cytoplasm during EV71 infection remains unknown. In this study, we firstly have examined this punctate pattern of Sam68 re-localization in the cytoplasm, and observed the obvious recruitments of Sam68 to the EV71-induced stress granules (SGs). Sam68, belongs to the KH domain family of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), was then confirmed that its KH domain was essential for this recruitment. Nevertheless, Knockdown of Sam68 expression using ShRNA had no effects on SGs assembly, indicating that Sam68 is not a constitutive component of the SGs during EV71 infection. Lastly, we investigated the importance of microtubulin transport to SGs aggregation, and revealed that microtubule depolymerization inhibited SGs formation, suggesting that EV71-induced SGs move throughout the cytoplasm in a microtubule-dependent manner. Taken together, these results illuminated that EV71 infections can induce SGs formation, and Sam68, as a SGs component, migrates alone with SGs dependent on intact microtubule upon the viral infections. These findings may provide novel underlying mechanism for delineating the role of SGs during EV71 infection. PMID:27057671

  19. Diffusive Promotion by Velocity Gradient of Cytoplasmic Streaming (CPS) in Nitella Internodal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Mochizuki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming (CPS) is well known to assist the movement of nutrients, organelles and genetic material by transporting all of the cytoplasmic contents of a cell. CPS is generated by motility organelles that are driven by motor proteins near a membrane surface, where the CPS has been found to have a flat velocity profile in the flow field according to the sliding theory. There is a consistent mixing of contents inside the cell by CPS if the velocity gradient profile is flattened, which is not assisted by advection diffusion but is only supported by Brownian diffusion. Although the precise flow structure of the cytoplasm has an important role for cellular metabolism, the hydrodynamic mechanism of its convection has not been clarified. We conducted an experiment to visualise the flow of cytoplasm in Nitella cells by injecting tracer fluorescent nanoparticles and using a flow visualisation system in order to understand how the flow profile affects their metabolic system. We determined that the velocity field in the cytosol has an obvious velocity gradient, not a flattened gradient, which suggests that the gradient assists cytosolic mixing by Taylor–Aris dispersion more than by Brownian diffusion. PMID:26694322

  20. Structure of human cytoplasmic dynein-2 primed for its power stroke.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Helgo; Zalyte, Ruta; Urnavicius, Linas; Carter, Andrew P

    2015-02-19

    Members of the dynein family, consisting of cytoplasmic and axonemal isoforms, are motors that move towards the minus ends of microtubules. Cytoplasmic dynein-1 (dynein-1) plays roles in mitosis and cellular cargo transport, and is implicated in viral infections and neurodegenerative diseases. Cytoplasmic dynein-2 (dynein-2) performs intraflagellar transport and is associated with human skeletal ciliopathies. Dyneins share a conserved motor domain that couples cycles of ATP hydrolysis with conformational changes to produce movement. Here we present the crystal structure of the human cytoplasmic dynein-2 motor bound to the ATP-hydrolysis transition state analogue ADP.vanadate. The structure reveals a closure of the motor's ring of six AAA+ domains (ATPases associated with various cellular activites: AAA1-AAA6). This induces a steric clash with the linker, the key element for the generation of movement, driving it into a conformation that is primed to produce force. Ring closure also changes the interface between the stalk and buttress coiled-coil extensions of the motor domain. This drives helix sliding in the stalk which causes the microtubule binding domain at its tip to release from the microtubule. Our structure answers the key questions of how ATP hydrolysis leads to linker remodelling and microtubule affinity regulation. PMID:25470043

  1. Characterization of the MUC1-C Cytoplasmic Domain as a Cancer Target

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Deepak; Agarwal, Praveen; Lee, James; Bharti, Ajit; McKnight, C. James; Sharma, Pankaj; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is a heterodimeric protein that is aberrantly expressed in diverse human carcinomas and certain hematologic malignancies. The oncogenic MUC1 transmembrane C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) functions in part by transducing growth and survival signals from cell surface receptors. However, little is known about the structure of the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain as a potential drug target. Using methods for structural predictions, our results indicate that a highly conserved CQCRRK sequence, which is adjacent to the cell membrane, forms a small pocket that exposes the two cysteine residues for forming disulfide bonds. By contrast, the remainder of the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain has no apparent structure, consistent with an intrinsically disordered protein. Our studies thus focused on targeting the MUC1 CQCRRK region. The results show that L- and D-amino acid CQCRRK-containing peptides bind directly to the CQC motif. We further show that the D-amino acid peptide, designated GO-203, blocks homodimerization of the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain in vitro and in transfected cells. Moreover, GO-203 binds directly to endogenous MUC1-C in breast and lung cancer cells. Colocalization studies further demonstrate that GO-203 predominantly binds to MUC1-C at the cell membrane. These findings support the further development of agents that target the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain CQC motif and thereby MUC1-C function in cancer cells. PMID:26267657

  2. Case 35: an unusual haematological neoplasm characterized by cells with cytoplasmic tails.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Shireen; Rice, Alexandra; Morilla, Ricardo; Bain, Barbara J

    2007-06-01

    A middle aged Northern European man presented with a submental lymph node and was found on imaging to have generalized lymphadenopathy. There was bone marrow infiltration by small apparently lymphoid cells, many with cytoplasmic tails; these cells were CD56(+) and weakly CD4(+). A provisional diagnosis was confirmed by further immunophenotyping. PMID:17577785

  3. Fat mass and obesity-related (FTO) shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Pawan; Avezov, Edward; Ma, Marcella; Antrobus, Robin; Lehner, Paul; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Yeo, Giles S. H.

    2014-01-01

    SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) on a chromosome 16 locus encompassing FTO, as well as IRX3, 5, 6, FTM and FTL are robustly associated with human obesity. FTO catalyses the Fe(II)- and 2OG-dependent demethylation of RNA and is an AA (amino acid) sensor that couples AA levels to mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) signalling, thereby playing a key role in regulating growth and translation. However, the cellular compartment in which FTO primarily resides to perform its biochemical role is unclear. Here, we undertake live cell imaging of GFP (green fluorescent protein)-FTO, and demonstrate that FTO resides in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We show using ‘FLIP’ (fluorescence loss in photobleaching) that a mobile FTO fraction shuttles between both compartments. We performed a proteomic study and identified XPO2 (Exportin 2), one of a family of proteins that mediates the shuttling of proteins between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, as a binding partner of FTO. Finally, using deletion studies, we show that the N-terminus of FTO is required for its ability to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. In conclusion, FTO is present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, with a mobile fraction that shuttles between both cellular compartments, possibly by interaction with XPO2. PMID:25242086

  4. The Cytoplasmic Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 Affects Binding of the Protective Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Go, Mandy Y.; Chow, Edith M. C.; Mogridge, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin binds the I domain of the receptor ANTXR1. Integrin I domains convert between open and closed conformations that bind ligand with high and low affinities, respectively; this process is regulated by signaling from the cytoplasmic domains. To assess whether intracellular signals might influence the interaction between ANTXR1 and PA, we compared two splice variants of ANTXR1 that differ only in their cytoplasmic domains. We found that cells expressing ANTXR1 splice variant 1 (ANTXR1-sv1) bound markedly less PA than did cells expressing a similar level of the shorter splice variant ANTXR1-sv2. ANTXR1-sv1 but not ANTXR1-sv2 associated with the actin cytoskeleton, although disruption of the cytoskeleton did not affect binding of ANTXR-sv1 to PA. Introduction of a cytoplasmic domain missense mutation found in the related receptor ANTXR2 in a patient with juvenile hyaline fibromatosis impaired actin association and increased binding of PA to ANTXR1-sv1. These results suggest that ANTXR1 has two affinity states that may be modulated by cytoplasmic signals. PMID:18936178

  5. MODELS WITH CYTOPLASMIC EFFECTS FOR THREE DUAL PURPOSE BREEDS OF SHEEP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of lactation performance of dairy cattle and weights of beef cattle with models that account for relationships among animals and records on which prior selection has been based have shown that cytoplasmic non nuclear effects accounted for negligible fractions of phenotypic variance. More rec...

  6. Bacterial cytoplasmic display platform Retained Display (ReD) identifies stable human germline antibody frameworks.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Matthew D; Niven, Keith P; Winnall, Wendy R; Kiefel, Ben R

    2015-05-01

    Conventional antibody surface display requires fusion protein export through at least one cellular membrane, constraining the yield and occasioning difficulties in achieving scaled production. To circumvent this limitation, we developed a novel cytoplasmic display platform, Retained Display (ReD), and used it to screen for human scFv frameworks that are highly soluble and stable in the bacterial cytoplasm. ReD, based on the retention of high-molecular weight complexes within detergent-permeabilized Escherichia coli, enabled presentation of exogenous targets to antibodies that were expressed and folded in the cytoplasm. All human λ and κ light chain family genes were expressed as IGHV3-23 fusions. Members of the λ subfamilies 1, 3 and 6 were soluble cytoplasmic partners of IGHV3-23. Contrary to previous in vivo screens for soluble reduced scFvs, the pairings identified by ReD were identical to the human germline sequences for the framework, CDR1 and CDR2 regions. Using the most soluble scFv scaffold identified, we demonstrated tolerance to CDR3 diversification and isolated a binding scFv to an exogenous protein target. This screening system has the potential to rapidly produce antibodies to target threats such as emerging infectious diseases and bioterror agents. PMID:25712138

  7. Changes of the Cytoplasmic Proteome in Response to Alcoholic Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Eun-Mi; Do, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Da-Hee; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic analyses have already been used in a number of hepatological studies and provide important information. However, few reports have focused on changes in the cytoplasmic proteome. The present study therefore aimed to evaluate changes in cytoplasmic proteome of rats in response to alcoholic hepatotoxicity. Rats were fed a Liber-DeCarli liquid diet containing ethanol for four weeks. Cytoplasmic proteins except mitochondrial proteins from the livers of these animals were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Alcohol induced a decrease in body weight gain and an increase in alanine transaminase (ALT), cholesterol, and phospholipid levels. Histopathological observations revealed hepatic damage characterized by necrosis and fatty change in alcohol-treated group at week 2, which continues until week 4. Our proteomic analysis revealed that 25 proteins were differentially expressed in the ethanol-fed group. Of these, 12 cytoplasmic proteins are being reported for the first time. Taken together, our results provide further insights into the disease mechanism and therapeutic information of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26266409

  8. Crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytoplasmic heme binding protein, Apo-PhuS.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sarvind; O'Neill, Maura J; Wilks, Angela; Poulos, Thomas L

    2013-11-01

    Iron is an essential element to all living organisms and is an important determinant of bacterial virulence. Bacteria have evolved specialized systems to sequester and transport iron from the environment or host. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, uses two outer membrane receptor mediated systems (Phu and Has) to utilize host heme as a source of iron. PhuS is a 39 kDa soluble cytoplasmic heme binding protein which interacts and transports heme from the inner membrane heme transporter to the cytoplasm where it is degraded by heme oxygenase thus releasing iron. PhuS is unique among other cytoplasmic heme transporter proteins owing to the presence of three histidines in the heme binding pocket which can potentially serve as heme ligands. Out of the three histidine residues on the heme binding helix, His 209 is conserved among heme trafficking proteins while His 210 and His 212 are unique to PhuS. Here we report the crystal structure of PhuS at 1.98Å resolution which shows a unique heme binding pocket and oligomeric structure compared to other known cytoplasmic heme transporter and accounts for some of the unusual biochemical properties of PhuS. PMID:23973453

  9. A link between the cytoplasmic engulfment protein Elmo1 and the Mediator complex subunit Med31.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, Joshua P; Lu, Mingjian; Das, Soumita; Park, Daeho; Ernst, Peter B; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2013-01-21

    The cytoplasmic Elmo1:Dock180 complex acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the small GTPase Rac and functions downstream of the phagocytic receptor BAI1 during apoptotic cell clearance, and in the entry of Salmonella and Shigella into cells. We discovered an unexpected binding between Elmo1 and the Mediator complex subunit Med31. The Mediator complex is a regulatory hub for nearly all gene transcription via RNA polymerase II, bridging the general transcription machinery with gene-specific regulatory proteins. Med31 is the smallest and the most evolutionarily conserved Mediator subunit, and knockout of Med31 results in embryonic lethality in mice; however, Med31 function in specific biological contexts is poorly understood. We observed that in primary macrophages, during Salmonella infection, Elmo1 and Med31 specifically affected expression of the cytokine genes Il10 and Il33 among the >25 genes monitored. Although endogenous Med31 is predominantly nuclear localized, Elmo1 increased the cytoplasmic localization of Med31. We identify ubiquitination as a novel posttranslational modification of Med31, with the cytoplasmic monoubiquitinated form of Med31 being enhanced by Elmo1. These data identify Elmo1 as a novel regulator of Med31, revealing a previously unrecognized link between cytoplasmic signaling proteins and the Mediator complex. PMID:23273896

  10. EXPRESSION AND ASSEMBLY OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE IN INSECT CELL CYTOPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vector was constructed for expression of Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) in the cytoplasm of Trichoplusia ni cells. The construct, pDDR101, comprises the mature-E1alpha coding sequence under control of the polh promoter, plus the mature-E1beta coding sequence under ...

  11. Cytoplasmic RNA viruses as potential vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viral vectors have become the best option for the delivery of therapeutic genes in conventional and RNA interference-based gene therapies. The current viral vectors for the delivery of small regulatory RNAs are based on DNA viruses and retroviruses/lentiviruses. Cytoplasmic RNA viruses have been excluded as viral vectors for RNAi therapy because of the nuclear localization of the microprocessor complex and the potential degradation of the viral RNA genome during the excision of any virus-encoded pre-microRNAs. However, in the last few years, the presence of several species of small RNAs (e.g., virus-derived small interfering RNAs, virus-derived short RNAs, and unusually small RNAs) in animals and cell cultures that are infected with cytoplasmic RNA viruses has suggested the existence of a non-canonical mechanism of microRNA biogenesis. Several studies have been conducted on the tick-borne encephalitis virus and on the Sindbis virus in which microRNA precursors were artificially incorporated and demonstrated the production of mature microRNAs. The ability of these viruses to recruit Drosha to the cytoplasm during infection resulted in the efficient processing of virus-encoded microRNA without the viral genome entering the nucleus. In this review, we discuss the relevance of these findings with an emphasis on the potential use of cytoplasmic RNA viruses as vehicles for the efficient delivery of therapeutic small RNAs. PMID:23759022

  12. Dynamics of vegetative cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, A.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes of pollen cytoplasm during generative cell formation and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pollen cytoplasm develops a complicated ultrastructure and changes dramatically during these stages. Lipid droplets increase after generative cell formation and their organization and distribution change with the developmental stage. Starch grains in amyloplasts increase in number and size during generative and sperm cell formation and decrease at pollen maturity. The shape and membrane system of mitochondria change only slightly. Dictyosomes become very prominent, and numerous associated vesicles are observed during and after sperm cell formation. Endoplasmic reticulum appears extensively as stacks during sperm cell formation. Free and polyribosomes are abundant in the cytoplasm at all developmental stages although they appear denser at certain stages and in some areas. In mature pollen, all organelles are randomly distributed throughout the vegetative cytoplasm and numerous small particles appear. Organization and distribution of storage substances and appearance of these small particles during generative and sperm cell formation and pollen maturation are discussed.

  13. Evaluating cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of inflammatory cytokines in cancer cells by western blotting.

    PubMed

    Gatla, Himavanth R; Singha, Bipradeb; Persaud, Valerie; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression and cellular release of inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8), and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) are associated with increased cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis during cancer progression. In prostate and ovarian cancer cells, increased levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 correlate with poor prognosis. We have recently shown that proteasome inhibition by bortezomib (BZ) specifically increases IL-8 release from metastatic prostate and ovarian cancer cells. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of IL-8 and HMGB1 in prostate and ovarian cancer cells by western blotting. IL-8 is localized in the cytoplasm in both cell types, and its protein levels are significantly increased by BZ. In contrast, HMGB1 is localized in the nucleus, and BZ increases its nuclear levels only in ovarian cancer cells. The protocol includes isolation of cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts, followed by SDS electrophoresis and western blotting, and can be easily modified to analyze the cytoplasmic and nuclear cytokine levels in other cell types. PMID:24908314

  14. Regulation of tRNA Bidirectional Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Athulaprabha; Shaheen, Hussam H.; Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Preston, Melanie A.; Lai, Tsung-Po; Phizicky, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    tRNAs in yeast and vertebrate cells move bidirectionally and reversibly between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We investigated roles of members of the β-importin family in tRNA subcellular dynamics. Retrograde import of tRNA into the nucleus is dependent, directly or indirectly, upon Mtr10. tRNA nuclear export utilizes at least two members of the β-importin family. The β-importins involved in nuclear export have shared and exclusive functions. Los1 functions in both the tRNA primary export and the tRNA reexport processes. Msn5 is unable to export tRNAs in the primary round of export if the tRNAs are encoded by intron-containing genes, and for these tRNAs Msn5 functions primarily in their reexport to the cytoplasm. The data support a model in which tRNA retrograde import to the nucleus is a constitutive process; in contrast, reexport of the imported tRNAs back to the cytoplasm is regulated by the availability of nutrients to cells and by tRNA aminoacylation in the nucleus. Finally, we implicate Tef1, the yeast orthologue of translation elongation factor eEF1A, in the tRNA reexport process and show that its subcellular distribution between the nucleus and cytoplasm is dependent upon Mtr10 and Msn5. PMID:20032305

  15. Identification of a new CMS cytoplasm and localization of its fertility restoration genes in sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytoplasm male sterility (CMS) and its fertility restoration genes (Rf) are critical tools for hybrid seed production. To broaden the genetic diversity of sunflower hybrid breeding materials, an initial F2 population of 113 individuals was generated from a single F1 plant from the cross H. giganteus...

  16. POLYMORPHISMS IN CYTOPLASMIC SERINE HYDROXYMETHYLTRANSFERASE AND METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE AFFECT THE RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN MEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic variation in folate-regulating enzymes contributes to the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The cytoplasmic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (cSHMT) enzyme is proposed to regulate a key metabolic intersection in folate metabolism. We hypothesized that a variant in cSHMT (cSHMT 1420CT) aff...

  17. Coordination of the Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Activities of p53 in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Tian; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a key role in the cellular response to various stresses. Most previous studies have focused on either the nuclear or cytoplasmic proapoptotic functions of p53, ignoring the combination of both functions. To explore how the two functions of p53 are coordinated in the DNA damage response via computer simulation, we construct a model for the p53 network comprising coupled positive and negative feedback loops involving p53, Mdm2, and Akt, as well as PUMA and Bax. In our model p53 is stabilized and accumulates in the nucleus and cytoplasm upon DNA damage. Nuclear p53 induces expression of Mdm2, PTEN, PUMA, and Bax. Cytoplasmic p53 is then released from the p53·Bcl-xL complex by PUMA to activate Bax directly. We find that the switching between low and high protein levels underlies the decision between cell survival and death. Moreover, a balance between the nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 levels and appropriate levels of Akt and PUMA are required for reliable cell fate decision. Our results indicate that coordination of the transcription-dependent and -independent activities of p53 is important in determining cellular outcomes. These findings advance our understanding of the mechanism for p53-mediated cellular responses and provide clues to p53-based cancer therapy. PMID:20858413

  18. Effect of cytoplasmic diversity on post anthesis heat tolerance in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear genomes of ten alloplasmic lines were substituted by backcrossing four or five times using ‘Karl 92’, ‘Ventnor’, ‘U1275’ and ‘Jagger’ as recurrent parents to study the cytoplasmic effects on heat tolerance. During the final backcross, reciprocal crosses were made to develop NILs (Near Is...

  19. Cytoplasmic gain-of-function mutant p53 contributes to inflammation-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bellazzo, Arianna; Di Minin, Giulio; Collavin, Licio

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and mutation of the tumor suppressor p53 are two apparently unrelated conditions that are strongly associated with cancer initiation and progression. We recently reported that gain-of-function mutant p53 modifies the response of cancer cells to inflammatory signals by binding a cytoplasmic tumor suppressor protein involved in TNFα signaling. PMID:27308497

  20. Distinct roles of NR2A and NR2B cytoplasmic tails in long term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kelly A.; McLaughlin, Nathan; Edbauer, Dieter; Phillips, Marnie; Bolton, Andrew; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Sheng, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are critical mediators of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, but the differential roles of NR2A- versus NR2B-containing NMDARs have been controversial. Here, we investigate the roles of NR2A and NR2B in LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures using RNAi and overexpression, to complement pharmacological approaches. In young slices, when NR2B is the predominant subunit expressed, LTP is blocked by the NR2B-selective antagonist Ro25-6981. As slices mature, and NR2A expression rises, activation of NR2B receptors became no longer necessary for LTP induction. LTP was blocked, however, by RNAi knockdown of NR2B, and this was rescued by coexpression of an RNAi-resistant NR2B (NR2B*) cDNA. Interestingly, a chimeric NR2B subunit in which the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail was replaced by that of NR2A failed to rescue LTP while the reverse chimera, NR2A channel with NR2B tail, was able to restore LTP. Thus expression of NR2B with its intact cytoplasmic tail is required for LTP induction, at an age when channel activity of NR2B-NMDARs is not required for LTP. Overexpression of wildtype NR2A failed to rescue LTP in neurons transfected with NR2B-RNAi construct, despite restoring NMDA-EPSC amplitude to a similar level as NR2B*. Surprisingly, an NR2A construct lacking its entire C-terminal cytoplasmic tail regained its ability to restore LTP. Together these data suggest that the NR2B subunit plays a critical role for LTP, presumably by recruiting relevant molecules important for LTP via its cytoplasmic tail. By contrast, NR2A is not essential for LTP and its cytoplasmic tail seems to carry inhibitory factors for LTP. PMID:20164351

  1. Size dependence of protein diffusion in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nenninger, Anja; Mastroianni, Giulia; Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2010-09-01

    Diffusion in the bacterial cytoplasm is regarded as the primary method of intracellular protein movement and must play a major role in controlling the rates of cell processes. A number of recent studies have used green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagging and fluorescence microscopy to probe the movement and distribution of proteins in the bacterial cytoplasm. However, the dynamic behavior of indigenous proteins must be controlled by a complex mixture of specific interactions, combined with the basic physical constraints imposed by the viscosity and macromolecular crowding of the cytoplasm. These factors are difficult to unravel in studies with indigenous proteins. To what extent the addition of a GFP tag might affect the movement of a protein through the cytoplasm has also remained unknown. To resolve these problems, we have carried out a systematic study of the size dependence of protein diffusion coefficients in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm, using engineered GFP multimers (from 2 to 6 covalently linked GFP molecules). Diffusion coefficients were measured using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). At least up to 110 kDa (four linked GFP molecules), the diffusion coefficient varies with size roughly as would be predicted from the Einstein-Stokes equation for a classical (Newtonian) fluid. Thus, protein diffusion coefficients are predictable over this range. GFP tagging of proteins has little impact on the diffusion coefficient over this size range and therefore need not significantly perturb protein movement. Two indigenous E. coli proteins were used to show that their specific interactions within the cell are the main controllers of the diffusion rate. PMID:20581203

  2. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Peremyslov, Valera V.; Cole, Rex A.; Fowler, John E.; Dolja, Valerian V.

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6–1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development. PMID:26426395

  3. Critical Role of the Fusion Protein Cytoplasmic Tail Sequence in Parainfluenza Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Raychel; Takimoto, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between viral glycoproteins, matrix protein and nucleocapsid sustain assembly of parainfluenza viruses at the plasma membrane. Although the protein interactions required for virion formation are considered to be highly specific, virions lacking envelope glycoprotein(s) can be produced, thus the molecular interactions driving viral assembly and production are still unclear. Sendai virus (SeV) and human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV1) are highly similar in structure, however, the cytoplasmic tail sequences of the envelope glycoproteins (HN and F) are relatively less conserved. To unveil the specific role of the envelope glycoproteins in viral assembly, we created chimeric SeVs whose HN (rSeVhHN) or HN and F (rSeVh(HN+F)) were replaced with those of hPIV1. rSeVhHN grew as efficiently as wt SeV or hPIV1, suggesting that the sequence difference in HN does not have a significant impact on SeV replication and virion production. In sharp contrast, the growth of rSeVh(HN+F) was significantly impaired compared to rSeVhHN. rSeVh(HN+Fstail) which expresses a chimeric hPIV1 F with the SeV cytoplasmic tail sequence grew similar to wt SeV or rSeVhHN. Further analysis indicated that the F cytoplasmic tail plays a critical role in cell surface expression/accumulation of HN and F, as well as NP and M association at the plasma membrane. Trafficking of nucelocapsids in infected cells was not significantly affected by the origin of F, suggesting that F cytoplasmic tail is not involved in intracellular movement. These results demonstrate the role of the F cytoplasmic tail in accumulation of structural components at the plasma membrane assembly sites. PMID:23593451

  4. Characterization of the cytoplasmic filament protein gene (cfpA) of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    You, Y; Elmore, S; Colton, L L; Mackenzie, C; Stoops, J K; Weinstock, G M; Norris, S J

    1996-01-01

    Treponema pallidum and other members of the genera Treponema, Spirochaeta, and Leptonema contain multiple cytoplasmic filaments that run the length of the organism just underneath the cytoplasmic membrane. These cytoplasmic filaments have a ribbon-like profile and consist of a major cytoplasmic filament protein subunit (CfpA, formerly called TpN83) with a relative molecular weight of approximately 80,000. Degenerate DNA primers based on N-terminal and CNBr cleavage fragment amino acid sequences of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols) CfpA were utilized to amplify a fragment of the encoding gene (cfpA). A 6.8-kb EcoRI fragment containing all but the 5' end of cfpA was identified by hybridization with the resulting PCR product and cloned into Lambda ZAP II. The 5' region was obtained by inverse PCR, and the complete gene sequence was determined. The cfpA sequence contained a 2,034-nucleotide coding region, a putative promoter with consensus sequences (5'-TTTACA-3' for -35 and 5'-TACAAT-3' for -10) similar to the sigma70 recognition sequence of Escherichia coli and other organisms, and a putative ribosome-binding site (5'-AGGAG-3'). The deduced amino acid sequence of CfpA indicated a protein of 678 residues with a calculated molecular mass of 78.5 kDa and an estimated pI of 6.15. No significant homology to known proteins or structural motifs was found among known prokaryotic or eukaryotic sequences. Expression of a LacZ-CfpA fusion protein in E. coli was detrimental to survival and growth of the host strain and resulted in the formation of short, irregular filaments suggestive of partial self-assembly of CfpA. The cytoplasmic filaments of T. pallidum and other spirochetes appear to represent a unique form of prokaryotic intracytoplasmic inclusions. PMID:8655496

  5. Mechanisms of cytoplasmic pH regulation in alkaliphilic strains of Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Krulwich, T A; Ito, M; Gilmour, R; Guffanti, A A

    1997-11-01

    The central challenge for extremely alkaliphilic Bacillus species is the need to establish and sustain a cytoplasmic pH that is over two units lower than the highly alkaline medium. Its centrality is suggested by the strong correlation between the growth rate in the upper range of pH for growth, i.e., at values above pH 10.5, and the cytoplasmic pH. The diminishing growth rate at extremely high pH values correlates better with the rise in cytoplasmic pH than with other energetic parameters. There are also general adaptations of alkaliphiles that are crucial prerequisites for pH homeostasis as well as other cell functions, i.e., the reduced basic amino acid content of proteins or segments thereof that are exposed to the medium, and there are other challenges of alkaliphily that emerge from solution of the cytoplasmic pH problem, i.e., reduction of the chemiosmotic driving force. For cells growing on glucose, strong evidence exists for the importance of acidic cell wall components, teichuronic acid and teichuronopeptides, in alkaliphily. These wall macromolecules may provide a passive barrier to ion flux. For cells growing on fermentable carbon sources, this and other passive mechanisms may have a particularly substantial role, but for cells growing on both fermentable and nonfermentable substrates, an active Na+-dependent cycle is apparently required for alkaliphily and the alkaliphile's remarkable capacity for pH homeostasis. The active cycle involves primary establishment of an electrochemical gradient via proton extrusion, a secondary electrogenic Na+/H+ antiport to achieve net acidification of the cytoplasm relative to the outside pH, and mechanisms for Na+ re-entry. Recent work in several laboratories on the critical antiporters involved in this cycle has begun to clarify the number and characteristics of the porters that support active mechanisms of pH homeostasis. PMID:9680297

  6. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Cole, Rex A; Fowler, John E; Dolja, Valerian V

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development. PMID:26426395

  7. Nucleus and cytoplasm segmentation in microscopic images using K-means clustering and region growing

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafzadeh, Omid; Dehnavi, Alireza Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Segmentation of leukocytes acts as the foundation for all automated image-based hematological disease recognition systems. Most of the time, hematologists are interested in evaluation of white blood cells only. Digital image processing techniques can help them in their analysis and diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The main objective of this paper is to detect leukocytes from a blood smear microscopic image and segment them into their two dominant elements, nucleus and cytoplasm. The segmentation is conducted using two stages of applying K-means clustering. First, the nuclei are segmented using K-means clustering. Then, a proposed method based on region growing is applied to separate the connected nuclei. Next, the nuclei are subtracted from the original image. Finally, the cytoplasm is segmented using the second stage of K-means clustering. Results: The results indicate that the proposed method is able to extract the nucleus and cytoplasm regions accurately and works well even though there is no significant contrast between the components in the image. Conclusions: In this paper, a method based on K-means clustering and region growing is proposed in order to detect leukocytes from a blood smear microscopic image and segment its components, the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As region growing step of the algorithm relies on the information of edges, it will not able to separate the connected nuclei more accurately in poor edges and it requires at least a weak edge to exist between the nuclei. The nucleus and cytoplasm segments of a leukocyte can be used for feature extraction and classification which leads to automated leukemia detection. PMID:26605213

  8. Protein Kinases Are Associated with Multiple, Distinct Cytoplasmic Granules in Quiescent Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Khyati H.; Nostramo, Regina; Zhang, Bo; Varia, Sapna N.; Klett, Bethany M.; Herman, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    The cytoplasm of the eukaryotic cell is subdivided into distinct functional domains by the presence of a variety of membrane-bound organelles. The remaining aqueous space may be further partitioned by the regulated assembly of discrete ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that contain particular proteins and messenger RNAs. These RNP granules are conserved structures whose importance is highlighted by studies linking them to human disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, relatively little is known about the diversity, composition, and physiological roles of these cytoplasmic structures. To begin to address these issues, we examined the cytoplasmic granules formed by a key set of signaling molecules, the protein kinases of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, a significant fraction of these proteins, almost 20%, was recruited to cytoplasmic foci specifically as cells entered into the G0-like quiescent state, stationary phase. Colocalization studies demonstrated that these foci corresponded to eight different granules, including four that had not been reported previously. All of these granules were found to rapidly disassemble upon the resumption of growth, and the presence of each was correlated with cell viability in the quiescent cultures. Finally, this work also identified new constituents of known RNP granules, including the well-characterized processing body and stress granule. The composition of these latter structures is therefore more varied than previously thought and could be an indicator of additional biological activities being associated with these complexes. Altogether, these observations indicate that quiescent yeast cells contain multiple distinct cytoplasmic granules that may make important contributions to their long-term survival. PMID:25342717

  9. Overexpressed cyclin D3 contributes to retaining the growth inhibitor p27 in the cytoplasm of thyroid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara; Bruni, Paola; Boccia, Angelo; Trapasso, Francesco; Pentimalli, Francesca; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Vento, Maria Teresa; Spiezia, Stefania; Fusco, Alfredo; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    The majority of thyroid carcinomas maintain the expression of the cell growth suppressor p27, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (Cdk2). However, we find that 80% of p27-expressing tumors show an uncommon cytoplasmic localization of p27 protein, associated with high Cdk2 activity. To reproduce such a situation, a mutant p27 devoid of its COOH-terminal nuclear-localization signal was generated (p27-NLS). p27-NLS accumulates in the cytoplasm and fails to induce growth arrest in 2 different cell lines, indicating that cytoplasm-residing p27 is inactive as a growth inhibitor, presumably because it does not interact with nuclear Cdk2. Overexpression of cyclin D3 may account in part for p27 cytoplasmic localization. In thyroid tumors and cell lines, cyclin D3 expression was associated with cytoplasmic localization of p27. Moreover, expression of cyclin D3 in thyroid carcinoma cells induced cytoplasmic retention of cotransfected p27 and rescued p27-imposed growth arrest. Endogenous p27 also localized prevalently to the cytoplasm in normal thyrocytes engineered to stably overexpress cyclin D3 (PC-D3 cells). In these cells, cyclin D3 induced the formation of cytoplasmic p27–cyclin D3–Cdk complexes, which titrated p27 away from intranuclear complexes that contain cyclins A–E and Cdk2. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism that may contribute to overcoming the p27 inhibitory threshold in transformed thyroid cells. PMID:10510327

  10. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor Upf2 exists in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Takanori; Nakamura, Yuka; Ma, Shaofu; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Ishigaki, Yasuhito

    2016-07-01

    Upf2 protein predominantly localizes to the cytoplasmic fraction, and binds to the exon junction complex (EJC) on spliced mRNA. The present study aimed to determine the cellular site where the interaction between Upf2 and EJC occurs. First, the cell lysate was fractionated into the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm, and western blotting to detect levels of Upf2 protein was performed. Upf2 was clearly detected in the cytoplasm and in the nucleoplasm. Secondly, immunostaining was performed, and the majority of Upf2 was detected in the cytoplasmic perinuclear region; a small quantity of Upf2 was detected in the intranuclear region. RNase treatment of the cells reduced the Upf2 immunostained signal. The immunopurified fractions containing nuclear and cytoplasmic Upf2 also contained one of the EJC core factors, RBM8A. These results implied the existence of Upf2 in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, and it appeared to be involved in the construction of the mRNA complex. In order to verify the construction of Upf2‑binding EJC in the nucleoplasm, an in situ proximity ligation assay was performed with anti‑Upf2 and anti‑RBM8A antibodies. These results demonstrated that their interaction occurred not only in the cytoplasmic region, but also in the intranuclear region. Taken together, these results suggested that Upf2 combines with EJC in both the cytoplasmic and the intranuclear fractions, and that it is involved in mRNA metabolism in human cells. PMID:27221324

  11. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor Upf2 exists in both the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    TATSUNO, TAKANORI; NAKAMURA, YUKA; MA, SHAOFU; TOMOSUGI, NAOHISA; ISHIGAKI, YASUHITO

    2016-01-01

    Upf2 protein predominantly localizes to the cytoplasmic fraction, and binds to the exon junction complex (EJC) on spliced mRNA. The present study aimed to determine the cellular site where the interaction between Upf2 and EJC occurs. First, the cell lysate was fractionated into the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm, and western blotting to detect levels of Upf2 protein was performed. Upf2 was clearly detected in the cytoplasm and in the nucleoplasm. Secondly, immunostaining was performed, and the majority of Upf2 was detected in the cytoplasmic perinuclear region; a small quantity of Upf2 was detected in the intranuclear region. RNase treatment of the cells reduced the Upf2 immunostained signal. The immune-purified fractions containing nuclear and cytoplasmic Upf2 also contained one of the EJC core factors, RBM8A. These results implied the existence of Upf2 in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, and it appeared to be involved in the construction of the mRNA complex. In order to verify the construction of Upf2-binding EJC in the nucleoplasm, an in situ proximity ligation assay was performed with anti-Upf2 and anti-RBM8A antibodies. These results demonstrated that their interaction occurred not only in the cytoplasmic region, but also in the intranuclear region. Taken together, these results suggested that Upf2 combines with EJC in both the cytoplasmic and the intranuclear fractions, and that it is involved in mRNA metabolism in human cells. PMID:27221324

  12. METAL-INDUCED ALTERATION OF THE CELL MEMBRANE/CYTOPLASM COMPLEX STUDIED BY FLOW CYTOMETRY AND DETERGENT LYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow cytometric analysis of the cell cycle is most effectively accomplished with membrane-/cytoplasm-free ("clean") nuclei. Non-ionic detergents (e.g. NP40 or Triton X-100) commonly are employed to solubilize cells membranes/cytoplasm to produce "clean" nuclei. reatment of murine...

  13. Molecular diversity of male sterility inducing and male-fertile cytoplasms in the genus Helianthus.

    PubMed

    Horn, R.

    2002-03-01

    The organisation of mtDNA was investigated for 28 sources of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and a fertile line (normal cytoplasm) of Helianthus annuus by Southern hybridisation. In addition to nine known mitochondrial genes ( atp6, atp9, cob, coxI, coxII, coxIII, 18S, 5S and nd5) three probes for the open reading frames in the rearranged area of PET1, orfH522, orfH708 and orfH873, were used. Genetic similarities of the investigat-ed cytoplasms varied between 0.3 and 1. Cluster analyses using the UPGMA method allowed the distinction of ten mitochondrial (mt) types between the 29 investigated cytoplasms. Most mitochondrial types comprise two or more CMS sources, which could not be further separated, like the PET1-like CMS sources (with the exception of ANO1 and PRR1), or ANN1/ANN2/ANN3, ANN4/ ANN5, ARG3/RIG1, BOL1/EXI1/PEF1/PEP1 and GIG1/ PET2. ANL1, ANL2 and the fertile cytoplasms are also regarded as one mitochondrial type. Unique banding patterns were only observed for ANT1 ( atp6), MAX1 ( atp6, orfH522 and orfH708) and PRR1 ( coxII). However, four of the mitochondrial types showed unique hybridisation signals: ANN4/ANN5 had characteristic bands for atp6 and orfH708, PEF1/PEP1/EXI1/BOL1 for atp6and coxII, and PET2/GIG1 for atp9. The PET1-like cytoplasms all shared the same patterns for orfH522, orfH708and cob (except ANO1). It could be demonstrated that CMS sources, like, e.g., PET2 and PEF1, are different from PET1 in mtDNA organisation and the CMS mechanism. Therefore, these CMS sources represent interesting candidates for the development of new hybrid breeding systems based on new CMS mechanisms. PMID:12582659

  14. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q.; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  15. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Eidahl, Jocelyn O; Lancelot, Céline; Tassin, Alexandra; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  16. Cytoplasmic Tail Regulates the Intercellular Adhesion Function of the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Balzar, Maarten; Bakker, Hellen A. M.; Briaire-de-Bruijn, Inge H.; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Warnaar, Sven O.; Litvinov, Sergey V.

    1998-01-01

    Ep-CAM, an epithelium-specific cell-cell adhesion molecule (CAM) not structurally related to the major families of CAMs, contains a cytoplasmic domain of 26 amino acids. The chemical disruption of the actin microfilaments, but not of the microtubuli or intermediate filaments, affected the localization of Ep-CAM at the cell-cell boundaries, suggesting that the molecule interacts with the actin-based cytoskeleton. Mutated forms of Ep-CAM were generated with the cytoplasmic domain truncated at various lengths. All of the mutants were transported to the cell surface in the transfectants; however, the mutant lacking the complete cytoplasmic domain was not able to localize to the cell-cell boundaries, in contrast to mutants with partial deletions. Both the disruption of the actin microfilaments and a complete truncation of the cytoplasmic tail strongly affected the ability of Ep-CAM to mediate aggregation of L cells. The capability of direct aggregation was reduced for the partially truncated mutants but remained cytochalasin D sensitive. The tail truncation did not affect the ability of the transfectants to adhere to solid-phase-adsorbed Ep-CAM, suggesting that the ability to form stable adhesions and not the ligand specificity of the molecule was affected by the truncation. The formation of intercellular adhesions mediated by Ep-CAM induced a redistribution to the cell-cell boundaries of α-actinin, but not of vinculin, talin, filamin, spectrin, or catenins. Coprecipitation demonstrated direct association of Ep-CAM with α-actinin. Binding of α-actinin to purified mutated and wild-type Ep-CAMs and to peptides representing different domains of the cytoplasmic tail of Ep-CAM demonstrates two binding sites for α-actinin at positions 289 to 296 and 304 to 314 of the amino acid sequence. The results demonstrate that the cytoplasmic domain of Ep-CAM regulates the adhesion function of the molecule through interaction with the actin cytoskeleton via α-actinin. PMID:9671492

  17. Cytoplasmic tail regulates the intercellular adhesion function of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Balzar, M; Bakker, H A; Briaire-de-Bruijn, I H; Fleuren, G J; Warnaar, S O; Litvinov, S V

    1998-08-01

    Ep-CAM, an epithelium-specific cell-cell adhesion molecule (CAM) not structurally related to the major families of CAMs, contains a cytoplasmic domain of 26 amino acids. The chemical disruption of the actin microfilaments, but not of the microtubuli or intermediate filaments, affected the localization of Ep-CAM at the cell-cell boundaries, suggesting that the molecule interacts with the actin-based cytoskeleton. Mutated forms of Ep-CAM were generated with the cytoplasmic domain truncated at various lengths. All of the mutants were transported to the cell surface in the transfectants; however, the mutant lacking the complete cytoplasmic domain was not able to localize to the cell-cell boundaries, in contrast to mutants with partial deletions. Both the disruption of the actin microfilaments and a complete truncation of the cytoplasmic tail strongly affected the ability of Ep-CAM to mediate aggregation of L cells. The capability of direct aggregation was reduced for the partially truncated mutants but remained cytochalasin D sensitive. The tail truncation did not affect the ability of the transfectants to adhere to solid-phase-adsorbed Ep-CAM, suggesting that the ability to form stable adhesions and not the ligand specificity of the molecule was affected by the truncation. The formation of intercellular adhesions mediated by Ep-CAM induced a redistribution to the cell-cell boundaries of alpha-actinin, but not of vinculin, talin, filamin, spectrin, or catenins. Coprecipitation demonstrated direct association of Ep-CAM with alpha-actinin. Binding of alpha-actinin to purified mutated and wild-type Ep-CAMs and to peptides representing different domains of the cytoplasmic tail of Ep-CAM demonstrates two binding sites for alpha-actinin at positions 289 to 296 and 304 to 314 of the amino acid sequence. The results demonstrate that the cytoplasmic domain of Ep-CAM regulates the adhesion function of the molecule through interaction with the actin cytoskeleton via alpha

  18. Estrogen action and cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Part I: membrane-associated signaling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Driggers, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress in recent years has suggested that estrogen action in vivo is complex and often involves activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades in addition to genomic actions mediated directly through estrogen receptors α and β. Rather than a linear response mediated solely through estrogen-responsive DNA elements, in vivo estrogen might simultaneously activate distinct signaling cascades that function as networks to coordinate tissue responses to estrogen. This complex signaling system provides for exquisite control and plasticity of response to estrogen at the tissue level, and undoubtedly contributes to the remarkable tissue-specific responses to estrogens. In part I of this series, we summarize cytoplasmic signaling modules involving estrogen or estrogen receptors, with particular focus on recently described membrane-associated signaling complexes. PMID:12217492

  19. Ooplasm donation in humans: the need to investigate the transmission of mitochondrial DNA following cytoplasmic transfer.

    PubMed

    St John, Justin C

    2002-08-01

    The use of cytoplasmic transfer as an assisted reproductive technique has generated much attention. This arises as donor mitochondria are introduced into the cytoplasm of the recipient oocyte. The consequences are the possible transmission of two mitochondrial (mt)DNA populations to the offspring. This pattern of inheritance is in contrast to the strictly maternal manner in which mtDNA is transmitted following natural fertilization and ICSI. This paper discusses the advantages of using such a technique to enhance embryonic development from poor quality oocytes with respect to the low copy number of mtDNA found in some oocytes following superovulation protocols. However, it also cautions against using such a technique before a clearer understanding of the patterns of inheritance and transmission of mtDNA has been established and suggests that animal models be utilised to do so. PMID:12151420

  20. Cytoplasmic motion induced by cytoskeleton stretching and its effect on cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T

    2011-09-01

    Cytoplasmic motion assumed as a steady state laminar flow induced by cytoskeleton stretching in a cell is determined and its effect on the mechanical behavior of the cell under externally applied forces is demonstrated. Non-Newtonian fluid is assumed for the multiphase cytoplasmic fluid and the analytical velocity field around the macromolecular chain is obtained by solving the reduced nonlinear momentum equation using homotopy technique. The entropy generation by the fluid internal friction is calculated and incorporated into the entropic elasticity based 8-chain constitutive relations. Numerical examples showed strengthening behavior of cells in response to externally applied mechanical stimuli. The spatial distribution of the stresses within a cell under externally applied fluid flow forces were also studied. PMID:21977515

  1. Interaction with Ppil3 leads to the cytoplasmic localization of Apoptin in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huo Dehua; Yi Lina; Yang Jine

    2008-07-18

    Apoptin, a small protein encoded by chicken anemia virus (CAV), induces cell death specifically in cancer cells. In normal cells, Apoptin remains in the cytoplasm; whereas in cancerous cells, it migrates into the nucleus and kills the cell. Cellular localization appears to be crucial. Through a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified human Peptidyl-prolyl isomerase-like 3 (Ppil3) as one of the Apoptin-associated proteins. Ppil3 could bind Apoptin directly, and held Apoptin in cytoplasm even in tumor cells. We then demonstrated that the nuclearcytoplasmic distribution of Apoptin is related to the expression level of intrinsic Ppil3. Moreover, extrinsic modifying of Ppil3 levels also resulted in nuclearcytoplasmic shuffling of Apoptin. The Apoptin P109A mutant, located between the putative nuclear localization and export signals, could significantly impair the function of Ppil3. Our results suggest a new direction for the localization mechanism study of Apoptin in cells.

  2. Evidence for a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, C.P.; Schreferl-Kunar, G.; Woehrer, W.; Roehr, M.

    1988-03-01

    Oxalate accumulation of up to 8 g/liter was induced in Aspergillus niger by shifting the pH from 6 to 8. This required the presence of P/sub i/ and a nitrogen source and was inhibited by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Exogenously added /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was not incorporated into oxalate, but was incorporated into acetate and malate, thus indicating the biosynthesis of oxalate by hydrolytic cleavage of oxaloacetate. Inhibition of mitochondrial citrate metabolism by fluorocitrate did not significantly decrease the oxalate yield. The putative enzyme that was responsible for this oxaloacetate hydrolase (EC 3.7.1.1), which was induced de novo during the pH shift. Subcellular fractionation of oxalic acid-forming mycelia of A. niger showed that this enzyme is located in the cytoplasm of A. niger. The results are consistent with a cytoplasmic pathway of oxalate formation which does not involve the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  3. Cytoplasmic Ig-Domain Proteins: Cytoskeletal Regulators with a Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Otey, Carol A.; Dixon, Richard; Stack, Christianna; Goicoechea, Silvia M.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin domains are found in a wide variety of functionally diverse transmembrane proteins, and also in a smaller number of cytoplasmic proteins. Members of this latter group are usually associated with the actin cytoskeleton, and most of them bind directly to either actin or myosin, or both. Recently, studies of inherited human disorders have identified disease-causing mutations in five cytoplasmic Ig-domain proteins: myosin-binding protein C, titin, myotilin, palladin, and myopalladin. Together with results obtained from cultured cells and mouse models, these clinical studies have yielded novel insights into the unexpected roles of Ig domain proteins in mechanotransduction and signaling to the nucleus. An emerging theme in this field is that cytoskeleton-associated Ig domain proteins are more than structural elements of the cell, and may have evolved to fill different needs in different cellular compartments. PMID:19466753

  4. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-05-15

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes.

  5. Cytoplasmic translocation of HuR contributes to angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Danna; Ge, Lan; Gao, Yan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wang, Haichang; Yang, Guodong

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is one of the key structural changes of the hypertrophied left ventricle in hypertensive heart disease. Increased angiotensin II was found to be important in the hypertension related fibrosis, while the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we found that angiotensin II dose-dependently increased the expression of Col1a1, Col3a1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were blocked by ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Mechanistically, angiotensin II induced robust ROS generation, which in turn induced cytoplasmic translocation of RNA binding protein HuR. Cytoplasmic translocated HuR increased TGFβ pathway activity and subsequent collagen synthesis. In contrast, knockdown of HuR nearly blocked angiotensin II induced TGFβ activation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, we here identified that angiotensin II promotes collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblast through ROS-HuR-TGFβ pathway. PMID:26093296

  6. Gravitational effects on the rearrangement of cytoplasmic components during axial formation in amphibian development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. R.; Whalon, B.; Moore, J.; Danilchik, M.

    The spatial positioning of the dorsal-ventral axis in the amphibian, Xenopus laevis, can be experimentally manipulated either by tipping the embryo relative to Earth's gravitational force vector or by centrifugation. Experimental evidence suggests that certain cytoplasmic components are redistributed during the first cell cycle and that these components are, in part, responsible for the establishment of this axis. Further studies indicate that at least some of the cytoplasmic components responsible for establishing this axis may be RNA. Recombinant cDNA and PCR technology are utilized to isolate DNA clones for messenger RNA which becomes spatially localized to the dorsal side of the embryo. These clones are being used to study the mechanisms of spatial localization and the function of the localized RNA transcripts.

  7. Cytoplasmic streaming emerges naturally from hydrodynamic self-organisation of a microfilament suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Francis; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is the ubiquitous phenomenon of deliberate, active circulation of the entire liquid contents of a plant or animal cell by the walking of motor proteins on polymer filament tracks. Its manifestation in the plant kingdom is particularly striking, where many cells exhibit highly organised patterns of flow. How these regimented flow templates develop is biologically unclear, but there is growing experimental evidence to support hydrodynamically-mediated self-organisation of the underlying microfilament tracks. Using the spirally-streaming giant internodal cells of the characean algae Chara and Nitella as our prototype, we model the developing sub-cortical streaming cytoplasm as a continuum microfilament suspension subject to hydrodynamic and geometric forcing. We show that our model successfully reproduces emergent streaming behaviour by evolving from a totally disordered initial state into a steady characean ``conveyor belt'' configuration as a consequence of the cell geometry, and discuss applicability to other classes of steadily streaming plant cells.

  8. Flow-induced channel formation in the cytoplasm of motile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert D.; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Wright, Grady B.

    2011-07-01

    A model is presented to explain the development of flow channels within the cytoplasm of the plasmodium of the giant amoeba Physarum polycephalum. The formation of channels is related to the development of a self-organizing tubular network in large cells. Experiments indicate that the flow of cytoplasm is involved in the development and organization of these networks, and the mathematical model proposed here is motivated by recent experiments involving the observation of development of flow channel in small cells. A model of pressure-driven flow through a polymer network is presented in which the rate of flow increases the rate of depolymerization. Numerical solutions and asymptotic analysis of the model in one spatial dimension show that under very general assumptions this model predicts the formation of channels in response to flow.

  9. Cytoplasmic protein aggregates interfere with nucleocytoplasmic transport of protein and RNA.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Andreas C; Frottin, Frédéric; Hornburg, Daniel; Feng, Li R; Meissner, Felix; Patra, Maria; Tatzelt, Jörg; Mann, Matthias; Winklhofer, Konstanze F; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hipp, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-like protein aggregation is associated with neurodegeneration and other pathologies. The nature of the toxic aggregate species and their mechanism of action remain elusive. Here, we analyzed the compartment specificity of aggregate toxicity using artificial β-sheet proteins, as well as fragments of mutant huntingtin and TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43). Aggregation in the cytoplasm interfered with nucleocytoplasmic protein and RNA transport. In contrast, the same proteins did not inhibit transport when forming inclusions in the nucleus at or around the nucleolus. Protein aggregation in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus, caused the sequestration and mislocalization of proteins containing disordered and low-complexity sequences, including multiple factors of the nuclear import and export machinery. Thus, impairment of nucleocytoplasmic transport may contribute to the cellular pathology of various aggregate deposition diseases. PMID:26634439

  10. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin; Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-01-01

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes. PMID:24889253

  11. A cytoplasmic pathway for gapmer antisense oligonucleotide-mediated gene silencing in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Castanotto, Daniela; Lin, Min; Kowolik, Claudia; Wang, LiAnn; Ren, Xiao-Qin; Soifer, Harris S.; Koch, Troels; Hansen, Bo Rode; Oerum, Henrik; Armstrong, Brian; Wang, Zhigang; Bauer, Paul; Rossi, John; Stein, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are known to trigger mRNA degradation in the nucleus via an RNase H-dependent mechanism. We have now identified a putative cytoplasmic mechanism through which ASO gapmers silence their targets when transfected or delivered gymnotically (i.e. in the absence of any transfection reagent). We have shown that the ASO gapmers can interact with the Ago-2 PAZ domain and can localize into GW-182 mRNA-degradation bodies (GW-bodies). The degradation products of the targeted mRNA, however, are not generated by Ago-2-directed cleavage. The apparent identification of a cytoplasmic pathway complements the previously known nuclear activity of ASOs and concurrently suggests that nuclear localization is not an absolute requirement for gene silencing. PMID:26433227

  12. Cytoplasmic Calcium in the Mediation of Macula Densa Tubulo-Glomerular Feedback Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwin Bell, P.; Navar, L. Gabriel

    1982-02-01

    Within each nephron of the mammalian kidney, a feedback mechanism operating between the macula densa segment of the distal tubule and the afferent arteriole participates in the regulation of glomerular filtration rate. Retrograde microperfusion studies in rats were conducted to test the hypothesis that activation of macula densa cytoplasmic calcium is involved in the transmission of feedback signals to the vascular elements. Perfusion into distal tubules with a hypotonic solution (70 milliosmolar) elicited moderate decreases in glomerular pressure of 6 ± 0.8 millimeters of mercury. With the addition of a calcium ionophore (A23187) glomerular pressure decreased by 16 ± 1.1 millimeters of mercury. When a solution devoid of calcium but containing A23187 was used, the feedback response was inhibited. Thus, cytoplasmic calcium within the receptor cells may participate in the transmission of feedback signals to the contractile cells.

  13. The CMS-associated 16 kDa protein encoded by orfH522 in the PET1 cytoplasm is also present in other male-sterile cytoplasms of sunflower.

    PubMed

    Horn, R; Hustedt, J E; Horstmeyer, A; Hahnen, J; Zetsche, K; Friedt, W

    1996-02-01

    In sunflower plants carrying the PET1 cytoplasm male sterility (CMS) is associated with a new open reading frame (orfH522) in the 3'-flanking region of the atpA gene and an additional 16 kDa protein. Twenty-seven male-sterile cytoplasms of different origin were studied for the expression of the 16 kDa protein. In addition to the PET1 cytoplasm nine other male-sterile cytoplasms express the CMS-associated protein. These CMS sources originate from different interspecific crosses, from spontaneously occurring male-sterile plants in wild sunflower and from induced mutagenesis. Polyclonal antisera were raised against fusion proteins which contain 421 bp of the 3'-coding region of orfH522 to verify by immunological methods the identity of the other CMS cytoplasms. The anti-ORFH522 antiserum showed a positive reaction in the immunoblot with all CMS cytoplasms which expressing the 16 kDa protein. Investigations of the mitochondrial DNA demonstrated that all ten CMS cytoplasms which express the 16 kDa protein have the same organization at the atpA locus. OrfH522 as probes gave the same transcript pattern for the investigated CMS cytoplasms, just as for PET1. The MAX1 cytoplasm has an orfH522-related sequence but does not synthesize the 16 kDa protein. Using the sodium carbonate treatment the 16 kDa protein proved to be membrane-bound. Computer analyses predict that the hydrophobic N-terminal region of ORFH522 may form a transmembrane helix functioning as membrane anchor. PMID:8605303

  14. Developmentally Regulated RNA-binding Protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding Motif Protein 45 (RBM45), a Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking Protein, Forms TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43)-mediated Cytoplasmic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takafumi; Sakashita, Eiji; Kasashima, Katsumi; Tominaga, Kaoru; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Matsuura, Tohru; Hamamoto, Toshiro; Endo, Hitoshi

    2016-07-15

    Cytoplasmic protein aggregates are one of the pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Several RNA-binding proteins have been identified as components of inclusion bodies. Developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding motif protein 45 is an RNA-binding protein that was recently described as a component in ALS- and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cytoplasmic Drb1 aggregation remains unclear. Here, using an in vitro cellular model, we demonstrated that Drb1 co-localizes with cytoplasmic aggregates mediated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43, a major component of ALS and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. We also defined the domains involved in the subcellular localization of Drb1 to clarify the role of Drb1 in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in ALS and FTLD. Drb1 predominantly localized in the nucleus via a classical nuclear localization signal in its carboxyl terminus and is a shuttling protein between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identify a double leucine motif serving as a nuclear export signal. The Drb1 mutant, presenting mutations in both nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal, is prone to aggregate in the cytoplasm. The mutant Drb1-induced cytoplasmic aggregates not only recruit TAR DNA-binding protein 43 but also decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these results indicate that perturbation of Drb1 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking induces toxic cytoplasmic aggregates, suggesting that mislocalization of Drb1 is involved in the cause of cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. PMID:27226551

  15. Aldolase exists in both the fluid and solid phases of cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, L; Taylor, D L

    1988-09-01

    We have prepared a functional fluorescent analogue of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase (rhodamine [Rh]-aldolase), using the succinimidyl ester of carboxytetramethyl-rhodamine. Fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching measurements of the diffusion coefficient of Rh-aldolase in aqueous solutions gave a value of 4.7 x 10(-7) cm2/S, and no immobile fraction. In the presence of filamentous actin, there was a 4.5-fold reduction in diffusion coefficient, as well as a 36% immobile fraction, demonstrating binding of Rh-aldolase to actin. However, in the presence of a 100-fold molar excess of its substrate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate, both the mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient of Rh-aldolase returned to control levels, indicating competition between substrate binding and actin cross-linking. When Rh-aldolase was microinjected into Swiss 3T3 cells, a relatively uniform intracellular distribution of fluorescence was observed. However, there were significant spatial differences in the in vivo diffusion coefficient and mobile fraction of Rh-aldolase measured with fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching. In the perinuclear region, we measured an apparent cytoplasmic diffusion coefficient of 1.1 x 10(-7) cm2/s with a 23% immobile fraction; while measurements in the cell periphery gave a value of 5.7 x 10(-8) cm2/s, with no immobile fraction. Ratio imaging of Rh-aldolase and FITC-dextran indicated that FITC-dextran was relatively excluded excluded from stress fiber domains. We interpret these data as evidence for the partitioning of aldolase between a soluble fraction in the fluid phase and a fraction associated with the solid phase of cytoplasm. The partitioning of aldolase and other glycolytic enzymes between the fluid and solid phases of cytoplasm could play a fundamental role in the control of glycolysis, the organization of cytoplasm, and cell motility. The concepts and experimental approaches described in this study can be applied to other cellular

  16. Cytoplasmic tail length influences fatty acid selection for acylation of viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Veit, M; Reverey, H; Schmidt, M F

    1996-01-01

    We report remarkable differences in the fatty acid content of thioester-type acylated glycoproteins of enveloped viruses from mammalian cells. The E2 glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus contains mainly palmitic acid like most other palmitoylated proteins analysed so far. However, the other glycoprotein (E1) of the same virus, as well as the HEF (haemagglutinin esterase fusion) glycoprotein of influenza C virus, are unique in this respect because they are acylated primarily with stearic acid. Comparative radiolabelling of uninfected cells with different fatty acids suggests that stearate may also be the prevailing fatty acid in some cellular acylproteins. To look for further differences between palmitoylated and stearoylated glycoproteins we characterized stearoylation in more detail. We identified the acylation site of HEF as a cysteine residue located at the boundary between the transmembrane region and the cytoplasmic tail. The attachment of stearate to HEF and E1 occurs post-translationally in a pre-Golgi compartment. Thus, stearoylated and palmitoylated proteins cannot be discriminated on the basis of the fatty acid linkage site or the intracellular compartment, where acylation occurs. However, stearoylated acylproteins contain a very short, positively charged cytoplasmic tail, whereas in palmitoylated proteins this molecular region is longer. Replacing the short cytoplasmic tail of stearoylated HEF with the long influenza A virus haemagglutinin (HA) tail in an HEF-HA chimera, and subsequent vaccinia T7 expression in CV-1 cells, yielded proteins with largely palmitic acid bound. The reverse chimera, HA-HEF with a short cytoplasmic tail was not fatty acylated at all during expression, indicating that conformational or topological constraints control fatty acid transfer. PMID:8761467

  17. Association between cytoplasmic CRABP2, altered retinoic acid signaling, and poor prognosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong-Zong; Li, Shuai; Garcia, Elizabeth; Glubrecht, Darryl D; Yin Poon, Ho; Easaw, Jacob C; Godbout, Roseline

    2016-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a metabolite of vitamin A, is required for the regulation of growth and development. Aberrant expression of molecules involved in RA signaling has been reported in various cancer types including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2) has previously been shown to play a key role in the transport of RA to retinoic acid receptors (RARs) to activate their transcription regulatory activity. Here, we demonstrate that CRABP2 is predominantly located in the cytoplasm of GBM tumors. Cytoplasmic, but not nuclear, CRABP2 levels in GBM tumors are associated with poor patient survival. Treatment of malignant glioma cell lines with RA results in a dose-dependent increase in accumulation of CRABP2 in the cytoplasm. CRABP2 knockdown reduces proliferation rates of malignant glioma cells, and enhances RA-induced RAR activation. Levels of CRYAB, a small heat shock protein with anti-apoptotic activity, and GFAP, an astrocyte-specific intermediate filament protein, are greatly reduced in CRABP2-depleted cells. Restoration of CRYAB expression partially but significantly reversed the effect of CRABP2 depletion on RAR activation. Our combined in vivo and in vitro data indicate that: (i) CRABP2 is an important determinant of clinical outcome in GBM patients, and (ii) the mechanism of action of CRABP2 in GBM involves sequestration of RA in the cytoplasm and activation of an anti-apoptotic pathway, thereby enhancing proliferation and preventing RA-mediated cell death and differentiation. We propose that reducing CRABP2 levels may enhance the therapeutic index of RA in GBM patients. GLIA 2016;64:963-976. PMID:26893190

  18. Avian retroviral RNA element promotes unspliced RNA accumulation in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Ogert, R A; Lee, L H; Beemon, K L

    1996-01-01

    All retroviruses need mechanisms for nucleocytoplasmic export of their unspliced RNA and for maintenance of this RNA in the cytoplasm, where it is either translated to produce Gag and Pol proteins or packaged into viral particles. The complex retroviruses encode Rev or Rex regulatory proteins, which interact with cis-acting viral sequences to promote cytoplasmic expression of incompletely spliced viral RNAs. Since the simple retroviruses do not encode regulatory proteins, we proposed that they might contain cis-acting sequences that could interact with cellular Rev-like proteins. To test this possibility, we initially looked for a cis-acting sequence in avian retroviruses that could substitute for Rev and the Rev response element in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression constructs. A cis-acting element in the 3' untranslated region of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) RNA was found to promote Rev-independent expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag proteins. This element was mapped between RSV nucleotides 8770 and 8925 and includes one copy of the direct repeat (DR) sequences flanking the RSV src gene; similar activity was observed for the upstream DR. To address the function of this element in RSV, both copies of the DR sequence were deleted. Subsequently, each DR sequence was inserted separately back into this deleted construct. While the viral construct lacking both DR sequences failed to replicate, constructs containing either the upstream or downstream DR replicated well. In the absence of both DRs, Gag protein levels were severely diminished and cytoplasmic levels of unspliced viral RNA were significantly reduced; replacement of either DR sequence led to normal levels of Gag protein and cytoplasmic unspliced RNA. PMID:8648719

  19. Adaptive epithelial cytoplasm segmentation and epithelial unit separation in immunoflurorescent images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Janakiramanan; Scott, Richard; Ajemba, Peter; Karvir, Hrishikesh; Khan, Faisal; Zeineh, Jack; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2012-02-01

    Tissue segmentation is one of the key preliminary steps in the morphometric analysis of tissue architecture. In multi-channel immunoflurorescent biomarker images, the primary segmentation steps consist of segmenting the nuclei (epithelial and stromal) and epithelial cytoplasm from 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and cytokeratin 18 (CK18) biomarker images respectively. The epithelial cytoplasm segmentation can be very challenging due to variability in cytoplasm morphology and image staining. A robust and adaptive segmentation algorithm was developed for the purpose of both delineating the boundaries and separating thin gaps that separate the epithelial unit structures. This paper discusses novel methods that were developed for adaptive segmentation of epithelial cytoplasm and separation of epithelial units. The adaptive segmentation was performed by computing the non-epithelial background texture of every CK18 biomarker image. The epithelial unit separation was performed using two complementary techniques: a marker based, center-initialized watershed transform and a boundary initialized fast marching-watershed segmentation. The adaptive segmentation algorithm was tested on 926 CK18 biomarker biopsy images (326 patients) with limited background noise and 1030 prostatectomy images (374 patients) with noisy to very noisy background. The segmentation performance was measured using two different methods, namely; stability and background textural metrics. It was observed that the database of 1030 noisy prostatectomy images had a lower mean value (using stability and three background texture performance metrics) compared to the biopsy dataset of 926 images that had limited background noise. The average of all four performance metrics yielded 94.32% accuracy for prostatectomy images compared to 99.40% accuracy for biopsy images.

  20. Cytoplasmic translocation, aggregation, and cleavage of TDP-43 by enteroviral proteases modulate viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fung, G; Shi, J; Deng, H; Hou, J; Wang, C; Hong, A; Zhang, J; Jia, W; Luo, H

    2015-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that infection by coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a positive-stranded RNA enterovirus, results in the accumulation of insoluble ubiquitin-protein aggregates, which resembles the common feature of neurodegenerative diseases. The importance of protein aggregation in viral pathogenesis has been recognized; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain ill-defined. Transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) is an RNA-binding protein that has an essential role in regulating RNA metabolism at multiple levels. Cleavage and cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 serves as a major molecular marker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration and contributes significantly to disease progression. In this study, we reported that TDP-43 is translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during CVB3 infection through the activity of viral protease 2A, followed by the cleavage mediated by viral protease 3C. Cytoplasmic translocation of TDP-43 is accompanied by reduced solubility and increased formation of protein aggregates. The cleavage takes place at amino-acid 327 between glutamine and alanine, resulting in the generation of an N- and C-terminal cleavage fragment of ~35 and ~8 kDa, respectively. The C-terminal product of TDP-43 is unstable and quickly degraded through the proteasome degradation pathway, whereas the N-terminal truncation of TDP-43 acts as a dominant-negative mutant that inhibits the function of native TDP-43 in alternative RNA splicing. Lastly, we demonstrated that knockdown of TDP-43 results in an increase in viral titers, suggesting a protective role for TDP-43 in CVB3 infection. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel model by which cytoplasmic redistribution and cleavage of TDP-43 as a consequence of CVB3 infection disrupts the solubility and transcriptional activity of TDP-43. Our results also reveal a mechanism evolved by enteroviruses to support efficient viral infection. PMID

  1. Detailed mapping of the species cytoplasm-specific (scs) gene in durum wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Kristin J; Gehlhar, Sarah B; Maan, Shivcharan S; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2003-01-01

    The compatibility-inducing action of the scs(ti) (species cytoplasm-specific gene derived from Triticum timopheevii) and Vi (vitality) genes can be observed when a durum (T. turgidum) nucleus is placed in T. longissimum cytoplasm. These two genes restore compatibility between an otherwise incompatible nucleus and cytoplasm. The objective of this study was to localize the scs(ti) gene on a linkage map of chromosome 1A, which could eventually be used to clone the gene. The mapping population consisted of 110 F2 individuals derived from crossing a Langdon-T. dicoccoides chromosome 1A substitution line with a euplasmic (normal cytoplasm) line homozygous for the scs(ti) gene. Through a series of testcrosses the genotypes of the 110 individuals were determined: 22 had two copies, 59 had one copy, and 29 had no copy of the scs(ti) gene. Data from RFLP, AFLP, and microsatellite analysis were used to create a linkage map. The flanking marker loci found for the scs(ti) gene were Xbcd12 and Xbcd1449-1A.2 with distances of 2.3 and 0.6 cM, respectively. Nearly 10% of individuals in this population were double recombinant for a genetic interval of <3 cM. A blistering phenotype reminiscent of the phenotype observed in maize brittle-1 mutable was also evident in these individuals. The higher frequency of double recombination within this region and seed-blistering phenotype could be an indication of a transposable element(s) in this locus. PMID:14704192

  2. The Cytoplasmic and Periplasmic Expression Levels and Folding of Organophosphorus Hydrolase Enzyme in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Khajeh, Khosro; Farnoosh, Gholamreza; Hassanpour, Kazem; Khodi, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) is a type of organophosphate-degrading enzyme which is widely used in the bioremediation process. Objectives: In this study, the periplasmic and cytoplasmic productions and the activity of recombinant OPH in Escherichia coli were investigated and compared using two pET systems (pET21a and pET26b). Materials and Methods: The sequence encoding the opd gene was synthesized and expressed in the form of inclusion body using pET21a-opd and in the periplasmic space in pET26b-opd. Results: Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed a band of about 37 kDa with a maximum expression level at 30°C from pET21a-opd.However, the obtained results of the periplasmic space extraction of OPH (pET26b-opd) showed a very weak band, while the cytoplasmic expression of OPH (pET21a-opd) produced a strong protein band. Conclusions: The activities studied by the production of PNP were determined by following the increase at 410 nm. The maximum PNP was produced at 30°C with an optical density of 10.62 in the presence of cytoplasmic expression of OPH (pET21a-opd). Consequently, our results suggest cytoplasmic expression system as an appropriate candidate with a high amount of OPH in spite of inclusion body formation, which needs an additional refolding step. PMID:26870308

  3. Intratumoral injection of taxol in vivo suppresses A549 tumor showing cytoplasmic vacuolization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoyang; Chen, Tongsheng

    2012-04-01

    Based on our recent in vitro studies, this report was designed to explore the mechanism by which high concentration of taxol (70 µM) induced paraptosis-like cell death in human lung carcinoma (A549) cells, and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of taxol using A549 tumor-bearing mice in vivo. Exposure of cells to taxol induced time-dependent cytotoxicity and cytoplasmic vacuolization without the involvement of Bax, Bak, Mcl-1, Bcl-XL, and caspase-3. Although taxol treatment induced activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) cleavage indicative of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, silencing ATF6 by shATF6 did not prevent taxol-induced both cytotoxcity and cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting that taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization and cell death were not due to ER stress. Moreover, taxol-treated cells did not show DNA fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the typical characteristics of apoptosis. In addition, taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization did not show the cellular lysis, the characteristics of oncosis, and positive of β-galactosidase, the characteristic of senescence, indicating that taxol induced paraptosis-like cell death is neither oncosis nor senescence. Moreover, our in vivo data showed that intratumoral injection of taxol (50 mg/kg) in A549 tumor xenograft mice on day 1 and day 19 potently suppressed tumor growth showing significant ER vacuolization without toxicity. In conclusion, high concentration of taxol exhibits a significant anticancer activity by inducing paraptosis-like cell death in vitro and in vivo, without significant toxicity, suggesting a promising therapeutic strategy for apoptosis-resistance cancer by inducing ER vacuolization. PMID:22134971

  4. Human autoantibodies to diacyl-phosphatidylethanolamine recognize a specific set of discrete cytoplasmic domains

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, C C F C; Fritzler, M J; Mortara, R A; Silva, N P; Almeida, I C; Andrade, L E C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a novel human autoantibody–autoantigen system represented as cytoplasmic discrete speckles (CDS) in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). A distinct CDS IIF pattern represented by 3–20 discrete speckles dispersed throughout the cytoplasm was identified among other cytoplasmic speckled IIF patterns. The cytoplasmic domains labelled by human anti-CDS-1 antibodies did not co-localize with endosome/lysosome markers EEA1 and LAMP-2, but showed partial co-localization with glycine–tryptophan bodies (GWB). CDS-1 sera did not react with several cellular extracts in immunoblotting and did not immunoprecipitate recombinant GW182 or EEA1 proteins. The typical CDS-1 IIF labelling pattern was abolished after delipidation of HEp-2 cells. Moreover, CDS-1 sera reacted strongly with a lipid component co-migrating with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC)-immunostaining of HEp-2 cell total lipid extracts. The CDS-1 major molecular targets were established by electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), HPTLC-immunostaining and chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as diacyl-PE species, containing preferentially a cis-C18 : 1 fatty acid chain at C-2 of the glycerol moiety, namely 1,2-cis-C18 : 1-PE and 1-C16 : 0-2-cis-C18 : 1-PE. The clinical association of CDS-1 sera included a variety of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases but they were also observed in patients with no evidence of autoimmune disease. PMID:16487257

  5. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase localizes to the cytoplasm of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei.

    PubMed

    Ferella, Marcela; Li, Zhu-Hong; Andersson, Björn; Docampo, Roberto

    2008-06-01

    The farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) has previously been characterized in trypanosomes as an essential enzyme for their survival and as the target for bisphosphonates, drugs that are effective both in vitro and in vivo against these parasites. Enzymes from the isoprenoid pathway have been assigned to different compartments in eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids. We here report that FPPS localizes to the cytoplasm of both Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei, and is not present in other organelles such as the mitochondria and glycosomes. PMID:18406406

  6. Ubiquitin ligase ITCH recruitment suppresses the aggregation and cellular toxicity of cytoplasmic misfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chhangani, Deepak; Upadhyay, Arun; Amanullah, Ayeman; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The protein quality control (QC) system protects cells against cellular toxicity induced by misfolded proteins and maintains overall cellular fitness. Inefficient clearance of or failure to degrade damaged proteins causes several diseases, especially age-linked neurodegenerative disorders. Attenuation of misfolded protein degradation under severe stress conditions leads to the rapid over-accumulation of toxic proteinaceous aggregates in the cytoplasmic compartment. However, the precise cytoplasmic quality control degradation mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Nedd4-like E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH specifically interacts with mutant bona fide misfolded proteins and colocalizes with their perinuclear aggregates. In a cell culture model, we demonstrate ITCH recruitment by cytoplasmic inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin or ataxin-3 proteins. Transient overexpression of ITCH dramatically induced the degradation of thermally denatured misfolded luciferase protein. Partial depletion of ITCH increased the rate of aggregate formation and cell death generated by expanded polyglutamine proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of ITCH alleviates the cytotoxic potential of expanded polyglutamine proteins and reduces aggregation. These observations indicate that ITCH is involved in the cytosolic quality control pathway and may help to explain how abnormal proteins are targeted by QC ubiquitin-protein ligases. PMID:24865853

  7. Production of stabilized scFv antibody fragments in the E. coli bacterial cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Vaks, Lilach; Benhar, Itai

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Parallel to full-length IgG format the development of recombinant technologies provided the production of smaller recombinant antibody variants. The single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody is a minimal form of functional antibody comprised of the variable domains of immunoglobulin light and heavy chains connected by a flexible linker. In most cases, scFvs are expressed in the bacterium E. coli. The production of soluble scFvs under the reducing conditions of the E. coli bacterial cytoplasm is inefficient because of the inability of the disulfide bonds to form. Hence, scFvs are either secreted to the periplasm as soluble proteins or expressed in the cytoplasm as insoluble inclusion bodies and recovered by refolding. The cytoplasmic expression of scFvs as a C-terminal fusion to maltose-binding protein (MBP) provided the high-level production of stable, soluble, and functional fusion protein. The below protocol provides the detailed description of MBP-scFv production in E. coli utilizing two expression systems: pMalc-TNN and pMalc-NHNN. Although the MBP tag does not disrupt the most of antibody activities, the MBP-TNN-scFv product can be cleaved by TEV protease in order to obtain untagged scFv. PMID:24037842

  8. Purification and properties of the cytoplasmic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Fickenscher, K; Scheibe, R

    1986-06-01

    A method involving affinity chromatography on the yellow dye Remazol Brilliant Gelb GL to highly purify the cytoplasmic isoenzyme of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from pea shoots is described. Purification is at least 6000-fold. The specific activity of the purified enzyme is 185 mumol NADP reduced/min per mg protein. The preparation was free from any contamination of chloroplastic isoenzyme. The purified enzyme retains its activity in the presence of reducing agents which, in contrast, inactivate the chloroplast enzyme. The state of activity of the cytoplasmic and the chloroplastic isoenzyme in illuminated or darkened pea leaves was investigated using specific antibodies. While upon illumination the chloroplastic isoenzyme was inactivated by 80 to 90%, we could not find any change in activity of the cytoplasmic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. ATP, ADP, NAD, NADH, and various sugar phosphates do not inhibit the enzyme activity. Only NADPH is a strong competitive inhibitor with respect to NADP, suggesting that the enzyme is regulated by feedback inhibition by one of its products. Mg2+ ions have no influence on the activity of the enzyme. The molecular weight has found to be 240,000 for the native enzyme and 60,000 for the subunit. Throughout the purification procedure the enzyme was very unstable unless NADP was present in the buffer. PMID:3717951

  9. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki . E-mail: mikeda.emb@tmd.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16{sup INK4a}, a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis.

  10. Molecular mobility in the cytoplasm: An approach to describe and predict lifespan of dry germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Buitink, Julia; Leprince, Olivier; Hemminga, Marcus A.; Hoekstra, Folkert A.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular mobility is increasingly considered a key factor influencing storage stability of biomolecular substances, because it is thought to control the rate of detrimental reactions responsible for reducing the shelf life of, for instance, pharmaceuticals, food, and germplasm. We investigated the relationship between aging rates of germplasm and the rotational motion of a polar spin probe in the cytoplasm under different storage conditions using saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rotational motion of the spin probe in the cytoplasm of seed and pollen of various plant species changed as a function of moisture content and temperature in a manner similar to aging rates or longevity. A linear relationship was established between the logarithms of rotational motion and aging rates or longevity. This linearity suggests that detrimental aging rates are associated with molecular mobility in the cytoplasm. By measuring the rotational correlation times at low temperatures at which experimental determination of longevity is practically impossible, this linearity enabled us to predict vigor loss or longevity. At subzero temperatures, moisture contents for maximum life span were predicted to be higher than those hitherto used in genebanks, urging for a reexamination of seed storage protocols. PMID:10681458

  11. Functional analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of the integrin {alpha}1 subunit in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abair, Tristin D; Bulus, Nada; Borza, Corina; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2008-10-15

    Integrin alpha1beta1, the major collagen type IV receptor, is expressed by endothelial cells and plays a role in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. Because the molecular mechanisms whereby this collagen IV receptor mediates endothelial cell functions are poorly understood, truncation and point mutants of the integrin alpha1 subunit cytoplasmic tail (amino acids 1137-1151) were generated and expressed into alpha1-null endothelial cells. We show that alpha1-null endothelial cells expressing the alpha1 subunit, which lacks the entire cytoplasmic tail (mutant alpha1-1136) or expresses all the amino acids up to the highly conserved GFFKR motif (mutant alpha1-1143), have a similar phenotype to parental alpha1-null cells. Pro(1144) and Leu(1145) were shown to be necessary for alpha1beta1-mediated endothelial cell proliferation; Lys(1146) for adhesion, migration, and tubulogenesis and Lys(1147) for tubulogenesis. Integrin alpha1beta1-dependent endothelial cell proliferation is primarily mediated by ERK activation, whereas migration and tubulogenesis require both p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt activation. Thus, distinct amino acids distal to the GFFKR motif of the alpha1 integrin cytoplasmic tail mediate activation of selective downstream signaling pathways and specific endothelial cell functions. PMID:18647959

  12. Nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of APC regulates beta-catenin subcellular localization and turnover.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B R

    2000-09-01

    Mutational inactivation of the APC gene is a key early event in the development of familial adenomatous polyposis and colon cancer. APC suppresses tumour progression by promoting degradation of the oncogenic transcriptional activator beta-catenin. APC gene mutations can lead to abnormally high levels of beta-catenin in the nucleus, and the consequent activation of transforming genes. Here, we show that APC is a nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, and that it can function as a beta-catenin chaperone. APC contains two active nuclear export sequences (NES) at the amino terminus, and mutagenesis of these conserved motifs blocks nuclear export dependent on the CRM1 export receptor. Treatment of cells with the CRM1-specific export inhibitor leptomycin B shifts APC from cytoplasm to nucleus. beta-catenin localization is also regulated by CRM1, but in an APC-dependent manner. Transient expression of wild-type APC in SW480 (APCmut/mut) colon cancer cells enhances nuclear export and degradation of beta-catenin, and these effects can be blocked by mutagenesis of the APC NES. These findings suggest that wild-type APC controls the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin by a combination of nuclear export and cytoplasmic degradation. PMID:10980707

  13. Autophagy-mediated reentry of Francisella tularensis into the endocytic compartment after cytoplasmic replication

    PubMed Central

    Checroun, Claire; Wehrly, Tara D.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hayes, Stanley F.; Celli, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens evade the bactericidal functions of mammalian cells by physical escape from their phagosome and replication into the cytoplasm or through the modulation of phagosome maturation and biogenesis of a membrane-bound replicative organelle. Here, we detail in murine primary macrophages the intracellular life cycle of Francisella tularensis, a highly infectious bacterium that survives and replicates within mammalian cells. After transient interactions with the endocytic pathway, bacteria escaped from their phagosome by 1 h after infection and underwent replication in the cytoplasm from 4 to 20 h after infection. Unexpectedly, the majority of bacteria were subsequently found to be enclosed within large, juxtanuclear, LAMP-1-positive vacuoles called Francisella-containing vacuoles (FCVs). FCV formation required intracytoplasmic replication of bacteria. Using electron and fluorescence microscopy, we observed that the FCVs contained morphologically intact bacteria, despite fusing with lysosomes. FCVs are multimembranous structures that accumulate monodansylcadaverine and display the autophagy-specific protein LC3 on their membrane. Formation of FCVs was significantly inhibited by 3-methyladenine, confirming a role for the autophagic pathway in the biogenesis of these organelles. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, via autophagy, F. tularensis reenters the endocytic pathway after cytoplasmic replication, a process thus far undescribed for intracellular pathogens. PMID:16983090

  14. Cytoplasmic CUL9/PARC ubiquitin ligase is a tumor suppressor and promotes p53-dependent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xin-Hai; Bai, Feng; Li, Zhijun; Smith, Matthew D.; Whitewolf, Gabrielle; Jin, Ran; Xiong, Yue

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of cell stresses, including DNA damage, signal to p53 through post-translational modification of p53. The cytoplasmic functions of p53 are emerging as an important constituent of p53’s role in tumor suppression. Here we report that deletion of the Cul9 (formerly Parc) gene, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that binds to p53 and localizes in the cytoplasm, resulted in spontaneous tumor development, accelerated Eμ-Myc-induced lymphomagenesis and rendered mice susceptible to carcinogenesis. Cul9-p53 double mutant mice exhibited indistinguishable tumor phenotypes as p53 single mutant mice, indicating that the function of Cul9 in tumor suppression is largely mediated by p53. Deletion of Cul9 had no significant effect on cell cycle progression, but attenuated DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Ectopic expression of wild-type CUL9, but not a point mutant CUL9 deficient in p53 binding, promotes apoptosis. These results demonstrate CUL9 as a potential p53 activating E3 ligase in the cytoplasm. PMID:21487039

  15. In vitro synthesis of cellulose II from a cytoplasmic membrane fraction of Acetobacter xylinum

    SciTech Connect

    Bureau, T.E.; Brown, R.M. Jr.

    1987-10-01

    The cytoplasmic and outer membranes of Acetobacter xylinum were isolated by discontinuous sucrose density ultracentrifugation. Both lysozyme and trypsin were required for efficient crude membrane separation. Primary dehydrogenases and NADH oxidase were used as cytoplasmic membrane markers, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid was used to identify the outer membranes. Cellulose synthetase activity was assayed as the conversion of radioactivity from UDP-(/sup 14/C)glucose into an alkali-insoluble ..beta..-1,4-D-(/sup 14/C)glucan. This activity was predominantly found in the cytoplasmic membrane. The cellulose nature of the product was demonstrated by (i) enzymatic hydrolysis followed by TLC, (ii) methylation analysis followed by TLC, and (iii) GC/MS. Further, the weight-average and number-average degree of polymerization of the in vitro product, determined by high-performance gel permeation chromatography, were 4820 and 5270, respectively. In addition, x-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the in vitro product is cellulose II, which is in contrast to the in vivo product--namely, cellulose I.

  16. Cyclin A- and cyclin E-Cdk complexes shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mark; Kubota, Yumiko; den Elzen, Nicole; Hagting, Anja; Pines, Jonathon

    2002-03-01

    Cyclins A and E and their partner cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are key regulators of DNA synthesis and of mitosis. Immunofluorescence studies have shown that both cyclins are nuclear and that a proportion of cyclin A is localized to sites of DNA replication. However, recently, both cyclin A and cyclin E have been implicated as regulators of centrosome replication, and it is unclear when and where these cyclin-Cdks can interact with cytoplasmic substrates. We have used live cell imaging to study the behavior of cyclin/Cdk complexes. We found that cyclin A and cyclin E are able to regulate both nuclear and cytoplasmic events because they both shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. However, we found that there are marked differences in their shuttling behavior, which raises the possibility that cyclin/Cdk function could be regulated at the level of nuclear import and export. In the course of these experiments, we have also found that, contrary to published results, mutations in the hydrophobic patch of cyclin A do affect Cdk binding and nuclear import. This has implications for the role of the hydrophobic patch as a substrate selection motif. PMID:11907280

  17. Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Negative Feedback Inhibition: Enhanced Hippocampal Glucocorticoid Signaling despite Lower Cytoplasmic GR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Füchsl, Andrea M.; Reber, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated mouse model for chronic psychosocial stress, results in increased basal and acute stress-induced plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. We assessed CSC effects on hippocampal glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and FK506 binding protein (FKBP51) expression, acute heterotypic stressor-induced GR translocation, as well as GC effects on gene expression and cell viability in isolated hippocampal cells. CSC mice showed decreased GR mRNA and cytoplasmic protein levels compared with single-housed control (SHC) mice. Basal and acute stress-induced nuclear GR protein expression were comparable between CSC and SHC mice, as were MR and FKBP51 mRNA and/or cytoplasmic protein levels. In vitro the effect of corticosterone (CORT) on hippocampal cell viability and gene transcription was more pronounced in CSC versus SHC mice. In summary, CSC mice show an, if at all, increased hippocampal GC signaling capacity despite lower cytoplasmic GR protein expression, making negative feedback deficits in the hippocampus unlikely to contribute to the increased ACTH drive following CSC. PMID:27057751

  18. In vitro synthesis of cellulose II from a cytoplasmic membrane fraction of Acetobacter xylinum

    PubMed Central

    Bureau, Thomas E.; Brown, R. Malcolm

    1987-01-01

    The cytoplasmic and outer membranes of Acetobacter xylinum (ATCC 53582) were isolated by discontinuous sucrose density ultracentrifugation. Both lysozyme (EC 3.2.1.17) and trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) were required for efficient crude membrane separation. Primary dehydrogenases and NADH oxidase were used as cytoplasmic membrane markers, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid was used to identify the outer membranes. Cellulose synthetase (UDP-glucose:1,4-β-D-glucan 4-β-D-glucosyltransferase; EC 2.4.1.12) activity was assayed as the conversion of radioactivity from UDP-[14C]glucose into an alkali-insoluble β-1,4-D-[14C]glucan. This activity was predominantly found in the cytoplasmic membrane. The cellulose nature of the product was demonstrated by (i) enzymatic hydrolysis followed by TLC, (ii) methylation analysis followed by TLC, and (iii) GC/MS. Further, the weight-average and number-average degree of polymerization of the in vitro product, determined by high-performance gel permeation chromatography, were 4820 and 5270, respectively. In addition, x-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the in vitro product is cellulose II, which is in contrast to the in vivo product—namely, cellulose I. Images PMID:16593877

  19. Macromolecular Transport between the Nucleus and the Cytoplasm: Advances in Mechanism and Emerging Links to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Elizabeth J.; King, Megan C.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2014-01-01

    Transport of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is critical for the function of all eukaryotic cells. Large macromolecular channels termed nuclear pore complexes that span the nuclear envelope mediate the bidirectional transport of cargoes between the nucleus and cytoplasm. However, the influence of macromolecular trafficking extends past the nuclear pore complex to transcription and RNA processing within the nucleus and signaling pathways that reach into the cytoplasm and beyond. At the Mechanisms of Nuclear Transport biennial meeting held from October 18-23, 2013 in Woods Hole, MA, researchers in the field met to report on their recent findings. The work presented highlighted significant advances in understanding nucleocytoplasmic trafficking including how transport receptors and cargoes pass through the nuclear pore complex, the many signaling pathways that impinge on transport pathways, interplay between the nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes, and transport pathways, and numerous links between transport pathways and human disease. The goal of this review is to highlight newly emerging themes in nuclear transport and underscore the major questions that are likely to be the focus of future research in the field. PMID:25116306

  20. The use of chloroplast microsatellite markers for assessing cytoplasmic variation in a watermelon germplasm collection.

    PubMed

    Hu, J-B; Li, J-W; Li, Q; Ma, S-W; Wang, J-M

    2011-11-01

    Fifteen chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers were tested to analyze cytoplasmic variation in a set of watermelon accessions containing 67 Chinese watermelon germplasms (CWGs) and 19 non-Chinese watermelon germplasms (NCGs), and 11 were polymorphic. These polymorphic cpSSR markers detected 2-4 alleles (mean = 2.8) in all the accessions, with diversity values ranging from 0.047 to 0.427 (mean = 0.252). Based on the polymorphic cpSSR loci, 17 distinct haplotypes were identified, of which six were from CWGs, seven were from NCGs, and four were shared by both of them. Most haplotypes from CWGs were nearly identical at the 11 cpSSR loci, but those from NCGs revealed higher variations. Of the haplotypes from CWGs, a predominant haplotype was found in 76.1% of CWGs, indicating that CWGs suffered a cytoplasmic bottleneck in domestication process and lost most of their cytoplasmic variability. To analyze the relationships among these 17 haplotypes, a dendrogram was constructed based on the cpSSR data using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA). Three distinct groups were generated, revealing a genetic divergence between CWGs and NCGs. From this analysis, we obtained five rare haplotypes which had quite low genetic similarity to the others and would be useful for watermelon breeding in China. The results enriched the knowledge in genetic diversity of CWGs and could be informative for broadening the genetic base of watermelon. PMID:21327542

  1. Genetic studies on cytoplasmic male sterility in maize. Progress report, April 15, 1990--April 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Laughnan, J.R.

    1992-05-01

    Our research concerns the basic mechanisms of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and fertility restoration in maize. The molecular determination of CMS is in the DNA of the mitochondria (mtDNA) but specific nuclear restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes can overrule the male-sterile effect of the cytoplasm. Our approach to the study of the Rf genes is threefold. We are attempting to tag the cms-S Rf genes and the cms-T Rf2 gene with controlling elements (CEs). Since we have identified a number of spontaneous Rf genes for cms-S and have demonstrated that they are themselves transposable, we are also searching for cases in which an Rf gene is inserted into a wild-type gene. The other aspect of our research involves the nuclear control over the organization of the mitochondrial genome. We found that the changes in mtDNA organization upon cytoplasmic reversion to fertility were characteristic of the nuclear background in which the reversion event occurred. We have investigated whether these differences are a reflection of differences in the organization of the mtDNA genome before reversion.

  2. Structural and Thermodynamic Characterization of a Cytoplasmic Dynein Light Chain-Intermediate Chain Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Williams,J.; Roulhac, P.; Roy, A.; Vallee, R.; Fitzgerald, M.; Hendrickson, W.

    2007-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule-based motor protein complex that plays important roles in a wide range of fundamental cellular processes, including vesicular transport, mitosis, and cell migration. A single major form of cytoplasmic dynein associates with membranous organelles, mitotic kinetochores, the mitotic and migratory cell cortex, centrosomes, and mRNA complexes. The ability of cytoplasmic dynein to recognize such diverse forms of cargo is thought to be associated with its several accessory subunits, which reside at the base of the molecule. The dynein light chains (LCs) LC8 and TcTex1 form a subcomplex with dynein intermediate chains, and they also interact with numerous protein and ribonucleoprotein partners. This observation has led to the hypothesis that these subunits serve to tether cargo to the dynein motor. Here, we present the structure and a thermodynamic analysis of a complex of LC8 and TcTex1 associated with their intermediate chain scaffold. The intermediate chains effectively block the major putative cargo binding sites within the light chains. These data suggest that, in the dynein complex, the LCs do not bind cargo, in apparent disagreement with a role for LCs in dynein cargo binding interactions.

  3. The cytoplasmic extension of the integrin β6 subunit regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carlin; Lee, Casey; Lee, Stacey; Siu, Amanda; Ramos, Daniel M

    2014-02-01

    Prognosis for oral cancer patients has not improved in over 60 years due to invasion and recurrence. To understand the invasive behavior of this tumor, we evaluated the role of the αvβ6 integrin. Invasive oral SCC cells express the αvβ6 integrin, which contains an 11-amino-acid extension on its β-subunit unique to the integrin family. We determined that this β6 cytoplasmic extension regulates the composition of the intermediate filament network and the organization of signaling structures called focal contacts. The auto-phosphorylation of FAK, which is localized to focal contacts, was also regulated by the β6-cytoplasmic tail, as were the transcription factors Notch and STAT3. Lastly, we also determined that activation of MAPK required the full-length β6 integrin. Together these results indicate that the signaling critical to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is regulated by the β6 integrin cytoplasmic domain. PMID:24510996

  4. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji Saeki, Yasushi

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  5. Proteins contribute insignificantly to the intrinsic buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Szczesny, Pawel; Ruszczynska, Katarzyna; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Paczek, Leszek

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We predicted buffering capacity of yeast proteome from protein abundance data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured total buffering capacity of yeast cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that proteins contribute insignificantly to buffering capacity. -- Abstract: Intracellular pH is maintained by a combination of the passive buffering of cytoplasmic dissociable compounds and several active systems. Over the years, a large portion of and possibly most of the cell's intrinsic (i.e., passive non-bicarbonate) buffering effect was attributed to proteins, both in higher organisms and in yeast. This attribution was not surprising, given that the concentration of proteins with multiple protonable/deprotonable groups in the cell exceeds the concentration of free protons by a few orders of magnitude. Using data from both high-throughput experiments and in vitro laboratory experiments, we tested this concept. We assessed the buffering capacity of the yeast proteome using protein abundance data and compared it to our own titration of yeast cytoplasm. We showed that the protein contribution is less than 1% of the total intracellular buffering capacity. As confirmed with NMR measurements, inorganic phosphates play a crucial role in the process. These findings also shed a new light on the role of proteomes in maintaining intracellular pH. The contribution of proteins to the intrinsic buffering capacity is negligible, and proteins might act only as a recipient of signals for changes in pH.

  6. Phage shock proteins B and C prevent lethal cytoplasmic membrane permeability in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Horstman, N Kaye; Darwin, Andrew J

    2012-08-01

    The bacterial phage shock protein (Psp) stress response system is activated by events affecting the cytoplasmic membrane. In response, Psp protein levels increase, including PspA, which has been implicated as the master effector of stress tolerance. Yersinia enterocolitica and related bacteria with a defective Psp system are highly sensitive to the mislocalization of pore-forming secretin proteins. However, why secretins are toxic to psp null strains, whereas some other Psp inducers are not, has not been explained. Furthermore, previous work has led to the confounding and disputable suggestion that PspA is not involved in mitigating secretin toxicity. Here we have established a correlation between the amount of secretin toxicity in a psp null strain and the extent of cytoplasmic membrane permeability to large molecules. This leads to a morphological change resembling cells undergoing plasmolysis. Furthermore, using novel strains with dis-regulated Psp proteins has allowed us to obtain unequivocal evidence that PspA is not required for secretin-stress tolerance. Together, our data suggest that the mechanism by which secretin multimers kill psp null cells is by causing a profound defect in the cytoplasmic membrane permeability barrier. This allows lethal molecular exchange with the environment, which the PspB and PspC proteins can prevent. PMID:22646656

  7. BRCA2 mediates centrosome cohesion via an interaction with cytoplasmic dynein

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sadiya; Saito, Hiroko; Takaoka, Miho; Miki, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 is responsible for familial breast and ovarian cancer and has been linked to DNA repair and centrosome duplication. Here we analyzed the mechanism by which the centrosomal localization signal (CLS) of BRCA2 interacts with cytoplasmic dynein 1 to localize BRCA2 to the centrosome. In vitro pull-down assays demonstrated that BRCA2 directly binds to the cytoplasmic dynein 1 light intermediate chain 2. A dominant-negative HA-CLS-DsRed fusion protein, the depletion of dynein by siRNA, and the inactivation of dynein by EHNA, inhibited the localization of BRCA2 at centrosomes and caused the separation of centrosome pairs during the S-phase. The double depletion of BRCA2 and C-Nap1 caused a larger dispersion of centrosome distances than the silencing of C-Nap1. These results suggest that cytoplasmic dynein 1 binds to BRCA2 through the latter's CLS and BRCA2 mediates the cohesion between centrosomes during the S phase, potentially serving as a cell-cycle checkpoint. PMID:27433848

  8. Cytoplasmic PML promotes TGF-β-associated epithelial–mesenchymal transition and invasion in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buczek, M E; Miles, A K; Green, W; Johnson, C; Boocock, D J; Pockley, A G; Rees, R C; Hulman, G; van Schalkwyk, G; Parkinson, R; Hulman, J; Powe, D G; Regad, T

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key event that is involved in the invasion and dissemination of cancer cells. Although typically considered as having tumour-suppressive properties, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling is altered during cancer and has been associated with the invasion of cancer cells and metastasis. In this study, we report a previously unknown role for the cytoplasmic promyelocytic leukaemia (cPML) tumour suppressor in TGF-β signalling-induced regulation of prostate cancer-associated EMT and invasion. We demonstrate that cPML promotes a mesenchymal phenotype and increases the invasiveness of prostate cancer cells. This event is associated with activation of TGF-β canonical signalling pathway through the induction of Sma and Mad related family 2 and 3 (SMAD2 and SMAD3) phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic localization of promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) is mediated by its nuclear export in a chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent manner. This was clinically tested in prostate cancer tissue and shown that cytoplasmic PML and CRM1 co-expression correlates with reduced disease-specific survival. In summary, we provide evidence of dysfunctional TGF-β signalling occurring at an early stage in prostate cancer. We show that this disease pathway is mediated by cPML and CRM1 and results in a more aggressive cancer cell phenotype. We propose that the targeting of this pathway could be therapeutically exploited for clinical benefit. PMID:26549027

  9. Cytoplasmic hnRNPK interacts with GSK3β and is essential for the osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Haiting; Wei, Jinmei; Gao, Xuejuan; Feng, Yuan; Liu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Gong; He, Qing-Yu; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Langxia

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast differentiation is a complex and finely regulated physiological process that involves a variety of signaling pathways and factors. Recent studies suggested that the Ser9 phosphorylation of Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is required for the osteoclast differentiation. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains unclear. We have previously identified the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK) as a putative GSK3β interactor. In the present study, we demonstrate that, during the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, the PI3K/Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK3β provokes the nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of hnRNPK in an ERK-dependent manner, enhancing the cytoplasmic co-localization and interaction of GSK3β and hnRNPK. We show that hnRNPK is essential for the osteoclast differentiation, and is involved in several reported functions of GSK3β, including the activation of NF-κB, the expression of NFATc1, and the acetylation of tubulin, all known to be critical for osteoclast differentiation and functions. We find that hnRNPK is localized in the actin belt, and is important for the mature osteoclast formation. Taken together, we demonstrate here the critical role of hnRNPK in osteoclast differentiation, and depict a model in which the cytoplasmic hnRNPK interacts with GSK3β and regulates its function. PMID:26638989

  10. A review comparing deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) concentrations in the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic compartments of normal and transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Vishal V.; Samuels, David C.

    2011-01-01

    The deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools that support the replication of mitochondrial DNA are physically separated from the rest of the cell by the double membrane of the mitochondria. Perturbed homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTP pools is associated with a set of severe diseases collectively termed mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes. The degree of interaction of the mitochondrial dNTP pools with the corresponding dNTP pools in the cytoplasm is currently not clear. We reviewed the literature on previously reported simultaneous measurements of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pools to investigate and quantify the extent of the influence of the cytoplasmic nucleotide metabolism on mitochondrial dNTP pools. We converted the reported measurements to concentrations creating a catalog of paired mitochondrial and cytoplasmic dNTP concentration measurements. Over experiments from multiple laboratories, dNTP concentrations in the mitochondria are highly correlated with dNTP concentrations in the cytoplasm in normal cells in culture (Pearson R = 0.79, p = 3 × 10-7) but not in transformed cells. For dTTP and dATP there was a strong linear relationship between the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial concentrations in normal cells. From this linear model we hypothesize that the salvage pathway within the mitochondrion is only capable of forming a concentration of approximately 2 μM of dTTP and dATP, and that higher concentrations require transport of deoxyribonucleotides from the cytoplasm. PMID:21774628

  11. Expression of aquaporin1, a water channel protein, in cytoplasm is negatively correlated with prognosis of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Ying; Liu, Xiaoli; Yang, Limin; Huang, Yong; Fu, Li; Gu, Feng; Ma, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin1 (AQP1) belongs to a highly conserved family of aquaporin proteins which facilitate water flux across cell membranes. Although emerging evidences indicated the cytoplasm was important for AQP1 localization, the function of AQP1 corresponding to its cytoplasmic distribution has rarely been explored until present. In our clinical study, we reported for the first time that AQP1 was localized dominantly in the cytoplasm of cancer cells of invasive breast cancer patients and cytoplasmic AQP1 was an independent prognostic factor. High expression of AQP1 indicated a shorter survival, especially in luminal subtype. Moreover, in line with our findings in clinic, cytoplasmic expression of AQP1 was further validated in both primary cultured breast cancer cells and AQP1 over-expressing cell lines, in which the functional importance of cytoplasmic AQP1 was confirmed in vitro. In conclusion, our study provided the first evidence that cytoplasmic expression of AQP1 promoted breast cancer progression and it could be a potential prognostic biomarker for breast cancer. PMID:26812884

  12. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  13. A novel nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid clone formed via androgenesis in polyploid gibel carp

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unisexual vertebrates have been demonstrated to reproduce by gynogenesis, hybridogenesis, parthenogenesis, or kleptogenesis, however, it is uncertain how the reproduction mode contributes to the clonal diversity. Recently, polyploid gibel carp has been revealed to possess coexisting dual modes of unisexual gynogenesis and sexual reproduction and to have numerous various clones. Using sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male and subsequent 7 generation multiplying of unisexual gynogenesis, we have created a novel clone strain with more than several hundred millions of individuals. Here, we attempt to identify genetic background of the novel clone and to explore the significant implication for clonal diversity contribution. Methods Several nuclear genome markers and one cytoplasmic marker, the mitochondrial genome sequence, were used to identify the genetic organization of the randomly sampled individuals from different generations of the novel clone. Results Chromosome number, Cot-1 repetitive DNA banded karyotype, microsatellite patterns, AFLP profiles and transferrin alleles uniformly indicated that nuclear genome of the novel clone is identical to that of clone A, and significantly different from that of clone D. However, the cytoplasmic marker, its complete mtDNA genome sequence, is same to that of clone D, and different from that of clone A. Conclusions The present data indicate that the novel clone is a nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid between the known clones A and D, because it originates from the offspring of gonochoristic sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male, and contains an entire nuclear genome from the paternal clone A and a mtDNA genome (cytoplasm) from the maternal clone D. It is suggested to arise via androgenesis by a mechanism of ploidy doubling of clone A sperm in clone D ooplasm through inhibiting the first mitotic division. Significantly, the selected nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid female

  14. Dual roles of p82, the clam CPEB homolog, in cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational masking.

    PubMed

    Minshall, N; Walker, J; Dale, M; Standart, N

    1999-01-01

    In the transcriptionally inert maturing oocyte and early embryo, control of gene expression is largely mediated by regulated changes in translational activity of maternal mRNAs. Some mRNAs are activated in response to poly(A) tail lengthening; in other cases activation results from de-repression of the inactive or masked mRNA. The 3' UTR cis-acting elements that direct these changes are defined, principally in Xenopus and mouse, and the study of their trans-acting binding factors is just beginning to shed light on the mechanism and regulation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational masking. In the marine invertebrate, Spisula solidissima, the timing of activation of three abundant mRNAs (encoding cyclin A and B and the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, RR) in fertilized oocytes correlates with their cytoplasmic polyadenylation. However, in vitro, mRNA-specific unmasking occurs in the absence of polyadenylation. In Walker et al. (in this issue) we showed that p82, a protein defined as selectively binding the 3' UTR masking elements, is a homolog of Xenopus CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein). In functional studies reported here, the elements that support polyadenylation in clam egg lysates include multiple U-rich CPE-like motifs as well as the nuclear polyadenylation signal AAUAAA. This represents the first detailed analysis of invertebrate cis-acting cytoplasmic polyadenylation signals. Polyadenylation activity correlates with p82 binding in wild-type and CPE-mutant RR 3' UTR RNAs. Moreover, since anti-p82 antibodies specifically neutralize polyadenylation in egg lysates, we conclude that clam p82 is a functional homolog of Xenopus CPEB, and plays a positive role in polyadenylation. Anti-p82 antibodies also result in specific translational activation of masked mRNAs in oocyte lysates, lending support to our original model of clam p82 as a translational repressor. We propose therefore that clam p82/CPEB has dual functions in

  15. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the Yxx{phi} domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1{sub NL4.3} compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and

  16. Heterozygous alleles restore male fertility to cytoplasmic male-sterile radish (Raphanus sativus L.): a case of overdominance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi Wei; Wang, Chuan; Gao, Lei; Mei, Shi Yong; Zhou, Yuan; Xiang, Chang Ping; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    The practice of hybridization has greatly contributed to the increase in crop productivity. A major component that exploits heterosis in crops is the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)/nucleus-controlled fertility restoration (Rf) system. Through positional cloning, it is shown that heterozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-2) encoding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are responsible for restoring fertility to cytoplasmic male-sterile radish (Raphanus sativus L.). Furthermore, it was found that heterozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-2) show higher expression and RNA polymerase II occupancy in the CMS cytoplasmic background compared with their homozygous alleles (RsRf3-1/RsRf3-1 or RsRf3-2/RsRf3-2). These data provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of fertility restoration to cytoplasmic male-sterile plants and illustrate a case of overdominance. PMID:23630327

  17. Structure of the cytoplasmic domain of Yersinia pestis YscD, an essential component of the type III secretion system

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-09-17

    The Yersinia pestis YscD protein is an essential component of the type III secretion system. YscD consists of an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (residues 1-121), a transmembrane linker (122-142) and a large periplasmic domain (143-419). Both the cytoplasmic and the periplasmic domains are required for the assembly of the type III secretion system. Here, the structure of the YscD cytoplasmic domain solved by SAD phasing is presented. Although the three-dimensional structure is similar to those of forkhead-associated (FHA) domains, comparison with the structures of canonical FHA domains revealed that the cytoplasmic domain of YscD lacks the conserved residues that are required for binding phosphothreonine and is therefore unlikely to function as a true FHA domain.

  18. Structure of the cytoplasmic domain of Yersinia pestis YscD, an essential component of the type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Yersinia pestis YscD protein is an essential component of the type III secretion system. YscD consists of an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (residues 1–121), a transmembrane linker (122–142) and a large periplasmic domain (143–419). Both the cytoplasmic and the periplasmic domains are required for the assembly of the type III secretion system. Here, the structure of the YscD cytoplasmic domain solved by SAD phasing is presented. Although the three-dimensional structure is similar to those of forkhead-associated (FHA) domains, comparison with the structures of canonical FHA domains revealed that the cytoplasmic domain of YscD lacks the conserved residues that are required for binding phosphothreonine and is therefore unlikely to function as a true FHA domain. PMID:22349221

  19. Sec6 regulated cytoplasmic translocation and degradation of p27 via interactions with Jab1 and Siah1.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-10-01

    p27 has essential roles in cellular proliferation and migration, and reduced or cytoplasmic p27 is associated with poor clinical outcomes in a variety of human tumours. Jun activation domain-binding protein (Jab1)/constitutive photomorphogenic-9 signalosome 5 (CSN5) directly interacts with p27 promoting its translocation and cytoplasmic degradation. Sec6 is a component of the exocyst complex. Recently, several studies revealed that Sec6 has specific functions in migration, adhesion, and cell differentiation. However, how Sec6 is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression is unknown. The present study shows that Sec6 regulates cytoplasmic translocation of p27 through p27 phosphorylation at Thr157, thereby promoting p27 degradation in the cytoplasm via interaction with Jab1 and Siah1 and suppressing cell cycle progression. PMID:24949832

  20. Cytoplasmic Accumulation of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K Strongly Promotes Tumor Invasion in Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Otoshi, Taiyo; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Morimoto, Kazuya; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a part of the ribonucleoprotein complex which regulates diverse biological events. While overexpression of hnRNP K has been shown to be related to tumorigenesis in several cancers, both the expression patterns and biological mechanisms of hnRNP K in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells remain unclear. In this study, we showed that hnRNP K protein was strongly expressed in selected RCC cell lines (ACHN, A498, Caki-1, 786–0), and knock-down of hnRNP K expression by siRNA induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Based on immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of hnRNP K expression in human clear cell RCC specimens, we demonstrated that there was a significant positive correlation between hnRNP K staining score and tumor aggressiveness (e.g., Fuhrman grade, metastasis). Particularly, the rate of cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP K in primary RCC with distant metastasis was significantly higher than that in RCC without metastasis. Additionally, our results indicated that the cytoplasmic distribution of hnRNP K induced by TGF-β stimulus mainly contributed to TGF-β-triggered tumor cell invasion in RCC cells. Dominant cytoplasmic expression of ectopic hnRNP K markedly suppressed the inhibition of invasion by knock-down of endogenous hnRNP K. The expression level of matrix metalloproteinase protein-2 was decreased by endogenous hnRNP K knock-down, and restored by ectopic hnRNP K. Therefore, hnRNP K may be a key molecule involved in cell motility in RCC cells, and molecular mechanism associated with the subcellular localization of hnRNP K may be a novel target in the treatment of metastatic RCC. PMID:26713736

  1. Recombinant Expression and Characterization of the Cytoplasmic Rice β-Glucosidase Os1BGlu4

    PubMed Central

    Rouyi, Chen; Baiya, Supaporn; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Mahong, Bancha; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Ketudat-Cairns, James R.; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena

    2014-01-01

    The Os1BGlu4 β-glucosidase is the only glycoside hydrolase family 1 member in rice that is predicted to be localized in the cytoplasm. To characterize the biochemical function of rice Os1BGlu4, the Os1bglu4 cDNA was cloned and used to express a thioredoxin fusion protein in Escherichia coli. After removal of the tag, the purified recombinant Os1BGlu4 (rOs1BGlu4) exhibited an optimum pH of 6.5, which is consistent with Os1BGlu4's cytoplasmic localization. Fluorescence microscopy of maize protoplasts and tobacco leaf cells expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged Os1BGlu4 confirmed the cytoplasmic localization. Purified rOs1BGlu4 can hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl (pNP)-β-d-glucoside (pNPGlc) efficiently (kcat/Km  =  17.9 mM−1·s−1), and hydrolyzes pNP-β-d-fucopyranoside with about 50% the efficiency of the pNPGlc. Among natural substrates tested, rOs1BGlu4 efficiently hydrolyzed β-(1,3)-linked oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization (DP) 2–3, and β-(1,4)-linked oligosaccharide of DP 3–4, and hydrolysis of salicin, esculin and p-coumaryl alcohol was also detected. Analysis of the hydrolysis of pNP-β-cellobioside showed that the initial hydrolysis was between the two glucose molecules, and suggested rOs1BGlu4 transglucosylates this substrate. At 10 mM pNPGlc concentration, rOs1BGlu4 can transfer the glucosyl group of pNPGlc to ethanol and pNPGlc. This transglycosylation activity suggests the potential use of Os1BGlu4 for pNP-oligosaccharide and alkyl glycosides synthesis. PMID:24802508

  2. Cytoplasmic pH dynamics in maize pulvinal cells induced by gravity vector changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannes, E.; Collings, D. A.; Rink, J. C.; Allen, N. S.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, changes in orientation of stems are perceived by pulvinal tissue, which responds to the stimulus by differential growth resulting in upward bending of the stem. The amyloplast-containing bundle sheath cells are the sites of gravity perception, although the initial steps of gravity perception and transmission remain unclear. In columella cells of Arabidopsis roots, we previously found that cytoplasmic pH (pH(c)) is a mediator in early gravitropic signaling (A.C. Scott, N.S. Allen [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1291-1298). The question arises whether pH(c) has a more general role in signaling gravity vector changes. Using confocal ratiometric imaging and the fluorescent pH indicator carboxy seminaphtorhodafluor acetoxymethyl ester acetate, we measured pH(c) in the cells composing the maize pulvinus. When stem slices were gravistimulated and imaged on a horizontally mounted confocal microscope, pH(c) changes were only apparent within the bundle sheath cells, and not in the parenchyma cells. After turning, cytoplasmic acidification was observed at the sides of the cells, whereas the cytoplasm at the base of the cells where plastids slowly accumulated became more basic. These changes were most apparent in cells exhibiting net amyloplast sedimentation. Parenchyma cells and isolated bundle sheath cells did not show any gravity-induced pH(c) changes although all cell types responded to external stimuli in the predicted way: Propionic acid and auxin treatments induced acidification, whereas raising the external pH caused alkalinization. The results suggest that pH(c) has an important role in the early signaling pathways of maize stem gravitropism.

  3. Platelet adhesion and activation on polyethylene glycol modified polyurethane surfaces. Measurement of cytoplasmic calcium.

    PubMed

    Park, K D; Suzuki, K; Lee, W K; Lee, J E; Kim, Y H; Sakurai, Y; Okano, T

    1996-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) surfaces were modified by coupling polyethylene glycol (PEG; molecular weight, 1,000) chains carrying different terminal groups (PU-PEG1K-OH, PU-PEG1K-NH2, PU-PEG1K-SO3) and longer PEG chains (MW, 3,350; PU-PEG3.4K-OH). The modified PU surfaces have the same PEG (1K) chain density. Surface induced platelet activation was evaluated by measuring cytoplasmic free calcium concentration in platelets contacting modified surfaces, and platelet adhesion onto modified surfaces was investigated in vitro. Cytoplasmic free calcium levels in platelets contacting PU-PEG-SO3 remained relatively constant, in contrast to the significant increase observed for PU-PEG-NH2, PU-PEG-OH, and control PU surfaces. The degree of platelet adhesion clearly demonstrates that all PEG graft surfaces prevented platelet adhesion. Among PEG1K surfaces, PU-PEG-SO3 shows the lowest platelet adhesion. In the case of relatively longer PEG grafted surfaces (PU-PEG3.4K-OH and PU-PEG3.4K-Hep), both surfaces were found to prevent the increase in both cytoplasmic free calcium and platelet adhesion. These results suggest that longer PEG chain grafting is more effective than shorter grafting in preventing platelet activation and adhesion because of the highly dynamic movement of hydrated PEG chains at the interface. In addition, in vitro platelet interaction is dependent upon terminal groups of PEG chains on PEG1K series surfaces. PMID:8945010

  4. Cytoplasmic pH Dynamics in Maize Pulvinal Cells Induced by Gravity Vector Changes1[w

    PubMed Central

    Johannes, Eva; Collings, David A.; Rink, Jochen C.; Allen, Nina Strömgren

    2001-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, changes in orientation of stems are perceived by pulvinal tissue, which responds to the stimulus by differential growth resulting in upward bending of the stem. The amyloplast-containing bundle sheath cells are the sites of gravity perception, although the initial steps of gravity perception and transmission remain unclear. In columella cells of Arabidopsis roots, we previously found that cytoplasmic pH (pHc) is a mediator in early gravitropic signaling (A.C. Scott, N.S. Allen [1999] Plant Physiol 121: 1291–1298). The question arises whether pHc has a more general role in signaling gravity vector changes. Using confocal ratiometric imaging and the fluorescent pH indicator carboxy seminaphtorhodafluor acetoxymethyl ester acetate, we measured pHc in the cells composing the maize pulvinus. When stem slices were gravistimulated and imaged on a horizontally mounted confocal microscope, pHc changes were only apparent within the bundle sheath cells, and not in the parenchyma cells. After turning, cytoplasmic acidification was observed at the sides of the cells, whereas the cytoplasm at the base of the cells where plastids slowly accumulated became more basic. These changes were most apparent in cells exhibiting net amyloplast sedimentation. Parenchyma cells and isolated bundle sheath cells did not show any gravity-induced pHc changes although all cell types responded to external stimuli in the predicted way: Propionic acid and auxin treatments induced acidification, whereas raising the external pH caused alkalinization. The results suggest that pHc has an important role in the early signaling pathways of maize stem gravitropism. PMID:11553740

  5. Cytoplasmic Inheritance of Transplantation Antigens In Animals Produced by Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hanekamp, John S.; Okumi, Masayoshi; Tena, Aseda; Arn, Scott; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nuclear transfer has been utilized as a means of selectively modifying the mammalian genome. One possible consequence of this technology is that the oocytes used in nuclear transfer may provide additional antigens via cytoplasmic inheritance of maternally derived, mitochondrial DNA. These studies examine the potential consequences of such inheritance in a large animal transplantation model. Methods Renal transplants were performed between MHC-identical animals differing only in the source of their maternally derived cytoplasmic DNA, using a protocol which uniformly leads to tolerance within standard MHC-inbred lines. In an attempt to correlate transplant results with a putative marker for disparities in cytoplasmically inherited minor histocompatibility antigens, we examined one hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), designated HV1. Results The mtDNA sequence of the HV1 region was found to be invariant among MGH miniature swine of different haplotypes, despite twenty years of selective breeding of the sublines of this colony. In contrast, swine derived by nuclear transfer into outbred oocytes differed in the HV1 region sequence from each other and from MGH swine. Renal transplants from standard, inbred MGH swine to their MHC-identical knockout counterparts derived from outbred oocytes were rejected within two weeks, while transplants in the reverse direction were accepted for over 30 days. Conclusions The HV1 sequence of mtDNA may serve as a marker for the level of diversity of mtDNA. These transplant data are consistent with the existence of mtDNA-encoded mitochondrial minor antigens with a similar level of diversity that can influence the outcome of renal transplantation. PMID:19584677

  6. FUS is phosphorylated by DNA-PK and accumulates in the cytoplasm after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiudong; Holler, Christopher J; Taylor, Georgia; Hudson, Kathryn F; Watkins, William; Gearing, Marla; Ito, Daisuke; Murray, Melissa E; Dickson, Dennis W; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Kukar, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal cytoplasmic accumulation of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) in neurons defines subtypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). FUS is a member of the FET protein family that includes Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 2N (TAF15). FET proteins are predominantly localized to the nucleus, where they bind RNA and DNA to modulate transcription, mRNA splicing, and DNA repair. In ALS cases with FUS inclusions (ALS-FUS), mutations in the FUS gene cause disease, whereas FTLD cases with FUS inclusions (FTLD-FUS) do not harbor FUS mutations. Notably, in FTLD-FUS, all FET proteins accumulate with their nuclear import receptor Transportin 1 (TRN1), in contrast ALS-FUS inclusions are exclusively positive for FUS. In the present study, we show that induction of DNA damage replicates several pathologic hallmarks of FTLD-FUS in immortalized human cells and primary human neurons and astrocytes. Treatment with the antibiotic calicheamicin γ1, which causes DNA double-strand breaks, leads to the cytoplasmic accumulation of FUS, TAF15, EWS, and TRN1. Moreover, cytoplasmic translocation of FUS is mediated by phosphorylation of its N terminus by the DNA-dependent protein kinase. Finally, we observed elevated levels of phospho-H2AX in FTLD-FUS brains, indicating that DNA damage occurs in patients. Together, our data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for FUS localization in cells and suggest that DNA damage may contribute to the accumulation of FET proteins observed in human FTLD-FUS cases, but not in ALS-FUS. PMID:24899704

  7. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma Protect Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Tam-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Brian J.; Regan Anderson, Tarah M.; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Ostrander, Julie H.

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  8. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Girard, Brian J; Regan Anderson, Tarah M; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ostrander, Julie H

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  9. Pur-alpha regulates cytoplasmic stress granule dynamics and ameliorates FUS toxicity.

    PubMed

    Daigle, J Gavin; Krishnamurthy, Karthik; Ramesh, Nandini; Casci, Ian; Monaghan, John; McAvoy, Kevin; Godfrey, Earl W; Daniel, Dianne C; Johnson, Edward M; Monahan, Zachary; Shewmaker, Frank; Pasinelli, Piera; Pandey, Udai Bhan

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is characterized by progressive loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Mutations in several genes, including FUS, TDP43, Matrin 3, hnRNPA2 and other RNA-binding proteins, have been linked to ALS pathology. Recently, Pur-alpha, a DNA/RNA-binding protein was found to bind to C9orf72 repeat expansions and could possibly play a role in the pathogenesis of ALS. When overexpressed, Pur-alpha mitigates toxicities associated with Fragile X tumor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and C9orf72 repeat expansion diseases in Drosophila and mammalian cell culture models. However, the function of Pur-alpha in regulating ALS pathogenesis has not been fully understood. We identified Pur-alpha as a novel component of cytoplasmic stress granules (SGs) in ALS patient cells carrying disease-causing mutations in FUS. When cells were challenged with stress, we observed that Pur-alpha co-localized with mutant FUS in ALS patient cells and became trapped in constitutive SGs. We also found that FUS physically interacted with Pur-alpha in mammalian neuronal cells. Interestingly, shRNA-mediated knock down of endogenous Pur-alpha significantly reduced formation of cytoplasmic stress granules in mammalian cells suggesting that Pur-alpha is essential for the formation of SGs. Furthermore, ectopic expression of Pur-alpha blocked cytoplasmic mislocalization of mutant FUS and strongly suppressed toxicity associated with mutant FUS expression in primary motor neurons. Our data emphasizes the importance of stress granules in ALS pathogenesis and identifies Pur-alpha as a novel regulator of SG dynamics. PMID:26728149

  10. Diagnostic utility of WT-1 cytoplasmic stain in variety of vascular lesions

    PubMed Central

    Galfione, Sarah K; Ro, Jae Y; Ayala, Alberto G; Ge, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions are commonly encountered in routine pathologic practice and often pose diagnostic challenges owing to their morphologic diversity. Although WT-1 expression was reported in some vascular tumors, little is known about its staining patterns in a spectrum of vascular lesions from various locations. We examined WT-1 immunostain in 95 cases of vascular lesions including angiosarcomas (AS, 19 cases), hemangioendotheliomas (HE, 5), Kaposi’s sarcomas (KS, 4), cavernous hemangiomas (CVH, 12), capillary hemangiomas (CPH, 7), pyogenic granulomas (PG, 4), lymphangiomas (LA, 4), hemangiopericytomas (HP, 5), glomus tumors (GT, 8), vascular malformation (VM, 13) and granulation tissue (GRT, 14). Strong WT-1 cytoplasmic stain was invariably observed in all cases of malignant and borderline vascular tumors including AS (19/19), KS (4/4) and HE (5/5). WT-1 was also consistently expressed in CPH (7/7), PG (4/4), and GRT (14/14), while it became weaker in VM (10/13) and often negative in CVH (2/12) and LA (0/4). WT1 stain was not demonstrated in HP (0/5) and rarely in GT (2/8). We conclude that consistent and diffuse WT-1 cytoplasmic stain in AS, HE and KS can be useful in distinguishing these tumors from poorly differentiated tumors with mimicking features. On the other hand, reliable WT-1 stain in CPH, PG and GRT may help in differential diagnosis with non-endothelial vascular tumors such as GT and HP. Recognizing the WT-1 cytoplasmic stain in a broad spectrum of benign and neoplastic tissues is critical in formulating appropriate immunohistochemical panels and avoiding misinterpretation of results. PMID:24966966

  11. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, E.H.

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. {yields} Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. {yields} Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  12. Implications of a Poroelastic Cytoplasm for the Dynamics of Animal Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    TJ, Mitchison; GT, Charras; L, Mahadevan

    2009-01-01

    Two views have dominated recent discussions of the physical basis of cell shape change during migration and division of animal cells: the cytoplasm can be modeled as a viscoelastic continuum, and the forces that change its shape are generated only by actin polymerization and actomyosin contractility in the cell cortex. Here, we question both views: we suggest that the cytoplasm is better described as poroelastic, and that hydrodynamic forces may be generally important for its shape dynamics. In the poroelastic view, the cytoplasm consists of a porous, elastic solid (cytoskeleton, organelles, ribosomes) penetrated by an interstitial fluid (cytosol) that moves through the pores in response to pressure gradients. If the pore size is small (30–60nm), as has been observed in some cells, pressure does not globally equilibrate on time and length scales relevant to cell motility. Pressure differences across the plasma membrane drive blebbing, and potentially other type of protrusive motility. In the poroelastic view, these pressures can be higher in one part of a cell than another, and can thus cause local shape change. Local pressure transients could be generated by actomyosin contractility, or by local activation of osmogenic ion transporters in the plasma membrane. We propose that local activation of Na+/H+ antiporters (NHE1) at the front of migrating cells promotes local swelling there to help drive protrusive motility, acting in combination with actin polymerization. Local shrinking at the equator of dividing cells may similarly help drive invagination during cytokinesis, acting in combination with actomyosin contractility. Testing these hypotheses is not easy, as water is a difficult analyte to track, and will require a joint effort of the cytoskeleton and ion physiology communities. PMID:18395478

  13. Temperature Affects the Tripartite Interactions between Bacteriophage WO, Wolbachia, and Cytoplasmic Incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Bordenstein, Sarah R.; Bordenstein, Seth R.

    2011-01-01

    Wolbachia infections are a model for understanding intracellular, bacterial symbioses. While the symbiosis is often studied from a binary perspective of host and bacteria, it is increasingly apparent that additional trophic levels can influence the symbiosis. For example, Wolbachia in arthropods harbor a widespread temperate bacteriophage, termed WO, that forms virions and rampantly transfers between coinfections. Here we test the hypothesis that temperatures at the extreme edges of an insect's habitable range alter bacteriophage WO inducibility and in turn, Wolbachia densities and the penetrance of cytoplasmic incompatibility. We report four key findings using the model wasp, Nasonia vitripennis: First, both cold treatment at 18 C and heat treatment at 30 C reduce Wolbachia densities by as much as 74% relative to wasps reared at 25 C. Second, in all cases where Wolbachia densities decline due to temperature changes, phage WO densities increase and inversely associate with Wolbachia densities. Heat has a marked effect on phage WO, yielding phage densities that are 552% higher than the room temperature control. Third, there is a significant affect of insect family on phage WO and endoysmbiont densities. Fourth, at extreme temperatures, there was a temperature-mediated adjustment to the density threshold at which Wolbachia cause complete cytoplasmic incompatibility. Taken together, these results demonstrate that temperature simultaneously affects phage WO densities, endosymbiont densities, and the penetrance of cytoplasmic incompatibility. While temperature shock enhances bacteriophage inducibility and the ensuing bacterial mortality in a wide range of medically and industrially-important bacteria, this is the first investigation of the associations in an obligate intracellular bacteria. Implications to a SOS global sensing feedback mechanism in Wolbachia are discussed. PMID:22194999

  14. RipA, a cytoplasmic membrane protein conserved among Francisella species, is required for intracellular survival.

    PubMed

    Fuller, James R; Craven, Robin R; Hall, Joshua D; Kijek, Todd M; Taft-Benz, Sharon; Kawula, Thomas H

    2008-11-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within numerous host cell types, including macrophages and epithelial cells. In an effort to better understand this process, we screened a transposon insertion library of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) for mutant strains that invaded but failed to replicate within alveolar epithelial cell lines. One such strain isolated from this screen contained an insertion in the gene FTL_1914, which is conserved among all sequenced Francisella species yet lacks significant homology to any gene with known function. A deletion strain lacking FTL_1914 was constructed. This strain did not replicate in either epithelial or macrophage-like cells, and intracellular replication was restored by the wild-type allele in trans. Based on the deletion mutant phenotype, FTL_1914 was termed ripA (required for intracellular proliferation, factor A). Following uptake by J774.A1 cells, F. tularensis LVS Delta ripA colocalized with LAMP-1 then escaped the phagosome at the same rate and frequency as wild-type LVS-infected cells. Electron micrographs of the F. tularensis LVS Delta ripA mutant demonstrated the reentry of the mutant bacteria into double membrane vacuoles characteristic of autophagosomes in a process that was not dependent on replication. The F. tularensis LVS Delta ripA mutant was significantly impaired in its ability to persist in the lung and in its capacity to disseminate and colonize the liver and spleen in a mouse model of pulmonary tularemia. The RipA protein was expressed during growth in laboratory media and localized to the cytoplasmic membrane. Thus, RipA is a cytoplasmic membrane protein conserved among Francisella species that is required for intracellular replication within the host cell cytoplasm as well as disease progression, dissemination, and virulence. PMID:18765722

  15. Secretion of Bacterial Lipoproteins: Through the Cytoplasmic Membrane, the Periplasm and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zückert, Wolfram R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., grampositive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporterlike LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the “+2 rule”. Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  16. Some early differentiation markers detected in cytoplasm of pre-B cells by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Glasová, M; Kusenda, J; Babusíková, O

    1996-01-01

    Immunofluorescent staining of cytoplasmic IgM (heavy chains) and CD24 as well as their simultaneous staining with surface B cell markers was used to study immunophenotype changes in B cell differentiation. Human hematopoietic B cell lines P3HR1 and RAJI were used. We found that IgM and CD24 cell markers while absent on cell membrane could be detected in their cytoplasm (c). The presence of cIgM in cell lines RAJI, P3HRI indicates their early pre-B differentiation stage. The presence of cCD24 simultaneously with mCD22 and cIgM is the evidence that hematopoietic cell lines or leukemias may not accurately reflect normal differentiation pathway. Combinations of cIgM, cCD24 with surface B cell markers CD10, CD19 on these cell lines can be considered as leukemia associated phenotypes. Some of them were shown in bone marrow and peripheral blood of pre-B ALL and B-CLL patients and can be used for the detection of minimal residual disease. Different fixation/permeabilization methods were tested in order to choose the optimal one for simple detection of cytoplasmic markers or their simultaneous detection with surface markers by flow cytometry. They included "one-component-methods" (methanol-M, saponin-S), methods combining these components with paraformaldehyde (P+M, P+S) or buffered formaldehyde acetone (BFA). The choice depended on individual marker detected. General parameters like the proportion of debris, cell aggregation, cell loss and the changes of scatter parameters FSC and SSC were taken into consideration. The priorities of combined methods P+S, P+M1 and BFA over one-component methods are demonstrated. PMID:8996561

  17. Accessory Factors of Cytoplasmic Viral RNA Sensors Required for Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Kouwaki, Takahisa; Seya, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) induces many antiviral factors in host cells. RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) are cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors that trigger the signal to induce the innate immune response that includes type I IFN production. RIG-I and MDA5 are RLRs that form nucleoprotein filaments along viral double-stranded RNA, resulting in the activation of MAVS adaptor molecule. The MAVS protein forms a prion-like aggregation structure, leading to type I IFN production. RIG-I and MDA5 undergo post-translational modification. TRIM25 and Riplet ubiquitin ligases deliver a K63-linked polyubiquitin moiety to the RIG-I N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs) and C-terminal region; the polyubiquitin chain then stabilizes the two-CARD tetramer structure required for MAVS assembly. MDA5 activation is regulated by phosphorylation. RIOK3 is a protein kinase that phosphorylates the MDA5 protein in a steady state, and PP1α/γ dephosphorylate this protein, resulting in its activation. RIG-I and MDA5 require cytoplasmic RNA helicases for their efficient activation. LGP2, another RLR, is an RNA helicase involved in RLR signaling. This protein does not possess N-terminal CARDs and, thus, cannot trigger downstream signaling by itself. Recent studies have revealed that this protein modulates MDA5 filament formation, resulting in enhanced type I IFN production. Several other cytoplasmic RNA helicases are involved in RLR signaling. DDX3, DHX29, DHX36, and DDX60 RNA helicases have been reported to be involved in RLR-mediated type I IFN production after viral infection. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Future studies are required to reveal the role of RNA helicases in the RLR signaling pathway. PMID:27252702

  18. Cytoplasmic domain mutations of the L1 cell adhesion molecule reduce L1-ankyrin interactions.

    PubMed

    Needham, L K; Thelen, K; Maness, P F

    2001-03-01

    The neural adhesion molecule L1 mediates the axon outgrowth, adhesion, and fasciculation that are necessary for proper development of synaptic connections. L1 gene mutations are present in humans with the X-linked mental retardation syndrome CRASH (corpus callosum hypoplasia, retardation, aphasia, spastic paraplegia, hydrocephalus). Three missense mutations associated with CRASH syndrome reside in the cytoplasmic domain of L1, which contains a highly conserved binding region for the cytoskeletal protein ankyrin. In a cellular ankyrin recruitment assay that uses transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, two of the pathologic mutations located within the conserved SFIGQY sequence (S1224L and Y1229H) strikingly reduced the ability of L1 to recruit 270 kDa ankyrinG protein that was tagged with green fluorescent protein (ankyrin-GFP) to the plasma membrane. In contrast, the L1 missense mutation S1194L and an L1 isoform lacking the neuron-specific sequence RSLE in the cytoplasmic domain were as effective as RSLE-containing neuronal L1 in the recruitment of ankyrin-GFP. Ankyrin binding by L1 was independent of cell-cell interactions. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of L1 regulates intracellular signal transduction, which is necessary for neurite outgrowth. In rat B35 neuroblastoma cell lines stably expressing L1 missense mutants, antibody-induced endocytosis was unaffected by S1224L or S1194L mutations but appeared to be enhanced by the Y1229H mutation. These results suggested a critical role for tyrosine residue 1229 in the regulation of L1 endocytosis. In conclusion, specific mutations within key residues of the cytoplasmic domain of L1 (Ser(1224), Tyr(1229)) destabilize normal L1-ankyrin interactions and may influence L1 endocytosis to contribute to the mechanism of neuronal dysfunction in human X-linked mental retardation. PMID:11222639

  19. Regulation of the cytoplasmic accumulation of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in MA104 cells is independent of folate receptor regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, B A; Johnson, C A; Wang, M T; Anderson, R G

    1989-01-01

    To better understand how the folate receptor (also known as the membrane folate binder) is able to deliver 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid to the cytoplasm of folate-depleted MA104 cells, we have examined the kinetics of movement from the cell surface into the cytoplasm. Bound 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid was transferred into an acid-resistant membrane compartment at the rate of 0.9-1.0 pmol/10(6) cells per h. This folate appeared in the cytoplasm at the same rate. Furthermore, cytoplasmic 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid became polyglutamated at the rate of 0.6-0.7 pmol/10(6) cells per h. As soon as intracellular 5-methyltetrahydrofolate reached 5-7 pmol/10(6) cells, however, cytoplasmic accumulation was markedly inhibited even though the folate receptor remained functional. Therefore, the acute regulation of 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid accumulation appears to be achieved by controlling the movement of the vitamin from the receptor into the cytoplasm of the cell. PMID:2478584

  20. In vivo functional protein-protein interaction: nuclear targeted hsp90 shifts cytoplasmic steroid receptor mutants into the nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, K I; Devin, J; Cadepond, F; Jibard, N; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Baulieu, E E; Catelli, M G

    1994-01-01

    In target tissue extracts, heat shock protein hsp90 has been found associated to all unliganded steroid receptors. Modulation of important functions of these receptors, including prevention of DNA binding and optimization of transcriptional activity, has been attributed to hsp90. However no unequivocal in vivo demonstration of interaction between receptors and hsp90 has been presented. We targeted chicken hsp90, a mainly cytoplasmic protein, with the nucleoplasmin nuclear localization signal (90NLS). After transfection into COS-7 cells, 90NLS was found in the nucleus with specific immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy techniques. A human glucocorticosteroid receptor mutant devoid of NLS sequence was also expressed in COS-7 cells and found exclusively cytoplasmic. Coexpression of 90NLS and of the cytoplasmic human glucocorticosteroid receptor mutant led to complete nuclear localization of the receptor, indicating its piggyback transport by 90NLS and thus physical and functional interaction between the two proteins in the absence of hormone. The same nuclear localization was obtained after cotransfection of 90NLS and a cytoplasmic rabbit progesterone receptor mutant. Finally, coexpression of wild-type rabbit progesterone receptor (nuclear) and wildtype hsp90 (cytoplasmic) into COS-7 cells provoked partial relocalization of hsp90 into the nucleus. These experiments lay the groundwork on which to study hsp90 as a chaperone, regulating activities of steroid receptors and possibly participating in their nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8278390

  1. Inhibition of cytoplasmic p53 differentially modulates Ca(2+) signaling and cellular viability in young and aged striata.

    PubMed

    Ureshino, Rodrigo Portes; Hsu, Yi-Te; do Carmo, Lúcia Garcez; Yokomizo, César Henrique; Nantes, Iseli Lourenço; Smaili, Soraya Soubhi

    2014-10-01

    The p53 protein, a transcription factor with many gene targets, can also trigger apoptosis in the cytoplasm. The disruption of cell homeostasis, such as Ca(2+) signaling and mitochondrial respiration, contributes to the loss of viability and ultimately leads to cell death. However, the link between Ca(2+) signaling and p53 signaling remains unclear. During aging, there are alterations in cell physiology that are commonly associated with a reduced adaptive stress response, thus increasing cell vulnerability. In this work, we examined the effects of a cytoplasmic p53 inhibitor (pifithrin μ) in the striatum of young and aged rats by evaluating Ca(2+) signaling, mitochondrial respiration, apoptotic protein expression, and tissue viability. Our results showed that pifithrin μ differentially modulated cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in young and aged rats. Cytoplasmic p53 inhibition appeared to reduce the mitochondrial respiration rate in both groups. In addition, p53 phosphorylation and Bax protein levels were elevated upon cytoplasmic p53 inhibition and could contribute to the reduction of tissue viability. Following glutamate challenge, pifithrin μ improved cell viability in aged tissue, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Taken together, these results indicate that cytoplasmic p53 may have a special role in cell viability by influencing cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and respiration and may produce differential effects in the striatum of young and aged rats. PMID:25084214

  2. A 127-kDa protein (UV-DDB) binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Sukegawa, J; Sukegawa, I; Tomita, S; Iijima, K; Oguchi, S; Suzuki, T; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P

    1999-02-01

    Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) is an integral membrane protein with a short cytoplasmic domain of 47 amino acids. It is hoped that identification of proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain will provide new insights into the physiological function of APP and, in turn, into the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To identify proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of APP, we employed affinity chromatography using an immobilized synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 645-694 of APP695 and identified a protein of approximately 130 kDa in rat brain cytosol. Amino acid sequencing of the protein revealed the protein to be a rat homologue of monkey UV-DDB (UV-damaged DNA-binding protein, calculated molecular mass of 127 kDa). UV-DDB/p127 co-immunoprecipitated with APP using an anti-APP antibody from PC12 cell lysates. APP also co-immunoprecipitated with UV-DDB/p127 using an anti-UV-DDB/p127 antibody. These results indicate that UV-DDB/p127, which is present in the cytosolic fraction, forms a complex with APP through its cytoplasmic domain. In vitro binding experiments using a glutathione S-transferase-APP cytoplasmic domain fusion protein and several mutants indicated that the YENPTY motif within the APP cytoplasmic domain, which is important in the internalization of APP and amyloid beta protein secretion, may be involved in the interaction between UV-DDB/p127 and APP. PMID:9930726

  3. Isolation of cell nuclei using inert macromolecules to mimic the crowded cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Ronald; Hadj-Sahraoui, Yasmina

    2009-01-01

    Cell nuclei are commonly isolated and studied in media which include millimolar concentrations of cations, which conserve the nuclear volume by screening the negative charges on chromatin and maintaining its compaction. However, two factors question if these ionic conditions correctly reproduce the environment of nuclei in vivo: the small-scale motion and conformation of chromatin in vivo are not reproduced in isolated nuclei, and experiments and theory suggest that small ions in the cytoplasm are not free in the soluble phase but are predominantly bound to macromolecules. We studied the possible role in maintaining the structure and functions of nuclei in vivo of a further but frequently overlooked property of the cytoplasm, the crowding or osmotic effects caused by diffusible macromolecules whose concentration, measured in several studies, is in the range of 130 mg/ml. Nuclei which conserved their volume in the cell and their ultrastructure seen by electron microscopy were released from K562 cells in media containing the inert polymer 70 kDa Ficoll (50% w/v) or 70 kDa dextran (35% w/v) to replace the diffusible cytoplasmic molecules which were dispersed on cell lysis with digitonin, with 100 microM K-Hepes buffer as the only source of ions. Immunofluorescence labelling and experiments using cells expressing GFP-fusion proteins showed that internal compartments (nucleoli, PML and coiled bodies, foci of RNA polymerase II) were conserved in these nuclei, and nascent RNA transcripts could be elongated. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that crowding by diffusible cytoplasmic macromolecules is a crucial but overlooked factor which supports the nucleus in vivo by equilibrating the opposing osmotic pressure cause by the high concentration of macromolecules in the nucleus, and suggest that crowded media provide more physiological conditions to study nuclear structure and functions. They may also help to resolve the long-standing paradox that the small

  4. Collapsing glomerulopathy in a case of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N.; Rathi, M.; Nada, R.; Sharma, A.; Goyal, A.; Ramachandran, R.; Kumar, V.; Kohli, H. S.; Gupta, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a pathological entity characterized by collapse and wrinkling of glomerular tuft, podocyte dedifferentiation and hyperplasia. CG may be idiopathic or secondary to other diseases. CG has been described with IgA nephropathy, membranous glomerulopathy, diabetic nephropathy, and lupus nephritis. However, till date there is no report of CG in association with the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV). Here, we present a case of CG that developed during follow-up in a case of AAV with biopsy proven pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. PMID:27051140

  5. Isolation of Cell Nuclei Using Inert Macromolecules to Mimic the Crowded Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Ronald; Hadj-Sahraoui, Yasmina

    2009-01-01

    Cell nuclei are commonly isolated and studied in media which include millimolar concentrations of cations, which conserve the nuclear volume by screening the negative charges on chromatin and maintaining its compaction. However, two factors question if these ionic conditions correctly reproduce the environment of nuclei in vivo: the small-scale motion and conformation of chromatin in vivo are not reproduced in isolated nuclei, and experiments and theory suggest that small ions in the cytoplasm are not free in the soluble phase but are predominantly bound to macromolecules. We studied the possible role in maintaining the structure and functions of nuclei in vivo of a further but frequently overlooked property of the cytoplasm, the crowding or osmotic effects caused by diffusible macromolecules whose concentration, measured in several studies, is in the range of 130 mg/ml. Nuclei which conserved their volume in the cell and their ultrastructure seen by electron microscopy were released from K562 cells in media containing the inert polymer 70 kDa Ficoll (50% w/v) or 70 kDa dextran (35% w/v) to replace the diffusible cytoplasmic molecules which were dispersed on cell lysis with digitonin, with 100 µM K-Hepes buffer as the only source of ions. Immunofluorescence labelling and experiments using cells expressing GFP-fusion proteins showed that internal compartments (nucleoli, PML and coiled bodies, foci of RNA polymerase II) were conserved in these nuclei, and nascent RNA transcripts could be elongated. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that crowding by diffusible cytoplasmic macromolecules is a crucial but overlooked factor which supports the nucleus in vivo by equilibrating the opposing osmotic pressure cause by the high concentration of macromolecules in the nucleus, and suggest that crowded media provide more physiological conditions to study nuclear structure and functions. They may also help to resolve the long-standing paradox that the small

  6. Theodor and Marcella Boveri: chromosomes and cytoplasm in heredity and development.

    PubMed

    Satzinger, Helga

    2008-03-01

    The chromosome theory of heredity, developed in 1902-1904, became one of the foundation stones of twentieth-century genetics. It is usually referred to as the Sutton-Boveri theory after Walter Sutton and Theodor Boveri. However, the contributions of Theodor Boveri and his co-worker, Marcella O'Grady Boveri (also his wife), to the understanding of heredity and development go beyond the localization of the Mendelian hereditary factors onto the chromosomes. They investigated the interaction of cytoplasm and chromosomes, and demonstrated its relevance in heredity and development. PMID:18268510

  7. Vesicles Cytoplasmic Injection: An Efficient Technique to Produce Porcine Transgene-Expressing Embryos.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, C G; Bevacqua, R J; Lorenzo, M S; Tello, M F; Willis, M; Buemo, C P; Lombardo, D M; Salamone, D F

    2016-08-01

    The use of vesicles co-incubated with plasmids showed to improve the efficiency of cytoplasmic injection of transgenes in cattle. Here, this technique was tested as a simplified alternative for transgenes delivery in porcine zygotes. To this aim, cytoplasmic injection of the plasmid alone was compared to the injection with plasmids co-incubated with vesicles both in diploid parthenogenic and IVF zygotes. The plasmid pcx-egfp was injected circular (CP) at 3, 30 and 300 ng/μl and linear (LP) at 30 ng/μl. The experimental groups using parthenogenetic zygotes were as follows: CP naked at 3 ng/μl (N = 105), 30 ng/μl (N = 95) and 300 ng/μl (N = 65); Sham (N = 105); control not injected (N = 223); LP naked at 30 ng/μl (N = 78); LP vesicles (N = 115) and Sham vesicles (N = 59). For IVF zygotes: LP naked (N = 44) LP vesicles (N = 94), Sham (N = 59) and control (N = 79). Cleavage, blastocyst and GFP+ rates were analysed by Fisher's test (p < 0.05). The parthenogenic CP naked group showed lower cleavage respect to control (p < 0.05). The highest concentration of plasmids to allow development to blastocyst stage was 30 ng/μl. There were no differences in DNA fragmentation between groups. The parthenogenic LP naked group resulted in high GFP rates (46%) and also allowed the production of GFP blastocysts (33%). The cytoplasmic injection with LP vesicles into parthenogenic zygotes allowed 100% GFP blastocysts. Injected IVF showed higher cleavage rates than control (p < 0.05). In IVF zygotes, only the use of vesicles produced GFP blastocysts. The use of vesicles co-incubated with plasmids improves the transgene expression efficiency for cytoplasmic injection in porcine zygotes and constitutes a simple technique for easy delivery of plasmids. PMID:27260090

  8. Morphogenesis of Candida albicans and cytoplasmic proteins associated with differences in morphology, strain, or temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Manning, M; Mitchell, T G

    1980-01-01

    The extent of change in cytoplasmic proteins which accompanies yeast-to-mycelium morphogenesis of Candida albicans was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Pure cultures of yeasts and true hyphae (i.e., without concomitant production of pseudohyphae) were grown in a synthetic low-sulfate medium. The two strains selected for this study were strain 4918, which produces pure mycelial cultures in low-sulfate medium at 37 degrees C and yeast cells at 24 degrees C, and strain 2252, which produces yeast cells exclusively at both 24 and 37 degrees C in low-sulfate medium. The proteins of both strains were labeled at both temperatures with [35S]sulfate, cytoplasmic fractions were prepared by mechanical disruption and ultracentrifugation, and the labeled proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Highly reproducible protein spot patterns were obtained which defined hundreds of proteins in each extract. Ten protein spots were identified on the two-dimensional gels of the 4918 mycelial-phase extract which were not present in the 4918 yeast-phase extract. These proteins appeared to be modifications of preexisting yeast-phase proteins rather than proteins synthesized de novo in the mycelial cells because 5 were absorbed by rabbit anti-yeast-phase immunoglobulin and each of the 10 was also present in extracts of strain 2252 grown at 24 and 37 degrees C, indicating that they were neither unique to filamentous cells nor sufficient for induction or maintenance of the mycelial morphology. Thirty-three proteins were identified in the 4918 yeast-phase extract which were not present in the 4918 mycelial-phase extract. Pulse-chase experiments revealed the synthesis of new proteins during yeast-to-mycelial conversion, but none of these was unique to mycelial cells. No differences in the major cytoplasmic proteins of any of the yeast- or mycelial-phase extracts were identified. This finding suggests that the major structural proteins of the cytoplasm are not

  9. Rapid and Sustained Nuclear-Cytoplasmic ERK Oscillations Induced by Epidermal Growth Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Ippolito, Danielle L.; Chrisler, William B.; Resat, Haluk; Bollinger, Nikki; Opresko, Lee K.; Wiley, H. S.

    2009-12-01

    Mathematical modeling has predicted that ERK activity should oscillate in response to cell stimulation, but this has never been observed. To explore this inconsistency, we expressed an ERK1-GFP fusion protein in mammary epithelial cells. Following EGF stimulation, we observed rapid and continuous ERK oscillations between the nucleus and cytoplasm with a periodicity of approximately 15 minutes. These oscillations were remarkably persistent (>45 cycles), displayed an asymmetric waveform, and were highly dependent on cell density, essentially disappearing at confluency. We conclude that the ERK pathway is an intrinsic oscillator. Although the functional implications of the observed oscillations are uncertain, this property can be used to continuously monitor ERK activity in single cells.

  10. Partial structural characterization of the cytoplasmic domain of the erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3.

    PubMed

    Appell, K C; Low, P S

    1981-11-10

    The cytoplasmic domain of band 3 was released from spectrin-depleted, acetic acid-stripped erythrocyte membrane vesicles by mild chymotryptic digestion. After purification by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography, the fragment preparation was found to be greater than 90% pure on polyacrylamide disc gels in the presence of 0.2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunit Mr from the electrophoretic procedure was estimated at approximately 40,000. The isolated cytoplasmic fragment ws judged to be a dimer, since (i) the unmodified fragment and its disulfide-cross-linked (dimeric) counterpart eluted in the same peak fraction from a Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration column, and (ii) the sedimentation velocity molecular weight of the native fragment was calculated to be approximately 95,000. No evidence of either larger or smaller aggregates was obtained. The frictional ratio of the fragment was measured at 1.6, suggesting a highly elongated morphology. The circular dichroism spectrum of the fragment corresponded to approximately 37% alpha helix. Titration of the cytoplasmic fragment over the physiological pH range gave rise to a reversible 2-fold increase in the intrinsic fluorescence quantum yield (lambda ex, 290 nm; lambda em, 335 nm) between pH 6 and 9. Computer analysis of the data yielded a temperature-dependent apparent pKa of 7.8 at 37 degrees C and 8.1 at 20 degrees C, both with Hill coefficients less than or equal to 1. Calorimetric experiments revealed a similar sensitivity to pH, where the denaturation temperature of the fragment titrated from 74 degrees C at pH 6 to 59 degrees C at pH 8.5, with an apparent pKa of 7.3 and a Hill coefficient less than 1. The enthalpies and widths at half-height of the transitions were also exquisitely sensitive to pH. The fluorescence and calorimetric data could all be described by the titration of a single ionizable group of apparent pKa of 7.8 at 37 degrees C and delta pKa/degrees C of -0.018. The ionization of this critical

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Sua-type cytoplasmic male sterility of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Li, Fengxia; Yang, Aiguo; Lv, Jing; Gong, Daping; Sun, Yuhe

    2016-07-01

    To uncover the cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)-associated mitochondrial genes of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of Sua-CMS mitochondrial genome. The Sua-CMS mtDNA sequence is 522,731 bp in length and contains 34 protein-coding genes, 25 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and three ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. The nucleotide sequence data of 34 protein-coding genes of 14 mitochondrial genomes were used for constructing the phylogenetic tree. The results showed that Nicotiana tabacum Sua-CMS exhibits most close relationship with other solanaceae species. PMID:27158790

  12. Understanding the organization of the amphibian egg cytoplasm - Gravitational force as a probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, Anton W.; Malacinski, George M.; Yokota, Hiroki; Wakahara, Masami

    1992-01-01

    A combination of hypergravity (centrifugation) and hypogravity (clinostat) studies have been carried out on amphibian (frog, Xenopus) eggs. The results reveal that the twinning caused by centrifugation exhibits substantial spawning to spawning variation. That variation can be attributed to the apparent viscosity of the egg's internal cytoplasm. Simulated hypogravity results in a relocation of the egg's third (horizontal) cleavage furrow, toward the equator. Substantial egg-to-egg variation is also observed in this 'cleavage effect'. For interpreting spaceflight data and for using G-forces as probes for understanding the egg's architecture the egg variation documented herein should be considered.

  13. Phosphorylation Controls the Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Shuttling of Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weinan; Li, Jing; Wang, Shanshan; Cao, Shuaishuai; Jiang, Jingwen; Chen, Can; Ding, Chan; Qin, Chuan; Ye, Xin; Gao, George F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleoprotein (NP) is a major component of the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex. During the replication of influenza virus, the vRNP complex undergoes nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, during which NP serves as one of the determinants. To date, many phosphorylation sites on NP have been identified, but the biological functions of many of these phosphorylation sites remain unknown. In the present study, the functions of the phosphorylation sites S9, Y10, and Y296 were characterized. These residues are highly conserved, and their phosphorylation was essential for virus growth in cell culture and in a mouse model by regulating the activity of the viral polymerase and the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of NP. The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of S9 and Y10 controlled nuclear import of NP by affecting the binding affinity between NP and different isoforms of importin-α. In addition, the phosphorylation of Y296 caused nuclear retention of NP by reducing the interaction between NP and CRM1. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of NP during the early stage of virus infection was ablated when Y296 was mutated to F. However, at later stages of infection, it was weakened by the Y10F mutation. Taken together, the present data indicate that the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of NP control the shuttling of NP between the nucleus and the cytoplasm during virus replication. IMPORTANCE It is well known that phosphorylation regulates the functions of viral proteins and the life cycle of influenza A virus. As NP is the most abundant protein in the vRNP complex of influenza A virus, several phosphorylation sites on this protein have been identified. However, the functions of these phosphorylation sites were unknown. The present study demonstrates that the phosphorylation status of these sites on NP can mediate its nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, which drives the trafficking of vRNP complexes in infected cells. The present data suggest that the

  14. Reconstitution of the Cytoplasmic Regulation of the Wnt Signaling Pathway Using Xenopus Egg Extracts.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Annastasia Simone; Hang, Brian I; Lee, Ethan

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of β-catenin turnover is the central mechanism governing activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. All components of the pathway are present in the early embryo of Xenopus laevis, and Xenopus egg extracts have been used to recapitulate complex biological reactions such as microtubule dynamics, DNA replication, chromatin assembly, and phases of the cell cycle. Herein, we describe a biochemical method for analyzing β-catenin degradation using radiolabeled and luciferase-fusion proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that in such a biochemical system, cytoplasmic β-catenin degradation is regulated by soluble components of the Wnt pathway as well as small molecules. PMID:27590156

  15. Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing and Re-Examination of a Cytoplasmic Male Sterility-Associated Gene in Boro-Taichung-Type Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Rice

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Tomohiko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genome substitutions between subspecies can lead to cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) through incompatibility between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Boro-Taichung (BT)-type CMS rice was obtained by substituting the nuclear genome of Oryza sativa subsp. indica cultivar Chinsurah Boro II with that of Oryza sativa subsp. japonica cultivar Taichung 65. In BT-type CMS rice, the mitochondrial gene orf79 is associated with male sterility. A complete sequence of the Boro-type mitochondrial genome responsible for BT-type CMS has not been determined to date. Here, we used pyrosequencing to construct the Boro-type mitochondrial genome. The contiguous sequences were assembled into five circular DNA molecules, four of which could be connected into a single circle. The two resulting subgenomic circles were unable to form a reliable master circle, as recombination between them was scarcely detected. We also found an unequal abundance of DNA molecules for the two loci of atp6. These results indicate the presence of multi-partite DNA molecules in the Boro-type mitochondrial genome. Expression patterns were investigated for Boro-type mitochondria-specific orfs, which were not found in the mitochondria from the standard japonica cultivar Nipponbare. Restorer of fertility 1 (RF1)-dependent RNA processing has been observed in orf79-containing RNA but was not detected in other Boro-type mitochondria-specific orfs, supporting the conclusion that orf79 is a unique CMS-associated gene in Boro-type mitochondria. PMID:27414645

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE FUNCTION OF CYTOPLASMIC FIBERS FORMED BY THE RUBELLA VIRUS NONSTRUCTURAL REPLICASE PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Jason D.; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Frey, Teryl K.

    2010-01-01

    The P150 and P90 replicase proteins of rubella virus (RUBV), a plus-strand RNA Togavirus, produce a unique cytoplasmic fiber network resembling microtubules. Pharmacological and mutagenic approaches were used to determine if these fibers functioned in virus replication. The pharmacological approach revealed that microtubules were required for fiber formation, but neither was necessary for virus replication. Through the mutagenic approach it was found that α-helices near both termini of P150 were necessary for fiber assembly and infectivity, but fiber formation and viability could not be correlated because most of these mutations were lethal. The N-terminal α-helix of P150 affected both proteolytic processing of P150 and P90 from the P200 precursor and targeting of P200, possibly through directing conformational folding of P200. Finally, we made the unexpected discovery that RUBV genomes can spread from cell-to-cell without virus particles, a process that we hypothesize utilizes RUBV-induced cytoplasmic projections containing fibers and replication complexes. PMID:20696450

  17. Mitochondrial uncouplers inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis largely through cytoplasmic acidification

    PubMed Central

    Dejonghe, Wim; Kuenen, Sabine; Mylle, Evelien; Vasileva, Mina; Keech, Olivier; Viotti, Corrado; Swerts, Jef; Fendrych, Matyáš; Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres; Mishev, Kiril; Delang, Simon; Scholl, Stefan; Zarza, Xavier; Heilmann, Mareike; Kourelis, Jiorgos; Kasprowicz, Jaroslaw; Nguyen, Le Son Long; Drozdzecki, Andrzej; Van Houtte, Isabelle; Szatmári, Anna-Mária; Majda, Mateusz; Baisa, Gary; Bednarek, Sebastian York; Robert, Stéphanie; Audenaert, Dominique; Testerink, Christa; Munnik, Teun; Van Damme, Daniël; Heilmann, Ingo; Schumacher, Karin; Winne, Johan; Friml, Jiří; Verstreken, Patrik; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    ATP production requires the establishment of an electrochemical proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondrial uncouplers dissipate this proton gradient and disrupt numerous cellular processes, including vesicular trafficking, mainly through energy depletion. Here we show that Endosidin9 (ES9), a novel mitochondrial uncoupler, is a potent inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in different systems and that ES9 induces inhibition of CME not because of its effect on cellular ATP, but rather due to its protonophore activity that leads to cytoplasm acidification. We show that the known tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostinA23, which is routinely used to block CME, displays similar properties, thus questioning its use as a specific inhibitor of cargo recognition by the AP-2 adaptor complex via tyrosine motif-based endocytosis signals. Furthermore, we show that cytoplasm acidification dramatically affects the dynamics and recruitment of clathrin and associated adaptors, and leads to reduction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate from the plasma membrane. PMID:27271794

  18. MCRS1 associates with cytoplasmic dynein and mediates pericentrosomal material recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si-Hyung; Lee, Mi-Sun; Choi, Tae-Ik; Hong, Hyowon; Seo, Jun-Young; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Joon

    2016-01-01

    MCRS1 is involved in multiple cellular activities, including mitotic spindle assembly, mTOR signaling and tumorigenesis. Although MCRS1 has been reported to bind to the dynein regulator NDE1, a functional interaction between MCRS1 and cytoplasmic dynein remains unaddressed. Here, we demonstrate that MCRS1 is required for dynein-dependent cargo transport to the centrosome and also plays a role in primary cilium formation. MCRS1 localized to centriolar satellites. Knockdown of MCRS1 resulted in a dispersion of centriolar satellites whose establishment depends on cytoplasmic dynein. By contrast, NDE1 was not necessary for the proper distribution of centriolar satellites, indicating a functional distinction between MCRS1 and NDE1. Unlike NDE1, MCRS1 played a positive role for the initiation of ciliogenesis, possibly through its interaction with TTBK2. Zebrafish with homozygous mcrs1 mutants exhibited a reduction in the size of the brain and the eye due to excessive apoptosis. In addition, mcrs1 mutants failed to develop distinct layers in the retina, and showed a defect in melatonin-induced aggregation of melanosomes in melanophores. These phenotypes are reminiscent of zebrafish dynein mutants. Reduced ciliogenesis was also apparent in the olfactory placode of mcrs1 mutants. Collectively, our findings identify MCRS1 as a dynein-interacting protein critical for centriolar satellite formation and ciliogenesis. PMID:27263857

  19. Viral respiratory infection increases alveolar macrophage cytoplasmic motility in rats: role of NO.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Sekizawa, K; Yamaya, M; Okinaga, S; Satoh, M; Sasaki, H

    1995-03-01

    Ingested ferrimagnetic (Fe3O4) particles were used to estimate noninvasively the motion of organelles in alveolar macrophages (AM) in intact rats during viral respiratory infection by parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus. Four days after instillation of Fe3O4 particles (3 mg/kg) into the lung, remnant field strength (RFS) was measured at the body surface immediately after magnetization of Fe3O4 particles by an externally applied magnetic field. RFS decreases with time, due to particle rotation (relaxation) which is related to cytoplasmic motility of AM. Viral infection increased the relaxation rate (lambda o per min), and increases in lambda o reached a maximum 3 days after nasal inoculation (day 3). Viral infection (day 3)-induced increases in lambda o were dose dependently inhibited by either the L-arginine analogue N-nitro-L-arginine or by methylene blue, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activity. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from infected rats contained significantly higher levels of nitrite than that from control rats (P < 0.01). In in vitro experiments, AM from infected rats showed significantly higher lambda o, nitrite production, and intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels than those from control rats (P < 0.01). Sodium nitroprusside, known to release nitric oxide concentration dependently, increased lambda o of AM from noninfected rats in vitro. These results suggest that nitric oxide plays an important role in AM cytoplasmic motility during viral respiratory infection. PMID:7900821

  20. Environmental stress increases the entry of cytoplasmic organellar DNA into the nucleus in plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Lloyd, Andrew H.; Timmis, Jeremy N.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts (photosynthetic members of the plastid family of cytoplasmic organelles) in eukaryotic cells originated more than a billion years ago when an ancestor of the nucleated cell engulfed two different prokaryotes in separate sequential events. Extant cytoplasmic organellar genomes contain very few genes compared with their candidate free-living ancestors, as most have functionally relocated to the nucleus. The first step in functional relocation involves the integration of inactive DNA fragments into nuclear chromosomes, and this process continues at high frequency with attendant genetic, genomic, and evolutionary consequences. Using two different transplastomic tobacco lines, we show that DNA migration from chloroplasts to the nucleus is markedly increased by mild heat stress. In addition, we show that insertion of mitochondrial DNA fragments during the repair of induced double-strand breaks is increased by heat stress. The experiments demonstrate that the nuclear influx of organellar DNA is a potentially a source of mutation for nuclear genomes that is highly susceptible to temperature fluctuations that are well within the range experienced naturally. PMID:22308419

  1. International Consensus Statement on Testing and Reporting of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA)

    PubMed

    Savige, J; Gillis, D; Benson, E; Davies, D; Esnault, V; Falk, R J; Hagen, E C; Jayne, D; Jennette, J C; Paspaliaris, B; Pollock, W; Pusey, C; Savage, C O; Silvestrini, R; van der Woude, F; Wieslander, J; Wiik, A

    1999-04-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) tests are used to diagnose and monitor inflammatory activity in the primary systemic small vessel vasculitides. ANCA is best demonstrated in these diseases by using a combination of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) of normal peripheral blood neutrophils and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that detect ANCA specific for proteinase 3 (PR3) or myeloperoxidase (MPO). For ANCA testing in "new" patients, IIF must be performed on all serum samples. Serum samples containing ANCA, any other cytoplasmic fluorescence, or an antinuclear antibody (ANA) that results in homogeneous or peripheral nuclear fluorescence then should be tested in ELISAs for PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA. Optimally, ELISAs for PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA should be performed on all serum samples. Inclusion of the most recent positive sample in the IIF or ELISA may help demonstrate a change in antibody level. Reports should use recommended terms. Any report of positive neutrophil fluorescence issued before the ELISA results are available should indicate that positive fluorescence alone is not specific for the diagnosis of Wegener granulomatosis or microscopic polyangiitis and that decisions about treatment should not be based solely on the ANCA results. PMID:10191771

  2. Transgenic induction of mitochondrial rearrangements for cytoplasmic male sterility in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Ajay Pal S; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2007-02-01

    Stability of the mitochondrial genome is controlled by nuclear loci. In plants, nuclear genes suppress mitochondrial DNA rearrangements during development. One nuclear gene involved in this process is Msh1. Msh1 appears to be involved in the suppression of illegitimate recombination in plant mitochondria. To test the hypothesis that Msh1 disruption leads to the type of mitochondrial DNA rearrangements associated with naturally occurring cytoplasmic male sterility in plants, a transgenic approach for RNAi was used to modulate expression of Msh1 in tobacco and tomato. In both species, these experiments resulted in reproducible mitochondrial DNA rearrangements and a condition of male (pollen) sterility. The male sterility was, in each case, heritable, associated with normal female fertility, and apparently maternal in its inheritance. Segregation of the transgene did not reverse the male sterile phenotype, producing stable, nontransgenic male sterility. The reproducible transgenic induction of mitochondrial rearrangements in plants is unprecedented, providing a means to develop novel cytoplasmic male sterile lines for release as non-GMO or transgenic materials. PMID:17261806

  3. Possible intrinsic association of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis coexisting with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huifang; Xiong, Jiachuan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Nie, Ling; Wang, Yiqin; Zhao, Jinghong

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a life-threatening condition that causes renal failure. Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells in the blood that can also cause renal failure. The two diseases have high morbidity and mortality rates in the elderly, with a poor prognosis. A 64-year-old female presented to Xinqiao Hospital (Chonqing, China) with fatigue and a poor appetite that had been apparent for 6 weeks. Laboratory tests revealed a serum creatinine level of 10.31 mg/dl, a cytoplasmic ANCA titer of 1:10, a positive result for myeloperoxidase and a serum globulin level of 3.96 g/dl. A renal biopsy revealed crescent glomerulonephritis, combined with the rapid progression of renal function. Based on these observations (ANCA titer, crescent glomerulonephritis and rapid progression of renal function) a diagnosis of AAV was established. MM was confirmed by serum immunofixation electrophoresis combined with bone marrow aspiration. The present study discusses what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of AAV coexisting with MM in order to highlight it as a clinical concern. PMID:27602144

  4. Diffusion in Cytoplasm: Effects of Excluded Volume Due to Internal Membranes and Cytoskeletal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Igor L.; Kraikivski, Pavel; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The intricate geometry of cytoskeletal networks and internal membranes causes the space available for diffusion in cytoplasm to be convoluted, thereby affecting macromolecule diffusivity. We present a first systematic computational study of this effect by approximating intracellular structures as mixtures of random overlapping obstacles of various shapes. Effective diffusion coefficients are computed using a fast homogenization technique. It is found that a simple two-parameter power law provides a remarkably accurate description of effective diffusion over the entire range of volume fractions and for any given composition of structures. This universality allows for fast computation of diffusion coefficients, once the obstacle shapes and volume fractions are specified. We demonstrate that the excluded volume effect alone can account for a four-to-sixfold reduction in diffusive transport in cells, relative to diffusion in vitro. The study lays the foundation for an accurate coarse-grain formulation that would account for cytoplasm heterogeneity on a micron scale and binding of tracers to intracellular structures. PMID:19651034

  5. Predominantly Cytoplasmic Localization in Yeast of ASR1, a Non-Receptor Transcription Factor from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Urtasun, Nicolás; Correa García, Susana; Iusem, Norberto D; Bermúdez Moretti, Mariana

    2010-01-01

    The Asr gene family (named after abscisic acid, stress and ripening), currently classified as a novel group of the LEA superfamily, is exclusively present in the genomes of seed plants, except for the Brassicaceae family. It is associated with water-deficit stress and is involved in adaptation to dry climates. Motivated by separate reports depicting ASR proteins as either transcription factors or chaperones, we decided to determine the intracellular localization of ASR proteins. For that purpose, we employed an in vivo eukaryotic expression system, the heterologous model Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including wild type strains as well as mutants in which the variant ASR1 previously proved to be functionally protective against osmotic stress. Our methodology involved immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy, without artificially altering the native structure of the protein under study. Results show that, in both normal and osmotic stress conditions, recombinant ASR1 turned out to localize mainly to the cytoplasm, irrespective of the genotype used, revealing a scattered distribution in the form of dots or granules. The results are discussed in terms of a plausible dual (cytoplasmic and nuclear) role of ASR proteins. PMID:20657719

  6. Suppression of cytoplasmic male sterility by nuclear genes alters expression of a novel mitochondrial gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M; Brown, G G

    1991-01-01

    To identify regions of the mitochondrial genome that potentially could specify the "Polima" (pol) cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) of Brassica napus, transcripts of 14 mitochondrial genes from nap (male fertile), pol (male sterile), and nuclear fertility-restored pol cytoplasm plants were analyzed. Transcriptional differences among these plants were detected only with the ATPase subunit 6 (atp6) gene. Structural analysis of the atp6 gene regions of pol and nap mitochondrial DNAs showed that rearrangements in the pol mitochondrial genome occurring upstream of atp6 have generated a chimeric 224-codon open reading frame, designated orf224, that is cotranscribed with atp6. In CMS plants, most transcripts of this region are dicistronic, comprising both orf224 and atp6 sequences. Nuclear restorer genes at either of two distinct loci appear to specifically alter this transcript pattern such that monocistronic atp6 transcripts predominate. The differences in expression of this region appear to result, in part, from differential processing of a tRNA-like element comprising a tRNA pseudogene present immediately upstream of atp6 in both the sterile and fertile mitochondrial DNAs. Possible mechanisms by which expression of the orf224/atp6 locus and the Polima CMS trait may be specifically related are considered. PMID:1840901

  7. CH2-units on (poly-)ethylene glycol radially dehydrate cytoplasm of resting skinned skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masako; Takemori, Shigeru

    2008-06-01

    Observing the optical cross-section and electron micrographs of mechanically skinned fibres of frog skeletal muscle, we found that ethylene glycols (EGs) of small (mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-EGs; M(r) 62-194) and medium (poly-EGs; M(r) 900 and 3350) molecular weights efficiently dehydrate the fibres to shrink them radially without microscopic inhomogeneity. The medium-sized poly-EGs at 30% weight/weight concentration absorbed almost all the evaporable water from the fibre. Passive tension measurement at near slack sarcomere spacing indicated that this dehydration by EGs did not accompany longitudinal fibre shrinkage. Chemically relevant fully hydric alcohols (glycerol, threitol, ribitol and mannitol; M(r) 92-182) showed no appreciable dehydrating ability on fibres. An intimate correlation was found between fibre dehydration and CH(2)-concentration of the solutions. Viscosity measurements indicated that the hydrodynamic radii of the alcohols were comparable to those of the small EGs. Therefore, hydrodynamic radii are not a primary determinant of the dehydrating ability. Additionally, CH(2)-concentration of EGs but not alcohols was found to correlate intimately with the measured viscosity of the bulk solution of EGs. These results suggested that the interaction between water molecules and CH(2)-units in crowded cytoplasm of skeletal muscle affects cytoplasm as a whole to realize anisotropic fibre shrinkage. PMID:18583358

  8. Induction of DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei by cytoplasmic factors: inhibition by protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, R L; Gutowski, J K; Katz, M; Goldfarb, R H; Cohen, S

    1987-01-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts from spontaneously proliferating and mitogen-activated lymphoid cells contain a protein factor called ADR (activator of DNA replication) that induces DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. ADR-containing preparations have proteolytic activity, as indicated by their ability to degrade fibrin in a plasminogen-independent and plasminogen-dependent manner. In addition, aprotinin, a nonspecific protease inhibitor, abrogates ADR-induced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. Preincubation studies demonstrated that the effect of aprotinin is not due to its suppressive effects on the nuclei themselves. Other protease inhibitors such as leupeptin, p-aminobenzamidine, and N-alpha-tosyllysine chloromethyl ketone are also inhibitory, but soybean trypsin inhibitor is without effect. ADR activity can be removed from active extracts by adsorption with aprotinin-conjugated agarose beads and can be recovered by elution with an acetate buffer (pH 5). These findings are consistent with the interpretation that the initiation of DNA synthesis in resting nuclei may be protease dependent and, further, that the cytoplasmic stimulatory factor we have called ADR may be a protease itself. PMID:3540956

  9. Gas6 Downregulation Impaired Cytoplasmic Maturation and Pronuclear Formation Independent to the MPF Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeoung-Hwa; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Yuna; Kim, Eunju; Lee, Hyun-Seo; Yoon, Sook-Young; Lee, Kyung-Ah

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we found that the growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) is more highly expressed in germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes than in metaphase II (MII) oocytes using annealing control primer (ACP)-PCR technology. The current study was undertaken to investigate the role of Gas6 in oocyte maturation and fertilization using RNA interference (RNAi). Interestingly, despite the specific and marked decrease in Gas6 mRNA and protein expression in GVs after Gas6 RNAi, nuclear maturation including spindle structures and chromosome segregation was not affected. The only discernible effect induced by Gas6 RNAi was a change in maturation promoting factor (MPF) activity. After parthenogenetic activation, Gas6 RNAi-treated oocytes at the MII stage had not developed further and arrested at MII (90.0%). After stimulation with Sr2+, Gas6-silenced MII oocytes had markedly reduced Ca2+ oscillation and exhibited no exocytosis of cortical granules. In these oocytes, sperm penetration occurred during fertilization but not pronucleus (PN) formation. By roscovitine and colcemid treatment, we found that the Gas6 knockdown affected cytoplasmic maturation directly, independent to the changed MPF activity. These results strongly suggest that 1) the Gas6 signaling itself is important to the cytoplasmic maturation, but not nuclear maturation, and 2) the decreased Gas6 expression and decreased MPF activity separately or mutually influence sperm head decondensation and PN formation. PMID:21850267

  10. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Anthers between Cytoplasmic Male Sterile and Maintainer Lines in Capsicum annuum L

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Qin, Cheng; Hu, Zhiqun; Yin, Caixia; Hu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), widely used in the production of hybrid seeds, is a maternally inherited trait resulting in a failure to produce functional pollen. In order to identify some specific proteins associated with CMS in pepper, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied to proteomic analysis of anthers/buds between a CMS line (designated NA3) and its maintainer (designated NB3) in Capsicum annuum L. Thirty-three spots showed more than 1.5-fold in either CMS or its maintainer. Based on mass spectrometry, 27 spots representing 23 distinct proteins in these 33 spots were identified. Proteins down-regulated in CMS anthers/buds includes ATP synthase D chain, formate dehydrogenase, alpha-mannosidas, RuBisCO large subunit-binding protein subunit beta, chloroplast manganese stabilizing protein-II, glutathione S-transferase, adenosine kinase isoform 1T-like protein, putative DNA repair protein RAD23-4, putative caffeoyl-CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, glutamine synthetase (GS), annexin Cap32, glutelin, allene oxide cyclase, etc. In CMS anthers/buds, polyphenol oxidase, ATP synthase subunit beta, and actin are up-regulated. It was predicted that male sterility in NA3 might be related to energy metabolism turbulence, excessive ethylene synthesis, and suffocation of starch synthesis. The present study lays a foundation for future investigations of gene functions associated with pollen development and cytoplasmic male sterility, and explores the molecular mechanism of CMS in pepper. PMID:24264042

  11. Cytoplasmic cyclin D1 regulates cell invasion and metastasis through the phosphorylation of paxillin.

    PubMed

    Fusté, Noel P; Fernández-Hernández, Rita; Cemeli, Tània; Mirantes, Cristina; Pedraza, Neus; Rafel, Marta; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Colomina, Neus; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Dolcet, Xavier; Garí, Eloi

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 (Ccnd1) together with its binding partner Cdk4 act as a transcriptional regulator to control cell proliferation and migration, and abnormal Ccnd1·Cdk4 expression promotes tumour growth and metastasis. While different nuclear Ccnd1·Cdk4 targets participating in cell proliferation and tissue development have been identified, little is known about how Ccnd1·Cdk4 controls cell adherence and invasion. Here, we show that the focal adhesion component paxillin is a cytoplasmic substrate of Ccnd1·Cdk4. This complex phosphorylates a fraction of paxillin specifically associated to the cell membrane, and promotes Rac1 activation, thereby triggering membrane ruffling and cell invasion in both normal fibroblasts and tumour cells. Our results demonstrate that localization of Ccnd1·Cdk4 to the cytoplasm does not simply act to restrain cell proliferation, but constitutes a functionally relevant mechanism operating under normal and pathological conditions to control cell adhesion, migration and metastasis through activation of a Ccnd1·Cdk4-paxillin-Rac1 axis. PMID:27181366

  12. A mitochondrial DNA sequence is associated with abnormal pollen development in cytoplasmic male sterile bean plants.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, C; Lu, M; Lyznik, A; Mackenzie, S

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in common bean is associated with the presence of a 3-kb unique mitochondrial sequence designated pvs. The pvs sequence encodes at least two open reading frames (297 and 720 bp in length) with portions derived from the chloroplast genome. Fertility restoration by the nuclear restorer gene Fr results in the loss of this transcriptionally active unique region. We examined the effect of CMS (pvs present) and fertility restoration by Fr (pvs absent) on the pattern of pollen development in bean. In the CMS line, pollen aborted in the tetrad stage late in microgametogenesis. Microspores maintained cytoplasmic connections throughout pollen development, indicating aberrant or incomplete cytokinesis. Pollen-specific events associated with pollen abortion and fertility restoration imply that a gametophytic factor or event may be involved in CMS. In situ hybridization experiments suggested that significant reduction or complete loss of the mitochondrial sterility-associated sequence occurred in fertile pollen of F2 populations segregating for fertility. These observations support a model of fertility restoration by the loss of a mitochondrial DNA sequence prior to or during microsporogenesis/gametogenesis. PMID:1498602

  13. A novel fluorescence ratiometric method confirms the low solvent viscosity of the cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Luby-Phelps, K; Mujumdar, S; Mujumdar, R B; Ernst, L A; Galbraith, W; Waggoner, A S

    1993-01-01

    Two homologous indocyanine dyes, Cy3.18 and Cy5.18, can be used as a ratio pair for fluorometric determination of solvent viscosity. Succinimidyl ester derivatives of these dyes can be attached to inert carrier macromolecules, such as Ficoll 70, for measurement of intracellular or intravesicular solvent viscosity. When the viscosity of the solvent was varied by various methods, the fluorescence intensity ratio (Cy3/Cy5) in a mixture of Cy3.18-Ficoll 70 (Cy3F70) and Cy5.18-Ficoll 70 (Cy5F70) in solution was found to be solely a function of solvent viscosity and was insensitive to other solvent parameters such as dielectric constant, temperature, and the ability of the solvent to form hydrogen bonds. Most important, it was insensitive to the presence of large macromolecules, such as proteins, which increase the shear viscosity but have little effect on solvent viscosity. Following microinjection into the cytoplasm of living tissue culture cells, no binding of Cy3F70 or Cy5F70 to intracellular components was detected by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Fluorescence intensity ratio imaging of Cy3F70 and Cy5F70 in non-motile interphase CV1 and PtK1 cells showed that the solvent viscosity of cytoplasm was not significantly different from water and showed no spatial variation. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8369435

  14. Possible continuity of subplasmalemmal cytoplasmic network with basement membrane cord network: ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S

    1995-05-01

    The ultrastructure of the subplasmalemmal cytoplasm of the cell and the associated basement membrane as well as the area of the cell-basement membrane border were observed with high resolution electron microscopy after preparation of the tissues with cryofixation or glutaraldehyde fixation followed by freeze substitution. The subplasmalemmal cytoplasm of the smooth muscle cells of rat epididymal tubules and the podocyte processes of the mouse glomerular visceral epithelium were found to be composed of a fine network of irregular anastomosing strands. This network closely resembled the previously characterized cord network of the basement membrane. The cords are known to be composed of a 1.5 to 3 nm thick core filament made up of type IV collagen which is surrounded by an irregular 'sheath' of other components. The strands in the subplasmalemmal network showed ultrastructural features similar to those of the cord network. Ribbon-like, 4.5 nm wide heparan sulfate proteoglycan 'double tracks' were previously reported to be associated with the cord network. Structures similar in size and appearance to the double tracks were also found in the subplasmalemmal network. At the cell-basement membrane border, the lamina densa of the basement membrane was in contact with the cell without the intervening space of a lamina lucida which was recently found to be an artefact caused by conventional tissue processing. Furthermore, the subplasmalemmal network appeared to be continuous through the plasma membrane, with the cord network of the basement membrane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7657717

  15. Detecting Protein-Protein Interactions in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Using a Cytoplasmic Yeast Two Hybrid System

    PubMed Central

    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; DeStephanis, Darla; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein interactions play an important role in many virus-encoded functions and in virus-host interactions. While a “classical” yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H) is one of the most common techniques to detect such interactions, it has a number of limitations, including a requirement for the proteins of interest to be relocated to the nucleus. Modified Y2H, such as the Sos recruitment system (SRS), which detect interactions occurring in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus, allow proteins from viruses replicating in the cytoplasm to be tested in a more natural context. In this study, a SRS was used to detect interactions involving proteins from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototypic non-segmented negative strand RNA (NNS) virus. All five full-length VSV proteins, as well as several truncated proteins, were screened against each other. Using the SRS, most interactions demonstrated previously involving VSV phosphoprotein, nucleocapsid (N) and large polymerase proteins were confirmed independently, while difficulties were encountered using the membrane associated matrix and glycoproteins. A human cDNA library was also screened against VSV N protein and one cellular protein, SFRS18, was identified which interacted with N in this context. The system presented can be redesigned easily for studies in other less tractable NNS viruses. PMID:21320532

  16. APOBEC3G restricts early HIV-1 replication in the cytoplasm of target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jenny L.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2008-05-25

    Cellular APOBEC3G (A3G) protein is packaged into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions in producer cells yet restricts viral replication in target cells. To characterize this restriction in target cells, the effect of A3G on generating various HIV-1 cDNA products was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. A3G decreased cDNA products from Vif-deficient HIV-1, with minor effects on early reverse transcripts and larger declines in late reverse transcripts. However, the greatest decline was typically observed in nuclear 2-LTR circles. Moreover, the magnitude of these declines varied with A3G dose. Adding integration inhibitor did not stop the A3G-mediated loss in 2-LTR circles. Moreover, obstructing HIV-1 nuclear entry using vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein did not stop the A3G-mediated decline in late reverse transcripts. Collectively, these data suggest that A3G has important restriction activity in the cytoplasm and progressively diminishes viral cytoplasmic and nuclear cDNA forms with increasing magnitude during restriction.

  17. Retention of a cell adhesion complex at the paranodal junction requires the cytoplasmic region of Caspr.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Leora; Sabanay, Helena; Poliak, Sebastian; Berglund, Erik O; Ranscht, Barbara; Peles, Elior

    2002-06-24

    An axonal complex of cell adhesion molecules consisting of Caspr and contactin has been found to be essential for the generation of the paranodal axo-glial junctions flanking the nodes of Ranvier. Here we report that although the extracellular region of Caspr was sufficient for directing it to the paranodes in transgenic mice, retention of the Caspr-contactin complex at the junction depended on the presence of an intact cytoplasmic domain of Caspr. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found that a Caspr mutant lacking its intracellular domain was often found within the axon instead of the junctional axolemma. We further show that a short sequence in the cytoplasmic domain of Caspr mediated its binding to the cytoskeleton-associated protein 4.1B. Clustering of contactin on the cell surface induced coclustering of Caspr and immobilized protein 4.1B at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, deletion of the protein 4.1B binding site accelerated the internalization of a Caspr-contactin chimera from the cell surface. These results suggest that Caspr serves as a "transmembrane scaffold" that stabilizes the Caspr/contactin adhesion complex at the paranodal junction by connecting it to cytoskeletal components within the axon. PMID:12082082

  18. Retention of a cell adhesion complex at the paranodal junction requires the cytoplasmic region of Caspr

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Leora; Sabanay, Helena; Poliak, Sebastian; Berglund, Erik O.; Ranscht, Barbara; Peles, Elior

    2002-01-01

    An axonal complex of cell adhesion molecules consisting of Caspr and contactin has been found to be essential for the generation of the paranodal axo-glial junctions flanking the nodes of Ranvier. Here we report that although the extracellular region of Caspr was sufficient for directing it to the paranodes in transgenic mice, retention of the Caspr–contactin complex at the junction depended on the presence of an intact cytoplasmic domain of Caspr. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found that a Caspr mutant lacking its intracellular domain was often found within the axon instead of the junctional axolemma. We further show that a short sequence in the cytoplasmic domain of Caspr mediated its binding to the cytoskeleton-associated protein 4.1B. Clustering of contactin on the cell surface induced coclustering of Caspr and immobilized protein 4.1B at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, deletion of the protein 4.1B binding site accelerated the internalization of a Caspr–contactin chimera from the cell surface. These results suggest that Caspr serves as a “transmembrane scaffold” that stabilizes the Caspr/contactin adhesion complex at the paranodal junction by connecting it to cytoskeletal components within the axon. PMID:12082082

  19. Cytoplasmic Expression of Pontin in Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Invasion, Metastasis and Patients’ Survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Ren, Juchao; Yan, Lei; Tang, Yueqing; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dawei; Zang, Yuanwei; Kong, Feng; Xu, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal of all genitourinary malignancies. Distant metastasis represents the major cause of death in patients with RCC. Recent studies have implicated the AAA+ ATPase pontin in many cellular activities that are highly relevant to carcinogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that pontin was up-regulated in RCC, and plays a previously unknown pro-invasive role in the metastatic progression of RCC through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. 28 pairs of freshly frozen clear cell RCC samples and the matched normal renal tissues analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting demonstrated that pontin was up-regulated in clear cell RCC tissues than in normal renal tissues. In addition, immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate subcellular pontin expression in 95 RCC patients, and found that overexpression of pontin in cytoplasm positively correlated with the metastatic features, predicting unfavorable outcomes of RCC patients. Furthermore, in vitro experiments show pontin was predominantly expressed in cytoplasm of RCC cell lines, and a significant suppression of cell migration and invasion in pontin siRNA treated RCC cell lines was observed. Mechanistic studies show that pontin depletion up-regulated the E-cadherin protein and down-regulated vimentin protein, and decreased nuclear β-catenin expression, suggesting the involvement of EMT in pontin induced metastatic progression. Together, our data suggest pontin as a potential prognostic biomarker in RCC, and provide new promising therapeutic targets for clinical intervention of kidney cancers. PMID:25751257

  20. A testis cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein that has the properties of a translational repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; Fajardo, M A; Braun, R E

    1996-01-01

    Translation of the mouse protamine 1 (Prm-1) mRNA is repressed for several days during male germ cell differentiation. With the hope of cloning genes that regulate the translational repression of Prm-1, we screened male germ cell cDNA expression libraries with the 3' untranslated region of the Prm-1 RNA. From this screen we obtained two independent clones that encode Prbp, a Prm-1 RNA-binding protein. Prbp contains two copies of a double-stranded-RNA-binding domain. In vitro, the protein binds to a portion of the Prm-1 3' untranslated region previously shown to be sufficient for translational repression in transgenic mice, as well as to poly(I). poly(C). Prbp protein is present in multiple forms in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from wild-type mouse testes and is absent from testes of germ cell-deficient mouse mutants, suggesting that Prbp is restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Immunocytochemical localization confirmed that Prbp is present in the cytoplasmic compartment of late-stage meiotic cells and haploid round spermatids. Recombinant Prbp protein inhibits the translation of multiple mRNAs in a wheat germ lysate, suggesting that Prbp acts to repress translation in round spermatids. While this protein lacks complete specificity for Prm-1-containing RNAs in vitro, the properties of Prbp are consistent with it acting as a general repressor of translation. PMID:8649414

  1. The RanGTP Pathway: From Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport to Spindle Assembly and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran regulates the interaction of transport receptors with a number of cellular cargo proteins. The high affinity binding of the GTP-bound form of Ran to import receptors promotes cargo release, whereas its binding to export receptors stabilizes their interaction with the cargo. This basic mechanism linked to the asymmetric distribution of the two nucleotide-bound forms of Ran between the nucleus and the cytoplasm generates a switch like mechanism controlling nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Since 1999, we have known that after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) Ran and the above transport receptors also provide a local control over the activity of factors driving spindle assembly and regulating other aspects of cell division. The identification and functional characterization of RanGTP mitotic targets is providing novel insights into mechanisms essential for cell division. Here we review our current knowledge on the RanGTP system and its regulation and we focus on the recent advances made through the characterization of its mitotic targets. We then briefly review the novel functions of the pathway that were recently described. Altogether, the RanGTP system has moonlighting functions exerting a spatial control over protein interactions that drive specific functions depending on the cellular context. PMID:26793706

  2. The native structure of cytoplasmic dynein at work translocating vesicles in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masaki; Aihara, Marilynn S; Allen, Richard D; Fok, Agnes K

    2011-01-01

    In Paramecium multimicronucleatum, the discoidal vesicles, the acidosomes and the 100-nm carrier vesicles are involved in phagosome formation, phagosome acidification and endosomal processing, respectively. Numerous cross bridges link these vesicles to the kinetic side of the microtubules of a cytopharyngeal microtubular ribbon. Vesicles are translocated along these ribbons in a minus-end direction towards the cytopharynx. A monoclonal antibody specific for the light vanadate-photocleaved fragment of the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein was used to show that this dynein is located between the discoidal vesicles and the ribbons as well as on the cytosolic surface of the acidosomes and the 100-nm carrier vesicles. This antibody inhibited the docking of the vesicles to the microtubular ribbons so that the transport of discoidal vesicles and acidosomes were reduced by 60% and 70%, respectively. It had little effect on the dynein's velocity of translocation. These results show that cytoplasmic dynein is the motor for vesicle translocation and its location, between the vesicles and the ribbons, indicates that the cross bridges seen at this location in thin sections and in quick-frozen, deep-etched replicas are apparently the working dyneins. Such a working dynein cross bridge, as preserved by ultra-rapid freezing, is 54 nm long and has two legs arising from a globular head that appears to be firmly bound to its cargo vesicle and each leg consists of ≥3 beaded subunits with the last subunit making contact with the microtubular ribbon. PMID:20837374

  3. Cytoplasmic Domain Filter Function in the Mechanosensitive Channel of Small Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Gamini, Ramya; Sotomayor, Marcos; Chipot, Christophe; Schulten, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels, inner membrane proteins of bacteria, open and close in response to mechanical stimuli such as changes in membrane tension during osmotic stress. In bacteria, these channels act as safety valves preventing cell lysis upon hypoosmotic cell swelling: the channels open under membrane tension to release osmolytes along with water. The mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, MscS, consists, in addition to the transmembrane channel, of a large cytoplasmic domain (CD) that features a balloon-like, water filled chamber opening to the cytoplasm through seven side pores and a small distal pore. The CD is apparently a molecular sieve covering the channel that optimizes loss of osmolytes during osmoadaptation. We employ diffusion theory and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the transport kinetics of Glu− and K+ as representative osmolytes. We suggest that the CD indeed acts as a filter that actually balances passage of Glu− and K+, and possibly other positive and negative osmolytes, to yield a largely neutral efflux and, thereby, reduce cell depolarization in the open state and conserve to a large degree the essential metabolite Glu−. PMID:21723817

  4. Activated caspase-9 immunoreactivity in glial and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Yasuhiro; Ayaki, Takashi; Urushitani, Makoto; Ito, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-08-15

    The mitochondria play an important role in apoptotic cell death, and the released cytochrome c from the mitochondria promotes the formation of the apoptosome, which contains cytochrome c, Apaf-1 and caspase-9, resulting in the activation of caspase-9 and the promotion of the apoptotic cascade. To investigate the role of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic cell death in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), we performed immunohistochemical studies on apoptosome-related proteins in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 8 normal subjects and 10 patients with MSA. We then performed double-labeling immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-9 and α-synuclein in some sections from 10 patients with MSA. In the brains with MSA, glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) were intensely immunoreactive for cytochrome c, Apaf-1 and caspase-9. Activated caspase-9 immunoreactivities were also confirmed to be densely localized to both GCIs and NCIs using two types of anti-cleaved caspase-9 antibodies. The semiquantitative analyses using the upper pontine sections double-immunostained with cleaved caspase-9 and α-synuclein demonstrated that approximately 80% of GCIs and NCIs were immunopositive for cleaved caspase-9. Our results suggest that the formation of the apoptosome accompanied by the activation of caspase-9 may occur in brains affected by MSA, and that a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway may be partially associated with the pathogenesis of MSA. PMID:27345387

  5. XIAP immunoreactivity in glial and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Yasuhiro; Ito, Hidefumi; Ihara, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2014-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) selectively binds to caspases-3, -7 and -9, and inhibits the activities of these caspases. To elucidate the role of XIAP in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), we performed immunohistochemical studies on XIAP in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 8 normal subjects and 10 patients with MSA. In normal brains, several types of neurons were immunostained for XIAP, and XIAP-immunopositive oligodendrocytes were scattered throughout the cerebral and cerebellar white matter. In the MSA brains, neuronal XIAP immunoreactivity was spared even in the severely-affected lesions, and glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs), neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) and dystrophic neurites were all intensely immunoreactive for XIAP. A semiquantitative analysis of mid-pons sections double-immunostained for XIAP and α-synuclein demonstrated that the average percentages of XIAP-immunopositive GCIs and NCIs in the pontine nucleus were 70.2% and 82.2%, respectively. Our results suggest that a widespread accumulation of XIAP may occur in brains with MSA, and that XIAP may be partially associated with the pathogenesis of MSA. PMID:23993308

  6. Effect of Adaptation to Ethanol on Cytoplasmic and Membrane Protein Profiles of Oenococcus oeni

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, M. Graça; Baumgärtner, Maja; Rombouts, Frank M.; Abee, Tjakko

    2004-01-01

    The practical application of commercial malolactic starter cultures of Oenococcus oeni surviving direct inoculation in wine requires insight into mechanisms of ethanol toxicity and of acquired ethanol tolerance in this organism. Therefore, the site-specific location of proteins involved in ethanol adaptation, including cytoplasmic, membrane-associated, and integral membrane proteins, was investigated. Ethanol triggers alterations in protein patterns of O. oeni cells stressed with 12% ethanol for 1 h and those of cells grown in the presence of 8% ethanol. Levels of inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, which generate reduced nicotinamide nucleotides, were decreased during growth in the presence of ethanol, while glutathione reductase, which consumes NADPH, was induced, suggesting that maintenance of the redox balance plays an important role in ethanol adaptation. Phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) components of mannose PTS, including the phosphocarrier protein HPr and EIIMan, were lacking in ethanol-adapted cells, providing strong evidence that mannose PTS is absent in ethanol-adapted cells, and this represents a metabolic advantage to O. oeni cells during malolactic fermentation. In cells grown in the presence of ethanol, a large increase in the number of membrane-associated proteins was observed. Interestingly, two of these proteins, dTDT-glucose-4,6-dehydratase and d-alanine:d-alanine ligase, are known to be involved in cell wall biosynthesis. Using a proteomic approach, we provide evidence for an active ethanol adaptation response of O. oeni at the cytoplasmic and membrane protein levels. PMID:15128528

  7. Effects of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate on cytoplasmic maturation of oocytes--The bovine model.

    PubMed

    Kalo, D; Roth, Z

    2015-06-01

    Phthalates are known reproductive toxicants, but their intracellular disruptive effects on oocyte maturation competence are less known. We studied the potential risk associated with acute exposure of oocytes to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP). First, bovine oocytes were matured in vitro with or without 50 μM MEHP and examined for mitochondrial features associated with DNA fragmentation. MEHP increased reactive oxygen species levels and reduced the proportion of highly polarized mitochondria along with alterations in genes associated with mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (CYC1, MT-CO1 and ATP5B). In a second set of experiments, we associated the effects of MEHP on meiotic progression with those on cytoplasmic maturation. MEHP impaired reorganization of cytoplasmic organelles in matured oocytes reflected by reductions in category I mitochondria, type III cortical granules and class I endoplasmic reticulum. These alterations are associated with the previously reported reduced developmental competence of MEHP-treated bovine oocytes, and reveal the risk associated with acute exposure. PMID:25900598

  8. Holophytochrome-Interacting Proteins in Physcomitrella: Putative Actors in Phytochrome Cytoplasmic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Anna Lena; Mailliet, Katharina; Hughes, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are the principle photoreceptors in light-regulated plant development, primarily acting via translocation of the light-activated photoreceptor into the nucleus and subsequent gene regulation. However, several independent lines of evidence indicate unambiguously that an additional cytoplasmic signaling mechanism must exist. Directional responses in filament tip cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens are steered by phy4 which has been shown to interact physically with the blue light receptor phototropin at the plasma membrane. This complex might perceive and transduce vectorial information leading to cytoskeleton reorganization and finally a directional growth response. We developed yeast two-hybrid procedures using photochemically functional, full-length phy4 as bait in Physcomitrella cDNA library screens and growth assays under different light conditions, revealing Pfr-dependent interactions possibly associated with phytochrome cytoplasmic signaling. Candidate proteins were then expressed in planta with fluorescent protein tags to determine their intracellular localization in darkness and red light. Of 14 candidates, 12 were confirmed to interact with phy4 in planta using bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We also used database information to study their expression patterns relative to those of phy4. We discuss the likely functional characteristics of these holophytochrome-interacting proteins (HIP’s) and their possible roles in signaling. PMID:27242820

  9. MCRS1 associates with cytoplasmic dynein and mediates pericentrosomal material recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si-Hyung; Lee, Mi-Sun; Choi, Tae-Ik; Hong, Hyowon; Seo, Jun-Young; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Joon

    2016-01-01

    MCRS1 is involved in multiple cellular activities, including mitotic spindle assembly, mTOR signaling and tumorigenesis. Although MCRS1 has been reported to bind to the dynein regulator NDE1, a functional interaction between MCRS1 and cytoplasmic dynein remains unaddressed. Here, we demonstrate that MCRS1 is required for dynein-dependent cargo transport to the centrosome and also plays a role in primary cilium formation. MCRS1 localized to centriolar satellites. Knockdown of MCRS1 resulted in a dispersion of centriolar satellites whose establishment depends on cytoplasmic dynein. By contrast, NDE1 was not necessary for the proper distribution of centriolar satellites, indicating a functional distinction between MCRS1 and NDE1. Unlike NDE1, MCRS1 played a positive role for the initiation of ciliogenesis, possibly through its interaction with TTBK2. Zebrafish with homozygous mcrs1 mutants exhibited a reduction in the size of the brain and the eye due to excessive apoptosis. In addition, mcrs1 mutants failed to develop distinct layers in the retina, and showed a defect in melatonin-induced aggregation of melanosomes in melanophores. These phenotypes are reminiscent of zebrafish dynein mutants. Reduced ciliogenesis was also apparent in the olfactory placode of mcrs1 mutants. Collectively, our findings identify MCRS1 as a dynein-interacting protein critical for centriolar satellite formation and ciliogenesis. PMID:27263857

  10. Nuclear Cytoplasmic Trafficking of Proteins is a Major Response of Human Fibroblasts to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Baqader, Noor O.; Radulovic, Marko; Crawford, Mark; Stoeber, Kai; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    We have used a subcellular spatial razor approach based on LC–MS/MS-based proteomics with SILAC isotope labeling to determine changes in protein abundances in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of human IMR90 fibroblasts subjected to mild oxidative stress. We show that response to mild tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide treatment includes redistribution between the nucleus and cytoplasm of numerous proteins not previously associated with oxidative stress. The 121 proteins with the most significant changes encompass proteins with known functions in a wide variety of subcellular locations and of cellular functional processes (transcription, signal transduction, autophagy, iron metabolism, TCA cycle, ATP synthesis) and are consistent with functional networks that are spatially dispersed across the cell. Both nuclear respiratory factor 2 and the proline regulatory axis appear to contribute to the cellular metabolic response. Proteins involved in iron metabolism or with iron/heme as a cofactor as well as mitochondrial proteins are prominent in the response. Evidence suggesting that nuclear import/export and vesicle-mediated protein transport contribute to the cellular response was obtained. We suggest that measurements of global changes in total cellular protein abundances need to be complemented with measurements of the dynamic subcellular spatial redistribution of proteins to obtain comprehensive pictures of cellular function. PMID:25133973

  11. Viral Membrane Fusion and Nucleocapsid Delivery into the Cytoplasm are Distinct Events in Some Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Li, Yue; Wolenski, Joseph; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviruses deliver their genome into the cell by fusing the viral lipid membrane to an endosomal membrane. The sequence and kinetics of the steps required for nucleocapsid delivery into the cytoplasm remain unclear. Here we dissect the cell entry pathway of virions and virus-like particles from two flaviviruses using single-particle tracking in live cells, a biochemical membrane fusion assay and virus infectivity assays. We show that the virus particles fuse with a small endosomal compartment in which the nucleocapsid remains trapped for several minutes. Endosomal maturation inhibitors inhibit infectivity but not membrane fusion. We propose a flavivirus cell entry mechanism in which the virus particles fuse preferentially with small endosomal carrier vesicles and depend on back-fusion of the vesicles with the late endosomal membrane to deliver the nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. Virus entry modulates intracellular calcium release and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase signaling. Moreover, the broadly cross-reactive therapeutic antibody scFv11 binds to virus-like particles and inhibits fusion. PMID:24039574

  12. Uptake and degradation of cytoplasmic RNA by lysosomes in the perfused rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Heydrick, S.J.; Lardeux, B.; Mortimore, G.E.

    1987-05-01

    The release of (/sup 14/C)cytidine has been shown previously to be a valid marker for RNA degradation in rat hepatocytes. The breakdown of RNA measured with this marker in perfused livers prelabeled in vivo with (6-/sup 14/C)orotic acid was found to be regulated acutely by perfusate amino acids over a wide range, from 0.29 to 3.48%/h. This regulation paralleled that of lysosomal proteolysis. Chloroquine inhibited RNA degradation 60-70%. In subsequent cell fractionation studies labelled cytidine was released; the distribution of this release paralleled that of a lysosomal marker enzyme. The release plateaued after two hours, defining a distinct lysosomal pool of RNA. The lysosomal location of the RNA pool was confirmed in experiments where a 22% increase in the apparent pool size was obtained by lowering the homogenate pH from 7.0 to 5.5. The pool size correlated linearly with the rate of RNA degradation measured during perfusion, giving a turnover constant in reasonable agreement with values reported for autophagy. These results indicate that cytoplasmic RNA degradation occurs primarily in the lysosome and is regulated under these conditions by the amino acid control of lysosomal sequestration of cytoplasm.

  13. Competing E3 ubiquitin ligases govern circadian periodicity by degradation of CRY in nucleus and cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Hee; Mohawk, Jennifer A; Siepka, Sandra M; Shan, Yongli; Huh, Seong Kwon; Hong, Hee-Kyung; Kornblum, Izabela; Kumar, Vivek; Koike, Nobuya; Xu, Ming; Nussbaum, Justin; Liu, Xinran; Chen, Zheng; Chen, Zhijian J; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2013-02-28

    Period determination in the mammalian circadian clock involves the turnover rate of the repressors CRY and PER. We show that CRY ubiquitination engages two competing E3 ligase complexes that either lengthen or shorten circadian period in mice. Cloning of a short-period circadian mutant, Past-time, revealed a glycine to glutamate missense mutation in Fbxl21, an F-box protein gene that is a paralog of Fbxl3 that targets the CRY proteins for degradation. While loss of function of FBXL3 leads to period lengthening, mutation of Fbxl21 causes period shortening. FBXL21 forms an SCF E3 ligase complex that slowly degrades CRY in the cytoplasm but antagonizes the stronger E3 ligase activity of FBXL3 in the nucleus. FBXL21 plays a dual role: protecting CRY from FBXL3 degradation in the nucleus and promoting CRY degradation within the cytoplasm. Thus, the balance and cellular compartmentalization of competing E3 ligases for CRY determine circadian period of the clock in mammals. PMID:23452855

  14. WIN55,212-2 induces cytoplasmic vacuolation in apoptosis-resistant MCL cells.

    PubMed

    Wasik, A M; Almestrand, S; Wang, X; Hultenby, K; Dackland, Å-L; Andersson, P; Kimby, E; Christensson, B; Sander, B

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1) and/or 2 (CB2) are overexpressed in many types of human malignancies including mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Agonists to CB1 and CB2 promote ceramide de novo synthesis, p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent activation of caspase-3 and apoptotic cell death in most MCLs. However, in this report we describe that in some MCLs the response to treatment with cannabinoids decreased cell viability as assessed by metabolic activity but did not involve the caspase-3 cascade or loss of plasma membrane integrity. Both primary cells from one MCL patient and the MCL cell line Granta519 responded to treatment with cannabinoids by formation of cycloheximide-sensitive cytoplasmic vacuoles, but did not enter apoptosis. The persistent expression of mammalian homolog of Atg8 with microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 II (LC3 II) and p62, as well as the lack of protection from chloroquine, indicates that lysosomal degradation is not involved in this cytoplasmic vacuolation process, distinguishing from classical autophagy. Transmission electron microscopy images and immunofluorescence staining of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone calreticulin showed that the vacuoles were of ER origin and that chromatin remained normal. These features resemble paraptosis-like cell death-a third type of a programmed cell death not previously described in response to cannabinoids. PMID:22048168

  15. No Influence of Indy on Lifespan in Drosophila after Correction for Genetic and Cytoplasmic Background Effects

    PubMed Central

    Toivonen, Janne M; Walker, Glenda A; Martinez-Diaz, Pedro; Bjedov, Ivana; Driege, Yasmine; Jacobs, Howard T; Gems, David; Partridge, Linda

    2007-01-01

    To investigate whether alterations in mitochondrial metabolism affect longevity in Drosophila melanogaster, we studied lifespan in various single gene mutants, using inbred and outbred genetic backgrounds. As positive controls we included the two most intensively studied mutants of Indy, which encodes a Drosophila Krebs cycle intermediate transporter. It has been reported that flies heterozygous for these Indy mutations, which lie outside the coding region, show almost a doubling of lifespan. We report that only one of the two mutants lowers mRNA levels, implying that the lifespan extension observed is not attributable to the Indy mutations themselves. Moreover, neither Indy mutation extended lifespan in female flies in any genetic background tested. In the original genetic background, only the Indy mutation associated with altered RNA expression extended lifespan in male flies. However, this effect was abolished by backcrossing into standard outbred genetic backgrounds, and was associated with an unidentified locus on the X chromosome. The original Indy line with long-lived males is infected by the cytoplasmic symbiont Wolbachia, and the longevity of Indy males disappeared after tetracycline clearance of this endosymbiont. These findings underscore the critical importance of standardisation of genetic background and of cytoplasm in genetic studies of lifespan, and show that the lifespan extension previously claimed for Indy mutants was entirely attributable to confounding variation from these two sources. In addition, we saw no effects on lifespan of expression knockdown of the Indy orthologues nac-2 and nac-3 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:17571923

  16. Regional orientation of actin filaments in the pericanalicular cytoplasm of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ishii, M; Washioka, H; Tonosaki, A; Toyota, T

    1991-12-01

    To elucidate how actin filaments participate in bile formation, polarity of actin filaments in the pericanalicular cytoplasm was determined with myosin subfragment 1 by transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections and deep-etching replicas. Densely concentrated actin filaments were identified around the bile canaliculi in the forms of microvillous core filaments, pericanalicular web filaments, and filaments on the junctional complex. They bound subfragment 1 to form double-helical strands on the deep-etching replica or typical arrowheads on the ultrathin section. All microvillous core filaments showed their arrowheads pointing basally, suggesting the molecular growth occurring at their apical ends. In contrast, filaments of the pericanalicular web, running in parallel to the cell surface, showed unfixed polarities as indicated by their arrowheads. Furthermore, neighboring filament pairs often showed opposite polarities, an alignment necessary for filament sliding. The junctional complex had filaments with arrowheads pointed mostly at the cell center with a small number in opposite direction. In addition, a group of sporadic filaments appeared to be installed to link to both the canalicular membrane and coated vesicles. Such regionally specialized actin filaments are considered inclusively to form a cytoskeletal system that is in charge of (a) maintenance of length of the microvilli, (b) contraction of the canalicular walls, and (c) translocation of coated vesicles in the pericanalicular cytoplasm. PMID:1955131

  17. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells emerges naturally by microfilament self-organization

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Francis G.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-01-01

    Many cells exhibit large-scale active circulation of their entire fluid contents, a process termed cytoplasmic streaming. This phenomenon is particularly prevalent in plant cells, often presenting strikingly regimented flow patterns. The driving mechanism in such cells is known: myosin-coated organelles entrain cytoplasm as they process along actin filament bundles fixed at the periphery. Still unknown, however, is the developmental process that constructs the well-ordered actin configurations required for coherent cell-scale flow. Previous experimental works on streaming regeneration in cells of Characean algae, whose longitudinal flow is perhaps the most regimented of all, hint at an autonomous process of microfilament self-organization driving the formation of streaming patterns during morphogenesis. Working from first principles, we propose a robust model of streaming emergence that combines motor dynamics with both microscopic and macroscopic hydrodynamics to explain how several independent processes, each ineffectual on its own, can reinforce to ultimately develop the patterns of streaming observed in the Characeae and other streaming species. PMID:23940314

  18. Mitochondrial uncouplers inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis largely through cytoplasmic acidification.

    PubMed

    Dejonghe, Wim; Kuenen, Sabine; Mylle, Evelien; Vasileva, Mina; Keech, Olivier; Viotti, Corrado; Swerts, Jef; Fendrych, Matyáš; Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres; Mishev, Kiril; Delang, Simon; Scholl, Stefan; Zarza, Xavier; Heilmann, Mareike; Kourelis, Jiorgos; Kasprowicz, Jaroslaw; Nguyen, Le Son Long; Drozdzecki, Andrzej; Van Houtte, Isabelle; Szatmári, Anna-Mária; Majda, Mateusz; Baisa, Gary; Bednarek, Sebastian York; Robert, Stéphanie; Audenaert, Dominique; Testerink, Christa; Munnik, Teun; Van Damme, Daniël; Heilmann, Ingo; Schumacher, Karin; Winne, Johan; Friml, Jiří; Verstreken, Patrik; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    ATP production requires the establishment of an electrochemical proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondrial uncouplers dissipate this proton gradient and disrupt numerous cellular processes, including vesicular trafficking, mainly through energy depletion. Here we show that Endosidin9 (ES9), a novel mitochondrial uncoupler, is a potent inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in different systems and that ES9 induces inhibition of CME not because of its effect on cellular ATP, but rather due to its protonophore activity that leads to cytoplasm acidification. We show that the known tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostinA23, which is routinely used to block CME, displays similar properties, thus questioning its use as a specific inhibitor of cargo recognition by the AP-2 adaptor complex via tyrosine motif-based endocytosis signals. Furthermore, we show that cytoplasm acidification dramatically affects the dynamics and recruitment of clathrin and associated adaptors, and leads to reduction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate from the plasma membrane. PMID:27271794

  19. Effect of temperature on Wolbachia density and impact on cytoplasmic incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Mouton, L; Henri, H; Bouletreau, M; Vavre, F

    2006-01-01

    The outcome and the evolution of host-symbiont associations depend on environmental constraints, but responses are difficult to predict since they arise from a complex interaction between the host, the parasite and the environment. The situation can be even more complex when multiple parasite genotypes, with potentially different responses to environmental changes, coexist within a single host. In this paper, we investigated the effect of the temperature (from 14 to 26 degrees C) during the host development on the density of 3 strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia that coexist within the wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. In this species, Wolbachia induces cytoplasmic incompatibility, a sperm-egg incompatibility that allows it to spread and persist in host populations. Using real-time quantitative PCR we found that (i) Wolbachia density is temperature-specific and highest at 26 degrees C; (ii) the order of the abundance of the 3 Wolbachia strains does not vary with temperature changes; (iii) the response of bacterial density to temperature occurs within a single insect generation, during the egg-to-adult developmental period; (iv) in this species, temperature-related changes in Wolbachia density do not influence cytoplasmic incompatibility. PMID:16393353

  20. Cytoplasmic irradiation results in mitochondrial dysfunction and DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Davidson, Mercy M.; Zhou, Hongning; Wang, Chunxin; Walker, Winsome F.; Hei, Tom K.

    2014-01-01

    Direct DNA damage is often considered the primary cause of cancer in patients exposed to ionizing radiation or environmental carcinogens. While mitochondria are known to play an important role in radiation-induced cellular response, the mechanisms by which cytoplasmic stimuli modulate mitochondrial dynamics and functions are largely unknown. In the present study, we examined changes in mitochondrial dynamics and functions triggered by α particle damage to the mitochondria in human small airway epithelial cells, using a precision microbeam irradiator with a beam width of one micron. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation using this device resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation and a reduction of cytochrome c oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activity, when compared with nonirradiated controls, suggesting a reduction in respiratory chain function. Additionally, mitochondrial fragmentation or fission was associated with increased expression of the dynamin-like protein DRP1, which promotes mitochondrial fission. DRP1 inhibition by the drug mdivi-1 prevented radiation-induced mitochondrial fission, but respiratory chain function in mitochondria inhibited by radiation persisted for 12 hr. Irradiated cells also showed an increase in mitochondria-derived superoxide that could be quenched by dimethyl sulfoxide. Taken together, our results provide a mechanistic explanation for the extranuclear, non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:24080278